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Sample records for two-dimensional computational fluid

  1. The Hydrodynamic Study of the Swimming Gliding: a Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M; Rouboa, Abel I; Silva, António J

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays the underwater gliding after the starts and the turns plays a major role in the overall swimming performance. Hence, minimizing hydrodynamic drag during the underwater phases should be a main aim during swimming. Indeed, there are several postures that swimmers can assume during the underwater gliding, although experimental results were not conclusive concerning the best body position to accomplish this aim. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyse the effect in hydrodynamic drag forces of using different body positions during gliding through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology. For this purpose, two-dimensional models of the human body in steady flow conditions were studied. Two-dimensional virtual models had been created: (i) a prone position with the arms extended at the front of the body; (ii) a prone position with the arms placed alongside the trunk; (iii) a lateral position with the arms extended at the front and; (iv) a dorsal position with the arms extended at the front. The drag forces were computed between speeds of 1.6 m/s and 2 m/s in a two-dimensional Fluent(®) analysis. The positions with the arms extended at the front presented lower drag values than the position with the arms aside the trunk. The lateral position was the one in which the drag was lower and seems to be the one that should be adopted during the gliding after starts and turns.

  2. K-FIX: a computer program for transient, two-dimensional, two-fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, W.C.; Torrey, M.D.

    1976-11-01

    The transient dynamics of two-dimensional, two-phase flow with interfacial exchange are calculated at all flow speeds using the K-FIX program. Each phase is described in terms of its own density, velocity, and temperature. The six field equations for the two phases couple through mass, momentum, and energy exchange. The equations are solved using an Eulerian finite difference technique that implicitly couples the rates of phase transitions, momentum, and energy exchange to determination of the pressure, density, and velocity fields. The implicit solution is accomplished iteratively without linearizing the equations, thus eliminating the need for numerous derivative terms. K-FIX is written in a highly modular form to be easily adaptable to a variety of problems. It is applied to growth of an isolated steam bubble in a superheated water pool

  3. TURBO: a computer program for two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis using a two-equations turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.; Moreira, M.L.

    1991-06-01

    The Reynolds turbulent transport equations for an incompressible fluid are integrated on a bi-dimensional staggered grid, for velocity and pressure, using the SIMPLER method. With the resulting algebraic relations it was developed the TURBO program, which final objectives are the thermal stratification and natural convection analysis of nuclear reactor pools. This program was tested in problems applications with analytic or experimental solutions previously known. (author)

  4. Linear and nonlinear viscous flow in two-dimensional fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravina, D.; Ciccotti, G.; Holian, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    We report on molecular dynamics simulations of shear viscosity η of a dense two-dimensional fluid as a function of the shear rate γ. We find an analytic dependence of η on γ, and do not find any evidence whatsoever of divergence in the Green-Kubo (GK) value that would be caused by the well-known long-time tail for the shear-stress autocorrelation function, as predicted by the mode-coupling theory. In accordance with the linear response theory, the GK value of η agrees remarkably well with nonequilibrium values at small shear rates. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  5. Green's function for a generalized two-dimensional fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwayama, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    A Green's function for a generalized two-dimensional (2D) fluid in an unbounded domain (the so-called α turbulence system) is discussed. The generalized 2D fluid is characterized by a relationship between an advected quantity q and the stream function ψ : namely, q=-(-Δ){α/2}ψ . Here, α is a real number and q is referred to as the vorticity. In this study, the Green's function refers to the stream function produced by a delta-functional distribution of q , i.e., a point vortex with unit strength. The Green's function has the form G{(α)}(r)∝r{α-2} , except when α is an even number, where r is the distance from the point vortex. This functional form is known as the Riesz potential. When α is a positive even number, the logarithmic correction to the Riesz potential has the form G(r){(α)}∝r{α-2} ln r . In contrast, when α is a negative even number, G{(α)} is given by the higher-order Laplacian of the delta function. The transition of the small-scale behavior of q at α=2 , a well-known property of forced and dissipative α turbulence, is explained in terms of the Green's function. Moreover, the azimuthal velocity around the point vortex is derived from the Green's function. The functional form of the azimuthal velocity indicates that physically realizable systems for the generalized 2D fluid exist only when α≤3 . The Green's function and physically realizable systems for an anisotropic generalized 2D fluid are presented as an application of the present study.

  6. Two-dimensional colloidal fluids exhibiting pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Blesson; Chalmers, Christopher; Archer, Andrew J

    2015-12-28

    Fluids with competing short range attraction and long range repulsive interactions between the particles can exhibit a variety of microphase separated structures. We develop a lattice-gas (generalised Ising) model and analyse the phase diagram using Monte Carlo computer simulations and also with density functional theory (DFT). The DFT predictions for the structures formed are in good agreement with the results from the simulations, which occur in the portion of the phase diagram where the theory predicts the uniform fluid to be linearly unstable. However, the mean-field DFT does not correctly describe the transitions between the different morphologies, which the simulations show to be analogous to micelle formation. We determine how the heat capacity varies as the model parameters are changed. There are peaks in the heat capacity at state points where the morphology changes occur. We also map the lattice model onto a continuum DFT that facilitates a simplification of the stability analysis of the uniform fluid.

  7. K-FIX: a computer program for transient, two-dimensional, two-fluid flow. THREED: an extension of the K-FIX code for three-dimensional calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, W.C.; Torrey, M.D.

    1978-10-01

    The transient, two-dimensional, two-fluid code K-FIX has been extended to perform three-dimensional calculations. This capability is achieved by adding five modification sets of FORTRAN statements to the basic two-dimensional code. The modifications are listed and described, and a complete listing of the three-dimensional code is provided. Results of an example problem are provided for verification

  8. Two-dimensional color-code quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, Austin G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe in detail how to perform universal fault-tolerant quantum computation on a two-dimensional color code, making use of only nearest neighbor interactions. Three defects (holes) in the code are used to represent logical qubits. Triple-defect logical qubits are deformed into isolated triangular sections of color code to enable transversal implementation of all single logical qubit Clifford group gates. Controlled-NOT (CNOT) is implemented between pairs of triple-defect logical qubits via braiding.

  9. Two-dimensional computer simulation of high intensity proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Lapostolle, Pierre M

    1972-01-01

    A computer program has been developed which simulates the two- dimensional transverse behaviour of a proton beam in a focusing channel. The model is represented by an assembly of a few thousand 'superparticles' acted upon by their own self-consistent electric field and an external focusing force. The evolution of the system is computed stepwise in time by successively solving Poisson's equation and Newton's law of motion. Fast Fourier transform techniques are used for speed in the solution of Poisson's equation, while extensive area weighting is utilized for the accurate evaluation of electric field components. A computer experiment has been performed on the CERN CDC 6600 computer to study the nonlinear behaviour of an intense beam in phase space, showing under certain circumstances a filamentation due to space charge and an apparent emittance growth. (14 refs).

  10. Vortex Thermometry for Turbulent Two-Dimensional Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groszek, Andrew J; Davis, Matthew J; Paganin, David M; Helmerson, Kristian; Simula, Tapio P

    2018-01-19

    We introduce a new method of statistical analysis to characterize the dynamics of turbulent fluids in two dimensions. We establish that, in equilibrium, the vortex distributions can be uniquely connected to the temperature of the vortex gas, and we apply this vortex thermometry to characterize simulations of decaying superfluid turbulence. We confirm the hypothesis of vortex evaporative heating leading to Onsager vortices proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 165302 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.113.165302, and we find previously unidentified vortex power-law distributions that emerge from the dynamics.

  11. Quantum hall fluid on fuzzy two dimensional sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xudong; Peng Dantao

    2004-01-01

    After reviewing the Haldane's description about the quantum Hall effect on the fuzzy two-sphere S 2 , authors construct the noncommutative algebra on the fuzzy sphere S 2 and the Moyal structure of the Hilbert space. By constructing noncommutative Chern-Simons theory of the incompressible Hall fluid on the fuzzy sphere and solving the Gaussian constraint with quasiparticle source, authors find the Calogero matrix on S 2 and the complete set of the Laughlin wave function for the lowest Landau level, and this wave function is expressed by the generalized Jack polynomials in terms of spinor coordinates. (author)

  12. Two dimensional electron systems for solid state quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sumit

    Two dimensional electron systems based on GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures are extremely useful in various scientific investigations of recent times including the search for quantum computational schemes. Although significant strides have been made over the past few years to realize solid state qubits on GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs, there are numerous factors limiting the progress. We attempt to identify factors that have material and design-specific origin and develop ways to overcome them. The thesis is divided in two broad segments. In the first segment we describe the realization of a new field-effect induced two dimensional electron system on GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the novel device-design is expected to suppress the level of charge noise present in the device. Modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures are utilized extensively in the study of quantum transport in nanostructures, but charge fluctuations associated with remote ionized dopants often produce deleterious effects. Electric field-induced carrier systems offer an attractive alternative if certain challenges can be overcome. We demonstrate a field-effect transistor in which the active channel is locally devoid of modulation-doping, but silicon dopant atoms are retained in the ohmic contact region to facilitate low-resistance contacts. A high quality two-dimensional electron gas is induced by a field-effect that is tunable over a density range of 6.5x10 10cm-2 to 2.6x1011cm-2 . Device design, fabrication, and low temperature (T=0.3K) characterization results are discussed. The demonstrated device-design overcomes several existing limitations in the fabrication of field-induced 2DEGs and might find utility in hosting nanostructures required for making spin qubits. The second broad segment describes our effort to correlate transport parameters measured at T=0.3K to the strength of the fractional quantum Hall state observed at nu=5/2 in the second Landau level of high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional

  13. Topology as fluid geometry two-dimensional spaces, volume 2

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, James W

    2017-01-01

    This is the second of a three volume collection devoted to the geometry, topology, and curvature of 2-dimensional spaces. The collection provides a guided tour through a wide range of topics by one of the twentieth century's masters of geometric topology. The books are accessible to college and graduate students and provide perspective and insight to mathematicians at all levels who are interested in geometry and topology. The second volume deals with the topology of 2-dimensional spaces. The attempts encountered in Volume 1 to understand length and area in the plane lead to examples most easily described by the methods of topology (fluid geometry): finite curves of infinite length, 1-dimensional curves of positive area, space-filling curves (Peano curves), 0-dimensional subsets of the plane through which no straight path can pass (Cantor sets), etc. Volume 2 describes such sets. All of the standard topological results about 2-dimensional spaces are then proved, such as the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra (two...

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myeong, Hyeon Guk

    1999-06-01

    This book deals with computational fluid dynamics with basic and history of numerical fluid dynamics, introduction of finite volume method using one-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of two-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of Navier-Stokes equation, fluid with heat transport, turbulent flow and turbulent model, Navier-Stokes solution by generalized coordinate system such as coordinate conversion, conversion of basic equation, program and example of calculation, application of abnormal problem and high speed solution of numerical fluid dynamics.

  15. One- and two-dimensional fluids properties of smectic, lamellar and columnar liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Jakli, Antal

    2006-01-01

    Smectic and lamellar liquid crystals are three-dimensional layered structures in which each layer behaves as a two-dimensional fluid. Because of their reduced dimensionality they have unique physical properties and challenging theoretical descriptions, and are the subject of much current research. One- and Two-Dimensional Fluids: Properties of Smectic, Lamellar and Columnar Liquid Crystals offers a comprehensive review of these phases and their applications. The book details the basic structures and properties of one- and two-dimensional fluids and the nature of phase transitions. The later chapters consider the optical, magnetic, and electrical properties of special structures, including uniformly and non-uniformly aligned anisotropic films, lyotropic lamellar systems, helical and chiral structures, and organic anisotropic materials. Topics also include typical and defective features, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity. The book concludes with a review of current and potential applications ...

  16. The planiverse computer contact with a two-dimensional world

    CERN Document Server

    Dewdney, Alexander Keewatin

    2000-01-01

    When The Planiverse ?rst appeared 16 years ago, it caught more than a few readers off guard. The line between willing suspension of dis- lief and innocent acceptance, if it exists at all, is a thin one. There were those who wanted to believe, despite the tongue-in-cheek subtext, that we had made contact with a two-dimensional world called Arde, a di- shaped planet embedded in the skin of a vast, balloon-shaped space called the planiverse. It is tempting to imagine that those who believed, as well as those who suspended disbelief, did so because of a persuasive consistency in the cosmology and physics of this in?nitesimally thin universe, and x preface to the millennium edition in its bizarre but oddly workable organisms. This was not just your r- of-the-mill universe fashioned out of the whole cloth of wish-driven imagination. The planiverse is a weirder place than that precisely - cause so much of it was “worked out” by a virtual team of scientists and technologists. Reality, even the pseudoreality of su...

  17. [Establishment of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis using cerebrospinal fluid from neurocysticercosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Yi; Tian, Xiao-Jun; Huang, Yong; Yang, Yan-Jun; Ma, Qiao-Rong; Xue, Yan-Ping

    2008-06-30

    To establish the method of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and obtain high resolution 2D images from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with neurocysticercosis. CSF samples were collected from four patients diagnosed as neurocysticercosis clinically and by ELISA, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and from four healthy subjects without neurological disorders. The CSF samples were precipitated with cold acetone, then pooled by equal amount as patients and controls. The internal standard comprised equal amounts of proteins extracted from both groups. Internal standard, and proteins from the two groups were labeled prior to electrophoresis with spectrally resolvable fluorescent dyes, cyanein dye2 (Cy2), Cy3 and Cy5. Sodium dodecylsulfonate polyacrylamide gel chromatography (SDS-PAGE) and two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) of labeled samples were then run. The differential expressed proteins showed in the images of SDS-PAGE and 2-D DIGE gels scanned with 488 nm, 532 nm and 633 nm wavelength laser were analyzed by ImageQuant and DeCyde 5.0 respectively. Spot detection and quantification was performed for the differential in-gel analysis (DIA) module of DeCyder. Biological variation analysis (BVA) module of DeCyder was matched gel 1 and gel 2 images to provide data on differential protein expression levels between the two groups. The ImageQuant result displayed that the CSF protein was compatible with the dye, and the difference of protein amount was revealed by the difference of fluorescence intensity. DIA indicated that there were 896 and 894 protein dots on gel 1 and gel 2 respectively, and 90% of them were matched each other. BVA showed that there were 55 protein spots with different expressional level between neurocysticercosis and control groups. Protein spots with two-fold increase or decrease were 47 and 8 respectively in neurocysticercosis patients compared with healthy controls. The

  18. Multigrid Computation of Stratified Flow over Two-Dimensional Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisley, M. F.

    1997-09-01

    A robust multigrid method for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented and applied to the computation of viscous flow over obstacles in a bounded domain under conditions of neutral stability and stable density stratification. Two obstacle shapes have been used, namely a vertical barrier, for which the grid is Cartesian, and a smooth cosine-shaped obstacle, for which a boundary-conforming transformation is incorporated. Results are given for laminar flows at low Reynolds numbers and turbulent flows at a high Reynolds number, when a simple mixing length turbulence model is included. The multigrid algorithm is used to compute steady flows for each obstacle at low and high Reynolds numbers in conditions of weak static stability, defined byK=ND/πU≤ 1, whereU,N, andDare the upstream velocity, bouyancy frequency, and domain height respectively. Results are also presented for the vertical barrier at low and high Reynolds number in conditions of strong static stability,K> 1, when lee wave motions ensure that the flow is unsteady, and the multigrid algorithm is used to compute the flow at each timestep.

  19. Classification of integrable two-dimensional models of relativistic field theory by means of computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getmanov, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    The results of classification of two-dimensional relativistic field models (1) spinor; (2) essentially-nonlinear scalar) possessing higher conservation laws using the system of symbolic computer calculations are presented shortly

  20. Painleve analysis and transformations for a generalized two-dimensional variable-coefficient Burgers model from fluid mechanics, acoustics and cosmic-ray astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Guang-Mei

    2006-01-01

    Generalized two-dimensional variable-coefficient Burgers model is of current value in fluid mechanics, acoustics and cosmic-ray astrophysics. In this paper, Painleve analysis leads to the constraints on the variable coefficients for such a model to pass the Painleve test and to an auto-Baecklund transformation. Moreover, four transformations from this model are constructed, to the standard two-dimensional and one-dimensional Burgers models with the relevant constraints on the variable coefficients via symbolic computation. By virtue of the given transformations the properties and solutions of this model can be obtained from those of the standard two-dimensional and one-dimensional ones

  1. STRUYA a code for two-dimensional fluid flow analysis with and without structure coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, F.W.; Schlechtendahl, E.G.; Stoelting, K.

    1979-11-01

    STRUYA is a code for two-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flow analysis. Both Eulerian and Lagrangian grids are allowed. In the third dimension the flow domain may be bounded by a moving wall. The wall movement may be prescribed in a time-and space varying way or computed by a structural model. STRUYA offers a general scheme for adapting various structural models. As a standard feature it includes a cylindrical shell model (CYLDY2). (orig.) [de

  2. Quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in shallow fluid layers: the role of bottom friction and fluid layer depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clercx, H J H; van Heijst, G J F; Zoeteweij, M L

    2003-06-01

    The role of bottom friction and the fluid layer depth in numerical simulations and experiments of freely decaying quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in shallow fluid layers has been investigated. In particular, the power-law behavior of the compensated kinetic energy E0(t)=E(t)e(2lambda t), with E(t) the total kinetic energy of the flow and lambda the bottom-drag coefficient, and the compensated enstrophy Omega(0)(t)=Omega(t)e(2lambda t), with Omega(t) the total enstrophy of the flow, have been studied. We also report on the scaling exponents of the ratio Omega(t)/E(t), which is considered as a measure of the characteristic length scale in the flow, for different values of lambda. The numerical simulations on square bounded domains with no-slip boundaries revealed bottom-friction independent power-law exponents for E0(t), Omega(0)(t), and Omega(t)/E(t). By applying a discrete wavelet packet transform technique to the numerical data, we have been able to compute the power-law exponents of the average number density of vortices rho(t), the average vortex radius a(t), the mean vortex separation r(t), and the averaged normalized vorticity extremum omega(ext)(t)/square root E(t). These decay exponents proved to be independent of the bottom friction as well. In the experiments we have varied the fluid layer depth, and it was found that the decay exponents of E0(t), Omega(0)(t), Omega(t)/E(t), and omega(ext)(t)/square root E(t) are virtually independent of the fluid layer depth. The experimental data for rho(t) and a(t) are less conclusive; power-law exponents obtained for small fluid layer depths agree with those from previously reported experiments, but significantly larger power-law exponents are found for experiments with larger fluid layer depths.

  3. Fluid flow and fuel-air mixing in a motored two-dimensional Wankel rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Nguyen, H. L.; Stegeman, J.

    1986-01-01

    The implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming was employed to obtain numerical solutions to the conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and energy to study the unsteady, multidimensional flow and mixing of fuel and air inside the combustion chambers of a two-dimensional Wankel rotary engine under motored conditions. The effects of the following engine design and operating parameters on fluid flow and fuel-air mixing during the intake and compression cycles were studied: engine speed, angle of gaseous fuel injection during compression cycle, and speed of the fuel leaving fuel injector.

  4. Hamiltonian field description of two-dimensional vortex fluids and guiding center plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, P.J.

    1981-03-01

    The equations that describe the motion of two-dimensional vortex fluids and guiding center plasmas are shown to possess underlying field Hamiltonian structure. A Poisson bracket which is given in terms of the vorticity, the physical although noncanonical dynamical variable, casts these equations into Heisenberg form. The Hamiltonian density is the kinetic energy density of the fluid. The well-known conserved quantities are seen to be in involution with respect to this Poisson bracket. Expanding the vorticity in terms of a Fourier-Dirac series transforms the field description given here into the usual canonical equations for discrete vortex motion. A Clebsch potential representation of the vorticity transforms the noncanonical field description into a canonical description

  5. Two dimensional, two fluid model for sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granziera, M.R.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1980-05-01

    A two dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transient was developed using the two fluid set of conservation equations. A semiimplicit numerical differencing scheme capable of handling the problems associated with the ill-posedness implied by the complex characteristic roots of the two fluid problems was used, which took advantage of the dumping effect of the exchange terms. Of particular interest in the development of the model was the identification of the numerical problems caused by the strong disparity between the axial and radial dimensions of fuel assemblies. A solution to this problem was found which uses the particular geometry of fuel assemblies to accelerate the convergence of the iterative technique used in the model. Three sodium boiling experiments were simulated with the model, with good agreement between the experimental results and the model predictions

  6. Complex of two-dimensional multigroup programs for neutron-physical computations of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, V.A.; Protsenko, A.N.

    1975-01-01

    Briefly stated mathematical aspects of the two-dimensional multigroup method of neutron-physical computation of nuclear reactor. Problems of algorithmization and BESM-6 computer realisation of multigroup diffuse approximations in hexagonal and rectangular calculated lattices are analysed. The results of computation of fast critical assembly having complicated composition of the core are given. The estimation of computation accuracy of criticality, neutron fields distribution and efficiency of absorbing rods by means of computer programs developed is done. (author)

  7. Relaxation and self-organization in two-dimensional plasma and neutral fluid flow systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Amita

    2008-01-01

    Extensive numerical studies in the framework of a simplified two-dimensional model for neutral and plasma fluid for a variety of initial configurations and for both decaying and driven cases are carried out to illustrate relaxation toward a self-organized state. The dynamical model equation constitutes a simple choice for this purpose, e.g., the vorticity equation of the Navier-Stokes dynamics for the incompressible neutral fluids and the Hasegawa-Mima equation for plasma fluid flow system. Scatter plots are employed to observe a development of functional relationship, if any, amidst the generalized vorticity and its Laplacian. It is seen that they do not satisfy a linear relationship as the well known variational approach of enstrophy minimization subject to constancy of the energy integral for the two-dimensional (2D) system suggests. The observed nonlinear functional relationship is understood by separating the contribution to the scatter plot from spatial regions with intense vorticity patches and those of the background flow region where the background vorticity is weak or absent altogether. It is shown that such a separation has close connection with the known exact analytical solutions of the system. The analytical solutions are typically obtained by assuming a finite source of vorticity for the inner core of the localized structure, which is then matched with the solution in the outer region where vorticity is chosen to be zero. The work also demonstrates that the seemingly ad hoc choice of the linear vorticity source function for the inner region is in fact consistent with the self-organization paradigm of the 2D systems

  8. Finite-time barriers to front propagation in two-dimensional fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, John R.; Mitchell, Kevin A.

    2015-08-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations have demonstrated the role of certain invariant manifolds, termed burning invariant manifolds (BIMs), as one-way dynamical barriers to reaction fronts propagating within a flowing fluid. These barriers form one-dimensional curves in a two-dimensional fluid flow. In prior studies, the fluid velocity field was required to be either time-independent or time-periodic. In the present study, we develop an approach to identify prominent one-way barriers based only on fluid velocity data over a finite time interval, which may have arbitrary time-dependence. We call such a barrier a burning Lagrangian coherent structure (bLCS) in analogy to Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) commonly used in passive advection. Our approach is based on the variational formulation of LCSs using curves of stationary "Lagrangian shear," introduced by Farazmand et al. [Physica D 278-279, 44 (2014)] in the context of passive advection. We numerically validate our technique by demonstrating that the bLCS closely tracks the BIM for a time-independent, double-vortex channel flow with an opposing "wind."

  9. Computation of two-dimensional isothermal flow in shell-and-tube heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, L.N.; Galpin, P.F.; Brown, J.D.; Frisina, V.

    1983-07-01

    A computational procedure is outlined whereby two-dimensional isothermal shell-side flow distributions can be calculated for tube bundles having arbitrary boundaries and flow blocking devices, such as sealing strips, defined in arbitrary locations. The procedure is described in some detail and several computed results are presented to illustrate the robustness and generality of the method

  10. Two-dimensional assemblies of soft repulsive colloids confined at fluid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, L.; Buttinoni, I.; Fernandez-Rodriguez, M. A.; Vasudevan, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    Colloidal systems are an excellent example of a materials class for which interrogating fundamental questions leads to answers of direct applied relevance. In our group, we in particular focus on two-dimensional assemblies of micro- and nano-particles confined at the interface between two fluids, e.g., oil-water. Here, we review our work on systems interacting through soft repulsive forces of different origin, i.e., electrostatic and steric. By starting from the paradigmatic case of charged colloids at an interface, we show how they are both offering great opportunities as model systems to investigate the structural and mechanical response of materials and as versatile patterning tools for surface nanostructuring. We then move to the case of deformable particles interacting via steric contacts. We first examine microgel particles, which we also demonstrate as very promising models for structural investigations and robust elements for tunable nanolithography. We conclude by briefly discussing the case of particles comprising a hard inorganic core and a deformable polymer shell, which maintain some of the advantageous features of microgel particles, but also enable the realization of two-dimensional functional materials. This article offers our perspective on a very active field of research, where many interesting developments are expected in the near future. Contribution to the Focus Issue Self-assemblies of Inorganic and Organic Nanomaterials edited by Marie-Paule Pileni.

  11. Two-dimensional 'photon fluid': effective photon-photon interaction and physical realizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiao, R Y; Hansson, T H; Leinaas, J M; Viefers, S

    2004-01-01

    We describe a recently developed effective theory for atom-mediated photon-photon interactions in a two-dimensional 'photon fluid' confined to a Fabry-Perot resonator. The photons in the lowest longitudinal cavity mode will appear as massive bosons interacting via a renormalized delta-function potential with a strength determined by physical parameters such as the density of atoms and the detuning of the photons relative to the resonance frequency of the atoms. We discuss novel quantum phenomena for photons, such as Bose-Einstein condensation and bound state formation, as well as possible experimental scenarios based on Rydberg atoms in a microwave cavity, or alkali atoms in an optical cavity

  12. Numerical investigation of fluid mud motion using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and two-dimensional fluid mud coupling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Zhang, Qinghe; Hao, Linnan

    2015-03-01

    A water-fluid mud coupling model is developed based on the unstructured grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) to investigate the fluid mud motion. The hydrodynamics and sediment transport of the overlying water column are solved using the original three-dimensional ocean model. A horizontal two-dimensional fluid mud model is integrated into the FVCOM model to simulate the underlying fluid mud flow. The fluid mud interacts with the water column through the sediment flux, current, and shear stress. The friction factor between the fluid mud and the bed, which is traditionally determined empirically, is derived with the assumption that the vertical distribution of shear stress below the yield surface of fluid mud is identical to that of uniform laminar flow of Newtonian fluid in the open channel. The model is validated by experimental data and reasonable agreement is found. Compared with numerical cases with fixed friction factors, the results simulated with the derived friction factor exhibit the best agreement with the experiment, which demonstrates the necessity of the derivation of the friction factor.

  13. Moment-based method for computing the two-dimensional discrete Hartley transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhifang; Wu, Jiasong; Shu, Huazhong

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we present a fast algorithm for computing the two-dimensional (2-D) discrete Hartley transform (DHT). By using kernel transform and Taylor expansion, the 2-D DHT is approximated by a linear sum of 2-D geometric moments. This enables us to use the fast algorithms developed for computing the 2-D moments to efficiently calculate the 2-D DHT. The proposed method achieves a simple computational structure and is suitable to deal with any sequence lengths.

  14. Lennard-Jones fluids in two-dimensional nano-pores. Multi-phase coexistence and fluid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsyshin, Petr; Savva, Nikos; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2014-03-01

    We present a number of fundamental findings on the wetting behaviour of nano-pores. A popular model for fluid confinement is a one-dimensional (1D) slit pore formed by two parallel planar walls and it exhibits capillary condensation (CC): a first-order phase transition from vapour to capillary-liquid (Kelvin shift). Capping such a pore at one end by a third orthogonal wall forms a prototypical two-dimensional (2D) pore. We show that 2D pores possess a wetting temperature such that below this temperature CC remains of first order, above it becomes a continuous phase transition manifested by a slab of capillary-liquid filling the pore from the capping wall. Continuous CC exhibits hysteresis and can be preceded by a first-order capillary prewetting transition. Additionally, liquid drops can form in the corners of the 2D pore (remnant of 2D wedge prewetting). The three fluid phases, vapour, capillary-liquid slab and corner drops, can coexist at the pore triple point. Our model is based on the statistical mechanics of fluids in the density functional formulation. The fluid-fluid and fluid-substrate interactions are dispersive. We analyze in detail the microscopic fluid structure, isotherms and full phase diagrams. Our findings also suggest novel ways to control wetting of nano-pores. We are grateful to the European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031 for support.

  15. On the late phase of relaxation of two-dimensional fluids: turbulence of unitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spineanu, F; Vlad, M

    2017-01-01

    The two-dimensional ideal fluid and the plasma confined by a strong magnetic field exhibit an intrinsic tendency to organization due to the inverse spectral cascade. In the asymptotic states reached at relaxation the turbulence has vanished and there are only coherent vortical structures. We are interested in the regime that precedes these ordered flow patterns, in which there still is turbulence and imperfect but robust structures have emerged. To develop an analytical description we propose to start from the stationary coherent states and (in the direction opposite to relaxation) explore the space of configurations before the extremum of the functional that defines the structures has been reached. We find necessary to assemble different but related models: point-like vortices, its field theoretical formulation as interacting matter and gauge fields, chiral model and surfaces with constant mean curvature. These models are connected by the similar ability to described randomly interacting coherent structures. They derive exactly the same equation for the asymptotic state (sinh-Poisson equation, confirmed by numerical calculation of fluid flows). The chiral model, to which one can arrive from self-duality equation of the field theoretical model for fluid and from constant mean curvature surface equations, appears to be the suitable analytical framework. Its solutions, the unitons, aquire dynamics when the system is not at the extremum of the action. In the present work we provide arguments that the underlying common nature of these models can be used to develop an approach to fluid and plasma states of turbulence interacting with structures. (paper)

  16. Bandgap calculation of two-dimensional mixed solid-fluid phononic crystals by Dirichlet-to-Neumann maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fenglian; Wang Yuesheng; Zhang Chuanzeng

    2011-01-01

    A numerical method based on the Dirichlet-to-Neumann (DtN) map is presented to compute the bandgaps of two-dimensional phononic crystals, which are composed of square or triangular lattices of circular solid cylinders in a fluid matrix. The DtN map is constructed using the cylindrical wave expansion in a unit cell. A linear eigenvalue problem, which depends on the Bloch wave vector and involves relatively small matrices, is formulated. Numerical calculations are performed for typical systems with various acoustic impedance ratios of the solid inclusions and the fluid matrix. The results indicate that the DtN-map based method can provide accurate results for various systems efficiently. In particular it takes into account the fluid-solid interface conditions and the transverse wave mode in the solid component, which has been proven to be significant when the acoustic impedance of the solid inclusions is close to or smaller than that of the fluid matrix. For systems with an acoustic impedance of the inclusion much less than that of the matrix, physical flat bands appear in the band structures, which will be missed if the transverse wave mode in the solid inclusions is neglected.

  17. Liquid structure and freezing of the two-dimensional classical electron fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballone, P.; Pastore, G.; Rovere, M.; Tosi, M.P.

    1984-11-01

    Accurate theoretical results are reported for the pair correlation function of the classical two-dimensional electron liquid with r -1 interactions at strong coupling. The approach involves an evaluation of the bridge diagram corrections to the hypernetted-chain approximation, the role of low dimensionality being evident, relative to the case of the three-dimensional classical plasma, in an enhanced sensitivity to long range correlations. The liquid structure results are utilized in a density-wave theory of first-order freezing into the triangular lattice, the calculated coupling strength at freezing being in reasonable agreement with computer simulation results and with data on electron films on a liquid-He surface. The stability of the triangular electron lattice against deformation into a body-centered rectangular lattice is also discussed. (author)

  18. A two-dimensional continuum model of biofilm growth incorporating fluid flow and shear stress based detachment

    KAUST Repository

    Duddu, Ravindra

    2009-05-01

    We present a two-dimensional biofilm growth model in a continuum framework using an Eulerian description. A computational technique based on the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the level set method is used to simulate the growth of the biofilm. The model considers fluid flow around the biofilm surface, the advection-diffusion and reaction of substrate, variable biomass volume fraction and erosion due to the interfacial shear stress at the biofilm-fluid interface. The key assumptions of the model and the governing equations of transport, biofilm kinetics and biofilm mechanics are presented. Our 2D biofilm growth results are in good agreement with those obtained by Picioreanu et al. (Biotechnol Bioeng 69(5):504-515, 2000). Detachment due to erosion is modeled using two continuous speed functions based on: (a) interfacial shear stress and (b) biofilm height. A relation between the two detachment models in the case of a 1D biofilm is established and simulated biofilm results with detachment in 2D are presented. The stress in the biofilm due to fluid flow is evaluated and higher stresses are observed close to the substratum where the biofilm is attached. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Two-dimensional single fluid MHD simulations of plasma opening switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, N.F.; Payne, S.S.; Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Frese, M.H.; Hussey, T.W.

    1989-01-01

    Simulations of plasma opening switch have been made using two-dimensional, single fluid, magnetohydrodynamic codes HAM and MACH2. A variety of mechanisms for magnetic field penetration have been investigated. These include plasma convection, classical and microturbulent resistive diffusion, and Hall effect transport. We find that plasma microturbulent models are necessary to explain the broad current channels observed in experiments. Both heuristic and consistent microturbulent models are able to explain observed channel widths and penetration features. The best results are obtained for a consistent model that includes the Buneman, ion acoustic, and lower hybrid microturbulent collision frequencies and threshold conditions. Maximum microturbulent collision frequencies of 5 ω p , are typical. Field transport and current channel profiles are in excellent agreement with experimental observations for GAMBLE I, GAMBLE II, and SUPERMITE experiments. Dominant field penetration mechanisms and center of mass plasma motion are current and density dependent. Including the Hall effect enhanced field penetration. Center of mass motion is negligible for the GAMBLE I experiments but significant for the GAMBLE II conditions. Scaling of plasma opening time with switch length and density can be fit by linear representations for lengths from 0.03 m to 0.24 m and ion densities from 10 18 m -3 to 1.5 times 10 19 m -3 . 15 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  20. Equilibrium states and ground state of two-dimensional fluid foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graner, F.; Jiang, Y.; Janiaud, E.; Flament, C.

    2001-01-01

    We study the equilibrium energies of two-dimensional (2D) noncoarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas. The equilibrium states correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. We present a theoretical derivation of energy minima; experiments with ferrofluid foams, which can be either highly distorted, locally relaxed, or globally annealed; and Monte Carlo simulations using the extended large-Q Potts model. For a dry foam with small size variance we develop physical insight and an electrostatic analogy, which enables us to (i) find an approximate value of the global minimum perimeter, accounting for (small) area disorder, the topological distribution, and physical boundary conditions; (ii) conjecture the corresponding pattern and topology: small bubbles sort inward and large bubbles sort outward, topological charges of the same signs ''repel'' while charges of the opposite signs ''attract;'' (iii) define local and global markers to determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state; (iv) conjecture that, in a local perimeter minimum at prescribed topology, the pressure distribution and thus the edge curvature are unique. Some results also apply to 3D foams

  1. Single-particle density matrix and superfluidity in the two-dimensional Bose Coulomb fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguzzi, A.; Tosi, M.P.; Davoudi, B.

    2002-01-01

    A study by Magro and Ceperley [Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 826 (1994)] has shown that the ground state of the two-dimensional fluid of charged bosons with logarithmic interactions is not Bose condensed, but exhibits algebraic off-diagonal order in the single-particle density matrix ρ(r). We use a hydrodynamic Hamiltonian expressed in terms of density and phase operators, in combination with an f-sum rule on the superfluid fraction, to reproduce these results and to extend the evaluation of the density matrix to finite temperature T. This approach allows us to treat the liquid as a superfluid in the absence of a condensate. The algebraic decay of the one-body density matrix is due to correlations between phase fluctuations, and we find that the exponent in the power law is determined by the superfluid density n s (T). We also find that the plasmon gap in the single-particle energy spectrum at long wavelengths decreases with increasing T and closes at the critical temperature for the onset of superfluidity

  2. Two-dimensional fluid-hammer analysis by the method of nearcharacteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.

    1975-05-01

    A numerical technique based on the method of nearcharacteristics is considered for solving propagation of fluid-hammer waves in a two-dimensional geometry. The solution is constructed by relating flow conditions by compatibility equations along lines called nearcharacteristics. Three choices are considered in the numerical scheme that are accurate within an error of the order of magnitude of the time step. Since the nearcharacteristics lie in the coordinate planes, the technique provides an efficient method requiring only simple interpolations in the initial plane. On the other hand, the nearcharacteristics fall outside the characteristics cone. Thus the solution procedure directly refers to conditions outside the true domain of dependence. The effect of this is studied through numerical calculation of a simple example problem and comparison with results obtained by a bicharacteristic method. Comparison is also made with existing analytical solutions and experiments. Furthermore, the three solution schemes considered are examined for numerical stability by the vonNeumann test. Two of the schemes were found to be unstable; the third yielded a stability criterion equivalent to that of the bicharacteristic formulation. The stability-analysis results were confirmed by numerical experimentation. (auth)

  3. VNAP2: a computer program for computation of two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible, turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, M.C.

    1981-08-01

    VNAP2 is a computer program for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing-length model, a one-equation model, or the Jones-Launder two-equation model. The geometry may be a single- or a dual-flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference-plane-characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free-jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet-powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free-jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  4. Numerical analysis of steady state fluid flow in a two-dimensional wavy channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorji, M.; Hosseinzadeh, E.

    2007-01-01

    A simple geometry of the flow passage that may be used to enhance the heat transfer rate is called wavy and periodic channel. Wavy channel can provide significant heat transfer augmentation and was always important for heat transfer engineering and so far many researches have been done in this field. In this paper, the effects of channel geometry and Reynolds number on the heat transfer coefficient, heat flux and pressure drop for the laminar fully developed flow in a two dimensional channel whereas the walls are considered fix temperature is numerically investigated. The problem is solved for channel with one and two wavy walls and comparisons with the straight channel, in the same flow rate, have been performed. Results indicate that, by decreasing the channel wave length and the distance between the channel walls the pressure drop, heat flux and heat transfer coefficient increase. Results and Conclusions: The following conclusion may be drawn: 1. In a specified channel, for the fluid flow with the constant Reynolds number, by decreasing the wave length from 0.2 m to 0.1 m, the pressure drop, heat flux and heat transfer coefficient increase by 37% , 54% and 29% respectively, whereas by decreasing the wave length from the same value the above mentioned parameters decrease to 108% , 143% and 47% respectively. 2. In a specified wave length, where the amplitude and the Reynolds number is constant, by increasing the distance between the walls from 0.15 m to 0.25 m, the pressure drop, heat flux and heat transfer coefficient decrease by 41% ,8% and 7.8% respectively. References [1] J.C. Burns, T. Parks, J. Fluid Mesh, 29(1967), 405-416. [2] J.L. Goldestein, E.M. Sparrow, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 99 (1977), 187. [3] J.E.O. Brain, E.M. Sparrow, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 104 (1982), 410 [4] N. Sanie, S. Dini, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 115 (1993), 788. [5] G. Wang, P. Vanka, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 38 (17) (1995), 3219. [6] T.A. Rush, T.A. Newell, A.M. Jacobi, Int, J. Heat Mass

  5. Two-dimensional convection of an incompressible viscous fluid with the heat exchange on the free border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana S. Vlasova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The exact stationary solution of the boundary-value problem that describes the convective motion of an incompressible viscous fluid in the two-dimensional layer with the square heating of a free surface in Stokes's approach is found. The linearization of the Oberbeck–Boussinesq equations allows one to describe the flow of fluid in extreme points of pressure and temperature. The condition under which the counter-current flows (two counter flows in the fluid can be observed, is introduced. If the stagnant point in the fluid exists, six non-closed whirlwinds can be observed.

  6. Computation of drag and lift coefficients for simple two-dimensional objects with Reynolds number Re = 420 000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matas Richard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with comparison of drag and lift coefficients for simple two-dimensional objects, which are often discussed in fluid mechanics fundamentals books. The commercial CFD software ANSYS/FLUENT 13 was used for computation of flow fields around the objects and determination of the drag and lift coefficients. The flow fields of the two-dimensional objects were computed for velocity up to 160 km per hour and Reynolds number Re = 420 000. Main purpose was to verify the suggested computational domain and model settings for further more complex objects geometries. The more complex profiles are used to stabilize asymmetrical ('z'-shaped pantographs of high-speed trains. The trains are used in two-way traffic where the pantographs have to operate with the same characteristics in both directions. Results of the CFD computations show oscillation of the drag and lift coefficients over time. The results are compared with theoretical and experimental data and discussed. Some examples are presented in the paper.

  7. Computer simulation of the martensite transformation in a model two-dimensional body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Khachaturyan, A.G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1979-05-01

    An analytical model of a martensitic transformation in an idealized body is constructed and used to carry out a computer simulation of the transformation in a pseudo-two-dimensional crystal. The reaction is assumed to proceed through the sequential transformation of elementary volumes (elementary martensitic particles, EMP) via the Bain strain. The elastic interaction between these volumes is computed and the transformation path chosen so as to minimize the total free energy. The model transformation shows interesting qualitative correspondencies with the known features of martensitic transformations in typical solids

  8. Computer simulation of the martensite transformation in a model two-dimensional body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Khachaturyan, A.G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1979-06-01

    An analytical model of a martensitic transformation in an idealized body is constructed and used to carry out a computer simulation of the transformation in a pseudo-two-dimensional crystal. The reaction is assumed to proceed through the sequential transformation of elementary volumes (elementary martensitic particles, EMP) via the Bain strain. The elastic interaction between these volumes is computed and the transformation path chosen so as to minimize the total free energy. The model transformation shows interesting qualitative correspondencies with the known features of martensitic transformations in typical solids

  9. An Extended Assessment of Fluid Flow Models for the Prediction of Two-Dimensional Steady-State Airfoil Aerodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Herbert-Acero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the analysis, application, and comparison of thirteen fluid flow models in the prediction of two-dimensional airfoil aerodynamics, considering laminar and turbulent subsonic inflow conditions. Diverse sensitivity analyses of different free parameters (e.g., the domain topology and its discretization, the flow model, and the solution method together with its convergence mechanisms revealed important effects on the simulations’ outcomes. The NACA 4412 airfoil was considered throughout the work and the computational predictions were compared with experiments conducted under a wide range of Reynolds numbers (7e5≤Re≤9e6 and angles-of-attack (-10°≤α≤20°. Improvements both in modeling accuracy and processing time were achieved by considering the RS LP-S and the Transition SST turbulence models, and by considering finite volume-based solution methods with preconditioned systems, respectively. The RS LP-S model provided the best lift force predictions due to the adequate modeling of the micro and macro anisotropic turbulence at the airfoil’s surface and at the nearby flow field, which in turn allowed the adequate prediction of stall conditions. The Transition-SST model provided the best drag force predictions due to adequate modeling of the laminar-to-turbulent flow transition and the surface shear stresses. Conclusions, recommendations, and a comprehensive research agenda are presented based on validated computational results.

  10. Development of a multimaterial, two-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian mesh computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, R.T.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed a large, multimaterial, two-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) computer program. The special feature of an ALE mesh is that it can be either an embedded Lagrangian mesh, a fixed Eulerian mesh, or a partially embedded, partially remapped mesh. Remapping is used to remove Lagrangian mesh distortion. This general purpose program has been used for astrophysical modeling, under the guidance of James R. Wilson. The rationale behind the development of this program will be used to highlight several important issues in program design

  11. Computing stationary solutions of the two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation with deflated continuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampidis, E. G.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Farrell, P. E.

    2018-01-01

    In this work we employ a recently proposed bifurcation analysis technique, the deflated continuation algorithm, to compute steady-state solitary waveforms in a one-component, two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a parabolic trap and repulsive interactions. Despite the fact that this system has been studied extensively, we discover a wide variety of previously unknown branches of solutions. We analyze the stability of the newly discovered branches and discuss the bifurcations that relate them to known solutions both in the near linear (Cartesian, as well as polar) and in the highly nonlinear regimes. While deflated continuation is not guaranteed to compute the full bifurcation diagram, this analysis is a potent demonstration that the algorithm can discover new nonlinear states and provide insights into the energy landscape of complex high-dimensional Hamiltonian dynamical systems.

  12. FLUST-2D - A computer code for the calculation of the two-dimensional flow of a compressible medium in coupled retangular areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enderle, G.

    1979-01-01

    The computer-code FLUST-2D is able to calculate the two-dimensional flow of a compressible fluid in arbitrary coupled rectangular areas. In a finite-difference scheme the program computes pressure, density, internal energy and velocity. Starting with a basic set of equations, the difference equations in a rectangular grid are developed. The computational cycle for coupled fluid areas is described. Results of test calculations are compared to analytical solutions and the influence of time step and mesh size are investigated. The program was used to precalculate the blowdown experiments of the HDR experimental program. Downcomer, plena, internal vessel region, blowdown pipe and a containment area have been modelled two-dimensionally. The major results of the precalculations are presented. This report also contains a description of the code structure and user information. (orig.) [de

  13. Fluid dynamics of moving fish in a two-dimensional multiparticle collision dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Daniel A. P.; Hildenbrandt, H.; Padding, J. T.; Hemelrijk, C. K.

    2012-02-01

    The fluid dynamics of animal locomotion, such as that of an undulating fish, are of great interest to both biologists and engineers. However, experimentally studying these fluid dynamics is difficult and time consuming. Model studies can be of great help because of their simpler and more detailed analysis. Their insights may guide empirical work. Particularly the recently introduced multiparticle collision dynamics method may be suitable for the study of moving organisms because it is computationally fast, simple to implement, and has a continuous representation of space. As regards the study of hydrodynamics of moving organisms, the method has only been applied at low Reynolds numbers (below 120) for soft, permeable bodies, and static fishlike shapes. In the present paper we use it to study the hydrodynamics of an undulating fish at Reynolds numbers 1100-1500, after confirming its performance for a moving insect wing at Reynolds number 75. We measure (1) drag, thrust, and lift forces, (2) swimming efficiency and spatial structure of the wake, and (3) distribution of forces along the fish body. We confirm the resemblance between the simulated undulating fish and empirical data. In contrast to theoretical predictions, our model shows that for steadily undulating fish, thrust is produced by the rear 2/3 of the body and that the slip ratio U/V (with U the forward swimming speed and V the rearward speed of the body wave) correlates negatively (instead of positively) with the actual Froude efficiency of swimming. Besides, we show that the common practice of modeling individuals while constraining their sideways acceleration causes them to resemble unconstrained fish with a higher tailbeat frequency.

  14. A binary motor imagery tasks based brain-computer interface for two-dimensional movement control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bin; Cao, Lei; Maysam, Oladazimi; Li, Jie; Xie, Hong; Su, Caixia; Birbaumer, Niels

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Two-dimensional movement control is a popular issue in brain-computer interface (BCI) research and has many applications in the real world. In this paper, we introduce a combined control strategy to a binary class-based BCI system that allows the user to move a cursor in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Users focus on a single moving vector to control 2D movement instead of controlling vertical and horizontal movement separately. Approach. Five participants took part in a fixed-target experiment and random-target experiment to verify the effectiveness of the combination control strategy under the fixed and random routine conditions. Both experiments were performed in a virtual 2D dimensional environment and visual feedback was provided on the screen. Main results. The five participants achieved an average hit rate of 98.9% and 99.4% for the fixed-target experiment and the random-target experiment, respectively. Significance. The results demonstrate that participants could move the cursor in the 2D plane effectively. The proposed control strategy is based only on a basic two-motor imagery BCI, which enables more people to use it in real-life applications.

  15. Computational study of energy transfer in two-dimensional J-aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Argyrakis, Panos; Lobanov, A.; Vitukhnovsky, A.

    2004-01-01

    We perform a computational analysis of the intra- and interband energy transfer in two-dimensional J-aggregates. Each aggregate is represented as a two-dimensional array (LB-film or self-assembled film) of two kinds of cyanine dyes. We consider the J-aggregate whose J-band is located at a shorter wavelength to be a donor and an aggregate or a small impurity with longer wavelength to be an acceptor. Light absorption in the blue wing of the donor aggregate gives rise to the population of its excitonic states. The depopulation of these states is possible by (a) radiative transfer to the ground state (b) intraband energy transfer, and (c) interband energy transfer to the acceptor. We study the dependence of energy transfer on properties such as the energy gap, the diagonal disorder, and the exciton-phonon interaction strength. Experimentally observable parameters, such as the position and form of luminescence spectrum, and results of the kinetic spectroscopy measurements strongly depend upon the density of states in excitonic bands, rates of energy exchange between states and oscillator strengths for luminescent transitions originating from these states

  16. Boundary effects in a quasi-two-dimensional driven granular fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N D; Smith, M I

    2017-12-01

    The effect of a confining boundary on the spatial variations in granular temperature of a driven quasi-two-dimensional layer of particles is investigated experimentally. The radial drop in the relative granular temperature ΔT/T exhibits a maximum at intermediate particle numbers which coincides with a crossover from kinetic to collisional transport of energy. It is also found that at low particle numbers, the distributions of radial velocities are increasingly asymmetric as one approaches the boundary. The radial and tangential granular temperatures split, and in the tails of the radial velocity distribution there is a higher population of fast moving particles traveling away rather than towards the boundary.

  17. Parallel Implementation of Triangular Cellular Automata for Computing Two-Dimensional Elastodynamic Response on Arbitrary Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leamy, Michael J.; Springer, Adam C.

    In this research we report parallel implementation of a Cellular Automata-based simulation tool for computing elastodynamic response on complex, two-dimensional domains. Elastodynamic simulation using Cellular Automata (CA) has recently been presented as an alternative, inherently object-oriented technique for accurately and efficiently computing linear and nonlinear wave propagation in arbitrarily-shaped geometries. The local, autonomous nature of the method should lead to straight-forward and efficient parallelization. We address this notion on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) hardware using a Java-based object-oriented CA code implementing triangular state machines (i.e., automata) and the MPI bindings written in Java (MPJ Express). We use MPJ Express to reconfigure our existing CA code to distribute a domain's automata to cores present on a dual quad-core shared-memory system (eight total processors). We note that this message passing parallelization strategy is directly applicable to computer clustered computing, which will be the focus of follow-on research. Results on the shared memory platform indicate nearly-ideal, linear speed-up. We conclude that the CA-based elastodynamic simulator is easily configured to run in parallel, and yields excellent speed-up on SMP hardware.

  18. Fluid dynamics of moving fish in a two-dimensional multiparticle collision dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reid, Daniel A. P.; Hildenbrandt, H.; Hemelrijk, C. K.; Padding, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of animal locomotion, such as that of an undulating fish, are of great interest to both biologists and engineers. However, experimentally studying these fluid dynamics is difficult and time consuming. Model studies can be of great help because of their simpler and more detailed

  19. Two-dimensional computer simulation of hypervelocity impact cratering: some preliminary results for Meteor Crater, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, J.B.; Burton, D.E.; Cunningham, M.E.; Lettis, L.A. Jr.

    1978-06-01

    A computational approach used for subsurface explosion cratering was extended to hypervelocity impact cratering. Meteor (Barringer) Crater, Arizona, was selected for the first computer simulation because it is one of the most thoroughly studied craters. It is also an excellent example of a simple, bowl-shaped crater and is one of the youngest terrestrial impact craters. Initial conditions for this calculation included a meteorite impact velocity of 15 km/s, meteorite mass of 1.67 x 10 8 kg, with a corresponding kinetic energy of 1.88 x 10 16 J (4.5 megatons). A two-dimensional Eulerian finite difference code called SOIL was used for this simulation of a cylindrical iron projectile impacting at normal incidence into a limestone target. For this initial calculation, a Tillotson equation-of-state description for iron and limestone was used with no shear strength. Results obtained for this preliminary calculation of the formation of Meteor Crater are in good agreement with field measurements. A color movie based on this calculation was produced using computer-generated graphics. 19 figures, 5 tables, 63 references

  20. Two-dimensional computer simulation of hypervelocity impact cratering: some preliminary results for Meteor Crater, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, J.B.; Burton, D.E.; Cunningham, M.E.; Lettis, L.A. Jr.

    1978-04-01

    A computational approach used for subsurface explosion cratering has been extended to hypervelocity impact cratering. Meteor (Barringer) Crater, Arizona, was selected for our first computer simulation because it was the most thoroughly studied. It is also an excellent example of a simple, bowl-shaped crater and is one of the youngest terrestrial impact craters. Shoemaker estimates that the impact occurred about 20,000 to 30,000 years ago [Roddy (1977)]. Initial conditions for this calculation included a meteorite impact velocity of 15 km/s. meteorite mass of 1.57E + 08 kg, with a corresponding kinetic energy of 1.88E + 16 J (4.5 megatons). A two-dimensional Eulerian finite difference code called SOIL was used for this simulation of a cylindrical iron projectile impacting at normal incidence into a limestone target. For this initial calculation a Tillotson equation-of-state description for iron and limestone was used with no shear strength. A color movie based on this calculation was produced using computer-generated graphics. Results obtained for this preliminary calculation of the formation of Meteor Crater, Arizona, are in good agreement with Meteor Crater Measurements

  1. Two-dimensional computer simulation of hypervelocity impact cratering: some preliminary results for Meteor Crater, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, J.B.; Burton, D.E.; Cunningham, M.E.; Lettis, L.A. Jr.

    1978-06-01

    A computational approach used for subsurface explosion cratering was extended to hypervelocity impact cratering. Meteor (Barringer) Crater, Arizona, was selected for the first computer simulation because it is one of the most thoroughly studied craters. It is also an excellent example of a simple, bowl-shaped crater and is one of the youngest terrestrial impact craters. Initial conditions for this calculation included a meteorite impact velocity of 15 km/s, meteorite mass of 1.67 x 10/sup 8/ kg, with a corresponding kinetic energy of 1.88 x 10/sup 16/ J (4.5 megatons). A two-dimensional Eulerian finite difference code called SOIL was used for this simulation of a cylindrical iron projectile impacting at normal incidence into a limestone target. For this initial calculation, a Tillotson equation-of-state description for iron and limestone was used with no shear strength. Results obtained for this preliminary calculation of the formation of Meteor Crater are in good agreement with field measurements. A color movie based on this calculation was produced using computer-generated graphics. 19 figures, 5 tables, 63 references.

  2. Large Deviations for Stochastic Models of Two-Dimensional Second Grade Fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Jianliang; Zhang, Tusheng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we establish a large deviation principle for stochastic models of incompressible second grade fluids. The weak convergence method introduced by Budhiraja and Dupuis (Probab Math Statist 20:39–61, 2000) plays an important role.

  3. Large Deviations for Stochastic Models of Two-Dimensional Second Grade Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Jianliang, E-mail: zhaijl@ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, School of Mathematical Sciences (China); Zhang, Tusheng, E-mail: Tusheng.Zhang@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, School of Mathematics (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper, we establish a large deviation principle for stochastic models of incompressible second grade fluids. The weak convergence method introduced by Budhiraja and Dupuis (Probab Math Statist 20:39–61, 2000) plays an important role.

  4. Field computation for two-dimensional array transducers with limited diffraction array beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Yu; Cheng, Jiqi

    2005-10-01

    A method is developed for calculating fields produced with a two-dimensional (2D) array transducer. This method decomposes an arbitrary 2D aperture weighting function into a set of limited diffraction array beams. Using the analytical expressions of limited diffraction beams, arbitrary continuous wave (cw) or pulse wave (pw) fields of 2D arrays can be obtained with a simple superposition of these beams. In addition, this method can be simplified and applied to a 1D array transducer of a finite or infinite elevation height. For beams produced with axially symmetric aperture weighting functions, this method can be reduced to the Fourier-Bessel method studied previously where an annular array transducer can be used. The advantage of the method is that it is accurate and computationally efficient, especially in regions that are not far from the surface of the transducer (near field), where it is important for medical imaging. Both computer simulations and a synthetic array experiment are carried out to verify the method. Results (Bessel beam, focused Gaussian beam, X wave and asymmetric array beams) show that the method is accurate as compared to that using the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula and agrees well with the experiment.

  5. Multiplanar and two-dimensional imaging of central airway stenting with multidetector computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgul Mehmet

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT provides guidance for primary screening of the central airways. The aim of our study was assessing the contribution of multidetector computed tomography- two dimensional reconstruction in the management of patients with tracheobronchial stenosis prior to the procedure and during a short follow up period of 3 months after the endobronchial treatment. Methods This is a retrospective study with data collected from an electronic database and from the medical records. Patients evaluated with MDCT and who had undergone a stenting procedure were included. A Philips RSGDT 07605 model MDCT was used, and slice thickness, 3 mm; overlap, 1.5 mm; matrix, 512x512; mass, 90 and kV, 120 were evaluated. The diameters of the airways 10 mm proximal and 10 mm distal to the obstruction were measured and the stent diameter (D was determined from the average between D upper and D lower. Results Fifty-six patients, 14 (25% women and 42 (75% men, mean age 55.3 ± 13.2 years (range: 16-79 years, were assessed by MDCT and then treated with placement of an endobronchial stent. A computed tomography review was made with 6 detector Philips RSGDT 07605 multidetector computed tomography device. Endobronchial therapy was provided for the patients with endoluminal lesions. Stents were placed into the area of stenosis in patients with external compression after dilatation and debulking procedures had been carried out. In one patient the migration of a stent was detected during the follow up period by using MDCT. Conclusions MDCT helps to define stent size, length and type in patients who are suitable for endobronchial stinting. This is a non-invasive, reliable method that helps decisions about optimal stent size and position, thus reducing complications.

  6. Normal versus anomalous self-diffusion in two-dimensional fluids: Memory function approach and generalized asymptotic Einstein relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun Kyung; Choi, Bongsik; Talkner, Peter; Lee, Eok Kyun

    2014-12-01

    Based on the generalized Langevin equation for the momentum of a Brownian particle a generalized asymptotic Einstein relation is derived. It agrees with the well-known Einstein relation in the case of normal diffusion but continues to hold for sub- and super-diffusive spreading of the Brownian particle's mean square displacement. The generalized asymptotic Einstein relation is used to analyze data obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of a two-dimensional soft disk fluid. We mainly concentrated on medium densities for which we found super-diffusive behavior of a tagged fluid particle. At higher densities a range of normal diffusion can be identified. The motion presumably changes to sub-diffusion for even higher densities.

  7. Nonmonotonic magnetoresistance of a two-dimensional viscous electron-hole fluid in a confined geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, P. S.; Dmitriev, A. P.; Gornyi, I. V.; Kachorovskii, V. Yu.; Narozhny, B. N.; Titov, M.

    2018-02-01

    Ultrapure conductors may exhibit hydrodynamic transport where the collective motion of charge carriers resembles the flow of a viscous fluid. In a confined geometry (e.g., in ultra-high-quality nanostructures), the electronic fluid assumes a Poiseuille-type flow. Applying an external magnetic field tends to diminish viscous effects leading to large negative magnetoresistance. In two-component systems near charge neutrality, the hydrodynamic flow of charge carriers is strongly affected by the mutual friction between the two constituents. At low fields, the magnetoresistance is negative, however, at high fields the interplay between electron-hole scattering, recombination, and viscosity results in a dramatic change of the flow profile: the magnetoresistance changes its sign and eventually becomes linear in very high fields. This nonmonotonic magnetoresistance can be used as a fingerprint to detect viscous flow in two-component conducting systems.

  8. Wide-field two-dimensional multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic computed microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Li, Guo; Wang, Lidai; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Maslov, Konstantin; Engelbach, John A.; Garbow, Joel R.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is an emerging technique that directly images optical absorption in tissue at high spatial resolution. To date, the majority of OR-PAM systems are based on single focused optical excitation and ultrasonic detection, limiting the wide-field imaging speed. While one-dimensional multifocal OR-PAM (1D-MFOR-PAM) has been developed, the potential of microlens and transducer arrays has not been fully realized. Here, we present the development of two-dimensional multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic computed microscopy (2D-MFOR-PACM), using a 2D microlens array and a full-ring ultrasonic transducer array. The 10 × 10 mm2 microlens array generates 1800 optical foci within the focal plane of the 512-element transducer array, and raster scanning the microlens array yields optical-resolution photoacoustic images. The system has improved the in-plane resolution of a full-ring transducer array from ≥100 µm to 29 µm and achieved an imaging time of 36 seconds over a 10 × 10 mm2 field of view. In comparison, the 1D-MFOR-PAM would take more than 4 minutes to image over the same field of view. The imaging capability of the system was demonstrated on phantoms and animals both ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:24322226

  9. Two-dimensional restoration of single photon emission computed tomography images using the Kalman filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulfelfel, D.; Rangayyan, R.M.; Kuduvalli, G.R.; Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.

    1994-01-01

    The discrete filtered backprojection (DFBP) algorithm used for the reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images affects image quality because of the operations of filtering and discretization. The discretization of the filtered backprojection process can cause the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the SPECT imaging system to be anisotropic and nonstationary, especially near the edges of the camera's field of view. The use of shift-invariant restoration techniques fails to restore large images because these techniques do not account for such variations in the MTF. This study presents the application of a two-dimensional (2-D) shift-variant Kalman filter for post-reconstruction restoration of SPECT slices. This filter was applied to SPECT images of a hollow cylinder phantom; a resolution phantom; and a large, truncated cone phantom containing two types of cold spots, a sphere, and a triangular prism. The images were acquired on an ADAC GENESYS camera. A comparison was performed between results obtained by the Kalman filter and those obtained by shift-invariant filters. Quantitative analysis of the restored images performed through measurement of root mean squared errors shows a considerable reduction in error of Kalman-filtered images over images restored using shift-invariant methods

  10. Two-dimensional convection and interchange motions in fluids and magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Naulin, V.

    2006-01-01

    fluids, emphasizing its relation to interchange motions of non- uniformly magnetized plasmas. This is followed by a review of the theories for the onset of convection and quasi-linear saturation in driven-dissipative systems. Non-linear numerical simulations which result in stationary convective states...... behaviour of the fluctuation level which is associated with relaxation oscillations in the kinetic energy of the azimuthally mean flows. This leads to a state of large-scale intermittency manifested by exponential tails in the single-point probability distribution function of the dependent variables...

  11. A new computationally-efficient two-dimensional model for boron implantation into single-crystal silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, K.M.; Park, C.; Yang, S.; Morris, S.; Do, V.; Tasch, F.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a new computationally-efficient two-dimensional model for boron implantation into single-crystal silicon. This paper reports that this new model is based on the dual Pearson semi-empirical implant depth profile model and the UT-MARLOWE Monte Carlo boron ion implantation model. This new model can predict with very high computational efficiency two-dimensional as-implanted boron profiles as a function of energy, dose, tilt angle, rotation angle, masking edge orientation, and masking edge thickness

  12. A comparative study of lattice Boltzmann and volume of fluid method for two dimensional multiphase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seung Yeob [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sung Ho [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    The volume of fluid (VOF) model of FLUENT and the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) are used to simulate two-phase flows. Both methods are validated for static and dynamic bubble test cases and then compared to experimental results. The VOF method does not reduce the spurious currents of the static droplet test and does not satisfy the Laplace law for small droplets at the acceptable level, as compared with the LBM. For single bubble flows, simulations are executed for various Eotvos numbers, Morton numbers and Reynolds numbers, and the results of both methods agree well with the experiments in the case of low Eotvos numbers. For high Eotvos numbers, the VOF results deviated from the experiments. For multiple bubbles, the bubble flow characteristics are related by the wake of the leading bubble. The coaxial and oblique coalescence of the bubbles are simulated successfully and the subsequent results are presented. In conclusion, the LBM performs better than the VOF method.

  13. Optimizing human synovial fluid preparation for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Carl Pc; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Yeh, Wen-Lin; Lin, Hsiu-Chu; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Lin, Shih-Cherng; Chen, Tai-Tzung; Chen, Max Jl; Tang, Simon Ft

    2011-10-11

    Proteome analysis is frequently applied in identifying the proteins or biomarkers in knee synovial fluids (SF) that are associated with osteoarthritis and other arthritic disorders. The 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is the technique of choice in these studies. Disease biomarkers usually appear in low concentrations and may be masked by high abundant proteins. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to find the most suitable sample preparation method that can optimize the expression of proteins on 2-DE gels that can be used to develop a reference proteome picture for non-osteoarthritic knee synovial fluid samples. Proteome pictures obtained from osteoarthritic knee synovial fluids can then be compared with the reference proteome pictures obtained in this study to assist us in identifying the disease biomarkers more correctly. The proteomic tool of 2-DE with immobilized pH gradients was applied in this study. A total of 12 2-DE gel images were constructed from SF samples that were free of osteoarthritis. In these samples, 3 were not treated with any sample preparation methods, 3 were treated with acetone, 3 were treated with 2-DE Clean-Up Kit, and 3 were treated with the combination of acetone and 2-D Clean-Up Kit prior to 2-DE analysis. Gel images were analyzed using the PDQuest Basic 8.0.1 Analytical software. Protein spots that were of interest were excised from the gels and sent for identification by mass spectrometry. Total SF total protein concentration was calculated to be 21.98 ± 0.86 mg/mL. The untreated SF samples were detected to have 456 ± 33 protein spots on 2-DE gel images. Acetone treated SF samples were detected to have 320 ± 28 protein spots, 2-D Clean-Up Kit treated SF samples were detected to have 413 ± 31 protein spots, and the combined treatment method of acetone and 2-D Clean-Up Kit was detected to have 278 ± 26 protein spots 2-DE gel images. SF samples treated with 2-D Clean-Up Kit revealed clearer presentation of the isoforms

  14. Optimizing Human Synovial Fluid Preparation for Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Max JL

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteome analysis is frequently applied in identifying the proteins or biomarkers in knee synovial fluids (SF that are associated with osteoarthritis and other arthritic disorders. The 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE is the technique of choice in these studies. Disease biomarkers usually appear in low concentrations and may be masked by high abundant proteins. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to find the most suitable sample preparation method that can optimize the expression of proteins on 2-DE gels that can be used to develop a reference proteome picture for non-osteoarthritic knee synovial fluid samples. Proteome pictures obtained from osteoarthritic knee synovial fluids can then be compared with the reference proteome pictures obtained in this study to assist us in identifying the disease biomarkers more correctly. Results The proteomic tool of 2-DE with immobilized pH gradients was applied in this study. A total of 12 2-DE gel images were constructed from SF samples that were free of osteoarthritis. In these samples, 3 were not treated with any sample preparation methods, 3 were treated with acetone, 3 were treated with 2-DE Clean-Up Kit, and 3 were treated with the combination of acetone and 2-D Clean-Up Kit prior to 2-DE analysis. Gel images were analyzed using the PDQuest Basic 8.0.1 Analytical software. Protein spots that were of interest were excised from the gels and sent for identification by mass spectrometry. Total SF total protein concentration was calculated to be 21.98 ± 0.86 mg/mL. The untreated SF samples were detected to have 456 ± 33 protein spots on 2-DE gel images. Acetone treated SF samples were detected to have 320 ± 28 protein spots, 2-D Clean-Up Kit treated SF samples were detected to have 413 ± 31 protein spots, and the combined treatment method of acetone and 2-D Clean-Up Kit was detected to have 278 ± 26 protein spots 2-DE gel images. SF samples treated with 2-D Clean-Up Kit

  15. Numerical simulation of transient, adiabatic, two-dimensional two-phase flow using the two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves Conti, T. das.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical method is developed to simulate adiabatic, transient, two-dimensional two-phase flow. The two-fluid model is used to obtain the mass and momentum conservation equations. These are solved by an iterative algorithm emphoying a time-marching scheme. Based on the corrective procedure of Hirt and Harlow a poisson equation is derived for the pressure field. This equation is finite-differenced and solved by a suitable matrix inversion technique. In the absence of experiment results several numerical tests were made in order to chec accuracy, convergence and stability of the proposed method. Several tests were also performed to check whether the behavior of void fraction and phasic velocities conforms with previous observations. (Author) [pt

  16. MULTI2D - a computer code for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Ramírez, J.

    2009-06-01

    required. Nature of problem: In inertial confinement fusion and related experiments with lasers and particle beams, energy transport by thermal radiation becomes important. Under these conditions, the radiation field strongly interacts with the hydrodynamic motion through emission and absorption processes. Solution method: The equations of radiation transfer coupled with Lagrangian hydrodynamics, heat diffusion and beam tracing (laser or ions) are solved, in two-dimensional axial-symmetric geometry ( R-Z coordinates) using a fractional step scheme. Radiation transfer is solved with angular resolution. Matter properties are either interpolated from tables (equations-of-state and opacities) or computed by user routines (conductivities and beam attenuation). Restrictions: The code has been designed for typical conditions prevailing in inertial confinement fusion (ns time scale, matter states close to local thermodynamical equilibrium, negligible radiation pressure, …). Although a wider range of situations can be treated, extrapolations to regions beyond this design range need special care. Unusual features: A special computer language, called r94, is used at top levels of the code. These parts have to be converted to standard C by a translation program (supplied as part of the package). Due to the complexity of code (hydro-code, grid generation, user interface, graphic post-processor, translator program, installation scripts) extensive manuals are supplied as part of the package. Running time: 567 seconds for the example supplied.

  17. A computer program for generating two-dimensional boundary-fitted orthogonal curvilinear coordinate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1997-11-01

    A numerical method is described which generates an orthogonal curvilinear mesh, subject to the constraint that mesh lines are matched to all boundaries of a closed, simply connected two-dimensional region of arbitrary shape. The method is based on the solution, by an iterative finite-difference technique, of an elliptic differential system of equations for the Cartesian coordinates of the orthogonal grid nodes. The interior grid distribution is controlled by a technique which ensures that coordinate lines can be concentrated as desired. Examples of orthogonal meshes inscribed in various geometrical figures are included.

  18. Supercritical fluid chromatography hyphenated with twin comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography for ultimate analysis of middle distillates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Frédérick; Thiébaut, Didier; Bertoncini, Fabrice; Courtiade, Marion; Hennion, Marie-Claire

    2010-02-19

    This paper reports the conditions of online hyphenation of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) with twin comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (twin-GCxGC) for detailed characterization of middle distillates; this is essential for a better understanding of reactions involved in refining processes. In this configuration, saturated and unsaturated compounds that have been fractionated by SFC are transferred on two different GC x GC columns sets (twin-GCxGC) placed in the same GC oven. Cryogenic focusing is used for transfer of fractions into the first dimension columns before simultaneous GCxGC analysis of both saturated and unsaturated fractions. The benefits of SFC-twin-GC x GC are demonstrated for the extended alkane, iso-alkane, alkene, naphthenes and aromatics analysis (so-called PIONA analysis) of diesel samples which can be achieved in one single injection. For that purpose, saturated and unsaturated compounds have been separated by SFC using a silver loaded silica column prior to GC x GC analysis. Alkenes and naphthenes are quantitatively recovered in the unsaturated and saturated fractions, respectively, allowing their identification in various diesel samples. Thus, resolution between each class of compounds is significantly improved compared to a single GCxGC run, and for the first time, an extended PIONA analysis of diesel samples is presented. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Simultaneous achiral-chiral analysis of pharmaceutical compounds using two-dimensional reversed phase liquid chromatography-supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatramani, C J; Al-Sayah, Mohammad; Li, Guannan; Goel, Meenakshi; Girotti, James; Zang, Lisa; Wigman, Larry; Yehl, Peter; Chetwyn, Nik

    2016-02-01

    A new interface was designed to enable the coupling of reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). This online two-dimensional chromatographic system utilizing RPLC in the first dimension and SFC in the second was developed to achieve simultaneous achiral and chiral analysis of pharmaceutical compounds. The interface consists of an eight-port, dual-position switching valve with small volume C-18 trapping columns. The peaks of interest eluting from the first RPLC dimension column were effectively focused as sharp concentration pulses on small volume C-18 trapping column/s and then injected onto the second dimension SFC column. The first dimension RPLC separation provides the achiral purity result, and the second dimension SFC separation provides the chiral purity result (enantiomeric excess). The results are quantitative enabling simultaneous achiral, chiral analysis of compounds. The interface design and proof of concept demonstration are presented. Additionally, comparative studies to conventional SFC and case studies of the applications of 2D LC-SFC in pharmaceutical analysis is presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Uncertainty propagation by using spectral methods: A practical application to a two-dimensional turbulence fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Fabio; Milanese, Lucio; Ricci, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    To reduce the computational cost of the uncertainty propagation analysis, which is used to study the impact of input parameter variations on the results of a simulation, a general and simple to apply methodology based on decomposing the solution to the model equations in terms of Chebyshev polynomials is discussed. This methodology, based on the work by Scheffel [Am. J. Comput. Math. 2, 173-193 (2012)], approximates the model equation solution with a semi-analytic expression that depends explicitly on time, spatial coordinates, and input parameters. By employing a weighted residual method, a set of nonlinear algebraic equations for the coefficients appearing in the Chebyshev decomposition is then obtained. The methodology is applied to a two-dimensional Braginskii model used to simulate plasma turbulence in basic plasma physics experiments and in the scrape-off layer of tokamaks, in order to study the impact on the simulation results of the input parameter that describes the parallel losses. The uncertainty that characterizes the time-averaged density gradient lengths, time-averaged densities, and fluctuation density level are evaluated. A reasonable estimate of the uncertainty of these distributions can be obtained with a single reduced-cost simulation.

  1. Numerical Modeling and Investigation of Fluid-Driven Fracture Propagation in Reservoirs Based on a Modified Fluid-Mechanically Coupled Model in Two-Dimensional Particle Flow Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is a useful tool for enhancing rock mass permeability for shale gas development, enhanced geothermal systems, and geological carbon sequestration by the high-pressure injection of a fracturing fluid into tight reservoir rocks. Although significant advances have been made in hydraulic fracturing theory, experiments, and numerical modeling, when it comes to the complexity of geological conditions knowledge is still limited. Mechanisms of fluid injection-induced fracture initiation and propagation should be better understood to take full advantage of hydraulic fracturing. This paper presents the development and application of discrete particle modeling based on two-dimensional particle flow code (PFC2D. Firstly, it is shown that the modeled value of the breakdown pressure for the hydraulic fracturing process is approximately equal to analytically calculated values under varied in situ stress conditions. Furthermore, a series of simulations for hydraulic fracturing in competent rock was performed to examine the influence of the in situ stress ratio, fluid injection rate, and fluid viscosity on the borehole pressure history, the geometry of hydraulic fractures, and the pore-pressure field, respectively. It was found that the hydraulic fractures in an isotropic medium always propagate parallel to the orientation of the maximum principal stress. When a high fluid injection rate is used, higher breakdown pressure is needed for fracture propagation and complex geometries of fractures can develop. When a low viscosity fluid is used, fluid can more easily penetrate from the borehole into the surrounding rock, which causes a reduction of the effective stress and leads to a lower breakdown pressure. Moreover, the geometry of the fractures is not particularly sensitive to the fluid viscosity in the approximate isotropic model.

  2. Binding Direction-Based Two-Dimensional Flattened Contact Area Computing Algorithm for Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Beom Sik; Pugalendhi, GaneshKumar; Kim, Ku-Jin

    2017-10-13

    Interactions between protein molecules are essential for the assembly, function, and regulation of proteins. The contact region between two protein molecules in a protein complex is usually complementary in shape for both molecules and the area of the contact region can be used to estimate the binding strength between two molecules. Although the area is a value calculated from the three-dimensional surface, it cannot represent the three-dimensional shape of the surface. Therefore, we propose an original concept of two-dimensional contact area which provides further information such as the ruggedness of the contact region. We present a novel algorithm for calculating the binding direction between two molecules in a protein complex, and then suggest a method to compute the two-dimensional flattened area of the contact region between two molecules based on the binding direction.

  3. Binding Direction-Based Two-Dimensional Flattened Contact Area Computing Algorithm for Protein–Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Sik Kang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between protein molecules are essential for the assembly, function, and regulation of proteins. The contact region between two protein molecules in a protein complex is usually complementary in shape for both molecules and the area of the contact region can be used to estimate the binding strength between two molecules. Although the area is a value calculated from the three-dimensional surface, it cannot represent the three-dimensional shape of the surface. Therefore, we propose an original concept of two-dimensional contact area which provides further information such as the ruggedness of the contact region. We present a novel algorithm for calculating the binding direction between two molecules in a protein complex, and then suggest a method to compute the two-dimensional flattened area of the contact region between two molecules based on the binding direction.

  4. A method of paralleling computer calculation for two-dimensional kinetic plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazhnik, V.A.; Demchenko, V.V.; Dem'yanov, V.G.; D'yakov, V.E.; Ol'shanskij, V.V.; Panchenko, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    A method for parallel computer calculation and OSIRIS program complex realizing it and designed for numerical plasma simulation by the macroparticle method are described. The calculation can be carried out either with one or simultaneously with two computers BESM-6, that is provided by some package of interacting programs functioning in every computer. Program interaction in every computer is based on event techniques realized in OS DISPAK. Parallel computer calculation with two BESM-6 computers allows to accelerate the computation 1.5 times

  5. Two-dimensional materials from high-throughput computational exfoliation of experimentally known compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounet, Nicolas; Gibertini, Marco; Schwaller, Philippe; Campi, Davide; Merkys, Andrius; Marrazzo, Antimo; Sohier, Thibault; Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Cepellotti, Andrea; Pizzi, Giovanni; Marzari, Nicola

    2018-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising candidates for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic applications. Yet, only a few dozen 2D materials have been successfully synthesized or exfoliated. Here, we search for 2D materials that can be easily exfoliated from their parent compounds. Starting from 108,423 unique, experimentally known 3D compounds, we identify a subset of 5,619 compounds that appear layered according to robust geometric and bonding criteria. High-throughput calculations using van der Waals density functional theory, validated against experimental structural data and calculated random phase approximation binding energies, further allowed the identification of 1,825 compounds that are either easily or potentially exfoliable. In particular, the subset of 1,036 easily exfoliable cases provides novel structural prototypes and simple ternary compounds as well as a large portfolio of materials to search from for optimal properties. For a subset of 258 compounds, we explore vibrational, electronic, magnetic and topological properties, identifying 56 ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic systems, including half-metals and half-semiconductors.

  6. Computational simulation of two-dimensional transient natural convection in volumetrically heated square enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Camila Braga; Jian Su

    2010-01-01

    Natural convection is a physical phenomenon that has been investigated in nuclear engineering so as to provide information about heat transfer in severe accident conditions involving nuclear reactors. This research reported transient natural convection of fluids with uniformly distributed volumetrically heat generation in square cavity with isothermal side walls and adiabatic top/bottom walls. Two Prandtl numbers were considered, 0:0321 and 0:71. Direct numerical simulations were applied in order to obtain results about the velocities of the fluid in directions x and y. These results were used in Fast Fourier Transform, which showed the periodic, quasi-chaotic and chaotic behavior of transient laminar flow. (author)

  7. SONATINA-2V: a computer program for seismic analysis of the two-dimensional vertical slice HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1982-07-01

    A computer program SONATINA-2V has been developed for predicting the behavior of a two-dimensional vertical slice HTGR core under seismic excitation. SONATINA-2V is a general two-dimensional computer program capable of analyzing the vertical slice HTGR core with the permanent side reflector blocks and its restraint structures. In the analytical model, each block is treated as rigid body and is restrained by dowel pins which restrict relative horizontal movement but allow vertical and rocking motions between upper and lower blocks. Coulomb friction is taken into account between blocks and between dowel pin and hole. A spring dashpot model is used for the collision process between adjacent blocks. The core support structure is represented by a single block. The computer program SONATINA-2V is capable of analyzing the core behavior for an excitation input applied simultaneously to both vertical and horizontal directions. Analytical results obtained from SONATINA-2V are compared with experimental results and are found to be in good agreement. The computer program can thus be used to predict with a good accuracy the behavior of the HTGR core under seismic excitation. In the present report are given, the theoretical formulation of the analytical model, a user's manual to describe the input and output format, and sample problems. (author)

  8. Tse computers. [ultrahigh speed optical processing for two dimensional binary image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, D. H.; Strong, J. P., III

    1977-01-01

    An ultra-high-speed computer that utilizes binary images as its basic computational entity is being developed. The basic logic components perform thousands of operations simultaneously. Technologies of the fiber optics, display, thin film, and semiconductor industries are being utilized in the building of the hardware.

  9. SONATINA-2H: a computer program for seismic analysis of the two-dimensional horizontal slice HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1990-02-01

    A Computer program SONATINA-2H has been developed for predicting the behavior of a two-dimensional horizontal HTGR core under seismic excitation. SONATINA-2H is a general two-dimensional computer program capable of analyzing the horizontal slice HTGR core with the fixed side reflector blocks and its restraint structures and the core support structure. In the analytical model, each block is treated as a rigid body and represent one column of the reactor core and is connected to the core support structure by means of column springs and viscous dampers. A single dashpot model is used for the collision process between adjacent blocks. The core support structure is represented by a single block. The computer program SONATINA-2H is capable of analyzing the core behavior for an excitation input applied simultaneously in two mutually perpendicular horizontal directions. In the present report are given, the theoretical formulation of the analytical model, an user's manual to describe the input and output format and sample problems. (author)

  10. VAMPIR - A two-group two-dimensional diffusion computer code for burnup calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmijarevic, I.; Petrovic, I.

    1985-01-01

    VAMPIR is a computer code which simulates the burnup within a reactor coe. It computes the neutron flux, power distribution and burnup taking into account spatial variations of temperature and xenon poisoning. Its overall reactor calculation uses diffusion theory with finite differences approximation in X-Y or R-Z geometry. Two-group macroscopic cross section data are prepared by the lattice cell code WIMS-D4 and stored in the library form of multi entry tabulation against the various parameters that significantly affect the physical conditions in the reactor core. herein, the main features of the program are presented. (author)

  11. Preparation of functions of computer code GENGTC and improvement for two-dimensional heat transfer calculations for irradiation capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Someya, Hiroyuki; Ito, Haruhiko.

    1992-11-01

    Capsules for irradiation tests in the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor), consist of irradiation specimens surrounded by a cladding tube, holders, an inner tube and a container tube (from 30mm to 65mm in diameter). And the annular gaps between these structural materials in the capsule are filled with liquids or gases. Cooling of the capsule is done by reactor primary coolant flowing down outside the capsule. Most of the heat generated by fission in fuel specimens and gamma absorption in structural materials is directed radially to the capsule container outer surface. In thermal performance calculations for capsule design, an one(r)-dimensional heat transfer computer code entitled (Generalyzed Gap Temperature Calculation), GENGTC, originally developed in Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S.A., has been frequently used. In designing a capsule, are needed many cases of parametric calculations with respect to changes materials and gap sizes. And in some cases, two(r,z)-dimensional heat transfer calculations are needed for irradiation test capsules with short length fuel rods. Recently the authors improved the original one-dimensional code GENGTC, (1) to simplify preparation of input data, (2) to perform automatic calculations for parametric survey based on design temperatures, ect. Moreover, the computer code has been improved to perform r-z two-dimensional heat transfer calculation. This report describes contents of the preparation of the one-dimensional code GENGTC and the improvement for the two-dimensional code GENGTC-2, together with their code manuals. (author)

  12. Interobserver reliability of coronoid fracture classification: two-dimensional versus three-dimensional computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindenhovius, Anneluuk; Karanicolas, Paul Jack; Bhandari, Mohit; van Dijk, Niek; Ring, David; Allan, Christopher; Anglen, Jeffrey; Axelrod, Terry; Baratz, Mark; Beingessner, Daphne; Brink, Peter; Cassidy, Charles; Coles, Chad; Conflitti, Joe; Crist, Brett; Della Rocca, Gregory; Dijkstra, Sander; Elmans, L. H. G. J.; Feibel, Roger; Flores, Luis; Frihagen, Frede; Gosens, Taco; Goslings, J. C.; Greenberg, Jeffrey; Grosso, Elena; Harness, Neil; van der Heide, Huub; Jeray, Kyle; Kalainov, David; van Kampen, Albert; Kawamura, Sumito; Kloen, Peter; McKee, Michael; Nork, Sean; Page, Richard; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Peters, Anil; Poolman, Rudolf; Prayson, Michael; Richardson, Martin; Seiler, John; Swiontkowski, Marc; Thomas, George; Trumble, Tom; van Vugt, Arie; Wright, Thomas; Zalavras, Charalampos; Zura, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) reconstructions improve interobserver agreement on classification and treatment of coronoid fractures compared with 2-dimensional CT. A total of 29 orthopedic surgeons evaluated 10 coronoid fractures on 2 occasions (first

  13. Modifications in the Teach-C computer code for convection analysis-two-dimensional transient diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampaio, P.A.B. de.

    1987-08-01

    Some modifications in Teach-C computer program to analyse the heat conduction with convective heat transport are presented. The utilization of the program to solve a convective - diffusion problem is studied and the results are compared with an analysis of the same problem, in steady - state conditions, by finite element method [pt

  14. Computer Solution of the Two-Dimensional Tether Ball: Problem to Illustrate Newton's Second Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, W. Bruce

    Force diagrams involving angular velocity, linear velocity, centripetal force, work, and kinetic energy are given with related equations of motion expressed in polar coordinates. The computer is used to solve differential equations, thus reducing the mathematical requirements of the students. An experiment is conducted using an air table to check…

  15. Computational issues in the simulation of two-dimensional discrete dislocation mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segurado, J.; LLorca, J.; Romero, I.

    2007-06-01

    The effect of the integration time step and the introduction of a cut-off velocity for the dislocation motion was analysed in discrete dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations of a single crystal microbeam. Two loading modes, bending and uniaxial tension, were examined. It was found that a longer integration time step led to a progressive increment of the oscillations in the numerical solution, which would eventually diverge. This problem could be corrected in the simulations carried out in bending by introducing a cut-off velocity for the dislocation motion. This strategy (long integration times and a cut-off velocity for the dislocation motion) did not recover, however, the solution computed with very short time steps in uniaxial tension: the dislocation density was overestimated and the dislocation patterns modified. The different response to the same numerical algorithm was explained in terms of the nature of the dislocations generated in each case: geometrically necessary in bending and statistically stored in tension. The evolution of the dislocation density in the former was controlled by the plastic curvature of the beam and was independent of the details of the simulations. On the contrary, the steady-state dislocation density in tension was determined by the balance between nucleation of dislocations and those which are annihilated or which exit the beam. Changes in the DD imposed by the cut-off velocity altered this equilibrium and the solution. These results point to the need for detailed analyses of the accuracy and stability of the dislocation dynamic simulations to ensure that the results obtained are not fundamentally affected by the numerical strategies used to solve this complex problem.

  16. Two-Dimensional Computational Flow Analysis and Frictional Characteristics Model for Red Blood Cell under Inclined Centrifuge Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Shirai, Atsushi

    Simplified two-dimensional flow analysis is performed in order to simulate frictional characteristics measurement of red blood cells moving on a glass plate in a medium with an inclined centrifuge microscope. Computation under various conditions reveals the influences of parameters on lift, drag, and moment acting on a red blood cell. Among these forces, lift appears only when the cell is longitudinally asymmetric. By considering the balance of forces, the frictional characteristics of the red blood cell are modeled as the sum of Coulomb friction and viscous drag. The model describes the possibility that the red blood cell deforms to expand in the front side in response to the inclined centrifugal force. When velocity exceeds some critical value, the lift overcomes the normal centrifugal force component, and the thickness of the plasma layer between the cell and the glass plate increases from the initial value of the plasma protein thickness.

  17. Two-dimensional simulation of clastic and carbonate sedimentation, consolidation, subsidence, fluid flow, heat flow and solute transport during the formation of sedimentary basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Klaus

    1999-05-01

    Geological processes that create sedimentary basins or act during their formation can be simulated using the public domain computer code `BASIN'. For a given set of geological initial and boundary conditions the sedimentary basin evolution is calculated in a forward modeling approach. The basin is represented in a two-dimensional vertical cross section with individual layers. The stratigraphic, tectonic, hydrodynamic and thermal evolution is calculated beginning at an initial state, and subsequent changes of basin geometry are calculated from sedimentation rates, compaction and pore fluid mobilization, isostatic compensation, fault movement and subsidence. The sedimentologic, hydraulic and thermal parameters are stored at discrete time steps allowing the temporal evolution of the basin to be analyzed. A maximum flexibility in terms of geological conditions is achieved by using individual program modules representing geological processes which can be switched on and off depending on the data available for a specific simulation experiment. The code incorporates a module for clastic and carbonate sedimentation, taking into account the impact of clastic sediment supply on carbonate production. A maximum of four different sediment types, which may be mixed during sedimentation, can be defined. Compaction and fluid flow are coupled through the consolidation equation and the nonlinear form of the equation of state for porosity, allowing nonequilibrium compaction and overpressuring to be calculated. Instead of empirical porosity-effective stress equations, a physically consistent consolidation model is applied which incorporates a porosity dependent sediment compressibility. Transient solute transport and heat flow are calculated as well, applying calculated fluid flow rates from the hydraulic model. As a measure for hydrocarbon generation, the Time-Temperature Index (TTI) is calculated. Three postprocessing programs are available to provide graphic output in Post

  18. Non-Darcy Free Convection of Power-Law Fluids Over a Two-Dimensional Body Embedded in a Porous Medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2010-11-27

    A boundary layer analysis was presented to study the non-Darcy-free convection of a power-law fluid over a non-isothermal two-dimensional body embedded in a porous medium. The Ostwald-de Waele power-law model was used to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. Similarity solutions were obtained with variations in surface temperature or surface heat flux. In view of the fact that most of the non-Newtonian fluids have large Prandtl numbers, this study was directed toward such fluids. The effects of the porous medium parameters, k1 and k2, body shape parameter, m, and surface thermal variations parameter, p, as well as the power-law index, n, were examined. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  19. Non-Darcy Free Convection of Power-Law Fluids Over a Two-Dimensional Body Embedded in a Porous Medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Sun, Shuyu; El-Ameen, M. A.; Jaha, Y. A.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2010-01-01

    A boundary layer analysis was presented to study the non-Darcy-free convection of a power-law fluid over a non-isothermal two-dimensional body embedded in a porous medium. The Ostwald-de Waele power-law model was used to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. Similarity solutions were obtained with variations in surface temperature or surface heat flux. In view of the fact that most of the non-Newtonian fluids have large Prandtl numbers, this study was directed toward such fluids. The effects of the porous medium parameters, k1 and k2, body shape parameter, m, and surface thermal variations parameter, p, as well as the power-law index, n, were examined. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  20. Simulation tools for two-dimensional experiments in x-ray computed tomography using the FORBILD head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhicong; Noo, Frédéric; Dennerlein, Frank; Wunderlich, Adam; Lauritsch, Günter; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-07-07

    Mathematical phantoms are essential for the development and early stage evaluation of image reconstruction algorithms in x-ray computed tomography (CT). This note offers tools for computer simulations using a two-dimensional (2D) phantom that models the central axial slice through the FORBILD head phantom. Introduced in 1999, in response to a need for a more robust test, the FORBILD head phantom is now seen by many as the gold standard. However, the simple Shepp-Logan phantom is still heavily used by researchers working on 2D image reconstruction. Universal acceptance of the FORBILD head phantom may have been prevented by its significantly higher complexity: software that allows computer simulations with the Shepp-Logan phantom is not readily applicable to the FORBILD head phantom. The tools offered here address this problem. They are designed for use with Matlab®, as well as open-source variants, such as FreeMat and Octave, which are all widely used in both academia and industry. To get started, the interested user can simply copy and paste the codes from this PDF document into Matlab® M-files.

  1. Simulation tools for two-dimensional experiments in x-ray computed tomography using the FORBILD head phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zhicong; Noo, Frédéric; Wunderlich, Adam; Dennerlein, Frank; Lauritsch, Günter; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical phantoms are essential for the development and early stage evaluation of image reconstruction algorithms in x-ray computed tomography (CT). This note offers tools for computer simulations using a two-dimensional (2D) phantom that models the central axial slice through the FORBILD head phantom. Introduced in 1999, in response to a need for a more robust test, the FORBILD head phantom is now seen by many as the gold standard. However, the simple Shepp–Logan phantom is still heavily used by researchers working on 2D image reconstruction. Universal acceptance of the FORBILD head phantom may have been prevented by its significantly higher complexity: software that allows computer simulations with the Shepp–Logan phantom is not readily applicable to the FORBILD head phantom. The tools offered here address this problem. They are designed for use with Matlab®, as well as open-source variants, such as FreeMat and Octave, which are all widely used in both academia and industry. To get started, the interested user can simply copy and paste the codes from this PDF document into Matlab® M-files. (note)

  2. A two-dimensional continuum model of biofilm growth incorporating fluid flow and shear stress based detachment

    KAUST Repository

    Duddu, Ravindra; Chopp, David L.; Moran, Brian

    2009-01-01

    of the biofilm. The model considers fluid flow around the biofilm surface, the advection-diffusion and reaction of substrate, variable biomass volume fraction and erosion due to the interfacial shear stress at the biofilm-fluid interface. The key assumptions

  3. Fluid dynamics of moving fish in a two-dimensional multiparticle collision dynamics model in 2D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reid, D.A.P.; Hildenbrandt, H.; Padding, J.T.; Hemelrijk, C.K.

    2012-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of animal locomotion, such as that of an undulating fish, are of great interest to both biologists and engineers. However, experimentally studying these fluid dynamics is difficult and time consuming. Model studies can be of great help because of their simpler and more detailed

  4. Simultaneous sensing of light and sound velocities of fluids in a two-dimensional phoXonic crystal with defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoudache, Samira [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, Université de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Université Mouloud Mammeri, B.P. 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Pennec, Yan, E-mail: yan.pennec@univ-lille1.fr; Djafari Rouhani, Bahram [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, Université de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Khater, Antoine [Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans UMR 6283 CNRS, Université du Maine, 72085 Le Mans (France); Lucklum, Ralf [Institute of Micro and Sensor Systems (IMOS), Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany); Tigrine, Rachid [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Université Mouloud Mammeri, B.P. 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    2014-04-07

    We theoretically investigate the potentiality of dual phononic-photonic (the so-called phoxonic) crystals for liquid sensing applications. We study the transmission through a two-dimensional (2D) crystal made of infinite cylindrical holes in a silicon substrate, where one row of holes oriented perpendicular to the propagation direction is filled with a liquid. The infiltrated holes may have a different radius than the regular holes. We show, in the defect structure, the existence of well-defined features (peaks or dips) in the transmission spectra of acoustic and optical waves and estimate their sensitivity to the sound and light velocity of the analyte. Some of the geometrical requirements behave in opposite directions when searching for an efficient sensing of either sound or light velocities. Hence, a compromise in the choice of the parameters may become necessary in making the phoxonic sensor.

  5. Self-organization phenomena and decaying self-similar state in two-dimensional incompressible viscous fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi; Serizawa, Shunsuke; Nakano, Akihiro; Takahashi, Toshiki; Van Dam, James W.

    2004-01-01

    The final self-similar state of decaying two-dimensional (2D) turbulence in 2D incompressible viscous flow is analytically and numerically investigated for the case with periodic boundaries. It is proved by theoretical analysis and simulations that the sinh-Poisson state cω=-sinh(βψ) is not realized in the dynamical system of interest. It is shown by an eigenfunction spectrum analysis that a sufficient explanation for the self-organization to the decaying self-similar state is the faster energy decay of higher eigenmodes and the energy accumulation to the lowest eigenmode for given boundary conditions due to simultaneous normal and inverse cascading by nonlinear mode couplings. The theoretical prediction is demonstrated to be correct by simulations leading to the lowest eigenmode of {(1,0)+(0,1)} of the dissipative operator for the periodic boundaries. It is also clarified that an important process during nonlinear self-organization is an interchange between the dominant operators, which leads to the final decaying self-similar state

  6. Development and utilization of a two-dimensional model of transient fluid flow in a generic repository (OGRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korver, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    An existing time-dependent numerical model (OGRE) has been modified to examine the time frames associated with repressuring the formation rocks surrounding a generic nuclear waste repository following the operational period when wastes are being stored. The model is two-dimensional in the vertical plane, and assumes that the entire regime is saturated, but the repository is at one atmosphere during the operational period. For the physical and geometric parameters assumed, the results of a simulation of the time necessary to repressurize the formation after the operational period was 421.5 years. These results were in close agreement with a steady-state calculation performed by Golder Associates, Inc., in 1977. The fact that the time-dependent model results were close to the steady-state calculation resulted from the use (in the model) of a very small compressibility value, which caused the simulation to reach a steady-state condition in a relatively short time. Based on these studies, the magnitude of the system (water plus matrix) compressibility is of great importance in determining whether the time for repressurization can be determined from analytical methods or requires the use of a time-dependent numerical model

  7. Two-dimensional fluid-filled closed-cell cellular solid as an acoustic metamaterial with negative index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnitsyn, V.; Van Damme, B.

    2016-04-01

    A concept for acoustic metamaterials consisting of a cellular medium with fluid-filled cells is fabricated and studied experimentally. In such a system, the fluid and solid structure explicitly interact, and elastic wave propagation is coupled to both phases. Focusing here on shear wave behavior, we confirm previous numerical studies in three steps. We first measure the material deformations pertaining to three qualitatively different shear wave modes in the frequency range below 3.5 kHz. We then measure the group velocity and demonstrate that, within a certain frequency interval, the group and phase velocity have opposite signs. This shows that the system acts as a negative-index metamaterial. Finally, we confirm the presence of band gaps due to the locally resonant behavior of the cell walls. The demonstrated concept of a closed, fluid-filled cellular material as an acoustic metamaterial opens a wide space for applications.

  8. Essential Computational Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    This book serves as a complete and self-contained introduction to the principles of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis. It is deliberately short (at approximately 300 pages) and can be used as a text for the first part of the course of applied CFD followed by a software tutorial. The main objectives of this non-traditional format are: 1) To introduce and explain, using simple examples where possible, the principles and methods of CFD analysis and to demystify the `black box’ of a CFD software tool, and 2) To provide a basic understanding of how CFD problems are set and

  9. Purification of lignans from Fructus Arctii using off-line two-dimensional supercritical fluid chromatography/reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bichao; Xin, Huaxia; Wang, Feier; Cai, Jianfeng; Liu, Yanfang; Fu, Qing; Jin, Yu; Liang, Xinmiao

    2017-08-01

    As a common traditional Chinese medicine, Fructus Arctii has important clinical medical values. Its main components are lignans, which are difficult to separate and analyze because of the complex composition, similar chemical structures, and close properties. In this study, an off-line two-dimensional supercritical fluid chromatography/reversed-phase liquid chromatography method, as well as an effective sample pretreatment method based on hydrophilic interaction chromatography material, was developed to enrich the minor lignan fractions and obtain high-purity compounds. In total, 12 high-purity compounds were isolated from Fructus Arctii. Their structures were identified by using high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which showed that all were lignans and that most of them were isomers. The results demonstrated the effective off-line two-dimensional supercritical fluid chromatography/reversed-phase liquid chromatography method for the purification of lignans from Fructus Arctii. The separation protocol established here will be beneficial for the separation of complex samples from other kinds of natural products. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Two-dimensional fluid dynamics in a sharply bent channel: Laminar flow, separation bubble, and vortex dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Daichi; Fukudome, Koji; Wada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic properties of fluid flow in a curving pipe and channel is important for controlling the flow behavior in technologies and biomechanics. The nature of the resulting flow in a bent pipe is extremely complicated because of the presence of a cross-stream secondary flow. In an attempt to disentangle this complexity, we investigate the fluid dynamics in a bent channel via the direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equation in two spatial dimensions. We exploit the absence of secondary flow from our model and systematically investigate the flow structure along the channel as a function of both the bend angle and Reynolds number of the laminar-to-turbulent regime. We numerically suggest a scaling relation between the shape of the separation bubble and the flow conductance, and construct an integrated phase diagram.

  11. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  12. FDTD method for computing the off-plane band structure in a two-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of nearly free-electron metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Sanshui; He Sailing

    2002-12-01

    An FDTD numerical method for computing the off-plane band structure of a two-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of nearly free-electron metals is presented. The method requires only a two-dimensional discretization mesh for a given off-plane wave number k{sub z} although the off-plane propagation is a three-dimensional problem. The off-plane band structures of a square lattice of metallic rods with the high-frequency metallic model in the air are studied, and a complete band gap for some nonzero off-plane wave number k{sub z} is founded.

  13. FDTD method for computing the off-plane band structure in a two-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of nearly free-electron metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Sanshui; He Sailing

    2002-01-01

    An FDTD numerical method for computing the off-plane band structure of a two-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of nearly free-electron metals is presented. The method requires only a two-dimensional discretization mesh for a given off-plane wave number k z although the off-plane propagation is a three-dimensional problem. The off-plane band structures of a square lattice of metallic rods with the high-frequency metallic model in the air are studied, and a complete band gap for some nonzero off-plane wave number k z is founded

  14. Computational Search for Two-Dimensional MX2 Semiconductors with Possible High Electron Mobility at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhishuo Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neither of the two typical two-dimensional materials, graphene and single layer MoS 2 , are good enough for developing semiconductor logical devices. We calculated the electron mobility of 14 two-dimensional semiconductors with composition of MX 2 , where M (=Mo, W, Sn, Hf, Zr and Pt are transition metals, and Xs are S, Se and Te. We approximated the electron phonon scattering matrix by deformation potentials, within which long wave longitudinal acoustical and optical phonon scatterings were included. Piezoelectric scattering in the compounds without inversion symmetry is also taken into account. We found that out of the 14 compounds, WS 2 , PtS 2 and PtSe 2 are promising for logical devices regarding the possible high electron mobility and finite band gap. Especially, the phonon limited electron mobility in PtSe 2 reaches about 4000 cm 2 ·V - 1 ·s - 1 at room temperature, which is the highest among the compounds with an indirect bandgap of about 1.25 eV under the local density approximation. Our results can be the first guide for experiments to synthesize better two-dimensional materials for future semiconductor devices.

  15. Computed and experimental motion picture determination of bubble and solids motion in a two-dimensional fluidized-bed with a jet and immersed obstacle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyczkowski, R.W.; Bouillard, J.; Gidaspow, D.

    1986-01-01

    Bubble and solids motion in a two-dimensional rectangular fluidized-bed having a high speed central jet with a rectangular obstacle above it and secondary air flow at minimum fluidization have been computer modeled. Computer generated motion pictures have been found to be necessary to analyze the computations since there are such a large number of time-dependent complex phenomena difficult to comprehend otherwise. Comparison of the computer generated motion pictures with high speed motion pictures of a flow visualization experiment reveal good agreement

  16. Effect of Temperature and Fluid Flow on Dendrite Growth During Solidification of Al-3 Wt Pct Cu Alloy by the Two-Dimensional Cellular Automaton Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Wei, Yanhong; Liu, Renpei; Yu, Fengyi

    2017-12-01

    A two-dimensional cellular automaton-finite volume model was developed to simulate dendrite growth of Al-3 wt pct Cu alloy during solidification to investigate the effect of temperature and fluid flow on dendrite morphology, solute concentration distribution, and dendrite growth velocity. Different calculation conditions that may influence the results of the simulation, including temperature and flow, were considered. The model was also employed to study the effect of different undercoolings, applied temperature fields, and forced flow velocities on solute segregation and dendrite growth. The initial temperature and fluid flow have a significant impact on the dendrite morphologies and solute profiles during solidification. The release of energy is operated with solidification and results in the increase of temperature. A larger undercooling leads to larger solute concentration near the solid/liquid interface and solute concentration gradient at the same time-step. Solute concentration in the solid region tends to increase with the increase of undercooling. Four vortexes appear under the condition when natural flow exists: the two on the right of the dendrite rotate clockwise, and those on the left of the dendrite rotate counterclockwise. With the increase of forced flow velocity, the rejected solute in the upstream region becomes easier to be washed away and enriched in the downstream region, resulting in acceleration of the growth of the dendrite in the upstream and inhibiting the downstream dendrite growth. The dendrite perpendicular to fluid flow shows a coarser morphology in the upstream region than that of the downstream. Almost no secondary dendrite appears during the calculation process.

  17. Two-dimensional errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter addresses the extension of previous work in one-dimensional (linear) error theory to two-dimensional error analysis. The topics of the chapter include the definition of two-dimensional error, the probability ellipse, the probability circle, elliptical (circular) error evaluation, the application to position accuracy, and the use of control systems (points) in measurements

  18. Fluid simulation for computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Bridson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Animating fluids like water, smoke, and fire using physics-based simulation is increasingly important in visual effects, in particular in movies, like The Day After Tomorrow, and in computer games. This book provides a practical introduction to fluid simulation for graphics. The focus is on animating fully three-dimensional incompressible flow, from understanding the math and the algorithms to the actual implementation.

  19. [Application of off-line two dimensional reversed-phase liquid chromatography/supercritical fluid chromatography to the separation of the seeds of Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yun; Xin, Huaxia; Peng, Ziyue; Fu, Qing; Jin, Yu

    2017-07-08

    An off-line two dimensional reversed-phase liquid chromatography/supercritical fluid chromatography (2D RPLC/SFC) method was developed for the separation of the seeds of Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim . ( T. kirilowii .). In the experiment, RPLC was used in the first dimension to analyze the samples. And 12 fractions (F 1 -F 12 ) were obtained according to the chromatographic peak collection mode, the fractions were re-analyzed in both RPLC and SFC modes. The results clearly showed that this 2D method had good orthogonality. The SFC was used as the second dimension. Ethanol- n -hexane (3:7, v/v) was used as a modifier in SFC. The modifier could provide appropriate elution power. When the sample load increased, it could also ensure the solubility of samples. The 2D RPLC/SFC method had obvious advantages for separating the compounds with similar properties, enriching and purifying the trace components. Finally, 150 peaks could be detected. The off-line 2D RPLC/SFC method will be further enlarged to a preparative level for preparation of compounds. The method can provide a practical reference for the purification of chemical constituents and material basis research of the seeds of T. kirilowii . in the future.

  20. Validation of a prefractionation method followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis – Applied to cerebrospinal fluid proteins from frontotemporal dementia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjögren Magnus

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was firstly, to improve and validate a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF prefractionation method followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and secondly, using this strategy to investigate differences between the CSF proteome of frontotemporal dementia (FTD patients and controls. From each subject three ml of CSF was prefractionated using liquid phase isoelectric focusing prior to 2-DE. Results With respect to protein recovery and purification potential, ethanol precipitation of the prefractionated CSF sample was found superior, after testing several sample preparation methods. The reproducibility of prefractionated CSF analyzed on 2-D gels was comparable to direct 2-DE analysis of CSF. The protein spots on the prefractionated 2-D gels had an increased intensity, indicating a higher protein concentration, compared to direct 2-D gels. Prefractionated 2-DE analysis of FTD and control CSF showed that 26 protein spots were changed at least two fold. Using mass spectrometry, 13 of these protein spots were identified, including retinol-binding protein, Zn-α-2-glycoprotein, proapolipoproteinA1, β-2-microglobulin, transthyretin, albumin and alloalbumin. Conclusion The results suggest that the prefractionated 2-DE method can be useful for enrichment of CSF proteins and may provide a new tool to investigate the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. This study confirmed reduced levels of retinol-binding protein and revealed some new biomarker candidates for FTD.

  1. JAC2D: A two-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biffle, J.H.; Blanford, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    JAC2D is a two-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equations. The method is implemented in a two-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. A four-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic/plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere

  2. FMG, RENUM, LINEL, ELLFMG, ELLP, and DIMES: Chain of programs for calculating and analyzing fluid flow through two-dimensional fracture networks -- theory and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billaux, D.; Bodea, S.; Long, J.

    1988-02-01

    This report describes some of the programs developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for network modelling. By themselves, these programs form a complete chain for the study of the equivalent permeability of two-dimensional fracture networks. FMG generates the fractures considered as line discontinuities, with any desired distribution of aperture, length, and orientation. The locations of these fractures on a plane can be either specified or generated randomly. The intersections of these fractures with each other, and with the boundaries of a specified flow region, are determined, and a finite element line network is output. RENUM is a line network optimizer. Nodes very close to each other are merged, dead-ends are removed, and the nodes are then renumbered in order to minimize the bandwidth of the corresponding linear system of equations. LINEL computes the steady state flux through a mesh of line elements previously processed by program RENUM. Equivalent directional permeabilities are output. ELLFMG determines the three components of the permeability tensor which best fits the directional permeabilities output by LINEL. A measure of the goodness fit is also computed. Two plotting programs, DIMES and ELLP, help visualize the outputs of these programs. DIMES plots the line network at various stages of the process. ELLP plots the equivalent permeability results. 14 refs., 25 figs

  3. Library of subroutines to produce one- and two-dimensional statistical distributions on the ES-1010 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vzorov, I.K.; Ivanov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    A library of subroutines to produce 1- and 2-dimensional distribution on the ES-1010 computer is described. 1-dimensional distribution is represented as the histogram, 2-dimensional one is represented as the table. The library provides such opportunities as booking and deleting, filling and clearing histograms (tables), arithmetic operations with them, and printing histograms (tables) on the computer printer with variable printer line. All subroutines are written in FORTRAN-4 language and can be called from the program written in FORTRAN or in ASSEMBLER. This library can be implemented on all computer systems that offer a FORTRAN-4 compiler

  4. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  5. Computational fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    Two papers are included in this progress report. In the first, the compressible Navier-Stokes equations have been used to compute leading edge receptivity of boundary layers over parabolic cylinders. Natural receptivity at the leading edge was simulated and Tollmien-Schlichting waves were observed to develop in response to an acoustic disturbance, applied through the farfield boundary conditions. To facilitate comparison with previous work, all computations were carried out at a free stream Mach number of 0.3. The spatial and temporal behavior of the flowfields are calculated through the use of finite volume algorithms and Runge-Kutta integration. The results are dominated by strong decay of the Tollmien-Schlichting wave due to the presence of the mean flow favorable pressure gradient. The effects of numerical dissipation, forcing frequency, and nose radius are studied. The Strouhal number is shown to have the greatest effect on the unsteady results. In the second paper, a transition model for low-speed flows, previously developed by Young et al., which incorporates first-mode (Tollmien-Schlichting) disturbance information from linear stability theory has been extended to high-speed flow by incorporating the effects of second mode disturbances. The transition model is incorporated into a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver with a one-equation turbulence model. Results using a variable turbulent Prandtl number approach demonstrate that the current model accurately reproduces available experimental data for first and second-mode dominated transitional flows. The performance of the present model shows significant improvement over previous transition modeling attempts.

  6. Evidence of nonuniqueness and oscillatory solutions in computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunziato, J.W.; Gartling, D.K.; Kipp, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    We will review some of our recent experiences in computing solutions for nonlinear fluids in relatively simple, two-dimensional geometries. The purpose of this discussion will be to display by example some of the interesting but difficult questions that arise when ill-behaved solutions are obtained numerically. We will consider two examples. As the first example, we will consider a nonlinear elastic (compressible) fluid with chemical reactions and discuss solutions for detonation and detonation failure in a two-dimensional cylinder. In this case, the numerical algorithm utilizes a finite-difference method with artificial viscosity (von Neumann-Richtmyer method) and leads to two, distinctly different, stable solutions depending on the time step criterion used. The second example to be considered involves the convection of a viscous fluid in a rectangular container as a result of an exothermic polymerization reaction. A solidification front develops near the top of the container and propagates down through the fluid, changing the aspect ratio of the region ahead of the front. Using a Galerkin-based finite element method, a numerical solution of the partial differential equations is obtained which tracks the front and correctly predicts the fluid temperatures near the walls. However, the solution also exhibits oscillatory behavior with regard to the number of cells in the fluid ahead of the front and in the strength of the cells. More definitive experiments and analysis are required to determine whether this oscillatory phenomena is a numerical artifact or a physical reality. 20 refs., 14 figs

  7. Computational modelling in fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauguel, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modelling of the greatest part of environmental or industrial flow problems gives very similar types of equations. The considerable increase in computing capacity over the last ten years consequently allowed numerical models of growing complexity to be processed. The varied group of computer codes presented are now a complementary tool of experimental facilities to achieve studies in the field of fluid mechanics. Several codes applied in the nuclear field (reactors, cooling towers, exchangers, plumes...) are presented among others [fr

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B.

    2008-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design is a new title in the is a new title in the REHVA guidebook series. The guidebook is written for people who need to use and discuss results based on CFD predictions, and it gives insight into the subject for those who are not used to work with CFD...

  9. CASKETSS-DYNA2D: a nonlinear impact analysis computer program for nuclear fuel transport casks in two dimensional geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1988-10-01

    A nonlinear impact analysis computer program DYNA2D, which was developed by Hallquist, has been introduced from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the purpose of using impact analysis of nuclear fuel transport casks. DYNA2D has been built in CASKETSS code system (CASKETSS means a modular code system for CASK Evaluation code system for Thermal and Structural Safety). Main features of DYNA2D are as follows; (1) This program has been programmed to provide near optimal speed on vector processing computers. (2) An explicit time integration method is used for fast calculation. (3) Many material models are available in the program. (4) A contact-impact algorithm permits gap and sliding along structural interfaces. (5) A rezoner has been embedded in the program. (6) The graphic program for representations of calculation is provided. In the paper, brief illustration of calculation method, input data and sample calculations are presented. (author)

  10. Computer program to solve two-dimensional shock-wave interference problems with an equilibrium chemically reacting air model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1990-08-01

    The computer program EASI, an acronym for Equilibrium Air Shock Interference, was developed to calculate the inviscid flowfield, the maximum surface pressure, and the maximum heat flux produced by six shock wave interference patterns on a 2-D, cylindrical configuration. Thermodynamic properties of the inviscid flowfield are determined using either an 11-specie, 7-reaction equilibrium chemically reacting air model or a calorically perfect air model. The inviscid flowfield is solved using the integral form of the conservation equations. Surface heating calculations at the impingement point for the equilibrium chemically reacting air model use variable transport properties and specific heat. However, for the calorically perfect air model, heating rate calculations use a constant Prandtl number. Sample calculations of the six shock wave interference patterns, a listing of the computer program, and flowcharts of the programming logic are included.

  11. EVP2D- a computer code developed for the eslastoviscoplastic-damage analysis of axyssimetrical and two-dimensional problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves Filho, O.J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This work aims to describe the computer code EVP2D developed for the elastoviscoplastic-damage analysis of mettalic components, with particular emphasis dedicated to the problem of creep damage and rupture. After a brief introduction of the basic concepts and procedures of Continuum Damage Mechanics, the constitutive equations implemented are presented. Next, the finite element approximation proposed for solution of the initial boundary value problem of interest is discussed, particularly the numerical algorithms used for time integration of the creep strain rate and damage rate equations, and the numerical procedures adopted for dealing with the presense of partially or fully ruptured finite elements in the mesh. As a pratical application, the rupture behaviour of a biaxially tension loaded plate containing a central circular hole is examined. Finally, future developments of the code, which include as prioritiesthe treatment of ciyclic loads and the description of the anisotropic feature of creep damage evolution, are briefly introduced. (author) [pt

  12. Recognition of regional hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using thallium-201 emission-computed tomography: comparison with two-dimensional echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kadota, K.; Nohara, R.

    1984-01-01

    The configuration of the hypertrophied myocardium was evaluated by thallium-201 emission-computed tomography and 2-dimensional (2-D) sector scan in 10 patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), 10 with nonobstructive HC with giant negative T waves and 10 with concentric left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging was reconstructed into multiple 12-mm-thick slices in 3 planes. The thickness ratio of the ventricular septum and the LV posterior wall in the short-axis plane and the ratio of the ventricular septum and the apical wall in the long-axis plane were analyzed. In the patients with obstructive HC the ventricular septal wall thickness index was increased, and the ratio of septal to posterior wall thickness index (1.45 +/- 0.23) was greater than that in the patients with nonobstructive HC with giant negative T waves or in those with concentric LV hypertrophy (1.03 +/- 0.20 and 0.98 +/- 0.11, respectively; p less than 0.01 for each). In the patients with nonobstructive HC with giant negative T waves, increased apical wall thickness with apical cavity obliteration was characteristic, and the ratio of ventricular septal to apical wall thickness index (0.66 +/- 0.14) was less than that in the patients with obstructive HC or in those with concentric LV hypertrophy (1.46 +/- 0.38 and 1.04 +/- 0.09, respectively; p less than 0.001 for each). In contrast, technically satisfactory 2-D sector scanning (83%) demonstrated various configurations of the hypertrophied ventricularseptum, but could not detect apical hypertrophy in 4 of the 10 patients with nonobstructive HC with giant negative T waves whose LV cineangiograms demonstrated apical hypertrophy. Thus, thallium-201 emission-computed tomography is useful in evaluating the characteristics of LV hypertrophy and assists 2-D sector scan, especially in patients with apical hypertrophy in HC

  13. Online monitoring of the two-dimensional temperature field in a boiler furnace based on acoustic computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shiping; Shen, Guoqing; An, Liansuo; Niu, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    Online monitoring of the temperature field is crucial to optimally adjust combustion within a boiler. In this paper, acoustic computed tomography (CT) technology was used to obtain the temperature profile of a furnace cross-section. The physical principles behind acoustic CT, acoustic signals and time delay estimation were studied. Then, the technique was applied to a domestic 600-MW coal-fired boiler. Acoustic CT technology was used to monitor the temperature field of the cross-section in the boiler furnace, and the temperature profile was reconstructed through ART iteration. The linear sweeping frequency signal was adopted as the sound source signal, whose sweeping frequency ranged from 500 to 3000 Hz with a sweeping cycle of 0.1 s. The generalized cross-correlation techniques with PHAT and ML were used as the time delay estimation method when the boiler was in different states. Its actual operation indicated that the monitored images accurately represented the combustion state of the boiler, and the acoustic CT system was determined to be accurate and reliable. - Highlights: • An online monitoring approach to monitor temperature field in a boiler furnace. • The paper provides acoustic CT technology to obtain the temperature profile of a furnace cross-section. • The temperature profile was reconstructed through ART iteration. • The technique is applied to a domestic 600-MW coal-fired boiler. • The monitored images accurately represent the combustion state of the boiler

  14. Adaptation, testing and application of the two-dimensional FE computer program system for steam generator tube testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betzold, K.

    1987-01-01

    The 2d-FE computing program system, taken over by EPRI, is used for the improvement of the eddy current test of steam generator heating tubes. The investigations focus on test tasks in the area of the tube plate and the scrap mark; among them: accumulation of mud in the cracking area and above the tube plate; circulating slots with and without accumulation of mud. The interaction of the factors of influence given by the test object and the parameters selectable by the tester as for example coil length and base space for absolute coils and differential coils as well as test frequencies are calculated and the form of the signal locus curves and the dynamic curves are listed in a sample catalogue. It is demonstrated with selected examples that the sample catalogue contributes to the test-specific design of the coil and to the choice of the test frequencies; interpretation of measured signals; deepening of the knowledge of the physical processe in eddy current tests. (orig./HP) [de

  15. On the improvement of two-dimensional curvature computation and its application to turbulent premixed flame correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrystie, R S M; Burns, I S; Hult, J; Kaminski, C F

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of curvature of the flamefront of premixed turbulent flames is important for the validation of numerical models for combustion. In this work, curvature is measured from contours that outline the flamefront, which are generated from laser-induced fluorescence images. The contours are inherently digitized, resulting in pixelation effects that lead to difficulties in computing curvature of the flamefront accurately. A common approach is to fit functions locally to short sections along the flame contour, and this approach is also followed in this work; the method helps smoothen the pixelation before curvature is measured. However, the length and degree of the polynomial, and hence the amount of smoothing, must be correctly set in order to maximize the precision and accuracy of the curvature measurements. Other researchers have applied polynomials of different orders and over different segment lengths to circles of known curvature as a test to determine the appropriate choice of polynomial; it is shown here that this method results in a sub-optimal choice of polynomial function. Here, we determine more suitable polynomial functions through use of a circle whose radius is sinusoidally modulated. We show that this leads to a more consistent and reliable choice for the local polynomial functions fitted to experimental data. A polynomial function thus determined is then applied to flame contour data to measure curvature of experimentally acquired flame contours. The results show that there is an enhancement in local flame speed at sections of the flamefront with a non-zero curvature, and this agrees with numerical models

  16. Two-dimensional turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzino, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    We present an overview of the most relevant, and sometimes contrasting, theoretical approaches to Rayleigh-Taylor and mean-gradient-forced Rayleigh-Bénard two-dimensional turbulence together with numerical and experimental evidences for their support. The main aim of this overview is to emphasize that, despite the different character of these two systems, especially in relation to their steadiness/unsteadiness, turbulent fluctuations are well described by the same scaling relationships originated from the Bolgiano balance. The latter states that inertial terms and buoyancy terms balance at small scales giving rise to an inverse kinetic energy cascade. The main difference with respect to the inverse energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence [R. H. Kraichnan, "Inertial ranges in two-dimensional turbulence," Phys. Fluids 10, 1417 (1967)] is that the rate of cascade of kinetic energy here is not constant along the inertial range of scales. Thanks to the absence of physical boundaries, the two systems here investigated turned out to be a natural physical realization of the Kraichnan scaling regime hitherto associated with the elusive "ultimate state of thermal convection" [R. H. Kraichnan, "Turbulent thermal convection at arbitrary Prandtl number," Phys. Fluids 5, 1374-1389 (1962)].

  17. Computational fluid dynamics in ventilation: Practical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, J. R.

    The potential of computation fluid dynamics (CFD) for conceiving ventilation systems is shown through the simulation of five practical cases. The following examples are considered: capture of pollutants on a surface treating tank equipped with a unilateral suction slot in the presence of a disturbing air draft opposed to suction; dispersion of solid aerosols inside fume cupboards; performances comparison of two general ventilation systems in a silkscreen printing workshop; ventilation of a large open painting area; and oil fog removal inside a mechanical engineering workshop. Whereas the two first problems are analyzed through two dimensional numerical simulations, the three other cases require three dimensional modeling. For the surface treating tank case, numerical results are compared to laboratory experiment data. All simulations are carried out using EOL, a CFD software specially devised to deal with air quality problems in industrial ventilated premises. It contains many analysis tools to interpret the results in terms familiar to the industrial hygienist. Much experimental work has been engaged to validate the predictions of EOL for ventilation flows.

  18. Two-dimensional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Osserman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The basic component of several-variable calculus, two-dimensional calculus is vital to mastery of the broader field. This extensive treatment of the subject offers the advantage of a thorough integration of linear algebra and materials, which aids readers in the development of geometric intuition. An introductory chapter presents background information on vectors in the plane, plane curves, and functions of two variables. Subsequent chapters address differentiation, transformations, and integration. Each chapter concludes with problem sets, and answers to selected exercises appear at the end o

  19. Two-dimensional models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, Bert; Freie Universitaet, Berlin

    2005-02-01

    It is not possible to compactly review the overwhelming literature on two-dimensional models in a meaningful way without a specific viewpoint; I have therefore tacitly added to the above title the words 'as theoretical laboratories for general quantum field theory'. I dedicate this contribution to the memory of J. A. Swieca with whom I have shared the passion of exploring 2-dimensional models for almost one decade. A shortened version of this article is intended as a contribution to the project 'Encyclopedia of mathematical physics' and comments, suggestions and critical remarks are welcome. (author)

  20. New approach in two-dimensional fluid modeling of edge plasma transport with high intermittency due to blobs and edge localized modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2011-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to simulate intermittent, non-diffusive plasma transport (via blobs and filaments of edge localized modes (ELMs)) observed in the tokamak edge region within the framework of two-dimensional transport codes. This approach combines the inherently three-dimensional filamentary structures associated with an ensemble of blobs into a macro-blob in the two-dimensional poloidal cross-section and advects the macro-blob ballistically across the magnetic field, B. Intermittent transport is represented as a sequence of macro-blobs appropriately seeded in the edge plasma according to experimental statistics. In this case, the code is capable of reproducing both the long-scale temporal evolution of the background plasma and the fast spatiotemporal dynamics of blobs. We report the results from a two-dimensional edge plasma code modeling of a single macro-blob dynamics, and its interaction with initially stationary background plasma as well as with material surfaces. The mechanisms of edge plasma particle and energy losses from macro-blobs are analyzed. The effects of macro-blob sizes and advection velocity on edge plasma profiles are studied. The macro-blob impact on power loading and sputtering rates on the chamber wall and on inner and outer divertor plates is discussed. Temporal evolution of particle inventory of the edge plasma perturbed by macro-blobs is analyzed. Application of macro-blobs to ELM modeling is highlighted.

  1. Two-dimensional ferroelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinov, L M; Fridkin, Vladimir M; Palto, Sergei P [A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federaion (Russian Federation); Bune, A V; Dowben, P A; Ducharme, Stephen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Behlen Laboratory of Physics, Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska-Linkoln, Linkoln, NE (United States)

    2000-03-31

    The investigation of the finite-size effect in ferroelectric crystals and films has been limited by the experimental conditions. The smallest demonstrated ferroelectric crystals had a diameter of {approx}200 A and the thinnest ferroelectric films were {approx}200 A thick, macroscopic sizes on an atomic scale. Langmuir-Blodgett deposition of films one monolayer at a time has produced high quality ferroelectric films as thin as 10 A, made from polyvinylidene fluoride and its copolymers. These ultrathin films permitted the ultimate investigation of finite-size effects on the atomic thickness scale. Langmuir-Blodgett films also revealed the fundamental two-dimensional character of ferroelectricity in these materials by demonstrating that there is no so-called critical thickness; films as thin as two monolayers (1 nm) are ferroelectric, with a transition temperature near that of the bulk material. The films exhibit all the main properties of ferroelectricity with a first-order ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition: polarization hysteresis (switching); the jump in spontaneous polarization at the phase transition temperature; thermal hysteresis in the polarization; the increase in the transition temperature with applied field; double hysteresis above the phase transition temperature; and the existence of the ferroelectric critical point. The films also exhibit a new phase transition associated with the two-dimensional layers. (reviews of topical problems)

  2. Principles of computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wesseling, Pieter

    2001-01-01

    The book is aimed at graduate students, researchers, engineers and physicists involved in flow computations. An up-to-date account is given of the present state-of-the-art of numerical methods employed in computational fluid dynamics. The underlying numerical principles are treated with a fair amount of detail, using elementary mathematical analysis. Attention is given to difficulties arising from geometric complexity of the flow domain and of nonuniform structured boundary-fitted grids. Uniform accuracy and efficiency for singular perturbation problems is studied, pointing the way to accurate computation of flows at high Reynolds number. Much attention is given to stability analysis, and useful stability conditions are provided, some of them new, for many numerical schemes used in practice. Unified methods for compressible and incompressible flows are discussed. Numerical analysis of the shallow-water equations is included. The theory of hyperbolic conservation laws is treated. Godunov's order barrier and ho...

  3. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2010-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  4. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book analyzes finite element theory as applied to computational fluid mechanics. It includes a chapter on using the heat conduction equation to expose the essence of finite element theory, including higher-order accuracy and convergence in a common knowledge framework. Another chapter generalizes the algorithm to extend application to the nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. Other chapters are concerned with the analysis of a specific fluids mechanics problem class, including theory and applications. Some of the topics covered include finite element theory for linear mechanics; potential flow; weighted residuals/galerkin finite element theory; inviscid and convection dominated flows; boundary layers; parabolic three-dimensional flows; and viscous and rotational flows

  5. Computational methods for fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H

    2002-01-01

    In its 3rd revised and extended edition the book offers an overview of the techniques used to solve problems in fluid mechanics on computers and describes in detail those most often used in practice. Included are advanced methods in computational fluid dynamics, like direct and large-eddy simulation of turbulence, multigrid methods, parallel computing, moving grids, structured, block-structured and unstructured boundary-fitted grids, free surface flows. The 3rd edition contains a new section dealing with grid quality and an extended description of discretization methods. The book shows common roots and basic principles for many different methods. The book also contains a great deal of practical advice for code developers and users, it is designed to be equally useful to beginners and experts. The issues of numerical accuracy, estimation and reduction of numerical errors are dealt with in detail, with many examples. A full-feature user-friendly demo-version of a commercial CFD software has been added, which ca...

  6. Kinetic-contact-driven gigantic energy transfer in a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined to a rotating pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowniczek, Paweł; Chrzanowska, Agnieszka

    2017-11-01

    A two-dimensional Lennard-Jones system in a circular and rotating container has been studied by means of molecular dynamics technique. A nonequilibrium transition to the rotating stage has been detected in a delayed time since an instant switching of the frame rotation. This transition is attributed to the increase of the density at the wall because of the centrifugal force. At the same time the phase transition occurs, the inner system changes its configuration of the solid-state type into the liquid type. Impact of angular frequency and molecular roughness on the transport properties of the nonrotating and rotating systems is analyzed.

  7. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, N.D., E-mail: nbrubaker@math.arizona.edu; Lega, J., E-mail: lega@math.arizona.edu

    2016-01-08

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid. - Highlights: • Full solution set of the two-dimensional capillary origami problem. • Fluid does not necessarily wet the entire plate. • Global energy approach provides exact differential equations satisfied by minimizers. • Bifurcation diagrams highlight three different regimes. • Conditions for spontaneous encapsulation are identified.

  8. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brubaker, N.D.; Lega, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid. - Highlights: • Full solution set of the two-dimensional capillary origami problem. • Fluid does not necessarily wet the entire plate. • Global energy approach provides exact differential equations satisfied by minimizers. • Bifurcation diagrams highlight three different regimes. • Conditions for spontaneous encapsulation are identified.

  9. Computational fluid-dynamic model of laser-induced breakdown in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dors, Ivan G.; Parigger, Christian G.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature and pressure profiles are computed by the use of a two-dimensional, axially symmetric, time-accurate computational fluid-dynamic model for nominal 10-ns optical breakdown laser pulses. The computational model includes a kinetics mechanism that implements plasma equilibrium kinetics in ionized regions and nonequilibrium, multistep, finite-rate reactions in nonionized regions. Fluid-physics phenomena following laser-induced breakdown are recorded with high-speed shadowgraph techniques. The predicted fluid phenomena are shown by direct comparison with experimental records to agree with the flow patterns that are characteristic of laser spark decay

  10. Computer face-matching technology using two-dimensional photographs accurately matches the facial gestalt of unrelated individuals with the same syndromic form of intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudding-Byth, Tracy; Baxter, Anne; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hackett, Anna; O'Donnell, Sheridan; White, Susan M; Attia, John; Brunner, Han; de Vries, Bert; Koolen, David; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Ratwatte, Seshika; Riveros, Carlos; Brain, Steve; Lovell, Brian C

    2017-12-19

    Massively parallel genetic sequencing allows rapid testing of known intellectual disability (ID) genes. However, the discovery of novel syndromic ID genes requires molecular confirmation in at least a second or a cluster of individuals with an overlapping phenotype or similar facial gestalt. Using computer face-matching technology we report an automated approach to matching the faces of non-identical individuals with the same genetic syndrome within a database of 3681 images [1600 images of one of 10 genetic syndrome subgroups together with 2081 control images]. Using the leave-one-out method, two research questions were specified: 1) Using two-dimensional (2D) photographs of individuals with one of 10 genetic syndromes within a database of images, did the technology correctly identify more than expected by chance: i) a top match? ii) at least one match within the top five matches? or iii) at least one in the top 10 with an individual from the same syndrome subgroup? 2) Was there concordance between correct technology-based matches and whether two out of three clinical geneticists would have considered the diagnosis based on the image alone? The computer face-matching technology correctly identifies a top match, at least one correct match in the top five and at least one in the top 10 more than expected by chance (P syndromes except Kabuki syndrome. Although the accuracy of the computer face-matching technology was tested on images of individuals with known syndromic forms of intellectual disability, the results of this pilot study illustrate the potential utility of face-matching technology within deep phenotyping platforms to facilitate the interpretation of DNA sequencing data for individuals who remain undiagnosed despite testing the known developmental disorder genes.

  11. Principles of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesseling, P.

    2001-01-01

    The book is aimed at graduate students, researchers, engineers and physicists involved in flow computations. An up-to-date account is given of the present state- of-the-art of numerical methods employed in computational fluid dynamics. The underlying numerical principles are treated with a fair amount of detail, using elementary mathematical analysis. Attention is given to difficulties arising from geometric complexity of the flow domain and of nonuniform structured boundary-fitted grids. Uniform accuracy and efficiency for singular perturbation problems is studied, pointing the way to accurate computation of flows at high Reynolds number. Much attention is given to stability analysis, and useful stability conditions are provided, some of them new, for many numerical schemes used in practice. Unified methods for compressible and incompressible flows are discussed. Numerical analysis of the shallow-water equations is included. The theory of hyperbolic conservation laws is treated. Godunov's order barrier and how to overcome it by means of slope-limited schemes is discussed. An introduction is given to efficient iterative solution methods, using Krylov subspace and multigrid acceleration. Many pointers are given to recent literature, to help the reader to quickly reach the current research frontier. (orig.)

  12. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  13. Evaluation of left ventricular function and volumes in patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy: gated single-photon emission computed tomography versus two-dimensional echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vourvouri, E.C.; Poldermans, D.; Sianos, G.; Sozzi, F.B.; Schinkel, A.F.L.; Sutter, J. de; Roelandt, J.R.T.C.; Bax, J.J.; Parcharidis, G.; Valkema, R.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a head-to-head comparison between two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography and gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPET) for the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) function and volumes in patients with severe ischaemic LV dysfunction. Thirty-two patients with chronic ischaemic LV dysfunction [mean LV ejection fraction (EF) 25%±6%] were studied with gated SPET and 2D echocardiography. Regional wall motion was evaluated by both modalities and scored by two independent observers using a 16-segment model with a 5-point scoring system (1= normokinesia, 2= mild hypokinesia, 3= severe hypokinesia, 4= akinesia and 5= dyskinesia). LVEF and LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were evaluated by 2D echocardiography using the Simpson's biplane discs method. The same parameters were calculated using quantitative gated SPET software (QGS, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center). The overall agreement between the two imaging modalities for assessment of regional wall motion was 69%. The correlations between gated SPET and 2D echocardiography for the assessment of end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were excellent (r=0.94, P<0.01, and r=0.96, P<0.01, respectively). The correlation for LVEF was also good (r=0.83, P<0.01). In conclusion: in patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, close and significant relations between gated SPET and 2D echocardiography were observed for the assessment of regional and global LV function and LV volumes; gated SPET has the advantage that it provides information on both LV function/dimensions and perfusion. (orig.)

  14. Accuracy of Cup Positioning With the Computed Tomography-Based Two-dimensional to Three-Dimensional Matched Navigation System: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuki; Endo, Hirosuke; Tetsunaga, Tomonori; Miyake, Takamasa; Sanki, Tomoaki; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2018-01-01

    The accuracy of various navigation systems used for total hip arthroplasty has been described, but no publications reported the accuracy of cup orientation in computed tomography (CT)-based 2D-3D (two-dimensional to three-dimensional) matched navigation. In a prospective, randomized controlled study, 80 hips including 44 with developmental dysplasia of the hips were divided into a CT-based 2D-3D matched navigation group (2D-3D group) and a paired-point matched navigation group (PPM group). The accuracy of cup orientation (absolute difference between the intraoperative record and the postoperative measurement) was compared between groups. Additionally, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate patient factors affecting the accuracy of cup orientation in each navigation. The accuracy of cup inclination was 2.5° ± 2.2° in the 2D-3D group and 4.6° ± 3.3° in the PPM group (P = .0016). The accuracy of cup anteversion was 2.3° ± 1.7° in the 2D-3D group and 4.4° ± 3.3° in the PPM group (P = .0009). In the PPM group, the presence of roof osteophytes decreased the accuracy of cup inclination (odds ratio 8.27, P = .0140) and the absolute value of pelvic tilt had a negative influence on the accuracy of cup anteversion (odds ratio 1.27, P = .0222). In the 2D-3D group, patient factors had no effect on the accuracy of cup orientation. The accuracy of cup positioning in CT-based 2D-3D matched navigation was better than in paired-point matched navigation, and was not affected by patient factors. It is a useful system for even severely deformed pelvises such as developmental dysplasia of the hips. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous determination of D-aspartic acid and D-glutamic acid in rat tissues and physiological fluids using a multi-loop two-dimensional HPLC procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hai; Miyoshi, Yurika; Ueno, Kyoko; Okamura, Chieko; Tojo, Yosuke; Mita, Masashi; Lindner, Wolfgang; Zaitsu, Kiyoshi; Hamase, Kenji

    2011-11-01

    For a metabolomics study focusing on the analysis of aspartic and glutamic acid enantiomers, a fully automated two-dimensional HPLC system employing a microbore-ODS column and a narrowbore-enantioselective column was developed. By using this system, a detailed distribution of D-Asp and D-Glu besides L-Asp and L-Glu in mammals was elucidated. For the total analysis concept, the amino acids were first pre-column derivatized with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F) to be sensitively and fluorometrically detected. For the non-stereoselective separation of the analytes in the first dimension a monolithic ODS column (750 mm × 0.53 mm i.d.) was adopted, and a self-packed narrowbore-Pirkle type enantioselective column (Sumichiral OA-2500S, 250 mm × 1.5 mm i.d.) was selected for the second dimension. In the rat plasma, RSD values for intra-day and inter-day precision were less than 6.8%, and the accuracy ranged between 96.1% and 105.8%. The values of LOQ of D-Asp and D-Glu were 5 fmol/injection (0.625 nmol/g tissue). The present method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of free aspartic acid and glutamic acid enantiomers in 7 brain areas, 11 peripheral tissues, plasma and urine of Wistar rats. Biologically significant D-Asp values were found in various tissue samples whereas for D-Glu the values were very low possibly indicating less significance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer Modeling of the Formosa Ridge Offshore SW Taiwan: Implication for Fluid Migrating Paths of a Cold Seep Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y.; Chi, W.; Liu, C.; Shyu, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Formosa Ridge, a small ridge located on the passive China continental slope offshore southwestern Taiwan, is an active cold seep site. Large and dense chemosynthetic communities were found there by the ROV Hyper-Dolphin during the 2007 NT0705 cruise. A vertical blank zone is clearly observed on all the seismic profiles across the cold seep site. This narrow zone is interpreted to be the fluid conduit of the seep site. Previous studies suggest that cold sea water carrying large amount of sulfate could flow into the fluid system from flanks of the ridge, and forms a very effective fluid circulation system that emits both methane and hydrogen sulfide to feed the unusual chemosynthetic communities observed at the Formosa Ridge cold seep site. Here we use thermal signals to study possible fluid flow migration paths. In 2008 and 2010, we have collected vdense thermal probe data at this site. We also study the temperatures at Bottom-Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) based on methane hydrate phase diagram. We perform 2D finite element thermal conductive simulations to study the effects of bathymetry on the temperature field in the ridge, and compare the simulation result with thermal probe and BSR-derived datasets. The boundary conditions include insulated boundaries on both sides, and we assign a fix temperature at the bottom of the model using an average regional geothermal gradient. Sensitivity tests and thermal probe data from a nearby region give a regional background geothermal gradient of 0.04 to 0.05 °C/m. The outputs of the simulation runs include geothermal gradient and temperature at different parts of the model. The model can fit the geothermal gradient at a distance away from the ridge where there is less geophysics evidence of fluid flow. However our model over-predicts the geothermal gradient by 50% at the ridge top. We also compare simulated temperature field and found that under the flanks of the ridge the temperature is cooled by 2 °C compared with the

  17. A two-dimensional adaptive numerical grids generation method and its realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Tao; Shui Hongshou

    1998-12-01

    A two-dimensional adaptive numerical grids generation method and its particular realization is discussed. This method is effective and easy to realize if the control functions are given continuously, and the grids for some regions is showed in this case. For Computational Fluid Dynamics, because the control values of adaptive grids-numerical solution is given in dispersed form, it is needed to interpolate these values to get the continuous control functions. These interpolation techniques are discussed, and some efficient adaptive grids are given. A two-dimensional fluid dynamics example was also given

  18. Dynamics of two disks settling in a two-dimensional narrow channel: From periodic motion to vertical chain in Oldroyd-B fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2016-11-01

    In this talk we present a numerical study of the dynamics of two disks settling in a narrow vertical channel filled with an Oldroyd-B fluid. Two kinds of particle dynamics are obtained: (i) periodic interaction between two disks and (ii) the formation of the chain of two disks. For the periodic interaction of two disks, two different motions are obtained: (a) two disks stay far apart and interact is periodically, which is similar to one of the motions of two disks settling in a narrow channel filled with a Newtonian fluid discussed by Aidun & Ding and (b) two disks draft, kiss and break away periodically and the chain is not formed due to not strong enough elastic force. For the formation of two disk chain occurred at higher values of the elasticity number, it is either a tilted chain or a vertical chain. The tilted chain can be obtained for either that the elasticity number is less than the critical value for having the vertical chain or that the Mach number is greater than the critical value for a long body to fall broadside-on, which is consistent with the results for the elliptic particles settling in Oldroyd-B fluids. NSF.

  19. Vortex Generators in a Two-Dimensional, External-Compression Supersonic Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydar, Ezgihan; Lu, Frank K.; Slater, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed as part of a process to design a vortex generator array for a two-dimensional inlet for Mach 1.6. The objective is to improve total pressure recovery a on at the engine face of the inlet. Both vane-type and ramp-type vortex generators are examined.

  20. Two-Dimensional Self-Propelled Fish Motion in Medium: An Integrated Method for Deforming Body Dynamics and Unsteady Fluid Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Yang; Yong-Liang, Yu; Bing-Gang, Tong; Guan-Hao, Wu

    2008-01-01

    We present (1) the dynamical equations of deforming body and (2) an integrated method for deforming body dynamics and unsteady fluid dynamics, to investigate a modelled freely self-propelled fish. The theoretical model and practical method is applicable for studies on the general mechanics of animal locomotion such as flying in air and swimming in water, particularly of free self-propulsion. The present results behave more credibly than the previous numerical studies and are close to the experimental results, and the aligned vortices pattern is discovered in cruising swimming

  1. Two-dimensional interaction of a shear flow with a free surface in a stratified fluid and its solitary-wave solutions via mathematical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seadawy, Aly R.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we presented the problem formulations of models for internal solitary waves in a stratified shear flow with a free surface. The nonlinear higher order of extended KdV equations for the free surface displacement is generated. We derived the coefficients of the nonlinear higher-order extended KdV equation in terms of integrals of the modal function for the linear long-wave theory. The wave amplitude potential and the fluid pressure of the extended KdV equation in the form of solitary-wave solutions are deduced. We discussed and analyzed the stability of the obtained solutions and the movement role of the waves by making graphs of the exact solutions.

  2. Using Computers in Fluids Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    Three approaches for using computers to improve basic fluids engineering education are presented. The use of computational fluid dynamics solutions to fundamental flow problems is discussed. The use of interactive, highly graphical software which operates on either a modern workstation or personal computer is highlighted. And finally, the development of 'textbooks' and teaching aids which are used and distributed on the World Wide Web is described. Arguments for and against this technology as applied to undergraduate education are also discussed.

  3. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes Two distinguishing features of the discourse are solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty Matlab codes are presented and discussed for a broad...

  4. Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics: Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner. The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming. This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice. There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes. Two distinguishing features of the discourse are: solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty. Matlab codes are presented and discussed for ...

  5. An introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    1999-01-01

    CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building.......CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building....

  6. A self-consistent two-dimensional resistive fluid theory of field-aligned potential structures including charge separation and magnetic and velocity shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, M.; Birn, J.; Schindler, K.

    1990-01-01

    A self-consistent two-fluid theory that includes the magnetic field and shear patterns therein is developed to model stationary electrostatic structures with field-aligned potential drops. Shear flow is also included in the theory since this seems to be a prominent feature of the structures of interest. In addition, Ohmic dissipation, a Hall term and pressure gradients in a generalized Ohm's law, modified for cases without quasi-neutrality are included. In the analytic theory, the electrostatic force is balanced by field-aligned pressure gradients, i.e., thermal effects in the direction of the magnetic field, and by pressure gradients and magnetic stresses in the perpendicular direction. Within this theory simple examples of applications are presented to demonstrate the kind of solutions resulting from the model. The results show how the effects of charge separation and shear in the magnetic field and the velocity can be combined to form self-consistent structures such as are found to exist above the aurora, suggested also in association with solar flares

  7. Sums of two-dimensional spectral triples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Ivan, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    construct a sum of two dimensional modules which reflects some aspects of the topological dimensions of the compact metric space, but this will only give the metric back approximately. At the end we make an explicit computation of the last module for the unit interval in. The metric is recovered exactly...

  8. Personal Computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.-C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes computation.

  9. Formation of large-scale structures with sharp density gradient through Rayleigh-Taylor growth in a two-dimensional slab under the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, R.; Hatori, T.; Miura, H.; Ito, A.; Sato, M.

    2015-01-01

    Two-fluid and the finite Larmor effects on linear and nonlinear growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a two-dimensional slab are studied numerically with special attention to high-wave-number dynamics and nonlinear structure formation at a low β-value. The two effects stabilize the unstable high wave number modes for a certain range of the β-value. In nonlinear simulations, the absence of the high wave number modes in the linear stage leads to the formation of the density field structure much larger than that in the single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation, together with a sharp density gradient as well as a large velocity difference. The formation of the sharp velocity difference leads to a subsequent Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability only when both the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius terms are incorporated, whereas it is not observed otherwise. It is shown that the emergence of the secondary instability can modify the outline of the turbulent structures associated with the primary Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  10. Fluid dynamics computer programs for NERVA turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    During the design of the NERVA turbopump, numerous computer programs were developed for the analyses of fluid dynamic problems within the machine. Program descriptions, example cases, users instructions, and listings for the majority of these programs are presented.

  11. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to the basic theory of fluid mechanics and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical computation. Methods of scientific computing are introduced alongside with theoretical analysis and MATLAB® codes are presented and discussed for a broad range of topics: from interfacial shapes in hydrostatics, to vortex dynamics, to viscous flow, to turbulent flow, to panel methods for flow past airfoils. The third edition includes new topics, additional examples, solved and unsolved problems, and revised images. It adds more computational algorithms and MATLAB programs. It also incorporates discussion of the latest version of the fluid dynamics software library FDLIB, which is freely available online. FDLIB offers an extensive range of computer codes that demonstrate the implementation of elementary and advanced algorithms and provide an invaluable resource for research, teaching, classroom instruction, and self-study. This ...

  12. Micromachined two dimensional resistor arrays for determination of gas parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, J.J.J.; Verwey, Willem B.; Dijkstra, Mindert; Dijkstra, Marcel; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    A resistive sensor array is presented for two dimensional temperature distribution measurements in a micromachined flow channel. This allows simultaneous measurement of flow velocity and fluid parameters, like thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient and viscosity. More general advantages of

  13. Generalized similarity method in unsteady two-dimensional MHD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2009 ... temperature two-dimensional MHD laminar boundary layer of incompressible fluid. ...... Φ η is Blasius solution for stationary boundary layer on the plate,. ( ). 0.

  14. Analysis of sponge zones for computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodony, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of sponge regions, or sponge zones, which add the forcing term -σ(q - q ref ) to the right-hand-side of the governing equations in computational fluid mechanics as an ad hoc boundary treatment is widespread. They are used to absorb and minimize reflections from computational boundaries and as forcing sponges to introduce prescribed disturbances into a calculation. A less common usage is as a means of extending a calculation from a smaller domain into a larger one, such as in computing the far-field sound generated in a localized region. By analogy to the penalty method of finite elements, the method is placed on a solid foundation, complete with estimates of convergence. The analysis generalizes the work of Israeli and Orszag [M. Israeli, S.A. Orszag, Approximation of radiation boundary conditions, J. Comp. Phys. 41 (1981) 115-135] and confirms their findings when applied as a special case to one-dimensional wave propagation in an absorbing sponge. It is found that the rate of convergence of the actual solution to the target solution, with an appropriate norm, is inversely proportional to the sponge strength. A detailed analysis for acoustic wave propagation in one-dimension verifies the convergence rate given by the general theory. The exponential point-wise convergence derived by Israeli and Orszag in the high-frequency limit is recovered and found to hold over all frequencies. A weakly nonlinear analysis of the method when applied to Burgers' equation shows similar convergence properties. Three numerical examples are given to confirm the analysis: the acoustic extension of a two-dimensional time-harmonic point source, the acoustic extension of a three-dimensional initial-value problem of a sound pulse, and the introduction of unstable eigenmodes from linear stability theory into a two-dimensional shear layer

  15. Computational aspects of the smectization process in liquid crystals: An example study of a perfectly aligned two-dimensional hard-boomerang system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowska, Agnieszka

    2017-06-01

    A replica method for calculation of smectic liquid crystal properties within the Onsager theory has been presented and applied to an exemplary case of two-dimensional perfectly aligned needlelike boomerangs. The method allows one to consider the complete influence of the interaction terms in contrast to the Fourier expansion method which uses mostly first or second order terms of expansion. The program based on the replica algorithm is able to calculate a single representative layer as an equivalent set of layers, depending on the size of the considered width of the sample integration interval. It predicts successfully smectic density distributions, energies, and layer thicknesses for different types of layer arrangement-of the antiferroelectric or of the smectic A order type. Specific features of the algorithm performance and influence of the numerical accuracy on the physical properties are presented. Future applications of the replica method to freely rotating molecules are discussed.

  16. Computational aspects of the smectization process in liquid crystals: An example study of a perfectly aligned two-dimensional hard-boomerang system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowska, Agnieszka

    2017-06-01

    A replica method for calculation of smectic liquid crystal properties within the Onsager theory has been presented and applied to an exemplary case of two-dimensional perfectly aligned needlelike boomerangs. The method allows one to consider the complete influence of the interaction terms in contrast to the Fourier expansion method which uses mostly first or second order terms of expansion. The program based on the replica algorithm is able to calculate a single representative layer as an equivalent set of layers, depending on the size of the considered width of the sample integration interval. It predicts successfully smectic density distributions, energies, and layer thicknesses for different types of layer arrangement—of the antiferroelectric or of the smectic A order type. Specific features of the algorithm performance and influence of the numerical accuracy on the physical properties are presented. Future applications of the replica method to freely rotating molecules are discussed.

  17. Two-dimensional NMR spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series. In part one (ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, May 15) the authors discussed one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and some relatively advanced nuclear spin gymnastics experiments that provide a capability for selective sensitivity enhancements. In this article and overview and some applications of two-dimensional NMR experiments are presented. These powerful experiments are important complements to the one-dimensional experiments. As in the more sophisticated one-dimensional experiments, the two-dimensional experiments involve three distinct time periods: a preparation period, t 0 ; an evolution period, t 1 ; and a detection period, t 2

  18. Quasi-two-dimensional holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, J.; Erhard, A.; Wuestenberg, H.; Zimpfer, J.

    1980-01-01

    The acoustical holography with numerical reconstruction by area scanning is memory- and time-intensive. With the experiences by the linear holography we tried to derive a scanning for the evaluating of the two-dimensional flaw-sizes. In most practical cases it is sufficient to determine the exact depth extension of a flaw, whereas the accuracy of the length extension is less critical. For this reason the applicability of the so-called quasi-two-dimensional holography is appropriate. The used sound field given by special probes is divergent in the inclined plane and light focussed in the perpendicular plane using cylindrical lenses. (orig.) [de

  19. Exact solutions and conservation laws of the system of two-dimensional viscous Burgers equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulwahhab, Muhammad Alim

    2016-10-01

    Fluid turbulence is one of the phenomena that has been studied extensively for many decades. Due to its huge practical importance in fluid dynamics, various models have been developed to capture both the indispensable physical quality and the mathematical structure of turbulent fluid flow. Among the prominent equations used for gaining in-depth insight of fluid turbulence is the two-dimensional Burgers equations. Its solutions have been studied by researchers through various methods, most of which are numerical. Being a simplified form of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations and its wide range of applicability in various fields of science and engineering, development of computationally efficient methods for the solution of the two-dimensional Burgers equations is still an active field of research. In this study, Lie symmetry method is used to perform detailed analysis on the system of two-dimensional Burgers equations. Optimal system of one-dimensional subalgebras up to conjugacy is derived and used to obtain distinct exact solutions. These solutions not only help in understanding the physical effects of the model problem but also, can serve as benchmarks for constructing algorithms and validation of numerical solutions of the system of Burgers equations under consideration at finite Reynolds numbers. Independent and nontrivial conserved vectors are also constructed.

  20. JAC2D: A two-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biffle, J.H.; Blanford, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    JAC2D is a two-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equations. The method is implemented in a two-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. A four-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic/plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  1. Colour in visualisation for computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Kinnear, D; Atherton, MA; Collins, MW; Dokhan, J; Karayiannis, TG

    2006-01-01

    Colour is used in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations in two key ways. First it is used to visualise the geometry and allow the engineers to be confident that the model constructed is a good representation of the engineering situation. Once an analysis has been completed, colour is used in post-processing the data from the simulations to illustrate the complex fluid mechanic phenomena under investigation. This paper describes these two uses of colour and provides some examples to il...

  2. Two-dimensional metamaterial optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolyaninov, I I

    2010-01-01

    While three-dimensional photonic metamaterials are difficult to fabricate, many new concepts and ideas in the metamaterial optics can be realized in two spatial dimensions using planar optics of surface plasmon polaritons. In this paper we review recent progress in this direction. Two-dimensional photonic crystals, hyperbolic metamaterials, and plasmonic focusing devices are demonstrated and used in novel microscopy and waveguiding schemes

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Room Air Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2004-01-01

    on the mass fraction transport equation. The importance of ?false? or numerical diffusion is also addressed in connection with the simple description of a supply opening. The different aspects of boundary conditions in the indoor environment as e.g. the simulation of Air Terminal Devices and the simulation......Nielsen, P.V. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Room Air Movement. Indoor Air, International Journal of Indoor Environment and Health, Vol. 14, Supplement 7, pp. 134-143, 2004. ABSTRACT Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and new developments of CFD in the indoor environment as well as quality...... considerations are important elements in the study of energy consumption, thermal comfort and indoor air quality in buildings. The paper discusses the quality level of Computational Fluid Dynamics and the involved schemes (first, second and third order schemes) by the use of the Smith and Hutton problem...

  4. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Algorithm on a Massively Parallel Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of computational fluid dynamics is demanding ever-increasing computational power to deal with complex fluid flow problems. We investigate the performance of a finite-difference computational fluid dynamics algorithm on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine. Of special interest is an implicit time-stepping algorithm; to obtain maximum performance from the Connection Machine, it is necessary to use a nonstandard algorithm to solve the linear systems that arise in the implicit algorithm. We find that the Connection Machine ran achieve very high computation rates on both explicit and implicit algorithms. The performance of the Connection Machine puts it in the same class as today's most powerful conventional supercomputers.

  5. Computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Pletcher, Richard H; Anderson, Dale

    2012-01-01

    ""I have always considered this book the best gift from one generation to the next in computational fluid dynamics. I earnestly recommend this book to graduate students and practicing engineers for the pleasure of learning and a handy reference. The description of the basic concepts and fundamentals is thorough and is crystal clear for understanding. And since 1984, two newer editions have kept abreast to the new, relevant, and fully verified advancements in CFD.""-Joseph J.S. Shang, Wright State University""Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer is very well written to be used as a t

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W.B.; Jungst, Rudolph G.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, John.

    1999-06-11

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. The model accounts for not only transport of species and charge, but also the electrode porosity variations and the electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures are compared to the experimental data with excellent agreement. Moreover, the simulation results. in conjunction with computer visualization and animation techniques, confirm that cell utilization in the temperature and current range of interest is limited by pore plugging or clogging of the front side of the cathode as a result of LiCl precipitation. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulation also shows that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell header predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  7. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haworth, D.C.; O' Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  8. Engineering Fracking Fluids with Computer Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaqfeh, Eric

    2015-11-01

    There are no comprehensive simulation-based tools for engineering the flows of viscoelastic fluid-particle suspensions in fully three-dimensional geometries. On the other hand, the need for such a tool in engineering applications is immense. Suspensions of rigid particles in viscoelastic fluids play key roles in many energy applications. For example, in oil drilling the ``drilling mud'' is a very viscous, viscoelastic fluid designed to shear-thin during drilling, but thicken at stoppage so that the ``cuttings'' can remain suspended. In a related application known as hydraulic fracturing suspensions of solids called ``proppant'' are used to prop open the fracture by pumping them into the well. It is well-known that particle flow and settling in a viscoelastic fluid can be quite different from that which is observed in Newtonian fluids. First, it is now well known that the ``fluid particle split'' at bifurcation cracks is controlled by fluid rheology in a manner that is not understood. Second, in Newtonian fluids, the presence of an imposed shear flow in the direction perpendicular to gravity (which we term a cross or orthogonal shear flow) has no effect on the settling of a spherical particle in Stokes flow (i.e. at vanishingly small Reynolds number). By contrast, in a non-Newtonian liquid, the complex rheological properties induce a nonlinear coupling between the sedimentation and shear flow. Recent experimental data have shown both the shear thinning and the elasticity of the suspending polymeric solutions significantly affects the fluid-particle split at bifurcations, as well as the settling rate of the solids. In the present work, we use the Immersed Boundary Method to develop computer simulations of viscoelastic flow in suspensions of spheres to study these problems. These simulations allow us to understand the detailed physical mechanisms for the remarkable physical behavior seen in practice, and actually suggest design rules for creating new fluid recipes.

  9. Two-dimensional flexible nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinwande, Deji; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James

    2014-12-01

    2014/2015 represents the tenth anniversary of modern graphene research. Over this decade, graphene has proven to be attractive for thin-film transistors owing to its remarkable electronic, optical, mechanical and thermal properties. Even its major drawback--zero bandgap--has resulted in something positive: a resurgence of interest in two-dimensional semiconductors, such as dichalcogenides and buckled nanomaterials with sizeable bandgaps. With the discovery of hexagonal boron nitride as an ideal dielectric, the materials are now in place to advance integrated flexible nanoelectronics, which uniquely take advantage of the unmatched portfolio of properties of two-dimensional crystals, beyond the capability of conventional thin films for ubiquitous flexible systems.

  10. Two-dimensional topological photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Shvets, Gennady

    2017-12-01

    Originating from the studies of two-dimensional condensed-matter states, the concept of topological order has recently been expanded to other fields of physics and engineering, particularly optics and photonics. Topological photonic structures have already overturned some of the traditional views on wave propagation and manipulation. The application of topological concepts to guided wave propagation has enabled novel photonic devices, such as reflection-free sharply bent waveguides, robust delay lines, spin-polarized switches and non-reciprocal devices. Discrete degrees of freedom, widely used in condensed-matter physics, such as spin and valley, are now entering the realm of photonics. In this Review, we summarize the latest advances in this highly dynamic field, with special emphasis on the experimental work on two-dimensional photonic topological structures.

  11. Two-dimensional thermofield bosonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Belvedere, L.V.; Rothe, K.D.

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this paper was to obtain an operator realization for the bosonization of fermions in 1 + 1 dimensions, at finite, non-zero temperature T. This is achieved in the framework of the real-time formalism of Thermofield Dynamics. Formally, the results parallel those of the T = 0 case. The well-known two-dimensional Fermion-Boson correspondences at zero temperature are shown to hold also at finite temperature. To emphasize the usefulness of the operator realization for handling a large class of two-dimensional quantum field-theoretic problems, we contrast this global approach with the cumbersome calculation of the fermion-current two-point function in the imaginary-time formalism and real-time formalisms. The calculations also illustrate the very different ways in which the transmutation from Fermi-Dirac to Bose-Einstein statistics is realized

  12. Two-dimensional critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleur, H.

    1987-09-01

    Two dimensional critical systems are studied using transformation to free fields and conformal invariance methods. The relations between the two approaches are also studied. The analytical results obtained generally depend on universality hypotheses or on renormalization group trajectories which are not established rigorously, so numerical verifications, mainly using the transfer matrix approach, are presented. The exact determination of critical exponents; the partition functions of critical models on toruses; and results as the critical point is approached are discussed [fr

  13. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  14. Finding two-dimensional peaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silagadze, Z.K.

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional generalization of the original peak finding algorithm suggested earlier is given. The ideology of the algorithm emerged from the well-known quantum mechanical tunneling property which enables small bodies to penetrate through narrow potential barriers. We merge this 'quantum' ideology with the philosophy of Particle Swarm Optimization to get the global optimization algorithm which can be called Quantum Swarm Optimization. The functionality of the newborn algorithm is tested on some benchmark optimization problems

  15. Engineering applications of computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Awang, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis that can be used for conceptual studies of product design, detail product development, process troubleshooting. It demonstrates the benefit of CFD modeling as a cost saving, timely, safe and easy to scale-up methodology.

  16. Optimized two-dimensional Sn transport (BISTRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Gho, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on an S n two-dimensional transport module developed for the French fast reactor code system CCRR to optimize algorithms in order to obtain the best performance in terms of computational time. A form of diffusion synthetic acceleration was adopted, and a special effort was made to solve the associated diffusion equation efficiently. The improvements in the algorithms, along with the use of an efficient programming language, led to a significant gain in computational time with respect to the DOT code

  17. Two-dimensional heat flow apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Patrick; Ayars, Eric

    2014-06-01

    We have created an apparatus to quantitatively measure two-dimensional heat flow in a metal plate using a grid of temperature sensors read by a microcontroller. Real-time temperature data are collected from the microcontroller by a computer for comparison with a computational model of the heat equation. The microcontroller-based sensor array allows previously unavailable levels of precision at very low cost, and the combination of measurement and modeling makes for an excellent apparatus for the advanced undergraduate laboratory course.

  18. Vectorization on the star computer of several numerical methods for a fluid flow problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.; Howser, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    A reexamination of some numerical methods is considered in light of the new class of computers which use vector streaming to achieve high computation rates. A study has been made of the effect on the relative efficiency of several numerical methods applied to a particular fluid flow problem when they are implemented on a vector computer. The method of Brailovskaya, the alternating direction implicit method, a fully implicit method, and a new method called partial implicitization have been applied to the problem of determining the steady state solution of the two-dimensional flow of a viscous imcompressible fluid in a square cavity driven by a sliding wall. Results are obtained for three mesh sizes and a comparison is made of the methods for serial computation.

  19. Spatial statistics of magnetic field in two-dimensional chaotic flow in the resistive growth stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolokolov, I.V., E-mail: igor.kolokolov@gmail.com [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 119334, Kosygina 2, Moscow (Russian Federation); NRU Higher School of Economics, 101000, Myasnitskaya 20, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-18

    The correlation tensors of magnetic field in a two-dimensional chaotic flow of conducting fluid are studied. It is shown that there is a stage of resistive evolution where the field correlators grow exponentially with time. The two- and four-point field correlation tensors are computed explicitly in this stage in the framework of Batchelor–Kraichnan–Kazantsev model. They demonstrate strong temporal intermittency of the field fluctuations and high level of non-Gaussianity in spatial field distribution.

  20. Observation of two-dimensional Faraday waves in extremely shallow depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaochen; Yu, Zhengyue; Liao, Shijun

    2015-09-01

    A family of two-dimensional Faraday waves in extremely shallow depth (1 mm to 2 mm) of absolute ethanol are observed experimentally using a Hele-Shaw cell that vibrates vertically. The same phenomena are not observed by means of water, ethanol solution, and silicone oil. These Faraday waves are quite different from the traditional ones. These phenomena are helpful to deepen and enrich our understandings about Faraday waves, and besides provide a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics a practical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Liu, Chaoqun

    2018-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics: A Practical Approach, Third Edition, is an introduction to CFD fundamentals and commercial CFD software to solve engineering problems. The book is designed for a wide variety of engineering students new to CFD, and for practicing engineers learning CFD for the first time. Combining an appropriate level of mathematical background, worked examples, computer screen shots, and step-by-step processes, this book walks the reader through modeling and computing, as well as interpreting CFD results. This new edition has been updated throughout, with new content and improved figures, examples and problems.

  2. Solitary wave solutions of two-dimensional nonlinear Kadomtsev ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aly R Seadawy

    2017-09-13

    Sep 13, 2017 ... We considered the two-dimensional DASWs in colli- sionless, unmagnetized cold plasma consisting of dust fluid, ions and electrons. The dynamics of DASWs is governed by the normalized fluid equations of nonlin- ear continuity (1), nonlinear motion of system (2) and. (3) and linear Poisson equation (4) as.

  3. Two-dimensional divertor modeling and scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catto, P.J.; Connor, J.W.; Knoll, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical models of divertors contain large numbers of dimensionless parameters that must be varied to investigate all operating regimes of interest. To simplify the task and gain insight into divertor operation, we employ similarity techniques to investigate whether model systems of equations plus boundary conditions in the steady state admit scaling transformations that lead to useful divertor similarity scaling laws. A short mean free path neutral-plasma model of the divertor region below the x-point is adopted in which all perpendicular transport is due to the neutrals. We illustrate how the results can be used to benchmark large computer simulations by employing a modified version of UEDGE which contains a neutral fluid model. (orig.)

  4. Charge ordering in two-dimensional ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Aurélien; Urbic, Tomaz

    2018-04-01

    The structural properties of model two-dimensional (2D) ionic liquids are examined, with a particular focus on the charge ordering process, with the use of computer simulation and integral equation theories. The influence of the logarithmic form of the Coulomb interaction, versus that of a 3D screened interaction form, is analysed. Charge order is found to hold and to be analogous for both interaction models, despite their very different form. The influence of charge ordering in the low density regime is discussed in relation to well known properties of 2D Coulomb fluids, such as the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and criticality. The present study suggests the existence of a stable thermodynamic labile cluster phase, implying the existence of a liquid-liquid "transition" above the liquid-gas binodal. The liquid-gas and Kosterlitz-Thouless transitions would then take place inside the predicted cluster phase.

  5. Optimization of a two-dimensional liquid chromatography-supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry (2D-LC-SFS-MS) system to assess "in-vivo" inter-conversion of chiral drug molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Meenakshi; Larson, Eli; Venkatramani, C J; Al-Sayah, Mohammad A

    2018-05-01

    Enantioselective analysis is an essential requirement during the pharmaceutical development of chiral drug molecules. In pre-clinical and clinical studies, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) mandates the assessment of "in vivo" inter-conversion of chiral drugs to determine their physiological effects. In-vivo analysis of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and its potential metabolites could be quite challenging due to their low abundance (ng/mL levels) and matrix interferences. Therefore, highly selective and sensitive analytical techniques are required to separate the API and its metabolites from the matrix components and one another. Additionally, for chiral APIs, further analytical separation is required to resolve the API and its potential metabolites from their corresponding enantiomers. In this work, we demonstrate the optimization of our previously designed two-dimensional liquid chromatography-supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry (2D-LC-SFC -MS) system to achieve 10 ng/mL detection limit [1]. The first LC dimension, used as a desalting step, could efficiently separate the API from its potential metabolites and matrix components. The API and its metabolites were then trapped/focused on small trapping columns and transferred onto the second SFC dimension for chiral separation. Detection can be achieved by ultra-violet (UV) or MS detection. Different system parameters such as column dimensions, transfer volumes, trapping column stationary phase, system tubing internal diameter (i.d.), and detection techniques, were optimized to enhance the sensitivity of the 2D-LC-SFC-MS system. The limit of detection was determined to be 10 ng/mL. An application is described where a mouse hepatocyte treated sample was analyzed using the optimized 2D-LC-SFC-MS system with successful assessment of the ratio of API to its metabolite (1D-LC), as well as the corresponding enantiomeric excess values (% e.e.) of each (2D-SFC). Copyright © 2018

  6. Graphics supercomputer for computational fluid dynamics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Goang S.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this project is to purchase a state-of-the-art graphics supercomputer to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) research capability at Alabama A & M University (AAMU) and to support the Air Force research projects. A cutting-edge graphics supercomputer system, Onyx VTX, from Silicon Graphics Computer Systems (SGI), was purchased and installed. Other equipment including a desktop personal computer, PC-486 DX2 with a built-in 10-BaseT Ethernet card, a 10-BaseT hub, an Apple Laser Printer Select 360, and a notebook computer from Zenith were also purchased. A reading room has been converted to a research computer lab by adding some furniture and an air conditioning unit in order to provide an appropriate working environments for researchers and the purchase equipment. All the purchased equipment were successfully installed and are fully functional. Several research projects, including two existing Air Force projects, are being performed using these facilities.

  7. Visualization of unsteady computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimes, Robert

    1994-11-01

    A brief summary of the computer environment used for calculating three dimensional unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is presented. This environment requires a super computer as well as massively parallel processors (MPP's) and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (by concurrently working on the same task) provide the required computational bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. The cluster of reduced instruction set computers (RISC) is a recent advent based on the low cost and high performance that workstation vendors provide. The cluster, with the proper software can act as a multiple instruction/multiple data (MIMD) machine. A new set of software tools is being designed specifically to address visualizing 3D unsteady CFD results in these environments. Three user's manuals for the parallel version of Visual3, pV3, revision 1.00 make up the bulk of this report.

  8. Two dimensional infinite conformal symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanta, N.N.; Tripathy, K.C.

    1993-01-01

    The invariant discontinuous (discrete) conformal transformation groups, namely the Kleinian and Fuchsian groups Gamma (with an arbitrary signature) of H (the Poincare upper half-plane l) and the unit disc Delta are explicitly constructed from the fundamental domain D. The Riemann surface with signatures of Gamma and conformally invariant automorphic forms (functions) with Peterson scalar product are discussed. The functor, where the category of complex Hilbert spaces spanned by the space of cusp forms constitutes the two dimensional conformal field theory. (Author) 7 refs

  9. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune

    -dimensional separation space. Optimization of gradients in online RP×RP is more difficult than in normal HPLC as a result of the increased number of parameters and their influence on each other. Modeling the coverage of the compounds across the two-dimensional chromatogram as a result of a change in gradients could...... be used for optimization purposes, and reduce the time spend on optimization. In this thesis (chapter 6), and manuscript B, a measure of the coverage of the compounds in the twodimensional separation space is defined. It is then shown that this measure can be modeled for changes in the gradient in both...

  10. Zonal methods and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atta, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in developing numerical algorithms for solving fluid flow problems, and the continuing improvement in the speed and storage of large scale computers have made it feasible to compute the flow field about complex and realistic configurations. Current solution methods involve the use of a hierarchy of mathematical models ranging from the linearized potential equation to the Navier Stokes equations. Because of the increasing complexity of both the geometries and flowfields encountered in practical fluid flow simulation, there is a growing emphasis in computational fluid dynamics on the use of zonal methods. A zonal method is one that subdivides the total flow region into interconnected smaller regions or zones. The flow solutions in these zones are then patched together to establish the global flow field solution. Zonal methods are primarily used either to limit the complexity of the governing flow equations to a localized region or to alleviate the grid generation problems about geometrically complex and multicomponent configurations. This paper surveys the application of zonal methods for solving the flow field about two and three-dimensional configurations. Various factors affecting their accuracy and ease of implementation are also discussed. From the presented review it is concluded that zonal methods promise to be very effective for computing complex flowfields and configurations. Currently there are increasing efforts to improve their efficiency, versatility, and accuracy

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of a lithium/thionyl chloride battery with electrolyte flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W.B.; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, J.W.; Jungst, R.G.; Nagasubramanian, G.

    2000-02-01

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. As in earlier one-dimensional models, the model accounts for transport of species and charge, and electrode porosity variations and electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures show good agreement with published experimental data, and are essentially identical to results published for one-dimensional models. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulations show that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell head space predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  12. Two dimensional solid state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kentgens, A.P.M.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis illustrates, by discussing some existing and newly developed 2D solid state experiments, that two-dimensional NMR of solids is a useful and important extension of NMR techniques. Chapter 1 gives an overview of spin interactions and averaging techniques important in solid state NMR. As 2D NMR is already an established technique in solutions, only the basics of two dimensional NMR are presented in chapter 2, with an emphasis on the aspects important for solid spectra. The following chapters discuss the theoretical background and applications of specific 2D solid state experiments. An application of 2D-J resolved NMR, analogous to J-resolved spectroscopy in solutions, to natural rubber is given in chapter 3. In chapter 4 the anisotropic chemical shift is mapped out against the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to obtain information about the orientation of the shielding tensor in poly-(oxymethylene). Chapter 5 concentrates on the study of super-slow molecular motions in polymers using a variant of the 2D exchange experiment developed by us. Finally chapter 6 discusses a new experiment, 2D nutation NMR, which makes it possible to study the quadrupole interaction of half-integer spins. 230 refs.; 48 figs.; 8 tabs

  13. Analytic computation of the quantum levels of a two-dimensional hydrogenic donor in the presence of a constant magnetic field of arbitrary strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba, Victor M.; Pino, Ramiro [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela)

    2001-03-01

    In this article we review different techniques for computing the energy spectrum of 2 D hydrogenic donors and two-electron quantum dots in the presence of a constant, magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the electron. We compute the 1S, 2P- and 3D- energy levels via a scaled variational mixed-bases method. We compare our results with those obtained with the shifted 1/N method. [Spanish] En el presente articulo se exhiben distintos metodos para calcular el espectro de energia de donores hidrogenicos y puntos cuanticos con dos electrones en presencia de un campo magnetico constante perpendicular al plano del electron. Se calculan los niveles de energia 1S, 2P- y 3D- con ayuda del metodo variacional de bases mixtas con escalamiento. Comparamos nuestro resultados con los obtenidos con ayuda del metodo 1/N con corrimiento.

  14. Elaboration of a computer code for the solution of a two-dimensional two-energy group diffusion problem using the matrix response method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarenga, M.A.B.

    1980-12-01

    An analytical procedure to solve the neutron diffusion equation in two dimensions and two energy groups was developed. The response matrix method was used coupled with an expansion of the neutron flux in finite Fourier series. A computer code 'MRF2D' was elaborated to implement the above mentioned procedure for PWR reactor core calculations. Different core symmetry options are allowed by the code, which is also flexible enough to allow for improvements by means of algorithm optimization. The code performance was compared with a corner mesh finite difference code named TVEDIM by using a International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard problem. Computer processing time 12,7% smaller is required by the MRF2D code to reach the same precision on criticality eigenvalue. (Author) [pt

  15. Computational fluid dynamics in ventilation design

    CERN Document Server

    Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B; Davidson, Lars; Schälin, Alois

    2007-01-01

    CFD-calculations have been rapidly developed to a powerful tool for the analysis of air pollution distribution in various spaces. However, the user of CFD-calculation should be aware of the basic principles of calculations and specifically the boundary conditions. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) – in Ventilation Design models is written by a working group of highly qualified international experts representing research, consulting and design.

  16. Numerical model for two-dimensional hydrodynamics and energy transport. [VECTRA code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, D.S.

    1973-06-01

    The theoretical basis and computational procedure of the VECTRA computer program are presented. VECTRA (Vorticity-Energy Code for TRansport Analysis) is designed for applying numerical simulation to a broad range of intake/discharge flows in conjunction with power plant hydrological evaluation. The code computational procedure is based on finite-difference approximation of the vorticity-stream function partial differential equations which govern steady flow momentum transport of two-dimensional, incompressible, viscous fluids in conjunction with the transport of heat and other constituents.

  17. The use of computers for instruction in fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Val

    1987-01-01

    Applications for computers which improve instruction in fluid dynamics are examined. Computers can be used to illustrate three-dimensional flow fields and simple fluid dynamics mechanisms, to solve fluid dynamics problems, and for electronic sketching. The usefulness of computer applications is limited by computer speed, memory, and software and the clarity and field of view of the projected display. Proposed advances in personal computers which will address these limitations are discussed. Long range applications for computers in education are considered.

  18. Mapping the Information Trace in Local Field Potentials by a Computational Method of Two-Dimensional Time-Shifting Synchronization Likelihood Based on Graphic Processing Unit Acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zi-Fang; Li, Xue-Zhu; Wan, You

    2017-12-01

    The local field potential (LFP) is a signal reflecting the electrical activity of neurons surrounding the electrode tip. Synchronization between LFP signals provides important details about how neural networks are organized. Synchronization between two distant brain regions is hard to detect using linear synchronization algorithms like correlation and coherence. Synchronization likelihood (SL) is a non-linear synchronization-detecting algorithm widely used in studies of neural signals from two distant brain areas. One drawback of non-linear algorithms is the heavy computational burden. In the present study, we proposed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-accelerated implementation of an SL algorithm with optional 2-dimensional time-shifting. We tested the algorithm with both artificial data and raw LFP data. The results showed that this method revealed detailed information from original data with the synchronization values of two temporal axes, delay time and onset time, and thus can be used to reconstruct the temporal structure of a neural network. Our results suggest that this GPU-accelerated method can be extended to other algorithms for processing time-series signals (like EEG and fMRI) using similar recording techniques.

  19. The coupling of fluids, dynamics, and controls on advanced architecture computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    This grant provided for the demonstration of coupled controls, body dynamics, and fluids computations in a workstation cluster environment; and an investigation of the impact of peer-peer communication on flow solver performance and robustness. The findings of these investigations were documented in the conference articles.The attached publication, 'Towards Distributed Fluids/Controls Simulations', documents the solution and scaling of the coupled Navier-Stokes, Euler rigid-body dynamics, and state feedback control equations for a two-dimensional canard-wing. The poor scaling shown was due to serialized grid connectivity computation and Ethernet bandwidth limits. The scaling of a peer-to-peer communication flow code on an IBM SP-2 was also shown. The scaling of the code on the switched fabric-linked nodes was good, with a 2.4 percent loss due to communication of intergrid boundary point information. The code performance on 30 worker nodes was 1.7 (mu)s/point/iteration, or a factor of three over a Cray C-90 head. The attached paper, 'Nonlinear Fluid Computations in a Distributed Environment', documents the effect of several computational rate enhancing methods on convergence. For the cases shown, the highest throughput was achieved using boundary updates at each step, with the manager process performing communication tasks only. Constrained domain decomposition of the implicit fluid equations did not degrade the convergence rate or final solution. The scaling of a coupled body/fluid dynamics problem on an Ethernet-linked cluster was also shown.

  20. A finite element perturbation method for computing fluid-induced forces on a certrifugal impeller rotating and whirling in a volute casing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Jan B.; van Essen, T.G.; van Essen, T.G.

    1997-01-01

    A finite element based method has been developed for computing time-averaged fluid-induced radial excitation forces and rotor dynamic forces on a two-dimensional centrifugal impeller rotating and whirling in a volute casing. In this method potential flow theory is used, which implies the assumption

  1. Computational fluid dynamics applied to flows in an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M. D.; Diwakar, R.; Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Jones, E.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation is a continuation of studies conducted by Diwakar et al. (1976) and Griffin et al. (1976), who reported the first computational fluid dynamic results for the two-dimensional flowfield for all four strokes of a reciprocating internal combustion (IC) engine cycle. An analysis of rectangular and cylindrical three-dimensional engine models is performed. The working fluid is assumed to be inviscid air of constant specific heats. Calculations are carried out of a four-stroke IC engine flowfield wherein detailed finite-rate chemical combustion of a gasoline-air mixture is included. The calculations remain basically inviscid, except that in some instances thermal conduction is included to allow a more realistic model of the localized sparking of the mixture. All the results of the investigation are obtained by means of an explicity time-dependent finite-difference technique, using a high-speed digital computer.

  2. Computational fluid mechanics qualification calculations for the code TEACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrazia, M.C.; Fitzsimmons, L.B.; Reynolds, J.T.

    1979-11-01

    KAPL is developing a predictive method for three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent fluid flow configurations typically encountered in the thermal-hydraulic design of a nuclear reactor. A series of experiments has been selected for analysis to investigate the adequacy of the two-equation turbulence model developed at Imperial College, London, England for predicting the flow patterns in simple geometries. The analysis of these experiments is described with the two-dimensional (2-D) turbulent fluid flow code TEACH. This work qualifies TEACH for a variety of geometries and flow conditions

  3. User's manual and guide to SALT3 and SALT4: two-dimensional computer codes for analysis of test-scale underground excavations for the disposal of radioactive waste in bedded salt deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, E.N.; St John, C.M.; Hart, R.D.

    1984-02-01

    SALT3 and SALT4 are two-dimensional analytical/displacement-discontinuity codes designed to evaluate temperatures, deformation, and stresses associated with underground disposal of radioactive waste in bedded salt. These codes were developed by the University of Minnesota for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation in 1979. The present documentation describes the mathematical equations of the physical system being modeled, the numerical techniques utilized, and the organization of these computer codes. The SALT3 and SALT4 codes can simulate: (a) viscoelastic behavior in pillars adjacent to excavations; (b) transversely isotropic elastic moduli such as those exhibited by bedded or stratified rock; and (c) excavation sequence. Major advantages of these codes are: (a) computational efficiency; (b) the small amount of input data required; and (c) a creep law based on laboratory experimental data for salt. The main disadvantage is that some of the assumptions in the formulation of the codes, i.e., the homogeneous elastic half-space and temperature-independent material properties, render it unsuitable for canister-scale analysis or analysis of lateral deformation of the pillars. The SALT3 and SALT4 codes can be used for parameter sensitivity analyses of two-dimensional, repository-scale, thermomechanical response in bedded salt during the excavation, operational, and post-closure phases. It is especially useful in evaluating alternative patterns and sequences of excavation or waste canister placement. SALT3 is a refinement of an earlier code, SALT, and includes a fully anelastic creep model and thermal stress routine. SALT4 is a later version, and incorporates a revised creep model which is strain-hardening

  4. Equilibrium: two-dimensional configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    In Chapter 6, the problem of toroidal force balance is addressed in the simplest, nontrivial two-dimensional geometry, that of an axisymmetric torus. A derivation is presented of the Grad-Shafranov equation, the basic equation describing axisymmetric toroidal equilibrium. The solutions to equations provide a complete description of ideal MHD equilibria: radial pressure balance, toroidal force balance, equilibrium Beta limits, rotational transform, shear, magnetic wall, etc. A wide number of configurations are accurately modeled by the Grad-Shafranov equation. Among them are all types of tokamaks, the spheromak, the reversed field pinch, and toroidal multipoles. An important aspect of the analysis is the use of asymptotic expansions, with an inverse aspect ratio serving as the expansion parameter. In addition, an equation similar to the Grad-Shafranov equation, but for helically symmetric equilibria, is presented. This equation represents the leading-order description low-Beta and high-Beta stellarators, heliacs, and the Elmo bumpy torus. The solutions all correspond to infinitely long straight helices. Bending such a configuration into a torus requires a full three-dimensional calculation and is discussed in Chapter 7

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on the new REHVA Guidebook Computational Fluid  Dynamics in Ventilation Design (Nielsen et al. 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis(Nielsen 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis Allard, Hazim B. Awbi, Lars Davidson and Alois Schälin. The guidebook is made for people....... The guidebook introduces rules for good quality prediction work, and it is the purpose of the guidebook to improve the technical level of CFD work in ventilation.......This paper is based on the new REHVA Guidebook Computational Fluid  Dynamics in Ventilation Design (Nielsen et al. 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis(Nielsen 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis Allard, Hazim B. Awbi, Lars Davidson and Alois Schälin. The guidebook is made for people...... who need to use and discuss results based on CFD predictions, and it gives insight into the subject for those who are not used to work with CFD. The guidebook is also written for people working with CFD who have to be more aware of how this numerical method is applied in the area of ventilation...

  6. Temperature maxima in stable two-dimensional shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kum, O.; Hoover, W.G.; Hoover, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics to study the structure of moderately strong shock waves in dense two-dimensional fluids, using Lucy pair potential. The stationary profiles show relatively broad temperature maxima, for both the longitudinal and the average kinetic temperatures, just as does Mott-Smith model for strong shock waves in dilute three-dimensional gases. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. Fast Computation Methods Research for Two Dimensional MUSIC Spectrum Based on Circular Array%圆阵二维 MUSIC 谱快速计算方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜政东; 魏平; 赵菲; 尹文禄

    2015-01-01

    针对二维波达方向估计时 MUSIC 谱的快速计算问题,研究了均匀圆阵变换到虚拟线阵的 MUSIC 算法(UCA-ULA-MUSIC)、流形分离 MUSIC 算法(MS-MUSIC)、傅立叶域线性求根 MUSIC 算法(FD-Line-Search-MU-SIC)、基于 FFT 的2n 元均匀圆阵 MUSIC 算法(2n-UCA-FFT-MUSIC)与基于 FFT 的任意圆阵 MUSIC 算法(ACA-FFT-MUSIC)。对各种算法快速计算二维 MUSIC 谱的实现步骤进行了总结。在此基础上,给出了各算法计算二维MUSIC 谱的计算复杂度表达式,并以传统方法为参考,对比了各种快速算法相对于传统方法的计算复杂度比值;同时,针对不同的阵列形式,对适用的快速算法的测向性能进行了仿真对比。根据分析和对比的结果,指出 MS-MUSIC 算法与 ACA-FFT-MUSIC 算法具有更高的工程应用价值,由具体的情况单独或分频段联合使用 MS-MUSIC算法与 ACA-FFT-MUSIC 算法,可以使测向系统较好的兼顾测向性能与时效性。%According to the fast computation problem of MUSIC spectrum in two dimensional direction of arrival estimation, the fast algorithms by manifold transformation or spectrum function transformation are studied.The implementation steps of computation method for two dimensional MUSIC spectrum by these algorithms are summarized.Furthermore,expressions for computational complexity of discussed algorithms in computing two dimensional MUSIC spectrum are presented.With refer-ence to the conventional method,the ratio of computational complexity of discussed algorithms is compared.Meanwhile,for different circular arrays,the direction finding performance of applicable algorithms is compared by simulation.It is proved that the MUSIC algorithm based on Manifold Separation (MS-MUSIC)and Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT)which suits to arbitrary circular array (ACA-FFT-MUSIC)have higher engineering value according to the results of analysis and com-parison.The performance and

  8. CFDLIB05, Computational Fluid Dynamics Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwa, B.A.; Padial, N.T.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; VanderHeyden, W.B.

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CFDLib05 is the Los Alamos Computational Fluid Dynamics Library. This is a collection of hydro-codes using a common data structure and a common numerical method, for problems ranging from single-field, incompressible flow, to multi-species, multi-field, compressible flow. The data structure is multi-block, with a so-called structured grid in each block. The numerical method is a Finite-Volume scheme employing a state vector that is fully cell-centered. This means that the integral form of the conversation laws is solved on the physical domain that is represented by a mesh of control volumes. The typical control volume is an arbitrary quadrilateral in 2D and an arbitrary hexahedron in 3D. The Finite-Volume scheme is for time-unsteady flow and remains well coupled by means of time and space centered fluxes; if a steady state solution is required, the problem is integrated forward in time until the user is satisfied that the state is stationary. 2 - Methods: Cells-centered Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) method

  9. Artificial Intelligence In Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1991-01-01

    Paper compares four first-generation artificial-intelligence (Al) software systems for computational fluid dynamics. Includes: Expert Cooling Fan Design System (EXFAN), PAN AIR Knowledge System (PAKS), grid-adaptation program MITOSIS, and Expert Zonal Grid Generation (EZGrid). Focuses on knowledge-based ("expert") software systems. Analyzes intended tasks, kinds of knowledge possessed, magnitude of effort required to codify knowledge, how quickly constructed, performances, and return on investment. On basis of comparison, concludes Al most successful when applied to well-formulated problems solved by classifying or selecting preenumerated solutions. In contrast, application of Al to poorly understood or poorly formulated problems generally results in long development time and large investment of effort, with no guarantee of success.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  11. A review of Green's function methods in computational fluid mechanics: Background, recent developments and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorning, J.

    1981-01-01

    The research and development over the past eight years on local Green's function methods for the high-accuracy, high-efficiency numerical solution of nuclear engineering problems is reviewed. The basic concepts and key ideas are presented by starting with an expository review of the original fully two-dimensional local Green's function methods developed for neutron diffusion and heat conduction, and continuing through the progressively more complicated and more efficient nodal Green's function methods for neutron diffusion, heat conduction and neutron transport to establish the background for the recent development of Green's function methods in computational fluid mechanics. Some of the impressive numerical results obtained via these classes of methods for nuclear engineering problems are briefly summarized. Finally, speculations are proffered on future directions in which the development of these types of methods in fluid mechanics and other areas might lead. (orig.) [de

  12. Device for measuring the two-dimensional distribution of a radioactive substance on a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    A device is described by which, using a one-dimensional measuring proportional counter tube depending on position, one can measure the two-dimensionally distributed radioactivity of a surface and can plot this to scale two-dimensionally, after computer processing, or can show it two-dimensionally on a monitor. (orig.) [de

  13. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  14. Verification and validation in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkampf, William L.; Trucano, Timothy G.

    2002-04-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess accuracy and reliability in computational simulations. This paper presents an extensive review of the literature in V&V in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), discusses methods and procedures for assessing V&V, and develops a number of extensions to existing ideas. The review of the development of V&V terminology and methodology points out the contributions from members of the operations research, statistics, and CFD communities. Fundamental issues in V&V are addressed, such as code verification versus solution verification, model validation versus solution validation, the distinction between error and uncertainty, conceptual sources of error and uncertainty, and the relationship between validation and prediction. The fundamental strategy of verification is the identification and quantification of errors in the computational model and its solution. In verification activities, the accuracy of a computational solution is primarily measured relative to two types of highly accurate solutions: analytical solutions and highly accurate numerical solutions. Methods for determining the accuracy of numerical solutions are presented and the importance of software testing during verification activities is emphasized. The fundamental strategy of validation is to assess how accurately the computational results compare with the experimental data, with quantified error and uncertainty estimates for both. This strategy employs a hierarchical methodology that segregates and simplifies the physical and coupling phenomena involved in the complex engineering system of interest. A hypersonic cruise missile is used as an example of how this hierarchical structure is formulated. The discussion of validation assessment also encompasses a number of other important topics. A set of guidelines is proposed for designing and conducting validation experiments, supported by an explanation of how validation experiments are different

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal Article Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Four different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Despite the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways of the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. This greater deposition of spores in the upper airways in the human resulted in lower penetration and deposition in the tracheobronchial airways and the deep lung than that predict

  16. Hamiltonian formalism of two-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Maxim V

    2014-12-08

    In this paper, the two-dimensional Benney system describing long wave propagation of a finite depth fluid motion and the multi-dimensional Russo-Smereka kinetic equation describing a bubbly flow are considered. The Hamiltonian approach established by J. Gibbons for the one-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation is extended to a multi-dimensional case. A local Hamiltonian structure associated with the hydrodynamic lattice of moments derived by D. J. Benney is constructed. A relationship between this hydrodynamic lattice of moments and the two-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation is found. In the two-dimensional case, a Hamiltonian hydrodynamic lattice for the Russo-Smereka kinetic model is constructed. Simple hydrodynamic reductions are presented.

  17. Two-dimensional transport of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshman, S.P.; Jardin, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced set of two-fluid transport equations is obtained from the conservation equations describing the time evolution of the differential particle number, entropy, and magnetic fluxes in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma with nested magnetic surfaces. Expanding in the small ratio of perpendicular to parallel mobilities and thermal conductivities yields as solubility constraints one-dimensional equations for the surface-averaged thermodynamic variables and magnetic fluxes. Since Ohm's law E +u x B =R', where R' accounts for any nonideal effects, only determines the particle flow relative to the diffusing magnetic surfaces, it is necessary to solve a single two-dimensional generalized differential equation, (partial/partialt) delpsi. (delp - J x B) =0, to find the absolute velocity of a magnetic surface enclosing a fixed toroidal flux. This equation is linear but nonstandard in that it involves flux surface averages of the unknown velocity. Specification of R' and the cross-field ion and electron heat fluxes provides a closed system of equations. A time-dependent coordinate transformation is used to describe the diffusion of plasma quantities through magnetic surfaces of changing shape

  18. Turbulent equipartitions in two dimensional drift convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isichenko, M.B.; Yankov, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Unlike the thermodynamic equipartition of energy in conservative systems, turbulent equipartitions (TEP) describe strongly non-equilibrium systems such as turbulent plasmas. In turbulent systems, energy is no longer a good invariant, but one can utilize the conservation of other quantities, such as adiabatic invariants, frozen-in magnetic flux, entropy, or combination thereof, in order to derive new, turbulent quasi-equilibria. These TEP equilibria assume various forms, but in general they sustain spatially inhomogeneous distributions of the usual thermodynamic quantities such as density or temperature. This mechanism explains the effects of particle and energy pinch in tokamaks. The analysis of the relaxed states caused by turbulent mixing is based on the existence of Lagrangian invariants (quantities constant along fluid-particle or other orbits). A turbulent equipartition corresponds to the spatially uniform distribution of relevant Lagrangian invariants. The existence of such turbulent equilibria is demonstrated in the simple model of two dimensional electrostatically turbulent plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The turbulence is prescribed, and the turbulent transport is assumed to be much stronger than the classical collisional transport. The simplicity of the model makes it possible to derive the equations describing the relaxation to the TEP state in several limits

  19. Fluid dynamics theoretical and computational approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Warsi, ZUA

    2005-01-01

    Important Nomenclature Kinematics of Fluid Motion Introduction to Continuum Motion Fluid Particles Inertial Coordinate Frames Motion of a Continuum The Time Derivatives Velocity and Acceleration Steady and Nonsteady Flow Trajectories of Fluid Particles and Streamlines Material Volume and Surface Relation between Elemental Volumes Kinematic Formulas of Euler and Reynolds Control Volume and Surface Kinematics of Deformation Kinematics of Vorticity and Circulation References Problems The Conservation Laws and the Kinetics of Flow Fluid Density and the Conservation of Mass Prin

  20. A Study of Flow Separation in Transonic Flow Using Inviscid and Viscous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J. A.; Tiwari, S. N.; Vonlavante, E.

    1988-01-01

    A comparison of flow separation in transonic flows is made using various computational schemes which solve the Euler and the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid mechanics. The flows examined are computed using several simple two-dimensional configurations including a backward facing step and a bump in a channel. Comparison of the results obtained using shock fitting and flux vector splitting methods are presented and the results obtained using the Euler codes are compared to results on the same configurations using a code which solves the Navier-Stokes equations.

  1. Topology optimization of two-dimensional waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2003-01-01

    In this work we use the method of topology optimization to design two-dimensional waveguides with low transmission loss.......In this work we use the method of topology optimization to design two-dimensional waveguides with low transmission loss....

  2. Research in Applied Mathematics, Fluid Mechanics and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1998 through March 31, 1999.

  3. [Research activities in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period April 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Blazek, J

    2005-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is an important design tool in engineering and also a substantial research tool in various physical sciences as well as in biology. The objective of this book is to provide university students with a solid foundation for understanding the numerical methods employed in today's CFD and to familiarise them with modern CFD codes by hands-on experience. It is also intended for engineers and scientists starting to work in the field of CFD or for those who apply CFD codes. Due to the detailed index, the text can serve as a reference handbook too. Each chapter includes an extensive bibliography, which provides an excellent basis for further studies. The accompanying companion website contains the sources of 1-D and 2-D Euler and Navier-Stokes flow solvers (structured and unstructured) as well as of grid generators. Provided are also tools for Von Neumann stability analysis of 1-D model equations. Finally, the companion website includes the source code of a dedicated visualisation so...

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods and Their Applications in Medical Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalewski Wojciech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As defined by the National Institutes of Health: “Biomedical engineering integrates physical, chemical, mathematical, and computational sciences and engineering principles to study biology, medicine, behavior, and health”. Many issues in this area are closely related to fluid dynamics. This paper provides an overview of the basic concepts concerning Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications in medicine.

  6. Turbulence Statistics in a Two-Dimensional Vortex Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frishman, Anna; Herbert, Corentin

    2018-05-01

    Disentangling the evolution of a coherent mean-flow and turbulent fluctuations, interacting through the nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations, is a central issue in fluid mechanics. It affects a wide range of flows, such as planetary atmospheres, plasmas, or wall-bounded flows, and hampers turbulence models. We consider the special case of a two-dimensional flow in a periodic box, for which the mean flow, a pair of box-size vortices called "condensate," emerges from turbulence. As was recently shown, a perturbative closure describes correctly the condensate when turbulence is excited at small scales. In this context, we obtain explicit results for the statistics of turbulence, encoded in the Reynolds stress tensor. We demonstrate that the two components of the Reynolds stress, the momentum flux and the turbulent energy, are determined by different mechanisms. It was suggested previously that the momentum flux is fixed by a balance between forcing and mean-flow advection: using unprecedently long numerical simulations, we provide the first direct evidence supporting this prediction. By contrast, combining analytical computations with numerical simulations, we show that the turbulent energy is determined only by mean-flow advection and obtain for the first time a formula describing its profile in the vortex.

  7. Effective viscosity of two-dimensional suspensions: Confinement effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyeux, Vincent; Priem, Stephane; Jibuti, Levan; Farutin, Alexander; Ismail, Mourad; Peyla, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    We study the rheology of a sheared two-dimensional (2D) suspension of non-Brownian disks in the presence of walls. Although it is of course possible today with modern computers and powerful algorithms to perform direct numerical simulations that fully account for multiparticle 3D interactions in the presence of walls, the analysis of the simple case of a 2D suspension provides valuable insights and helps in the understanding of 3D results. Due to the direct visualization of the whole 2D flow (the shear plane), we are able to give a clear interpretation of the full hydrodynamics of semidilute confined suspensions. For instance, we examine the role of disk-wall and disk-disk interactions to determine the dissipation of confined sheared suspensions whose effective viscosity depends on the area fraction ϕ of the disks as ηeff=η0[1 +[η ] ϕ +β ϕ2+O (ϕ3) ] . We provide numerical estimates of [η ] and β for a wide range of confinements. As a benchmark for our simulations, we compare the numerical results obtained for [η ] and β for very weak confinements with analytical values [η] ∞ and β∞ obtained for an infinite fluid. If the value [η] ∞=2 is well known in the literature, much less is published on the value of β . Here we analytically calculate with very high precision β∞=3.6 . We also reexamine the 3D case in the light of our 2D results.

  8. Savoir Fluide. A newsletter on computational hydraulics and fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter reports on computational works performed by the National Laboratory of Hydraulics (LNH) from Electricite de France (EdF). Two papers were selected which concern the simulation of the Paluel nuclear power plant plume and the computation of particles and droplets inside a cooling tower. (J.S.)

  9. Two-dimensional generalized harmonic oscillators and their Darboux partners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel

    2011-01-01

    We construct two-dimensional Darboux partners of the shifted harmonic oscillator potential and of an isotonic oscillator potential belonging to the Smorodinsky–Winternitz class of superintegrable systems. The transformed solutions, their potentials and the corresponding discrete energy spectra are computed in explicit form. (paper)

  10. Finite element solution of two dimensional time dependent heat equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maaz

    1999-01-01

    A Microsoft Windows based computer code, named FHEAT, has been developed for solving two dimensional heat problems in Cartesian and Cylindrical geometries. The programming language is Microsoft Visual Basic 3.0. The code makes use of Finite element formulation for spatial domain and Finite difference formulation for time domain. Presently the code is capable of solving two dimensional steady state and transient problems in xy- and rz-geometries. The code is capable excepting both triangular and rectangular elements. Validation and benchmarking was done against hand calculations and published results. (author)

  11. Hall effect in the two-dimensional Luttinger liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Hall effect in the normal state is a commom theme of all the cuprate superconductors and has been one of the more puzzling observations on these puzzling materials. We describe a general scheme within the Luttinger liquid theory of these two-dimensional quantum fluids which corrrelates the anomalous Hall and resistivity observations on a wide variety of both pure and doped single crystals, especially the data in the accompanying Letter of Chien, Wang, and Ong

  12. High-pressure fluid phase equilibria phenomenology and computation

    CERN Document Server

    Deiters, Ulrich K

    2012-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of the phase diagrams of fluid mixtures (fluid = liquid, gas, or supercritical state), which can show an astonishing variety when elevated pressures are taken into account; phenomena like retrograde condensation (single and double) and azeotropy (normal and double) are discussed. It then gives an introduction into the relevant thermodynamic equations for fluid mixtures, including some that are rarely found in modern textbooks, and shows how they can they be used to compute phase diagrams and related properties. This chapter gives a consistent and axiomatic approach to fluid thermodynamics; it avoids using activity coefficients. Further chapters are dedicated to solid-fluid phase equilibria and global phase diagrams (systematic search for phase diagram classes). The appendix contains numerical algorithms needed for the computations. The book thus enables the reader to create or improve computer programs for the calculation of fluid phase diagrams. introduces phase diagram class...

  13. Two-dimensional topological photonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Chen; He, Cheng; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Shi-Ning; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2017-09-01

    The topological phase of matter, originally proposed and first demonstrated in fermionic electronic systems, has drawn considerable research attention in the past decades due to its robust transport of edge states and its potential with respect to future quantum information, communication, and computation. Recently, searching for such a unique material phase in bosonic systems has become a hot research topic worldwide. So far, many bosonic topological models and methods for realizing them have been discovered in photonic systems, acoustic systems, mechanical systems, etc. These discoveries have certainly yielded vast opportunities in designing material phases and related properties in the topological domain. In this review, we first focus on some of the representative photonic topological models and employ the underlying Dirac model to analyze the edge states and geometric phase. On the basis of these models, three common types of two-dimensional topological photonic systems are discussed: 1) photonic quantum Hall effect with broken time-reversal symmetry; 2) photonic topological insulator and the associated pseudo-time-reversal symmetry-protected mechanism; 3) time/space periodically modulated photonic Floquet topological insulator. Finally, we provide a summary and extension of this emerging field, including a brief introduction to the Weyl point in three-dimensional systems.

  14. Two-dimensional analytic weighting functions for limb scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawada, D. J.; Bourassa, A. E.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2017-10-01

    Through the inversion of limb scatter measurements it is possible to obtain vertical profiles of trace species in the atmosphere. Many of these inversion methods require what is often referred to as weighting functions, or derivatives of the radiance with respect to concentrations of trace species in the atmosphere. Several radiative transfer models have implemented analytic methods to calculate weighting functions, alleviating the computational burden of traditional numerical perturbation methods. Here we describe the implementation of analytic two-dimensional weighting functions, where derivatives are calculated relative to atmospheric constituents in a two-dimensional grid of altitude and angle along the line of sight direction, in the SASKTRAN-HR radiative transfer model. Two-dimensional weighting functions are required for two-dimensional inversions of limb scatter measurements. Examples are presented where the analytic two-dimensional weighting functions are calculated with an underlying one-dimensional atmosphere. It is shown that the analytic weighting functions are more accurate than ones calculated with a single scatter approximation, and are orders of magnitude faster than a typical perturbation method. Evidence is presented that weighting functions for stratospheric aerosols calculated under a single scatter approximation may not be suitable for use in retrieval algorithms under solar backscatter conditions.

  15. Control Operator for the Two-Dimensional Energized Wave Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Augustus REJU

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the analytical model for the construction of the two-dimensional Energized wave equation. The control operator is given in term of space and time t independent variables. The integral quadratic objective cost functional is subject to the constraint of two-dimensional Energized diffusion, Heat and a source. The operator that shall be obtained extends the Conjugate Gradient method (ECGM as developed by Hestenes et al (1952, [1]. The new operator enables the computation of the penalty cost, optimal controls and state trajectories of the two-dimensional energized wave equation when apply to the Conjugate Gradient methods in (Waziri & Reju, LEJPT & LJS, Issues 9, 2006, [2-4] to appear in this series.

  16. Self-study manual for introduction to computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Nabatov, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is the branch of Fluid Mechanics and Computational Physics that plays a decent role in modern Mechanical Engineering Design process due to such advantages as relatively low cost of simulation comparing with conduction of real experiment, an opportunity to easily correct the design of a prototype prior to manufacturing of the final product and a wide range of application: mixing, acoustics, cooling and aerodynamics. This makes CFD particularly and Computation...

  17. Piezoelectricity in Two-Dimensional Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Tao; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Powering up 2D materials: Recent experimental studies confirmed the existence of piezoelectricity - the conversion of mechanical stress into electricity - in two-dimensional single-layer MoS2 nanosheets. The results represent a milestone towards

  18. Construction of two-dimensional quantum chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimek, S.; Kondracki, W.

    1987-12-01

    We present a sketch of the construction of the functional measure for the SU(2) quantum chromodynamics with one generation of fermions in two-dimensional space-time. The method is based on a detailed analysis of Wilson loops.

  19. Development of Two-Dimensional NMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Development of Two-Dimensional NMR: Strucure Determination of Biomolecules in Solution. Anil Kumar. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 995-1002 ...

  20. Phase transitions in two-dimensional systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, S.R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Some experiences are related using synchrotron radiation beams, to characterize solid-liquid (fusion) and commensurate solid-uncommensurate solid transitions in two-dimensional systems. Some ideas involved in the modern theories of two-dimensional fusion are shortly exposed. The systems treated consist of noble gases (Kr,Ar,Xe) adsorbed in the basal plane of graphite and thin films formed by some liquid crystal shells. (L.C.) [pt

  1. Description of a method for computing fluid-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantenbein, F.

    1982-02-01

    A general formulation allowing computation of structure vibrations in a dense fluid is described. It is based on fluid modelisation by fluid finite elements. For each fluid node are associated two variables: the pressure p and a variable π defined as p=d 2 π/dt 2 . Coupling between structure and fluid is introduced by surface elements. This method is easy to introduce in a general finite element code. Validation was obtained by analytical calculus and tests. It is widely used for vibrational and seismic studies of pipes and internals of nuclear reactors some applications are presented [fr

  2. Computational fluid dynamics incompressible turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kajishima, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents numerical solution techniques for incompressible turbulent flows that occur in a variety of scientific and engineering settings including aerodynamics of ground-based vehicles and low-speed aircraft, fluid flows in energy systems, atmospheric flows, and biological flows. This book encompasses fluid mechanics, partial differential equations, numerical methods, and turbulence models, and emphasizes the foundation on how the governing partial differential equations for incompressible fluid flow can be solved numerically in an accurate and efficient manner. Extensive discussions on incompressible flow solvers and turbulence modeling are also offered. This text is an ideal instructional resource and reference for students, research scientists, and professional engineers interested in analyzing fluid flows using numerical simulations for fundamental research and industrial applications. • Introduces CFD techniques for incompressible flow and turbulence with a comprehensive approach; • Enr...

  3. GEPOIS: a two dimensional nonuniform mesh Poisson solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Freeman, J.R.

    1979-06-01

    A computer code is described which solves Poisson's equation for the electric potential over a two dimensional cylindrical (r,z) nonuniform mesh which can contain internal electrodes. Poisson's equation is solved over a given region subject to a specified charge distribution with either Neumann or Dirichlet perimeter boundary conditions and with Dirichlet boundary conditions on internal surfaces. The static electric field is also computed over the region with special care given to normal electric field components at boundary surfaces

  4. Two-dimensional simulation of the MHD stability, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Gen-ichi; Amano, Tsuneo.

    1976-03-01

    The two-dimensional computer code has been prepared to study MHD stability of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma with and without the surrounding vacuum region. It also includes the effect of magnetic surfaces with non-circular cross sections. The linearized equations of motion are solved as an initial value problem. The results by computer simulation are compared with those by the theory for the cylindrical plasma; they are in good agreement. (auth.)

  5. A future for computational fluid dynamics at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Battistin, M

    2005-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is an analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer and associated phenomena in physical systems using computers. CFD has been used at CERN since 1993 by the TS-CV group, to solve thermo-fluid related problems, particularly during the development, design and construction phases of the LHC experiments. Computer models based on CFD techniques can be employed to reduce the effort required for prototype testing, saving not only time and money but offering possibilities of additional investigations and design optimisation. The development of a more efficient support team at CERN depends on to two important factors: available computing power and experienced engineers. Available computer power IS the limiting resource of CFD. Only the recent increase of computer power had allowed important high tech and industrial applications. Computer Grid is already now (OpenLab at CERN) and will be more so in the future natural environment for CFD science. At CERN, CFD activities have been developed by...

  6. One- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation using experimentally generated reversing flow turbuulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, L.F.

    1990-08-01

    The activities described in this report do not constitute a continuum but rather a series of linked smaller investigations in the general area of one- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation. The initial impetus for these investigations was the development and construction of the Mechanical Engineering Test Rig (METR) under a grant awarded by NASA to Dr. Terry Simon at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota. The purpose of the METR is to provide experimental data on oscillating turbulent flows in Stirling machine working fluid flow path components (heater, cooler, regenerator, etc.) with particular emphasis on laminar/turbulent flow transitions. Hence, the initial goals for the grant awarded by NASA were, broadly, to provide computer simulation backup for the design of the METR and to analyze the results produced. This was envisaged in two phases: First, to apply an existing one-dimensional Stirling machine simulation code to the METR and second, to adapt a two-dimensional fluid mechanics code which had been developed for simulating high Rayleigh number buoyant cavity flows to the METR. The key aspect of this latter component was the development of an appropriate turbulence model suitable for generalized application to Stirling simulation. A final-step was then to apply the two-dimensional code to an existing Stirling machine for which adequate experimental data exist. The work described herein was carried out over a period of three years on a part-time basis. Forty percent of the first year's funding was provided as a match to the NASA funds by the Underground Space Center, University of Minnesota, which also made its computing facilities available to the project at no charge

  7. Surface Ship Shock Modeling and Simulation: Two-Dimensional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young S. Shin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling and simulation of the response of a surface ship system to underwater explosion requires an understanding of many different subject areas. These include the process of underwater explosion events, shock wave propagation, explosion gas bubble behavior and bubble-pulse loading, bulk and local cavitation, free surface effect, fluid-structure interaction, and structural dynamics. This paper investigates the effects of fluid-structure interaction and cavitation on the response of a surface ship using USA-NASTRAN-CFA code. First, the one-dimensional Bleich-Sandler model is used to validate the approach, and second, the underwater shock response of a two-dimensional mid-section model of a surface ship is predicted with a surrounding fluid model using a constitutive equation of a bilinear fluid which does not allow transmission of negative pressures.

  8. Unsteady flow around a two-dimensional section of a vertical axis turbine for tidal stream energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ju Jung

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The two-dimensional unsteady flow around a vertical axis turbine for tidal stream energy conversion was investigated using a computational fluid dynamics tool solving the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The geometry of the turbine blade section was NACA653-018 airfoil. The computational analysis was done at several different angles of attack and the results were compared with the corresponding experimental data for validation and calibration. Simulations were then carried out for the two-dimensional cross section of a vertical axis turbine. The simulation results demonstrated the usefulness of the method for the typical unsteady flows around vertical axis turbines. The optimum turbine efficiency was achieved for carefully selected combinations of the number of blades and tip speed ratios.

  9. Finite element method with quadratic quadrilateral unit for solving two dimensional incompressible N-S equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Ganqiang; Yu Qing; Xiao Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Viscous and incompressible fluid flow is important for numerous engineering mechanics problems. Because of high non linear and incompressibility for Navier-Stokes equation, it is very difficult to solve Navier-Stokes equation by numerical method. According to its characters of Navier-Stokes equation, quartic derivation controlling equation of the two dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is set up firstly. The method solves the problem for dealing with vorticity boundary and automatically meets incompressibility condition. Then Finite Element equation for Navier-Stokes equation is proposed by using quadratic quadrilateral unit with 8 nodes in which the unit function is quadratic and non linear.-Based on it, the Finite Element program of quadratic quadrilateral unit with 8 nodes is developed. Lastly, numerical experiment proves the accuracy and dependability of the method and also shows the method has good application prospect in computational fluid mechanics. (authors)

  10. Using FlowLab, an educational computational fluid dynamics tool, to perform a comparative study of turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parihar, A.; Kulkarni, A.; Stern, F.; Xing, T.; Moeykens, S.

    2005-01-01

    Flow over an Ahmed body is a key benchmark case for validating the complex turbulent flow field around vehicles. In spite of the simple geometry, the flow field around an Ahmed body retains critical features of real, external vehicular flow. The present study is an attempt to implement such a real life example into the course curriculum for undergraduate engineers. FlowLab, which is a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool developed by Fluent Inc. for use in engineering education, allows students to conduct interactive application studies. This paper presents a synopsis of FlowLab, a description of one FlowLab exercise, and an overview of the educational experience gained by students through using FlowLab, which is understood through student surveys and examinations. FlowLab-based CFD exercises were implemented into 57:020 Mechanics of Fluids and Transport Processes and 58:160 Intermediate Mechanics of Fluids courses at the University of Iowa in the fall of 2004, although this report focuses only on experiences with the Ahmed body exercise, which was used only in the intermediate-level fluids class, 58:160. This exercise was developed under National Science Foundation funding by the authors of this paper. The focus of this study does not include validating the various turbulence models used for the Ahmed body simulation, because a two-dimensional simplification was applied. With the two-dimensional simplification, students may setup, run, and post process this model in a 50 minute class period using a single-CPU PC, as required for the 58:160 class at the University of Iowa. It is educational for students to understand the implication of a two- dimensional approximation for essentially a three-dimensional flow field, along with the consequent variation in both qualitative and quantitative results. Additionally, through this exercise, students may realize that the choice of the respective turbulence model will affect simulation prediction. (author)

  11. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bax, A.; Lerner, L.

    1986-01-01

    Great spectral simplification can be obtained by spreading the conventional one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum in two independent frequency dimensions. This so-called two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy removes spectral overlap, facilitates spectral assignment, and provides a wealth of additional information. For example, conformational information related to interproton distances is available from resonance intensities in certain types of two-dimensional experiments. Another method generates 1 H NMR spectra of a preselected fragment of the molecule, suppressing resonances from other regions and greatly simplifying spectral appearance. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy can also be applied to the study of 13 C and 15 N, not only providing valuable connectivity information but also improving sensitivity of 13 C and 15 N detection by up to two orders of magnitude. 45 references, 10 figures

  12. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  13. Equivalence of two-dimensional gravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammedi, N.

    1990-01-01

    The authors find the relationship between the Jackiw-Teitelboim model of two-dimensional gravity and the SL(2,R) induced gravity. These are shown to be related to a two-dimensional gauge theory obtained by dimensionally reducing the Chern-Simons action of the 2 + 1 dimensional gravity. The authors present an explicit solution to the equations of motion of the auxiliary field of the Jackiw-Teitelboim model in the light-cone gauge. A renormalization of the cosmological constant is also given

  14. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity of two-dimensional fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, C. T.; Zimmerman, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    Most oil and gas reservoirs, as well as most potential sites for nuclear waste disposal, are naturally fractured. In these sites, the network of fractures will provide the main path for fluid to flow through the rock mass. In many cases, the fracture density is so high as to make it impractical to model it with a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. For such rock masses, it would be useful to have recourse to analytical, or semi-analytical, methods to estimate the macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the fracture network. We have investigated single-phase fluid flow through stochastically generated two-dimensional fracture networks. The centres and orientations of the fractures are uniformly distributed, whereas their lengths follow either a lognormal distribution or a power law distribution. We have considered the case where the fractures in the network each have the same aperture, as well as the case where the aperture of each fracture is directly proportional to the fracture length. The discrete fracture network flow and transport simulator NAPSAC, developed by Serco (Didcot, UK), is used to establish the “true” macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the network. We then attempt to match this conductivity using a simple estimation method that does not require extensive computation. For our calculations, fracture networks are represented as networks composed of conducting segments (bonds) between nodes. Each bond represents the region of a single fracture between two adjacent intersections with other fractures. We assume that the bonds are arranged on a kagome lattice, with some fraction of the bonds randomly missing. The conductance of each bond is then replaced with some effective conductance, Ceff, which we take to be the arithmetic mean of the individual conductances, averaged over each bond, rather than over each fracture. This is in contrast to the usual approximation used in effective medium theories, wherein the geometric mean is used. Our

  15. An incompressible two-dimensional multiphase particle-in-cell model for dense particle flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snider, D.M. [SAIC, Albuquerque, NM (United States); O`Rourke, P.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Andrews, M.J. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-06-01

    A two-dimensional, incompressible, multiphase particle-in-cell (MP-PIC) method is presented for dense particle flows. The numerical technique solves the governing equations of the fluid phase using a continuum model and those of the particle phase using a Lagrangian model. Difficulties associated with calculating interparticle interactions for dense particle flows with volume fractions above 5% have been eliminated by mapping particle properties to a Eulerian grid and then mapping back computed stress tensors to particle positions. This approach utilizes the best of Eulerian/Eulerian continuum models and Eulerian/Lagrangian discrete models. The solution scheme allows for distributions of types, sizes, and density of particles, with no numerical diffusion from the Lagrangian particle calculations. The computational method is implicit with respect to pressure, velocity, and volume fraction in the continuum solution thus avoiding courant limits on computational time advancement. MP-PIC simulations are compared with one-dimensional problems that have analytical solutions and with two-dimensional problems for which there are experimental data.

  16. Two-dimensional Simulations of Correlation Reflectometry in Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeo, E.J.; Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional wave propagation code, developed specifically to simulate correlation reflectometry in large-scale fusion plasmas is described. The code makes use of separate computational methods in the vacuum, underdense and reflection regions of the plasma in order to obtain the high computational efficiency necessary for correlation analysis. Simulations of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasma with internal transport barriers are presented and compared with one-dimensional full-wave simulations. It is shown that the two-dimensional simulations are remarkably similar to the results of the one-dimensional full-wave analysis for a wide range of turbulent correlation lengths. Implications for the interpretation of correlation reflectometer measurements in fusion plasma are discussed

  17. Analytical simulation of two dimensional advection dispersion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to investigate the analytical simulation of two dimensional advection dispersion equation of contaminant transport. The steady state flow condition of the contaminant transport where inorganic contaminants in aqueous waste solutions are disposed of at the land surface where it would migrate ...

  18. Analytical Simulation of Two Dimensional Advection Dispersion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: The study was designed to investigate the analytical simulation of two dimensional advection dispersion equation of contaminant transport. The steady state flow condition of the contaminant transport where inorganic contaminants in aqueous waste solutions are disposed of at the land surface where it would ...

  19. Stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhmaidi, D.; Provenzale, A.; Lili, T.; Babiano, A.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the results of a numerical study on the stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments around a circular vortex. We illustrate how the stability of the filaments depends on the balance between the strain associated with the far field of the vortex and the local vorticity of the filament, and we discuss an empirical criterion for filament stability

  20. Two-Dimensional Motions of Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoonhwan; Bae, Saebyok

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the two-dimensional motions of the rockets for various types of rocket thrusts, the air friction and the gravitation by using a suitable representation of the rocket equation and the numerical calculation. The slope shapes of the rocket trajectories are discussed for the three types of rocket engines. Unlike the projectile motions, the…

  1. Two-dimensional microstrip detector for neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oed, A [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Because of their robust design, gas microstrip detectors, which were developed at ILL, can be assembled relatively quickly, provided the prefabricated components are available. At the beginning of 1996, orders were received for the construction of three two-dimensional neutron detectors. These detectors have been completed. The detectors are outlined below. (author). 2 refs.

  2. Conformal invariance and two-dimensional physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuber, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Actually, physicists and mathematicians are very interested in conformal invariance: geometric transformations which keep angles. This symmetry is very important for two-dimensional systems as phase transitions, string theory or node mathematics. In this article, the author presents the conformal invariance and explains its usefulness

  3. Matching Two-dimensional Gel Electrophoresis' Spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Anjos, António; AL-Tam, Faroq; Shahbazkia, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for matching Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2-DE) gels' spots, involving the use of image registration. The number of false positive matches produced by the proposed approach is small, when compared to academic and commercial state-of-the-art approaches. This ar...

  4. Two-dimensional membranes in motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidovikj, D.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis revolves around nanomechanical membranes made of suspended two - dimensional materials. Chapters 1-3 give an introduction to the field of 2D-based nanomechanical devices together with an overview of the underlying physics and the measurementtools used in subsequent chapters. The research

  5. Extended Polymorphism of Two-Dimensional Material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshida, Masaro; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijin; Imai, Yasuhiko; Kimura, Shigeru; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Nishizaki, Terukazu; Kobayashi, Norio; Nakano, Masaki; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    When controlling electronic properties of bulk materials, we usually assume that the basic crystal structure is fixed. However, in two-dimensional (2D) materials, atomic structure or to functionalize their properties. Various polymorphs can exist in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) from

  6. Piezoelectricity in Two-Dimensional Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Tao

    2015-02-25

    Powering up 2D materials: Recent experimental studies confirmed the existence of piezoelectricity - the conversion of mechanical stress into electricity - in two-dimensional single-layer MoS2 nanosheets. The results represent a milestone towards embedding low-dimensional materials into future disruptive technologies. © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. On a numerical strategy to compute gravity currents of non-Newtonian fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vola, D.; Babik, F.; Latche, J.-C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the presentation of a numerical scheme for the simulation of gravity currents of non-Newtonian fluids. The two dimensional computational grid is fixed and the free-surface is described as a polygonal interface independent from the grid and advanced in time by a Lagrangian technique. Navier-Stokes equations are semi-discretized in time by the Characteristic-Galerkin method, which finally leads to solve a generalized Stokes problem posed on a physical domain limited by the free surface to only a part of the computational grid. To this purpose, we implement a Galerkin technique with a particular approximation space, defined as the restriction to the fluid domain of functions of a finite element space. The decomposition-coordination method allows to deal without any regularization with a variety of non-linear and possibly non-differentiable constitutive laws. Beside more analytical tests, we revisit with this numerical method some simulations of gravity currents of the literature, up to now investigated within the simplified thin-flow approximation framework

  8. Collision dynamics of two-dimensional non-Abelian vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Thomas; Petersen, Timothy C.; Simula, Tapio

    2017-09-01

    We study computationally the collision dynamics of vortices in a two-dimensional spin-2 Bose-Einstein condensate. In contrast to Abelian vortex pairs, which annihilate or pass through each other, we observe non-Abelian vortex pairs to undergo rungihilation—an event that converts the colliding vortices into a rung vortex. The resulting rung defect subsequently decays to another pair of non-Abelian vortices of different type, accompanied by a magnetization reversal.

  9. Prospects for Computational Fluid Dynamics in Room Air Contaminant Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The fluid dynamics research is strongly influenced by the increasing computer power which has been available for the last decades. This development is obvious from the curve in figure 1 which shows the computation cost as a function of years. It is obvious that the cost for a given job will decre...

  10. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of light water reactor flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.; Weber, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), turbulence simulation, and parallel computing have made feasible the development of three-dimensional (3-D) single-phase and two-phase flow CFD codes that can simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in realistic reactor geometries with significantly reduced reliance, especially in single phase, on empirical correlations. The objective of this work was to assess the predictive power and computational efficiency of a CFD code in the analysis of a challenging single-phase light water reactor problem, as well as to identify areas where further improvements are needed

  11. An Introduction to Computational Fluid Mechanics by Example

    CERN Document Server

    Biringen, Sedat

    2011-01-01

    This new book builds on the original classic textbook entitled: An Introduction to Computational Fluid Mechanics by C. Y. Chow which was originally published in 1979. In the decades that have passed since this book was published the field of computational fluid dynamics has seen a number of changes in both the sophistication of the algorithms used but also advances in the computer hardware and software available. This new book incorporates the latest algorithms in the solution techniques and supports this by using numerous examples of applications to a broad range of industries from mechanical

  12. Approximate solutions for the two-dimensional integral transport equation. Solution of complex two-dimensional transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Richard.

    1980-11-01

    This work is divided into two parts: the first part deals with the solution of complex two-dimensional transport problems, the second one (note CEA-N-2166) treats the critically mixed methods of resolution. A set of approximate solutions for the isotropic two-dimensional neutron transport problem has been developed using the interface current formalism. The method has been applied to regular lattices of rectangular cells containing a fuel pin, cladding, and water, or homogenized structural material. The cells are divided into zones that are homogeneous. A zone-wise flux expansion is used to formulate a direct collision probability problem within a cell. The coupling of the cells is effected by making extra assumptions on the currents entering and leaving the interfaces. Two codes have been written: CALLIOPE uses a cylindrical cell model and one or three terms for the flux expansion, and NAUSICAA uses a two-dimensional flux representation and does a truly two-dimensional calculation inside each cell. In both codes, one or three terms can be used to make a space-independent expansion of the angular fluxes entering and leaving each side of the cell. The accuracies and computing times achieved with the different approximations are illustrated by numerical studies on two benchmark problems and by calculations performed in the APOLLO multigroup code [fr

  13. Unsteady computational fluid dynamics in aeronautics

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, P G

    2014-01-01

    The field of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and hybrids is a vibrant research area. This book runs through all the potential unsteady modelling fidelity ranges, from low-order to LES. The latter is probably the highest fidelity for practical aerospace systems modelling. Cutting edge new frontiers are defined.  One example of a pressing environmental concern is noise. For the accurate prediction of this, unsteady modelling is needed. Hence computational aeroacoustics is explored. It is also emerging that there is a critical need for coupled simulations. Hence, this area is also considered and the tensions of utilizing such simulations with the already expensive LES.  This work has relevance to the general field of CFD and LES and to a wide variety of non-aerospace aerodynamic systems (e.g. cars, submarines, ships, electronics, buildings). Topics treated include unsteady flow techniques; LES and hybrids; general numerical methods; computational aeroacoustics; computational aeroelasticity; coupled simulations and...

  14. Fluid dynamics parallel computer development at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James C.; Zang, Thomas A.; Dwoyer, Douglas L.

    1987-01-01

    To accomplish more detailed simulations of highly complex flows, such as the transition to turbulence, fluid dynamics research requires computers much more powerful than any available today. Only parallel processing on multiple-processor computers offers hope for achieving the required effective speeds. Looking ahead to the use of these machines, the fluid dynamicist faces three issues: algorithm development for near-term parallel computers, architecture development for future computer power increases, and assessment of possible advantages of special purpose designs. Two projects at NASA Langley address these issues. Software development and algorithm exploration is being done on the FLEX/32 Parallel Processing Research Computer. New architecture features are being explored in the special purpose hardware design of the Navier-Stokes Computer. These projects are complementary and are producing promising results.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics for sport simulation

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    All over the world sport plays a prominent role in society: as a leisure activity for many, as an ingredient of culture, as a business and as a matter of national prestige in such major events as the World Cup in soccer or the Olympic Games. Hence, it is not surprising that science has entered the realm of sports, and, in particular, that computer simulation has become highly relevant in recent years. This is explored in this book by choosing five different sports as examples, demonstrating that computational science and engineering (CSE) can make essential contributions to research on sports topics on both the fundamental level and, eventually, by supporting athletes’ performance.

  16. Anisotropic mass density by two-dimensional acoustic metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose [Wave Phenomena Group, Department of Electronic Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, C/Camino de Vera s/n, E-46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.es

    2008-02-15

    We show that specially designed two-dimensional arrangements of full elastic cylinders embedded in a nonviscous fluid or gas define (in the homogenization limit) a new class of acoustic metamaterials characterized by a dynamical effective mass density that is anisotropic. Here, analytic expressions for the dynamical mass density and the effective sound velocity tensors are derived in the long wavelength limit. Both show an explicit dependence on the lattice filling fraction, the elastic properties of cylinders relative to the background, their positions in the unit cell, and their multiple scattering interactions. Several examples of these metamaterials are reported and discussed.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Ventilation Airflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2014-01-01

    the principle behind CFD, the development in numerical schemes and computer size since the 1970s. Special attention is given to the selection of the correct governing equations, to the understanding of low turbulent flow, to the selection of turbulence models, and to addressing situations with more steady...

  18. HEXAGA-II. A two-dimensional multi-group neutron diffusion programme for a uniform triangular mesh with arbitrary group scattering for the IBM/370-168 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicki, Z.

    1976-05-01

    This report presents the AGA two-sweep iterative methods belonging to the family of factorization techniques in their practical application in the HEXAGA-II two-dimensional programme to obtain the numerical solution to the multi-group, time-independent, (real and/or adjoint) neutron diffusion equations for a fine uniform triangular mesh. An arbitrary group scattering model is permitted. The report written for the users provides the description of input and output. The use of HEXAGA-II is illustrated by two sample reactor problems. (orig.) [de

  19. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on the fetal aortic coarctation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue; Zhang, Yutao; Wang, Jingying

    2018-03-01

    Blood flows in normal and coarctate fetal aortas are simulated by the CFD technique using T-rex grids. The three-dimensional (3-D) digital model of the fetal arota is reconstructed by the computer-aided design (CAD) software based on two-dimensional (2-D) ultrasono tomographic images. Simulation results displays the development and enhancement of the secondary flow structure in the coarctate fetal arota. As the diameter narrow ratio rises greater than 45%, the pressure and wall shear stress (WSS) of the aorta arch increase exponentially, which is consistent with the conventional clinical concept. The present study also demonstrates that CFD is a very promising assistant technique to investigate human cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Two-dimensional confinement of heavy fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishido, Hiroaki; Shibauchi, Takasada; Matsuda, Yuji; Terashima, Takahito

    2010-01-01

    Metallic systems with the strongest electron correlations are realized in certain rare-earth and actinide compounds whose physics are dominated by f-electrons. These materials are known as heavy fermions, so called because the effective mass of the conduction electrons is enhanced via correlation effects up to as much as several hundreds times the free electron mass. To date the electronic structure of all heavy-fermion compounds is essentially three-dimensional. Here we report on the first realization of a two-dimensional heavy-fermion system, where the dimensionality is adjusted in a controllable fashion by fabricating heterostructures using molecular beam epitaxy. The two-dimensional heavy fermion system displays striking deviations from the standard Fermi liquid low-temperature electronic properties. (author)

  1. Two-dimensional sensitivity calculation code: SENSETWO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Michinori; Nakayama, Mitsuo; Minami, Kazuyoshi; Seki, Yasushi; Iida, Hiromasa.

    1979-05-01

    A SENSETWO code for the calculation of cross section sensitivities with a two-dimensional model has been developed, on the basis of first order perturbation theory. It uses forward neutron and/or gamma-ray fluxes and adjoint fluxes obtained by two-dimensional discrete ordinates code TWOTRAN-II. The data and informations of cross sections, geometry, nuclide density, response functions, etc. are transmitted to SENSETWO by the dump magnetic tape made in TWOTRAN calculations. The required input for SENSETWO calculations is thus very simple. The SENSETWO yields as printed output the cross section sensitivities for each coarse mesh zone and for each energy group, as well as the plotted output of sensitivity profiles specified by the input. A special feature of the code is that it also calculates the reaction rate with the response function used as the adjoint source in TWOTRAN adjoint calculation and the calculated forward flux from the TWOTRAN forward calculation. (author)

  2. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirov, A. O.; Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists ab aeterno. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. While PageRank highlights very well known nodes with many ingoing links, CheiRank highlights very communicative nodes with many outgoing links. In this way the ranking becomes two-dimensional. Using CheiRank and PageRank we analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  3. Toward two-dimensional search engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermann, L; Shepelyansky, D L; Chepelianskii, A D

    2012-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way, the ranking of nodes becomes two dimensional which paves the way for the development of two-dimensional search engines of a new type. Statistical properties of information flow on the PageRank–CheiRank plane are analyzed for networks of British, French and Italian universities, Wikipedia, Linux Kernel, gene regulation and other networks. A special emphasis is done for British universities networks using the large database publicly available in the UK. Methods of spam links control are also analyzed. (paper)

  4. Acoustic phonon emission by two dimensional plasmons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishonov, T.M.

    1990-06-01

    Acoustic wave emission of the two dimensional plasmons in a semiconductor or superconductor microstructure is investigated by using the phenomenological deformation potential within the jellium model. The plasmons are excited by the external electromagnetic (e.m.) field. The power conversion coefficient of e.m. energy into acoustic wave energy is also estimated. It is shown, the coherent transformation has a sharp resonance at the plasmon frequency of the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The incoherent transformation of the e.m. energy is generated by ohmic dissipation of 2DEG. The method proposed for coherent phonon beam generation can be very effective for high mobility 2DEG and for thin superconducting layers if the plasmon frequency ω is smaller than the superconducting gap 2Δ. (author). 21 refs, 1 fig

  5. Fluid dynamics applications of the Illiac IV computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccormack, R. W.; Stevens, K. G., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The Illiac IV is a parallel-structure computer with computing power an order of magnitude greater than that of conventional computers. It can be used for experimental tasks in fluid dynamics which can be simulated more economically, for simulating flows that cannot be studied by experiment, and for combining computer and experimental simulations. The architecture of Illiac IV is described, and the use of its parallel operation is demonstrated on the example of its solution of the one-dimensional wave equation. For fluid dynamics problems, a special FORTRAN-like vector programming language was devised, called CFD language. Two applications are described in detail: (1) the determination of the flowfield around the space shuttle, and (2) the computation of transonic turbulent separated flow past a thick biconvex airfoil.

  6. Applied Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Terry L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has advanced to the point where it can now be used for many applications in fluid mechanics research and aerospace vehicle design. A few applications being explored at NASA Ames Research Center will be presented and discussed. The examples presented will range in speed from hypersonic to low speed incompressible flow applications. Most of the results will be from numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes or Euler equations in three space dimensions for general geometry applications. Computational results will be used to highlight the presentation as appropriate. Advances in computational facilities including those associated with NASA's CAS (Computational Aerosciences) Project of the Federal HPCC (High Performance Computing and Communications) Program will be discussed. Finally, opportunities for future research will be presented and discussed. All material will be taken from non-sensitive, previously-published and widely-disseminated work.

  7. Confined catalysis under two-dimensional materials

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Haobo; Xiao, Jianping; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-01-01

    Small spaces in nanoreactors may have big implications in chemistry, because the chemical nature of molecules and reactions within the nanospaces can be changed significantly due to the nanoconfinement effect. Two-dimensional (2D) nanoreactor formed under 2D materials can provide a well-defined model system to explore the confined catalysis. We demonstrate a general tendency for weakened surface adsorption under the confinement of graphene overlayer, illustrating the feasible modulation of su...

  8. Two-Dimensional Extreme Learning Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jia

    2015-01-01

    (BP networks. However, like many other methods, ELM is originally proposed to handle vector pattern while nonvector patterns in real applications need to be explored, such as image data. We propose the two-dimensional extreme learning machine (2DELM based on the very natural idea to deal with matrix data directly. Unlike original ELM which handles vectors, 2DELM take the matrices as input features without vectorization. Empirical studies on several real image datasets show the efficiency and effectiveness of the algorithm.

  9. Superintegrability on the two dimensional hyperboloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akopyan, E.; Pogosyan, G.S.; Kalnins, E.G.; Miller, W. Jr

    1998-01-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of the quantum mechanical systems on the two dimensional hyperboloid which admit separation of variables in at least two coordinate systems. Here we consider two potentials introduced in a paper of C.P.Boyer, E.G.Kalnins and P.Winternitz, which haven't been studied yet. An example of an interbasis expansion is given and the structure of the quadratic algebra generated by the integrals of motion is carried out

  10. Two-dimensional Kagome photonic bandgap waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Søndergaard, Thomas; Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2000-01-01

    The transverse-magnetic photonic-bandgap-guidance properties are investigated for a planar two-dimensional (2-D) Kagome waveguide configuration using a full-vectorial plane-wave-expansion method. Single-moded well-localized low-index guided modes are found. The localization of the optical modes...... is investigated with respect to the width of the 2-D Kagome waveguide, and the number of modes existing for specific frequencies and waveguide widths is mapped out....

  11. Two dimensional analytical model for a reconfigurable field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjith, R.; Jayachandran, Remya; Suja, K. J.; Komaragiri, Rama S.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents two-dimensional potential and current models for a reconfigurable field effect transistor (RFET). Two potential models which describe subthreshold and above-threshold channel potentials are developed by solving two-dimensional (2D) Poisson's equation. In the first potential model, 2D Poisson's equation is solved by considering constant/zero charge density in the channel region of the device to get the subthreshold potential characteristics. In the second model, accumulation charge density is considered to get above-threshold potential characteristics of the device. The proposed models are applicable for the device having lightly doped or intrinsic channel. While obtaining the mathematical model, whole body area is divided into two regions: gated region and un-gated region. The analytical models are compared with technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation results and are in complete agreement for different lengths of the gated regions as well as at various supply voltage levels.

  12. Two-dimensional time dependent Riemann solvers for neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, Thomas A.; Holloway, James Paul

    2005-01-01

    A two-dimensional Riemann solver is developed for the spherical harmonics approximation to the time dependent neutron transport equation. The eigenstructure of the resulting equations is explored, giving insight into both the spherical harmonics approximation and the Riemann solver. The classic Roe-type Riemann solver used here was developed for one-dimensional problems, but can be used in multidimensional problems by treating each face of a two-dimensional computation cell in a locally one-dimensional way. Several test problems are used to explore the capabilities of both the Riemann solver and the spherical harmonics approximation. The numerical solution for a simple line source problem is compared to the analytic solution to both the P 1 equation and the full transport solution. A lattice problem is used to test the method on a more challenging problem

  13. Review of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) researches on nano fluid flow through micro channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Satish Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Nanofluid is becoming a promising heat transfer fluids due to its improved thermo-physical properties and heat transfer performance. Micro channel heat transfer has potential application in the cooling high power density microchips in CPU system, micro power systems and many such miniature thermal systems which need advanced cooling capacity. Use of nanofluids enhances the effectiveness of t=scu systems. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a very powerful tool in computational analysis of the various physical processes. It application to the situations of flow and heat transfer analysis of the nano fluids is catching up very fast. Present research paper gives a brief account of the methodology of the CFD and also summarizes its application on nano fluid and heat transfer for microchannel cases.

  14. Mechanical exfoliation of two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Enlai; Lin, Shao-Zhen; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Xu, Zhiping

    2018-06-01

    Two-dimensional materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides have been identified and drawn much attention over the last few years for their unique structural and electronic properties. However, their rise begins only after these materials are successfully isolated from their layered assemblies or adhesive substrates into individual monolayers. Mechanical exfoliation and transfer are the most successful techniques to obtain high-quality single- or few-layer nanocrystals from their native multi-layer structures or their substrate for growth, which involves interfacial peeling and intralayer tearing processes that are controlled by material properties, geometry and the kinetics of exfoliation. This procedure is rationalized in this work through theoretical analysis and atomistic simulations. We propose a criterion to assess the feasibility for the exfoliation of two-dimensional sheets from an adhesive substrate without fracturing itself, and explore the effects of material and interface properties, as well as the geometrical, kinetic factors on the peeling behaviors and the torn morphology. This multi-scale approach elucidates the microscopic mechanism of the mechanical processes, offering predictive models and tools for the design of experimental procedures to obtain single- or few-layer two-dimensional materials and structures.

  15. Nonlinear aerodynamics of two-dimensional airfoils in severe maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Matthew T.; Mccune, James E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear theory of forces and moment acting on a two-dimensional airfoil in unsteady potential flow. Results are obtained for cases of both large and small amplitude motion. The analysis, which is based on an extension of Wagner's integral equation to the nonlinear regime, takes full advantage of the trailing wake's tendency to deform under local velocities. Interactive computational results are presented that show examples of wake-induced lift and moment augmentation on the order of 20 percent of quasi-static values. The expandability and flexibility of the present computational method are noted, as well as the relative speed with which solutions are obtained.

  16. Computer simulations of a rough sphere fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyklema, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer simulation is described on rough hard spheres with a continuously variable roughness parameter, including the limits of smooth and completely rough spheres. A system of 500 particles is simulated with a homogeneous mass distribution at 8 different densities and for 5 different values of the roughness parameter. For these 40 physically different situations the intermediate scattering function for 6 values of the wave number, the orientational correlation functions and the velocity autocorrelation functions have been calculated. A comparison has been made with a neutron scattering experiment on neopentane and agreement was good for an intermediate value of the roughness parameter. Some often made approximations in neutron scattering experiments are also checked. The influence of the variable roughness parameter on the correlation functions has been investigated and three simple stochastic models studied to describe the orientational correlation function which shows the most pronounced dependence on the roughness. (Auth.)

  17. MINIMUM QUANTITY LUBRICANT FLOW ANALYSIS IN END MILLING PROCESSES: A COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Najiha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-dimensional steady-state incompressible analysis for the minimum quantity of lubricant flow in milling operations using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach. The analysis of flow and heat transfer in a four-teeth milling cutter operation was undertaken. The domain of the rotating cutter along with the spray nozzle is defined. Operating cutting and boundary conditions are taken from the literature. A steady-state, pressure-based, planar analysis was performed with a viscous, realizable k-ε model. A mixture of oils and air were sprayed on the tool, which is considered to be rotating and is at a temperature near the melting temperature of the workpiece. Flow fields are obtained from the study. The vector plot of the flow field shows that the flow is not evenly distributed over the cutter surface, as well as the uneven distribution of the lubricant in the direction of the cutter rotation. It can be seen that the cutting fluid has not completely penetrated the tool edges. The turbulence created by the cutter rotation in the proximity of the tool throws oil drops out of the cutting zone. The nozzle position in relation to the feed direction is very important in order to obtain the optimum effect of the MQL flow.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics on a massively parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    A finite difference code was implemented for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on the Connection Machine, a massively parallel computer. The code is based on the ARC2D/ARC3D program and uses the implicit factored algorithm of Beam and Warming. The codes uses odd-even elimination to solve linear systems. Timings and computation rates are given for the code, and a comparison is made with a Cray XMP.

  19. Computational Fluid and Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory System

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Traditional research methodologies in the human respiratory system have always been challenging due to their invasive nature. Recent advances in medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have accelerated this research. This book compiles and details recent advances in the modelling of the respiratory system for researchers, engineers, scientists, and health practitioners. It breaks down the complexities of this field and provides both students and scientists with an introduction and starting point to the physiology of the respiratory system, fluid dynamics and advanced CFD modeling tools. In addition to a brief introduction to the physics of the respiratory system and an overview of computational methods, the book contains best-practice guidelines for establishing high-quality computational models and simulations. Inspiration for new simulations can be gained through innovative case studies as well as hands-on practice using pre-made computational code. Last but not least, students and researcher...

  20. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of displacement natural ventilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Yingchun

    2005-01-01

    Natural ventilation is widely recognised as contributing towards low-energy building design. The requirement to reduce energy usage in new buildings has rejuvenated interest in natural ventilation. This thesis deals with computer modelling of natural displacement ventilation driven either by buoyancy or buoyancy combined with wind forces. Two benchmarks have been developed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in order to evaluate the accuracy with which CFD is able to mo...

  1. Multi-dimensional two-fluid flow computation. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a repertoire of three-dimensional computer programs developed to perform critical analysis of single-phase, two-phase and multi-fluid flow in reactor components. The basic numerical approach to solving the governing equations common to all the codes is presented and the additional constitutive relationships required for closure are discussed. Particular applications are presented for a number of computer codes. (author). 12 refs

  2. Moving domain computational fluid dynamics to interface with an embryonic model of cardiac morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Lee

    Full Text Available Peristaltic contraction of the embryonic heart tube produces time- and spatial-varying wall shear stress (WSS and pressure gradients (∇P across the atrioventricular (AV canal. Zebrafish (Danio rerio are a genetically tractable system to investigate cardiac morphogenesis. The use of Tg(fli1a:EGFP (y1 transgenic embryos allowed for delineation and two-dimensional reconstruction of the endocardium. This time-varying wall motion was then prescribed in a two-dimensional moving domain computational fluid dynamics (CFD model, providing new insights into spatial and temporal variations in WSS and ∇P during cardiac development. The CFD simulations were validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV across the atrioventricular (AV canal, revealing an increase in both velocities and heart rates, but a decrease in the duration of atrial systole from early to later stages. At 20-30 hours post fertilization (hpf, simulation results revealed bidirectional WSS across the AV canal in the heart tube in response to peristaltic motion of the wall. At 40-50 hpf, the tube structure undergoes cardiac looping, accompanied by a nearly 3-fold increase in WSS magnitude. At 110-120 hpf, distinct AV valve, atrium, ventricle, and bulbus arteriosus form, accompanied by incremental increases in both WSS magnitude and ∇P, but a decrease in bi-directional flow. Laminar flow develops across the AV canal at 20-30 hpf, and persists at 110-120 hpf. Reynolds numbers at the AV canal increase from 0.07±0.03 at 20-30 hpf to 0.23±0.07 at 110-120 hpf (p< 0.05, n=6, whereas Womersley numbers remain relatively unchanged from 0.11 to 0.13. Our moving domain simulations highlights hemodynamic changes in relation to cardiac morphogenesis; thereby, providing a 2-D quantitative approach to complement imaging analysis.

  3. Shape and Symmetry Determine Two-Dimensional Melting Transitions of Hard Regular Polygons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A. Anderson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The melting transition of two-dimensional systems is a fundamental problem in condensed matter and statistical physics that has advanced significantly through the application of computational resources and algorithms. Two-dimensional systems present the opportunity for novel phases and phase transition scenarios not observed in 3D systems, but these phases depend sensitively on the system and, thus, predicting how any given 2D system will behave remains a challenge. Here, we report a comprehensive simulation study of the phase behavior near the melting transition of all hard regular polygons with 3≤n≤14 vertices using massively parallel Monte Carlo simulations of up to 1×10^{6} particles. By investigating this family of shapes, we show that the melting transition depends upon both particle shape and symmetry considerations, which together can predict which of three different melting scenarios will occur for a given n. We show that systems of polygons with as few as seven edges behave like hard disks; they melt continuously from a solid to a hexatic fluid and then undergo a first-order transition from the hexatic phase to the isotropic fluid phase. We show that this behavior, which holds for all 7≤n≤14, arises from weak entropic forces among the particles. Strong directional entropic forces align polygons with fewer than seven edges and impose local order in the fluid. These forces can enhance or suppress the discontinuous character of the transition depending on whether the local order in the fluid is compatible with the local order in the solid. As a result, systems of triangles, squares, and hexagons exhibit a Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young (KTHNY predicted continuous transition between isotropic fluid and triatic, tetratic, and hexatic phases, respectively, and a continuous transition from the appropriate x-atic to the solid. In particular, we find that systems of hexagons display continuous two-step KTHNY melting. In

  4. THE DECAY OF A WEAK LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD IN TWO-DIMENSIONAL TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondić, Todor; Hughes, David W.; Tobias, Steven M., E-mail: t.kondic@leeds.ac.uk [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the decay of a large-scale magnetic field in the context of incompressible, two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. It is well established that a very weak mean field, of strength significantly below equipartition value, induces a small-scale field strong enough to inhibit the process of turbulent magnetic diffusion. In light of ever-increasing computer power, we revisit this problem to investigate fluids and magnetic Reynolds numbers that were previously inaccessible. Furthermore, by exploiting the relation between the turbulent diffusion of the magnetic potential and that of the magnetic field, we are able to calculate the turbulent magnetic diffusivity extremely accurately through the imposition of a uniform mean magnetic field. We confirm the strong dependence of the turbulent diffusivity on the product of the magnetic Reynolds number and the energy of the large-scale magnetic field. We compare our findings with various theoretical descriptions of this process.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of hot air flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation of air flow distribution, air velocity and pressure field pattern as it will affect moisture transient in a cabinet tray dryer is performed using SolidWorks Flow Simulation (SWFS) 2014 SP 4.0 program. The model used for the drying process in this experiment was designed with Solid ...

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Tryggvason, Tryggvi

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...

  7. Modelling Emission from Building Materials with Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter V.; Heiselberg, Per

    This paper presents a numerical model that by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is capable of dealing with both pollutant transport across the boundary layer and internal diffusion in the source without prior knowledge of which is the limiting process. The model provides the concentration...

  8. Computer program for calculating thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braon, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    Computer code has been developed to provide thermodynamic and transport properties of liquid argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, helium, methane, neon, nitrogen, oxygen, and parahydrogen. Equation of state and transport coefficients are updated and other fluids added as new material becomes available.

  9. On Computational Fluid Dynamics Tools in Architectural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Hougaard, Mads; Stærdahl, Jesper Winther

    engineering computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation program ANSYS CFX and a CFD based representative program RealFlow are investigated. These two programs represent two types of CFD based tools available for use during phases of an architectural design process. However, as outlined in two case studies...

  10. HAMOC: a computer program for fluid hammer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, H.G.

    1975-12-01

    A computer program has been developed for fluid hammer analysis of piping systems attached to a vessel which has undergone a known rapid pressure transient. The program is based on the characteristics method for solution of the partial differential equations of motion and continuity. Column separation logic is included for situations in which pressures fall to saturation values

  11. Multiscale methods in computational fluid and solid mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, de R.; Hulshoff, S.J.; Lenz, S.; Munts, E.A.; Brummelen, van E.H.; Wall, W.; Wesseling, P.; Onate, E.; Periaux, J.

    2006-01-01

    First, an attempt is made towards gaining a more systematic understanding of recent progress in multiscale modelling in computational solid and fluid mechanics. Sub- sequently, the discussion is focused on variational multiscale methods for the compressible and incompressible Navier-Stokes

  12. Vector (two-dimensional) magnetic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enokizono, Masato

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, some interesting phenomena were described from the viewpoint of two-dimensional magnetic property, which is reworded with the vector magnetic property. It shows imperfection of conventional magnetic property and some interested phenomena were discovered, too. We found magnetic materials had the strong nonlinearity both magnitude and spatial phase due to the relationship between the magnetic field strength H-vector and the magnetic flux density B-vector. Therefore, magnetic properties should be defined as the vector relationship. Furthermore, the new Barukhausen signal was observed under rotating flux. (Author)

  13. Two-dimensional Semiconductor-Superconductor Hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suominen, Henri Juhani

    This thesis investigates hybrid two-dimensional semiconductor-superconductor (Sm-S) devices and presents a new material platform exhibiting intimate Sm-S coupling straight out of the box. Starting with the conventional approach, we investigate coupling superconductors to buried quantum well....... To overcome these issues we integrate the superconductor directly into the semiconducting material growth stack, depositing it in-situ in a molecular beam epitaxy system under high vacuum. We present a number of experiments on these hybrid heterostructures, demonstrating near unity interface transparency...

  14. Binding energy of two-dimensional biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jai; Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko

    1996-01-01

    Using a model structure for a two-dimensional (2D) biexciton confined in a quantum well, it is shown that the form of the Hamiltonian of the 2D biexciton reduces into that of an exciton. The binding energies and Bohr radii of a 2D biexciton in its various internal energy states are derived...... analytically using the fractional dimension approach. The ratio of the binding energy of a 2D biexciton to that of a 2D exciton is found to be 0.228, which agrees very well with the recent experimental value. The results of our approach are compared with those of earlier theories....

  15. Airy beams on two dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Li, Rujiang; Jiang, Yuyu; Lin, Xiao; Zheng, Bin; Dehdashti, Shahram; Xu, Zhiwei; Wang, Huaping

    2018-05-01

    We propose that quasi-transverse-magnetic (quasi-TM) Airy beams can be supported on two dimensional (2D) materials. By taking graphene as a typical example, the solution of quasi-TM Airy beams is studied under the paraxial approximation. The analytical field intensity in a bilayer graphene-based planar plasmonic waveguide is confirmed by the simulation results. Due to the tunability of the chemical potential of graphene, the self-accelerating behavior of the quasi-TM Airy beam can be steered effectively. 2D materials thus provide a good platform to investigate the propagation of Airy beams.

  16. A wavenumber-partitioning scheme for two-dimensional statistical closures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    One of the principal advantages of statistical closure approximations for fluid turbulence is that they involve smoothly varying functions of wavenumber. This suggests the possibility of modeling a flow by following the evolution of only a few representative wavenumbers. This work presents two new techniques for the implementation of two-dimensional isotropic statistical closures that for the first time allows the inertial-range scalings of these approximation to be numerically demonstrated. A technique of wavenumber partitioning that conserves both energy and enstrophy is developed for two-dimensional statistical closures. Coupled with a new time-stepping scheme based on a variable integrating factor, this advance facilitates the computation of energy spectra over seven wavenumber decades, a task that will clearly remain outside the realm of conventional numerical simulations for the foreseeable future. Within the context of the test-field model, the method is used to demonstrate Kraichnan's logarithmically-corrected scaling for the enstrophy inertial range and to make a quantitative assessment of the effect of replacing the physical Laplacian viscosity with an enhanced hyperviscosity

  17. A modified CoSaMP algorithm for electromagnetic imaging of two dimensional domains

    KAUST Repository

    Sandhu, Ali Imran; Bagci, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    The compressive sampling matching pursuit (CoSaMP) algorithm is used for solving the electromagnetic inverse scattering problem on two-dimensional sparse domains. Since the scattering matrix, which is computed by sampling the Green function, does

  18. Decoherence in two-dimensional quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A. C.; Portugal, R.; Donangelo, R.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the decoherence in quantum walks in two-dimensional lattices generated by broken-link-type noise. In this type of decoherence, the links of the lattice are randomly broken with some given constant probability. We obtain the evolution equation for a quantum walker moving on two-dimensional (2D) lattices subject to this noise, and we point out how to generalize for lattices in more dimensions. In the nonsymmetric case, when the probability of breaking links in one direction is different from the probability in the perpendicular direction, we have obtained a nontrivial result. If one fixes the link-breaking probability in one direction, and gradually increases the probability in the other direction from 0 to 1, the decoherence initially increases until it reaches a maximum value, and then it decreases. This means that, in some cases, one can increase the noise level and still obtain more coherence. Physically, this can be explained as a transition from a decoherent 2D walk to a coherent 1D walk

  19. Study of two-dimensional interchange turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, Hideo; Wakatani, Masahiro.

    1990-04-01

    An eddy viscosity model describing enstrophy transfer in two-dimensional turbulence is presented. This model is similar to that of Canuto et al. and provides an equation for the energy spectral function F(k) as a function of the energy input rate to the system per unit wavenumber, γ s (k). In the enstrophy-transfer inertial range, F(k)∝ k -3 is predicted by the model. The eddy viscosity model is applied to the interchange turbulence of a plasma in shearless magnetic field. Numerical simulation of the two-dimensional interchange turbulence demonstrates that the energy spectrum in the high wavenumber region is well described by this model. The turbulent transport driven by the interchange turbulence is expressed in terms of the Nusselt number Nu, the Rayleigh number Ra and Prantl number Pr in the same manner as that of thermal convection problem. When we use the linear growth rate for γ s (k), our theoretical model predicts that Nu ∝ (Ra·Pr) 1/2 for a constant background pressure gradient and Nu ∝ (Ra·Pr) 1/3 for a self-consistent background pressure profile with the stress-free slip boundary conditions. The latter agrees with our numerical result showing Nu ∝ Ra 1/3 . (author)

  20. Two-Dimensional Theory of Scientific Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Yaghmaie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific representation is an interesting topic for philosophers of science, many of whom have recently explored it from different points of view. There are currently two competing approaches to the issue: cognitive and non-cognitive, and each of them claims its own merits over the other. This article tries to provide a hybrid theory of scientific representation, called Two-Dimensional Theory of Scientific Representation, which has the merits of the two accounts and is free of their shortcomings. To do this, we will argue that although scientific representation needs to use the notion of intentionality, such a notion is defined and realized in a simply structural form contrary to what cognitive approach says about intentionality. After a short introduction, the second part of the paper is devoted to introducing theories of scientific representation briefly. In the third part, the structural accounts of representation will be criticized. The next step is to introduce the two-dimensional theory which involves two key components: fixing and structural fitness. It will be argued that fitness is an objective and non-intentional relation, while fixing is intentional.

  1. Morphing-Based Shape Optimization in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Yannick; Men'Shov, Igor; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    In this paper, a Morphing-based Shape Optimization (MbSO) technique is presented for solving Optimum-Shape Design (OSD) problems in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The proposed method couples Free-Form Deformation (FFD) and Evolutionary Computation, and, as its name suggests, relies on the morphing of shape and computational domain, rather than direct shape parameterization. Advantages of the FFD approach compared to traditional parameterization are first discussed. Then, examples of shape and grid deformations by FFD are presented. Finally, the MbSO approach is illustrated and applied through an example: the design of an airfoil for a future Mars exploration airplane.

  2. On the Use of Computers for Teaching Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Several approaches for improving the teaching of basic fluid mechanics using computers are presented. There are two objectives to these approaches: to increase the involvement of the student in the learning process and to present information to the student in a variety of forms. Items discussed include: the preparation of educational videos using the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations, the analysis of CFD flow solutions using workstation based post-processing graphics packages, and the development of workstation or personal computer based simulators which behave like desk top wind tunnels. Examples of these approaches are presented along with observations from working with undergraduate co-ops. Possible problems in the implementation of these approaches as well as solutions to these problems are also discussed.

  3. Cavalier perspective plots of two-dimensional matrices. Program Stereo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Arcos Merino, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The program Stereo allows representation of a two-dimensional matrix containing numerical data, in the form of a cavalier perspective, isometric or not, with an angle variable between 0 deg and 180 deg. The representation is in histogram form for each matrix row and those curves which fall behind higher curves and therefore would not be seen are suppressed. It has been written in Fortran V for a Calcomp-936 digital plotter operating off-line with a Univac 1106 computer. Drawing method, subroutine structure and running instructions are described in this paper. (author)

  4. Bosonization in a two-dimensional Riemann Cartan geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denardo, G.; Spallucci, E.

    1987-01-01

    We study the vacuum functional for a Dirac field in a two dimensional Riemann-Cartan geometry. Torsion is treated as a quantum variable while the metric is considered as a classical background field. Decoupling spinors from the non-Riemannian part of the geometry introduces a chiral Jacobian into the vacuum generating functional. We compute this functional Jacobian determinant by means of the Alvarez method. Finally, we show that the effective action for the background geometry is of the Liouville type and does not preserve any memory of the initial torsion field. (author)

  5. Two-dimensional collapse calculations of cylindrical clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, P.; Mitalas, R.

    1979-01-01

    A two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code has been extensively modified and expanded to study the collapse of non-rotating interstellar clouds. The physics and the numerical methods involved are discussed. The results are presented and discussed in terms of the Jeans number. The critical Jeans number for collapse of non-rotating cylindrical clouds whose length is the same as their diameter is 1.00. No evidence for fragmentation has been found for these clouds, but fragmentation seems quite likely for more elongated cylindrical clouds. (author)

  6. Application of computational fluid mechanics to atmospheric pollution problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Smith, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most noticeable effects of air pollution on the properties of the atmosphere is the reduction in visibility. This paper reports the results of investigations of the fluid dynamical and microphysical processes involved in the formation of advection fog on aerosols from combustion-related pollutants, as condensation nuclei. The effects of a polydisperse aerosol distribution, on the condensation/nucleation processes which cause the reduction in visibility are studied. This study demonstrates how computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer modeling can be applied to simulate the life cycle of the atmosphereic pollution problems.

  7. Using artificial intelligence to control fluid flow computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsey, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation is an essential tool for the prediction of fluid flow. Many powerful simulation programs exist today. However, using these programs to reliably analyze fluid flow and other physical situations requires considerable human effort and expertise to set up a simulation, determine whether the output makes sense, and repeatedly run the simulation with different inputs until a satisfactory result is achieved. Automating this process is not only of considerable practical importance but will also significantly advance basic artificial intelligence (AI) research in reasoning about the physical world.

  8. Symposium on computational fluid dynamics: technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A symposium on the technology and applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was held in Pretoria from 21-23 Nov 1988. The following aspects were covered: multilevel adaptive methods and multigrid solvers in CFD, a symbolic processing approach to CFD, interplay between CFD and analytical approximations, CFD on a transfer array, the application of CFD in high speed aerodynamics, numerical simulation of laminar blood flow, two-phase flow modelling in nuclear accident analysis, and the finite difference scheme for the numerical solution of fluid flow

  9. Computer program for computing the properties of seventeen fluids. [cryogenic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, J. A.; Friend, D. G.; Arp, V. D.; Mccarty, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The present study describes modifications and additions to the MIPROPS computer program for calculating the thermophysical properties of 17 fluids. These changes include adding new fluids, new properties, and a new interface to the program. The new program allows the user to select the input and output parameters and the units to be displayed for each parameter. Fluids added to the MIPROPS program are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, deuterium, helium, normal hydrogen, and xenon. The most recent modifications to the MIPROPS program are the addition of viscosity and thermal conductivity correlations for parahydrogen and the addition of the fluids normal hydrogen and xenon. The recently added interface considerably increases the program's utility.

  10. Two-dimensional simulation of sintering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Pinto, Lucio Carlos Martins; Vasconcelos, Wander L.

    1996-01-01

    The results of two-dimensional simulations are directly applied to systems in which one of the dimensions is much smaller than the others, and to sections of three dimensional models. Moreover, these simulations are the first step of the analysis of more complex three-dimensional systems. In this work, two basic features of the sintering process are studied: the types of particle size distributions related to the powder production processes and the evolution of geometric parameters of the resultant microstructures during the solid-state sintering. Random packing of equal spheres is considered in the sintering simulation. The packing algorithm does not take into account the interactive forces between the particles. The used sintering algorithm causes the densification of the particle set. (author)

  11. Two dimensional generalizations of the Newcomb equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, R.L.; Pletzer, A.

    1989-11-01

    The Bineau reduction to scalar form of the equation governing ideal, zero frequency linearized displacements from a hydromagnetic equilibrium possessing a continuous symmetry is performed in 'universal coordinates', applicable to both the toroidal and helical cases. The resulting generalized Newcomb equation (GNE) has in general a more complicated form than the corresponding one dimensional equation obtained by Newcomb in the case of circular cylindrical symmetry, but in this cylindrical case , the equation can be transformed to that of Newcomb. In the two dimensional case there is a transformation which leaves the form of the GNE invariant and simplifies the Frobenius expansion about a rational surface, especially in the limit of zero pressure gradient. The Frobenius expansions about a mode rational surface is developed and the connection with Hamiltonian transformation theory is shown. 17 refs

  12. Pressure of two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Yan; Wang, Lei; Tian, Wen-de; Goree, J; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A simple analytic expression for the pressure of a two-dimensional Yukawa liquid is found by fitting results from a molecular dynamics simulation. The results verify that the pressure can be written as the sum of a potential term which is a simple multiple of the Coulomb potential energy at a distance of the Wigner–Seitz radius, and a kinetic term which is a multiple of the one for an ideal gas. Dimensionless coefficients for each of these terms are found empirically, by fitting. The resulting analytic expression, with its empirically determined coefficients, is plotted as isochores, or curves of constant area. These results should be applicable to monolayer dusty plasmas. (paper)

  13. Two dimensional nanomaterials for flexible supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xu; Peng, Lele; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2014-05-21

    Flexible supercapacitors, as one of most promising emerging energy storage devices, are of great interest owing to their high power density with great mechanical compliance, making them very suitable as power back-ups for future stretchable electronics. Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, including the quasi-2D graphene and inorganic graphene-like materials (IGMs), have been greatly explored to providing huge potential for the development of flexible supercapacitors with higher electrochemical performance. This review article is devoted to recent progresses in engineering 2D nanomaterials for flexible supercapacitors, which survey the evolution of electrode materials, recent developments in 2D nanomaterials and their hybrid nanostructures with regulated electrical properties, and the new planar configurations of flexible supercapacitors. Furthermore, a brief discussion on future directions, challenges and opportunities in this fascinating area is also provided.

  14. Geometrical aspects of solvable two dimensional models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.

    1989-01-01

    It was noted that there is a connection between the non-linear two-dimensional (2D) models and the scalar curvature r, i.e., when r = -2 the equations of motion of the Liouville and sine-Gordon models were obtained. Further, solutions of various classical nonlinear 2D models can be obtained from the condition that the appropriate curvature two form Ω = 0, which suggests that these models are closely related. This relation is explored further in the classical version by obtaining the equations of motion from the evolution equations, the infinite number of conserved quantities, and the common central charge. The Poisson brackets of the solvable 2D models are specified by the Virasoro algebra. 21 refs

  15. Two-dimensional materials for ultrafast lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fengqiu

    2017-01-01

    As the fundamental optical properties and novel photophysics of graphene and related two-dimensional (2D) crystals are being extensively investigated and revealed, a range of potential applications in optical and optoelectronic devices have been proposed and demonstrated. Of the many possibilities, the use of 2D materials as broadband, cost-effective and versatile ultrafast optical switches (or saturable absorbers) for short-pulsed lasers constitutes a rapidly developing field with not only a good number of publications, but also a promising prospect for commercial exploitation. This review primarily focuses on the recent development of pulsed lasers based on several representative 2D materials. The comparative advantages of these materials are discussed, and challenges to practical exploitation, which represent good future directions of research, are laid out. (paper)

  16. Two-dimensional phase fraction charts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morral, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A phase fraction chart is a graphical representation of the amount of each phase present in a system as a function of temperature, composition or other variable. Examples are phase fraction versus temperature charts used to characterize specific alloys and as a teaching tool in elementary texts, and Schaeffler diagrams used to predict the amount of ferrite in stainless steel welds. Isothermal-transformation diagrams (TTT diagrams) are examples that give phase (or microconstituent) amount versus temperature and time. The purpose of this communication is to discuss the properties of two-dimensional phase fraction charts in more general terms than have been reported before. It is shown that they can represent multi-component, multiphase equilibria in a way which is easier to read and which contains more information than the isotherms and isopleths of multi-component phase diagrams

  17. Two-dimensional motions of rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yoonhwan; Bae, Saebyok

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the two-dimensional motions of the rockets for various types of rocket thrusts, the air friction and the gravitation by using a suitable representation of the rocket equation and the numerical calculation. The slope shapes of the rocket trajectories are discussed for the three types of rocket engines. Unlike the projectile motions, the descending parts of the trajectories tend to be gentler and straighter slopes than the ascending parts for relatively large launching angles due to the non-vanishing thrusts. We discuss the ranges, the maximum altitudes and the engine performances of the rockets. It seems that the exponential fuel exhaustion can be the most potent engine for the longest and highest flights

  18. Two dimensional NMR studies of polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, R.A.; Egan, W.; Summers, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    Polysaccharides are very important components in the immune response system. Capsular polysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides occupy cell surface sites of bacteria, play key roles in recognition and some have been used to develop vaccines. Consequently, the ability to determine chemical structures of these systems is vital to an understanding of their immunogenic action. The authors have been utilizing recently developed two-dimensional homonuclear and heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy for unambiguous assignment and structure determination of a number of polysaccharides. In particular, the 1 H-detected heteronuclear correlation experiments are essential to the rapid and sensitive determination of these structures. Linkage sites are determined by independent polarization transfer experiments and multiple quantum correlation experiments. These methods permit the complete structure determination on very small amounts of the polysaccharides. They present the results of a number of structural determinations and discuss the limits of these experiments in terms of their applications to polysaccharides

  19. Two-Dimensional Homogeneous Fermi Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueck, Klaus; Luick, Niclas; Sobirey, Lennart; Siegl, Jonas; Lompe, Thomas; Moritz, Henning

    2018-02-01

    We report on the experimental realization of homogeneous two-dimensional (2D) Fermi gases trapped in a box potential. In contrast to harmonically trapped gases, these homogeneous 2D systems are ideally suited to probe local as well as nonlocal properties of strongly interacting many-body systems. As a first benchmark experiment, we use a local probe to measure the density of a noninteracting 2D Fermi gas as a function of the chemical potential and find excellent agreement with the corresponding equation of state. We then perform matter wave focusing to extract the momentum distribution of the system and directly observe Pauli blocking in a near unity occupation of momentum states. Finally, we measure the momentum distribution of an interacting homogeneous 2D gas in the crossover between attractively interacting fermions and bosonic dimers.

  20. Two-dimensional electroacoustic waves in silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Alexander V.; Bouffanais, Roland; Konobeeva, Natalia N.; Belonenko, Mikhail B.

    2018-01-01

    In this letter, we investigate the propagation of two-dimensional electromagnetic waves in a piezoelectric medium built upon silicene. Ultrashort optical pulses of Gaussian form are considered to probe this medium. On the basis of Maxwell's equations supplemented with the wave equation for the medium's displacement vector, we obtain the effective governing equation for the vector potential associated with the electromagnetic field, as well as the component of the displacement vector. The dependence of the pulse shape on the bandgap in silicene and the piezoelectric coefficient of the medium was analyzed, thereby revealing a nontrivial triadic interplay between the characteristics of the pulse dynamics, the electronic properties of silicene, and the electrically induced mechanical vibrations of the medium. In particular, we uncovered the possibility for an amplification of the pulse amplitude through the tuning of the piezoelectric coefficient. This property could potentially offer promising prospects for the development of amplification devices for the optoelectronics industry.

  1. Versatile two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Affannoukoué, Kévin; Döbeli, Max

    ), a strategy for the fabrication of 2D heterostructures must be developed. Here we demonstrate a novel approach for the bottom-up synthesis of TMDC monolayers, namely Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) combined with a sulfur evaporation beam. PLD relies on the use of a pulsed laser (ns pulse duration) to induce...... material transfer from a solid source (such as a sintered target of MoS2) to a substrate (such as Si or sapphire). The deposition rate in PLD is typically much less than a monolayer per pulse, meaning that the number of MLs can be controlled by a careful selection of the number of laser pulses......Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDCs), such as MoS2, have emerged as a new class of semiconducting materials with distinct optical and electrical properties. The availability of 2D-TMDCs with distinct band gaps allows for unlimited combinations of TMDC monolayers (MLs...

  2. Two-dimensional heterostructures for energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogotsi, Yury G. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pomerantseva, Ekaterina [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-06-12

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials provide slit-shaped ion diffusion channels that enable fast movement of lithium and other ions. However, electronic conductivity, the number of intercalation sites, and stability during extended cycling are also crucial for building high-performance energy storage devices. While individual 2D materials, such as graphene, show some of the required properties, none of them can offer all properties needed to maximize energy density, power density, and cycle life. Here we argue that stacking different 2D materials into heterostructured architectures opens an opportunity to construct electrodes that would combine the advantages of the individual building blocks while eliminating the associated shortcomings. We discuss characteristics of common 2D materials and provide examples of 2D heterostructured electrodes that showed new phenomena leading to superior electrochemical performance. As a result, we also consider electrode fabrication approaches and finally outline future steps to create 2D heterostructured electrodes that could greatly expand current energy storage technologies.

  3. Two-dimensional fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFlores, Lauren; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-09-03

    The present invention relates to a system and methods for acquiring two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D FT) spectra. Overlap of a collinear pulse pair and probe induce a molecular response which is collected by spectral dispersion of the signal modulated probe beam. Simultaneous collection of the molecular response, pulse timing and characteristics permit real time phasing and rapid acquisition of spectra. Full spectra are acquired as a function of pulse pair timings and numerically transformed to achieve the full frequency-frequency spectrum. This method demonstrates the ability to acquire information on molecular dynamics, couplings and structure in a simple apparatus. Multi-dimensional methods can be used for diagnostic and analytical measurements in the biological, biomedical, and chemical fields.

  4. A computational model for doctoring fluid films in gravure printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariprasad, Daniel S., E-mail: dshari@unm.edu [Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States); Grau, Gerd [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1770 (United States); Schunk, P. Randall [Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States); Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0826 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States); Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto [Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States)

    2016-04-07

    The wiping, or doctoring, process in gravure printing presents a fundamental barrier to resolving the micron-sized features desired in printed electronics applications. This barrier starts with the residual fluid film left behind after wiping, and its importance grows as feature sizes are reduced, especially as the feature size approaches the thickness of the residual fluid film. In this work, various mechanical complexities are considered in a computational model developed to predict the residual fluid film thickness. Lubrication models alone are inadequate, and deformation of the doctor blade body together with elastohydrodynamic lubrication must be considered to make the model predictive of experimental trends. Moreover, model results demonstrate that the particular form of the wetted region of the blade has a significant impact on the model's ability to reproduce experimental measurements.

  5. Development of computational fluid dynamics--habitat suitability (CFD-HSI) models to identify potential passage--Challenge zones for migratory fishes in the Penobscot River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Alexander J.; Dudley, Robert W.; Chelminski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics-habitat suitability (CFD–HSI) model was developed to identify potential zones of shallow depth and high water velocity that may present passage challenges for five anadromous fish species in the Penobscot River, Maine, upstream from two existing dams and as a result of the proposed future removal of the dams. Potential depth-challenge zones were predicted for larger species at the lowest flow modeled in the dam-removal scenario. Increasing flows under both scenarios increased the number and size of potential velocity-challenge zones, especially for smaller species. This application of the two-dimensional CFD–HSI model demonstrated its capabilities to estimate the potential effects of flow and hydraulic alteration on the passage of migratory fish.

  6. Equivalency of two-dimensional algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Gildemar Carneiro dos; Pomponet Filho, Balbino Jose S.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Let us consider a vector z = xi + yj over the field of real numbers, whose basis (i,j) satisfy a given algebra. Any property of this algebra will be reflected in any function of z, so we can state that the knowledge of the properties of an algebra leads to more general conclusions than the knowledge of the properties of a function. However structural properties of an algebra do not change when this algebra suffers a linear transformation, though the structural constants defining this algebra do change. We say that two algebras are equivalent to each other whenever they are related by a linear transformation. In this case, we have found that some relations between the structural constants are sufficient to recognize whether or not an algebra is equivalent to another. In spite that the basis transform linearly, the structural constants change like a third order tensor, but some combinations of these tensors result in a linear transformation, allowing to write the entries of the transformation matrix as function of the structural constants. Eventually, a systematic way to find the transformation matrix between these equivalent algebras is obtained. In this sense, we have performed the thorough classification of associative commutative two-dimensional algebras, and find that even non-division algebra may be helpful in solving non-linear dynamic systems. The Mandelbrot set was used to have a pictorial view of each algebra, since equivalent algebras result in the same pattern. Presently we have succeeded in classifying some non-associative two-dimensional algebras, a task more difficult than for associative one. (author)

  7. Finite volume model for two-dimensional shallow environmental flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, F.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a two-dimensional, depth integrated, unsteady, free-surface model based on the shallow water equations. The development was motivated by the desire of balancing computational efficiency and accuracy by selective and conjunctive use of different numerical techniques. The base framework of the discrete model uses Godunov methods on unstructured triangular grids, but the solution technique emphasizes the use of a high-resolution Riemann solver where needed, switching to a simpler and computationally more efficient upwind finite volume technique in the smooth regions of the flow. Explicit time marching is accomplished with strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta methods, with additional acceleration techniques for steady-state computations. A simplified mass-preserving algorithm is used to deal with wet/dry fronts. Application of the model is made to several benchmark cases that show the interplay of the diverse solution techniques.

  8. Effectiveness of two-dimensional CFD simulations for Darrieus VAWTs: a combined numerical and experimental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchini, Alessandro; Balduzzi, Francesco; Bachant, Peter; Ferrara, Giovanni; Ferrari, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • 2D CFD simulations compared to experimental tow-tank data on the RVAT test model. • The use of CFD with open-field-like boundaries is suggested. • A reliable estimation of the turbine performance and the wake structure is obtained. • The transitional turbulence model is recommended for low TSRs and/or small rotors. • The wake analysis identified the main vortical structures generated by the blades. - Abstract: Thanks to the continuous improvement of calculation resources, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is expected to provide in the next few years a cost-effective and accurate tool to improve the understanding of the unsteady aerodynamics of Darrieus wind turbines. This rotor type is in fact increasingly welcome by the wind energy community, especially in case of small size applications and/or non-conventional installation sites. In the present study, unique tow tank experimental data on the performance curve and the near-wake structure of a Darrieus rotor were used as a benchmark to validate the effectiveness of different CFD approaches. In particular, a dedicated analysis is provided to assess the suitability, the effectiveness and the future prospects of simplified two-dimensional (2D) simulations. The correct definition of the computational domain, the selection of the turbulence models and the correction of simulated data for the parasitic torque components are discussed in this study. Results clearly show that, (only) if properly set, two-dimensional CFD simulations are able to provide - with a reasonable computational cost - an accurate estimation of the turbine performance and also quite reliably describe the attended flow-field around the rotor and its wake.

  9. Data Point Averaging for Computational Fluid Dynamics Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jr., David (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system and method for generating fluid flow parameter data for use in aerodynamic heating analysis. Computational fluid dynamics data is generated for a number of points in an area on a surface to be analyzed. Sub-areas corresponding to areas of the surface for which an aerodynamic heating analysis is to be performed are identified. A computer system automatically determines a sub-set of the number of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas and determines a value for each of the number of sub-areas using the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The value is determined as an average of the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The resulting parameter values then may be used to perform an aerodynamic heating analysis.

  10. Distributed interactive graphics applications in computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, S.E.; Buning, P.G.; Merritt, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Implementation of two distributed graphics programs used in computational fluid dynamics is discussed. Both programs are interactive in nature. They run on a CRAY-2 supercomputer and use a Silicon Graphics Iris workstation as the front-end machine. The hardware and supporting software are from the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation project. The supercomputer does all numerically intensive work and the workstation, as the front-end machine, allows the user to perform real-time interactive transformations on the displayed data. The first program was written as a distributed program that computes particle traces for fluid flow solutions existing on the supercomputer. The second is an older post-processing and plotting program modified to run in a distributed mode. Both programs have realized a large increase in speed over that obtained using a single machine. By using these programs, one can learn quickly about complex features of a three-dimensional flow field. Some color results are presented

  11. Fast reactor safety and computational thermo-fluid dynamics approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, Hisashi; Shimizu, Takeshi

    1993-01-01

    This article provides a brief description of the safety principle on which liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) is based and the roles of computations in the safety practices. A number of thermohydraulics models have been developed to date that successfully describe several of the important types of fluids and materials motion encountered in the analysis of postulated accidents in LMFBRs. Most of these models use a mixture of implicit and explicit numerical solution techniques in solving a set of conservation equations formulated in Eulerian coordinates, with special techniques included to specific situations. Typical computational thermo-fluid dynamics approaches are discussed in particular areas of analyses of the physical phenomena relevant to the fuel subassembly thermohydraulics design and that involve describing the motion of molten materials in the core over a large scale. (orig.)

  12. Cardioplegia heat exchanger design modelling using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, M R

    2000-11-01

    A new cardioplegia heat exchanger has been developed by Sorin Biomedica. A three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) model was optimized using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling. CFD optimization techniques have commonly been applied to velocity flow field analysis, but CFD analysis was also used in this study to predict the heat exchange performance of the design before prototype fabrication. The iterative results of the optimization and the actual heat exchange performance of the final configuration are presented in this paper. Based on the behaviour of this model, both the water and blood fluid flow paths of the heat exchanger were optimized. The simulation predicted superior heat exchange performance using an optimal amount of energy exchange surface area, reducing the total contact surface area, the device priming volume and the material costs. Experimental results confirm the empirical results predicted by the CFD analysis.

  13. Quality control of computational fluid dynamics in indoor environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Nielsen, P. V.

    2003-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used routinely to predict air movement and distributions of temperature and concentrations in indoor environments. Modelling and numerical errors are inherent in such studies and must be considered when the results are presented. Here, we discuss modelling as...... the quality of CFD calculations, as well as guidelines for the minimum information that should accompany all CFD-related publications to enable a scientific judgment of the quality of the study....

  14. Computer methods for transient fluid-structure analysis of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems in nuclear engineering are categorized according to the dominant physical phenomena and the appropriate computational methods. Linear fluid models that are considered include acoustic fluids, incompressible fluids undergoing small disturbances, and small amplitude sloshing. Methods available in general-purpose codes for these linear fluid problems are described. For nonlinear fluid problems, the major features of alternative computational treatments are reviewed; some special-purpose and multipurpose computer codes applicable to these problems are then described. For illustration, some examples of nuclear reactor problems that entail coupled fluid-structure analysis are described along with computational results

  15. Interface between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and plant analysis computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffield, R.D.; Dunckhorst, F.F.; Tomlinson, E.T.; Welch, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can provide valuable input to the development of advanced plant analysis computer codes. The types of interfacing discussed in this paper will directly contribute to modeling and accuracy improvements throughout the plant system and should result in significant reduction of design conservatisms that have been applied to such analyses in the past

  16. Critical behavior of the two-dimensional first passage time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chayes, J.T.; Chayes, L.; Durrett, R.

    1986-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional first passage problem in which bonds have zero and unit passage times with probability p and 1-p, respectively. We provide that as the zero-time bonds approach the percolation threshold p/sub c/, the first passage time exhibits the same critical behavior as the correlation function of the underlying percolation problem. In particular, if the correlation length obeys ξ(p)--chemical bondp-p/sub c/chemical bond/sup -//sup v/, then the first passage time constant satisfies μ(p)--chemical bondp-p/sub c/chemical bond/sup v/. At p/sub c/, where it has been asserted that the first passage time from 0 to x scales as chemical bondxchemical bond to a power psi with 0< psi<1, we show that the passage times grow like log chemical bondxchemical bond, i.e., the fluid spreads exponentially rapidly

  17. Acoustic metamaterials for new two-dimensional sonic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose [Wave Phenomena Group, Department of Electronic Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, C/Camino de Vera sn, E-46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    It has been shown that two-dimensional arrays of rigid or fluidlike cylinders in a fluid or a gas define, in the limit of large wavelengths, a class of acoustic metamaterials whose effective parameters (sound velocity and density) can be tailored up to a certain limit. This work goes a step further by considering arrays of solid cylinders in which the elastic properties of cylinders are taken into account. We have also treated mixtures of two different elastic cylinders. It is shown that both effects broaden the range of acoustic parameters available for designing metamaterials. For example, it is predicted that metamaterials with perfect matching of impedance with air are now possible by using aerogel and rigid cylinders equally distributed in a square lattice. As a potential application of the proposed metamaterial, we present a gradient index lens for airborne sound (i.e. a sonic Wood lens) whose functionality is demonstrated by multiple scattering simulations.

  18. Multitasking the code ARC3D. [for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, John T.; Hsiung, Christopher C.

    1986-01-01

    The CRAY multitasking system was developed in order to utilize all four processors and sharply reduce the wall clock run time. This paper describes the techniques used to modify the computational fluid dynamics code ARC3D for this run and analyzes the achieved speedup. The ARC3D code solves either the Euler or thin-layer N-S equations using an implicit approximate factorization scheme. Results indicate that multitask processing can be used to achieve wall clock speedup factors of over three times, depending on the nature of the program code being used. Multitasking appears to be particularly advantageous for large-memory problems running on multiple CPU computers.

  19. Kolmogorov flow in two dimensional strongly coupled dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, R., E-mail: ganesh@ipr.res.in; Joy, Ashwin [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-07-15

    Undriven, incompressible Kolmogorov flow in two dimensional doubly periodic strongly coupled dusty plasma is modelled using generalised hydrodynamics, both in linear and nonlinear regime. A complete stability diagram is obtained for low Reynolds numbers R and for a range of viscoelastic relaxation time τ{sub m} [0 < τ{sub m} < 10]. For the system size considered, using a linear stability analysis, similar to Navier Stokes fluid (τ{sub m} = 0), it is found that for Reynolds number beyond a critical R, say R{sub c}, the Kolmogorov flow becomes unstable. Importantly, it is found that R{sub c} is strongly reduced for increasing values of τ{sub m}. A critical τ{sub m}{sup c} is found above which Kolmogorov flow is unconditionally unstable and becomes independent of Reynolds number. For R < R{sub c}, the neutral stability regime found in Navier Stokes fluid (τ{sub m} = 0) is now found to be a damped regime in viscoelastic fluids, thus changing the fundamental nature of transition of Kolmogorov flow as function of Reynolds number R. A new parallelized nonlinear pseudo spectral code has been developed and is benchmarked against eigen values for Kolmogorov flow obtained from linear analysis. Nonlinear states obtained from the pseudo spectral code exhibit cyclicity and pattern formation in vorticity and viscoelastic oscillations in energy.

  20. The Efficient Use of Vector Computers with Emphasis on Computational Fluid Dynamics : a GAMM-Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Gentzsch, Wolfgang

    1986-01-01

    The GAMM Committee for Numerical Methods in Fluid Mechanics organizes workshops which should bring together experts of a narrow field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to exchange ideas and experiences in order to speed-up the development in this field. In this sense it was suggested that a workshop should treat the solution of CFD problems on vector computers. Thus we organized a workshop with the title "The efficient use of vector computers with emphasis on computational fluid dynamics". The workshop took place at the Computing Centre of the University of Karlsruhe, March 13-15,1985. The participation had been restricted to 22 people of 7 countries. 18 papers have been presented. In the announcement of the workshop we wrote: "Fluid mechanics has actively stimulated the development of superfast vector computers like the CRAY's or CYBER 205. Now these computers on their turn stimulate the development of new algorithms which result in a high degree of vectorization (sca1ar/vectorized execution-time). But w...

  1. Nematic Equilibria on a Two-Dimensional Annulus

    KAUST Repository

    Lewis, A. H.; Aarts, D. G. A. L.; Howell, P. D.; Majumdar, A.

    2017-01-01

    We study planar nematic equilibria on a two-dimensional annulus with strong and weak tangent anchoring, in the Oseen–Frank theoretical framework. We analyze a radially invariant defect-free state and compute analytic stability criteria for this state in terms of the elastic anisotropy, annular aspect ratio, and anchoring strength. In the strong anchoring case, we define and characterize a new spiral-like equilibrium which emerges as the defect-free state loses stability. In the weak anchoring case, we compute stability diagrams that quantify the response of the defect-free state to radial and azimuthal perturbations. We study sector equilibria on sectors of an annulus, including the effects of weak anchoring and elastic anisotropy, giving novel insights into the correlation between preferred numbers of boundary defects and the geometry. We numerically demonstrate that these sector configurations can approximate experimentally observed equilibria with boundary defects.

  2. Superfluid response of two-dimensional parahydrogen clusters in confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idowu, Saheed; Boninsegni, Massimo [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E7 (Canada)

    2015-04-07

    We study by computer simulations the effect of confinement on the superfluid properties of small two-dimensional (2D) parahydrogen clusters. For clusters of fewer than twenty molecules, the superfluid response in the low temperature limit is found to remain comparable in magnitude to that of free clusters, within a rather wide range of depth and size of the confining well. The resilience of the superfluid response is attributable to the “supersolid” character of these clusters. We investigate the possibility of establishing a bulk 2D superfluid “cluster crystal” phase of p-H{sub 2}, in which a global superfluid response would arise from tunnelling of molecules across adjacent unit cells. The computed energetics suggests that for clusters of about ten molecules, such a phase may be thermodynamically stable against the formation of the equilibrium insulating crystal, for values of the cluster crystal lattice constant possibly allowing tunnelling across adjacent unit cells.

  3. Efficient two-dimensional compressive sensing in MIMO radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Nafiseh; Abbasfar, Aliazam; Jabbarian-Jahromi, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has been a way to lower sampling rate leading to data reduction for processing in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar systems. In this paper, we further reduce the computational complexity of a pulse-Doppler collocated MIMO radar by introducing a two-dimensional (2D) compressive sensing. To do so, we first introduce a new 2D formulation for the compressed received signals and then we propose a new measurement matrix design for our 2D compressive sensing model that is based on minimizing the coherence of sensing matrix using gradient descent algorithm. The simulation results show that our proposed 2D measurement matrix design using gradient decent algorithm (2D-MMDGD) has much lower computational complexity compared to one-dimensional (1D) methods while having better performance in comparison with conventional methods such as Gaussian random measurement matrix.

  4. Nematic Equilibria on a Two-Dimensional Annulus

    KAUST Repository

    Lewis, A. H.

    2017-01-16

    We study planar nematic equilibria on a two-dimensional annulus with strong and weak tangent anchoring, in the Oseen–Frank theoretical framework. We analyze a radially invariant defect-free state and compute analytic stability criteria for this state in terms of the elastic anisotropy, annular aspect ratio, and anchoring strength. In the strong anchoring case, we define and characterize a new spiral-like equilibrium which emerges as the defect-free state loses stability. In the weak anchoring case, we compute stability diagrams that quantify the response of the defect-free state to radial and azimuthal perturbations. We study sector equilibria on sectors of an annulus, including the effects of weak anchoring and elastic anisotropy, giving novel insights into the correlation between preferred numbers of boundary defects and the geometry. We numerically demonstrate that these sector configurations can approximate experimentally observed equilibria with boundary defects.

  5. Internal optical bistability of quasi-two-dimensional semiconductor nanoheterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevyanchuk, Oleksandr V.; Kramar, Natalia K.; Kramar, Valeriy M.

    2018-01-01

    We represent the results of numerical computations of the frequency and temperature domains of possible realization of internal optical bistability in flat quasi-two-dimensional semiconductor nanoheterostructures with a single quantum well (i.e., nanofilms). Particular computations have been made for a nanofilm of layered semiconductor PbI2 embedded in dielectric medium, i.e. ethylene-methacrylic acid (E-MAA) copolymer. It is shown that an increase in the nanofilm's thickness leads to a long-wave shift of the frequency range of the manifestation the phenomenon of bistability, to increase the size of the hysteresis loop, as well as to the expansion of the temperature interval at which the realization of this phenomenon is possible.

  6. Electronic Transport in Two-Dimensional Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Vinod K.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2018-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have captured the attention of the scientific community due to the wide range of unique properties at nanometer-scale thicknesses. While significant exploratory research in 2D materials has been achieved, the understanding of 2D electronic transport and carrier dynamics remains in a nascent stage. Furthermore, because prior review articles have provided general overviews of 2D materials or specifically focused on charge transport in graphene, here we instead highlight charge transport mechanisms in post-graphene 2D materials, with particular emphasis on transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. For these systems, we delineate the intricacies of electronic transport, including band structure control with thickness and external fields, valley polarization, scattering mechanisms, electrical contacts, and doping. In addition, electronic interactions between 2D materials are considered in the form of van der Waals heterojunctions and composite films. This review concludes with a perspective on the most promising future directions in this fast-evolving field.

  7. Stress distribution in two-dimensional silos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Rodríguez, Rodolfo; Pérez-Ángel, Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    Simulations of a polydispersed two-dimensional silo were performed using molecular dynamics, with different numbers of grains reaching up to 64 000, verifying numerically the model derived by Janssen and also the main assumption that the walls carry part of the weight due to the static friction between grains with themselves and those with the silo's walls. We vary the friction coefficient, the radii dispersity, the silo width, and the size of grains. We find that the Janssen's model becomes less relevant as the the silo width increases since the behavior of the stresses becomes more hydrostatic. Likewise, we get the normal and tangential stress distribution on the walls evidencing the existence of points of maximum stress. We also obtained the stress matrix with which we observe zones of concentration of load, located always at a height around two thirds of the granular columns. Finally, we observe that the size of the grains affects the distribution of stresses, increasing the weight on the bottom and reducing the normal stress on the walls, as the grains are made smaller (for the same total mass of the granulate), giving again a more hydrostatic and therefore less Janssen-type behavior for the weight of the column.

  8. Asymptotics for Two-dimensional Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nam, Phan Thanh; Portmann, Fabian; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the ground state energy of an atom confined to two dimensions with an infinitely heavy nucleus of charge $Z>0$ and $N$ quantum electrons of charge -1 is $E(N,Z)=-{1/2}Z^2\\ln Z+(E^{\\TF}(\\lambda)+{1/2}c^{\\rm H})Z^2+o(Z^2)$ when $Z\\to \\infty$ and $N/Z\\to \\lambda$, where $E^{\\TF}(\\lambd......We prove that the ground state energy of an atom confined to two dimensions with an infinitely heavy nucleus of charge $Z>0$ and $N$ quantum electrons of charge -1 is $E(N,Z)=-{1/2}Z^2\\ln Z+(E^{\\TF}(\\lambda)+{1/2}c^{\\rm H})Z^2+o(Z^2)$ when $Z\\to \\infty$ and $N/Z\\to \\lambda$, where $E......^{\\TF}(\\lambda)$ is given by a Thomas-Fermi type variational problem and $c^{\\rm H}\\approx -2.2339$ is an explicit constant. We also show that the radius of a two-dimensional neutral atom is unbounded when $Z\\to \\infty$, which is contrary to the expected behavior of three-dimensional atoms....

  9. Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L.; Laskar, A.; Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z.; Menq, F.; Tang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5 Hz to 50 Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

  10. Radiation effects on two-dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, R.C. II; Robinson, J.A. [Department of Materials Science, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Center for Two-Dimensional Layered Materials, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Shi, T. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Silva, E.C. [GlobalFoundries, Malta, NY (United States); Jovanovic, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The effects of electromagnetic and particle irradiation on two-dimensional materials (2DMs) are discussed in this review. Radiation creates defects that impact the structure and electronic performance of materials. Determining the impact of these defects is important for developing 2DM-based devices for use in high-radiation environments, such as space or nuclear reactors. As such, most experimental studies have been focused on determining total ionizing dose damage to 2DMs and devices. Total dose experiments using X-rays, gamma rays, electrons, protons, and heavy ions are summarized in this review. We briefly discuss the possibility of investigating single event effects in 2DMs based on initial ion beam irradiation experiments and the development of 2DM-based integrated circuits. Additionally, beneficial uses of irradiation such as ion implantation to dope materials or electron-beam and helium-beam etching to shape materials have begun to be used on 2DMs and are reviewed as well. For non-ionizing radiation, such as low-energy photons, we review the literature on 2DM-based photo-detection from terahertz to UV. The majority of photo-detecting devices operate in the visible and UV range, and for this reason they are the focus of this review. However, we review the progress in developing 2DMs for detecting infrared and terahertz radiation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Buckled two-dimensional Xene sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Alessandro; Goldberger, Joshua; Houssa, Michel; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Akinwande, Deji

    2017-02-01

    Silicene, germanene and stanene are part of a monoelemental class of two-dimensional (2D) crystals termed 2D-Xenes (X = Si, Ge, Sn and so on) which, together with their ligand-functionalized derivatives referred to as Xanes, are comprised of group IVA atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice - similar to graphene but with varying degrees of buckling. Their electronic structure ranges from trivial insulators, to semiconductors with tunable gaps, to semi-metallic, depending on the substrate, chemical functionalization and strain. More than a dozen different topological insulator states are predicted to emerge, including the quantum spin Hall state at room temperature, which, if realized, would enable new classes of nanoelectronic and spintronic devices, such as the topological field-effect transistor. The electronic structure can be tuned, for example, by changing the group IVA element, the degree of spin-orbit coupling, the functionalization chemistry or the substrate, making the 2D-Xene systems promising multifunctional 2D materials for nanotechnology. This Perspective highlights the current state of the art and future opportunities in the manipulation and stability of these materials, their functions and applications, and novel device concepts.

  12. Electromagnetic wave propagation over an inhomogeneous flat earth (two-dimensional integral equation formulation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Jong, G.

    1975-01-01

    With the aid of a two-dimensional integral equation formulation, the ground wave propagation of electromagnetic waves transmitted by a vertical electric dipole over an inhomogeneous flat earth is investigated. For the configuration in which a ground wave is propagating across an ''island'' on a flat earth, the modulus and argument of the attenuation function have been computed. The results for the two-dimensional treatment are significantly more accurate in detail than the calculations using a one-dimensional integral equation

  13. Issues in computational fluid dynamics code verification and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1997-09-01

    A broad range of mathematical modeling errors of fluid flow physics and numerical approximation errors are addressed in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is strongly believed that if CFD is to have a major impact on the design of engineering hardware and flight systems, the level of confidence in complex simulations must substantially improve. To better understand the present limitations of CFD simulations, a wide variety of physical modeling, discretization, and solution errors are identified and discussed. Here, discretization and solution errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential, or integral, conservation equations representing the physical process, to algebraic equations and their solution on a computer. The impact of boundary conditions on the solution of the partial differential equations and their discrete representation will also be discussed. Throughout the article, clear distinctions are made between the analytical mathematical models of fluid dynamics and the numerical models. Lax`s Equivalence Theorem and its frailties in practical CFD solutions are pointed out. Distinctions are also made between the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the partial differential equations as opposed to the discrete equations. Two techniques are briefly discussed for the detection and quantification of certain types of discretization and grid resolution errors.

  14. Two dimensional kinetic analysis of electrostatic harmonic plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca-Pongutá, E. C.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Yoon, P. H. [IPST, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); SSR, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Electrostatic harmonic Langmuir waves are virtual modes excited in weakly turbulent plasmas, first observed in early laboratory beam-plasma experiments as well as in rocket-borne active experiments in space. However, their unequivocal presence was confirmed through computer simulated experiments and subsequently theoretically explained. The peculiarity of harmonic Langmuir waves is that while their existence requires nonlinear response, their excitation mechanism and subsequent early time evolution are governed by essentially linear process. One of the unresolved theoretical issues regards the role of nonlinear wave-particle interaction process over longer evolution time period. Another outstanding issue is that existing theories for these modes are limited to one-dimensional space. The present paper carries out two dimensional theoretical analysis of fundamental and (first) harmonic Langmuir waves for the first time. The result shows that harmonic Langmuir wave is essentially governed by (quasi)linear process and that nonlinear wave-particle interaction plays no significant role in the time evolution of the wave spectrum. The numerical solutions of the two-dimensional wave spectra for fundamental and harmonic Langmuir waves are also found to be consistent with those obtained by direct particle-in-cell simulation method reported in the literature.

  15. Elliptic Length Scales in Laminar, Two-Dimensional Supersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    sophisticated computational fluid dynamics ( CFD ) methods. Additionally, for 3D interactions, the length scales would require determination in spanwise as well...Manna, M. “Experimental, Analytical, and Computational Methods Applied to Hypersonic Compression Ramp Flows,” AIAA Journal, Vol. 32, No. 2, Feb. 1994

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a Heisenberg Vortex Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunge, Carl; Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Leachman, Jake

    2017-11-01

    A 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of a Heisenberg Vortex Tube (HVT) is performed to estimate cooling potential with cryogenic hydrogen. The main mechanism driving operation of the vortex tube is the use of fluid power for enthalpy streaming in a highly turbulent swirl in a dual-outlet tube. This enthalpy streaming creates a temperature separation between the outer and inner regions of the flow. Use of a catalyst on the peripheral wall of the centrifuge enables endothermic conversion of para-ortho hydrogen to aid primary cooling. A κ- ɛ turbulence model is used with a cryogenic, non-ideal equation of state, and para-orthohydrogen species evolution. The simulations are validated with experiments and strategies for parametric optimization of this device are presented.

  17. FAST - A multiprocessed environment for visualization of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, G.V.; Merritt, F.J.; Plessel, T.C.; Kelaita, P.G.; Mccabe, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents the Flow Analysis Software Toolset (FAST) to be used for fluid-mechanics analysis. The design criteria for FAST including the minimization of the data path in the computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) process, consistent user interface, extensible software architecture, modularization, and the isolation of three-dimensional tasks from the application programmer are outlined. Each separate process communicates through the FAST Hub, while other modules such as FAST Central, NAS file input, CFD calculator, surface extractor and renderer, titler, tracer, and isolev might work together to generate the scene. An interprocess communication package making it possible for FAST to operate as a modular environment where resources could be shared among different machines as well as a single host is discussed. 20 refs

  18. Computational fluid dynamics study of viscous fingering in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subraveti, Sai Gokul; Nikrityuk, Petr; Rajendran, Arvind

    2018-01-26

    Axi-symmetric numerical simulations are carried out to study the dynamics of a plug introduced through a mixed-stream injection in supercritical fluid chromatographic columns. The computational fluid dynamics model developed in this work takes into account both the hydrodynamics and adsorption equilibria to describe the phenomena of viscous fingering and plug effect that contribute to peak distortions in mixed-stream injections. The model was implemented into commercial computational fluid dynamics software using user-defined functions. The simulations describe the propagation of both the solute and modifier highlighting the interplay between the hydrodynamics and plug effect. The simulated peaks showed good agreement with experimental data published in the literature involving different injection volumes (5 μL, 50 μL, 1 mL and 2 mL) of flurbiprofen on Chiralpak AD-H column using a mobile phase of CO 2 and methanol. The study demonstrates that while viscous fingering is the main source of peak distortions for large-volume injections (1 mL and 2 mL) it has negligible impact on small-volume injections (5 μL and 50 μL). Band broadening in small-volume injections arise mainly due to the plug effect. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme 1995- 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haekkinen, R.J.; Hirsch, C.; Krause, E.; Kytoemaa, H.K. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The report is a mid-term evaluation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme started by Technology Development Centre Finland (TEKES) in 1995 as a five-year initiative to be concluded in 1999. The main goal of the programme is to increase the know-how and application of CFD in Finnish industry, to coordinate and thus provide a better basis for co-operation between national CFD activities and encouraging research laboratories and industry to establish co-operation with the international CFD community. The projects of the programme focus on the following areas: (1) studies of modeling the physics and dynamics of the behaviour of fluid material, (2) expressing the physical models in a numerical mode and developing a computer codes, (3) evaluating and testing current physical models and developing new ones, (4) developing new numerical algorithms, solvers, and pre- and post-processing software, and (5) applying the new computational tools to problems relevant to their ultimate industrial use. The report consists of two sections. The first considers issues concerning the whole programme and the second reviews each project

  1. Two-Dimensional Programmable Manipulation of Magnetic Nanoparticles on-Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarella, Anandakumar; Torti, Andrea; Donolato, Marco

    2014-01-01

    A novel device is designed for on-chip selective trap and two-dimensional remote manipulation of single and multiple fluid-borne magnetic particles using field controlled magnetic domain walls in circular nanostructures. The combination of different ring-shaped nanostructures and field sequences ...

  2. Streamline topologies near simple degenerate critical points in two-dimensional flow away from boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten; Hartnack, Johan Nicolai

    1998-01-01

    Streamline patterns and their bifurcations in two-dimensional incompressible flow are investigated from a topological point of view. The velocity field is expanded at a point in the fluid, and the expansion coefficients are considered as bifurcation parameters. A series of non-linear coordinate c...

  3. Streamline topologies near simple degenerate critical points in two-dimensional flow away from boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten; Hartnack, Johan Nicolai

    1999-01-01

    Streamline patterns and their bifurcations in two-dimensional incompressible flow are investigated from a topological point of view. The velocity field is expanded at a point in the fluid, and the expansion coefficients are considered as bifurcation parameters. A series of nonlinear coordinate ch...

  4. Computational and Spectroscopic Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, R. James; Kalinichev, Andrey G.

    2008-01-01

    significantly larger systems. These calculations have allowed us, for the first time, to study the effects of metal cations with different charges and charge density on the NOM aggregation in aqueous solutions. Other computational work has looked at the longer-time-scale dynamical behavior of aqueous species at mineral-water interfaces investigated simultaneously by NMR spectroscopy. Our experimental NMR studies have focused on understanding the structure and dynamics of water and dissolved species at mineral-water interfaces and in two-dimensional nano-confinement within clay interlayers. Combined NMR and MD study of H2O, Na+, and Cl- interactions with the surface of quartz has direct implications regarding interpretation of sum frequency vibrational spectroscopic experiments for this phase and will be an important reference for future studies. We also used NMR to examine the behavior of K+ and H2O in the interlayer and at the surfaces of the clay minerals hectorite and illite-rich illite-smectite. This the first time K+ dynamics has been characterized spectroscopically in geochemical systems. Preliminary experiments were also performed to evaluate the potential of 75As NMR as a probe of arsenic geochemical behavior. The 75As NMR study used advanced signal enhancement methods, introduced a new data acquisition approach to minimize the time investment in ultra-wide-line NMR experiments, and provides the first evidence of a strong relationship between the chemical shift and structural parameters for this experimentally challenging nucleus. We have also initiated a series of inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements of water dynamics in the interlayers of clays and layered double hydroxides. The objective of these experiments is to probe the correlations of water molecular motions in confined spaces over the scale of times and distances most directly comparable to our MD simulations and on a time scale different than that probed by NMR. This work is being done

  5. A computer model for dispersed fluid-solid turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.H.; Tulig, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    A computer model is being developed to simulate two-phase turbulent flow phenomena in fluids containing finely dispersed solids. The model is based on a dual-continuum picture of the individual phases and an extension of a two-equation turbulence closure theory. The resulting set of nonlinear partial differential equations are solved using a finite difference procedure with special treatment to promote convergence. The model has been checked against a number of idealized flow problems with known solutions. The authors are currently comparing model predictions with measurements to determine a proper set of turbulence parameters needed for simulating two-phase turbulent flows

  6. Modeling fires in adjacent ship compartments with computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Cole, J.K.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the thermal effects on radioactive (RAM) transportation pack ages with a fire in an adjacent compartment. An assumption for this analysis is that the adjacent hold fire is some sort of engine room fire. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis tools were used to perform the analysis in order to include convective heat transfer effects. The analysis results were compared to experimental data gathered in a series of tests on the United States Coast Guard ship Mayo Lykes located at Mobile, Alabama. (authors)

  7. Computational fluid dynamics in fire engineering theory, modelling and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Yuen, Kwok Kit

    2009-01-01

    Fire and combustion presents a significant engineering challenge to mechanical, civil and dedicated fire engineers, as well as specialists in the process and chemical, safety, buildings and structural fields. We are reminded of the tragic outcomes of 'untenable' fire disasters such as at King's Cross underground station or Switzerland's St Gotthard tunnel. In these and many other cases, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is at the forefront of active research into unravelling the probable causes of fires and helping to design structures and systems to ensure that they are less likely in the f

  8. Torque converter transient characteristics prediction using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T; Tanaka, K

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the transient torque converter performance used in an automobile. A new technique in computational fluid dynamics is introduced, which includes the inertia of the turbine in a three dimensional simulation of the torque converter during a launch condition. The simulation results are compared to experimental test data with good agreement across the range of data. In addition, the simulated flow structure inside the torque converter is visualized and compared to results from a steady-state calculation.

  9. Approaching multiphase flows from the perspective of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banas, A.O.

    1992-01-01

    Thermalhydraulic simulation methodologies based on subchannel and porous-medium concepts are briefly reviewed and contrasted with the general approach of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). An outline of the advanced CFD methods for single-phase turbulent flows is followed by a short discussion of the unified formulation of averaged equations for turbulent and multiphase flows. Some of the recent applications of CFD at Chalk River Laboratories are discussed, and the complementary role of CFD with regard to the established thermalhydraulic methods of analysis is indicated. (author). 8 refs

  10. Techniques for animation of CFD results. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Jay; Hanson, Jeffery C.

    1992-01-01

    Video animation is becoming increasingly vital to the computational fluid dynamics researcher, not just for presentation, but for recording and comparing dynamic visualizations that are beyond the current capabilities of even the most powerful graphic workstation. To meet these needs, Lewis Research Center has recently established a facility to provide users with easy access to advanced video animation capabilities. However, producing animation that is both visually effective and scientifically accurate involves various technological and aesthetic considerations that must be understood both by the researcher and those supporting the visualization process. These considerations include: scan conversion, color conversion, and spatial ambiguities.

  11. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (νCN) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([FeIII(CN)6]3- dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN)5FeIICNRuIII(NH3)5]- dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific νCN modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a wide range of complex molecular, material, and biological systems.

  12. Two-dimensional silica opens new perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, Christin; Heyde, Markus

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, silica films have emerged as a novel class of two-dimensional (2D) materials. Several groups succeeded in epitaxial growth of ultrathin SiO2 layers using different growth methods and various substrates. The structures consist of tetrahedral [SiO4] building blocks in two mirror symmetrical planes, connected via oxygen bridges. This arrangement is called a silica bilayer as it is the thinnest 2D arrangement with the stoichiometry SiO2 known today. With all bonds saturated within the nano-sheet, the interaction with the substrate is based on van der Waals forces. Complex ring networks are observed, including hexagonal honeycomb lattices, point defects and domain boundaries, as well as amorphous domains. The network structures are highly tuneable through variation of the substrate, deposition parameters, cooling procedure, introducing dopants or intercalating small species. The amorphous networks and structural defects were resolved with atomic resolution microscopy and modeled with density functional theory and molecular dynamics. Such data contribute to our understanding of the formation and characteristic motifs of glassy systems. Growth studies and doping with other chemical elements reveal ways to tune ring sizes and defects as well as chemical reactivities. The pristine films have been utilized as molecular sieves and for confining molecules in nanocatalysis. Post growth hydroxylation can be used to tweak the reactivity as well. The electronic properties of silica bilayers are favourable for using silica as insulators in 2D material stacks. Due to the fully saturated atomic structure, the bilayer interacts weakly with the substrate and can be described as quasi-freestanding. Recently, a mm-scale film transfer under structure retention has been demonstrated. The chemical and mechanical stability of silica bilayers is very promising for technological applications in 2D heterostacks. Due to the impact of this bilayer system for glass science

  13. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira, E-mail: mkhalil@uw.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Box 351700, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-10-21

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (ν{sub CN}) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNRu{sup III}(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup −} dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific ν{sub CN} modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a

  14. Two-dimensional FSI simulation of closing dynamics of a tilting disc mechanical heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, V; Udaykumar, H S; Herbertson, L H; Deutsch, S; Manning, K B; Chandran, K B

    2010-03-01

    The fluid dynamics during valve closure resulting in high shear flows and large residence times of particles has been implicated in platelet activation and thrombus formation in mechanical heart valves. Our previous studies with bi-leaflet valves have shown that large shear stresses induced in the gap between the leaflet edge and the valve housing results in relatively high platelet activation levels whereas flow between the leaflets results in shed vortices not conducive to platelet damage. In this study we compare the result of closing dynamics of a tilting disc valve with that of a bi-leaflet valve. The two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction analysis of a tilting disc valve closure mechanics is performed with a fixed grid Cartesian mesh flow solver with local mesh refinement, and a Lagrangian particle dynamic analysis for computation of potential for platelet activation. Throughout the simulation the flow remains in the laminar regime and the flow through the gap width is marked by the development of a shear layer which separates from the leaflet downstream of the valve. Zones of re-circulation are observed in the gap between the leaflet edge and the valve housing on the major orifice region of the tilting disc valve and are seen to be migrating towards the minor orifice region. Jet flow is observed at the minor orifice region and a vortex is formed which sheds in the direction of fluid motion as observed in experiments using PIV measurements. The activation parameter computed for the tilting disc valve, at the time of closure was found to be 2.7 times greater than that of the bi-leaflet mechanical valve and was found to be in the vicinity of the minor orifice region mainly due to the migration of vortical structures from the major to the minor orifice region during the leaflet rebound of the closing phase.

  15. Integrating aerodynamic surface modeling for computational fluid dynamics with computer aided structural analysis, design, and manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the development of a NASA Geometry Exchange Specification for transferring aerodynamic surface geometry between LeRC systems and grid generation software used for computational fluid dynamics research. The proposed specification is based on a subset of the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). The presentation will include discussion of how the NASA-IGES standard will accommodate improved computer aided design inspection methods and reverse engineering techniques currently being developed. The presentation is in viewgraph format.

  16. Generalized added masses computation for fluid structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzeri, L.; Cecconi, S.; Scala, M.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of this paper a description of a method to simulate the dynamic effect of a fluid between two structures by means of an added mass and an added stiffness. The method is based on a potential theory which assumes the fluid is inviscid and incompressible (the case of compressibility is discussed); a solution of the corresponding field equation is given as a superposition of elementary conditions (i.e. applicable to elementary boundary conditions). Consequently the pressure and displacements of the fluid on the boundary are given as a function of the series coefficients; the ''work lost'' (i.e. the work done by the pressures on the difference between actual and estimated displacements) is minimized, in this way the expansion coefficients are related to the displacements on the boundaries. Virtual work procedures are then used to compute added masses. The particular case of a free surface (with gravity effects) is discussed, it is shown how the effect can be modelled by means of an added stiffness term. Some examples relative to vibrations in reservoirs are given and discussed. (orig.)

  17. Self-organized defect strings in two-dimensional crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Polster, David; Maret, Georg; Keim, Peter; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Using experiments with single-particle resolution and computer simulations we study the collective behavior of multiple vacancies injected into two-dimensional crystals. We find that the defects assemble into linear strings, terminated by dislocations with antiparallel Burgers vectors. We show that these defect strings propagate through the crystal in a succession of rapid one-dimensional gliding and rare rotations. While the rotation rate decreases exponentially with the number of defects in the string, the diffusion constant is constant for large strings. By monitoring the separation of the dislocations at the end points, we measure their effective interactions with high precision beyond their spontaneous formation and annihilation, and we explain the double-well form of the dislocation interaction in terms of continuum elasticity theory.

  18. Computational transport phenomena of fluid-particle systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arastoopour, Hamid; Abbasi, Emad

    2017-01-01

    This book concerns the most up-to-date advances in computational transport phenomena (CTP), an emerging tool for the design of gas-solid processes such as fluidized bed systems. The authors examine recent work in kinetic theory and CTP and illustrate gas-solid processes’ many applications in the energy, chemical, pharmaceutical, and food industries. They also discuss the kinetic theory approach in developing constitutive equations for gas-solid flow systems and how it has advanced over the last decade as well as the possibility of obtaining innovative designs for multiphase reactors, such as those needed to capture CO2 from flue gases. Suitable as a concise reference and a textbook supplement for graduate courses, Computational Transport Phenomena of Gas-Solid Systems is ideal for practitioners in industries involved with the design and operation of processes based on fluid/particle mixtures, such as the energy, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and food processing. Explains how to couple the population balance e...

  19. Application of a distributed network in computational fluid dynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.; Deshpande, Ashish

    1994-01-01

    A general-purpose 3-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes algorithm is implemented on a network of concurrently operating workstations using parallel virtual machine (PVM) and compared with its performance on a CRAY Y-MP and on an Intel iPSC/860. The problem is relatively computationally intensive, and has a communication structure based primarily on nearest-neighbor communication, making it ideally suited to message passing. Such problems are frequently encountered in computational fluid dynamics (CDF), and their solution is increasingly in demand. The communication structure is explicitly coded in the implementation to fully exploit the regularity in message passing in order to produce a near-optimal solution. Results are presented for various grid sizes using up to eight processors.

  20. Optimal Padding for the Two-Dimensional Fast Fourier Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Bruce H.; Aronstein, David L.; Smith, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    One-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) operations work fastest on grids whose size is divisible by a power of two. Because of this, padding grids (that are not already sized to a power of two) so that their size is the next highest power of two can speed up operations. While this works well for one-dimensional grids, it does not work well for two-dimensional grids. For a two-dimensional grid, there are certain pad sizes that work better than others. Therefore, the need exists to generalize a strategy for determining optimal pad sizes. There are three steps in the FFT algorithm. The first is to perform a one-dimensional transform on each row in the grid. The second step is to transpose the resulting matrix. The third step is to perform a one-dimensional transform on each row in the resulting grid. Steps one and three both benefit from padding the row to the next highest power of two, but the second step needs a novel approach. An algorithm was developed that struck a balance between optimizing the grid pad size with prime factors that are small (which are optimal for one-dimensional operations), and with prime factors that are large (which are optimal for two-dimensional operations). This algorithm optimizes based on average run times, and is not fine-tuned for any specific application. It increases the amount of times that processor-requested data is found in the set-associative processor cache. Cache retrievals are 4-10 times faster than conventional memory retrievals. The tested implementation of the algorithm resulted in faster execution times on all platforms tested, but with varying sized grids. This is because various computer architectures process commands differently. The test grid was 512 512. Using a 540 540 grid on a Pentium V processor, the code ran 30 percent faster. On a PowerPC, a 256x256 grid worked best. A Core2Duo computer preferred either a 1040x1040 (15 percent faster) or a 1008x1008 (30 percent faster) grid. There are many industries that

  1. Computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics for geosystems management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Scott; Alger, Nicholas; Turner, Daniel Zack; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Carnes, Brian; Martinez, Mario J.; Notz, Patrick K.; Klise, Katherine A.; Stone, Charles Michael; Field, Richard V., Jr.; Newell, Pania; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Red-Horse, John Robert; Bishop, Joseph E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Hopkins, Polly L.; Mesh, Mikhail; Bean, James E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Yoon, Hongkyu

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes research performed under the SNL LDRD entitled - Computational Mechanics for Geosystems Management to Support the Energy and Natural Resources Mission. The main accomplishment was development of a foundational SNL capability for computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics analysis of geosystems. The code was developed within the SNL Sierra software system. This report summarizes the capabilities of the simulation code and the supporting research and development conducted under this LDRD. The main goal of this project was the development of a foundational capability for coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) simulation of heterogeneous geosystems utilizing massively parallel processing. To solve these complex issues, this project integrated research in numerical mathematics and algorithms for chemically reactive multiphase systems with computer science research in adaptive coupled solution control and framework architecture. This report summarizes and demonstrates the capabilities that were developed together with the supporting research underlying the models. Key accomplishments are: (1) General capability for modeling nonisothermal, multiphase, multicomponent flow in heterogeneous porous geologic materials; (2) General capability to model multiphase reactive transport of species in heterogeneous porous media; (3) Constitutive models for describing real, general geomaterials under multiphase conditions utilizing laboratory data; (4) General capability to couple nonisothermal reactive flow with geomechanics (THMC); (5) Phase behavior thermodynamics for the CO2-H2O-NaCl system. General implementation enables modeling of other fluid mixtures. Adaptive look-up tables enable thermodynamic capability to other simulators; (6) Capability for statistical modeling of heterogeneity in geologic materials; and (7) Simulator utilizes unstructured grids on parallel processing computers.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of High Injection Pressure Blended Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Amir; Jaat, Norrizam; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Manshoor, Bukhari; Zaman, Izzuddin; Sapit, Azwan; Razali, Azahari

    2017-08-01

    Biodiesel have great potential for substitution with petrol fuel for the purpose of achieving clean energy production and emission reduction. Among the methods that can control the combustion properties, controlling of the fuel injection conditions is one of the successful methods. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of high injection pressure of biodiesel blends on spray characteristics using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Injection pressure was observed at 220 MPa, 250 MPa and 280 MPa. The ambient temperature was kept held at 1050 K and ambient pressure 8 MPa in order to simulate the effect of boost pressure or turbo charger during combustion process. Computational Fluid Dynamics were used to investigate the spray characteristics of biodiesel blends such as spray penetration length, spray angle and mixture formation of fuel-air mixing. The results shows that increases of injection pressure, wider spray angle is produced by biodiesel blends and diesel fuel. The injection pressure strongly affects the mixture formation, characteristics of fuel spray, longer spray penetration length thus promotes the fuel and air mixing.

  3. Particle simulation of a two-dimensional electrostatic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, K.

    1989-01-01

    Computer simulation is a growing field of research and plasma physics is one of the important areas where it is being applied today. This report describes the particle method of simulating a two-dimensional electrostatic plasma. The methods used to discretise the plasma equations and integrate the equations of motion are outlined. The algorithm used in building a simulation program is described. The program is applied to simulating the Two-stream Instability occurring within an infinite plasma. The results of the simulation are presented. The growth rate of the instability as simulated is in excellent agreement with the growth rate as calculated using linear theory. Diagnostic techniques used in interpreting the data generated by the simulation program are discussed. A comparison of the computing environment of the ND and PC from a user's viewpoint is presented. It is observed that the PC is an acceptable computing tool for certain (non-trivial) physics problems, and that more extensive use of its computing power should be made. (author). 5 figs

  4. Application of GPU to computational multiphase fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatake, T; Kunugi, T

    2010-01-01

    The MARS (Multi-interfaces Advection and Reconstruction Solver) [1] is one of the surface volume tracking methods for multi-phase flows. Nowadays, the performance of GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) is much higher than the CPU (Central Processing Unit). In this study, the GPU was applied to the MARS in order to accelerate the computation of multi-phase flows (GPU-MARS), and the performance of the GPU-MARS was discussed. From the performance of the interface tracking method for the analyses of one-directional advection problem, it is found that the computing time of GPU(single GTX280) was around 4 times faster than that of the CPU (Xeon 5040, 4 threads parallelized). From the performance of Poisson Solver by using the algorithm developed in this study, it is found that the performance of the GPU showed around 30 times faster than that of the CPU. Finally, it is confirmed that the GPU showed the large acceleration of the fluid flow computation (GPU-MARS) compared to the CPU. However, it is also found that the double-precision computation of the GPU must perform with very high precision.

  5. Development of real-time visualization system for Computational Fluid Dynamics on parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Otani, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Hideki; Takei, Toshifumi; Doi, Shun

    1998-03-01

    A real-time visualization system for computational fluid dynamics in a network connecting between a parallel computing server and the client terminal was developed. Using the system, a user can visualize the results of a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation on the parallel computer as a client terminal during the actual computation on a server. Using GUI (Graphical User Interface) on the client terminal, to user is also able to change parameters of the analysis and visualization during the real-time of the calculation. The system carries out both of CFD simulation and generation of a pixel image data on the parallel computer, and compresses the data. Therefore, the amount of data from the parallel computer to the client is so small in comparison with no compression that the user can enjoy the swift image appearance comfortably. Parallelization of image data generation is based on Owner Computation Rule. GUI on the client is built on Java applet. A real-time visualization is thus possible on the client PC only if Web browser is implemented on it. (author)

  6. Two-dimensional speckle-tracking strain echocardiography in long-term heart transplant patients: a study comparing deformation parameters and ejection fraction derived from echocardiography and multislice computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Bonni; Höfer, Peter; Pichler, Philipp; Vertesich, Markus; Bergler-Klein, Jutta; Roedler, Susanne; Mahr, Stephane; Goliasch, Georg; Zuckermann, Andreas; Binder, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Longitudinal strain determined by speckle tracking is a sensitive parameter to detect systolic left ventricular dysfunction. In this study, we assessed regional and global longitudinal strain values in long-term heart transplants and compared deformation indices with ejection fraction as determined by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and multislice computed tomographic coronary angiography (MSCTA). TTE and MSCTA were prospectively performed in 31 transplant patients (10.6 years post-transplantation) and in 42 control subjects. Grey-scale apical views were recorded for speckle tracking (EchoPAC 7.0, GE) of the 16 segments of the left ventricle. The presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) was assessed by MSCTA. Strain analysis was performed in 1168 segments [496 in transplant patients (42.5%), 672 in control subjects (57.7%)]. Global longitudinal peak systolic strain was significantly lower in the transplant recipients than in the healthy population (-13.9 ± 4.2 vs. -17.4 ± 5.8%, PSimpsons method) was 60.7 ± 10.1%/60.2 ± 6.7% in transplant recipients vs. 64.7 ± 6.4%/63.0 ± 6.2% in the healthy population, P=ns. Even though 'healthy' heart transplants without CAD exhibit normal ejection fraction, deformation indices are reduced in this population when compared with control subjects. Our findings suggests that strain analysis is more sensitive than assessment of ejection fraction for the detection of abnormalities of systolic function.

  7. Comparison of various spring analogy related mesh deformation techniques in two-dimensional airfoil design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Özgen, S.

    2017-06-01

    During the last few decades, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) has developed greatly and has become a more reliable tool for the conceptual phase of aircraft design. This tool is generally combined with an optimization algorithm. In the optimization phase, the need for regenerating the computational mesh might become cumbersome, especially when the number of design parameters is high. For this reason, several mesh generation and deformation techniques have been developed in the past decades. One of the most widely used techniques is the Spring Analogy. There are numerous spring analogy related techniques reported in the literature: linear spring analogy, torsional spring analogy, semitorsional spring analogy, and ball vertex spring analogy. This paper gives the explanation of linear spring analogy method and angle inclusion in the spring analogy method. In the latter case, two di¨erent solution methods are proposed. The best feasible method will later be used for two-dimensional (2D) Airfoil Design Optimization with objective function being to minimize sectional drag for a required lift coe©cient at di¨erent speeds. Design variables used in the optimization include camber and thickness distribution of the airfoil. SU2 CFD is chosen as the §ow solver during the optimization procedure. The optimization is done by using Phoenix ModelCenter Optimization Tool.

  8. Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics 2007 : Implementations and Experiences on Large Scale and Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    At the 19th Annual Conference on Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics held in Antalya, Turkey, in May 2007, the most recent developments and implementations of large-scale and grid computing were presented. This book, comprised of the invited and selected papers of this conference, details those advances, which are of particular interest to CFD and CFD-related communities. It also offers the results related to applications of various scientific and engineering problems involving flows and flow-related topics. Intended for CFD researchers and graduate students, this book is a state-of-the-art presentation of the relevant methodology and implementation techniques of large-scale computing.

  9. Two dimensional MHD flows between porous boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratton, F.T.

    1994-01-01

    Similarity solutions of dissipative MHD equations representing conducting fluids injected through porous walls and flowing out in both directions from the center of the channel, are studied as a function of four non dimensional parameters, Reynolds number R e , magnetic Reynolds number R m , Alfvenic Mach number, M A , and pressure gradient coefficient, C. The effluence is restrained by an external magnetic field normal to the walls. When R m m >>1, the solution may model a collision of plasmas of astrophysical interest. In this case the magnetic field lines help to drive the outflow acting jointly with the pressure gradient. The law for C as a function of the other parameters is given for several asymptotic limits. (author). 3 refs, 6 figs

  10. Primary Three-Dimensional Analysis with Perspective-Filet View Versus Primary Two-Dimensional Analysis: Evaluation of Lesion Detection by Inexperienced Readers at Computed Tomographic Colonography in Symptomatic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisichella, V.A.; Horvath, S.; Hellstroem, M.; Jaederling, F.; Stotzer, P.O.; Kilander, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: 'Perspective-filet view' is a novel three-dimensional (3D) viewing technique for computed tomography colonography (CTC). Studies with experienced readers have shown a sensitivity for perspective-filet view similar to that of 2D or 3D endoluminal fly-through in detection of colorectal lesions. It is not known whether perspective-filet view, compared to axial images, improves lesion detection by inexperienced readers. Purpose: To compare primary 3D analysis using perspective-filet view (3D Filet) with primary 2D analysis, as used by inexperienced CTC readers. Secondary aims were to compare lesion detection by 3D Filet when used by experienced and inexperienced readers, and to evaluate the effect of combined 3D Filet + 2D analysis. Material and Methods: Fifty symptomatic patients were prospectively enrolled. An experienced reader performed 3D Filet analysis followed by complete 2D analysis (3D Filet + 2D), before colonoscopy with segmental unblinding. Two inexperienced readers (readers 2 and 3), blinded to CTC and colonoscopy findings, retrospectively performed 3D Filet analysis and, after 5 weeks, 2D analysis. True positives =6 mm detected by the inexperienced readers with 3D Filet and/or 2D were combined to obtain 3D Filet + 2D. Results: Colonoscopy revealed 116 lesions: 16 lesions =10 mm, 19 lesions 6-9 mm, and 81 lesions =5 mm. For the experienced reader, sensitivities for lesions =6 mm with 3D Filet and 3D Filet + 2D were 77% and 83%, respectively. For the inexperienced readers, sensitivities for lesions =6 mm with 3D Filet and 2D were 51% and 57% (reader 2) and 40% and 43% (reader 3), respectively. There was no significant difference between 3D Filet and 2D regarding sensitivity and reading time. For lesions =6 mm, 3D Filet + 2D improved the sensitivity of reader 2 to 63% and of reader 3 to 51%. Conclusion: Lesion detection by inexperienced readers using perspective-filet view is comparable to that obtained by 2D. Lesion detection improves by

  11. Lie algebra contractions on two-dimensional hyperboloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogosyan, G. S.; Yakhno, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Inoenue-Wigner contraction from the SO(2, 1) group to the Euclidean E(2) and E(1, 1) group is used to relate the separation of variables in Laplace-Beltrami (Helmholtz) equations for the four corresponding two-dimensional homogeneous spaces: two-dimensional hyperboloids and two-dimensional Euclidean and pseudo-Euclidean spaces. We show how the nine systems of coordinates on the two-dimensional hyperboloids contracted to the four systems of coordinates on E 2 and eight on E 1,1 . The text was submitted by the authors in English.

  12. Ten iterative steps for model development and evaluation applied to Computational Fluid Dynamics for Environmental Fluid Mechanic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blocken, B.J.E.; Gualtieri, C.

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used to study a wide variety of complex Environmental Fluid Mechanics (EFM) processes, such as water flow and turbulent mixing of contaminants in rivers and estuaries and wind flow and air pollution dispersion in urban areas. However, the accuracy

  13. Efficient Parallel Kernel Solvers for Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xian-He

    1997-01-01

    Distributed-memory parallel computers dominate today's parallel computing arena. These machines, such as Intel Paragon, IBM SP2, and Cray Origin2OO, have successfully delivered high performance computing power for solving some of the so-called "grand-challenge" problems. Despite initial success, parallel machines have not been widely accepted in production engineering environments due to the complexity of parallel programming. On a parallel computing system, a task has to be partitioned and distributed appropriately among processors to reduce communication cost and to attain load balance. More importantly, even with careful partitioning and mapping, the performance of an algorithm may still be unsatisfactory, since conventional sequential algorithms may be serial in nature and may not be implemented efficiently on parallel machines. In many cases, new algorithms have to be introduced to increase parallel performance. In order to achieve optimal performance, in addition to partitioning and mapping, a careful performance study should be conducted for a given application to find a good algorithm-machine combination. This process, however, is usually painful and elusive. The goal of this project is to design and develop efficient parallel algorithms for highly accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and other engineering applications. The work plan is 1) developing highly accurate parallel numerical algorithms, 2) conduct preliminary testing to verify the effectiveness and potential of these algorithms, 3) incorporate newly developed algorithms into actual simulation packages. The work plan has well achieved. Two highly accurate, efficient Poisson solvers have been developed and tested based on two different approaches: (1) Adopting a mathematical geometry which has a better capacity to describe the fluid, (2) Using compact scheme to gain high order accuracy in numerical discretization. The previously developed Parallel Diagonal Dominant (PDD) algorithm

  14. Two-dimensional PCA-based human gait identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyan; Wu, Rongteng

    2012-11-01

    It is very necessary to recognize person through visual surveillance automatically for public security reason. Human gait based identification focus on recognizing human by his walking video automatically using computer vision and image processing approaches. As a potential biometric measure, human gait identification has attracted more and more researchers. Current human gait identification methods can be divided into two categories: model-based methods and motion-based methods. In this paper a two-Dimensional Principal Component Analysis and temporal-space analysis based human gait identification method is proposed. Using background estimation and image subtraction we can get a binary images sequence from the surveillance video. By comparing the difference of two adjacent images in the gait images sequence, we can get a difference binary images sequence. Every binary difference image indicates the body moving mode during a person walking. We use the following steps to extract the temporal-space features from the difference binary images sequence: Projecting one difference image to Y axis or X axis we can get two vectors. Project every difference image in the difference binary images sequence to Y axis or X axis difference binary images sequence we can get two matrixes. These two matrixes indicate the styles of one walking. Then Two-Dimensional Principal Component Analysis(2DPCA) is used to transform these two matrixes to two vectors while at the same time keep the maximum separability. Finally the similarity of two human gait images is calculated by the Euclidean distance of the two vectors. The performance of our methods is illustrated using the CASIA Gait Database.

  15. Cepstrum analysis and applications to computational fluid dynamic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Kristine R.

    1990-04-01

    A novel approach to the problem of spurious reflections introduced by artificial boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) solutions is proposed. Instead of attempting to derive non-reflecting boundary conditions, the approach is to accept the fact that spurious reflections occur, but to remove these reflections with cepstrum analysis, a signal processing technique which has been successfully used to remove echoes from experimental data. First, the theory of the cepstrum method is presented. This includes presentation of two types of cepstra: The Power Cepstrum and the Complex Cepstrum. The definitions of the cepstrum methods are applied theoretically and numerically to the analytical solution of sinusoidal plane wave propagation in a duct. One-D and 3-D time dependent solutions to the Euler equations are computed, and hard-wall conditions are prescribed at the numerical boundaries. The cepstrum method is applied, and the reflections from the boundaries are removed from the solutions. One-D and 3-D solutions are computed with so called nonreflecting boundary conditions, and these solutions are compared to those obtained by prescribing hard wall conditions and processing with the cepstrum.

  16. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  17. Energy Spectra of Vortex Distributions in Two-Dimensional Quantum Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashton S. Bradley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically explore key concepts of two-dimensional turbulence in a homogeneous compressible superfluid described by a dissipative two-dimensional Gross-Pitaeveskii equation. Such a fluid supports quantized vortices that have a size characterized by the healing length ξ. We show that, for the divergence-free portion of the superfluid velocity field, the kinetic-energy spectrum over wave number k may be decomposed into an ultraviolet regime (k≫ξ^{-1} having a universal k^{-3} scaling arising from the vortex core structure, and an infrared regime (k≪ξ^{-1} with a spectrum that arises purely from the configuration of the vortices. The Novikov power-law distribution of intervortex distances with exponent -1/3 for vortices of the same sign of circulation leads to an infrared kinetic-energy spectrum with a Kolmogorov k^{-5/3} power law, which is consistent with the existence of an inertial range. The presence of these k^{-3} and k^{-5/3} power laws, together with the constraint of continuity at the smallest configurational scale k≈ξ^{-1}, allows us to derive a new analytical expression for the Kolmogorov constant that we test against a numerical simulation of a forced homogeneous, compressible, two-dimensional superfluid. The numerical simulation corroborates our analysis of the spectral features of the kinetic-energy distribution, once we introduce the concept of a clustered fraction consisting of the fraction of vortices that have the same sign of circulation as their nearest neighboring vortices. Our analysis presents a new approach to understanding two-dimensional quantum turbulence and interpreting similarities and differences with classical two-dimensional turbulence, and suggests new methods to characterize vortex turbulence in two-dimensional quantum fluids via vortex position and circulation measurements.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of a miniaturized dissolution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenning, G; Ahnfelt, E; Sjögren, E; Lennernäs, H

    2017-04-15

    Dissolution testing is an important tool that has applications ranging from fundamental studies of drug-release mechanisms to quality control of the final product. The rate of release of the drug from the delivery system is known to be affected by hydrodynamics. In this study we used computational fluid dynamics to simulate and investigate the hydrodynamics in a novel miniaturized dissolution method for parenteral formulations. The dissolution method is based on a rotating disc system and uses a rotating sample reservoir which is separated from the remaining dissolution medium by a nylon screen. Sample reservoirs of two sizes were investigated (SR6 and SR8) and the hydrodynamic studies were performed at rotation rates of 100, 200 and 400rpm. The overall fluid flow was similar for all investigated cases, with a lateral upward spiraling motion and central downward motion in the form of a vortex to and through the screen. The simulations indicated that the exchange of dissolution medium between the sample reservoir and the remaining release medium was rapid for typical screens, for which almost complete mixing would be expected to occur within less than one minute at 400rpm. The local hydrodynamic conditions in the sample reservoirs depended on their size; SR8 appeared to be relatively more affected than SR6 by the resistance to liquid flow resulting from the screen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of a Vibrating Turbine Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama N. Alshroof

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI modelling of a vibrating turbine blade using the commercial software ANSYS-12.1. The study has two major aims: (i discussion of the current state of the art of modelling FSI in gas turbine engines and (ii development of a “tuned” one-way FSI model of a vibrating turbine blade to investigate the correlation between the pressure at the turbine casing surface and the vibrating blade motion. Firstly, the feasibility of the complete FSI coupled two-way, three-dimensional modelling of a turbine blade undergoing vibration using current commercial software is discussed. Various modelling simplifications, which reduce the full coupling between the fluid and structural domains, are then presented. The one-way FSI model of the vibrating turbine blade is introduced, which has the computational efficiency of a moving boundary CFD model. This one-way FSI model includes the corrected motion of the vibrating turbine blade under given engine flow conditions. This one-way FSI model is used to interrogate the pressure around a vibrating gas turbine blade. The results obtained show that the pressure distribution at the casing surface does not differ significantly, in its general form, from the pressure at the vibrating rotor blade tip.

  20. Review of computational fluid dynamics applications in biotechnology processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C; Malhotra, D; Rathore, A S

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is well established as a tool of choice for solving problems that involve one or more of the following phenomena: flow of fluids, heat transfer,mass transfer, and chemical reaction. Unit operations that are commonly utilized in biotechnology processes are often complex and as such would greatly benefit from application of CFD. The thirst for deeper process and product understanding that has arisen out of initiatives such as quality by design provides further impetus toward usefulness of CFD for problems that may otherwise require extensive experimentation. Not surprisingly, there has been increasing interest in applying CFD toward a variety of applications in biotechnology processing in the last decade. In this article, we will review applications in the major unit operations involved with processing of biotechnology products. These include fermentation,centrifugation, chromatography, ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and freeze drying. We feel that the future applications of CFD in biotechnology processing will focus on establishing CFD as a tool of choice for providing process understanding that can be then used to guide more efficient and effective experimentation. This article puts special emphasis on the work done in the last 10 years. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Tryggvason, T.

    1998-01-01

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...... simulation program requires a detailed description of the energy flow in the air movement which can be obtained by a CFD program. The paper describes an energy consumption calculation in a large building, where the building energy simulation program is modified by CFD predictions of the flow between three...... zones connected by open areas with pressure and buoyancy driven air flow. The two programs are interconnected in an iterative procedure. The paper shows also an evaluation of the air quality in the main area of the buildings based on CFD predictions. It is shown that an interconnection between a CFD...

  2. Modeling centrifugal cell washers using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellet, Beth E; Han, Binbing; Dandy, David S; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil

    2004-11-01

    Reinfusion of shed blood during surgery could avoid the need for blood transfusions. Prior to reinfusion of the red blood cells, the shed blood must be washed in order to remove leukocytes, platelets, and other contaminants. Further, the hematocrit of the washed blood must be increased. The feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to guide the design of better centrifuges for processing shed blood is explored here. The velocity field within a centrifuge bowl and the rate of protein removal from the shed blood has been studied. The results obtained indicate that CFD could help screen preliminary centrifuge bowl designs, thus reducing the number of initial experimental tests required when developing new centrifuge bowls. Although the focus of this work is on washing shed blood, the methods developed here are applicable to the design of centrifuge bowls for other blood-processing applications.

  3. Improving coal flotation recovery using computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Koh [CSIRO Minerals (Australia)

    2009-06-15

    This work involves using the latest advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to increase understanding of the hydrodynamics in coal flotation and to identify any opportunities to improve design and operation of both the Microcel column and Jameson cell. The CSIRO CFD model incorporates micro-processes from cell hydrodynamics that affect particle-bubble attachments and detachments. CFD simulation results include the liquid velocities, turbulent dissipation rates, gas hold-up, particle-bubble attachment rates and detachment rates. This work has demonstrated that CFD modelling is a cost effective means of developing an understanding of particle-bubble attachments and detachments, and can be used to identify and test potential cell or process modifications.

  4. Simulation of Tailrace Hydrodynamics Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to investigate hydrodynamic flow fields surrounding the tailrace zone below large hydraulic structures. Previous and ongoing studies using CFD tools to simulate gradually varied flow with multiple constituents and forebay/intake hydrodynamics have shown that CFD tools can provide valuable information for hydraulic and biological evaluation of fish passage near hydraulic structures. These studies however are incapable of simulating the rapidly varying flow fields that involving breakup of the free-surface, such as those through and below high flow outfalls and spillways. Although the use of CFD tools for these types of flow are still an active area of research, initial applications discussed in this report show that these tools are capable of simulating the primary features of these highly transient flow fields.

  5. Qweak Data Analysis for Target Modeling Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Covrig, Silviu

    2015-04-01

    The 2.5 kW liquid hydrogen (LH2) target used in the Qweak parity violation experiment is the highest power LH2 target in the world and the first to be designed with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at Jefferson Lab. The Qweak experiment determined the weak charge of the proton by measuring the parity-violating elastic scattering asymmetry of longitudinally polarized electrons from unpolarized liquid hydrogen at small momentum transfer (Q2 = 0 . 025 GeV2). This target met the design goals of bench-marked with the Qweak target data. This work is an essential ingredient in future designs of very high power low noise targets like MOLLER (5 kW, target noise asymmetry contribution < 25 ppm) and MESA (4.5 kW).

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of an Evaporative Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapilan N.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of chlorofluorocarbon based refrigerants in the air-conditioning system increases the global warming and causes the climate change. The climate change is expected to present a number of challenges for the built environment and an evaporative cooling system is one of the simplest and environmentally friendly cooling system. The evaporative cooling system is most widely used in summer and in rural and urban areas of India for human comfort. In evaporative cooling system, the addition of water into air reduces the temperature of the air as the energy needed to evaporate the water is taken from the air. Computational fluid dynamics is a numerical analysis and was used to analyse the evaporative cooling system. The CFD results are matches with the experimental results.

  7. Uncertainty quantification in computational fluid dynamics and aircraft engines

    CERN Document Server

    Montomoli, Francesco; D'Ammaro, Antonio; Massini, Michela; Salvadori, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces novel design techniques developed to increase the safety of aircraft engines. The authors demonstrate how the application of uncertainty methods can overcome problems in the accurate prediction of engine lift, caused by manufacturing error. This in turn ameliorates the difficulty of achieving required safety margins imposed by limits in current design and manufacturing methods. This text shows that even state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are not able to predict the same performance measured in experiments; CFD methods assume idealised geometries but ideal geometries do not exist, cannot be manufactured and their performance differs from real-world ones. By applying geometrical variations of a few microns, the agreement with experiments improves dramatically, but unfortunately the manufacturing errors in engines or in experiments are unknown. In order to overcome this limitation, uncertainty quantification considers the probability density functions of manufacturing errors...

  8. Simulating Smoke Filling in Big Halls by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Chow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many tall halls of big space volume were built and, to be built in many construction projects in the Far East, particularly Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Smoke is identified to be the key hazard to handle. Consequently, smoke exhaust systems are specified in the fire code in those areas. An update on applying Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD in smoke exhaust design will be presented in this paper. Key points to note in CFD simulations on smoke filling due to a fire in a big hall will be discussed. Mathematical aspects concerning of discretization of partial differential equations and algorithms for solving the velocity-pressure linked equations are briefly outlined. Results predicted by CFD with different free boundary conditions are compared with those on room fire tests. Standards on grid size, relaxation factors, convergence criteria, and false diffusion should be set up for numerical experiments with CFD.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Choanoflagellate Filter-Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadzadeh, Seyed Saeed; Walther, Jens; Nielsen, Lasse Tore; Kiorboe, Thomas; Dolger, Julia; Andersen, Anders

    2017-11-01

    Choanoflagellates are unicellular aquatic organisms with a single flagellum that drives a feeding current through a funnel-shaped collar filter on which bacteria-sized prey are caught. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) we model the beating flagellum and the complex filter flow of the choanoflagellate Diaphanoeca grandis. Our CFD simulations based on the current understanding of the morphology underestimate the experimentally observed clearance rate by more than an order of magnitude: The beating flagellum is simply unable to draw enough water through the fine filter. Our observations motivate us to suggest a radically different filtration mechanism that requires a flagellar vane (sheet), and addition of a wide vane in our CFD model allows us to correctly predict the observed clearance rate.

  10. Study of blast wave overpressures using the computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. COSTA NETO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The threats of bomb attacks by criminal organizations and accidental events involving chemical explosives are a danger to the people and buildings. Due the severity of these issues and the need of data required for a safety design, more research is required about explosions and shock waves. This paper presents an assessment of blast wave overpressures using a computational fluid dynamics software. Analyses of phenomena as reflection of shock waves and channeling effects were done and a comparison between numerical results and analytical predictions has been executed, based on the simulation on several models. The results suggest that the common analytical predictions aren’t accurate enough for an overpressure analysis in small stand-off distances and that poorly designed buildings may increase the shock wave overpressures due multiple blast wave reflections, increasing the destructive potential of the explosions.

  11. Mapping flow distortion on oceanographic platforms using computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O'Sullivan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind speed measurements over the ocean on ships or buoys are affected by flow distortion from the platform and by the anemometer itself. This can lead to errors in direct measurements and the derived parametrisations. Here we computational fluid dynamics (CFD to simulate the errors in wind speed measurements caused by flow distortion on the RV Celtic Explorer. Numerical measurements were obtained from the finite-volume CFD code OpenFOAM, which was used to simulate the velocity fields. This was done over a range of orientations in the test domain from −60 to +60° in increments of 10°. The simulation was also set up for a range of velocities, ranging from 5 to 25 m s−1 in increments of 0.5 m s−1. The numerical analysis showed close agreement to experimental measurements.

  12. Helicopter fuselage drag - combined computational fluid dynamics and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batrakov, A.; Kusyumov, A.; Mikhailov, S.; Pakhov, V.; Sungatullin, A.; Valeev, M.; Zherekhov, V.; Barakos, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, wind tunnel experiments are combined with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) aiming to analyze the aerodynamics of realistic fuselage configurations. A development model of the ANSAT aircraft and an early model of the AKTAI light helicopter were employed. Both models were tested at the subsonic wind tunnel of KNRTU-KAI for a range of Reynolds numbers and pitch and yaw angles. The force balance measurements were complemented by particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigations for the cases where the experimental force measurements showed substantial unsteadiness. The CFD results were found to be in fair agreement with the test data and revealed some flow separation at the rear of the fuselages. Once confidence on the CFD method was established, further modifications were introduced to the ANSAT-like fuselage model to demonstrate drag reduction via small shape changes.

  13. Two-dimensional photonic crystal accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Cowan

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals provide a method of confining a synchronous speed-of-light mode in an all-dielectric structure, likely a necessary feature in any optical accelerator. We explore computationally a class of photonic crystal structures with translational symmetry in a direction transverse to the electron beam. We demonstrate synchronous waveguide modes and discuss relevant parameters of such modes. We then explore how accelerator parameters vary as the geometry of the structure is changed and consider trade-offs inherent in the design of an accelerator of this type.

  14. Hall conductivity for two dimensional magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbois, J.; Ouvry, S.; Texier, C.

    1996-01-01

    A Kubo inspired formalism is proposed to compute the longitudinal and transverse dynamical conductivities of an electron in a plane (or a gas of electrons at zero temperature) coupled to the potential vector of an external local magnetic field, with the additional coupling of the spin degree of freedom of the electron to the local magnetic field (Pauli Hamiltonian). As an example, the homogeneous magnetic field Hall conductivity is rederived. The case of the vortex at the origin is worked out in detail. A perturbative analysis is proposed for the conductivity in the random magnetic impurity problem (Poissonian vortices in the plane). (author)

  15. Two Dimensional Heat Transfer around Penetrations in Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Kelly, Andrew O.; Jumper, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this task was to quantify thermal losses involving integrating MLI into real life situations. Testing specifically focused on the effects of penetrations (including structural attachments, electrical conduit/feedthroughs, and fluid lines) through MLI. While there have been attempts at quantifying these losses both analytically and experimentally, none have included a thorough investigation of the methods and materials that could be used in such applications. To attempt to quantify the excess heat load coming into the system due to the integration losses, a calorimeter was designed to study two dimensional heat transfer through penetrated MLI. The test matrix was designed to take as many variables into account as was possible with the limited test duration and system size. The parameters varied were the attachment mechanism, the buffer material (for buffer attachment mechanisms only), the thickness of the buffer, and the penetration material. The work done under this task is an attempt to measure the parasitic heat loads and affected insulation areas produced by system integration, to model the parasitic loads, and from the model produce engineering equations to allow for the determination of parasitic heat loads in future applications. The methods of integration investigated were no integration, using a buffer to thermally isolate the strut from the MLI, and temperature matching the MLI on the strut. Several materials were investigated as a buffer material including aerogel blankets, aerogel bead packages, cryolite, and even an evacuated vacuum space (in essence a no buffer condition).

  16. Hysteresis and avalanches in two-dimensional foam rheology simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Y.; Swart, P.J.; Saxena, A.; Asipauskas, M.; Glazier, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Foams have unique rheological properties that range from solidlike to fluidlike. We study two-dimensional noncoarsening foams of different disorder under shear in a Monte Carlo simulation, using a driven large-Q Potts model. Simulations of periodic shear on an ordered foam show several different response regimes. At small strain amplitudes, bubbles deform and recover their shapes elastically, and the macroscopic response is that of a linear elastic cellular material. For increasing strain amplitude, the energy-strain curve starts to exhibit hysteresis before any topological rearrangements occur, indicating a macroscopic viscoelastic response. When the applied strain amplitude exceeds a critical value, the yield strain, topological rearrangements occur, the foam starts to flow, and we observe macroscopic irreversibility. We find that the dynamics of topological rearrangements depend sensitively on the structural disorder. Structural disorder decreases the yield strain; sufficiently high disorder changes the macroscopic response of a foam from a viscoelastic solid to a viscoelastic fluid. This wide-ranging dynamical response and the associated history effects of foams result from avalanchelike rearrangement events. The spatiotemporal statistics of rearrangement events do not display long-range correlations for ordered foams or at low shear rates, consistent with experimental observations. As the shear rate or structural disorder increases, the topological events become more correlated and their power spectra change from that of white noise toward 1/f noise. Intriguingly, the power spectra of the total stored energy also exhibit this 1/f trend. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  17. Note: Interpolation for evaluation of a two-dimensional spatial profile of plasma densities at low gas pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Se-Jin; Kim, Young-Chul; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2011-01-01

    An interpolation algorithm for the evaluation of the spatial profile of plasma densities in a cylindrical reactor was developed for low gas pressures. The algorithm is based on a collisionless two-dimensional fluid model. Contrary to the collisional case, i.e., diffusion fluid model, the fitting algorithm depends on the aspect ratio of the cylindrical reactor. The spatial density profile of the collisionless fitting algorithm is presented in two-dimensional images and compared with the results of the diffusion fluid model.

  18. Decaying quasi-two-dimensional viscous flow on a square domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konijnenberg, J.A. van de; Flor, J.B.; Heijst, G.J.F. van

    1998-01-01

    A comparison is made between experimental, numerical and analytical results for the two-dimensional flow on a square domain. The experiments concern the flow at the interface of a two-layer stratified fluid, evoked by either stirring the fluid with a rake, or by injecting additional fluid...... at the interface. Two numerical simulations were performed with initial conditions and boundary conditions that correspond approximately with those met in the experiments. The analytical results concern the calculation of the lowest modes of a decaying Stokes flow on a square domain. At late times...... relationship between vorticity and stream function in the experiments and the simulations. (C) 1998 American Institute of Physics....

  19. Numerical computation of fluid flow in different nonferrous metallurgical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, A.

    1996-10-01

    Heat, mass and fluid flow phenomena in metallurgical reactor systems such as smelting cyclones or electrolytic cells are complex and intricately linked through the governing equations of fluid flow, chemical reaction kinetics and chemical thermodynamics. The challenges for the representation of flow phenomena in such reactors as well as the transfers of these concepts to non-specialist modelers (e.g. plant operators and management personnel) can be met through scientific flow visualization techniques. In the first example the fluid flow of the gas phase and of concentrate particles in a smelting cyclone for copper production are calculated three dimensionally. The effect of design parameters (length and diameter of reactor, concentrate feeding tangentially or from the top, ..) and operating conditions are investigated. Single particle traces show, how to increase particle retention time before the particles reach the liquid film flowing down the cyclone wall. Cyclone separators are widely used in the metallurgical and chemical industry for collection of large quantities of dust. Most of the empirical models, which today are applied for the design, are lacking in being valid in the high temperature region. Therefore the numerical prediction of the collection efficiency of dust particles is done. The particle behavior close to the wall is considered by applying a particle restitution model, which calculates individual particle restitution coefficients as functions of impact velocity and impact angle. The effect of design parameters and operating are studied. Moreover, the fluid flow inside a copper refining electrolysis cell is modeled. The simulation is based on density variations in the boundary layer at the electrode surface. Density and thickness of the boundary layer are compared to measurements in a parametric study. The actual inhibitor concentration in the cell is calculated, too. Moreover, a two-phase flow approach is developed to simulate the behavior of

  20. Two dimensional layered materials: First-principle investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Youjian

    Two-dimensional layered materials have emerged as a fascinating research area due to their unique physical and chemical properties, which differ from those of their bulk counterparts. Some of these unique properties are due to carriers and transport being confined to 2 dimensions, some are due to lattice symmetry, and some arise from their large surface area, gateability, stackability, high mobility, spin transport, or optical accessibility. How to modify the electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional layered materials for desirable long-term applications or fundamental physics is the main focus of this thesis. We explored the methods of adsorption, intercalation, and doping as ways to modify two-dimensional layered materials, using density functional theory as the main computational methodology. Chapter 1 gives a brief review of density functional theory. Due to the difficulty of solving the many-particle Schrodinger equation, density functional theory was developed to find the ground-state properties of many-electron systems through an examination of their charge density, rather than their wavefunction. This method has great application throughout the chemical and material sciences, such as modeling nano-scale systems, analyzing electronic, mechanical, thermal, optical and magnetic properties, and predicting reaction mechanisms. Graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides are arguably the two most important two-dimensional layered materials in terms of the scope and interest of their physical properties. Thus they are the main focus of this thesis. In chapter 2, the structure and electronic properties of graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides are described. Alkali adsorption onto the surface of bulk graphite and metal intecalation into transition metal dichalcogenides -- two methods of modifying properties through the introduction of metallic atoms into layered systems -- are described in chapter 2. Chapter 3 presents a new method of tuning

  1. Beginning Introductory Physics with Two-Dimensional Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2009-01-01

    During the session on "Introductory College Physics Textbooks" at the 2007 Summer Meeting of the AAPT, there was a brief discussion about whether introductory physics should begin with one-dimensional motion or two-dimensional motion. Here we present the case that by starting with two-dimensional motion, we are able to introduce a considerable…

  2. Two-dimensional black holes and non-commutative spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the effects of non-commutative spaces on two-dimensional black hole. The event horizon of two-dimensional black hole is obtained in non-commutative space up to second order of perturbative calculations. A lower limit for the non-commutativity parameter is also obtained. The observer in that limit in contrast to commutative case see two horizon

  3. Solution of the two-dimensional spectral factorization problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    An approximation theorem is proven which solves a classic problem in two-dimensional (2-D) filter theory. The theorem shows that any continuous two-dimensional spectrum can be uniformly approximated by the squared modulus of a recursively stable finite trigonometric polynomial supported on a nonsymmetric half-plane.

  4. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in bounded domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clercx, H.J.H.; van Heijst, G.J.F.

    In this review we will discuss recent experimental and numerical results of quasi-two-dimensional decaying and forced Navier–Stokes turbulence in bounded domains. We will give a concise overview of developments in two-dimensional turbulence research, with emphasis on the progress made during the

  5. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in bounded domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clercx, H.J.H.; Heijst, van G.J.F.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we will discuss recent experimental and numerical results of quasi-two-dimensional decaying and forced Navier–Stokes turbulence in bounded domains. We will give a concise overview of developments in two-dimensional turbulence research, with emphasis on the progress made during the

  6. Predicting the Noise of High Power Fluid Targets Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Covrig Dusa, Silviu

    The 2.5 kW liquid hydrogen (LH2) target used in the Qweak parity violation experiment is the highest power LH2 target in the world and the first to be designed with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at Jefferson Lab. The Qweak experiment determined the weak charge of the proton by measuring the parity-violating elastic scattering asymmetry of longitudinally polarized electrons from unpolarized liquid hydrogen at small momentum transfer (Q2 = 0 . 025 GeV2). This target satisfied the design goals of bench-marked with the Qweak target data. This work is an essential component in future designs of very high power low noise targets like MOLLER (5 kW, target noise asymmetry contribution < 25 ppm) and MESA (4.5 kW).

  7. Two-dimensional disruption thermal analysis code DREAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Seki, Masahiro.

    1988-08-01

    When a plasma disruption takes place in a tokamak type fusion reactor, plasma facing components such as first wall and divertor/limiter are subjected to an intense heat load with very high heat flux and short duration. At the surface of the wall, temperature rapidly rises, and melting and evaporation occurs, it causes reduction of wall thickness and crack initiation/propagation. As lifetime of the components is significantly affected by them, the transient analysis in consideration of phase changes (melting/evaporation) and radiation heat loss is required in the design of these components. This paper describes the computer code DREAM developed to perform the two-dimensional transient thermal analysis that takes phase changes and radiation into account. The input and output of the code and a sample analysis on a disruption simulation experiment are also reported. The user's input manual is added as an appendix. The profiles and time variations of temperature, and melting and evaporated thicknesses of the material subjected to intense heat load can be obtained, using this computer code. This code also gives the temperature data for elastoplastic analysis with FEM structural analysis codes (ADINA, MARC, etc.) to evaluate the thermal stress and crack propagation behavior within the wall materials. (author)

  8. Two dimensional spatial distortion correction algorithm for scintillation GAMMA cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, R.; Gray, E.; Jih, F.; King, S.E.; Lim, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Spatial distortion in an Anger gamma camera originates fundamentally from the discrete nature of scintillation light sampling with an array of PMT's. Historically digital distortion correction started with the method based on the distortion measurement by using 1-D slit pattern and the subsequent on-line bi-linear approximation with 64 x 64 look-up tables for X and Y. However, the X, Y distortions are inherently two-dimensional in nature, and thus the validity of this 1-D calibration method becomes questionable with the increasing distortion amplitude in association with the effort to get better spatial and energy resolutions. The authors have developed a new accurate 2-D correction algorithm. This method involves the steps of; data collection from 2-D orthogonal hole pattern, 2-D distortion vector measurement, 2-D Lagrangian polynomial interpolation, and transformation to X, Y ADC frame. The impact of numerical precision used in correction and the accuracy of bilinear approximation with varying look-up table size have been carefully examined through computer simulation by using measured single PMT light response function together with Anger positioning logic. Also the accuracy level of different order Lagrangian polynomial interpolations for correction table expansion from hole centroids were investigated. Detailed algorithm and computer simulation are presented along with camera test results

  9. Parallel processing of two-dimensional Sn transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, M.

    1997-01-01

    A parallel processing method for the two-dimensional S n transport code DOT3.5 has been developed to achieve a drastic reduction in computation time. In the proposed method, parallelization is achieved with angular domain decomposition and/or space domain decomposition. The calculational speed of parallel processing by angular domain decomposition is largely influenced by frequent communications between processing elements. To assess parallelization efficiency, sample problems with up to 32 x 32 spatial meshes were solved with a Sun workstation using the PVM message-passing library. As a result, parallel calculation using 16 processing elements, for example, was found to be nine times as fast as that with one processing element. As for parallel processing by geometry segmentation, the influence of processing element communications on computation time is small; however, discontinuity at the segment boundary degrades convergence speed. To accelerate the convergence, an alternate sweep of angular flux in conjunction with space domain decomposition and a two-step rescaling method consisting of segmentwise rescaling and ordinary pointwise rescaling have been developed. By applying the developed method, the number of iterations needed to obtain a converged flux solution was reduced by a factor of 2. As a result, parallel calculation using 16 processing elements was found to be 5.98 times as fast as the original DOT3.5 calculation

  10. Class of reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin methods in computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hong; Xia, Yidong; Nourgaliev, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A class of reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods is presented to solve compressible flow problems on arbitrary grids. The idea is to combine the efficiency of the reconstruction methods in finite volume methods and the accuracy of the DG methods to obtain a better numerical algorithm in computational fluid dynamics. The beauty of the resulting reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin (RDG) methods is that they provide a unified formulation for both finite volume and DG methods, and contain both classical finite volume and standard DG methods as two special cases of the RDG methods, and thus allow for a direct efficiency comparison. Both Green-Gauss and least-squares reconstruction methods and a least-squares recovery method are presented to obtain a quadratic polynomial representation of the underlying linear discontinuous Galerkin solution on each cell via a so-called in-cell reconstruction process. The devised in-cell reconstruction is aimed to augment the accuracy of the discontinuous Galerkin method by increasing the order of the underlying polynomial solution. These three reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin methods are used to compute a variety of compressible flow problems on arbitrary meshes to assess their accuracy. The numerical experiments demonstrate that all three reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin methods can significantly improve the accuracy of the underlying second-order DG method, although the least-squares reconstructed DG method provides the best performance in terms of both accuracy, efficiency, and robustness. (author)

  11. Algorithms for computational fluid dynamics n parallel processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Velde, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    A study of parallel algorithms for the numerical solution of partial differential equations arising in computational fluid dynamics is presented. The actual implementation on parallel processors of shared and nonshared memory design is discussed. The performance of these algorithms is analyzed in terms of machine efficiency, communication time, bottlenecks and software development costs. For elliptic equations, a parallel preconditioned conjugate gradient method is described, which has been used to solve pressure equations discretized with high order finite elements on irregular grids. A parallel full multigrid method and a parallel fast Poisson solver are also presented. Hyperbolic conservation laws were discretized with parallel versions of finite difference methods like the Lax-Wendroff scheme and with the Random Choice method. Techniques are developed for comparing the behavior of an algorithm on different architectures as a function of problem size and local computational effort. Effective use of these advanced architecture machines requires the use of machine dependent programming. It is shown that the portability problems can be minimized by introducing high level operations on vectors and matrices structured into program libraries

  12. Benchmarking Computational Fluid Dynamics for Application to PWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.D. III; Conner, M.E.; Liu, B.; Dzodzo, B.; Paramonov, D.V.; Beasley, D.E.; Langford, H.M.; Holloway, M.V.

    2002-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a process used to develop confidence in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as a tool to investigate flow and temperature distributions in a PWR fuel bundle. The velocity and temperature fields produced by a mixing spacer grid of a PWR fuel assembly are quite complex. Before using CFD to evaluate these flow fields, a rigorous benchmarking effort should be performed to ensure that reasonable results are obtained. Westinghouse has developed a method to quantitatively benchmark CFD tools against data at conditions representative of the PWR. Several measurements in a 5 x 5 rod bundle were performed. Lateral flow-field testing employed visualization techniques and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Heat transfer testing involved measurements of the single-phase heat transfer coefficient downstream of the spacer grid. These test results were used to compare with CFD predictions. Among the parameters optimized in the CFD models based on this comparison with data include computational mesh, turbulence model, and boundary conditions. As an outcome of this effort, a methodology was developed for CFD modeling that provides confidence in the numerical results. (authors)

  13. Two-dimensional thermal analysis of radial heat transfer of monoliths in small-scale steam methane reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cui, Xiaoti; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2018-01-01

    Monolithic catalysts have received increasing attention for application in the small-scale steam methane reforming process. The radial heat transfer behaviors of monolith reformers were analyzed by two-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling. A parameter study was conducted...... by a large number of simulations focusing on the thermal conductivity of the monolith substrate, washcoat layer, wall gap, radiation heat transfer and the geometric parameters (cell density, porosity and diameter of monolith). The effective radial thermal conductivity of the monolith structure, kr......,eff, showed good agreement with predictions made by the pseudo-continuous symmetric model. This influence of the radiation heat transfer is low for highly conductive monoliths. A simplified model has been developed to evaluate the importance of radiation for monolithic reformers under different conditions...

  14. Developing of two-dimensional model of the corium cooling and behavior with non-condensible gas injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chang Hyun; Cho, Jae Seon; Kim, Ju Youl; Kim, Do Hyoung [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of the non-condensible gas injection into the molten corium on the heat transfer and dynamic behavior within the melt when molten core-concrete interaction occurs during the hypothetical severe accident. Corium behavior with gas injection effect is two phase fluid pattern in which droplet has dispersed gas phase in continuous liquid phase of corium. To analyze this behavior, two dimensional governing equation using the governing equation, the computer program is accomplished using the finite difference method and SIMPLER algorithm. And benchmarking calculation is performed for the KfK experiment, which consider the gas injection effect. After this pre-calculation, an analyses is performed with typical corium under severe accidents. It is concluded that the heat transfer within corium increases as the metal components of the corium and gas injection velocity increase. 88 refs., 23 tabs., 35 figs. (author)

  15. An Automated High Aspect Ratio Mesher for Computational Fluid Dynamics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are routinely used while designing, analyzing, and optimizing air- and spacecraft. An important component of CFD...

  16. Probabilistic Methods for the Quantification of Uncertainty and Error in Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Faragher, John

    2004-01-01

    ... conservatism to allow for them. This report examines the feasibility of using a probabilistic approach for modelling the component temperatures in an engine using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics).

  17. Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor Discharge-Flow Overexpansion and Limit-Loading Condition, Part I: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Cheng S.

    2017-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) investigation is conducted over a two-dimensional axial-flow turbine rotor blade row to study the phenomena of turbine rotor discharge flow overexpansion at subcritical, critical, and supercritical conditions. Quantitative data of the mean-flow Mach numbers, mean-flow angles, the tangential blade pressure forces, the mean-flow mass flux, and the flow-path total pressure loss coefficients, averaged or integrated across the two-dimensional computational domain encompassing two blade-passages, are obtained over a series of 14 inlet-total to exit-static pressure ratios, from 1.5 (un-choked; subcritical condition) to 10.0 (supercritical with excessively high pressure ratio.) Detailed flow features over the full domain-of-computation, such as the streamline patterns, Mach contours, pressure contours, blade surface pressure distributions, etc. are collected and displayed in this paper. A formal, quantitative definition of the limit loading condition based on the channel flow theory is proposed and explained. Contrary to the comments made in the historical works performed on this subject, about the deficiency of the theoretical methods applied in analyzing this phenomena, using modern CFD method for the study of this subject appears to be quite adequate and successful. This paper describes the CFD work and its findings.

  18. Effects of finite pulse width on two-dimensional Fourier transform electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhichun; Crepeau, Richard H; Freed, Jack H

    2005-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ESR techniques, such as 2D-ELDOR, have considerably improved the resolution of ESR in studies of molecular dynamics in complex fluids such as liquid crystals and membrane vesicles and in spin labeled polymers and peptides. A well-developed theory based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) has been successfully employed to analyze these experiments. However, one fundamental assumption has been utilized to simplify the complex analysis, viz. the pulses have been treated as ideal non-selective ones, which therefore provide uniform irradiation of the whole spectrum. In actual experiments, the pulses are of finite width causing deviations from the theoretical predictions, a problem that is exacerbated by experiments performed at higher frequencies. In the present paper we provide a method to deal with the full SLE including the explicit role of the molecular dynamics, the spin Hamiltonian and the radiation field during the pulse. The computations are rendered more manageable by utilizing the Trotter formula, which is adapted to handle this SLE in what we call a "Split Super-Operator" method. Examples are given for different motional regimes, which show how 2D-ELDOR spectra are affected by the finite pulse widths. The theory shows good agreement with 2D-ELDOR experiments performed as a function of pulse width.

  19. Super-Cavitating Flow Around Two-Dimensional Conical, Spherical, Disc and Stepped Disc Cavitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooraj, S.; Chandrasekharan, Vaishakh; Robson, Rony S.; Bhanu Prakash, S.

    2017-08-01

    A super-cavitating object is a high speed submerged object that is designed to initiate a cavitation bubble at the nose which extends past the aft end of the object, substantially reducing the skin friction drag that would be present if the sides of the object were in contact with the liquid in which the object is submerged. By reducing the drag force the thermal energy consumption to move faster can also be minimised. The super-cavitation behavioural changes with respect to Cavitators of various geometries have been studied by varying the inlet velocity. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analysis has been carried out by applying k-ε turbulence model. The variation of drag coefficient, cavity length with respect to cavitation number and inlet velocity are analyzed. Results showed conical Cavitator with wedge angle of 30° has lesser drag coefficient and cavity length when compared to conical Cavitators with wedge angles 45° and 60°, spherical, disc and stepped disc Cavitators. Conical cavitator 60° and disc cavitator have the maximum cavity length but with higher drag coefficient. Also there is significant variation of supercavitation effect observed between inlet velocities of 32 m/s to 40 m/s.

  20. Border-crossing model for the diffusive coarsening of two-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional wet foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimming, C. D.; Durian, D. J.

    2017-09-01

    For dry foams, the transport of gas from small high-pressure bubbles to large low-pressure bubbles is dominated by diffusion across the thin soap films separating neighboring bubbles. For wetter foams, the film areas become smaller as the Plateau borders and vertices inflate with liquid. So-called "border-blocking" models can explain some features of wet-foam coarsening based on the presumption that the inflated borders totally block the gas flux; however, this approximation dramatically fails in the wet or unjamming limit where the bubbles become close-packed spheres and coarsening proceeds even though there are no films. Here, we account for the ever-present border-crossing flux by a new length scale defined by the average gradient of gas concentration inside the borders. We compute that it is proportional to the geometric average of film and border thicknesses, and we verify this scaling by numerical solution of the diffusion equation. We similarly consider transport across inflated vertices and surface Plateau borders in quasi-two-dimensional foams. And we show how the d A /d t =K0(n -6 ) von Neumann law is modified by the appearance of terms that depend on bubble size and shape as well as the concentration gradient length scales. Finally, we use the modified von Neumann law to compute the growth rate of the average bubble area, which is not constant.

  1. Optimizing separations in online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirok, Bob W J; Gargano, Andrea F G; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2018-01-01

    Online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography has become an attractive option for the analysis of complex nonvolatile samples found in various fields (e.g. environmental studies, food, life, and polymer sciences). Two-dimensional liquid chromatography complements the highly popular hyphenated systems that combine liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography is also applied to the analysis of samples that are not compatible with mass spectrometry (e.g. high-molecular-weight polymers), providing important information on the distribution of the sample components along chemical dimensions (molecular weight, charge, lipophilicity, stereochemistry, etc.). Also, in comparison with conventional one-dimensional liquid chromatography, two-dimensional liquid chromatography provides a greater separation power (peak capacity). Because of the additional selectivity and higher peak capacity, the combination of two-dimensional liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry allows for simpler mixtures of compounds to be introduced in the ion source at any given time, improving quantitative analysis by reducing matrix effects. In this review, we summarize the rationale and principles of two-dimensional liquid chromatography experiments, describe advantages and disadvantages of combining different selectivities and discuss strategies to improve the quality of two-dimensional liquid chromatography separations. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Separation Science published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  2. Two-dimensional beam-profile monitor using the Reticon MC510A array camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, B.

    1981-08-01

    A quantitative two-dimensional beam profile may be obtained from a scintillator viewed by a Reticon camera which uses a 32 x 32 array of photodiodes as its sensing element. In this note, CAMAC-oriented data acquisition electronics which allow one either to transmit the profile to a computer, or to use the monitor in a stand-alone mode are described

  3. Solving the two-dimensional Schrödinger equation using basis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ihab H Naeim

    2017-10-19

    Oct 19, 2017 ... We shall study the case of a two-dimensional quantum system .... Solving (6) for ck,l is tantamount to pro- ... case, the final computational problem becomes quite ..... matrix approach fails in the case of two particles con-.

  4. Status for the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, J.

    2001-01-01

    This report sets up an evaluation of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D in its present state. This code is used for blade aerodynamics simulations in the Aeroelastic Design group at Risø. Two airfoils are investigated by computing theflow at several angles of attack ranging from...

  5. Overview on the anomaly and Schwinger term in two dimensional QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, C.; Bertlmann, R.A.; Hofer, P.

    1993-01-01

    The axial anomaly of two-dimensional QED is computed in different ways (perturbative, via dispersion integrals, path integral and index theorem) and their relation is discussed as well as the relation between anomaly, Schwinger term and the Dirac vacuum. Some features of the special case of massless fermions (Schwinger model) and some methods of exactly solving it are demonstrated. (authors)

  6. Solving the two-dimensional stationary transport equation with the aid of the nodal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesina, M.

    1976-07-01

    In this document the two-dimensional stationary transport equation for the geometry of a fuel assembly or for a system of square boxes has been formulated as an algebraic eigenvalue problem, and the solution was achieved with the computer code NODE 2 which was developed for this purpose. (orig.) [de

  7. Exploring two-dimensional electron gases with two-dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, J.; Dey, P.; Karaiskaj, D., E-mail: karaiskaj@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Ave., Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Tokumoto, T.; Hilton, D. J. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States); Reno, J. L. [CINT, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    The dephasing of the Fermi edge singularity excitations in two modulation doped single quantum wells of 12 nm and 18 nm thickness and in-well carrier concentration of ∼4 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} was carefully measured using spectrally resolved four-wave mixing (FWM) and two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) spectroscopy. Although the absorption at the Fermi edge is broad at this doping level, the spectrally resolved FWM shows narrow resonances. Two peaks are observed separated by the heavy hole/light hole energy splitting. Temperature dependent “rephasing” (S{sub 1}) 2DFT spectra show a rapid linear increase of the homogeneous linewidth with temperature. The dephasing rate increases faster with temperature in the narrower 12 nm quantum well, likely due to an increased carrier-phonon scattering rate. The S{sub 1} 2DFT spectra were measured using co-linear, cross-linear, and co-circular polarizations. Distinct 2DFT lineshapes were observed for co-linear and cross-linear polarizations, suggesting the existence of polarization dependent contributions. The “two-quantum coherence” (S{sub 3}) 2DFT spectra for the 12 nm quantum well show a single peak for both co-linear and co-circular polarizations.

  8. Functional inks and printing of two-dimensional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guohua; Kang, Joohoon; Ng, Leonard W T; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Howe, Richard C T; Jones, Christopher G; Hersam, Mark C; Hasan, Tawfique

    2018-05-08

    Graphene and related two-dimensional materials provide an ideal platform for next generation disruptive technologies and applications. Exploiting these solution-processed two-dimensional materials in printing can accelerate this development by allowing additive patterning on both rigid and conformable substrates for flexible device design and large-scale, high-speed, cost-effective manufacturing. In this review, we summarise the current progress on ink formulation of two-dimensional materials and the printable applications enabled by them. We also present our perspectives on their research and technological future prospects.

  9. Third sound in one and two dimensional modulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, T.; Kawashima, H., Shirahama, K.; Kono, K.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental technique is developed to study acoustic transmission in one and two dimensional modulated structures by employing third sound of a superfluid helium film. In particular, the Penrose lattice, which is a two dimensional quasiperiodic structure, is studied. In two dimensions, the scattering of third sound is weaker than in one dimension. Nevertheless, the authors find that the transmission spectrum in the Penrose lattice, which is a two dimensional prototype of the quasicrystal, is observable if the helium film thickness is chosen around 5 atomic layers. The transmission spectra in the Penrose lattice are explained in terms of dynamical theory of diffraction

  10. ONE-DIMENSIONAL AND TWO-DIMENSIONAL LEADERSHIP STYLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Stefanović

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to motivate their group members to perform certain tasks, leaders use different leadership styles. These styles are based on leaders' backgrounds, knowledge, values, experiences, and expectations. The one-dimensional styles, used by many world leaders, are autocratic and democratic styles. These styles lie on the two opposite sides of the leadership spectrum. In order to precisely define the leadership styles on the spectrum between the autocratic leadership style and the democratic leadership style, leadership theory researchers use two dimensional matrices. The two-dimensional matrices define leadership styles on the basis of different parameters. By using these parameters, one can identify two-dimensional styles.

  11. Two-dimensional Lorentz-Weyl anomaly and gravitational Chern-Simons theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamseddine, A.H.; Froehlich, J.

    1992-01-01

    Two-dimensional chiral fermions and bosons, more generally conformal blocks of two-dimensional conformal field theories, exhibit Weyl-, Lorentz- and mixed Lorentz-Weyl anomalies. A novel way of computing these anomalies for a system of chiral bosons of arbitrary conformal spin j is sketched. It is shown that the Lorentz- and mixed Lorentz-Weyl anomalies of these theories can be cancelled by the anomalies of a three-dimensional classical Chern-Simons action for the spin connection, expressed in terms of the dreibein field. Some tentative applications of this result to string theory are indicated. (orig.)

  12. Theory and application of the RAZOR two-dimensional continuous energy lattice physics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerkle, M.L.; Abu-Shumays, I.K.; Ott, M.W.; Winwood, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The theory and application of the RAZOR two-dimensional, continuous energy lattice physics code are discussed. RAZOR solves the continuous energy neutron transport equation in one- and two-dimensional geometries, and calculates equivalent few-group diffusion theory constants that rigorously account for spatial and spectral self-shielding effects. A dual energy resolution slowing down algorithm is used to reduce computer memory and disk storage requirements for the slowing down calculation. Results are presented for a 2D BWR pin cell depletion benchmark problem

  13. A numerical method for two-dimensional anisotropic transport problem in cylindrical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Mingsheng; Feng Tiekai; Fu Lianxiang; Cao Changshu; Liu Yulan

    1988-01-01

    The authors deal with the triangular mesh-discontinuous finite element method for solving the time-dependent anisotropic neutron transport problem in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry. A prior estimate of the numerical solution is given. Stability is proved. The authors have computed a two dimensional anisotropic neutron transport problem and a Tungsten-Carbide critical assembly problem by using the numerical method. In comparision with DSN method and the experimental results obtained by others both at home and abroad, the method is satisfactory

  14. Quinoa - Adaptive Computational Fluid Dynamics, 0.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-09-22

    Quinoa is a set of computational tools that enables research and numerical analysis in fluid dynamics. At this time it remains a test-bed to experiment with various algorithms using fully asynchronous runtime systems. Currently, Quinoa consists of the following tools: (1) Walker, a numerical integrator for systems of stochastic differential equations in time. It is a mathematical tool to analyze and design the behavior of stochastic differential equations. It allows the estimation of arbitrary coupled statistics and probability density functions and is currently used for the design of statistical moment approximations for multiple mixing materials in variable-density turbulence. (2) Inciter, an overdecomposition-aware finite element field solver for partial differential equations using 3D unstructured grids. Inciter is used to research asynchronous mesh-based algorithms and to experiment with coupling asynchronous to bulk-synchronous parallel code. Two planned new features of Inciter, compared to the previous release (LA-CC-16-015), to be implemented in 2017, are (a) a simple Navier-Stokes solver for ideal single-material compressible gases, and (b) solution-adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), which enables dynamically concentrating compute resources to regions with interesting physics. Using the NS-AMR problem we plan to explore how to scale such high-load-imbalance simulations, representative of large production multiphysics codes, to very large problems on very large computers using an asynchronous runtime system. (3) RNGTest, a test harness to subject random number generators to stringent statistical tests enabling quantitative ranking with respect to their quality and computational cost. (4) UnitTest, a unit test harness, running hundreds of tests per second, capable of testing serial, synchronous, and asynchronous functions. (5) MeshConv, a mesh file converter that can be used to convert 3D tetrahedron meshes from and to either of the following formats: Gmsh

  15. Two-dimensional analysis for a scrapeoff and divertor regions with an MHD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Noriaki; Kasai, Masao; Hitoki, Shigehisa

    1987-08-01

    With a two-dimensional time dependent fluid code for transport processes in the edge plasma in a tokamak, coupled with Monte-Carlo method for neutral gas behavior, preliminary numerical study has been carried out for the FER divertor. Design base data such as energy flux, particle flux and so on which are essentially important to make an divertor design reliable have been obtained. (author)

  16. An object-oriented programming paradigm for parallelization of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takashi.

    1997-03-01

    We propose an object-oriented programming paradigm for parallelization of scientific computing programs, and show that the approach can be a very useful strategy. Generally, parallelization of scientific programs tends to be complicated and unportable due to the specific requirements of each parallel computer or compiler. In this paper, we show that the object-oriented programming design, which separates the parallel processing parts from the solver of the applications, can achieve the large improvement in the maintenance of the codes, as well as the high portability. We design the program for the two-dimensional Euler equations according to the paradigm, and evaluate the parallel performance on IBM SP2. (author)

  17. Computational fluid dynamics model of avian tracheal temperature control as a model for extant and extinct animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlova, N S; Arkali, F; Witzel, U; Perry, S F

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory evaporative cooling is an important mechanism of temperature control in bird. A computational simulation of the breathing cycle, heat and water loss in anatomical avian trachea/air sac model has not previously been conducted. We report a first attempt to simulate a breathing cycle in a three-dimensional model of avian trachea and air sacs (domestic fowl) using transient computational fluid dynamics. The airflow in the trachea of the model is evoked by changing the volume of the air sacs based on the measured tidal volume and inspiratory/expiratory times for the domestic fowl. We compare flow parameters and heat transfer results with in vivo data and with our previously reported results for a two-dimensional model. The total respiratory heat loss corresponds to about 13-19% of the starvation metabolic rate of domestic fowl. The present study can lend insight into a possible thermoregulatory function in species with long necks and/or a very long trachea, as found in swans and birds of paradise. Assuming the structure of the sauropod dinosaur respiratory system was close to avian, the simulation of the respiratory temperature control (using convective and evaporative cooling) in the extensively experimentally studied domestic fowl may also help in making simulations of respiratory heat control in these extinct animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Two-dimensional steady unsaturated flow through embedded elliptical layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Mark; Nieber, John L.

    2004-12-01

    New analytic element solutions are presented for unsaturated, two-dimensional steady flow in vertical planes that include nonoverlapping impermeable elliptical layers and elliptical inhomogeneities. The hydraulic conductivity, which is represented by an exponential function of the pressure head, differs between the inside and outside of an elliptical inhomogeneity; both the saturated hydraulic conductivity and water retention parameters are allowed to differ between the inside and outside. The Richards equation is transformed, through the Kirchhoff transformation and a second standard transformation, into the modified Helmholtz equation. Analytic element solutions are obtained through separation of variables in elliptical coordinates. The resulting equations for the Kirchhoff potential consist of infinite sums of products of exponentials and modified Mathieu functions. In practical applications the series are truncated but still fulfill the differential equation exactly; boundary conditions are met approximately but up to machine accuracy, provided that enough terms are used. The pressure head, saturation, and flow may be computed analytically at any point in the vadose zone. Examples are given of the shadowing effect of an impermeable elliptical layer in a uniform flow field and funnel-type flow between two elliptical inhomogeneities. The presented solutions may be applied to study transport processes in vadose zones containing many impermeable elliptical layers or elliptical inhomogeneities.

  19. Two dimensional simulation of high power laser-surface interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, S.R.; Wilke, M.D.; Green, R.E.L.; Johnson, R.P.; Busch, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    For laser intensities in the range of 10 8 --10 9 W/cm 2 , and pulse lengths of order 10 microsec or longer, the authors have modified the inertial confinement fusion code Lasnex to simulate gaseous and some dense material aspects of the laser-matter interaction. The unique aspect of their treatment consists of an ablation model which defines a dense material-vapor interface and then calculates the mass flow across this interface. The model treats the dense material as a rigid two-dimensional mass and heat reservoir suppressing all hydrodynamic motion in the dense material. The computer simulations and additional post-processors provide predictions for measurements including impulse given to the target, pressures at the target interface, electron temperatures and densities in the vapor-plasma plume region, and emission of radiation from the target. The authors will present an analysis of some relatively well diagnosed experiments which have been useful in developing their modeling. The simulations match experimentally obtained target impulses, pressures at the target surface inside the laser spot, and radiation emission from the target to within about 20%. Hence their simulational technique appears to form a useful basis for further investigation of laser-surface interaction in this intensity, pulse-width range. This work is useful in many technical areas such as materials processing

  20. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear