WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-dimensional carbon nanostructures

  1. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-04-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold-gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  2. Two-dimensional nanostructure-reinforced biodegradable polymeric nanocomposites for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Henslee, Allan M; Farshid, Behzad; Lin, Liangjun; Kasper, F Kurtis; Qin, Yi-Xian; Mikos, Antonios G; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-03-11

    This study investigates the efficacy of two-dimensional (2D) carbon and inorganic nanostructures as reinforcing agents for cross-linked composites of the biodegradable and biocompatible polymer polypropylene fumarate (PPF) as a function of nanostructure concentration. PPF composites were reinforced using various 2D nanostructures: single- and multiwalled graphene oxide nanoribbons (SWGONRs, MWGONRs), graphene oxide nanoplatelets (GONPs), and molybdenum disulfide nanoplatelets (MSNPs) at 0.01-0.2 weight% concentrations. Cross-linked PPF was used as the baseline control, and PPF composites reinforced with single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, MWCNTs) were used as positive controls. Compression and flexural testing show a significant enhancement (i.e., compressive modulus = 35-108%, compressive yield strength = 26-93%, flexural modulus = 15-53%, and flexural yield strength = 101-262% greater than the baseline control) in the mechanical properties of the 2D-reinforced PPF nanocomposites. MSNP nanocomposites consistently showed the highest values among the experimental or control groups in all the mechanical measurements. In general, the inorganic nanoparticle MSNP showed a better or equivalent mechanical reinforcement compared to carbon nanomaterials, and 2D nanostructures (GONPs, MSNPs) are better reinforcing agents compared to one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures (e.g., SWCNTs). The results also indicated that the extent of mechanical reinforcement is closely dependent on the nanostructure morphology and follows the trend nanoplatelets > nanoribbons > nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy of the cross-linked nanocomposites indicated good dispersion of nanomaterials in the polymer matrix without the use of a surfactant. The sol-fraction analysis showed significant changes in the polymer cross-linking in the presence of MSNP (0.01-0.2 wt %) and higher loading concentrations of GONP and MWGONR (0.1-0.2 wt %). The analysis of surface area and aspect ratio

  3. 25th anniversary article: hybrid nanostructures based on two-dimensional nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao; Tan, Chaoliang; Yin, Zongyou; Zhang, Hua

    2014-04-09

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), receive a lot of attention, because of their intriguing properties and wide applications in catalysis, energy-storage devices, electronics, optoelectronics, and so on. To further enhance the performance of their application, these 2D nanomaterials are hybridized with other functional nanostructures. In this review, the latest studies of 2D nanomaterial-based hybrid nanostructures are discussed, focusing on their preparation methods, properties, and applications.

  4. Two-dimensional carbon fundamental properties, synthesis, characterization, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yihong, Wu; Ting, Yu

    2013-01-01

    After a brief introduction to the fundamental properties of graphene, this book focuses on synthesis, characterization and application of various types of two-dimensional (2D) nanocarbons ranging from single/few layer graphene to carbon nanowalls and graphene oxides. Three major synthesis techniques are covered: epitaxial growth of graphene on SiC, chemical synthesis of graphene on metal, and chemical vapor deposition of vertically aligned carbon nanosheets or nanowalls. One chapter is dedicated to characterization of 2D nanocarbon using Raman spectroscopy. It provides extensive coverage for a

  5. Continuous and discrete modeling of the decay of two-dimensional nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castez, Marcos F; Albano, Ezequiel V [Instituto de Investigaciones FisicoquImicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), CCT La Plata, Casilla de Correo 16, Sucursal 4, (1900) La Plata, UNLP, CONICET (Argentina)

    2009-07-01

    In this work we review some recent research on the surface diffusion-mediated decay of two-dimensional nanostructures. These results include both a continuous, vectorial model and a discrete kinetic Monte Carlo approach. Predictions from the standard linear continuous theory of surface-diffusion-driven interface decay are contrasted with simulational results both from kinetic and morphological points of view. In particular, we focused our attention on high-aspect-ratio nanostructures, where strong deviations from linear theory take place, including nonexponential amplitude decay and the emergence of several interesting nanostructures such as overhangs developing, nanoislands and nanovoids formation, loss of convexity, nanostructures-pinch off and nanostructures-break off, etc. (topical review)

  6. Hybrid nanostructures of metal/two-dimensional nanomaterials for plasmon-enhanced applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuanhua; Zhu, Jinmeng; Wei, Bingqing

    2016-06-07

    Hybrid nanostructures composed of graphene or other two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials and plasmonic metal components have been extensively studied. The unusual properties of 2D materials are associated with their atomically thin thickness and 2D morphology, and many impressive structures enable the metal nanomaterials to establish various interesting hybrid nanostructures with outstanding plasmonic properties. In addition, the hybrid nanostructures display unique optical characteristics that are derived from the close conjunction of plasmonic optical effects and the unique physicochemical properties of 2D materials. More importantly, the hybrid nanostructures show several plasmonic electrical effects including an improved photogeneration rate, efficient carrier transfer, and a plasmon-induced "hot carrier", playing a significant role in enhancing device performance. They have been widely studied for plasmon-enhanced optical signals, photocatalysis, photodetectors (PDs), and solar cells. In this review, the developments in the field of metal/2D hybrid nanostructures are comprehensively described. Preparation of hybrid nanostructures is first presented according to the 2D material type, as well as the metal nanomaterial morphology. The plasmonic properties and the enabled applications of the hybrid nanostructures are then described. Lastly, possible future research in this promising field is discussed.

  7. Synthesis and structural characterization of two-dimensional hierarchical covellite nano-structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Nirupam, E-mail: n.banerjee@utwente.nl [Materials Research Center, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Krupanidhi, S.B., E-mail: sbk@mrc.iisc.ernet.in [Materials Research Center, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2012-12-14

    We report a simple, template free and low-temperature hydrothermal reaction pathway using Cu(II) - thiourea complex (prepared in situ from copper (II) chloride and thiourea as precursors) and citric acid as complexing agent to synthesize two-dimensional hierarchical nano-structures of covellite (CuS). The product was characterized with the help of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The concentration of citric acid in the hydrothermal precursor solution was seen to have a profound effect on the nanostructure of the product generated. Based on the outcoming product nano-architecture at different concentration of the ionic surfactant in the hydrothermal precursor solution a possible mechanism suited for reaction and further nucleation is also discussed. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel reaction scheme is proposed for synthesizing covellite 2D nano-structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanostructures were thoroughly characterized, both structurally and chemically. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Through variation of synthetic parameters a general growth mechanism is proposed.

  8. An investigation of the mimetic enzyme activity of two-dimensional Pd-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jingping; Chen, Xiaolan; Shi, Saige; Mo, Shiguang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we investigated the mimetic enzyme activity of two-dimensional (2D) Pd-based nanostructures (e.g. Pd nanosheets, Pd@Au and Pd@Pt nanoplates) and found that they possess intrinsic peroxidase-, oxidase- and catalase-like activities. These nanostructures were able to activate hydrogen peroxide or dissolved oxygen for catalyzing the oxidation of organic substrates, and decompose hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen. More systematic investigations revealed that the peroxidase-like activities of these Pd-based nanomaterials were highly structure- and composition-dependent. Among them, Pd@Pt nanoplates displayed the highest peroxidase-like activity. Based on these findings, Pd-based nanostructures were applied for the colorimetric detection of H2O2 and glucose, and also the electro-catalytic reduction of H2O2. This work offers a promising prospect for the application of 2D noble metal nanostructures in biocatalysis.In this work, we investigated the mimetic enzyme activity of two-dimensional (2D) Pd-based nanostructures (e.g. Pd nanosheets, Pd@Au and Pd@Pt nanoplates) and found that they possess intrinsic peroxidase-, oxidase- and catalase-like activities. These nanostructures were able to activate hydrogen peroxide or dissolved oxygen for catalyzing the oxidation of organic substrates, and decompose hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen. More systematic investigations revealed that the peroxidase-like activities of these Pd-based nanomaterials were highly structure- and composition-dependent. Among them, Pd@Pt nanoplates displayed the highest peroxidase-like activity. Based on these findings, Pd-based nanostructures were applied for the colorimetric detection of H2O2 and glucose, and also the electro-catalytic reduction of H2O2. This work offers a promising prospect for the application of 2D noble metal nanostructures in biocatalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images, EDX and dispersion stability of Pd-based nanomaterials

  9. LDRD final report on Bloch Oscillations in two-dimensional nanostructure arrays for high frequency applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Pan, Wei; Reno, John Louis; Wendt, Joel Robert; Barton, Daniel Lee

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the physics of Bloch oscillations (BO) of electrons, engineered in high mobility quantum wells patterned into lateral periodic arrays of nanostructures, i.e. two-dimensional (2D) quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs). A BO occurs when an electron moves out of the Brillouin zone (BZ) in response to a DC electric field, passing back into the BZ on the opposite side. This results in quantum oscillations of the electron--i.e., a high frequency AC current in response to a DC voltage. Thus, engineering a BO will yield continuously electrically tunable high-frequency sources (and detectors) for sensor applications, and be a physics tour-de-force. More than a decade ago, Bloch oscillation (BO) was observed in a quantum well superlattice (QWSL) in short-pulse optical experiments. However, its potential as electrically biased high frequency source and detector so far has not been realized. This is partially due to fast damping of BO in QWSLs. In this project, we have investigated the possibility of improving the stability of BO by fabricating lateral superlattices of periodic coupled nanostructures, such as metal grid, quantum (anti)dots arrays, in high quality GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As heterostructures. In these nanostructures, the lateral quantum confinement has been shown theoretically to suppress the optical-phonon scattering, believed to be the main mechanism for fast damping of BO in QWSLs. Over the last three years, we have made great progress toward demonstrating Bloch oscillations in QDSLs. In the first two years of this project, we studied the negative differential conductance and the Bloch radiation induced edge-magnetoplasmon resonance. Recently, in collaboration with Prof. Kono's group at Rice University, we investigated the time-domain THz magneto-spectroscopy measurements in QDSLs and two-dimensional electron systems. A surprising DC electrical field induced THz phase flip was observed. More measurements are planned to investigate this

  10. Ultrathin Two-Dimensional Nanostructured Materials for Highly Efficient Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wang; Zhou, Kun

    2017-08-01

    Water oxidation, also known as the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), is a crucial process in energy conversion and storage, especially in water electrolysis. The critical challenge of the electrochemical water splitting technology is to explore alternative precious-metal-free catalysts for the promotion of the kinetically sluggish OER. Recently, emerging two-dimensional (2D) ultrathin materials with abundant accessible active sites and improved electrical conductivity provide an ideal platform for the synthesis of promising OER catalysts. This Review focuses on the most recent advances in ultrathin 2D nanostructured materials for enhanced electrochemical activity of the OER. The design, synthesis and performance of such ultrathin 2D nanomaterials-based OER catalysts and their property-structure relationships are discussed, providing valuable insights to the exploration of novel OER catalysts with high efficiency and low overpotential. The potential research directions are also proposed in the research field. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Interfacial engineering of two-dimensional nano-structured materials by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuiykov, Serge; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu; Hai, Zhenyin; Karbalaei Akbari, Mohammad; Heynderickx, Philippe M.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is an enabling technology which provides coating and material features with significant advantages compared to other existing techniques for depositing precise nanometer-thin two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures. It is a cyclic process which relies on sequential self-terminating reactions between gas phase precursor molecules and a solid surface. ALD is especially advantageous when the film quality or thickness is critical, offering ultra-high aspect ratios. ALD provides digital thickness control to the atomic level by depositing film one atomic layer at a time, as well as pinhole-free films even over a very large and complex areas. Digital control extends to sandwiches, hetero-structures, nano-laminates, metal oxides, graded index layers and doping, and it is perfect for conformal coating and challenging 2D electrodes for various functional devices. The technique's capabilities are presented on the example of ALD-developed ultra-thin 2D tungsten oxide (WO3) over the large area of standard 4" Si substrates. The discussed advantages of ALD enable and endorse the employment of this technique for the development of hetero-nanostructure 2D semiconductors with unique properties.

  12. Scaling behavior of the dipole-coupling energy in two-dimensional disordered magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, P. J.; Pastor, G. M.

    2003-11-01

    Numerical calculations of the average dipole-coupling energy Edip in two-dimensional disordered magnetic nanostructures are performed as a function of the particle coverage C. We observe that Edip scales as Edip∝Cα* with an unusually small exponent α*≃0.8 1.0 for coverages C≲20%. This behavior is shown to be primarily given by the contributions of particle pairs at short distances, which is intrinsically related to the presence of an appreciable degree of disorder. The value of α* is found to be sensitive to the magnetic arrangement within the nanostructure and to the degree of disorder. For large coverages C≳20% we obtain Edip∝Cα with α=3/2, in agreement with the straightforward scaling of the dipole coupling as in a periodic particle setup. Taking into account the effect of single-particle anisotropies, we show that the scaling exponent can be used as a criterion to distinguish between weakly interacting (α*≃1.0) and strongly interacting (α*≃0.8) particle ensembles as a function of coverage.

  13. Two-dimensional carbon-coated graphene/metal oxide hybrids for enhanced lithium storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuezeng; Li, Shuang; Wu, Dongqing; Zhang, Fan; Liang, Haiwei; Gao, Pengfei; Cheng, Chong; Feng, Xinliang

    2012-09-25

    Metal oxides (MOs) have been widely investigated as promising high-capacity anode material for lithium ion batteries, but they usually exhibit poor cycling stability and rate performance due to the huge volume change induced by the alloying reaction with lithium. In this article, we present a double protection strategy by fabricating a two-dimensional (2D) core-shell nanostructure to improve the electrochemical performance of metal oxides in lithium storage. The 2D core-shell architecture is constructed by confining the well-defined graphene based metal oxides nanosheets (G@MO) within carbon layers. The resulting 2D carbon-coated graphene/metal oxides nanosheets (G@MO@C) inherit the advantages of graphene, which possesses high electrical conductivity, large aspect ratio, and thin feature. Furthermore, the carbon shells can tackle the deformation of MO nanoparticles while keeping the overall electrode highly conductive and active in lithium storage. As the result, the produced G@MO@C hybrids exhibit outstanding reversible capacity and excellent rate performance for lithium storage (G@SnO(2)@C, 800 mAh g(-1) at the rate of 200 mA g(-1) after 100 cycles; G@Fe(3)O(4)@C, 920 mAh g(-1) at the rate of 200 mA g(-1) after 100 cycles).

  14. High-resolution photocurrent mapping of carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghard, Marko; Mews, Alf

    2012-07-24

    The spatial resolution of photocurrent measurements on carbon nanostructures has reached 20 nm, as demonstrated by Hartschuh and co-workers for individual carbon nanotubes in this issue of ACS Nano. In this Perspective, we provide a brief overview of the applications of scanning photocurrent microscopy to various one- and two-dimensional nanostructures and highlight the importance of the optical antenna concept for future studies of the optoelectronic properties of hybrid nanostructures.

  15. Arsenic-bridged magnetic interactions in an emerging two-dimensional FeAs nanostructure on MnAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helman, Christian; Ferrari, Valeria; Llois, Ana Maria

    2015-08-01

    The extreme case of an Fe monolayer deposited onto a manganese arsenide (MnAs) substrate is analyzed using density functional theory. We find that an FeAs quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnetic surface nanostructure emerges. This nanostructure, which is magnetically nearly decoupled from the substrate, is due to bonding effects arising from the arsenic atoms bridging the Fe magnetic interactions. These interactions are studied and modeled using a Heisenberg-type Hamiltonian. They display an angular dependence which is characteristic of superexchange-like interactions, which are of the same order of magnitude as those appearing in Fe-based pnictides.

  16. Complete Proton and Carbon Assignment of Triclosan via One- and Two- Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Students from an upper-division undergraduate spectroscopy class analyzed one- and two-dimensional 400 MHz NMR spectroscopic data from triclosan in CDCl3. Guided assignment of all proton and carbon signals was completed via 1D proton and carbon, nuclear Overhauser effect (nOe), distortionless enhanc...

  17. Two-Dimensional Covalent Organic Frameworks for Carbon Dioxide Capture through Channel-Wall Functionalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, N.; Chen, X.; Krishna, R.; Jiang, D.

    2015-01-01

    Ordered open channels found in two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (2D COFs) could enable them to adsorb carbon dioxide. However, the frameworks' dense layer architecture results in low porosity that has thus far restricted their potential for carbon dioxide adsorption. Here we report a

  18. Rational design of two-dimensional molecular donor-acceptor nanostructure arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Shu; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Niu, Tian Chao; Hu, Wen Ping; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Chen, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The construction of long-range ordered organic donor-acceptor nanostructure arrays over microscopic areas supported on solid substrates is one of the most challenging tasks towards the realization of molecular nanodevices. They can also be used as ideal model systems to understand light induced charge transfer, charge separation and energy conversion processes and mechanisms at the nanometer scale. The aim of this paper is to highlight recent advances and progress in this topic. Special attention is given to two different strategies for the construction of organic donor-acceptor nanostructure arrays, namely (i) molecular self-assembly on artificially patterned or pre-defined molecular surface nanotemplates and (ii) molecular nanostructure formation steered via directional and selective intermolecular interactions. The interfacial charge transfer and the energy level alignment of these donor-acceptor nanostructures are also discussed.

  19. Optical properties of two-dimensional (2D) CdSe nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherevkov, S. A.; Baranov, A. V.; Fedorov, A. V.; Litvin, A. P.; Artemyev, M. V.; Prudnikau, A. V.

    2013-09-01

    The resonant and off-resonant Raman spectra of optical phonons in two-dimensional CdSe nanocrystals of 5, 6, and 7 monolayers are analysed. The spectra are dominated by SO and LO phonon bands of CdSe, whose frequencies are thickness-independent in the off-resonant Raman scattering but demonstrate an evident thickness dependence in the case of the resonant Raman scattering.

  20. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Liang

    2015-04-22

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  1. Wedding Cake Growth Mechanism in One-Dimensional and Two-Dimensional Nanostructure Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Shi, Jian; Niu, Xiaobin; Huang, Hanchen; Wang, Xudong

    2015-11-11

    The kinetic processes and atomistic mechanisms in nanostructure growth are of fundamental interest to nanomaterial syntheses with precisely controlled morphology and functionality. By programming deposition conditions at time domain, we observed the wedding cake growth mechanism in the formation of 1D and 2D ZnO nanostructures. Within a narrow growth window, the surfaces of the 1D and 2D structures were covered with a unique concentric terrace feature. This mechanism was further validated by comparing the characteristic growth rates to the screw dislocation-driven model. An interesting 1D to 2D morphology transition was also found during the wedding cake growth, when the adatoms overcome the Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier along the edge of the top crystal facet triggered by lowering the supersaturation. The wedding cake model might be a general growth mechanism for flat-tipped nanowires that do not possess any dislocations. This study enriches our understanding on the fundamental kinetics of nanostructured crystal growth and provides a transformative strategy to achieve rational design and control of nanoscale geometry.

  2. Electrical transport across metal/two-dimensional carbon junctions: Edge versus side contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihong Wu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal/two-dimensional carbon junctions are characterized by using a nanoprobe in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. Significant differences were found in bias voltage (V dependence of differential conductance (dI/dV between edge- and side-contact; the former exhibits a clear linear relationship (i.e., dI/dV ∝ V, whereas the latter is characterized by a nonlinear dependence, dI/dV ∝ V3/2. Theoretical calculations confirm the experimental results, which are due to the robust two-dimensional nature of the carbon materials under study. Our work demonstrates the importance of contact geometry in graphene-based electronic devices.

  3. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  4. Transfer of Two-Dimensional Oligonucleotide Patterns onto Stereocontrolled Plasmonic Nanostructures through DNA-Origami-Based Nanoimprinting Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Chao, Jie; Liu, Huajie; Wang, Fei; Su, Shao; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Lan; Shi, Jiye; Wang, Lihua; Huang, Wei; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-07-04

    The precise functionalization of self-assembled nanostructures with spatial and stereocontrol is a major objective of nanotechnology and holds great promise for many applications. Herein, the nanoscale addressability of DNA origami was exploited to develop a precise copy-machine-like platform that can transfer two-dimensional oligonucleotide patterns onto the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through a deliberately designed toehold-initiated DNA displacement reaction. This strategy of DNA-origami-based nanoimprinting lithography (DONIL) demonstrates high precision in controlling the valence and valence angles of AuNPs. These DNA-decorated AuNPs act as precursors in the construction of discrete AuNP clusters with desired chirality.

  5. Low-energy properties of two-dimensional magnetic nanostructures: interparticle interactions and disorder effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, P J; Pastor, G M [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, Universite Paul Sabatier, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2003-06-01

    The low-energy properties of two-dimensional ensembles of dipole-coupled magnetic nanoparticles are studied as a function of structural disorder and particle coverage. Already small deviations from a square particle arrangement lift the degeneracies of the microvortex (MV) magnetic configuration and result in a strongly inhomogeneous magnetic order of the particle ensemble. The energy distribution of metastable states is determined. For a low degree of disorder a strongly asymmetric shape with a pronounced peak of the ground-state energy results. In contrast, for a strong disorder a Gaussian-like distribution is obtained. The average dipole energy barE{sub dip} decreases with increasing structural disorder. Above a coverage-dependent degree of disorder barE{sub dip} resembles the average dipole energy of a random particle set-up, for which a simple scaling behaviour is derived. The role of vacancies has been studied for a square particle array by determining the angular distribution of the preferred MV angle as a function of the vacancy concentration. Preferred angles along the axial as well as along the diagonal directions of the square array are obtained. A corresponding investigation for disturbed square arrays yields preferred MV angles only along the axial directions. The effect of dipole-quadrupole corrections resulting from the finite size of the particles is quantified.

  6. Atomistic Analysis of Room Temperature Quantum Coherence in Two-Dimensional CdSe Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sougata; Nijjar, Parmeet; Frauenheim, Thomas; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2017-03-02

    Recent experiments on CdSe nanoplatelets synthesized with precisely controlled thickness that eliminates ensemble disorder have allowed accurate measurement of quantum coherence at room temperature. Matching exactly the CdSe cores of the experimentally studied particles and considering several defects, we establish the atomistic origins of the loss of coherence between heavy and light hole excitations in two-dimensional CdSe and CdSe/CdZnS core/shell structures. The coherence times obtained using molecular dynamics based on tight-binding density functional theory are in excellent agreement with the measured values. We show that a long coherence time is a consequence of both small fluctuations in the energy gap between the excited state pair, which is much less than thermal energy, and a slow decay of correlation between the energies of the two states. Anionic defects at the core/shell interface have little effect on the coherence lifetime, while cationic defects strongly perturb the electronic structure, destroying the experimentally observed coherence. By coupling to the same phonon modes, the heavy and light holes synchronize their energy fluctuations, facilitating long-lived coherence. We further demonstrate that the electronic excitations are localized close to the surface of these narrow nanoscale systems, and therefore, they couple most strongly to surface acoustic phonons. The established features of electron-phonon coupling and the influence of defects, surfaces, and core/shell interfaces provide important insights into quantum coherence in nanoscale materials in general.

  7. Two-dimensional carbon-based nanocomposites for photocatalytic energy generation and environmental remediation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suneel; Kumar, Ashish; Bahuguna, Ashish; Sharma, Vipul; Krishnan, Venkata

    2017-01-01

    In the pursuit towards the use of sunlight as a sustainable source for energy generation and environmental remediation, photocatalytic water splitting and photocatalytic pollutant degradation have recently gained significant importance. Research in this field is aimed at solving the global energy crisis and environmental issues in an ecologically-friendly way by using two of the most abundant natural resources, namely sunlight and water. Over the past few years, carbon-based nanocomposites, particularly graphene and graphitic carbon nitride, have attracted much attention as interesting materials in this field. Due to their unique chemical and physical properties, carbon-based nanocomposites have made a substantial contribution towards the generation of clean, renewable and viable forms of energy from light-based water splitting and pollutant removal. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the recent research progress in the field of energy generation and environmental remediation using two-dimensional carbon-based nanocomposites. It begins with a brief introduction to the field, basic principles of photocatalytic water splitting for energy generation and environmental remediation, followed by the properties of carbon-based nanocomposites. Then, the development of various graphene-based nanocomposites for the above-mentioned applications is presented, wherein graphene plays different roles, including electron acceptor/transporter, cocatalyst, photocatalyst and photosensitizer. Subsequently, the development of different graphitic carbon nitride-based nanocomposites as photocatalysts for energy and environmental applications is discussed in detail. This review concludes by highlighting the advantages and challenges involved in the use of two-dimensional carbon-based nanocomposites for photocatalysis. Finally, the future perspectives of research in this field are also briefly mentioned.

  8. Theoretical Study of Carrier Mobility in Two-Dimensional Tetragonal Carbon Allotrope from Porous Graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Gao; Hui Xiang; Bo Xu; Yi-Dong Xia; Jiang Yin; Zhi-Guo Liu

    2016-01-01

    The carrier mobility of two-dimensional tetragonal carbon allotrope (T-CA) from porous graphene is investigated by first-principles calculations.T-CA can be constructed from divacancy and Stone-Thrower-Wales defects from graphene.T-CA is a direct semiconductor with a band gap of 0.4 eV at Γ point.T-CA possesses a high carrier mobility of the order of 104 cm2 V-1s-1.As our study demonstrates,T-CA has potential applications for next-generation electronic materials.

  9. Noncovalent interaction of carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, Deivasigamani; Panigrahi, Swati; Sastry, Garikapati Narahari

    2014-08-19

    The potential application of carbon nanomaterials in biology and medicine increases the necessity to understand the nature of their interactions with living organisms and the environment. The primary forces of interaction at the nano-bio interface are mostly noncovalent in nature. Quantifying such interactions and identifying various factors that influence such interactions is a question of outstanding fundamental interest in academia and industry. In this Account, we have summarized our recent studies in understanding the noncovalent interactions of carbon nanostructures (CNSs), which were obtained by employing first-principles calculations on various model systems representing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. Bestowed with an extended sp(2) carbon network, which is a common feature in all of these nanostructures, they exhibit π-π interactions with aromatic molecules (benzene, naphthalene, nucleobases, amino acids), cation-π type of interactions with metal ions, anion-π interactions with anions, and other XH···π type of interactions with various small molecules (H2O, NH3, CH4, H2, etc.). CNTs are wrapped-up forms of two-dimensional graphene, and hence, it is interesting to compare the binding abilities of these two allotropes that differ in their curvature. The chirality and curvature of CNSs appear to play a major role in determining the structural, energetic, and functional properties. Flat graphene shows stronger noncovalent interactions than the curved nanotubes toward various substrates. Understanding the interactions of CNSs with organic molecules and biomolecules has gained a great deal of research interest because of their potential applications in various fields. Aromatic hydrocarbons show a strong propensity to interact with CNSs via the π-π mode of interaction rather than CH···π interaction. As DNA sequencing appears to be one of the most important potential applications of carbon nanomaterials, the study of CNS

  10. Energy transfer pathways in semiconducting carbon nanotubes revealed using two-dimensional white-light spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlenbacher, Randy D.; McDonough, Thomas J.; Grechko, Maksim; Wu, Meng-Yin; Arnold, Michael S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2015-04-01

    Thin film networks of highly purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being explored for energy harvesting and optoelectronic devices because of their exceptional transport and optical properties. The nanotubes in these films are in close contact, which permits energy to flow through the films, although the pathways and mechanisms for energy transfer are largely unknown. Here we use a broadband continuum to collect femtosecond two-dimensional white-light spectra. The continuum spans 500 to 1,300 nm, resolving energy transfer between all combinations of bandgap (S1) and higher (S2) transitions. We observe ultrafast energy redistribution on the S2 states, non-Förster energy transfer on the S1 states and anti-correlated energy levels. The two-dimensional spectra reveal competing pathways for energy transfer, with S2 excitons taking routes depending on the bandgap separation, whereas S1 excitons relax independent of the bandgap. These observations provide a basis for understanding and ultimately controlling the photophysics of energy flow in CNT-based devices.

  11. Two-dimensional modeling of volatile organic compounds adsorption onto beaded activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefera, Dereje Tamiru; Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Hashisho, Zaher; Philips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2013-10-15

    A two-dimensional heterogeneous computational fluid dynamics model was developed and validated to study the mass, heat, and momentum transport in a fixed-bed cylindrical adsorber during the adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a gas stream onto a fixed bed of beaded activated carbon (BAC). Experimental validation tests revealed that the model predicted the breakthrough curves for the studied VOCs (acetone, benzene, toluene, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene) as well as the pressure drop and temperature during benzene adsorption with a mean relative absolute error of 2.6, 11.8, and 0.8%, respectively. Effects of varying adsorption process variables such as carrier gas temperature, superficial velocity, VOC loading, particle size, and channelling were investigated. The results obtained from this study are encouraging because they show that the model was able to accurately simulate the transport processes in an adsorber and can potentially be used for enhancing absorber design and operation.

  12. Electrowetting on dielectric digital microfluidic platform with nanostructured biosensor interface for enhanced two-dimensional surface plasmon resonance imaging detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Lidija

    The sensitive and specific detection of biomolecular interactions is at the heart of many routine analyses in fundamental research, medical diagnosis and environmental monitoring. In contrast to laborious and costly multiwell plate assays, recent years have witnessed a significant progress in miniaturized and integrated biosensors, such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), tailored to these applications. While the design of various SPR biosensors has been described in literature, a robust, multichannel, low-cost and highly sensitive solution has not yet been presented. Specifically, an integrated system that can allow surface functionalization in array format, low-volume multichannel fluidic interfacing, and increased sensitivity is sought. This thesis describes a novel electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic device with integrated nanostructured biosensor interface that addresses the aforementioned issues for enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) detection. We have taken the opportunity of the most recent advances in microfabrication, nanotechnology and SPR technique to develop this integrated platform. EWOD device is employed for the dynamic immobilization of bioreceptors on SPRi biosensor surface in an array fashion from sub-muL volume solutions. Programmable EWOD electric interface allows the application of an electric field at the biosensor surface for active control of the immobilized probe density and orientation, enhancing SPRi detection. Two-dimensional SPRi detection is achieved by coupling the EWOD device to SPRi instrumentation. Parallel manipulation of individual droplets allows more efficient exploitation of the biosensor surface by separating different samples for simultaneous and selective SPRi detection. Periodic gold structures (nanoposts, nanogratings and nanogrooves) residing on a surface of glass and plastic substrates are investigated to improve the SPRi sensitivity. The corresponding electromagnetic field

  13. Preparing two-dimensional microporous carbon from Pistachio nutshell with high areal capacitance as supercapacitor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiandong; Gao, Qiuming; Zhang, Yunlu; Tan, Yanli; Tian, Weiqian; Zhu, Lihua; Jiang, Lei

    2014-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) porous carbon AC-SPN-3 possessing of amazing high micropore volume ratio of 83% and large surface area of about 1069 m2 g-1 is high-yield obtained by pyrolysis of natural waste Pistachio nutshells with KOH activation. The AC-SPN-3 has a curved 2D lamellar morphology with the thickness of each slice about 200 nm. The porous carbon is consists of highly interconnected uniform pores with the median pore diameter of about 0.76 nm, which could potentially improve the performance by maximizing the electrode surface area accessible to the typical electrolyte ions (such as TEA+, diameter = ~0.68 nm). Electrochemical analyses show that AC-SPN-3 has significantly large areal capacitance of 29.3/20.1 μF cm-2 and high energy density of 10/39 Wh kg-1 at power of 52/286 kW kg-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte and 1 M TEABF4 in EC-DEC (1:1) organic electrolyte system, respectively.

  14. Two-dimensional boron-nitrogen-carbon monolayers with tunable direct band gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Gao, Guoying; Kutana, Alex; Wang, Yanchao; Zou, Xiaolong; Tse, John S.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Li, Hongdong; Liu, Hanyu; Ma, Yanming

    2015-07-01

    The search for new candidate semiconductors with direct band gaps of ~1.4 eV has attracted significant attention, especially among the two-dimensional (2D) materials, which have become potential candidates for next-generation optoelectronics. Herein, we systematically studied 2D Bx/2Nx/2C1-x (0 optimization method (CALYPSO) in conjunction with density functional theory. Furthermore, we examine more stoichiometries by the cluster expansion technique based on a hexagonal lattice. The results reveal that all monolayer Bx/2Nx/2C1-x stoichiometries adopt a planar honeycomb character and are dynamically stable. Remarkably, electronic structural calculations show that most of Bx/2Nx/2C1-x phases possess direct band gaps within the optical range, thereby they can potentially be used in high-efficiency conversion of solar energy to electric power, as well as in p-n junction photovoltaic modules. The present results also show that the band gaps of Bx/2Nx/2C1-x can be widely tuned within the optical range by changing the concentration of carbon, thus allowing the fast development of band gap engineered materials in optoelectronics. These new findings may enable new approaches to the design of microelectronic devices.The search for new candidate semiconductors with direct band gaps of ~1.4 eV has attracted significant attention, especially among the two-dimensional (2D) materials, which have become potential candidates for next-generation optoelectronics. Herein, we systematically studied 2D Bx/2Nx/2C1-x (0 optimization method (CALYPSO) in conjunction with density functional theory. Furthermore, we examine more stoichiometries by the cluster expansion technique based on a hexagonal lattice. The results reveal that all monolayer Bx/2Nx/2C1-x stoichiometries adopt a planar honeycomb character and are dynamically stable. Remarkably, electronic structural calculations show that most of Bx/2Nx/2C1-x phases possess direct band gaps within the optical range, thereby they can

  15. Size effect on brittle and ductile fracture of two-dimensional interlinked carbon nanotube network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yuhang; Aluru, N. R.

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical properties of two-dimensional (2D) interlinked carbon nanotube (CNT) network are investigated using ab initio calculation and molecular dynamics simulations (MD) with Reaxff force field. The simulation results show that bulk 2D interlinked CNT network has good mechanical properties along the axial direction which can be comparable to that of single-walled CNT and graphene, but has better ductility along the radial direction than single-walled CNT and graphene. In addition, the mechanical properties of 2D interlinked CNT network ribbon along the radial direction depend strongly on the size of the ribbon. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio decrease as the size increases while the fracture strain increases with the size increasing. By analyzing the atomic structural (both bond length and atomic von Mises stress) evolution of the ribbons, the mechanism of a brittle-to-ductile transition is revealed. The exploration of the mechanical properties of the 2D interlinked CNT network paves the way for application of the relevant devices that can benefit from the high Young's modulus, high tensile strength, and good ductility.

  16. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes-anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  17. Thermal properties of graphene and nanostructured carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandin, Alexander A.

    2011-08-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth of interest by the scientific and engineering communities in the thermal properties of materials. Heat removal has become a crucial issue for continuing progress in the electronic industry, and thermal conduction in low-dimensional structures has revealed truly intriguing features. Carbon allotropes and their derivatives occupy a unique place in terms of their ability to conduct heat. The room-temperature thermal conductivity of carbon materials span an extraordinary large range -- of over five orders of magnitude -- from the lowest in amorphous carbons to the highest in graphene and carbon nanotubes. Here, I review the thermal properties of carbon materials focusing on recent results for graphene, carbon nanotubes and nanostructured carbon materials with different degrees of disorder. Special attention is given to the unusual size dependence of heat conduction in two-dimensional crystals and, specifically, in graphene. I also describe the prospects of applications of graphene and carbon materials for thermal management of electronics.

  18. Full molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water and carbon tetrachloride for two-dimensional Raman spectroscopy in the frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Jo, Ju-Yeon; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-domain two-dimensional Raman signals, which are equivalent to coherent two-dimensional Raman scattering (COTRAS) signals, for liquid water and carbon tetrachloride were calculated using an equilibrium-nonequilibrium hybrid MD simulation algorithm. We elucidate mechanisms governing the 2D signal pro?les involving anharmonic mode-mode coupling and the nonlinearities of the polarizability for the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational modes. The predicted signal pro?les and intensities can be utilized to analyze recently developed single-beam 2D spectra, whose signals are generated from a coherently controlled pulse, allowing the single-beam measurement to be carried out more efficiently.

  19. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  20. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  1. Covalent crosslinking of carbon nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Urmimala Maitra; M Pandeeswar; T Govindaraju

    2012-05-01

    Covalent crosslinking of carbon nanostructures of different dimensionalities such as nanodiamond, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene can yield useful homo- and hetero-binary conjugates. Binary conjugation of the nanocarbons has been achieved by introducing symmetrical amide-linkages between acid (-COOH) functionalized nanocarbons and a diamine-linker. The binary conjugates have been characterized by using transmission electron microscopy as well as infrared, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. Dispersions of covalently crosslinked binary conjugates of nanocarbons could be obtained in dimethyl formamide (DMF). Composites of the binary conjugates with polymer can be readily prepared by using the DMF suspensions.

  2. Preparation of Dispersed Platinum Nanoparticles on a Carbon Nanostructured Surface Using Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineo Hiramatsu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a method of forming platinum (Pt nanoparticles using a metal organic chemical fluid deposition (MOCFD process employing a supercritical fluid (SCF, and have demonstrated the synthesis of dispersed Pt nanoparticles on the surfaces of carbon nanowalls (CNWs, two-dimensional carbon nanostructures, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. By using SCF-MOCFD with supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent of metal-organic compounds, highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles of 2 nm diameter were deposited on the entire surface of CNWs and CNTs. The SCF-MOCFD process proved to be effective for the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on the entire surface of intricate carbon nanostructures with narrow interspaces.

  3. Convergent fabrication of a nanoporous two-dimensional carbon network from an aldol condensation on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, John; Chérioux, Frédéric; De Santis, Maurizio; Bendiab, Nedjma; Lamare, Simon; Magaud, Laurence; Coraux, Johann

    2014-12-01

    We report a convergent surface polymerization reaction scheme on Au(111), based on a triple aldol condensation, yielding a carbon-rich, covalent nanoporous two-dimensional network. The reaction is not self-poisoning and proceeds up to a full surface coverage. The deposited precursor molecules 1, 3, 5-tri(4’-acetylphenyl) first form supramolecular assemblies that are converted to the porous covalent network upon heating. The formation and structure of the network and of the intermediate steps are studied with scanning tunneling microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory.

  4. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, M.G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; de Jong, K.P.; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam ‘opened’

  5. Two-dimensional Few-circle Optical Pulses in the Inhomogeneous Environment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Belonenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the task about few-circle optical pulses dynamics (light bullets in the inhomogeneous environment of carbon nanotubes. Electromagnetic field of pulse describes classically, on basis of Maxwell equation, and carbon nanotubes give dispersion law for electrons, which interacting with pulse. We show that light bullets propagate stably.

  6. Dispersion and separation of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Brian J. (Inventor); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Inventor); Ruf, Herbert J. (Inventor); Evans, Christopher M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to dispersions of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents containing alkyl amide compounds and/or diamide compounds. The invention also relates to methods of dispersing nanostructured carbon in organic solvents and methods of mobilizing nanostructured carbon. Also disclosed are methods of determining the purity of nanostructured carbon.

  7. Evaluation of excess carbon 14 and strontium 90 data for suitability to test two-dimensional stratospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Harold

    1989-12-01

    From reports by the Atomic Energy Commission concerning the atmospheric distribution of radionucleides following the nuclear bomb tests of 1958-1959 and 1961-1962, excess carbon 14 data from the period 1959-1970 and strontium 90 data from 1963-1967 are reviewed for possible use as inert tracers to test two-dimensional stratospheric-tropospheric models. Contrary to some views expressed in the literature, it is concluded that the carbon 14 data are suitable to test (1) the altitude (at 4 latitudes) of the transition region between troposphere and stratosphere with respect to transport of an inert tracer, (2) some aspects of transport between the northern and southern hemispheres, (3) horizontal and vertical transport as the vertical profile between 4.5 and 33 km and at 31°N evolves from a skewed Gaussian in 1963 to an almost stair-step profile in 1966, and (4) the long-term one-dimensional aspect of a two-dimensional model over the period 1966-1970. More tentatively, it is concluded that the strontium 90 data may be used as a model for the distribution and gross settling rate of the natural stratospheric aerosol layer between 15 and 25 km. Data from difficultly obtained laboratory reports and suggested initial conditions and boundary conditions are included as a microfiche supplement to this paper.

  8. Unique combination of zero-one-two dimensional carbon-titania hybrid for cold cathode application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, D.; Kumar, D.; Das, N. S.; Sarkar, S.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2015-11-01

    A unique multi-dimensional hybrid system has been developed by incorporating titania nanoparticle into chemically synthesized amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs)-amorphous graphene composites. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy; Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The microscopic studies confirm the attachment of the TiO2 nanoparticles on carbon structures. The performance of the both the pure and hybrid samples as cold cathode emitter has been investigated and it has been found that cold emission performance of the pure carbon system improves considerably after TiO2 nanoparticles being added to it giving a turn on field as low as 2.1 V/μm and enhancement factor 2746. The enhancement of field emission characteristic after TiO2 addition was justified from the 'ANSYS- Maxwell' software based simulation study.

  9. A two-dimensional model of the passive coastal margin deep sedimentary carbon and methane cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Archer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new geologic-time and basin-spatial scale model of the continental margin methane cycle. The model, SpongeBOB, is used to simulate evolution of the carbon cycle in a passive sedimentary continental margin in response to changing oceanographic and geologic forcing over a time scale of 200 million years. The geochemistry of the sediment column is altered by the addition of vertical high-permeability channels intended to mimic the effects of heterogeneity in the real sediment column due to faults, and produces results consistent with measured pore-water tracers SO42− and 129I. Pore water dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC concentrations are consistent with chemical weathering (CaCO3 formation from igneous rocks at depth within the sediment column. The carbon isotopic composition of the DIC is consistent with a methane production efficiency from particulate organic carbon (POC of 50%, which is somewhat lower than redox balance with the H / C of organic matter in the model. The hydrate inventory in the model is somewhat less sensitive to temperature than our previous results with a one-dimensional model, quite sensitive to reasonable changes in POC, and extremely sensitive to the ability of methane bubbles to rise within the sediment column, and how far gas-phase methane can get through the sediment column before it redissolves when it reaches undersaturated conditions. Hydrate formation is also sensitive to deep respiration of migrating petroleum. Other phenomena which we simulated had only a small impact on the hydrate inventory, including thermogenic methane production and production/decomposition of dissolved organic carbon.

  10. A two-dimensional model of the passive coastal margin deep sedimentary carbon and methane cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Archer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new geologic-time and basin-spatial scale model of the continental margin methane cycle. The model, SpongeBOB, is used to simulate evolution of the carbon cycle in a passive sedimentary continental margin in response to changing oceanographic and geologic forcing over a time scale of 140 million years. The model is somewhat less sensitive to temperature than our previous results with a one-dimensional model, but is more sensitive to reasonable changes in POC than it is to reasonable changes in temperature. This behavior could lead to higher inventories of hydrate during hothouse climate conditions, rather than lower as generally assumed, due to the enrichment of the sediments in organic carbon. The hydrate inventory in the model is extremely sensitive to the ability of methane bubbles to rise within the sediment column, and how far gas-phase methane can get through the sediment column before it redissolves when it reaches undersaturated conditions. Hydrate formation is also sensitive to deep respiration of migrating petroleum in the model. The geochemistry of the sediment column is altered by the addition of vertical high-permeability chimneys intended to mimic the effects of heterogeneity in the real sediment column due to faults and chimneys, and produces results consistent with measured pore-water tracers SO42− and 129I. Pore water DIC concentrations are consistent with chemical weathering at depth within the sediment column. The carbon isotopic composition of the DIC is consistent with a methane production efficiency from POC of 50%, which is somewhat lower than redox balance with the H/C of organic matter in the model. Other phenomena which we simulated had only small impact on the hydrate inventory, including thermogenic methane, dissolved organic carbon, and sediment transport characteristics.

  11. A two-dimensional model of the passive coastal margin deep sedimentary carbon and methane cycles

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We present a new geologic-time and basin-spatial scale model of the continental margin methane cycle. The model, SpongeBOB, is used to simulate evolution of the carbon cycle in a passive sedimentary continental margin in response to changing oceanographic and geologic forcing over a time scale of 200 million years. The geochemistry of the sediment column is altered by the addition of vertical high-permeability channels intended to mimic the effects of heterogeneity in the real sediment column...

  12. Dense Carbon Monoxide to 160 GPa: Stepwise Polymerization to Two-Dimensional Layered Solid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Young-Jay; Kim, Minseob; Lim, Jinhyuk; Dias, Ranga; Klug, Dennis; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-11-14

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the first molecular system found to transform into a nonmolecular “polymeric” solid above 5.5 GPa, yet been studied beyond 10 GPa. Here, we show a series of pressure-induced phase transformations in CO to 160 GPa: from a molecular solid to a highly colored, low-density polymeric phase I to translucent, high-density phase II to transparent, layered phase III. The properties of these phases are consistent with those expected from recently predicted 1D P21/m, 3D I212121, and 2D Cmcm structures, respectively. Thus, the present results advocate a stepwise polymerization of CO triple bonds to ultimately a 2D singly bonded layer structure with an enhanced ionic character.

  13. The importance of terrestrial weathering changes in multimillennial recovery of the global carbon cycle: a two-dimensional perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Marc-Olivier; Damon Matthews, H.; Mysak, Lawrence A.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the development and application of a new spatially explicit weathering scheme within the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM). We integrated a dataset of modern-day lithology with a number of previously devised parameterizations for weathering dependency on temperature, primary productivity, and runoff. We tested the model with simulations of future carbon cycle perturbations, comparing a number of emission scenarios and model versions with each other and with zero-dimensional equivalents of each experiment. Overall, we found that our two-dimensional weathering model versions were more efficient in restoring the carbon cycle to its pre-industrial state following the pulse emissions than their zero-dimensional counterparts; however, in either case the effect of this weathering negative feedback on the global carbon cycle was small on timescales of less than 1000 years. According to model results, the largest contribution to future changes in weathering rates came from the expansion of tropical and mid-latitude vegetation in grid cells dominated by weathering-vulnerable rock types, whereas changes in temperature and river runoff had a more modest direct effect. Our results also confirmed that silicate weathering is the only mechanism that can lead to a full recovery of the carbon cycle to pre-industrial levels on multimillennial timescales.

  14. In- and out-of-plane dynamic flexural behaviors of two-dimensional ensembles of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiani, Keivan, E-mail: k_kiani@kntu.ac.ir

    2014-09-15

    Useful nonlocal discrete and continuous models are developed to explain free vibration of two-dimensional (2D) ensembles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in bending. For this purpose, the models are constructed based on the nonlocal Rayleigh, Timoshenko, and higher-order beam theories. In contrast to an individual SWCNT exhibits identical bending behavior in different directions, for 2D ensemble networks of SWCNTs, it is shown that such a fact is completely dissimilar. Such an important issue leads to the definition of in-plane and out-of-plane flexural behaviors for such nanostructures. Subsequently, their corresponding fundamental frequencies are evaluated based on the proposed nonlocal models. The capabilities of the proposed nonlocal continuous models in predicting flexural frequencies of SWCNTs' ensembles with different numbers of SWCNTs as well as various levels of slenderness ratios are then explained. Such investigations confirm the high efficiency of the proposed continuous models. This matter would be of great importance in vibration analysis of highly populated ensembles of SWCNTs in which the discrete models may suffer from the size of the governing equations. The roles of the number of SWCNTs, slenderness ratio, intertube distance, small-scale parameter, and radius of the SWCNT on both in-plane and out-of-plane fundamental frequencies are addressed.

  15. Redox Active Cation Intercalation/Deintercalation in Two-Dimensional Layered MnO2 Nanostructures for High-Rate Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Pan; Ma, Renzhi; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Bai, Xueyin; Li, Shen; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2017-02-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials with a high intercalation pseudocapacitance have long been investigated for Li(+)-ion-based electrochemical energy storage. By contrast, the exploration of guest ions other than Li(+) has been limited, although promising. The present study investigates intercalation/deintercalation behaviors of various metal ions in 2D layered MnO2 with various interlayer distances, K-birnessite nanobelt (K-MnO2), its protonated form (H-MnO2), and a freeze-dried sample of exfoliated nanosheets. Series of metal ions, such as monovalent Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) and divalent Mg(2+), exhibit reversible intercalation during charge/discharge cycling, delivering high-rate pseudocapacitances. In particular, the freeze-dried MnO2 of exfoliated nanosheets restacked with the largest interlayer spacing and a less compact 3D network exhibits the best rate capability and a stable cyclability over 5000 cycles. Both theoretical calculation and kinetic analysis reveal that the increased interlayer distance facilitates the fast diffusion of cations in layered MnO2 hosts. The results presented herein provide a basis for the controllable synthesis of layered nanostructures for high-rate electrochemical energy storage using various single- and multivalent ions.

  16. Numerical study of the effect of disorder and magnetic field on the quantum transport of two-dimensional nanostructures modeled by tight-binding approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Taghizdehsiskht

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  In recent years, semiconductor nanostructures have become the model systems of choice for investigation of electrical conduction on short length scales. Quantum transport is studied in a two dimensional electron gas because of the combination of a large Fermi wavelength and large mean free path. In the present work, a numerical method is implemented in order to contribute to the understanding of quantum transport in narrow channels in different conditions of disorder and magnetic fields. We have used an approach that has proved to be very useful in describing mesoscopic transport. We have assumed zero temperature and phase coherent transport. By using the trick that a conductor connected to infinite leads can be replaced by a finite conductor with the effect of the leads incorporated through a 'self-energy' function, a convenient method was provided for evaluating the Green's function of the whole device numerically. Then, Fisher-Lee relations was used for calculating the transmission coefficients through coherent mesoscopic conductors. Our calculations were done in a model system with Hard-wall boundary conditions in the transverse direction, and the Anderson model of disorder was used in disordered samples. We have presented the results of quantum transport for different strengths of disorder and introduced magnetic fields. Our results confirmed the Landauer formalism for calculation of electronic transport. We observed that weak localization effect can be removed by application of a weak perpendicular magnetic field. Finally, we numerically showed the transition to the integral quantum Hall effect regime through the suppression of backscattering on a disordered model system by calculating the two­ terminal conductance of a quasi-one-dimensional quantum conductor as a strong magnetic field is applied. Our results showed that this regime is entered when there is a negligible overlap between electron edge states localized at opposite sides of

  17. Capacitance of two-dimensional titanium carbide (MXene) and MXene/carbon nanotube composites in organic electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Agnese, Yohan; Rozier, Patrick; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Gogotsi, Yury; Simon, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    Pseudocapacitive materials that store charges by fast redox reactions are promising candidates for designing high energy density electrochemical capacitors. MXenes - recently discovered two-dimensional carbides, have shown excellent capacitance in aqueous electrolytes, but in a narrow potential window, which limits both the energy and power density. Here, we investigated the electrochemical behavior of Ti3C2 MXene in 1M solution of 1-ethly-3-methylimidazolium bis- (trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide (EMITFSI) in acetonitrile and two other common organic electrolytes. This paper describes the use of clay, delaminated and composite Ti3C2 electrodes with carbon nanotubes in order to understand the effect of the electrode architecture and composition on the electrochemical performance. Capacitance values of 85 F g-1 and 245 F cm-3 were obtained at 2 mV s-1, with a high rate capability and good cyclability. In situ X-ray diffraction study reveals the intercalation of large EMI+ cations into MXene, which leads to increased capacitance, but may also be the rate limiting factor that determines the device performance.

  18. Enhanced supercapacitive performance of delaminated two-dimensional titanium carbide/carbon nanotube composites in alkaline electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Pengtao; Zhang, Ruijun; Jia, Jin; Wu, Chao; Zhou, Aiguo; Xu, Jiang; Zhang, Xuesha

    2015-06-01

    MXenes, a new family of two-dimensional materials, are terminated by O, OH and F groups. The existence of the oxygen-containing functional groups indicates a potential application in supercapacitor based on a redox mechanism. However, the irreversible stacking of MXenes will lead to an insufficient utilization of these functional groups and thus a decrease in the supercapacitive performance. To solve the problem, we synthesized a composite material comprised of carbon nanotube (CNT) and Ti3C2 sheets (d-Ti3C2) delaminated from MXenes by ultrasonic stirring. The FTIR result suggests that the ultrasonication has no significant effect on the oxygen-containing functional groups. The resultant composites exhibit significantly higher volumetric capacitance and better capacitance retention (during 5-100 mv s-1) than d-Ti3C2. A highest volumetric capacitance of 393 F cm-3 at 5 mv s-1 in KOH electrolyte can be obtained when the weight ratio of d-Ti3C2 to CNT is 2:1. In addition, the volumetric capacitance has no significant degradation even after 10000 cycles in cycling stability test, showing an excellent cycling stability compared with metal oxides. These enhanced electrochemical performances can be ascribed to the introduction of CNTs, which impede the stacking of Ti3C2, enlarge the distance between Ti3C2 sheets and improve the electrical conductivity.

  19. Carbon nanostructure composite for electromagnetic interference shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anupama Joshi; Suwarna Datar

    2015-06-01

    This communication reviews current developments in carbon nanostructure-based composite materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. With more and more electronic gadgets being used at different frequencies, there is a need for shielding them from one another to avoid interference. Conventionally, metal-based shielding materials have been used. But due to the requirement of light weight, corrosion resistive materials, lot of work is being done on composite materials. In this research the forerunner is the nanocarbon-based composite material whose different forms add different characteristics to the composite. The article focusses on composites based on graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and several other novel forms of carbon.

  20. Structural colors: from plasmonic to carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Shi, Haofei; Wu, Yi-Kuei; Kaplan, Alex F; Ok, Jong G; Guo, L Jay

    2011-11-18

    In addition to colorant-based pigmentation, structure is a major contributor to a material's color. In nature, structural color is often caused by the interaction of light with dielectric structures whose dimensions are on the order of visible-light wavelengths. Different optical interactions including multilayer interference, light scattering, the photonic crystal effect, and combinations thereof give rise to selective transmission or reflection of particular light wavelengths, which leads to the generation of structural color. Recent developments in nanofabrication of plasmonic and carbon nanostructures have opened another efficient way to control light properties at the subwavelength scale, including visible-light wavelength selection, which can produce structural color. In this Concept, the most relevant and representative achievements demonstrated over the last several years are presented and analyzed. These plasmonic and carbon nanostructures are believed to offer great potential for high-resolution color displays and spectral filtering applications.

  1. Monitoring the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with chitosan and folic acid by two-dimensional diffusion-ordered nmr spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Torres, Mary H.; Molina, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    A conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes, chitosan and folic acid has been prepared. It was characterized by diffusion ordered two-dimensional hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy which revealed the presence of a conjugate that was......A conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes, chitosan and folic acid has been prepared. It was characterized by diffusion ordered two-dimensional hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy which revealed the presence of a conjugate...... that was generated by the linkage between the carboxyl moiety of the folic acid and the amino group of the chitosan, which in turn was non-covalently bound to the single-walled carbon nanotubes. The obtained diffusion coefficient values demonstrated that free folic acid diffused more rapidly than the folic acid...... conjugated to single-walled carbon nanotubes-chitosan. The values of the proton signal of hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and two-dimensional hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy further confirmed that the folic acid was conjugated to the chitosan, wrapping the single...

  2. Dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes for intact crystalline graphene nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joonwon; Narayan Maiti, Uday; Kim, Na-Young; Narayan, Rekha; Jun Lee, Won; Sung Choi, Dong; Oh, Youngtak; Min Lee, Ju; Yong Lee, Gil; Hun Kang, Seok; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Ouk Kim, Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atomic level engineering of graphene-based materials is in high demand to enable customize structures and properties for different applications. Unzipping of the graphene plane is a potential means to this end, but uncontrollable damage of the two-dimensional crystalline framework during harsh unzipping reaction has remained a key challenge. Here we present heteroatom dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes as a reliable and controllable route to customized intact crystalline graphene-based nanostructures. Substitutional pyridinic nitrogen dopant sites at carbon nanotubes can selectively initiate the unzipping of graphene side walls at a relatively low electrochemical potential (0.6 V). The resultant nanostructures consisting of unzipped graphene nanoribbons wrapping around carbon nanotube cores maintain the intact two-dimensional crystallinity with well-defined atomic configuration at the unzipped edges. Large surface area and robust electrical connectivity of the synergistic nanostructure demonstrate ultrahigh-power supercapacitor performance, which can serve for AC filtering with the record high rate capability of -85° of phase angle at 120 Hz.

  3. Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.; BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-01-27

    Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-C) films grown on silicon using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) is correlated to both growth energetic and film thickness. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity probe both the topological nature of 3- and 4-fold coordinated carbon atom bonding and the topographical clustering of their distributions within a given film. In general, increasing the energetic of PLD growth results in films becoming more ``diamondlike'', i.e. increasing mass density and decreasing optical absorbance. However, these same properties decrease appreciably with thickness. The topology of carbon atom bonding is different for material near the substrate interface compared to material within the bulk portion of an a-C film. A simple model balancing the energy of residual stress and the free energies of resulting carbon topologies is proposed to provide an explanation of the evolution of topographical bonding clusters in a growing a-C film.

  4. Surface modification and functionalization of nanostructured carbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stanishevsky

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nanostructured carbon nanomaterials (e.g., nanocrystalline diamond films and particles, carbon nanotubes, carbon onions, fullerenes, etc. are being extensively explored for numerous biomedical applications in surgical implants, therapy, drug delivery, and biosensoring due to their interesting physical, chemical, and biological properties. Such applications of carbon nanomaterials often require specific surface functionality to be introduced for better integration of these materials with physiological environment. In the last decade, substantial progress has been made in the development of controllable surface modification methods and in the introduction of different functional groups on the surface of carbon nanomaterials.Design/methodology/approach: This paper briefly overviews the surface modification and functionalization approaches for various carbon nanomaterials, and it focuses on the plasma modification and functionalization of nanocrystalline diamond films, diamond nanoparticles, and carbon nanospheres. The results on the surface characterization using FTIR and XPS techniques, and the preliminary studies of cellular response to these modified carbon nanomaterials are presented and discussed.Findings: The results of surface modification of NCD films, detonation nanodiamonds, and carbon nanospheres, demonstrate the flexibility of nanocarbons to attain various surface functionality that can be adjusted for specific applications. It has been shown that neither of tested nanocarbon materials was cytotoxic in this study, although the attachement and proliferation of various cells was strongly affected by the specific type of surface functionalization.Research limitations/implications: At the present, it is not clear to what degree the available surface sites on NCD films or carbon nanoparticles can be occupied with functional groups. Furthermore, while there is clear selectivity of cellular response to H, O, and F surface

  5. Programmably Shaped Carbon Nanostructure from Shape-Conserving Carbonization of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Sun, Wei; Ricardo, Karen B; Wang, Dong; Shen, Jie; Yin, Peng; Liu, Haitao

    2016-03-22

    DNA nanostructures are versatile templates for low cost, high resolution nanofabrication. However, due to the limited chemical stability of pure DNA structures, their applications in nanofabrication have long been limited to low temperature processes or solution phase reactions. Here, we demonstrate the use of DNA nanostructure as a template for high temperature, solid-state chemistries. We show that programmably shaped carbon nanostructures can be obtained by a shape-conserving carbonization of DNA nanostructures. The DNA nanostructures were first coated with a thin film of Al2O3 by atomic layer deposition (ALD), after which the DNA nanostructure was carbonized in low pressure H2 atmosphere at 800-1000 °C. Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) data showed that carbon nanostructures were produced and the shape of the DNA nanostructure was preserved. Conductive AFM measurement shows that the carbon nanostructures are electrically conductive.

  6. DEPOSITION CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES BY SURFATRON GENERATED DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Davydova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures were deposited by surface wave discharge using various Ar/CH4/ CO2 gas mixture ratios. The morphology was controlled by adjusting of gas concentration and was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Also, the influence of the low temperature plasma treatment and process time on the wettability of the diamond films has been studied. The results indicate that for hydrogen termination of diamond surface indicate that the temperature as low as 400°C and treatment time of 15 min is sufficient to attain the p-type surface conductivity of diamond.

  7. Carbon nanostructures and networks produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowlgi, N.K.K.; Koper, G.J.M.; Van Raalten, R.A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a method for manufacturing crystalline carbon nanostructures and/or a network of crystalline carbon nanostructures, comprising: (i) providing a bicontinuous micro-emulsion containing metal nanoparticles having an average particle size between 1and 100nm; (ii) bringing said

  8. Carbon nanostructures and networks produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowlgi, N.K.K.; Koper, G.J.M.; Van Raalten, R.A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a method for manufacturing crystalline carbon nanostructures and/or a network of crystalline carbon nanostructures, comprising: (i) providing a bicontinuous micro-emulsion containing metal nanoparticles having an average particle size between 1and 100nm; (ii) bringing said

  9. Multifunctional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Energy Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures—including graphene, fullerenes, etc.—have found applications in a number of areas synergistically with a number of other materials. These multifunctional carbon nanostructures have recently attracted tremendous interest for energy storage applications due to their large aspect ratios, specific surface areas, and electrical conductivity. This succinct review aims to report on the recent advances in energy storage applications involving these multifunctional carbon nanostructures. The advanced design and testing of multifunctional carbon nanostructures for energy storage applications—specifically, electrochemical capacitors, lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells—are emphasized with comprehensive examples.

  10. Effects of doubled carbon dioxide on rainfall responses to large-scale forcing: A two-dimensional cloud-resolving modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Shen, Xinyong; Liu, Jia

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall responses to doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration were investigated through the analysis of two pairs of two-dimensional cloud-resolving model sensitivity experiments. One pair of experiments simulated pre-summer heavy rainfall over southern China around the summer solstice, whereas the other pair of experiments simulated tropical rainfall around the winter solstice. The analysis of the time and model domain mean heat budget revealed that the enhanced local atmospheric warming was associated with doubled carbon dioxide through the weakened infrared radiative cooling during the summer solstice. The weakened mean pre-summer rainfall corresponded to the weakened mean infrared radiative cooling. Doubled carbon dioxide increased the mean tropical atmospheric warming via the enhanced mean latent heat in correspondence with the strengthened mean infrared radiative cooling during the winter solstice. The enhanced mean tropical rainfall was associated with the increased mean latent heat.

  11. Two-dimensional thermal simulations of aluminum and carbon ion strippers for experiments at SPIRAL2 using the highest beam intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, N.A., E-mail: n.tahir@gsi.de [GSI Helmholzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kim, V. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Lamour, E. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UPMC-Sorbonne Universite, CNRS-UMR 7588, 75252 Paris (France); Lomonosov, I.V. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Piriz, A.R. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Rozet, J.P. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UPMC-Sorbonne Universite, CNRS-UMR 7588, 75252 Paris (France); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI Helmholzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholz-Institut Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Sultanov, V. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Vernhet, D. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UPMC-Sorbonne Universite, CNRS-UMR 7588, 75252 Paris (France)

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we report on two-dimensional numerical simulations of heating of a rotating, wheel shaped target impacted by the full intensity of the ion beam that will be delivered by the SPIRAL2 facility at Caen, France. The purpose of this work is to study heating of solid targets that will be used to strip the fast ions of SPIRAL2 to the required high charge state for the FISIC (Fast Ion-Slow Ion Collision) experiments. Strippers of aluminum with different emissivities and of carbon are exposed to high beam current of different ion species as oxygen, neon and argon. These studies show that carbon, due to its much higher sublimation temperature and much higher emissivity, is more favorable compared to aluminum. For the highest beam intensities, an aluminum stripper does not survive. However, problem of the induced thermal stresses and long term material fatigue needs to be investigated before a final conclusion can be drawn.

  12. Host-guest supramolecular chemistry at solid-liquid interface:An important strategy for preparing two-dimensional functional nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XueMei; ZENG QingDao; WANG Chen

    2014-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly,an important strategy in nanotechnology,has been widely studied in the past two decades.In this review,we have introduced the recent progress on construction of two-dimensional(2D)nanostructures by host-guest supramolecular chemistry at solid-liquid interface,and the interactions between the host assembly and the guest molecules are the major concerns.At first,the hydrogen bonds connected hybrid structures are discussed.And then we have paid a close attention on the surface-confined condensation reactions that has flourished recently in direct preparing novel nanostructures with increasing structural complexity.In the end,the cavity confinement of the 2D supramolecular host-guest architectures has been studied.On the basis of the above-mentioned interactions,a group of functional hybrid structures have been prepared.Notably,scanning tunneling microscopy(STM),a unique technique to probe the surface morphology and information at the single molecule level,has been used to probe the formed structures on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite(HOPG)surface.

  13. Nitrogen-doped two-dimensional porous carbon sheets derived from clover biomass for high performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cunjing; Wu, Dapeng; Wang, Hongju; Gao, Zhiyong; Xu, Fang; Jiang, Kai

    2017-09-01

    Highly porous carbon sheets were prepared from fresh clover stems under air atmosphere via a facile potassium chloride salt-sealing technique, which not only avoids using the high cost inert gas protection but also spontaneously introduce multi-level porosity into the carbon structure taking advantage of the trace of oxygen in the molten salt system. The as-obtained porous carbon sheets possess high specific surface area of 2244 m2 g-1 and interconnected hierarchical pore structures from micro-to macro-scale, which provide abundant storage active sites and fast ion diffusion channels. In addition, the spontaneously formed N (2.55 at%) and O (6.94 at%) doping sites not only improve the electron conductivity of the electrode but also enhance the specific capacitance by introducing pseudocapacitance. When employed as supercapacitor electrodes, a high specific capacitance of 436 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 and an excellent rate capacity with capacitance remaining 290 F g-1 at 50 A g-1 are demonstrated. Furthermore, the assembled symmetric supercapacitor delivers a high specific capacitance of 420 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1, excellent energy density of 58.4 Wh kg-1 and good cycling stability which retains 99.4% of the initial capacitance at 5 A g-1 after 30,000 cycles.

  14. Coherent phonons in carbon based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, G. D.; Nugraha, A. R. T.; Sato, K.; Kim, J.-H.; Lim, Y.-S.; Kono, J.; Saito, R.; Stanton, C. J.

    2014-06-01

    We have developed a theory for the generation and detection of coherent phonons in carbon based nanotstructures such as single walled nanotubes (SWNTs), graphene, and graphene nanoribbons. Coherent phonons are generated via the deformation potential electron/hole-phonon interaction with ultrafast photo-excited carriers. They modulate the reflectance or absorption of an optical probe pules on a THz time scale and might be useful for optical modulators. In our theory the electronic states are treated in a third nearest neighbor extended tight binding formalism which gives a good description of the states over the entire Brillouin zone while the phonon states are treated using valence force field models which include bond stretching, in-plane and out-of-plane bond bending, and bond twisting interactions up to fourth neighbor distances. We compare our theory to experiments for the low frequency radial breathing mode (RBM) in micelle suspended single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). The analysis of such data provides a wealth of information on the dynamics and interplay of photons, phonons and electrons in these carbon based nanostructures.

  15. Tuning structural and mechanical properties of two-dimensional molecular crystals: the roles of carbon side chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cun, Huanyao; Wang, Yeliang; Du, Shixuan; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Lizhi; Yang, Bing; He, Xiaobo; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Xueyan; Yuan, Quanzi; Zhao, Ya-Pu; Ouyang, Min; Hofer, Werner A; Pennycook, Stephen J; Gao, Hong-jun

    2012-03-14

    A key requirement for the future applicability of molecular electronics devices is a resilience of their properties to mechanical deformation. At present, however, there is no fundamental understanding of the origins of mechanical properties of molecular films. Here we use quinacridone, which possesses flexible carbon side chains, as a model molecular system to address this issue. Eight molecular configurations with different molecular coverage are identified by scanning tunneling microscopy. Theoretical calculations reveal quantitatively the roles of different molecule-molecule and molecule-substrate interactions and predict the observed sequence of configurations. Remarkably, we find that a single Young's modulus applies for all configurations, the magnitude of which is controlled by side chain length, suggesting a versatile avenue for tuning not only the physical and chemical properties of molecular films but also their elastic properties.

  16. Effects on the Thermo-Mechanical and Crystallinity Properties of Nylon 6,6 Electrospun Fibres Reinforced with One Dimensional (1D and Two Dimensional (2D Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Medellín-Rodríguez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun one dimensional (1D and two dimensional (2D carbon based polymer nanocomposites are studied in order to determine the effect provided by the two differently structured nanofillers on crystallinity and thermo-mechanical properties of the nanofibres. The nanomaterials studied are pristine carbon nanotubes, oxidised carbon nanotubes, reduced graphene oxide and graphene oxide. Functional groups associated with the order structure of the polymers are analysed by infrared and Raman spectroscopies; the morphology is studied by scanning electron microscopy and the crystallinity properties are investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Differences in crystallisation behaviour between 1D and 2D carbon based nanofibres are shown by their crystallinity degree and their crystal sizes. The nanocomposite crystal sizes perpendicular to the plane (100 decrease with nanofiller content in all cases. The crystallinity trend and crystal sizes are in accordance with storage modulus response. The results also suggest that functionalisation favours interfacial bonding and dispersion of the nanomaterials within the polymer matrix. As a consequence the number of nucleating sites increases which in turn decreases the crystal size in the nanocomposites. These features explain the improved thermo-mechanical properties in the nanocomposites.

  17. Continuous versus discrete for interacting carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Hill, James M.

    2007-04-01

    Intermolecular forces between two interacting nanostructures can be obtained by either summing over all the individual atomic interactions or by using a continuum or continuous approach, where the number of atoms situated at discrete locations is averaged over the surface of each molecule. This paper aims to undertake a limited comparison of the continuum approach, the discrete atom-atom formulation and a hybrid discrete-continuum formulation for a range of molecular interactions involving a carbon nanotube, including interactions with another carbon nanotube and the fullerenes C60, C70 and C80. In the hybrid approach only one of the interacting molecules is discretized and the other is considered to be continuous. The hybrid discrete-continuum formulation would enable non-regular shaped molecules to be described, particularly useful for drug delivery systems which employ carbon nanotubes as carriers. The present investigation is important to obtain a rough estimate of the anticipated percentage errors which may occur between the various approaches in any specific application. Although our investigation is by no means comprehensive, overall we show that typically the interaction energies for these three approaches differ on average by at most 10% and the forces by 5%, with the exception of the C80 fullerene. For the C80 fullerene, while the intermolecular forces and the suction energies are in reasonable overall agreement, the point-wise energies can be significantly different. This may in part be due to differences in modelling the geometry of the C80 fullerene, but also the suction energies involve integrals of the energy, and therefore any errors or discrepancies in the point-wise energy tend to be smoothed out to give reasonable overall agreement for the former quantities.

  18. Self-assembled MoS2–carbon nanostructures: influence of nanostructuring and carbon on lithium battery performance

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Shyamal K.

    2012-01-01

    Composites of MoS 2 and amorphous carbon are grown and self-assembled into hierarchical nanostructures via a hydrothermal method. Application of the composites as high-energy electrodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries is investigated. The critical roles of nanostructuring of MoS 2 and carbon composition on lithium-ion battery performance are highlighted. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. One-step thermolysis synthesis of two-dimensional ultrafine Fe3O4 particles/carbon nanonetworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanqun; Li, Xiaona; Liang, Jianwen; Tang, Kaibin; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2016-02-01

    To tackle the issue of inferior cycle stability and rate capability for Fe3O4 anode materials in lithium ion batteries, ultrafine Fe3O4 nanocrystals uniformly encapsulated in two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanonetworks have been fabricated through thermolysis of a simple, low-cost iron(iii) acetylacetonate without any extra processes. Moreover, compared to the reported Fe3O4/carbon composites, the particle size of Fe3O4 is controllable and held down to ~3 nm. Benefitting from the synergistic effects of the excellent electroconductive carbon nanonetworks and uniform distribution of ultrafine Fe3O4 particles, the prepared 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetwork anode exhibits high reversible capacity, excellent rate capability and superior cyclability. A high capacity of 1534 mA h g-1 is achieved at a 1 C rate and is maintained without decay up to 500 cycles (1 C = 1 A g-1). Even at the high current density of 5 C and 10 C, the 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetworks maintain a reversible capacity of 845 and 647 mA h g-1 after 500 discharge/charge cycles, respectively. In comparison with other reported Fe3O4-based anodes, the 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetwork electrode is one of the most attractive of those in energy storage applications.To tackle the issue of inferior cycle stability and rate capability for Fe3O4 anode materials in lithium ion batteries, ultrafine Fe3O4 nanocrystals uniformly encapsulated in two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanonetworks have been fabricated through thermolysis of a simple, low-cost iron(iii) acetylacetonate without any extra processes. Moreover, compared to the reported Fe3O4/carbon composites, the particle size of Fe3O4 is controllable and held down to ~3 nm. Benefitting from the synergistic effects of the excellent electroconductive carbon nanonetworks and uniform distribution of ultrafine Fe3O4 particles, the prepared 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetwork anode exhibits high reversible capacity, excellent rate capability and superior cyclability. A high capacity of 1534 mA h

  20. Biotemplate synthesis of carbon nanostructures using bamboo as both the template and the carbon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xiaodan [Research Center of Analysis and Measurement, Hangzhou 310014 (China); China National Bamboo Research and Development Center, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Yang, Qian [Research Center of Analysis and Measurement, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Zheng, Yifan; Mo, Weimin; Hu, Jianguan [Research Center of Analysis and Measurement, Hangzhou 310014 (China); College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Huang, Wanzhen, E-mail: risohuang@zjut.edu.cn [Research Center of Analysis and Measurement, Hangzhou 310014 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A new method for the in situ growth of carbon nanostructures was demonstrated. • The bamboo was selected as both the green carbon source and the biotemplate. • Four distinct structural types of carbon nanostructure have been identified. • The corresponding growth mechanism of each carbon nanostructure was proposed. - Abstract: A series of carbon nanostructures were prepared via a biotemplate method by catalytic decomposition of bamboo impregnated with ferric nitrate. The natural nanoporous bamboo was used as both the green carbon source and the template for the in situ growth of carbon nanostructures. Scanning electron microscope, field emission transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope were used to characterize the product. Four distinct structural types of carbon nanostructures have been identified, namely nanofibers, hollow carbon nanospheres, herringbone and bamboo-shaped nanotubes. The effect of reaction temperature (from 600 to 900 °C) on the growth behavior of carbon nanostructures was investigated and the corresponding growth mechanism was proposed. At low temperature the production of nanofibers was favored, while higher temperature led to bamboo-shaped nanostructures.

  1. Synthesis of Two-Dimensional CoS1.097/Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanocomposites Using Metal-Organic Framework Nanosheets as Precursors for Supercapacitor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feifei; Zhao, Meiting; Yu, Yifu; Chen, Bo; Huang, Ying; Yang, Jian; Cao, Xiehong; Lu, Qipeng; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Zhicheng; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhang, Hua

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) metal-organic framework (MOF) nanosheets are attracting increasing research interest. Here, for the first time, we report the facile synthesis of 2D porphyrin paddlewheel framework-3 (PPF-3) MOF nanosheets with thickness of ca. 12-43 nm. Through the simultaneous sulfidation and carbonization of PPF-3 MOF nanosheets, we have prepared the 2D nanocomposite of CoS1.097 nanoparticles (NPs) and nitrogen-doped carbon, referred to as CoSNC, in which the CoS1.097 NPs with size of ca. 10 nm are embedded in the nitrogen-doped carbon matrix. As a proof-of-concept application, the obtained 2D CoSNC nanocomposite is used as an electrode material for a supercapacitor, which exhibits a specific capacitance of 360.1 F g(-1) at a current density of 1.5 A g(-1). Moreover, the composite electrode also shows high rate capability. Its specific capacitance delivered at a current density of 30.0 A g(-1) retains 56.8% of the value at 1.5 A g(-1).

  2. Design, fabrication and evaluation of two-dimensional to three-dimensional nanostructured ceramic/polymer composites for orthopedic regeneration and controlled drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huinan

    Desirable cytocompatibility properties of nano-sized ceramics were combined with the tunable degradability and deformability of a select polymer (poly-lactide-co-glycolide, or PLGA) to optimize biological and mechanical properties for orthopedic tissue regeneration. Nanophase ceramics mimic the size scale of constituent components of natural bone and enhance the adsorption of proteins that mediate bone cell adhesion. Results have shown significantly promoted osteoblast (bone-forming cell) adhesion and long-term functions (alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition) on nanophase ceramics compared to conventional (micron-scale) ceramics. Therefore, nano-titania particles were first dispersed in a model polymer (PLGA) matrix using sonication to imitate the nano-sized surface features and distribution of nano-ceramics in/on bone. Surface characteristics of the composites (such as topography, surface area and surface roughness) were studied. Importantly, results showed that osteoblast adhesion was the greatest when surface roughness values of the composites were closer to that of natural bone; this was mediated by controlling the dispersion of titania in PLGA. Moreover, this study demonstrated that the dispersion of nanophase titania in PLGA decreased the harmful acidic pH changes of PLGA as it degrades. From the perspective of mechanical properties, compared to agglomerated nano-titania in PLGA, well-dispersed nanophase titania in PLGA improved the tensile and compressive moduli and strength of these composites. In order to mimic the hierarchical structure of bone, a novel aerosol-based 3D printing technique was used to further fabricate nanostructured 3D ceramic/polymer composites. Osteoblast interactions with these 3D scaffolds provided evidence of an even further promoted bone cell infiltration into such 3D structures. Lastly, nanocomposites were used as novel drug delivery systems to promote bone growth. Specifically, a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-7

  3. Nanostructure-based Processes at the Carbonizing Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Roslyakova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies of nanostructure-based processes carburizing steels showed that oxidizing atmosphere when carburizing steel contains along with carbon dioxide (CO2 + C = 2CO molecular and atmospheric oxygen (O2 + 2C = 2CO; O + C = CO released from the carbonate ВаСОз during its thermal dissociation. Intensive formation of CO provides high carbonizing ability of carbonate-soot coating and steel.

  4. Study of collective radial breathing-like modes in double-walled carbon nanotubes: combination of continuous two-dimensional membrane theory and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levshov, Dmitry I.; Avramenko, Marina V.; Than, Xuan-Tinh; Michel, Thierry; Arenal, Raul; Paillet, Matthieu; Rybkovskiy, Dmitry V.; Osadchy, Alexander V.; Rochal, Sergei B.; Yuzyuk, Yuri I.; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Radial breathing modes (RBMs) are widely used for the atomic structure characterization and index assignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from resonant Raman spectroscopy. However, for double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs), the use of conventional ωRBM(d) formulas is complicated due to the van der Waals interaction between the layers, which strongly affects the frequencies of radial modes and leads to new collective vibrations. This paper presents an alternative way to theoretically study the collective radial breathing-like modes (RBLMs) of DWNTs and to account for interlayer interaction, namely the continuous two-dimensional membrane theory. We obtain an analytical ωRBLM(do,di) relation, being the equivalent of the conventional ωRBM(d) expressions, established for SWNTs. We compare our theoretical predictions with Raman data, measured on individual index-identified suspended DWNTs, and find a good agreement between experiment and theory. Moreover, we show that the interlayer coupling in individual DWNTs strongly depends on the interlayer distance, which is manifested in the frequency shifts of the RBLMs with respect to the RBMs of the individual inner and outer tubes. In terms of characterization, this means that the combination of Raman spectroscopy data and predictions of continuous membrane theory may give additional criteria for the index identification of DWNTs, namely the interlayer distance.

  5. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsah, Kofi [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  6. Two-dimensional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Osserman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The basic component of several-variable calculus, two-dimensional calculus is vital to mastery of the broader field. This extensive treatment of the subject offers the advantage of a thorough integration of linear algebra and materials, which aids readers in the development of geometric intuition. An introductory chapter presents background information on vectors in the plane, plane curves, and functions of two variables. Subsequent chapters address differentiation, transformations, and integration. Each chapter concludes with problem sets, and answers to selected exercises appear at the end o

  7. Two dimensional vernier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional vernier scale is disclosed utilizing a cartesian grid on one plate member with a polar grid on an overlying transparent plate member. The polar grid has multiple concentric circles at a fractional spacing of the spacing of the cartesian grid lines. By locating the center of the polar grid on a location on the cartesian grid, interpolation can be made of both the X and Y fractional relationship to the cartesian grid by noting which circles coincide with a cartesian grid line for the X and Y direction.

  8. Congener-specific carbon isotopic analysis of technical PCB and PCN mixtures using two-dimensional gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Yuichi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Petrick, Gert; Gamo, Toshitaka; Falandysz, Jerzy; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi

    2005-06-01

    Analysis of stable carbon isotope fractionation is a useful method to study the sources and fate of anthropogenic organic contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the environment. To evaluate the utility of carbon isotopes, determination of isotopic ratios of 13C/12C in source materials, for example, technical PCB preparations, is needed. In this study, we determined delta13C values of 31 chlorobiphenyl (CB) congeners in 18 technical PCB preparations and 15 chloronaphthalene (CN) congeners in 6 polychlorinated naphthalene preparations using two-dimensional gas chromatography-combustion furnace-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (2DGC-C-IRMS). Development of 2DGC-IRMS enabled improved resolution and sensitivity of compound-specific carbon isotope analysis (CSIA) of CB or CN congeners. Delta13C values of PCB congeners ranged from -34.4 (Delors) to -22.0/1000 (Sovol). Analogous PCB preparations with similar chlorine content, but different geographical origin, had different delta13C values. PCB preparations from Eastern European countries--Delors, Sovol, Trichlorodiphenyl, and Chlorofen--had distinct delta13C values. PCB mixtures showed increased 13C depletion with increasing chlorine content. Delta13C values for individual CB congeners varied depending on the degree of chlorination in technical mixtures. Delta13C values of CN congeners in Halowaxes ranged from -26.3 to -21.7/1000 and these values are within the ranges observed for PCBs. This study establishes the range of delta13C values in technical PCB and PCN preparations, which may prove to be useful in the determination of sources of these compounds in the environment. This is the first study to employ 2DGC-IRMS analysis of delta13C values in technical PCB and PCN preparations.

  9. Combustion synthesis of carbon nanotubes and related nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchan-Merchan, Wilson; Jimenez, Walmy Cuello [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Saveliev, Alexei V. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Kennedy, Lawrence [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Recently flames have emerged as a viable alternative method for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes and related nanostructures. The flame volume provides a carbon-rich chemically reactive environment capable of generating nanostructures during short residence times in a continuous single-step process. Various flame configurations, fuel types, and catalytic materials have been employed in an attempt to achieve controlled growth of multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes as well as other carbon nanostructures such as nanofibers, carbon micro-trees, and whiskers. Premixed and non-premixed flames in co-flow and counterflow geometries were examined using low atmospheric and elevated pressures, various hydrocarbon fuels, oxygen enrichment, and dilution with inert gases were employed as well. Catalytic materials in the form of solid untreated supports, solid supports with pre-fabricated catalytic sites, and also in the form of aerosol have demonstrated high activity and selectivity in the growth of various nanostructures. The ability to synthesize and control carbon nanotube orientation, length, diameter, uniformity, purity, and internal morphology is essential for the fabrication of nanomechanical and electrical devices. An understanding of the growth mechanism and development of control methods such as the electric field, particle loading, and nanotemplates is critically important to address these issues. Today, flames are envisioned as the alternative technique for the synthesis of SWNTs in tons/year production scale leading to the development of related technologies such as purification and separation methods. (author)

  10. Methods of analyzing carbon nanostructures, methods of preparation of analytes from carbon nanostructures, and systems for analyzing carbon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Da Costa, Pedro Miquel Ferreira Joaquim

    2016-09-09

    Provided herein is a method determining the concentration of impurities in a carbon material, comprising: mixing a flux and a carbon material to form a mixture, wherein the carbon material is selected from the group consisting of graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerene, carbon onions, graphite, carbon fibers, and a combination thereof; heating the mixture using microwave energy to form fused materials; dissolution of the fused materials in an acid mixture; and measuring the concentration of one or more impurities.

  11. Phthalocyanine-Carbon Nanostructure Materials Assembled through Supramolecular Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottari, Giovanni; Suanzes, Juan A; Trukhina, Olga; Torres, Tomas

    2011-04-21

    The use of self-assembly for the construction of materials based on phthalocyanines and carbon nanostructures-fullerenes, single-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphene-has demonstrated to be a versatile strategy for the preparation of novel, multifunctional systems. Photophysical studies carried out on these photo- and electroactive supramolecular ensembles have revealed the occurrence of an efficient photoinduced electron-transfer process, thus paving the way for the utilization of these materials as active components in optoelectronic devices. This Perspective highlights the recent progress in the preparation of such materials and the potential use of these systems for the construction of nanostructured materials with singular physicochemical properties.

  12. Electron transport properties of carbon-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Pinto, Carlos A.

    Grapheme and graphene-related systems have been the focus of intensive research due to their exceptional electronic behavior. Their properties have been studied for decades, from the unique band structure predicted for a single layer of graphite, to the unexpected linear magnetoresistance observed in its bulk form. Since its experimental isolation in 2004, studies on graphene monolayer, bilayer, and few-layer systems garnered an overwhelming amount of attention from the scientific community, with studies focusing on multilayers with nanometer thicknesses paling in comparison. The main motivation of this study is to further the understanding of systems consisting of multilayer graphene and ultrathin graphite (graphitic multilayers) through electron transport experiments. Uniquely designed and fabricated devices based on carbon nanostructures were used to study the transport of charge carriers under high electric and magnetic fields. For short-channel suspended graphitic multilayer devices, the two-terminal differential conductance dI/dV as a function of drain-source bias Vd displays a pronounced dip pinned at Vd=0, explained by the hot electron effect. The dip is attenuated under high magnetic fields, likely due to intra-Landau level cyclotron phonon scattering. Also, distinct high-energy dI/dV anomalies have been observed and shown to be related to intrinsic phonon-emission processes in graphite. The evolution of such dI/dV anomalies under magnetic fields is understood as a consequence of the inter-Landau level cyclotron-phonon resonance scattering. The magnetoresistance (MR) of this system shows Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations on top of a strong positive nearly-linear background. Upon the introduction of a significant amount of short-range disorders through ion implantation, the positive MR transforms into a negative MR. The results for the MR of pure and implanted graphitic multilayers can be understood by considering a recent magneto-transport theory for two-dimensional

  13. Sweet carbon nanostructures: carbohydrate conjugates with carbon nanotubes and graphene and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanan; Star, Alexander; Vidal, Sébastien

    2013-06-07

    Because of their unique physicochemical properties, carbon nanotubes and graphene can find promising applications in many fields of biomedical research. However, the pristine nanomaterials suffer from low solubility in aqueous systems which results in their limited biocompatibility. Through the introduction of carbohydrates, the surface properties of these graphitic carbon nanostructures can be modified not just to improve their water solubility but also to enable these versatile nanostructures to interact selectively with biological systems. This review will highlight the synthetic strategies that have been reported for the covalent and noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanostructures with carbohydrates, as well as their applications in biosensing and biomedicine.

  14. Two-dimensional optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-01-01

    Discusses the principles and applications of two-dimensional vibrational and optical spectroscopy techniques. This book provides an account of basic theory required for an understanding of two-dimensional vibrational and electronic spectroscopy.

  15. Hybrid carbon nanostructure assemblage for high performance pseudo-capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Mishra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of novel nanocomposites for pseudo-capacitors with high capacitance and energy density is the spotlight of current energy research. In the present work, hybrid carbon nanostructure assemblage of graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes has been used as carbon support to nanostructured RuO2 and polyaniline for high energy supercapacitors. Maximum specific capacitances of 110, 235 and 440 F g−1 at the voltage sweep rate of 10 mV s−1 and maximum energy densities of 7, 12.5 and 20.5 Wh kg−1 were observed for carbon assemblage and its RuO2 and polyanilne decorated nanocomposites, respectively, with 1M H2SO4 as electrolyte.

  16. Surface modification of microfibrous materials with nanostructured carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnikova, Irina V., E-mail: tokareva@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Mishakov, Ilya V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Bauman, Yury I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Korneev, Denis V. [State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR, Koltsovo, Novosibirsk Region 630559 (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The surface of fiberglass cloth, carbon and basalt microfibers was modified with carbon nanostructured coating via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of 1,2-dichloroethane. Incipient wetness impregnation and solution combustion synthesis (SCS) methods were used to deposit nickel catalyst on the surface of microfibrous support. Prepared NiO/support samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis and temperature-programmed reduction. The samples of resulted hybrid materials were studied by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopies as well as by low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. The nature of the support was found to have considerable effect on the CCVD process peculiarities. High yield of nanostructured carbon with largest average diameter of nanofibers within the studied series was observed when carbon microfibers were used as a support. This sample characterized with moderate surface area (about 80 m{sup 2}/g after 2 h of CCVD) shows the best anchorage effect. Among the mineral supports, fiberglass tissue was found to provide highest carbon yield (up to 3.07 g/g{sub FG}) and surface area (up to 344 m{sup 2}/g) due to applicability of SCS method for Ni deposition. - Highlights: • The microfibers of different nature were coated with nanostructured carbon layer. • Features of CNF growth and characteristics of hybrid materials were studied. • Appropriate anchorage of CNF layer on microfiber’s surface was demonstrated.

  17. The mathematical model for synthesis process management of the carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakova, T. B.; Petrov, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, key difficulties of management process for carbon nanostructure synthesis are described. Tasks of optimum control of the carbon nanostructure synthesis process and management in case of emergency situations are formulated. The mathematical model of carbon nanostructure synthesis is offered. The equations for calculation of quantitative, qualitative indexes, indicators of safety and operability of engineering procedure are provided. The necessity of mathematical model use for carbon nanostructure synthesis is caused by improvement of the quality, the quantity, a decrease in the cost value of carbon nanostructures and an increase in safety of the engineering procedure of their obtaining. Testing and approbation of the mathematical model for carbon nanostructure synthesis are executed on a fullerene industrial production line. Suitability of the mathematical model of carbon nanostructure synthesis for production control in the mode of optimum control and management in case of emergency situations is confirmed. The obtained solution is recommended for implementation on the enterprises of a similar purpose.

  18. Carbon Nanostructures for Tagging in Electrochemical Biosensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Yáñez-Sedeño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing demand for developing ultrasensitive electrochemical bioassays has led to the design of numerous signal amplification strategies. In this context, carbon-based nanomaterials have been demonstrated to be excellent tags for greatly amplifying the transduction of recognition events and simplifying the protocols used in electrochemical biosensing. This relevant role is due to the carbon-nanomaterials’ large surface area, excellent biological compatibility and ease functionalization and, in some cases, intrinsic electrochemistry. These carbon-based nanomaterials involve well-known carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene as well as the more recent use of other carbon nanoforms. This paper briefly discusses the advantages of using carbon nanostructures and their hybrid nanocomposites for amplification through tagging in electrochemical biosensing platforms and provides an updated overview of some selected examples making use of labels involving carbon nanomaterials, acting both as carriers for signal elements and as electrochemical tracers, applied to the electrochemical biosensing of relevant (biomarkers.

  19. Hybrid Aluminum Composite Materials Based on Carbon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana S. Koltsova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated formation of carbon nanofibers grown by chemical deposition (CVD method using an acetylene-hydrogen mixture on the surface of micron-sized aluminum powder particles. To obtain uniform distribution of the carbon nanostructures on the particles we deposited nickel catalyst on the surface by spraying from the aqueous solution of nickel nitrate. It was found that increasing the time of the synthesis lowers the rate of growth of carbon nanostructures due to the deactivation of the catalyst. The Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm the presence of disordered carbon corresponding to CNFs in the specimen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of aluminum carbide in the hot pressed samples. An aluminum composite material prepared using 1 wt.% CNFs obtained by uniaxial cold pressing and sintering showed 30% increase in the hardness compared to pure aluminum, whereas the composites prepared by hot pressing showed 80% increase in the hardness. Composite materials have satisfactory ductility. Thus, the aluminum based material reinforced with carbon nanostructures should be appropriate for creating high-strength and light compacts for aerospace and automotive applications and power engineering.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7355

  20. Applications of Nanostructured Carbon Materials in Constructions: The State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Nan Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most recent studies on the applications of nanostructured carbon materials, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and graphene oxides, in constructions are presented. First, the preparation of nanostructured carbon/infrastructure material composites is summarized. This part is mainly focused on how the nanostructured carbon materials were mixed with cementitious or asphalt matrix to realize a good dispersion condition. Several methods, including high speed melting mixing, surface treatment, and aqueous solution with surfactants and sonication, were introduced. Second, the applications of the carbon nanostructured materials in constructions such as mechanical reinforcement, self-sensing detectors, self-heating element for deicing, and electromagnetic shielding component were systematically reviewed. This paper not only helps the readers understand the preparation process of the carbon nanostructured materials/infrastructure material composites but also sheds some light on the state-of-the-art applications of carbon nanostructured materials in constructions.

  1. Antibacterial Carbon Nanotubes by Impregnation with Copper Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palza, Humberto; Saldias, Natalia; Arriagada, Paulo; Palma, Patricia; Sanchez, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    The addition of metal-based nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes (CNT) is a relevant method producing multifunctional materials. In this context, CNT were dispersed in an ethanol/water solution containing copper acetate for their impregnation with different copper nanostructures by either a non-thermal or a thermal post-synthesis treatment. Our simple method is based on pure CNT in an air atmosphere without any other reagents. Particles without thermal treatment were present as a well-dispersed layered copper hydroxide acetate nanostructures on CNT, as confirmed by scanning and transmission (TEM) electron microscopies, and showing a characteristic x-ray diffraction peak at 6.6°. On the other hand, by thermal post-synthesis treatment at 300°C, these layered nanostructures became Cu2O nanoparticles of around 20 nm supported on CNT, as confirmed by TEM images and x-ray diffraction peaks. These copper nanostructures present on the CNT surface rendered antibacterial behavior to the resulting hybrid materials against both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. These findings present for the first time a simple method for producing antibacterial CNT by direct impregnation of copper nanostructures.

  2. Plasma-enhanced Deposition of Nano-Structured Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qiaoqin (杨巧勤); Xiao Chijin (肖持进); A. Hirose

    2005-01-01

    By pre-treating substrate with different methods and patterning the catalyst, selective and patterned growth of diamond and graphitic nano-structured carbon films have been realized through DC Plasma-Enhanced Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-HFCVD).Through two-step processing in an HFCVD reactor, novel nano-structured composite diamond films containing a nanocrystalline diamond layer on the top of a nanocone diamond layer have been synthesized. Well-aligned carbon nanotubes, diamond and graphitic carbon nanocones with controllable alignment orientations have been synthesized by using PE-HFCVD. The orientation of the nanostructures can be controlled by adjusting the working pressure. In a Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PECVD) reactor, high-quality diamond films have been synthesized at low temperatures (310 ℃~550 ℃) without adding oxygen or halogen gas in a newly developed processing technique. In this process, carbon source originates from graphite etching, instead of hydrocarbon. The lowest growth temperature for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond films with a reasonable growth rate without addition of oxygen or halogen is 260 ℃.

  3. Growth of Carbon Nanostructure Materials Using Laser Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehozeky, S.

    2000-01-01

    Since the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered in many fields, such as non-structure electronics, lightweight composite structure, and drug delivery, CNT has been grown by many techniques in which high yield single wall CNT has been produced by physical processes including arc vaporization and laser vaporization. In this presentation, the growth mechanism of the carbon nanostructure materials by laser vaporization is to be discussed. Carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes have been synthesized using pulsed laser vaporization on Si substrates in various temperatures and pressures. Two kinds of targets were used to grow the nanostructure materials. One was a pure graphite target and the other one contained Ni and Co catalysts. The growth temperatures were 600-1000 C and the pressures varied from several torr to 500 torr. Carbon nanoparticles were observed when a graphite target was used, although catalysts were deposited on substrates before growing carbon films. When the target contains catalysts, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are obtained. The CNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission, and Raman spectroscopy. The temperature-and pressure-dependencies of carbon nanotubes' growth rate and size were investigated.

  4. Electron Field Emission from Nanostructured Carbon Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanju

    2005-03-01

    Fabricating small structures has almost become fashionable and the rationale is that reducing one or more dimensions below some critical length changes the systems' physical properties drastically, where nanocrystalline diamond (n-D) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the class of advanced carbon materials serve model examples. Emission of electrons at room temperature - cold electron emitters - are of vital importance for a variety of vacuum microelectronic devices - electron microscopes, photo multipliers, X-ray generators, lamps, and flat panel displays and microwave cathodes. Electron emitters may lead to otherwise difficult to obtain advantages in performance and/or design. This is the driving force to investigate the carbon-related materials as cold cathodes. In this talk, the performance of various forms of carbon in thin film form including diamond, n-D, and vertically aligned CNTs as cold cathodes for their potential use in field emission displays (FEDs) in terms of I-V characteristics and corresponding spatial imaging will be presented. Physics based models such as, NEA, surface modification, geometric enhancement, and microstructure alteration due to particle bombardment, and doping, will be described to support the experimental observations of electron field enhancement (low turn-on voltage, high current and emission site density) and its reliability from the abovementioned carbon-related materials. Other vacuum device applications such as thermionic power generators will be mentioned briefly.

  5. Water-evaporation-induced electricity with nanostructured carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Guobin; Xu, Ying; Ding, Tianpeng; Li, Jia; Yin, Jun; Fei, Wenwen; Cao, Yuanzhi; Yu, Jin; Yuan, Longyan; Gong, Li; Chen, Jian; Deng, Shaozhi; Zhou, Jun; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-01-30

    Water evaporation is a ubiquitous natural process that harvests thermal energy from the ambient environment. It has previously been utilized in a number of applications including the synthesis of nanostructures and the creation of energy-harvesting devices. Here, we show that water evaporation from the surface of a variety of nanostructured carbon materials can be used to generate electricity. We find that evaporation from centimetre-sized carbon black sheets can reliably generate sustained voltages of up to 1 V under ambient conditions. The interaction between the water molecules and the carbon layers and moreover evaporation-induced water flow within the porous carbon sheets are thought to be key to the voltage generation. This approach to electricity generation is related to the traditional streaming potential, which relies on driving ionic solutions through narrow gaps, and the recently reported method of moving ionic solutions across graphene surfaces, but as it exploits the natural process of evaporation and uses cheap carbon black it could offer advantages in the development of practical devices.

  6. Water-evaporation-induced electricity with nanostructured carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Guobin; Xu, Ying; Ding, Tianpeng; Li, Jia; Yin, Jun; Fei, Wenwen; Cao, Yuanzhi; Yu, Jin; Yuan, Longyan; Gong, Li; Chen, Jian; Deng, Shaozhi; Zhou, Jun; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-05-01

    Water evaporation is a ubiquitous natural process that harvests thermal energy from the ambient environment. It has previously been utilized in a number of applications including the synthesis of nanostructures and the creation of energy-harvesting devices. Here, we show that water evaporation from the surface of a variety of nanostructured carbon materials can be used to generate electricity. We find that evaporation from centimetre-sized carbon black sheets can reliably generate sustained voltages of up to 1 V under ambient conditions. The interaction between the water molecules and the carbon layers and moreover evaporation-induced water flow within the porous carbon sheets are thought to be key to the voltage generation. This approach to electricity generation is related to the traditional streaming potential, which relies on driving ionic solutions through narrow gaps, and the recently reported method of moving ionic solutions across graphene surfaces, but as it exploits the natural process of evaporation and uses cheap carbon black it could offer advantages in the development of practical devices.

  7. Equilibrium Configurations of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Carbon Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iva(i)lo M.Mladenov; Peter A.Djondjorov; Mariana Ts.Hadzhilazova; Vassil M.Vassilev

    2013-01-01

    The present article concerns the continuum modelling of the mechanical behaviour and equilibrium shapes of two types of nano-scale objects:fluid lipid bilayer membranes and carbon nanostructures.A unified continuum model is used to handle four different case studies.Two of them consist in representing in analytic form cylindrical and axisymmetric equilibrium configurations of single-wall carbon nanotubes and fluid lipid bilayer membranes subjected to uniform hydrostatic pressure.The third one is concerned with determination of possible shapes of junctions between a single-wall carbon nanotube and a fiat graphene sheet or another single-wall carbon nanotube.The last one deals with the mechanical behaviour of closed fluid lipid bilayer membranes (vesicles) adhering onto a fiat homogeneous rigid substrate subjected to micro-injection and uniform hydrostatic pressure.

  8. Device Fabrication and Probing of Discrete Carbon Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Batra, Nitin M

    2015-05-06

    Device fabrication on multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using electrical beam lithography (EBL), electron beam induced deposition (EBID), ion beam induced deposition (IBID) methods was carried out, followed by device electrical characterization using a conventional probe station. A four-probe configuration was utilized to measure accurately the electrical resistivity of MWCNTs with similar results obtained from devices fabricated by different methods. In order to reduce the contact resistance of the beam deposited platinum electrodes, single step vacuum thermal annealing was performed. Microscopy and spectroscopy were carried out on the beam deposited electrodes to follow the structural and chemical changes occurring during the vacuum thermal annealing. For the first time, a core-shell type structure was identified on EBID Pt and IBID Pt annealed electrodes and analogous free standing nanorods previously exposed to high temperature. We believe this observation has important implications for transport properties studies of carbon materials. Apart from that, contamination of carbon nanostructure, originating from the device fabrication methods, was also studied. Finally, based on the observations of faster processing time together with higher yield and flexibility for device preparation, we investigated EBID to fabricate devices for other discrete carbon nanostructures.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of branched carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharali Malik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have atomically smooth surfaces and tend not to form covalent bonds with composite matrix materials. Thus, it is the magnitude of the CNT/fiber interfacial strength that limits the amount of nanomechanical interlocking when using conventional CNTs to improve the structural behavior of composite materials through reinforcement. This arises from two well-known, long standing problems in this research field: (a inhomogeneous dispersion of the filler, which can lead to aggregation and (b insufficient reinforcement arising from bonding interactions between the filler and the matrix. These dispersion and reinforcement issues could be addressed by using branched multiwalled carbon nanotubes (b-MWCNTs as it is known that branched fibers can greatly enhance interfacial bonding and dispersability. Therefore, the use of b-MWCNTs would lead to improved mechanical performance and, in the case of conductive composites, improved electrical performance if the CNT filler was better dispersed and connected. This will provide major benefits to the existing commercial application of CNT-reinforced composites in electrostatic discharge materials (ESD: There would be also potential usage for energy conversion, e.g., in supercapacitors, solar cells and Li-ion batteries. However, the limited availability of b-MWCNTs has, to date, restricted their use in such technological applications. Herein, we report an inexpensive and simple method to fabricate large amounts of branched-MWCNTs, which opens the door to a multitude of possible applications.

  10. Using metal nanostructures to form hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Shen, Mengyan; Huo, Haibin; Ren, Haizhou; Johnson, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Based on experimental results, we propose a mechanism that allows the use of metal nanostructures to synthesize hydrocarbons and carbohydrates from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight. When sunlight impinges on cobalt nanostructures in a glass chamber, its intensity is greatly enhanced around the tips of the nanostructures through surface plasmon excitations focusing effect, and it then photodissociates the water and carbon dioxide molecules through enhanced photon absorptions of ions around the tips of the nanostructures. The photodissociated molecules in excited states remain on the cobalt nanostructure surfaces and various hydrocarbons and carbohydrates then will be formed around the surfaces at temperatures much lower than 100 oC.

  11. Tunneling spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures: A romance in many dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Travis Lee

    In this dissertation we present results from various methods of tunneling spectroscopy in carbon nanotubes, which shed light on electron -- electron interaction in carbon nanotubes and low dimensional systems in general. We also apply those methods to two dimensional graphene sheets. We first review the fabrication techniques used to make the devices studied here. Some of the techniques are standard in nanofabrication, and some were developed in-house to make the particular device geometries studied here possible. In particular, we developed recipes for the growth and contact of clean, ultra-long carbon nanotubes as well as for the fabrication of non-invasive top tunnel probes. We then present results on normal metal tunneling spectroscopy of carbon nanotube devices of varying length. We measure the exponent of the conductance power law in the density of states as a function of device length over two orders of magnitude and find unexpected evidence of finite size effects in long devices. Next, we present results from the first measurement of the non-equilibrium electron energy distribution function in carbon nanotubes measured via non-equilibrium superconducting tunneling spectroscopy and find little evidence of scattering at low temperatures, which is consistent with a clean, strongly interacting Luttinger liquid. In addition, we discuss two ways we are working to extend this powerful technique. We also present results of superconducting tunneling spectroscopy of a clean carbon nanotube quantum dot. We are able to characterize the energy spectrum of the quantum dot and distinguish between spin singlet and spin triplet shell filling. We observe elastic and inelastic co-tunneling features which are not visible when the probe is made normal by a magnetic field. These co-tunneling rates have important technological implications for carbon nanotubes as single electron transistors. We also observe an energetically forbidden conductance inside the superconducting gap

  12. Carbon Xerogel-supported Iron as a Catalyst in Combustion Synthesis of Carbon Fibrous Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wojciech Kiciriski; Joanna Lasota

    2012-01-01

    The catalytically assisted self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of carbon fibrous nanostructures, where the iron-doped colloidal carbon xerogel is proposed as a catalyst system, was examined. The carbon xerogel was prepared through carbonization of an iron doped organic xerogel at temperatures ranging from 600 to 1050℃. The reaction between calcium carbide and hexachloroethane in the presence of sodium azide is exothermic enough to proceed at a high temperature, self-sustaining regime. The combustion reactions of those mixtures enriched with iron-doped carbon xerogels were conducted in a stainless steel reactor---calorimetric bomb under an initial pressure of 1 MPa of argon. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the combustion products revealed low yield of various type of carbon fibers (presumably nanotubes), which grew via the tip-growth mechanism. The fibrous nanostructures were found in the vicinity of the spot of ignition, while in the outer and cooler area of the reactor, dusty products with soot-like morphology dominated. No significant correlation between the pyrolysis temperature of the carbon xerogel and the morphology of the obtained carbon fibrous nanostructures was observed.

  13. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition growth of carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivan R. Singh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of various input parameters on the production of carbon nanostructures using a simple microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique has been investigated. The technique utilises a conventional microwave oven as the microwave energy source. The developed apparatus is inexpensive and easy to install and is suitable for use as a carbon nanostructure source for potential laboratory-based research of the bulk properties of carbon nanostructures. A result of this investigation is the reproducibility of specific nanostructures with the variation of input parameters, such as carbon-containing precursor and support gas flow rate. It was shown that the yield and quality of the carbon products is directly controlled by input parameters. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to analyse the carbon products; these were found to be amorphous, nanotubes and onion-like nanostructures.

  14. Study of physical chemical properties of nanostructured carbon sorbent for cleanup of biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Almagul Kerimkulova; M. Koldasbekova; Аmіr Kenzhehan; Moldir Kerimkulova; Zulkhair Mansurov; Murat Gilmanov

    2012-01-01

    The technology of nanostructured carbon sorbent. Optimized the conditions of carbonization of plant material and studied the basic structural and physicochemical properties of the sorbent. Studied the molecular-sieve and adsorption characteristics of the sorbent.

  15. Study of physical chemical properties of nanostructured carbon sorbent for cleanup of biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almagul Kerimkulova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The technology of nanostructured carbon sorbent. Optimized the conditions of carbonization of plant material and studied the basic structural and physicochemical properties of the sorbent. Studied the molecular-sieve and adsorption characteristics of the sorbent.

  16. Tailoring Carbon Nanostructure for High Frequency Supercapacitor Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritesh Hiralal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of enhancing the frequency performance of electrochemical capacitors by tailoring the nanostructure of the carbon electrode to increase electrolyte permeability is demonstrated. Highly porous, vertically oriented carbon electrodes which are in direct electrical contact with the metallic current collector are produced via MPECVD growth on metal foils. The resulting structure has a capacitance and frequency performance between that of an electrolytic capacitor and an electrochemical capacitor. Fully packaged devices are produced on Ni and Cu current collectors and performance compared to state-of-the-art electrochemical capacitors and electrolytic capacitors. The extension of capacitive behavior to the AC regime (~100 Hz opens up an avenue for a number of new applications where physical volume of the capacitor may be significantly reduced.

  17. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune

    of this thesis is on online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (online LC×LC) with reverse phase in both dimensions (online RP×RP). Since online RP×RP has not been attempted before within this research group, a significant part of this thesis consists of knowledge and experience gained...

  18. Nanostructured carbon and carbon nanocomposites for electrochemical energy storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dang Sheng; Schlögl, Robert

    2010-02-22

    Electrochemical energy storage is one of the important technologies for a sustainable future of our society, in times of energy crisis. Lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors with their high energy or power densities, portability, and promising cycling life are the cores of future technologies. This Review describes some materials science aspects on nanocarbon-based materials for these applications. Nanostructuring (decreasing dimensions) and nanoarchitecturing (combining or assembling several nanometer-scale building blocks) are landmarks in the development of high-performance electrodes for with long cycle lifes and high safety. Numerous works reviewed herein have shown higher performances for such electrodes, but mostly give diverse values that show no converging tendency towards future development. The lack of knowledge about interface processes and defect dynamics of electrodes, as well as the missing cooperation between material scientists, electrochemists, and battery engineers, are reasons for the currently widespread trial-and-error strategy of experiments. A concerted action between all of these disciplines is a prerequisite for the future development of electrochemical energy storage devices.

  19. Reconstruction of central carbon metabolism in Sulfolobus solfataricus using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis map, stable isotope labelling and DNA microarray analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, B.P.L.; Walther, J.; Peter, S.; Kinnman, I.; Vos, de M.J.G.; Werken, van de H.J.G.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.; Wright, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade, an increasing number of sequenced archaeal genomes have become available, opening up the possibility for functional genomic analyses. Here, we reconstructed the central carbon metabolism in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis an

  20. Reconstruction of central carbon metabolism in Sulfolobus solfataricus using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis map, stable isotope labelling and DNA microarray analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, B.P.L.; Walther, J.; Peter, S.; Kinnman, I.; Vos, de M.J.G.; Werken, van de H.J.G.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.; Wright, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade, an increasing number of sequenced archaeal genomes have become available, opening up the possibility for functional genomic analyses. Here, we reconstructed the central carbon metabolism in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis

  1. Improvement of capacitive performances of symmetric carbon/carbon supercapacitors by addition of nanostructured polypyrrole powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhaddad, L.; Gamby, J.; Makhloufi, L.; Pailleret, A.; Pillier, F.; Takenouti, H.

    2016-03-01

    A nanostructured polypyrrole powder was synthesized in a previous work from the oxidation of pyrrole by a nanostructured MnO2 powder used simultaneously as an oxidizing agent and a sacrificial template in a redox heterogeneous mechanism. In this study, this original PPy powder was used as an active additive material with different ratio in carbon/carbon symmetrical supercapacitors whose performances were studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using a Swagelok-type cell. From the EIS spectra, the complex capacitance was extracted using a model involving two Cole-Cole type complex capacitances linked in series. The specific capacitance values evaluated by EIS and cyclic voltammetry are in a good agreement between them. The results show that the addition of nanostructured polypyrrole powder improves significantly the specific capacitance of the carbon electrode and consequently the performances of carbon/carbon supercapacitors. The original and versatile synthesis method used to produce this polypyrrole powder appears to be attractive for large scale production of promising additives for electrode materials of supercapacitors.

  2. Direct Analysis of Free and Sulfite-Bound Carbonyl Compounds in Wine by Two-Dimensional Quantitative Proton and Carbon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolantonaki, Maria; Magiatis, Prokopios; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2015-11-03

    Recent developments that have accelerated 2D NMR methods and improved quantitation have made these methods accessible analytical procedures, and the large signal dispersion allows for the analysis of complex samples. Few natural samples are as complex as wine, so the application to challenges in wine analysis look promising. The analysis of carbonyl compounds in wine, key oxidation products, is complicated by a multitude of kinetically reversible adducts, such as acetals and sulfonates, so that sample preparation steps can generate complex interferences. These challenges could be overcome if the compounds could be quantified in situ. Here, two-dimensional ((1)H-(1)H) homonuclear and heteronuclear ((13)C-(1)H) single quantum correlations (correlation spectroscopy, COSY, and heteronuclear single quantum coherence, HSQC) nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of undiluted wine samples were observed at natural abundance. These techniques achieve simultaneous direct identification and quantitation of acetaldehyde, pyruvic acid, acetoin, methylglyoxal, and α-ketoglutaric acid in wine with only a small addition of D2O. It was also possible to observe and sometimes quantify the sulfite, hydrate, and acetal forms of the carbonyl compounds. The accuracy of the method was tested in wine samples by spiking with a mixture of all analytes at different concentrations. The method was applied to 15 wine samples of various vintages and grape varieties. The application of this method could provide a powerful tool to better understand the development, evolution, and perception of wine oxidation and insight into the impact of these sulfite bound carbonyls on antimicrobial and antioxidant action by SO2.

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of Hierarchically Nanostructured Porous Carbonated Hydroxyapatite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕君英; 郭亚平

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchically nanostructured porous carbonated hydroxyapatite coatings (HNPCs) on Ti6A14V substrate were fabricated by a two-stage application route:fabrication of nacre coatings (NCs) on Ti6A14V substrate by electrophoretic technique,and conversion of NCs to HNPCs in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS) by microwave irradiation method.Their samples were characterized by using XRD,FT-IR,SEM,TEM,and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms.The results show that the microwave irradiation technique improves obviously the conversion rate of NCs to HNPCs as compared with conventional method.After soaking the NCs in the PBS,calcium ions are released from the nacre particles and react with phosphate ions to form carbonated hydroxyapatite nanoparticles.These nanoparticles aggregate to form the plate-like carbonated apatite.The mesopores with a size of about 3.9 nm and macropores with the diameters of 1~4 μm exist within and among the carbonated apatite plates,respectively.Simulated body fluid immersion tests reveal that the HNPCs have a good in vitro bioactivity.

  4. Magnetic carbon nanostructures: microwave energy-assisted pyrolysis vs. conventional pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiahua; Pallavkar, Sameer; Chen, Minjiao; Yerra, Narendranath; Luo, Zhiping; Colorado, Henry A; Lin, Hongfei; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Khasanov, Airat; Ho, Thomas C; Young, David P; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2013-01-11

    Magnetic carbon nanostructures from microwave assisted- and conventional-pyrolysis processes are compared. Unlike graphitized carbon shells from conventional heating, different carbon shell morphologies including nanotubes, nanoflakes and amorphous carbon were observed. Crystalline iron and cementite were observed in the magnetic core, different from a single cementite phase from the conventional process.

  5. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  6. Two-Dimensional Vernier Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    Modified vernier scale gives accurate two-dimensional coordinates from maps, drawings, or cathode-ray-tube displays. Movable circular overlay rests on fixed rectangular-grid overlay. Pitch of circles nine-tenths that of grid and, for greatest accuracy, radii of circles large compared with pitch of grid. Scale enables user to interpolate between finest divisions of regularly spaced rule simply by observing which mark on auxiliary vernier rule aligns with mark on primary rule.

  7. Towards early detection of the hydrolytic degradation of poly(bisphenol A)carbonate by hyphenated liquid chromatography and comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coulier, L.; Kaal, E.R.; Hankemeier, Th.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrolytic degradation of poly(bisphenol A)carbonate (PC) has been characterized by various liquid chromatography techniques. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) showed a significant decrease in molecular mass as a result of hydrolytic degradation, while 'liquid chromatography at critical

  8. Towards early detection of the hydrolytic degradation of poly(bisphenol A)carbonate by hyphenated liquid chromatography and comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coulier, L.; Kaal, E.R.; Hankemeier, Th.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrolytic degradation of poly(bisphenol A)carbonate (PC) has been characterized by various liquid chromatography techniques. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) showed a significant decrease in molecular mass as a result of hydrolytic degradation, while 'liquid chromatography at critical condit

  9. New Method of Depositing the Nanostructured Amorphous Carbon for Carbon Based Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Fadzilah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured amorphous carbon (a-C solar cells were successfully deposited via a self-designed aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD. The fabricated solar cell with the configuration of Au/p-C/n-Si/Au achieved efficiency ( of % for device deposited at 500°C, % for 450°C, and % for 400°C. Photoresponse characteristic was highlighted under illumination (AM 1.5 illuminations: 100 mW/cm2, 25°C, where conductivity increased when the sample was being hit by light. Transmittance spectrum exhibits a large transmittance value (85% and absorption coefficient value of  cm−1 at the visible range from 390 to 790 nm. The nanostructured a-C thin film deposited at higher temperature possesses lower transmittance due to higher absorption as a result of the higher content of sp2-bonded carbon atoms. From Tauc’s plot, optical band gap ( was determined, and decreased as deposition temperature increased (1.2 eV, 1.0 eV, 0.7 eV. On the other hand, FESEM images exhibited a nanostructured sized a-C with the particle size less than 100 nm. To the best of our knowledge, the presence of nanostructured particle of a-C by a self-prepared AACVD has not frequently been reported.

  10. Self-assembly of double helical nanostructures inside carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cheng; Xue, Qingzhong; Shan, Meixia; Jing, Nuannuan; Ling, Cuicui; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Jiao, Zhiyong; Xing, Wei; Yan, Zifeng

    2013-05-21

    We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to show that a DNA-like double helix of two poly(acetylene) (PA) chains can form inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The computational results indicate that SWNTs can activate and guide the self-assembly of polymer chains, allowing them to adopt a helical configuration in a SWNT through the combined action of the van der Waals potential well and the π-π stacking interaction between the polymer and the inner surface of SWNTs. Meanwhile both the SWNT size and polymer chain stiffness determine the outcome of the nanostructure. Furthermore, we also found that water clusters encourage the self-assembly of PA helical structures in the tube. This molecular model may lead to a better understanding of the formation of a double helix biological molecule inside SWNTs. Alternatively, it could form the basis of a novel nanoscale material by utilizing the 'empty' spaces of SWNTs.

  11. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-11-16

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100-270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies.

  12. Remarkable enhancement of the electrical conductivity of carbon nanostructured thin films after compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakilas, Vasilios; Koutsioukis, Apostolos; Petr, Martin; Tucek, Jiri; Zboril, Radek

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the electrical conductivity of carbon nanostructured thin films, composed of graphene nanosheets and multiwalled carbon nanotubes, by compression/polishing. It is shown that the sheet resistance of compressed thin films of carbon nanostructures and hybrids is remarkably decreased in comparison with that of as-deposited films. The number of the interconnections, the distance between the nanostructures as well as their orientation are highly altered by the compression favoring the electrical conductivity of the compressed samples.

  13. Integration of inorganic nanostructures with polydopamine-derived carbon: tunable morphologies and versatile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Junhua; Seyed Shahabadi, Seyed Ismail; Lu, Xuehong

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA), a mussel adhesive-inspired biomimetic polymer, has attracted tremendous attention owing to its extremely versatile adhesion properties, facile aqueous coating process, capability of self-assembly to form nanostructures, and abundant surface functional groups for secondary modification. PDA is also a fantastic carbon source because it gives nitrogen (N)-doped graphite-like carbon in high yield, and the carbonized PDA (C-PDA) thin coatings have similar properties to those of N-doped multilayered graphene, i.e., they exhibit high electrical conductivity, and good electrochemical and mechanical properties. In comparison with other carbon sources, an outstanding feature of PDA lies in its ease of integration with inorganic nanostructures and capability for easy tailoring the structure and morphology of the resultant composite nanostructures. In this article, different routes for the preparation of C-PDA-based composite nanostructures, such as carbon/metal oxide and carbon/Si hollow, mesoporous, core-shell, yolk-shell nanostructures, are introduced with typical examples. The structures, morphologies and properties of the C-PDA-based composite nanostructures are also reviewed, and their potential applications in various engineering fields, such as energy storage, solar water splitting, flexible electronics, catalysis, sensing and environmental engineering, are highlighted. Finally a future outlook for this fascinating composite-nanostructure enabler is also presented.

  14. Two-Dimensional Materials for Sensing: Graphene and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seba Sara Varghese

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional materials have attracted great scientific attention due to their unusual and fascinating properties for use in electronics, spintronics, photovoltaics, medicine, composites, etc. Graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides such as MoS2, phosphorene, etc., which belong to the family of two-dimensional materials, have shown great promise for gas sensing applications due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, low noise and sensitivity of electronic properties to the changes in the surroundings. Two-dimensional nanostructured semiconducting metal oxide based gas sensors have also been recognized as successful gas detection devices. This review aims to provide the latest advancements in the field of gas sensors based on various two-dimensional materials with the main focus on sensor performance metrics such as sensitivity, specificity, detection limit, response time, and reversibility. Both experimental and theoretical studies on the gas sensing properties of graphene and other two-dimensional materials beyond graphene are also discussed. The article concludes with the current challenges and future prospects for two-dimensional materials in gas sensor applications.

  15. Glass-like carbon, pyrolytic graphite or nanostructured carbon for electrochemical sensing of bismuth ion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Milikić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Different carbon electrodes were explored for application in electroanalysis, namely for sensing of bismuth ion as model analyte. Carbon materials tested included glassy carbon, basal and edge plane pyrolytic graphite, as well as nanostructured carbonized polyaniline prepared in the presence of 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. Bismuth ion was chosen as model analyte as protocol for its detection and quantifications is still to be determined. Herein, anodic stripping voltammetry was used with study of effect of several parameters such as scan rate and deposition time. Electrode based on carbonized polyaniline showed the highest activity for bismuth ion sensing in terms of the highest current densities recorded both in a laboratory and in real sample, while basal plane pyrolytic graphite electrode gave the lowest limit of detection.

  16. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune

    Two-dimensional liquid chromatography has received increasing interest due to the rise in demand for analysis of complex chemical mixtures. Separation of complex mixtures is hard to achieve as a simple consequence of the sheer number of analytes, as these samples might contain hundreds or even...... dimensions. As a consequence of the conclusions made within this thesis, the research group has, for the time being, decided against further development of online LC×LC systems, since it was not deemed ideal for the intended application, the analysis of the polar fraction of oil. Trap-and...

  17. Saturated versus unsaturated hydrocarbon interactions with carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivasigamani eUmadevi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of various acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons in both saturated and unsaturated forms with the carbon nanostructures (CNSs have been explored by using density functional theory (DFT calculations. Model systems representing armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene have been considered to investigate the effect of chirality and curvature of the CNSs towards these interactions. Results of this study reveal contrasting binding nature of the acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons towards CNSs. While the saturated molecules show stronger binding affinity in acyclic hydrocarbons; the unsaturated molecules exhibit higher binding affinity in cyclic hydrocarbons. In addition, acyclic hydrocarbons exhibit stronger binding affinity towards the CNSs when compared to their corresponding cyclic counterparts. The computed results excellently corroborate the experimental observations. The interaction of hydrocarbons with graphene is more favourable when compared with CNTs. Bader’s theory of atoms in molecules has been invoked to characterize the noncovalent interactions of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Our results are expected to provide useful insights towards the development of rational strategies for designing complexes with desired noncovalent interaction involving CNSs.

  18. Saturated vs. unsaturated hydrocarbon interactions with carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, Deivasigamani; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of various acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons in both saturated and unsaturated forms with the carbon nanostructures (CNSs) have been explored by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Model systems representing armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have been considered to investigate the effect of chirality and curvature of the CNSs toward these interactions. Results of this study reveal contrasting binding nature of the acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons toward CNSs. While the saturated molecules show stronger binding affinity in acyclic hydrocarbons; the unsaturated molecules exhibit higher binding affinity in cyclic hydrocarbons. In addition, acyclic hydrocarbons exhibit stronger binding affinity toward the CNSs when compared to their corresponding cyclic counterparts. The computed results excellently corroborate the experimental observations. The interaction of hydrocarbons with graphene is more favorable when compared with CNTs. Bader's theory of atoms in molecules has been invoked to characterize the noncovalent interactions of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Our results are expected to provide useful insights toward the development of rational strategies for designing complexes with desired noncovalent interaction involving CNSs. PMID:25232539

  19. Saturated versus unsaturated hydrocarbon interactions with carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, Deivasigamani; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2014-09-01

    The interactions of various acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons in both saturated and unsaturated forms with the carbon nanostructures (CNSs) have been explored by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Model systems representing armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have been considered to investigate the effect of chirality and curvature of the CNSs towards these interactions. Results of this study reveal contrasting binding nature of the acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons towards CNSs. While the saturated molecules show stronger binding affinity in acyclic hydrocarbons; the unsaturated molecules exhibit higher binding affinity in cyclic hydrocarbons. In addition, acyclic hydrocarbons exhibit stronger binding affinity towards the CNSs when compared to their corresponding cyclic counterparts. The computed results excellently corroborate the experimental observations. The interaction of hydrocarbons with graphene is more favourable when compared with CNTs. Bader’s theory of atoms in molecules has been invoked to characterize the noncovalent interactions of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Our results are expected to provide useful insights towards the development of rational strategies for designing complexes with desired noncovalent interaction involving CNSs.

  20. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, N.D., E-mail: nbrubaker@math.arizona.edu; Lega, J., E-mail: lega@math.arizona.edu

    2016-01-08

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid. - Highlights: • Full solution set of the two-dimensional capillary origami problem. • Fluid does not necessarily wet the entire plate. • Global energy approach provides exact differential equations satisfied by minimizers. • Bifurcation diagrams highlight three different regimes. • Conditions for spontaneous encapsulation are identified.

  1. Theoretical Studies of Gas Phase Elementary and Carbon Nanostructure Growth Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    DOI: 10.1021/ct1000268. 26. A. J. Midey, T. M. Miller, A. A. Viggiano, N. C. Bera, S. Maeda, and K. Morokuma, Chemistry of VX Surrogates and Ion...THEORETICAL STUDIES OF GAS PHASE ELEMENTARY AND CARBON NANOSTRUCTURE GROWTH REACTIONS KEIJI MOROKUMA EMORY UNIVERSITY 09/19/2013 Final Report...Z39.18 30-09-2013 Final Performance Report 1 July 2010 - 30 June 2013 Theoretical Studies of Gas Phase Elementary and Carbon Nanostructure Growth

  2. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  3. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, N. D.; Lega, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid.

  4. Two-dimensional cubic convolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E; Geng, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The paper develops two-dimensional (2D), nonseparable, piecewise cubic convolution (PCC) for image interpolation. Traditionally, PCC has been implemented based on a one-dimensional (1D) derivation with a separable generalization to two dimensions. However, typical scenes and imaging systems are not separable, so the traditional approach is suboptimal. We develop a closed-form derivation for a two-parameter, 2D PCC kernel with support [-2,2] x [-2,2] that is constrained for continuity, smoothness, symmetry, and flat-field response. Our analyses, using several image models, including Markov random fields, demonstrate that the 2D PCC yields small improvements in interpolation fidelity over the traditional, separable approach. The constraints on the derivation can be relaxed to provide greater flexibility and performance.

  5. Non-covalently functionalized carbon nanostructures for synthesizing carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiqing; Song, Sing I; Song, Ga Young; Kim, Il

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanostructures (CNSs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanodiamonds provide an important type of substrate for constructing a variety of hybrid nanomaterials. However, their intrinsic chemistry-inert surfaces make it indispensable to pre-functionalize them prior to immobilizing additional components onto their surfaces. Currently developed strategies for functionalizing CNSs include covalent and non-covalent approaches. Conventional covalent treatments often damage the structure integrity of carbon surfaces and adversely affect their physical properties. In contrast, the non-covalent approach offers a non-destructive way to modify CNSs with desired functional surfaces, while reserving their intrinsic properties. Thus far, a number of surface modifiers including aromatic compounds, small-molecular surfactants, amphiphilic polymers, and biomacromolecules have been developed to non-covalently functionalize CNS surfaces. Mediated by these surface modifiers, various functional components such as organic species and inorganic nanoparticles were further decorated onto their surfaces, resulting in versatile carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials with broad applications in chemical engineering and biomedical areas. In this review, the recent advances in the generation of such hybrid nanostructures based on non-covalently functionalized CNSs will be reviewed.

  6. Two-dimensional hexagonal semiconductors beyond graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-12-01

    The rapid and successful development of the research on graphene and graphene-based nanostructures has been substantially enlarged to include many other two-dimensional hexagonal semiconductors (THS): phosphorene, silicene, germanene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2 as well as the van der Waals heterostructures of various THSs (including graphene). The present article is a review of recent works on THSs beyond graphene and van der Waals heterostructures composed of different pairs of all THSs. One among the priorities of new THSs compared to graphene is the presence of a non-vanishing energy bandgap which opened up the ability to fabricate a large number of electronic, optoelectronic and photonic devices on the basis of these new materials and their van der Waals heterostructures. Moreover, a significant progress in the research on TMDCs was the discovery of valley degree of freedom. The results of research on valley degree of freedom and the development of a new technology based on valley degree of freedom-valleytronics are also presented. Thus the scientific contents of the basic research and practical applications os THSs are very rich and extremely promising.

  7. Nanostructured membranes and electrodes with sulfonic acid functionalized carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Tripathi, Bijay Prakash

    2011-02-01

    Herein we report the covalent functionalization of multiwall carbon nanotubes by grafting sulfanilic acid and their dispersion into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The nanocomposites were explored as an option for tuning the proton and electron conductivity, swelling, water and alcohol permeability aiming at nanostructured membranes and electrodes for application in alcohol or hydrogen fuel cells and other electrochemical devices. The nanocomposites were extensively characterized, by studying their physicochemical and electrochemical properties. They were processed as self-supporting films with high mechanical stability, proton conductivity of 4.47 × 10 -2 S cm-1 at 30 °C and 16.8 × 10-2 S cm-1 at 80 °C and 100% humidity level, electron conductivity much higher than for the plain polymer. The methanol permeability could be reduced to 1/20, keeping water permeability at reasonable values. The ratio of bound water also increases with increasing content of sulfonated filler, helping in keeping water in the polymer in conditions of low external humidity level. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Nanostructured membranes and electrodes with sulfonic acid functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Bijay P. [Electro-Membrane Processes Division, Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), G.B. Marg, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India); Department of Membranes for Sustainable Energy, GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht GmbH, Max Planck Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Schieda, M. [Department of Membranes for Sustainable Energy, GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht GmbH, Max Planck Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Shahi, Vinod K. [Electro-Membrane Processes Division, Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), G.B. Marg, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India); Nunes, Suzana P. [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-02-01

    Herein we report the covalent functionalization of multiwall carbon nanotubes by grafting sulfanilic acid and their dispersion into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The nanocomposites were explored as an option for tuning the proton and electron conductivity, swelling, water and alcohol permeability aiming at nanostructured membranes and electrodes for application in alcohol or hydrogen fuel cells and other electrochemical devices. The nanocomposites were extensively characterized, by studying their physicochemical and electrochemical properties. They were processed as self-supporting films with high mechanical stability, proton conductivity of 4.47 x 10{sup -2} S cm{sup -1} at 30 C and 16.8 x 10{sup -2} S cm{sup -1} at 80 C and 100% humidity level, electron conductivity much higher than for the plain polymer. The methanol permeability could be reduced to 1/20, keeping water permeability at reasonable values. The ratio of bound water also increases with increasing content of sulfonated filler, helping in keeping water in the polymer in conditions of low external humidity level. (author)

  9. Nanostructured membranes and electrodes with sulfonic acid functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Bijay P.; Schieda, M.; Shahi, Vinod K.; Nunes, Suzana P.

    Herein we report the covalent functionalization of multiwall carbon nanotubes by grafting sulfanilic acid and their dispersion into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The nanocomposites were explored as an option for tuning the proton and electron conductivity, swelling, water and alcohol permeability aiming at nanostructured membranes and electrodes for application in alcohol or hydrogen fuel cells and other electrochemical devices. The nanocomposites were extensively characterized, by studying their physicochemical and electrochemical properties. They were processed as self-supporting films with high mechanical stability, proton conductivity of 4.47 × 10 -2 S cm -1 at 30 °C and 16.8 × 10 -2 S cm -1 at 80 °C and 100% humidity level, electron conductivity much higher than for the plain polymer. The methanol permeability could be reduced to 1/20, keeping water permeability at reasonable values. The ratio of bound water also increases with increasing content of sulfonated filler, helping in keeping water in the polymer in conditions of low external humidity level.

  10. Nanostructures formed on carbon-based materials with different levels of crystallinity using oxygen plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Tae-Jun [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Wonjin; Lee, Heon Ju [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Kyu Hwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myoung-Woon, E-mail: mwmoon@kist.re.kr [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    Nanostructure formation was explored for various carbon-based materials, such as diamond, carbon fiber, polyethylene terephthalate and poly (methyl methacrylate), which have different levels of crystallinity, ranging from perfect crystal to polymeric amorphous. After treatment of oxygen plasma glow discharge, the nanostructures on these carbon-based materials were found to evolve via preferential etching due to the co-deposition of metal elements sputtered from the metal cathode plate. Local islands or clusters formed by the metal co-deposition have a low etching rate compared to pristine regions on each material, resulting in anisotropic patterns on the carbon-based materials. This pattern formation mechanism was confirmed by covering the cathode or preventing the co-deposition of metallic sources with a polymeric material. Regardless of the level of crystallinity of the carbon-based materials, no patterns were observed on the surfaces covered with the polymeric material, and the surfaces were uniformly etched. It was found that the materials with low crystallinity had a high etching rate due to low carbon atom density, which thus easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructures for the same plasma treatment duration. - Highlight: • Reactive ion etching & metal deposition were occurred in oxygen plasma treatment. • High-aspect-ratio nanostructures can be fabricated on carbon-based materials. • Materials with low crystallinity easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructure. • Amount of etching inhibitors affects the pattern formation and configuration.

  11. Calcium-decorated carbon nanostructures for the selective capture of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jahyun; Bae, Hyeonhu; Kang, Lei; Huang, Bing; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-10-26

    The development of advanced materials for CO2 capture is of great importance for mitigating climate change. In this paper, we outline our discovery that calcium-decorated carbon nanostructures, i.e., zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs), carbyne, and graphyne, have great potential for selective CO2 capture, as demonstrated via first-principles calculations. Our findings show that Ca-decorated ZGNRs can bind up to three CO2 molecules at each Ca atom site with an adsorption energy of ∼-0.8 eV per CO2, making them suitable for reversible CO2 capture. They adsorb CO2 molecules preferentially, compared with other gas molecules such as H2, N2, and CH4. Moreover, based on equilibrium thermodynamical simulations, we confirm that Ca-decorated ZGNRs can capture CO2 selectively from a gas mixture with a capacity of ∼4.5 mmol g(-1) under ambient conditions. Similar results have been found in other carbon nanomaterials, indicating the generality of carbon based nanostructures for selective CO2 capture under ambient conditions.

  12. Classifying Two-dimensional Hyporeductive Triple Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Issa, A Nourou

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional real hyporeductive triple algebras (h.t.a.) are investigated. A classification of such algebras is presented. As a consequence, a classification of two-dimensional real Lie triple algebras (i.e. generalized Lie triple systems) and two-dimensional real Bol algebras is given.

  13. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanostructures through enzyme immobilization in colloidal silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Evan M.

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) and carbon nanopipettes (CNP) provide interesting high aspect ratio scaffolds on which to base functionally gradient materials. In this dissertation, we present a general method for the production of an enzymatically active composite material based on MWNTs. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) was applied to purified MWNTs, generating a positive electrostatic potential on the MWNTs. This positive potential was used to apply negatively charged colloidal silica particle in the presence of a high concentration of enzyme. The silica coating continued to grow via localized condensation of silica particles driven by the buffered saline conditions, immobilizing the enzyme within the coating. The mesoporous nanostructure was characterized via transmission electron microscopy. Optical spectroscopy experiments on the material employed as an active suspension showed that the immobilized enzymes horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and tyrosinase (TV) retained their activity upon incorporation into the material. Using HRP as a model enzyme, it was determined that the MWNT-HRP-Silica material showed similar pH and temperature dependencies in activity to those of free HRP in solution. An examination of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics showed that the material had a slightly higher value of KM than did free HRP. The MWNT-HRP-Silica material was also employed as an active filter membrane, which allowed us to explore the reusable nature of the material. We were able to show the denaturation of the filter due to the loss of Ca2+ cations at low pH and then restore the activity by soaking the filter membrane in 1 mM CaCl2. The MWNT-HRP-Silica material was used to modify a carbon microelectrode and produce a functioning electrochemical sensor for H2O2 . Utilizing cyclic voltammetry, the sensor was shown to have a linear response in limiting current versus concentration of H2O2 of 4.26 pA/microM. We also determined a lower detection limit of 0.67 microM H2O2. CNPs were

  14. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have firstly proposed two-dimensional function photonic crystals, which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates $\\vec{r}$, it is different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals constituting by the medium columns of dielectric constants are constants. We find the band gaps of two-dimensional function photonic crystals are different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals, and when the functions form of dielectric constants are different, the band gaps structure should be changed, which can be designed into the appropriate band gaps structures by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals.

  15. A comparative study of the field emission properties of aligned carbon nanostructures films, from carbon nanotubes to diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Le Normand, Francois; Cojocaru, Costel Sorin; Fleaca, Claudiu; Li, J. Q.; Vincent, Pascal; Pirio, Gilles; Gangloff, Laurent; Nedellec, Yanick; Legagneux, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The electron field emission properties of different graphitic and diamond-like nanostructures films are compared. They are prepared in the same CVD chamber on SiO{2}/Si(100) and Si(100) flat surfaces, respectively. These nanostructures are thoroughly characterized by scanning electron emission (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Films of dense aligned carbon nan...

  16. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  17. Effects of heating time on the growth and behavior of amorphous carbon nanostructures from ferrocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiqul Islam, Md; Rashid, A. K. M. B.; Ferdous, Md; Shafiul Azam, Md

    2017-05-01

    Heating time is one of the crucial factors in various methods employed for the synthesis of carbon nanostructures (CNSs) from ferrocene. However, the effects of heating time on the growth and morphology of the nanostructured materials has not been well explored yet, particularly for amorphous carbon. Herein, we investigate how the variation of heating time impacts the growth of CNSs by carrying out the reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride in a solvent free condition at 250 °C. Several different forms of carbon nanostructures yielded from this reaction at 25 min (CNS-25), 30 min (CNS-30), 35 min (CNS-35) and 40 min (CNS-40) were analyzed by means of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) coupled with energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The final product CNS-40 was washed several times with concentrated hydrochloric acid solution to remove the impurities and then characterized by the means of similar techniques. FTIR spectra of all the nanostructures confirmed the presence of several functional groups such as C  =  C, C-O and -OH etc, which are common in carbonaceous nanostructures. However, the FESEM images obtained are significantly different and suggest a gradual growth of the carbon nanostructures ending up with long carbon nanotubes after 40 min. No absorption peak in the visible region of the UV-Vis spectra of the final product confirms the amorphous nature, which is also supported by XRD of the synthesized nanotube. Moreover, a noteworthy redshift in the UV-Vis peaks reflecting a huge increase in length and diameter of the nanostructures indicates the maximum longitudinal growth of the carbon nanotubes occurs during 35 min to 40 min.

  18. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    adhesion and durability in the environment. Though these coatings are efficient in protecting polymer composites, their application imposes severe constraints. Their thermal expansion coefficients may differ markedly from those of polymer composite substrates: as a result, cracks develop in the coatings on thermal cycling and AO can penetrate through them to the substrate. In addition to the technicalities of forming an effective barrier, such factors as cost, convenience of application and ease of repair are important considerations in the selection of a coating for a particular application. The latter issues drive the aerospace research toward the development of novel light composite materials, like the so called polymer nanocomposites, which are materials with a polymer matrix and a filler with at least one dimension less than 100 nanometers. Current interest in nanocomposites has been generated and maintained because nanoparticle-filled polymers exhibit unique combinations of properties not achievable with traditional composites. These combinations of properties can be achieved because of the small size of the fillers, the large surface area the fillers provide, and in many cases the unique properties of the fillers themselves. In particular, the carbon fiber-based polymeric composite materials are the basic point of interest: the aim of the present study is to find new solution to produce carbon fiber-based composites with even more upgraded performances. One intriguing strategy to tackle such an issue has been picked out in the coupling between the carbon fibers and the carbon nanostructures. That for two main reasons: first, carbon nanostructures have shown fancy potentialities for any kind of technological applications since their discovery, second, the chemical affinity between fiber and nanostructure (made of the same element) should be a likely route to approach the typical problems due to thermo-mechanical compatibility. This work is joined in such framework

  19. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on nanostructured carbon electrodes grown by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettini, Luca Giacomo; Bardizza, Giorgio; Podesta, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo; Piseri, Paolo, E-mail: piseri@mi.infn.it [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica and CIMaINa (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Nanostructured porous films of carbon with density of about 0.5 g/cm{sup 3} and 200 nm thickness were deposited at room temperature by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) from carbon clusters formed in the gas phase. Carbon film surface topography, determined by atomic force microscopy, reveals a surface roughness of 16 nm and a granular morphology arising from the low kinetic energy ballistic deposition regime. The material is characterized by a highly disordered carbon structure with predominant sp2 hybridization as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy. The interface properties of nanostructured carbon electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy employing KOH 1 M solution as aqueous electrolyte. An increase of the double layer capacitance is observed when the electrodes are heat treated in air or when a nanostructured nickel layer deposited by SCBD on top of a sputter deposited film of the same metal is employed as a current collector instead of a plain metallic film. This enhancement is consistent with an improved charge injection in the active material and is ascribed to the modification of the electrical contact at the interface between the carbon and the metal current collector. Specific capacitance values up to 120 F/g have been measured for the electrodes with nanostructured metal/carbon interface.

  20. Synthesis of carbon materials via the cold compression of aromatic molecules and carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbons, Thomas C.

    Carbon's ability for catenation makes it a remarkable element and allows for many interesting and surprising properties and structures. Carbon can exist in one of its two thermodynamically stable bulk crystals, graphite or diamond, one of its several nanostructures: fullerene, nanotube, or graphene, or as an amorphous material with a mixed bonding pattern. Carbon also has an ability to bond heteroatoms such as hydrogen which can increase its properties and structures even further. Pressure has been shown to be able to drastically change the bonding in and structure of carbon based materials. In this dissertation I will present how pressure can be used to synthesize new amorphous hydrogenated carbons and how a battery of analytical techniques can be used to elicit the microstructure of the carbon networks. This microstructure can then be related back to the reaction conditions and more importantly the starting small molecule. This work has been expanded to looking for a molecular analogue to the cold compressed graphite system by investigating the high pressure stability and reactivity of 2-D polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This work was followed by discovering the failure of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes at high static pressures. When the tubes fail they transform into nano-graphitic polyhedra. It has been found that metallic tubes preferentially collapse, leaving the semiconducting tubes intact for the most part. Finally, the most influential work performed in my dissertation has been related to the kinetically controlled solid state reaction of molecular benzene to form diamond nanothreads. These nanothreads pack into hexagonal bundles without axial order. A combination of Raman spectroscopy, x-ray and neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and first principles calculations were performed to confirm their existence. The three data chapters in this dissertation are enhanced by an introduction to carbon based materials and high pressure chemistry

  1. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  2. Elastomer-Carbon Nanostructure Composites as Prospective Materials for Flexible Robotic Tactile Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Knite, M; Podiņš, G; Zīke, S; Zavickis, J

    2008-01-01

    Our recent achievements in the design, processing and studies of physical properties of elastomer – nano-structured carbon composites as prospective compressive strain sensor materials for robotic tactile elements are presented. Composites made of polyisoprene matrix and high-structured carbon black or multi-wall carbon nano-tube filler have been designed and manufactured to develop completely flexible conductive polymer nano-composites for tactile sensing elements. Electrical resistance of t...

  3. Two dimensional soft material: new faces of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaemyung; Cote, Laura J; Huang, Jiaxing

    2012-08-21

    Graphite oxide sheets, now called graphene oxide (GO), can be made from chemical exfoliation of graphite by reactions that have been known for 150 years. Because GO is a promising solution-processable precursor for the bulk production of graphene, interest in this old material has resurged. The reactions to produce GO add oxygenated functional groups to the graphene sheets on their basal plane and edges, and this derivatization breaks the π-conjugated network, resulting in electrically insulating but highly water-dispersible sheets. Apart from making graphene, GO itself has many intriguing properties. Like graphene, GO is a two-dimensional (2D) sheet with feature sizes at two abruptly different length scales. The apparent thickness of the functionalized carbon sheet is approximately 1 nm, but the lateral dimensions can range from a few nanometers to hundreds of micrometers. Therefore, researchers can think of GO as either a single molecule or a particle, depending on which length scale is of greater interest. At the same time, GO can be viewed as an unconventional soft material, such as a 2D polymer, highly anisotropic colloid, membrane, liquid crystal, or amphiphile. In this Account, we highlight the soft material characteristics of GO. GO consists of nanographitic patches surrounded by largely disordered, oxygenated domains. Such structural characteristics effectively make GO a 2D amphiphile with a hydrophilic periphery and largely hydrophobic center. This insight has led to better understanding of the solution properties of GO for making thin films and new applications of GO as a surfactant. Changes in pH and sheet size can tune the amphiphilicity of GO, leading to intriguing interfacial activities. In addition, new all-carbon composites made of only graphitic nanostructures using GO as a dispersing agent have potential applications in photovoltaics and energy storage. On the other hand, GO can function as a 2D random diblock copolymer, one block graphitic and

  4. Nanostructured water and carbon dioxide inside collapsing carbon nanotubes at high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wenwen; Cerqueira, Tiago F T; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A L; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2016-07-20

    We present simulations of the collapse under hydrostatic pressure of carbon nanotubes containing either water or carbon dioxide. We show that the molecules inside the tube alter the dynamics of the collapse process, providing either mechanical support and increasing the collapse pressure, or reducing mechanical stability. At the same time the nanotube acts as a nanoanvil, and the confinement leads to the nanostructuring of the molecules inside the collapsed tube. In this way, depending on the pressure and on the concentration of water or carbon dioxide inside the nanotube, we observe the formation of 1D molecular chains, 2D nanoribbons, and even molecular single and multi-walled nanotubes. The structure of the encapsulated molecules correlates with the mechanical response of the nanotube, opening up opportunities for the development of new devices or composite materials. Our analysis is quite general and it can be extended to other molecules in carbon nanotube nanoanvils, providing a strategy to obtain a variety of nano-objects with controlled features.

  5. Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coscia, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNISM Unita' di Napoli, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosone, G., E-mail: ambrosone@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Basa, D.K. [Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India); Rigato, V. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Ferrero, S.; Virga, A. [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films, composed of Si nanocrystallites embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon matrix, have been prepared by varying rf power in ultra high vacuum plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system using silane and methane gas mixtures diluted in hydrogen. In this paper we have studied the compositional, structural and electrical properties of these films as a function of rf power. It is shown that with increasing rf power the atomic densities of carbon and hydrogen increase while the atomic density of silicon decreases, resulting in a reduction in the mass density. Further, it is demonstrated that carbon is incorporated into amorphous matrix and it is mainly bonded to silicon. The study has also revealed that the crystalline volume fraction decreases with increase in rf power and that the films deposited with low rf power have a size distribution of large and small crystallites while the films deposited with relatively high power have only small crystallites. Finally, the enhanced transport properties of the nanostructured silicon carbon films, as compared to amorphous counterpart, have been attributed to the presence of Si nanocrystallites. - Highlights: • The mass density of silicon carbon films decreases from 2.3 to 2 g/cm{sup 3}. • Carbon is incorporated in the amorphous phase and it is mainly bonded to silicon. • Nanostructured silicon carbon films are deposited at rf power > 40 W. • Si nanocrystallites in amorphous silicon carbon enhance the electrical properties.

  6. Hadamard States and Two-dimensional Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Salehi, H

    2001-01-01

    We have used a two-dimensional analog of the Hadamard state-condition to study the local constraints on the two-point function of a linear quantum field conformally coupled to a two-dimensional gravitational background. We develop a dynamical model in which the determination of the state of the quantum field is essentially related to the determination of a conformal frame. A particular conformal frame is then introduced in which a two-dimensional gravitational equation is established.

  7. Topological defects in two-dimensional crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yong; Qi, Wei-Kai

    2008-01-01

    By using topological current theory, we study the inner topological structure of the topological defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystal. We find that there are two elementary point defects topological current in two-dimensional crystal, one for dislocations and the other for disclinations. The topological quantization and evolution of topological defects in two-dimensional crystals are discussed. Finally, We compare our theory with Brownian-dynamics simulations in 2D Yukawa systems.

  8. Theoretical study of amino derivatives and anticancer platinum drug grafted on various carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraszewski, S; Duverger, E; Ramseyer, C; Picaud, F

    2013-11-07

    Density functional theory calculations with van der Waals approximation have been conducted to analyze the functionalization of various carbon-based nanostructures (fullerene, metallic, and semi-conducting nanotubes) with amino derivative groups. The results obtained with azomethine, show the formation of a five membered ring on fullerenes, and on nanotubes consistent with experimental observations. The attachment of an azomethine plus subsequent drug like a Pt(IV) complex does not perturb the cycloaddition process. Moreover, all theoretical results show that the length of different amino derivatives with subsequent Pt(IV) complex does not affect the complexed therapeutic agent when it is attached onto these carbon-based nanostructures.

  9. Theoretical study of amino derivatives and anticancer platinum drug grafted on various carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraszewski, S.; Duverger, E.; Ramseyer, C.; Picaud, F.

    2013-11-01

    Density functional theory calculations with van der Waals approximation have been conducted to analyze the functionalization of various carbon-based nanostructures (fullerene, metallic, and semi-conducting nanotubes) with amino derivative groups. The results obtained with azomethine, show the formation of a five membered ring on fullerenes, and on nanotubes consistent with experimental observations. The attachment of an azomethine plus subsequent drug like a Pt(IV) complex does not perturb the cycloaddition process. Moreover, all theoretical results show that the length of different amino derivatives with subsequent Pt(IV) complex does not affect the complexed therapeutic agent when it is attached onto these carbon-based nanostructures.

  10. Ambient carbon dioxide capture by different dimensional AlN nanostructures: A comparative DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nurazar, Roghaye; Nematollahi, Parisa

    2016-08-01

    Strong binding of an isolated carbon dioxide molecule over three different aluminium nitride (AlN) nanostructures (nanocage, nanotube and nanosheet) is verified using density functional calculations. Equilibrium geometries, electronic properties, adsorption energies and thermodynamic stability of each adsorbed configuration are also identified. Optimized configurations are shown at least one corresponding physisorption and chemisorption of CO2 molecule over different AlN nanostructures. Also, the effect of chirality on the adsorption of CO2 molecule is studied over two different finite-sized zigzag (6,0) and armchair (4,4) AlN nanotubes. It is found that the electronic properties of the Al12N12 nanocage are more sensitive to the CO2 molecule than other AlN nanostructures. This indicates the significant potential of Al12N12 nanocage toward the CO2 adsorption, fixation and catalytic applications in contrast to other AlN nanostructures.

  11. Selective growth of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures inside carbon nanotube membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevia, Samuel; Homm, Pía; Cortes, Andrea; Núñez, Verónica; Contreras, Claudia; Vera, Jenniffer; Segura, Rodrigo

    2012-06-01

    Hybrid nanostructured arrays based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) and palladium or titanium dioxide materials have been synthesized using self-supported and silicon-supported anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as nanoporous template. It is well demonstrated that carbon nanotubes can be grown using these membranes and hydrocarbon precursors that decompose at temperatures closer to 600°C without the use of a metal catalyst. In this process, carbonic fragments condensate to form stacked graphitic sheets, which adopt the shape of the pores, yielding from these moulds' multi-walled carbon nanotubes. After this process, the ends of the tubes remain open and accessible to other substances, whereas the outer walls are protected by the alumina. Taking advantage of this fact, we have performed the synthesis of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures selectively inside carbon nanotubes using these CNT-AAO membranes as nanoreactors.

  12. Spectroscopic studies of the electronic properties of regularly arrayed two-dimensional protein layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyalikh, D V [Institute of Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Kirchner, A [BioNanotechnology and Structure Formation Group, Max Bergmann Centre of Biomaterials, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Kade, A [Institute of Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Danzenbaecher, S [Institute of Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Dedkov, Yu S [Institute of Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Mertig, M [BioNanotechnology and Structure Formation Group, Max Bergmann Centre of Biomaterials, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Molodtsov, S L [Institute of Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-04-05

    Photoemission (PE) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were applied to characterize electronic properties of the regular two-dimensional bacterial surface protein layer (S layer) of Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602, which is widely used as a protein template for the bottom-up fabrication of advanced metallic and hybrid nanostructures. PE and NEXAFS at the C 1s, O 1s, and N 1s core levels show similar chemical states for each oxygen atom and also for each nitrogen atom, while carbon atoms exhibit a range of chemical environments in different functional groups of the amino acids. A series of characteristic NEXAFS peaks were assigned to particular molecular orbitals of the amino acids by applying a phenomenological building-block model. It was found that the {pi} clouds of aromatic rings make the main contribution to both the lowest unoccupied and highest occupied molecular orbitals. The two-dimensional protein crystal shows a semiconductor-like behaviour with a gap value of {approx}3.0 eV and the Fermi energy close to the bottom of the LUMO.

  13. Two-dimensional TiO2-based nanosheets co-modified by surface-enriched carbon dots and Gd2O3 nanoparticles for efficient visible-light-driven photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dingze; Fang, Pengfei; Ding, Junqian; Yang, Minchen; Cao, Yufei; Zhou, Yawei; Peng, Kui; Kondamareddy, Kiran Kumar; Liu, Min

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional TiO2-based nanosheets (TNSs) co-modified by surface-enriched carbon dots (CDs) and Gd2O3 nanoparticles: (Gd-C-TNSs), capable of exhibiting visible-light-driven photo catalysis were synthesized using a two-pot hydrothermal route. The samples had a sheet-like structure, thickness of approximately 3.6 nm, large specific surface area of 240-350 cm2/g. The CDs (2-3 nm) and Gd2O3 nanoparticles (1-2 nm) were highly dispersed over the surface of the nanosheets. The co-modification by Gd2O3 nanoparticles and CDs influenced the crystallinity, crystal structure, and surface area of the TNSs, and improved the visible-light absorption. Surface photocurrent and fluorescence spectral studies revealed that the photo-generated charge carrier separation efficiency could be improved by an appropriate amount of modification. A very high efficiency was obtained using 0.5 at% Gd/Ti and 3.0 g/L of CDs. The visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity is enhanced under the isolated Cr(VI) system, isolated Rhodamin B (RhB) system, and the synergism between RhB degradation and Cr(VI) reduction for the Gd-C-TNSs photocatalysts. Initially, the photocatalytic activity gradually increased with an increase in the amount of CDs, and then decreased after attaining a maximum, in the case where 0.5 at% Gd/Ti and 3.0 g/L of CDs were used. The enhancement in the photocatalytic activity was attributed to the synergetic effect of the Gd2O3 nanoparticles, TNSs, and CDs in the Gd-C-TNSs composites. The effect led to a fast separation and slow recombination of photo-induced electron-hole pairs. An alternate mechanism for enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity was also considered.

  14. Strongly interacting two-dimensional Dirac fermions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, L.K.; Lazarides, A.; Hemmerich, Andreas; de Morais Smith, C.

    2009-01-01

    We show how strongly interacting two-dimensional Dirac fermions can be realized with ultracold atoms in a two-dimensional optical square lattice with an experimentally realistic, inherent gauge field, which breaks time reversal and inversion symmetries. We find remarkable phenomena in a temperature

  15. Topology optimization of two-dimensional waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2003-01-01

    In this work we use the method of topology optimization to design two-dimensional waveguides with low transmission loss.......In this work we use the method of topology optimization to design two-dimensional waveguides with low transmission loss....

  16. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Field-Effect Transistors for Label-Free Chemical/Biological Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PingAn Hu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, electrical detection of chemical and biological species using novel nanostructure-based devices has attracted significant attention for chemical, genomics, biomedical diagnostics, and drug discovery applications. The use of nanostructured devices in chemical/biological sensors in place of conventional sensing technologies has advantages of high sensitivity, low decreased energy consumption and potentially highly miniaturized integration. Owing to their particular structure, excellent electrical properties and high chemical stability, carbon nanotube and graphene based electrical devices have been widely developed for high performance label-free chemical/biological sensors. Here, we review the latest developments of carbon nanostructure-based transistor sensors in ultrasensitive detection of chemical/biological entities, such as poisonous gases, nucleic acids, proteins and cells.

  17. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  18. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  19. A comparative study of the field emission properties of aligned carbon nanostructures films, from carbon nanotubes to diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Normand, F.; Cojocaru, C. S.; Fleaca, C.; Li, J. Q.; Vincent, P.; Pirio, G.; Gangloff, L.; Nedellec, Y.; Legagneux, P.

    2007-05-01

    The electron field emission properties of different graphitic and diamond-like nanostructures films are compared. They are prepared in the same CVD chamber on SiO{2}/Si(100) and Si(100) flat surfaces, respectively. These nanostructures are thoroughly characterized by scanning electron emission (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Films of dense aligned carbon nanotubes by far display the lowest threshold fields around few V/μ m and the largest emission currents. Carbon nanofibers, with platelet arrangement of the graphitic planes parallel to the substrate, exhibit higher emission thresholds around 10 V/μ m. Diamond nanostructures, either modified through ammonia incorporation within the gas phase or not, exhibit the largest emission threshold around 25 V/μ m. The high enhancement factors, deduced from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, can explain the low emission thresholds whereas limitations to the electron transport ever occur through different processes (i) surface modifications of the surface, as the transformation of the SiO{2} barrier layer into SiN{x} in the presence of ammonia evidenced by XPS; (ii) different orientation of the graphitic basal planes relative to the direction of electron transport (carbon nanofiber) and (iii) presence of a graphitic nest at the interface of the carbon nanostructure and the substrate, observed when catalyst is deposited through mild evaporation.

  20. Predicting Two-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhiming; Zhang, Zhuhua; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-10-27

    Intrinsic semimetallicity of graphene and silicene largely limits their applications in functional devices. Mixing carbon and silicon atoms to form two-dimensional (2D) silicon carbide (SixC1-x) sheets is promising to overcome this issue. Using first-principles calculations combined with the cluster expansion method, we perform a comprehensive study on the thermodynamic stability and electronic properties of 2D SixC1-x monolayers with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Upon varying the silicon concentration, the 2D SixC1-x presents two distinct structural phases, a homogeneous phase with well dispersed Si (or C) atoms and an in-plane hybrid phase rich in SiC domains. While the in-plane hybrid structure shows uniform semiconducting properties with widely tunable band gap from 0 to 2.87 eV due to quantum confinement effect imposed by the SiC domains, the homogeneous structures can be semiconducting or remain semimetallic depending on a superlattice vector which dictates whether the sublattice symmetry is topologically broken. Moreover, we reveal a universal rule for describing the electronic properties of the homogeneous SixC1-x structures. These findings suggest that the 2D SixC1-x monolayers may present a new "family" of 2D materials, with a rich variety of properties for applications in electronics and optoelectronics.

  1. Molecular assembly on two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avijit; Banerjee, Kaustuv; Liljeroth, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Molecular self-assembly is a well-known technique to create highly functional nanostructures on surfaces. Self-assembly on two-dimensional (2D) materials is a developing field driven by the interest in functionalization of 2D materials in order to tune their electronic properties. This has resulted in the discovery of several rich and interesting phenomena. Here, we review this progress with an emphasis on the electronic properties of the adsorbates and the substrate in well-defined systems, as unveiled by scanning tunneling microscopy. The review covers three aspects of the self-assembly. The first one focuses on non-covalent self-assembly dealing with site-selectivity due to inherent moiré pattern present on 2D materials grown on substrates. We also see that modification of intermolecular interactions and molecule–substrate interactions influences the assembly drastically and that 2D materials can also be used as a platform to carry out covalent and metal-coordinated assembly. The second part deals with the electronic properties of molecules adsorbed on 2D materials. By virtue of being inert and possessing low density of states near the Fermi level, 2D materials decouple molecules electronically from the underlying metal substrate and allow high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging of molecular orbitals. The moiré pattern on the 2D materials causes site-selective gating and charging of molecules in some cases. The last section covers the effects of self-assembled, acceptor and donor type, organic molecules on the electronic properties of graphene as revealed by spectroscopy and electrical transport measurements. Non-covalent functionalization of 2D materials has already been applied for their application as catalysts and sensors. With the current surge of activity on building van der Waals heterostructures from atomically thin crystals, molecular self-assembly has the potential to add an extra level of flexibility and functionality for applications ranging

  2. A study on hydrogen storage through adsorption in nano-structured carbons; Etude du stockage d'hydrogene par adsorption dans des carbones nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langohr, D

    2004-10-15

    The aim of this work is to build and calibrate an experimental set-up for the testing of the materials, to produce some carbon materials in large amounts and characterise them, and finally, to test these materials in their ability to store hydrogen. This will help in establishing a link between the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbons and their nano-structure. The script is divided into four chapters. The first chapter will deal with the literature review on the thematic of hydrogen storage through adsorption in the carbon materials, while the second chapter will present the experimental set-up elaborated in the laboratory. The third chapter explains the processes used to produce the two families of carbon materials and finally, the last chapter presents the structural characterisation of the samples as well as the experimental results of hydrogen storage on the materials elaborated. (author)

  3. HRTEM study of Popigai impact diamond: heterogeneous diamond nanostructures in native amorphous carbon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Viktoria K.; Shumilova, Tatyana; Masaitis, Victor

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied for the detailed nanostructural investigation of Popigai impact diamonds with the aim of revealing the nature of the amorphous carbon of the matrix. The successful application of two complementary specimen preparation methods, focused ion beam (FIB) milling and mechanical cleavage, allowed direct imaging of nanotwinned nanodiamond crystals embedded in a native amorphous carbon matrix for the first time. Based on its stability under the electron beam, native amorphous carbon can be easily distinguished from the amorphous carbon layer produced by FIB milling during specimen preparation. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the native amorphous carbon revealed the dominance of sp 2-bonded carbon and the presence of a small amount of oxygen. The heterogeneous size distribution and twin density of the nanodiamond crystals and the structural properties of the native amorphous carbon are presumably related to non-graphitic (organic) carbon precursor material.

  4. Platinum-based electrocatalysts synthesized by depositing contiguous adlayers on carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Harris, Alexander

    2015-10-06

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The manufacturing process may involve initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means and the nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. Subsequent film growth may be performed via the initial quasi-underpotential deposition of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a more noble metal. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  5. Platinum-based electrocatalysts synthesized by depositing contiguous adlayers on carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2013-03-26

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means and the nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. Subsequent film growth may be performed via the initial quasi-underpotential deposition of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a more noble metal. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  6. Solid-state Synthesis of Carbon-nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Wilhelm; A.Winkel; D.Jain

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In addition to single wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes[1], several structures,which are more or less related to fullerenes,including carbon nanohorns[2a], carbon nanospheres[2b] and onion like carbon structures[2c] have been reported.A new simple straight forward method to access some of these structures is the solid-state pyrolysis of different organometallic complexes in a sealed vessel,which led so far to carbon nanotubes[3a,b], carbon nanocables[3c] and onions[3d].

  7. Formation of nanostructures from colloidal solutions of silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukalin, D. A.; Tuchin, A. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Bityutskaya, L. A.

    2015-02-01

    The formation of nanostructures from colloidal solutions of amorphous silicon dioxide (SiO2) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in evaporating drops at room temperature has been studied. It is established that spherical aggregates with an average diameter of ˜2 μm and rodlike nanostructures with diameters within 250-300 nm and lengths of ˜4 μm are formed under these conditions. The mechanisms of covalent and van der Waals interaction between CNTs and SiO2 are considered in the framework of a phenomenological model of the active center of a closed CNT.

  8. Two-Dimensional Programmable Manipulation of Magnetic Nanoparticles on-Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarella, Anandakumar; Torti, Andrea; Donolato, Marco

    2014-01-01

    A novel device is designed for on-chip selective trap and two-dimensional remote manipulation of single and multiple fluid-borne magnetic particles using field controlled magnetic domain walls in circular nanostructures. The combination of different ring-shaped nanostructures and field sequences...... allows for remote manipulation of magnetic particles with high-precision along any arbitrary pathway on a chip surface....

  9. Two Dimensional Plasmonic Cavities on Moire Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    We investigate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) cavitiy modes on two dimensional Moire surfaces in the visible spectrum. Two dimensional hexagonal Moire surface can be recorded on a photoresist layer using Interference lithography (IL). Two sequential exposures at slightly different angles in IL generate one dimensional Moire surfaces. Further sequential exposure for the same sample at slightly different angles after turning the sample 60 degrees around its own axis generates two dimensional hexagonal Moire cavity. Spectroscopic reflection measurements have shown plasmonic band gaps and cavity states at all the azimuthal angles (omnidirectional cavity and band gap formation) investigated. The plasmonic band gap edge and the cavity states energies show six fold symmetry on the two dimensional Moire surface as measured in reflection measurements.

  10. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Ma, Ji; Zhang, Si-Qi; Li, Hong; Wu, Xiang-Yao; Wu, Yi-Heng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied two-dimensional function photonic crystals, in which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates , that can become true easily by electro-optical effect and optical kerr effect. We calculated the band gap structures of TE and TM waves, and found the TE (TM) wave band gaps of function photonic crystals are wider (narrower) than the conventional photonic crystals. For the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, when the dielectric constant functions change, the band gaps numbers, width and position should be changed, and the band gap structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals can be adjusted flexibly, the needed band gap structures can be designed by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, and it can be of help to design optical devices.

  11. Two-Dimensional Planetary Surface Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, H.; Sengupta, A.; Castillo, J.; McElrath, T.; Roberts, T.; Willis, P.

    2014-06-01

    A systems engineering study was conducted to leverage a new two-dimensional (2D) lander concept with a low per unit cost to enable scientific study at multiple locations with a single entry system as the delivery vehicle.

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Nano-Structured SiO2 Thin Films on Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Chun XIONG; Dong Zhou YAN; Gang WEI

    2003-01-01

    Nano-structured SiO2 thin films were prepared on the surface of carbon steel for the first time by LPD. The compositions of the films were analyzed by XPS, and the surface morphology of the thin films were observed by AFM. The thin films were constituted by compact particles of SiO2, and there was no Fe in the films. In the process of film forming, the SiO2 colloid particles were deposited or absorbed directly onto the surface of carbon steel substrates that were activated by acid solution containing inhibitor, and corrosion of the substrates was avoided. The nano-structured SiO2 thin films that were prepared had excellent protective efficiency to the carbon steel.

  13. Liquid Phase – Pulsed Laser Ablation: A route to fabricate different carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hamaoy, Ahmed [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Institute of Laser for Postgraduate Studies, University of Baghdad (Iraq); Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, University of Anbar (Iraq); Chikarakara, Evans [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Jawad, Hussein [Institute of Laser for Postgraduate Studies, University of Baghdad (Iraq); Gupta, Kapil; Kumar, Dinesh; Rao, M.S. Ramachandra [Department of Physics, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre and Materials Science Research Centre, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Krishnamurthy, Satheesh [Materials Engineering, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Morshed, Muhammad [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Fox, Eoin; Brougham, Dermot [School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); He, Xiaoyun; Vázquez, Mercedes [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Irish Separation Science Cluster (ISSC) National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Brabazon, Dermot, E-mail: dermot.brabazon@dcu.ie [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Irish Separation Science Cluster (ISSC) National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2014-05-01

    Carbon nanostructures in various forms and sizes, and with different speciation properties have been prepared from graphite by Liquid Phase – Pulsed Laser Ablation (LP-PLA) using a high frequency Nd:YAG laser. High energy densities and pulse repetition frequencies of up to 10 kHz were used in this ablation process to produce carbon nanomaterials with unique chemical structures. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), micro-Raman and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) were used to confirm the size distribution, morphology, chemical bonding, and crystallinity of these nanostructures. This article demonstrates how the fabrication process affects measured characteristics of the produced carbon nanomaterials. The obtained particle properties have potential use for various applications including biochemical speciation applications.

  14. Electrodeposited manganese dioxide nanostructures on electro-etched carbon fibers: High performance materials for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Sayed Habib, E-mail: habibkazemi@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center for Research in Climate Change and Global Warming (CRCC), Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maghami, Mostafa Ghaem [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kiani, Mohammad Ali [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Research Center of Iran, P.O. Box 14335-186, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We report a facile method for fabrication of MnO{sub 2} nanostructures on electro-etched carbon fiber. • MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode shows outstanding supercapacitive behavior even at high discharge rates. • Exceptional cycle stability was achieved for MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode. • The coulombic efficiency of MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode is nearly 100%. - Abstract: In this article we introduce a facile, low cost and additive/template free method to fabricate high-rate electrochemical capacitors. Manganese oxide nanostructures were electrodeposited on electro-etched carbon fiber substrate by applying a constant anodic current. Nanostructured MnO{sub 2} on electro-etched carbon fiber was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The electrochemical behavior of MnO{sub 2} electro-etched carbon fiber electrode was investigated by electrochemical techniques including cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A maximum specific capacitance of 728.5 F g{sup −1} was achieved at a scan rate of 5 mV s{sup −1} for MnO{sub 2} electro-etched carbon fiber electrode. Also, this electrode showed exceptional cycle stability, suggesting that it can be considered as a good candidate for supercapacitor electrodes.

  15. Metal Nanoparticles and Carbon-Based Nanostructures as Advanced Materials for Cathode Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Calandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the most advanced methods for the fabrication of cathodes for dye-sensitized solar cells employing nanostructured materials. The attention is focused on metal nanoparticles and nanostructured carbon, among which nanotubes and graphene, whose good catalytic properties make them ideal for the development of counter electrode substrates, transparent conducting oxide, and advanced catalyst materials.

  16. Photo-induced nonlinear absorption in carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatrudina, Rimma Sh.; Gribkov, Vladislav Yu.

    2017-05-01

    Photoinduced nonlinear absorption of new carbon nanoparticles - astralenes and two types of carbon nanoclusters was investigated. The nonlinear absorption of aqueous suspensions of astralenes and solutions of carbon nanoclusters was studied by the method of z-scanning with Nd3+ -glass laser (wavelength λ = 1064 nm) in Q-switching regimes. A numerical model of the propagation of the laser pulse in a medium with reverse saturable absorption was created. Relaxation time of the first exited state and the ratio of absorption cross-sections of the first exited and ground states for the researched types of carbon nanoparticles were determined by the numerical simulation.

  17. Hierarchical nanostructured carbons with meso-macroporosity: design, characterization, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Baizeng; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Min-Sik; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2013-07-16

    Nanostructured porous carbon materials have diverse applications including sorbents, catalyst supports for fuel cells, electrode materials for capacitors, and hydrogen storage systems. When these materials have hierarchical porosity, interconnected pores of different dimensions, their potential application is increased. Hierarchical nanostructured carbons (HNCs) that contain 3D-interconnected macroporous/mesoporous and mesoporous/microporous structures have enhanced properties compared with single-sized porous carbon materials, because they have improved mass transport through the macropores/mesopores and enhanced selectivity and increased specific surface area on the level of fine pore systems through mesopores/micropores. The HNCs with macro/mesoporosity are of particular interest because chemists can tailor specific applications through controllable synthesis of HNCs with designed nanostructures. An efficient and commonly used technique for creating HNCs is "nanocasting", a technique that first involves the creation of a sacrificial silica template with hierarchical porous nanostructure and then the impregnation of the silica template with an appropriate carbon source. This is followed by carbonization of the filled carbon precursor, and subsequent removal of the silica template. The resulting HNC is an inverse replica of its parent hierarchical nanostructured silica (HNS). Through such nanocasting, scientists can create different HNC frameworks with tailored pore structures and narrow pore size distribution. Generally, HNSs with specific structure and 3D-interconnected porosity are needed to fabricate HNCs using the nanocasting strategy. However, how can we fabricate a HNS framework with tailored structure and hierarchical porosity of meso-macropores? This Account reports on our recent work in the development of novel HNCs and their interesting applications. We have explored a series of strategies to address the challenges in synthesis of HNSs and HNCs. Through

  18. Ultrafast two dimensional infrared chemical exchange spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayer, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The method of ultrafast two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy is described. Three ultrashort IR pulses tuned to the frequencies of the vibrational transitions of interest are directed into the sample. The interaction of these pulses with the molecular vibrational oscillators produces a polarization that gives rise to a fourth pulse, the vibrational echo. The vibrational echo pulse is combined with another pulse, the local oscillator, for heterodyne detection of the signal. For fixed time between the second and third pulses, the waiting time, the first pulse is scanned. Two Fourier transforms of the data yield a 2D IR spectrum. The waiting time is increased, and another spectrum is obtained. The change in the 2D IR spectra with increased waiting time provides information on the time evolution of the structure of the molecular system under observation. In a 2D IR chemical exchange experiment, two species A and B, are undergoing chemical exchange. A's are turning into B's, and B's are turning into A's, but the overall concentrations of the species are not changing. The kinetics of the chemical exchange on the ground electronic state under thermal equilibrium conditions can be obtained 2D IR spectroscopy. A vibration that has a different frequency for the two species is monitored. At very short time, there will be two peaks on the diagonal of the 2D IR spectrum, one for A and one for B. As the waiting time is increased, chemical exchange causes off-diagonal peaks to grow in. The time dependence of the growth of these off-diagonal peaks gives the chemical exchange rate. The method is applied to organic solute-solvent complex formation, orientational isomerization about a carbon-carbon single bond, migration of a hydrogen bond from one position on a molecule to another, protein structural substate interconversion, and water hydrogen bond switching between ions and water molecules. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific

  19. Synthesis and characterization of nanocomposites based on PANI and carbon nanostructures prepared by electropolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovski, Aleksandar; Paunović, Perica [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, SS Cyril and Methodius University, Rudjer Bošković, 16, 1000, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Avolio, Roberto; Errico, Maria E.; Cocca, Mariacristina; Gentile, Gennaro [Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, National Research Council, Via Campi Flegrei 34, 80078, Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy); Grozdanov, Anita, E-mail: anita.grozdanov@yahoo.com [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, SS Cyril and Methodius University, Rudjer Bošković, 16, 1000, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Avella, Maurizio [Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, National Research Council, Via Campi Flegrei 34, 80078, Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy); Barton, John [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Dyke Parade, T12 R5CP, Cork (Ireland); Dimitrov, Aleksandar [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, SS Cyril and Methodius University, Rudjer Bošković, 16, 1000, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2017-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on polyaniline (PANI) and carbon nanostructures (CNSs) (graphene (G) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)) were prepared by in situ electrochemical polymerization. CNSs were inserted into the PANI matrix by dispersing them into the electrolyte before the electropolymerization. Electrochemical characterization by means of cyclic voltammetry and steady state polarization were performed in order to determine conditions for electro-polymerization. Electro-polymerization of the PANI based nanocomposites was carried out at 0.75 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) for 40 and 60 min. The morphology and structural characteristics of the obtained nanocomposites were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, while thermal stability was determined using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). According to the morphological and structural study, fibrous and porous structure of PANI based nanocomposites was detected well embedding both G and MWCNTs. Also, strong interaction between quinoidal structure of PANI with carbon nanostructures via π–π stacking was detected by Raman spectroscopy. TGA showed the increased thermal stability of composites reinforced with CNSs, especially those reinforced with graphene. - Highlights: • Nanocomposites of PANI with carbon nanostructures were prepared for sensing application. • By cyclic voltammetry, conductive form of PANI (green colored emeraldine phase) is obtained 0.75 V • Using 4 Probe method, nanocomposite PANI/CNS tablet was tested for sensing application. • Micro-structural properties of nanocomposites were studied by SEM, TGA and Raman analysis.

  20. Carbon nanostructures from Fe-C nanocomposites by activated CVD methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleaca, Claudiu; Morjan, Ion; Alexandrescu, Rodica; Dumitrache, Florian; Soare, Iuliana; Gavrila-Florescu, Lavinia [Laser Photochemistry Laboratory, NILPRP, Bucharest (Romania); Le Normand, Francois; Faerber, Jaques [Groupe Surfaces and Interfaces, IPCMS, UMR 7504 CNRS, Strasbourg (France)

    2010-04-15

    Iron-based core-shell nanoparticles can present interesting catalytic properties for the growth of carbon nanostructures. We report the synthesis of various carbon nanostructures using activated chemical vapour deposition methods. These structures were analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Laser pyrolysis technique was used for synthesis of less than 10 nm diameter Fe-C core-shell catalyst nanoparticles. Acetone suspensions of Fe-C nanoparticles were drop-casted or spin coated onto Si(100) substrates. The consequence of hydrogen selective etching of these nanocomposites at 550 C, followed by a treatment with a mixture of H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} at 700 C (both in the presence of hot filaments) was the growth of corrugated ribbons and decorated or distorted carbon nanotubes/nanofibers. Round agglomerate nanoparticles and long and very thin nanotubes were observed on the substrates edges (protected from direct etching). By adding in similar conditions a glow discharge plasma to hot filaments, the resulted deposits contain oriented nanotubes. Due to the implication of the electric field, the presence of both plasma and hot wires seems to significantly change the specific growth conditions of carbon nanostructures towards those resulted when only incandescent filaments were used (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiwon Kang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructural materials have gained the spotlight as promising anode materials for energy storage; they exhibit unique physico-chemical properties such as large surface area, short Li+ ion diffusion length, and high electrical conductivity, in addition to their long-term stability. However, carbon-nanostructured materials have issues with low areal and volumetric densities for the practical applications in electric vehicles, portable electronics, and power grid systems, which demand higher energy and power densities. One approach to overcoming these issues is to design and apply a three-dimensional (3D electrode accommodating a larger loading amount of active anode materials while facilitating Li+ ion diffusion. Furthermore, 3D nanocarbon frameworks can impart a conducting pathway and structural buffer to high-capacity non-carbon nanomaterials, which results in enhanced Li+ ion storage capacity. In this paper, we review our recent progress on the design and fabrication of 3D carbon nanostructures, their performance in Li-ion batteries (LIBs, and their implementation into large-scale, lightweight, and flexible LIBs.

  2. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of carbon and silicon nanostructures for energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Xuhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-12-10

    Carbon and silicon materials are two of the most important materials involved in the history of the science and technology development. In the last two decades, C and Si nanoscale materials, e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, and silicon nanowires, and quantum dots, have also emerged as the most interesting nanomaterials in nanoscience and nanotechnology for their myriad promising applications such as for electronics, sensors, biotechnology, etc. In particular, carbon and silicon nanostructures are being utilized in energy-related applications such as catalysis, batteries, solar cells, etc., with significant advances. Understanding of the nature of surface and electronic structures of nanostructures plays a key role in the development and improvement of energy conversion and storage nanosystems. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and related techniques, such as X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), show unique capability in revealing the surface and electronic structures of C and Si nanomaterials. In this review, XAS is demonstrated as a powerful technique for probing chemical bonding, the electronic structure, and the surface chemistry of carbon and silicon nanomaterials, which can greatly enhance the fundamental understanding and also applicability of these nanomaterials in energy applications. The focus is on the unique advantages of XAS as a complementary tool to conventional microscopy and spectroscopy for effectively providing chemical and structural information about carbon and silicon nanostructures. The employment of XAS for in situ, real-time study of property evolution of C and Si nanostructures to elucidate the mechanisms in energy conversion or storage processes is also discussed.

  3. Equilibrium Limit of Boundary Scattering in Carbon Nanostructures: Molecular Dynamics Calculations of Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin; Kinaci, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Cagin, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    It is widely known that graphene and many of its derivative nanostructures have exceedingly high reported thermal conductivities (up to 4000 W/mK at 300 K). Such attractive thermal properties beg the use of these structures in practical devices; however, to implement these materials while preserving transport quality, the influence of structure on thermal conductivity should be thoroughly understood. For graphene nanostructures, having average phonon mean free paths on the order of one micron, a primary concern is how size influences the potential for heat conduction. To investigate this, we employ a novel technique to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity from the Green-Kubo relations and equilibrium molecular dynamics in systems where phonon-boundary scattering dominates heat flow. Specifically, the thermal conductivities of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes are calculated in sizes up to 3 microns, and the relative influence of boundary scattering on thermal transport is determined to be dominant at sizes less than 1 micron, after which the thermal transport largely depends on the quality of the nanostructure interface. The method is also extended to carbon nanostructures (fullerenes) where phonon confinement, as opposed to boundary scattering, dominates, and general trends related to the influence of curvature on thermal transport in these materials are discussed.

  4. Interpolation by two-dimensional cubic convolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiazheng; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents results of image interpolation with an improved method for two-dimensional cubic convolution. Convolution with a piecewise cubic is one of the most popular methods for image reconstruction, but the traditional approach uses a separable two-dimensional convolution kernel that is based on a one-dimensional derivation. The traditional, separable method is sub-optimal for the usual case of non-separable images. The improved method in this paper implements the most general non-separable, two-dimensional, piecewise-cubic interpolator with constraints for symmetry, continuity, and smoothness. The improved method of two-dimensional cubic convolution has three parameters that can be tuned to yield maximal fidelity for specific scene ensembles characterized by autocorrelation or power-spectrum. This paper illustrates examples for several scene models (a circular disk of parametric size, a square pulse with parametric rotation, and a Markov random field with parametric spatial detail) and actual images -- presenting the optimal parameters and the resulting fidelity for each model. In these examples, improved two-dimensional cubic convolution is superior to several other popular small-kernel interpolation methods.

  5. Electron emission degradation of nano-structured sp2-bonded amorphous carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Zhan-Ling; Wang Chang-Qing; Jia Yu; Zhang Bing-Lin; Yao Ning

    2007-01-01

    The initial field electron emission degradation behaviour of original nano-structured sp2-bonded amorphous carbon films has been observed.which can be attributed to the increase of the work function of the film in the field emission process analysed using a Fowler-Nordheim plot.The possible re.on for the change of work function is suggested to be the desorption of hydrogen from the original hydrogen termination film surface due to field emission current-induced local heating.For the explanation of the emission degradation behaviour of the nano-structured sp2-bonded amorphous carbon film,a cluster model with a series of graphite(0001) basal surfaces has been presented,and the theoretical calculations have been performed to investigate work functions of graphite(0001) surfaces with different hydrogen atom and ion chemisorption sites by using first principles method based on density functional theory-local density approximation.

  6. TWO-DIMENSIONAL TOPOLOGY OF COSMOLOGICAL REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yougang; Xu, Yidong; Chen, Xuelei [Key Laboratory of Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100012 China (China); Park, Changbom [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Juhan, E-mail: wangyg@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr [Center for Advanced Computation, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-20

    We study the two-dimensional topology of the 21-cm differential brightness temperature for two hydrodynamic radiative transfer simulations and two semi-numerical models. In each model, we calculate the two-dimensional genus curve for the early, middle, and late epochs of reionization. It is found that the genus curve depends strongly on the ionized fraction of hydrogen in each model. The genus curves are significantly different for different reionization scenarios even when the ionized faction is the same. We find that the two-dimensional topology analysis method is a useful tool to constrain the reionization models. Our method can be applied to the future observations such as those of the Square Kilometre Array.

  7. Two dimensional topology of cosmological reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yougang; Xu, Yidong; Chen, Xuelei; Kim, Juhan

    2015-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional topology of the 21-cm differential brightness temperature for two hydrodynamic radiative transfer simulations and two semi-numerical models. In each model, we calculate the two dimensional genus curve for the early, middle and late epochs of reionization. It is found that the genus curve depends strongly on the ionized fraction of hydrogen in each model. The genus curves are significantly different for different reionization scenarios even when the ionized faction is the same. We find that the two-dimensional topology analysis method is a useful tool to constrain the reionization models. Our method can be applied to the future observations such as those of the Square Kilometer Array.

  8. Synthesis of carbon nanostructures in an RF induction plasmatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalogin, G. N.; Krasil'nikov, A. V.; Rudin, N. F.; Popov, M. Yu.; Kul'nitskii, B. A.; Kirichenko, A. N.

    2015-05-01

    The method and results of synthesizing carbon nanotubes and onion-like structures by the sublimation of a mixture of a carbon powder with a catalyst (Y2(CO3)3) in the plasma flow of an inert gas (argon) generated in an rf plasmatron are described. Carbon vapors are condensed into fullerene-containing soot onto various materials (Al, Cu, Ti, stainless steel) placed in the working chamber of an experimental setup. The composition of the synthesized soot is analyzed by modern highly informative methods (Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction). Single-wall carbon nanotubes of a small diameter (1.2 nm) and onion-like structures 10-20 nm in size are formed in experiments. In a reference experiment on a mixture of argon and methane, a material, which consists of a mixture of amorphous carbon, nanosized graphite, and graphite with a crystallite size of several microns, is synthesized. The effect of the substrate material, the gas pressure, and the plasma flow velocity on the formation of carbon nanotubes is studied.

  9. Decomposition kinetic study of nanostructured composites of poly (phenylene sulfide) reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Ribeiro; Edson C. Botelho; Michelle L. Costa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain nanostructured composites of poly (phenylene sulfide), PPS, reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes, MWCNT, by melt mixing technique and further characterization of their morphological and thermal properties. Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis was carried out to evaluate the quality of MWCNT dispersion throughout the PPS matrix. Thermogravimetry shows an increase in the maximum degradation temperature by the addition of the nanofiller to the polym...

  10. Pyrolytic deposition of nanostructured titanium carbide coatings on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremlev, K. V.; Ob"edkov, A. M.; Ketkov, S. Yu.; Kaverin, B. S.; Semenov, N. M.; Gusev, S. A.; Tatarskii, D. A.; Yunin, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured titanium carbide coatings have been deposited on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by the MOCVD method with bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium dichloride precursor. The obtained TiC/MWCNT hybrid materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is established that a TiC coating deposits onto the MWCNT surface with the formation of a core-shell (MWSNT-TiC) type structure.

  11. Nanostructured Multifilamentary Carbon-Copper Composites: Fabrication, Microstructural Characterization, and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evarice Yama Nzoma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of research on the emerging techniques to produce bulk nanostructured composites materials by severe plastic deformation and their characterization. Based on the Levi work, we present a new method to synthesize a composite wire-containing carbon-nanosized filaments (graphite and C60 fullerenes embedded in a copper matrix. The originality of this process is using powder media as fiber. Microstructures and electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties are presented.

  12. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  13. Matching Two-dimensional Gel Electrophoresis' Spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Anjos, António; AL-Tam, Faroq; Shahbazkia, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for matching Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2-DE) gels' spots, involving the use of image registration. The number of false positive matches produced by the proposed approach is small, when compared to academic and commercial state-of-the-art approaches. This ar......This paper describes an approach for matching Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2-DE) gels' spots, involving the use of image registration. The number of false positive matches produced by the proposed approach is small, when compared to academic and commercial state-of-the-art approaches...

  14. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Haifeng; Zhang, Shuqing; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-12-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic phonon scattering was theoretically studied using deformation potential theory. Based on the Boltzmann equation with the relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was derived, showing that the influence of effective mass on mobility anisotropy is larger than those of deformation potential constant or elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic two-dimensional materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC2N , MXene, TiS3, and GeCH3) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio is overestimated by the previously described method.

  15. Towards two-dimensional search engines

    OpenAIRE

    Ermann, Leonardo; Chepelianskii, Alexei D.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2011-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way the ranking of nodes becomes two-dimensional that paves the way for development of two-dimensional search engines of new type. Statistical properties of inf...

  16. IF-WS2/Nanostructured Carbon Hybrids Generation and Their Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia C. Luhrs

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available With the aim to develop a new generation of materials that combine either the known energy absorbing properties of carbon nanofibers (CNF, or the carbon-carbon bond strength of graphene sheets (G, with the shock resistance properties reported for Inorganic Fullerene type WS2 structures (IF-WS2, hybrid CNF/IF-WS2 and G/IF-WS2 were generated, characterized and tested. Experimentation revealed that in situ growth of carbon nanostructures with inorganic fullerene tungsten disulfide particulates had to be performed from particular precursors and fabrication conditions to avoid undesirable byproducts that hinder fiber growth or deter graphene generation. The novel protocols that allowed us to integrate the IF-WS2 with the carbon nanostructures, producing dispersions at the nanoscale, are reported. Resulting hybrid CNF/IF-WS2 and G/IF-WS2 products were analyzed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy. The thermal stability of samples in air was evaluated by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA. CNF/IF-WS2 and G/IF-WS2 hybrids were introduced into epoxy matrices, and the mechanical properties of the resulting composites were analyzed using nanoindentation. Epoxy composite samples showed drastic improvements in the Young’s modulus and hardness values by the use of only 1% hybrid weight loadings. The carbon nanofiber inclusions seem to have a much greater impact on the mechanical properties of the composite than the graphene based counterparts.

  17. Development of sensors based on advanced micro- and nanostructured carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Centeno, Frank Willi

    The thesis is focused on the development of sensors based on advanced micro- and nano-structured carbon materials. In particular, we developed prototype diamond-based ultraviolet photodetectors and carbon nanotubes-based gas sensors. We describe the method of preparation and characterization of the active carbon-based materials and their structural and compositional characterizations. This is followed by the corresponding device fabrication and testing. The thesis briefly gives an introduction to our current understanding about carbon materials, with emphasis on synthetic diamond and bamboo-like carbon nanotubes, and to the materials' properties that are useful for ultraviolet photodetectors and gas sensor applications. The thesis also give an overview of the experience gained through this research, and some suggestions for those who would like follow the research methods employ here. It provides experimental information learned through experience that may be helpful and avoid delays to the newer experimentalists.

  18. Nanostructure criteria for lithium intercalation in non-doped and phosphorus-doped hard carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, H.H.; Kitoh, Kenshin; Nemoto, Hiroshi [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan). Corporate Research and Development Group

    1997-10-01

    Hard carbons from various precursors heat-treated at 1000-2000 C follow a common rule with regard to their structure-capacity correlation for lithium intercalation. A nanostructure containing a large fraction of highly strained carbon layers with large interlayer spacings and small crystallite sizes is a prerequisite to achieve reversible capacities in the range 300-450 mAh/g. P-doping of carbon derived from a polymer precursor causes a softening of the hard carbon structure by decreasing the strain on carbon layers, reducing interlayer spacing and increasing the crystallite sizes. It also induces a reduction of the number of nanopores which become large in size. The amount of space reduction by the softening effect, however, is more than compensated by the dopant so that capacities of 550 mAh/g and first cycle efficiencies improved up to 83% are achieved. (orig.)

  19. Carbonized Micro- and Nanostructures: Can Downsizing Really Help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naraghi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we discuss relationships between morphology and mechanical strength of carbonized structures, obtained via pyrolysis of polymeric precursors, across multiple length scales, from carbon fibers (CFs with diameters of 5–10 µm to submicron thick carbon nanofibers (CNFs. Our research points to radial inhomogeneity, skin–core structure, as a size-dependent feature of polyacrylonitrile-based CFs. This inhomogeneity is a surface effect, caused by suppressed diffusion of oxygen and stabilization byproducts during stabilization through skin. Hence, reducing the precursor diameters from tens of microns to submicron appears as an effective strategy to develop homogeneous carbonized structures. Our research establishes the significance of this downsizing in developing lightweight structural materials by comparing intrinsic strength of radially inhomogeneous CFs with that of radially homogeneous CNF. While experimental studies on the strength of CNFs have targeted randomly oriented turbostratic domains, via continuum modeling, we have estimated that strength of CNFs can reach 14 GPa, when the basal planes of graphitic domains are parallel to nanofiber axis. The CNFs in our model are treated as composites of amorphous carbon (matrix, reinforced with turbostratic domains, and their strength is predicted using Tsai–Hill criterion. The model was calibrated with existing experimental data.

  20. Application of DC plasma torch for synthesis of carbon nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavelkina, M. B.; Amirov, R. H.; Katarzhis, V. A.; Kiselev, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The results of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures at high temperatures using a DC plasma torch are presented. Plasma was generated by introduction of argon, nitrogen and helium into the plasma torch with an anode in the form of an expanding channel. Sustainable modes of the plasma torch operation have been achieved by simultaneous tangential input of a plasma gas with a carbon source. Obtained solid products were studied using electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction to characterize their properties and morphological structures.

  1. An investigation into carbon nanostructured materials as catalyst support in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune

    black support materials for low platinum containing electrocatalyst. This is partly due to their high electronic conductivity. Partly due to their high surface area needed for the dispersion of nanoparticulate metal-clusters. In addition carbon nano-structures (CNF, SWCNT, MWCNT etc.) are more durable...... dispersion methods as the weak Van der Waals forces prevent the solvatisation and dispersion carbon nano structured materials. As the dispersion of SWCNT, MWCNT and CNF exhibit colloidal dispersion behaviour, the usual methods of consist solvatisation in organic solvents, mixture of water and an organic...

  2. Piezoelectricity in Two-Dimensional Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Tao

    2015-02-25

    Powering up 2D materials: Recent experimental studies confirmed the existence of piezoelectricity - the conversion of mechanical stress into electricity - in two-dimensional single-layer MoS2 nanosheets. The results represent a milestone towards embedding low-dimensional materials into future disruptive technologies. © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  3. Kronecker Product of Two-dimensional Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Hu

    2006-01-01

    Kronecker sequences constructed from short sequences are good sequences for spread spectrum communication systems. In this paper we study a similar problem for two-dimensional arrays, and we determine the linear complexity of the Kronecker product of two arrays. Our result shows that similar good property on linear complexity holds for Kronecker product of arrays.

  4. Two-Dimensional Toda-Heisenberg Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim E. Vekslerchik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a nonlinear model that is a combination of the anisotropic two-dimensional classical Heisenberg and Toda-like lattices. In the framework of the Hirota direct approach, we present the field equations of this model as a bilinear system, which is closely related to the Ablowitz-Ladik hierarchy, and derive its N-soliton solutions.

  5. A novel two dimensional particle velocity sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pjetri, Olti; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theo S.; Krijnen, Gijs J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a two wire, two-dimensional particle velocity sensor. The miniature sensor of size 1.0x2.5x0.525 mm, consisting of only two crossed wires, shows excellent directional sensitivity in both directions, thus requiring no directivity calibration, and is relatively easy to fabrica

  6. Two-dimensional microstrip detector for neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oed, A. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Because of their robust design, gas microstrip detectors, which were developed at ILL, can be assembled relatively quickly, provided the prefabricated components are available. At the beginning of 1996, orders were received for the construction of three two-dimensional neutron detectors. These detectors have been completed. The detectors are outlined below. (author). 2 refs.

  7. Two-dimensional magma-repository interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, O.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of magma-repository interactions reveal that the three phases --a shock tube, shock reflection and amplification, and shock attenuation and decay phase-- in a one-dimensional flow tube model have a precursor. This newly identified phase ``zero'' consists of the impact of

  8. Two-dimensional subwavelength plasmonic lattice solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, F; Hu, B; Panoiu, N C

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of plasmonic lattice solitons (PLSs) formed in two-dimensional (2D) arrays of metallic nanowires embedded into a nonlinear medium with Kerr nonlinearity. We analyze two classes of 2D PLSs families, namely, fundamental and vortical PLSs in both focusing and defocusing media. Their existence, stability, and subwavelength spatial confinement are studied in detai

  9. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, Jose; Stampfer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2...

  10. Flavonol-carbon nanostructure hybrid systems: a DFT study on the interaction mechanism and UV/Vis features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gregorio; Atilhan, Mert; Aparicio, Santiago

    2016-02-14

    Flavonols are a class of natural compounds with potential biological and pharmacological applications. They are also natural pigments responsible for the diversity of colors in plants. Flavonols offer the possibility of tuning their features through chemical functionalization as well as the presence of an aromatic backbone, which could lead to non-covalent interactions with different nanostructures or aromatic molecules. In this work, a protocol based on ONIOM (QM/QM) calculations to investigate the structural features (binding energies, intermolecular interactions) of flavonols interacting with the surface of several carbon nanostructures (such as graphene, fullerene C60 and carbon nanotubes) is developed. The confinement of flavonols inside carbon nanotubes has also been studied. Three flavonols, galangin, quercetin and myricetin, as well as pristine flavone were selected. Special attention has also been paid to the changes in UV/Vis features of flavonols due to the interaction with carbon nanostructures. Our results point out that π-stacking interactions are the driving force for the adsorption onto carbon nanostructures as well as for the confinement inside carbon nanotubes. Likewise, UV/Vis features of flavonols could be fine-tuned through the interaction with suitable carbon nanostructures.

  11. Electrochemical Decoration of Carbon Nanotubes with Au Nanostructure for the Electroanalysis of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ashok Kumar; Raj, C Retna

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical route for the decoration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with anisotropic Au nanostructures and the electroanalytical application of decorated MWCNTs are described. MWCNTs were electrochemically decorated with flowers and buds-like Au nanostructures in aqueous solution in the presence of KI. The flowers and buds-like nanostructures had an average size of 80 nm with a predominant Au(111) plane. The analytical application of the decorated MWCNTs in the electroanalysis of biologically important analytes, such as uric acid (UA), epinephrine (EN) and ascorbic acid (AA), was studied. The nanoparticles of flower-like morphology efficiently catalyze the oxidation of the bioanalytes at a less-positive potential. Simultaneous electroanalysis of AA, UA and EN have been achieved. Well separated individual voltammetric peaks were obtained in their coexistence. The decorated MWCNT modified electrode is very stable and highly sensitive towards UA and EN. It could detect micromolar levels of bioanalytes without any interference. The catalytic property of the nanostructures is superior to that of the conventional spherical nanoparticle. The morphology of the nanoparticle controls the electrocatalytic activity.

  12. Electrodeposition of Various Au Nanostructures on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nanoelectrode Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayazfar, H.; Afshar, A.; Dolati, A.

    2015-05-01

    An efficient method has been developed to synthesize well-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a conductive Ta substrate by chemical vapor deposition. Free-standing MWCNTs arrays were functionalized through electrochemical oxidation with the formation of hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups. Facile template-free electrochemical routes were then developed for the shape-selective synthesis of less-common Au nanostructures, including flower, sphere, dendrite, rod, sheet, and cabbage onto the aligned MWCNTs at room temperature. Especially, among all the synthesis methods for Au nanocrystals, this is the first report using electrochemical technique to synthesize wide variety shapes of gold nanostructures (GNs) onto the aligned MWCNTs. The morphology of electrodeposited Au nanostructures was controlled by adjustment of the deposition time and potential, the number of potential cycles, the kind of deposition bath, and electrodeposition method. Transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the products. Cyclic voltammograms showed that the MWCNT/Ta electrodes modified with GNs have higher sensitivity compared to the unmodified electrodes in the presence of Fe2+/Fe3+ redox couple. These kinds of aligned-CNT/Au nanostructure hybrid materials introduced by these efficient and simple electrochemical methods could lead to the development of a new generation device for ultrasensitive catalytic and biological application.

  13. Nanostructured Carbon Materials as Supports in the Preparation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Lázaro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Different advanced nanostructured carbon materials, such as carbon nanocoils, carbon nanofibers, graphitized ordered mesoporous carbons and carbon xerogels, presenting interesting features such as high electrical conductivity and extensively developed porous structure were synthesized and used as supports in the preparation of electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. The main advantage of these supports is that their physical properties and surface chemistry can be tailored to adapt the carbonaceous material to the catalytic requirements. Moreover, all of them present a highly mesoporous structure, diminishing diffusion problems, and both graphitic character and surface area can be conveniently modified. In the present work, the influence of the particular features of each material on the catalytic activity and stability was analyzed. Results have been compared with those obtained for commercial catalysts supported on Vulcan XC-72R, Pt/C and PtRu/C (ETEK. Both a highly ordered graphitic and mesopore-enriched structure of these advanced nanostructured materials resulted in an improved electrochemical performance in comparison to the commercial catalysts assayed, both towards CO and alcohol oxidation.

  14. Enzymatic electrodes nanostructured with functionalized carbon nanotubes for biofuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazaruk, E.; Bilewicz, R. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw (Poland); Sadowska, K.; Biernat, J.F. [Gdansk University of Technology, Chemical Faculty, Gdansk (Poland); Rogalski, J. [Maria Curie Sklodowska University, Department of Biochemistry, Lublin (Poland); Ginalska, G. [Medical University of Lublin, Department of Biochemistry, Lublin (Poland)

    2010-10-15

    Nanostructured bioelectrodes were designed and assembled into a biofuel cell with no separating membrane. The glassy carbon electrodes were modified with mediator-functionalized carbon nanotubes. Ferrocene (Fc) and 2,2{sup '}-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) diammonium salt (ABTS) bound chemically to the carbon nanotubes were found useful as mediators of the enzyme catalyzed electrode processes. Glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger AM-11 and laccase from Cerrena unicolor C-139 were incorporated in a liquid-crystalline matrix-monoolein cubic phase. The carbon nanotubes-nanostructured electrode surface was covered with the cubic phase film containing the enzyme and acted as the catalytic surface for the oxidation of glucose and reduction of oxygen. Thanks to the mediating role of derivatized nanotubes the catalysis was almost ten times more efficient than on the GCE electrodes: catalytic current of glucose oxidation was 1 mA cm{sup -2} and oxygen reduction current exceeded 0.6 mA cm{sup -2}. The open circuit voltage of the biofuel cell was 0.43 V. Application of carbon nanotubes increased the maximum power output of the constructed biofuel cell to 100 {mu}W cm{sup -2} without stirring of the solution which was ca. 100 times more efficient than using the same bioelectrodes without nanotubes on the electrode surface. (orig.)

  15. Highly zone-dependent synthesis of different carbon nanostructures using plasma-enhanced arc discharge technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: rajeshbhu1@gmail.com [Yonsei University, Department of Materials Science & Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Singh, Rajesh Kumar, E-mail: rksbhu@gmail.com [Banaras Hindu University, Department of Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (India); Dubey, Pawan Kumar [University of Allahabad, Nanotechnology Application Centre (India); Yadav, Ram Manohar [Rice University, Department of Materials Science and Nano Engineering (United States); Singh, Dinesh Pratap [Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Departamento de Física (Chile); Tiwari, R. S.; Srivastava, O. N. [Banaras Hindu University, Department of Physics (India)

    2015-01-15

    Three kinds of carbon nanostructures, i.e., graphene nanoflakes (GNFs), multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and spherical carbon nanoparticles (SCNPs) were comparatively investigated in one run experiment. These carbon nanostructures are located at specific location inside the direct current plasma-assisted arc discharge chamber. These carbon nanomaterials have been successfully synthesized using graphite as arcing electrodes at 400 torr in helium (He) atmosphere. The SCNPs were found in the deposits formed on the cathode holder, in which highly curled graphitic structure are found in majority. The diameter varies from 20 to 60 nm and it also appears that these particles are self-assembled to each other. The MWCNTs with the diameter of 10–30 nm were obtained which were present inside the swelling portion of cathode deposited. These MWCNTs have 14–18 graphitic layers with 3.59 Å interlayer spacing. The GNFs have average lateral sizes of 1–5 μm and few of them are stacked layers and shows crumpled like structure. The GNFs are more stable at low temperature (low mass loss) but SCNPs have low mass loss at high temperature.

  16. Enzymatic electrodes nanostructured with functionalized carbon nanotubes for biofuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaruk, E; Sadowska, K; Biernat, J F; Rogalski, J; Ginalska, G; Bilewicz, R

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructured bioelectrodes were designed and assembled into a biofuel cell with no separating membrane. The glassy carbon electrodes were modified with mediator-functionalized carbon nanotubes. Ferrocene (Fc) and 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) diammonium salt (ABTS) bound chemically to the carbon nanotubes were found useful as mediators of the enzyme catalyzed electrode processes. Glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger AM-11 and laccase from Cerrena unicolor C-139 were incorporated in a liquid-crystalline matrix-monoolein cubic phase. The carbon nanotubes-nanostructured electrode surface was covered with the cubic phase film containing the enzyme and acted as the catalytic surface for the oxidation of glucose and reduction of oxygen. Thanks to the mediating role of derivatized nanotubes the catalysis was almost ten times more efficient than on the GCE electrodes: catalytic current of glucose oxidation was 1 mA cm(-2) and oxygen reduction current exceeded 0.6 mA cm(-2). The open circuit voltage of the biofuel cell was 0.43 V. Application of carbon nanotubes increased the maximum power output of the constructed biofuel cell to 100 μW cm(-2) without stirring of the solution which was ca. 100 times more efficient than using the same bioelectrodes without nanotubes on the electrode surface.

  17. Application of carbon-aluminum nanostructures in divertor coatings from fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupina, V.; Lungu, C. P.; Vladoiu, R.; Epure, T. D.; Prodan, G.; Porosnicu, C.; Prodan, M.; Stanescu, I. M.; Contulov, M.; Mandes, A.; Dinca, V.; Zarovschi, V.

    2012-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon materials have increasingly attracted the interest of the scientific community, because of their fascinating physical properties and potential applications in high-tech devices. In the current ITER design, the tiles made of carbon fiber composites (CFCs) are foreseen for the strike point zone and tungsten (W) for other parts of the divertor region. This choice is a compromise based mainly on experience with individual materials in many different tokamaks. Also Carbon-Aluminum composites are the candidate material for the First Wall in ITER. In order to prepare nanostructured carbon-aluminum nanocomposite for the divertor part in fusion applications, the original method thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) was used in two electronic guns configuration. One of the main advantages of this technology is the bombardment of the growing thin film just by the ions of the depositing film. Moreover, the energy of ions can be controlled. Thermo-electrons emitted by an externally heated cathode and focused by a Wehnelt focusing cylinder are strongly accelerated towards the anode whose material is evaporated and bright plasma is ignited by a high voltage DC supply. The nanostructured C-Al films were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Tribological properties in dry sliding were evaluated using a CSM ball-on-disc tribometer. The carbon - aluminum films were identified as a nanocrystals complex (from 2nm to 50 nm diameters) surrounded by amorphous structures with a strong graphitization tendency, allowing the creating of adherent and wear resistant films. The friction coefficients (0.1 - 0.2, 0.5) of the C-Al coatings was decreased more than 2-5 times in comparison with the uncoated substrates proving excellent tribological properties. C-Al nanocomposites coatings were designed to have excellent tribological properties while the structure is composed by nanocrystals complex surrounded by amorphous structures

  18. Nanostructured carbon materials decorated with organophosphorus moieties: synthesis and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagiotti, Giacomo; Langè, Vittoria; Ligi, Cristina; Caporali, Stefano; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Flis, Anna; Pietrusiewicz, K Michał; Ghini, Giacomo; Brandi, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    A new synthetic approach for the production of carbon nanomaterials (CNM) decorated with organophosphorus moieties is presented. Three different triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) derivatives were used to decorate oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (ox-MWCNTs) and graphene platelets (GPs). The TPPOs chosen bear functional groups able to react with the CNMs by Tour reaction (an amino group), nitrene cycloaddition (an azido group) or CuAAC reaction (one terminal C–C triple bond). All the adducts were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, TEM, XPS, elemental analysis and ICP-AES. The cycloaddition of nitrene provided the higher loading on ox-MWCNTs and GPs as well, while the Tour approach gave best results with nanotubes (CNTs). Finally, we investigated the possibility to reduce the TPPO functionalized CNMs to the corresponding phosphine derivatives and applied one of the materials produced as heterogeneous organocatalyst in a Staudinger ligation reaction.

  19. Rehybridization of atomic orbitals and field electron emission from nanostructured carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Obraztsov, A N; Boronin, A I; Koshcheev, S V

    2001-01-01

    The results of the experimental study on the electron field emission, structural peculiarities and electron properties of carbon films, obtained through the gas-phase chemical deposition, are presented. It is shown that the field emission for the films, consisting of the spatially oriented carbon nanotubes and graphite laminar nanocrystallites, is observed by the electric field intensity by one-two orders lower than the values, representative for the metal emitters. The experimental data, testifying to the local decrease in the yield performance in such carbon materials in comparison with the graphite are obtained for the first time. The model of the emission center and the field emission mechanism for the nanostructured carbon are proposed

  20. The Formation of Carbon Nanostructures via Catalytic Pyrolysis of Naphthalene under Its Autogenic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Gang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, spherical carbon nanocapsules (CNCs, and carbon spheres (CSs is accomplished by using the method of reactions under autogenic pressure at elevated temperatures (RAPET. A powder mixture of naphthalene and nickel acetate tetrahydrate is dissociated under its autogenic pressure. The resultant CNTs and CNCs exhibit good graphitic quality, and the diameters range from 50~200 nm. Smooth and monodisperse CSs with the diameter ranging from 5~10 μm can be obtained by pyrolysis of pure naphthalene. Our results show that the reaction temperature and catalyst proportion play a key role in the formation of carbon nanostructures with RAPET method.

  1. Revisiting direct electron transfer in nanostructured carbon laccase oxygen cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Catherine; Scodeller, Pablo; Grattieri, Matteo; Villalba, Matías; Calvo, Ernesto J

    2016-06-01

    The biocatalytic electroreduction of oxygen has been studied on large surface area graphite and Vulcan® carbon electrodes with adsorbed Trametes trogii laccase. The electrokinetics of the O2 reduction reaction (ORR) was studied at different electrode potentials, O2 partial pressures and concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Even though the overpotential at 0.25 mA·cm(-2) for the ORR at T1Cu of the adsorbed laccase on carbon is 0.8 V lower than for Pt of similar geometric area, the rate of the reaction and thus the operative current density is limited by the enzyme reaction rate at the T2/T3 cluster site for the adsorbed enzyme. The transition potential for the rate determining step from the direct electron transfer (DET) to the enzyme reaction shifts to higher potentials at higher oxygen partial pressure. Hydrogen peroxide produced by the ORR on bare carbon support participates in an inhibition mechanism, with uncompetitive predominance at high H2O2 concentration, non-competitive contribution can be detected at low inhibitor concentration.

  2. Nanostructured membrane material designed for carbon dioxide separation

    KAUST Repository

    Yave, Wilfredo

    2010-03-15

    In this work carbon dioxide selective membrane materials from a commercially available poly(amide-b-ethylene oxide) (Pebax (R), Arkema) blended with polyethylene glycol ethers are presented. The preferred PEG-ether was PEG-dimethylether (PEG-DME). PEG-DME is well known as a physical solvent for acid gas absorption. It is used under the trade name Genosorb (R) in the Selexol (R) process (UOP) for acid gas removal from natural gas and synthesis gas. The combination of the liquid absorbent with the multiblock copolymer resulted in mechanically stable films with superior CO(2) separation properties. The addition of 50 wt.% PEG-DME to the copolymer resulted in a 8-fold increase of the carbon dioxide permeability; the CO(2)/H(2)-selectivity increased simultaneously from 9.1 to 14.9. It is shown that diffusivity as well as solubility of carbon dioxide is strongly increased by the blending of the copolymer with PEG-ethers. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Graphitic carbon in a nanostructured titanium oxycarbide thin film to improve implant osseointegration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanoni, R., E-mail: robertino.zanoni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’ p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Ioannidu, C.A.; Mazzola, L.; Politi, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Misiano, C. [Romana Film Sottili, Anzio, Rome (Italy); Longo, G. [Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, SB IPSB LPMV, BSP 409 (Cubotron UNIL), R.te de la Sorge, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Falconieri, M. [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Applicazioni delle Radiazioni, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Scandurra, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    A nanostructured coating layer on titanium implants, able to improve their integration into bones and to protect against the harsh conditions of body fluids, was obtained by Ion Plating Plasma Assisted, a method suitable for industrial applications. A titanium carbide target was attached under vacuum to a magnetron sputtering source powered with a direct current in the 500–1100 W range, and a 100 W radio frequency was applied to the sample holder. The samples produced at 900 W gave the best biological response in terms of overexpression of some genes of proteins involved in bone turnover. We report the characterization of a reference and of an implant sample, both obtained at 900 W. Different micro/nanoscopic techniques evidenced the morphology of the substrates, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to disclose the surface composition. The layer is a 500 nm thick hard nanostructure, composed of 60% graphitic carbon clustered with 15% TiC and 25% Ti oxides. - Highlights: • Nanostructured TiC protective layers were produced on Ti samples for prostheses. • Ion Plating Plasma-Assisted Deposition from TiC targets was used on Ti samples. • A model of the surface layer has been drawn from XPS, Raman, AFM, FIB/SEM, TEM. • The layer is mainly composed of graphitic carbon in addition to TiC and Ti oxides.

  4. Electrical and optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaoming

    Electrical and optoelectronic properties of bulk semiconductor materials have been extensively explored in last century. However, when reduced to one-dimensional and two-dimensional, many semiconductors start to show unique electrical and optoelectronic behaviors. In this dissertation, electrical and optoelectronic properties of one-dimensional (nanowires) and two-dimensional semiconductor materials are investigated by various techniques, including scanning photocurrent microscopy, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and finite-element simulations. In our work, gate-tunable photocurrent in ZnO nanowires has been observed under optical excitation in the visible regime, which originates from the nanowire/substrate interface states. This gate tunability in the visible regime can be used to enhance the photon absorption efficiency, and suppress the undesirable visible-light photodetection in ZnO-based solar cells. The power conversion efficiency of CuInSe2/CdS core-shell nanowire solar cells has been investigated. The highest power conversion efficiency per unit area/volume is achieved with core diameter of 50 nm and the thinnest shell thickness. The existence of the optimal geometrical parameters is due to a combined effect of optical resonances and carrier transport/dynamics. Significant current crowding in two-dimensional black phosphorus field-effect transistors has been found, which has been significantly underestimated by the commonly used transmission-line model. This current crowding can lead to Joule heating close to the contacts. New van der Waals metal-semiconductor junctions have been mechanically constructed and systematically studied. The photocurrent on junction area has been demonstrated to originate from the photothermal effect rather than the photovoltaic effect. Our findings suggest that a reasonable control of interface/surface state properties can enable new and beneficial functionalities in nanostructures. We

  5. Cold cathodes based on carbonic nanostructured layered structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyanin A. F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes formation conditions for and the structure of diamond-like materials films used in the manufacture of layered cold cathodes of emission electronics devices. The authors study the structure and field emission properties of layered structures with polycluster diamond and diamond-like carbon films (DCF formed by various methods. It has been found that the best emission properties are characteristic of DCFs obtained by cathode sputtering. Emission from the surface of such films occurs on the boundaries of the globules.

  6. Recent Advances in Disordered and Nanostructured Carbon Coatings for Superl Ubricity and Wearless Sliding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALI Erdemir

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly more demanding and very stringent operating conditions envisioned for future mechanical and tribological systems will certainly require new materials and coatings that are superhard and at the same time self-lubricating.For example, dry machining is a much desired practice in manufacturing sector, but it is currently very difficult to realize mainly because of high friction and severe wear losses. However, recent advances in surface engineering and coating technologies may enable design and production of novel coatings architectures that can combine superhardness with self-lubricating properties in both the disordered or nanostructured forms. Recently developed nearly frictionless carbon films, ultrananocrystalline diamond and carbide derived carbon films can dramatically lower friction and at the same time reduce wear under very harsh sliding conditions. These coatings can be formulated in such a way that they can substantially increase the load-bearing capacity of sliding surfaces and hence improve their resistance to scuffing. It is also possible to design nano-composite coatings that can form self-replenishing and-lubricating tribofilms on their sliding surfaces and thus help increase the overall lubricity of these surfaces. In this paper, an overview of recent advances in disordered and nanostructured carbon films will be presented. Specific examples will be given to demonstrate the superior performance and durability of such novel coatings under a very wide range of tribological conditions. The major emphasis is placed on super low friction carbon films. The fundamental tribological mechanisms that control their exceptional friction and wear behaviors are also discussed.

  7. Electronics based on two-dimensional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Gianluca; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Iannaccone, Giuseppe; Palacios, Tomás; Neumaier, Daniel; Seabaugh, Alan; Banerjee, Sanjay K; Colombo, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    The compelling demand for higher performance and lower power consumption in electronic systems is the main driving force of the electronics industry's quest for devices and/or architectures based on new materials. Here, we provide a review of electronic devices based on two-dimensional materials, outlining their potential as a technological option beyond scaled complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor switches. We focus on the performance limits and advantages of these materials and associated technologies, when exploited for both digital and analog applications, focusing on the main figures of merit needed to meet industry requirements. We also discuss the use of two-dimensional materials as an enabling factor for flexible electronics and provide our perspectives on future developments.

  8. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirov, A. O.; Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists ab aeterno. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. While PageRank highlights very well known nodes with many ingoing links, CheiRank highlights very communicative nodes with many outgoing links. In this way the ranking becomes two-dimensional. Using CheiRank and PageRank we analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  9. Two-Dimensional NMR Lineshape Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Ramos, Andres; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2016-04-01

    NMR titration experiments are a rich source of structural, mechanistic, thermodynamic and kinetic information on biomolecular interactions, which can be extracted through the quantitative analysis of resonance lineshapes. However, applications of such analyses are frequently limited by peak overlap inherent to complex biomolecular systems. Moreover, systematic errors may arise due to the analysis of two-dimensional data using theoretical frameworks developed for one-dimensional experiments. Here we introduce a more accurate and convenient method for the analysis of such data, based on the direct quantum mechanical simulation and fitting of entire two-dimensional experiments, which we implement in a new software tool, TITAN (TITration ANalysis). We expect the approach, which we demonstrate for a variety of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to be particularly useful in providing information on multi-step or multi-component interactions.

  10. Towards two-dimensional search engines

    CERN Document Server

    Ermann, Leonardo; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2011-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way the ranking of nodes becomes two-dimensional that paves the way for development of two-dimensional search engines of new type. Information flow properties on PageRank-CheiRank plane are analyzed for networks of British, French and Italian Universities, Wikipedia, Linux Kernel, gene regulation and other networks. Methods of spam links control are also analyzed.

  11. Toward two-dimensional search engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, L.; Chepelianskii, A. D.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-07-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way, the ranking of nodes becomes two dimensional which paves the way for the development of two-dimensional search engines of a new type. Statistical properties of information flow on the PageRank-CheiRank plane are analyzed for networks of British, French and Italian universities, Wikipedia, Linux Kernel, gene regulation and other networks. A special emphasis is done for British universities networks using the large database publicly available in the UK. Methods of spam links control are also analyzed.

  12. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M.; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-06-01

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots.

  13. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-06-09

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots.

  14. Dynamic nanocrystal response and high temperature growth of carbon nanotube-ferroelectric hybrid nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Scott, J. F.; Katiyar, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    A long standing problem related to the capping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by inorganic materials at high temperature has been solved. In situ dynamic response of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) nanocrystals attached to the wings of the outer surface of PZT/CNT hybrid-nanostructure has been demonstrated under a constant-energy high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) e-beam. PZT nanocrystals revealed that the crystal orientations, positions, faces, and hopping states change with time. HRTEM study has been performed to investigate the microstructure of hybrid nanostructures and nanosize polycrystal trapped across the wings. Raman spectroscopy was utilized to investigate the local structures, defects, crystal qualities and temperature dependent growth and degradation of hybrid nanostructures. Raman spectra indicate that MWCNT and PZT/MWCNT/n-Si possess good quality of CNT before and after PZT deposition until 650 °C. The monoclinic Cc/Cm phase of PZT which is optimum in piezoelectric properties was prominent in the hybrid structure and should be useful for device applications. An unusual hexagonal faceting oscillation of the nano-crystal perimeter on a 10-30 s period is also observed.A long standing problem related to the capping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by inorganic materials at high temperature has been solved. In situ dynamic response of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) nanocrystals attached to the wings of the outer surface of PZT/CNT hybrid-nanostructure has been demonstrated under a constant-energy high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) e-beam. PZT nanocrystals revealed that the crystal orientations, positions, faces, and hopping states change with time. HRTEM study has been performed to investigate the microstructure of hybrid nanostructures and nanosize polycrystal trapped across the wings. Raman spectroscopy was utilized to investigate the local structures, defects, crystal qualities and temperature dependent growth and degradation of

  15. Two-Dimensional Scheduling: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuolei Xiao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a literature review, classification schemes and analysis of methodology for scheduling problems on Batch Processing machine (BP with both processing time and job size constraints which is also regarded as Two-Dimensional (TD scheduling. Special attention is given to scheduling problems with non-identical job sizes and processing times, with details of the basic algorithms and other significant results.

  16. Two dimensional fermions in four dimensional YM

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, R

    2009-01-01

    Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation of SU(N) live on a two dimensional torus flatly embedded in $R^4$. They interact with a four dimensional SU(N) Yang Mills vector potential preserving a global chiral symmetry at finite $N$. As the size of the torus in units of $\\frac{1}{\\Lambda_{SU(N)}}$ is varied from small to large, the chiral symmetry gets spontaneously broken in the infinite $N$ limit.

  17. Two-dimensional Kagome photonic bandgap waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Søndergaard, Thomas; Libori, Stig E. Barkou;

    2000-01-01

    The transverse-magnetic photonic-bandgap-guidance properties are investigated for a planar two-dimensional (2-D) Kagome waveguide configuration using a full-vectorial plane-wave-expansion method. Single-moded well-localized low-index guided modes are found. The localization of the optical modes...... is investigated with respect to the width of the 2-D Kagome waveguide, and the number of modes existing for specific frequencies and waveguide widths is mapped out....

  18. String breaking in two-dimensional QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hornbostel, K J

    1999-01-01

    I present results of a numerical calculation of the effects of light quark-antiquark pairs on the linear heavy-quark potential in light-cone quantized two-dimensional QCD. I extract the potential from the Q-Qbar component of the ground-state wavefunction, and observe string breaking at the heavy-light meson pair threshold. I briefly comment on the states responsible for the breaking.

  19. Two-dimensional supramolecular electron spin arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Nowakowski, Jan; Liu, Shi-Xia; Jaggi, Michael; Siewert, Dorota; Girovsky, Jan; Shchyrba, Aneliia; Hählen, Tatjana; Kleibert, Armin; Oppeneer, Peter M; Nolting, Frithjof; Decurtins, Silvio; Jung, Thomas A; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2013-05-07

    A bottom-up approach is introduced to fabricate two-dimensional self-assembled layers of molecular spin-systems containing Mn and Fe ions arranged in a chessboard lattice. We demonstrate that the Mn and Fe spin states can be reversibly operated by their selective response to coordination/decoordination of volatile ligands like ammonia (NH3). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Heteroatom-Doped Carbon Nanostructures Derived from Conjugated Polymers for Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhen He

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Heteroatom-doped carbon materials have been one of the most remarkable families of materials with promising applications in fuel cells, supercapacitors, and batteries. Among them, conjugated polymer (CP-derived heteroatom-doped carbon materials exhibit remarkable electrochemical performances because the heteroatoms can be preserved at a relatively high content and keep stable under harsh working conditions. In this review, we summarized recent advances in the rational design and various applications of CP-derived heteroatom-doped carbon materials, including polyaniline (PANI, polypyrrole (PPy, and their ramification-derived carbons, as well as transition metal-carbon nanocomposites. The key point of considering CP-derived heteroatom-doped carbon materials as important candidates of electrode materials is that CPs contain only nonmetallic elements and some key heteroatoms in their backbones which provide great chances for the synthesis of metal-free heteroatom-doped carbon nanostructures. The presented examples in this review will provide new insights in designing and optimizing heteroatom-doped carbon materials for the development of anode and cathode materials for electrochemical device applications.

  1. Self-catalyzed carbon plasma-assisted growth of tin-doped indium oxide nanostructures by the sputtering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setti, Grazielle O.; de Jesus, Dosil P.; Joanni, Ednan

    2016-10-01

    In this work a new strategy for growth of nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) by RF sputtering is presented. ITO is deposited in the presence of a carbon plasma which reacts with the free oxygen atoms during the deposition, forming species like CO x . These species are removed from the chamber by the pumping system, and one-dimensional ITO nanostructures are formed without the need for a seed layer. Different values of substrate temperature and power applied to the gun containing the carbon target were investigated, resulting in different nanostructure morphologies. The samples containing a higher density of nanowires were covered with gold and evaluated as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for detection of dye solutions. The concept might be applied to other oxides, providing a simple method for unidimensional nanostructural synthesis.

  2. Two dimensional echocardiographic detection of intraatrial masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, N L; Soulen, R L; Kotler, M N; Mintz, G S

    1981-11-01

    With two dimensional echocardiography, a left atrial mass was detected in 19 patients. Of these, 10 patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis had a left atrial thrombus. The distinctive two dimensional echocardiographic features of left atrial thrombus included a mass of irregular nonmobile laminated echos within an enlarged atrial cavity, usually with a broad base of attachment to the posterior left atrial wall. Seven patients had a left atrial myxoma. Usually, the myxoma appeared as a mottled ovoid, sharply demarcated mobile mass attached to the interatrial septum. One patient had a right atrial angiosarcoma that appeared as a nonmobile mass extending from the inferior vena caval-right atrial junction into the right atrial cavity. One patient had a left atrial leiomyosarcoma producing a highly mobile mass attached to the lateral wall of the left atrium. M mode echocardiography detected six of the seven myxomas, one thrombus and neither of the other tumors. Thus, two dimensional echocardiography appears to be the technique of choice in the detection, localization and differentiation of intraatrial masses.

  3. Improved photovoltaic performance of multiple carbon-doped ZnO nanostructures under UV and visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianbin; Du, Hejun; Sun, Xiao Wei; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Sun, Gengzhi; Li, Fengji; Zheng, Lianxi; Zhang, Sam

    2014-09-01

    We report synthesis of multiple carbon-doped ZnO nanostructures by using carbon cloth as substrates to obtain multiple hollow ZnO microtube-nanowire structures. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analysis clearly show that carbon is doped into ZnO through substitution of carbon for oxygen in the growth and annealing processes. Upon exposure to 633-nm red laser, a distinct photoresponse can be observed, which indicates that carbon doping in ZnO can well extend its light harvesting to visible light region. Furthermore, a prototype of photovoltaic cell was fabricated to demonstrate the photovoltaic performance of multiple carbon-doped ZnO nanostructures under UV and visible light irradiation. This result shows that carbon-doped ZnO can act as effective photoactive materials for photoelectric components.

  4. Electrophysical properties and structural features of shungite (natural nanostructured carbon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations of the electrical conductive properties with a nanoscale locality at nanoampere currents and the results of an analysis of the correlation between the electrical conductivity and structural features of natural glassy carbon, i.e., shungite. The investigations have been performed using atomic force microscopy, electric force spectroscopy, scanning spreading resistance microscopy, X-ray spectroscopic analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that there are differences in electrical conductive properties of the structurally similar shungite samples formed under different PT conditions. Based on the analysis of the structural parameters and specific features of the shungite compositions, it has been shown that the effect of intercalation of impurities into boundary layers of graphene sheets has the most significant influence on the electrical and physical properties of the shungites. The differences in types and values of conductivity of the shungite samples are determined by the different degrees of intercalation.

  5. Laser-induced forward transfer of hybrid carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palla-Papavlu, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Filipescu, M., E-mail: mihaela.filipescu@inflpr.ro [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Vizireanu, S. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Vogt, L. [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Antohe, S. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094 Bucharest (Romania); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T. [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Rapid prototyping of carbon nanowalls (CNW) and functionalized CNWs is described. • CNW and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels are successfully printed by laser-induced forward transfer. • Flexible (polyimide) and rigid (glass) supports are used as substrates. • 4 μm thick CNW and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels maintain their morphology and structure after LIFT. - Abstract: Chemically functionalized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are promising materials for a wide range of applications, i.e. gas sensors, membranes for fuel cells, or as supports for catalysts. However, the difficulty of manipulation of these materials hinders their integration into devices. In this manuscript a procedure for rapid prototyping of CNWs and functionalized CNWs (i.e. decorated with SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles) is described. This procedure enables the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) as a powerful technique for printing CNWs and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels onto rigid and flexible substrates. A morphological study shows that for a large range of laser fluences i.e. 500–700 mJ/cm{sup 2} it is possible to transfer thick (4 μm) CNW and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels. Micro-Raman investigation of the transferred pixels reveals that the chemical composition of the CNWs and functionalized CNWs does not change as a result of the laser transfer. Following these results one can envision that CNWs and CNW:SnO{sub 2} pixels obtained by LIFT can be ultimately applied in technological applications.

  6. Computational study of pressure-driven methane transport in hierarchical nanostructured porous carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Kisung; Huang, Liping, E-mail: huangL5@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Using the reflecting particle method together with a perturbation-relaxation loop developed in our previous work, we studied pressure-driven methane transport in hierarchical nanostructured porous carbons (HNPCs) containing both mesopores and micropores in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The surface morphology of the mesopore wall was systematically varied by tuning interaction strength between carbon atoms and the template in a mimetic nanocasting process. Effects of temperature and mesopore size on methane transport in HNPCs were also studied. Our study shows that increased mesopore wall surface roughness changes the character of the gas-wall interaction from specular to diffuse, while the gas-gas interaction is diminished due to the decrease of adsorption density. Effects of the mesopore wall surface morphology are the most significant at low temperatures and in small channels. Our systematic study provides a better understanding of the transport mechanisms of light gases through carbon nanotube composite membranes in experiments.

  7. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Valdirene Aparecida [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Folgueras, Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira, E-mail: mirabelmcr@iae.cta.br [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Materiais; Costa, Michelle Leali [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (DMT/UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multi walled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on formulations containing different quantities of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin matrix. To reach this objective the adequate concentration of CNTs in the resin matrix was determined. The processed structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and reflectivity in the frequency range of 8.2 to 12.4 GHz analyses. The microwave attenuation was up to 99.7%, using only 0.5% (w/w) of CNT, showing that these materials present advantages in performance associated with low additive concentrations (author)

  8. From small aromatic molecules to functional nanostructured carbon by pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Gokhale

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel route employing UV laser pulses (KrF Excimer, 248 nm to cleave small aromatic molecules and stitch the generated free radicals into functional nanostructured forms of carbon is introduced. The process differs distinctly from any strategies wherein the aromatic rings are broken in the primary process. It is demonstrated that this pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching (PLPS process when applied to routine laboratory solvents (or toxic chemical wastes when discarded Chlorobenzene and o-Dichlorobenzene yields Carbon Nanospheres (CNSs comprising of graphene-like sheets assembled in onion-like configurations. This room temperature process implemented under normal laboratory conditions is versatile and clearly applicable to the whole family of haloaromatic compounds without and with additions of precursors or other nanomaterials. We further bring out its applicability for synthesis of metal-oxide based carbon nanocomposites.

  9. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Amand A.; Lambin, Philippe

    2005-05-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein α-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized.

  10. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Amand A; Lambin, Philippe [Physics Department, FUNDP, 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2005-05-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein {alpha}-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized.

  11. Laser-induced forward transfer of hybrid carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Filipescu, M.; Vizireanu, S.; Vogt, L.; Antohe, S.; Dinescu, M.; Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T.

    2016-06-01

    Chemically functionalized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are promising materials for a wide range of applications, i.e. gas sensors, membranes for fuel cells, or as supports for catalysts. However, the difficulty of manipulation of these materials hinders their integration into devices. In this manuscript a procedure for rapid prototyping of CNWs and functionalized CNWs (i.e. decorated with SnO2 nanoparticles) is described. This procedure enables the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) as a powerful technique for printing CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels onto rigid and flexible substrates. A morphological study shows that for a large range of laser fluences i.e. 500-700 mJ/cm2 it is possible to transfer thick (4 μm) CNW and CNW:SnO2 pixels. Micro-Raman investigation of the transferred pixels reveals that the chemical composition of the CNWs and functionalized CNWs does not change as a result of the laser transfer. Following these results one can envision that CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels obtained by LIFT can be ultimately applied in technological applications.

  12. Promotion of Water-mediated Carbon Removal by Nanostructured Barium Oxide/nickel Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Yang; Y Choi; W Qin; H Chen; K Blinn; M Liu; P Liu; J Bai; T Tyson; M Liu

    2011-12-31

    The existing Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) perform poorly in carbon-containing fuels because of coking and deactivation at desired operating temperatures. Here we report a new anode with nanostructured barium oxide/nickel (BaO/Ni) interfaces for low-cost SOFCs, demonstrating high power density and stability in C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750 C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate water-mediated carbon removal reactions. Density functional theory calculations predict that the dissociated OH from H2O on BaO reacts with C on Ni near the BaO/Ni interface to produce CO and H species, which are then electrochemically oxidized at the triple-phase boundaries of the anode. This anode offers potential for ushering in a new generation of SOFCs for efficient, low-emission conversion of readily available fuels to electricity.

  13. High-pressure catalytic chemical vapor deposition of ferromagnetic ruthenium-containing carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khavrus, Vyacheslav O., E-mail: V.Khavrus@ifw-dresden.de; Ibrahim, E. M. M.; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Ruemmeli, Mark H.; Wolter, A. U. B.; Hampel, Silke; Leonhardt, Albrecht [IFW Dresden (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    We report on the high-pressure catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of ruthenium nanoparticles (NPs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by means of gas-phase decomposition of acetonitrile and ruthenocene in a tubular quartz flow reactor at 950 Degree-Sign C and at elevated pressures (between 2 and 8 bar). The deposited material consists of Ru metal cores with sizes ranging between 1 and 3 nm surrounded by a carbon matrix. The high-pressure CCVD seems to be an effective route to obtain composite materials containing metallic NPs, Ru in this work, inside a nanostructured carbon matrix protecting them from oxidation in ambient air. We find that in contradiction to the weak paramagnetic properties characterizing bulk ruthenium, the synthesized samples are ferromagnetic as predicted for nanosized particles of nonmagnetic materials. At low pressure, the very small ruthenium catalyst particles are able to catalyze growth of SWCNTs. Their yield decreases with increasing reaction pressure. Transmission electron microscopy, selected area energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements were used to analyze and confirm properties of the synthesized NPs and nanotubes. A discussion on the growth mechanism of the Ru-containing nanostructures is presented.

  14. Electron microscopy characterization of some carbon based nanostructures with application in divertors coatings from fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupina, V.; Morjan, I.; Lungu, C. P.; Vladoiu, R.; Prodan, G.; Prodan, M.; Zarovschi, V.; Porosnicu, C.; Stanescu, I. M.; Contulov, M.; Mandes, A.; Dinca, V.; Sugiyama, K.

    2011-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon materials have increasingly attracted the interest of the scientific community, because of their fascinating physical properties and potential applications in high-tech devices. In the current ITER design, the tiles made of carbon fiber composites (CFCs) are foreseen for the strike point zone and tungsten (W) for other parts of the divertor region. This choice is a compromise based mainly on experience with individual materials in many different tokamaks. Also Beryllium is the candidate material for the First Wall in ITER. In order to prepare nanostructured carbon-tungsten nanocomposite for the divertor part in fusion applications, the original method thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) was used in two electronic guns configuration. One of the main advantages of this technology is the bombardment of the growing thin film just by the ions of the depositing film. The nanostructured C-W and C-Be films were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The C-W films were identified as a nanocrystals complex (5 nm average diameter) surrounded by amorphous structures with a strong graphitization tendency, allowing the creating of adherent and wear resistant films. The C-Be films are polycrystalline with mean grain size about 15 nm. The friction coefficients (0.15 - 0.35) of the C-W coatings was decreased more than 3-5 times in comparison with the uncoated substrates proving excellent tribological properties. C-W nanocomposites coatings were designed to have excellent tribological properties while the structure is composed by nanocrystals complex surrounded by amorphous structures with a strong graphitization tendency, allowing the creating of adherent and wear resistant films.&updat

  15. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.; Hull, David R.

    2003-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e., soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  16. Density functional theory for field emission from carbon nano-structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhibing

    2015-12-01

    Electron field emission is understood as a quantum mechanical many-body problem in which an electronic quasi-particle of the emitter is converted into an electron in vacuum. Fundamental concepts of field emission, such as the field enhancement factor, work-function, edge barrier and emission current density, will be investigated, using carbon nanotubes and graphene as examples. A multi-scale algorithm basing on density functional theory is introduced. We will argue that such a first principle approach is necessary and appropriate for field emission of nano-structures, not only for a more accurate quantitative description, but, more importantly, for deeper insight into field emission.

  17. Analysis of the Carbon Nano-Structures Formation in Liquid Arcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Gang; JIA Shen-li; XING Jian; SHI Zong-qian

    2007-01-01

    Graphite electrodes were used for the direct current (DC) arc discharge in water.And high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to investigate the products.Based on the experimental phenomena and nano-structure products,arc plasma characteristics in water were analyzed theoretically.Two growth regions and relevant growth modes were proposed to interpret the formation mechanisms of nano-struetures by are discharge in water.Furthermore,liquid nitrogen and cross magnetic field was applied to change the arcing state respectively,and new carbon nano-struetures were obtained.Their formation mechanisms were also analyzed correspondingly.

  18. Novel ZnO nanostructures grown on carbon nanotubes by thermal evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrissanthopoulos, A. [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, Rio Patras GR-26504 (Greece)], E-mail: acrissan@upatras.gr; Baskoutas, S.; Bouropoulos, N. [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, Rio Patras GR-26504 (Greece); Dracopoulos, V. [Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas-Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes - FORTH/ICE-HT, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Tasis, D. [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, Rio Patras GR-26504 (Greece); Yannopoulos, S.N. [Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas-Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes - FORTH/ICE-HT, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2007-10-15

    We report on the formation of ZnO/carbon nanotubes heterostructures achieved by means of a thermal evaporation method. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the main building block of the observed morphologies was the nanorod whose self-assembling resulted in various structures such as polypods and nano-hedgehogs, depending on various factors as well as the location of the ZnO-CNT junction. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to study the structure and optical properties of obtained nanostructures. Semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations gave evidence for the nature of the binding between ZnO and CNTs.

  19. Dynamic nanocrystal response and high temperature growth of carbon nanotube-ferroelectric hybrid nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Scott, J F; Katiyar, R S

    2014-01-21

    A long standing problem related to the capping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by inorganic materials at high temperature has been solved. In situ dynamic response of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) nanocrystals attached to the wings of the outer surface of PZT/CNT hybrid-nanostructure has been demonstrated under a constant-energy high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) e-beam. PZT nanocrystals revealed that the crystal orientations, positions, faces, and hopping states change with time. HRTEM study has been performed to investigate the microstructure of hybrid nanostructures and nanosize polycrystal trapped across the wings. Raman spectroscopy was utilized to investigate the local structures, defects, crystal qualities and temperature dependent growth and degradation of hybrid nanostructures. Raman spectra indicate that MWCNT and PZT/MWCNT/n-Si possess good quality of CNT before and after PZT deposition until 650 °C. The monoclinic Cc/Cm phase of PZT which is optimum in piezoelectric properties was prominent in the hybrid structure and should be useful for device applications. An unusual hexagonal faceting oscillation of the nano-crystal perimeter on a 10-30 s period is also observed.

  20. Weakly disordered two-dimensional Frenkel excitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukahil, A.; Zettili, Nouredine

    2004-03-01

    We report the results of studies of the optical properties of weakly disordered two- dimensional Frenkel excitons in the Coherent Potential Approximation (CPA). An approximate complex Green's function for a square lattice with nearest neighbor interactions is used in the self-consistent equation to determine the coherent potential. It is shown that the Density of States is very much affected by the logarithmic singularities in the Green's function. Our CPA results are in excellent agreement with previous investigations by Schreiber and Toyozawa using the Monte Carlo simulation.

  1. Two-dimensional photonic crystal surfactant detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Smith, Natasha; Asher, Sanford A

    2012-08-07

    We developed a novel two-dimensional (2-D) crystalline colloidal array photonic crystal sensing material for the visual detection of amphiphilic molecules in water. A close-packed polystyrene 2-D array monolayer was embedded in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogel film. These 2-D photonic crystals placed on a mirror show intense diffraction that enables them to be used for visual determination of analytes. Binding of surfactant molecules attaches ions to the sensor that swells the PNIPAAm-based hydrogel. The resulting increase in particle spacing red shifts the 2-D diffracted light. Incorporation of more hydrophobic monomers increases the sensitivity to surfactants.

  2. Theory of two-dimensional transformations

    OpenAIRE

    Kanayama, Yutaka J.; Krahn, Gary W.

    1998-01-01

    The article of record may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/70.720359 Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on This paper proposes a new "heterogeneous" two-dimensional (2D) transformation group ___ to solve motion analysis/planning problems in robotics. In this theory, we use a 3×1 matrix to represent a transformation as opposed to a 3×3 matrix in the homogeneous formulation. First, this theory is as capable as the homogeneous theory, Because of the minimal size, its implement...

  3. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    CERN Document Server

    Zhirov, A O; Shepelyansky, D L

    2010-01-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists {\\it ab aeterno}. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. We analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  4. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Haifeng; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonon scattering was theoretically studied with the deformation potential theory. Based on Boltzmann equation with relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was deduced, which shows that the influence of effective mass to the mobility anisotropy is larger than that of deformation potential constant and elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic 2D materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC$_2$N, MXene, TiS$_3$, GeCH$_3$) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio was overestimated in the past.

  5. Sums of two-dimensional spectral triples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Ivan, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    construct a sum of two dimensional modules which reflects some aspects of the topological dimensions of the compact metric space, but this will only give the metric back approximately. At the end we make an explicit computation of the last module for the unit interval in. The metric is recovered exactly......, the Dixmier trace induces a multiple of the Lebesgue integral but the growth of the number of eigenvalues is different from the one found for the standard differential operator on the unit interval....

  6. Binding energy of two-dimensional biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jai; Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko;

    1996-01-01

    Using a model structure for a two-dimensional (2D) biexciton confined in a quantum well, it is shown that the form of the Hamiltonian of the 2D biexciton reduces into that of an exciton. The binding energies and Bohr radii of a 2D biexciton in its various internal energy states are derived...... analytically using the fractional dimension approach. The ratio of the binding energy of a 2D biexciton to that of a 2D exciton is found to be 0.228, which agrees very well with the recent experimental value. The results of our approach are compared with those of earlier theories....

  7. Dynamics of film. [two dimensional continua theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    1979-01-01

    The general theory of films as two-dimensional continua are elaborated upon. As physical realizations of such a model this paper examines: inextensible films, elastic films, and nets. The suggested dynamic equations have enabled us to find out the characteristic speeds of wave propagation of the invariants of external and internal geometry and formulate the criteria of instability of their shape. Also included herein is a detailed account of the equation describing the film motions beyond the limits of the shape stability accompanied by the formation of wrinkles. The theory is illustrated by examples.

  8. Development of nitrogen enriched nanostructured carbon adsorbents for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Chitrakshi; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon adsorbents containing high nitrogen content were developed by templating melamine-formaldehyde resin in the pores of mesoporous silica by nanocasting technique. A series of adsorbents were prepared by altering the carbonization temperature from 400 to 700 °C and characterized in terms of their textural and morphological properties. CO2 adsorption performance was investigated at various temperatures from 30 to 100 °C by using a thermogravimetric analyzer under varying CO2 concentrations. Multiple adsorption-desorption experiments were also carried out to investigate the adsorbent regenerability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the development of nanostructured materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and elemental analysis indicated the development of carbon adsorbents having high nitrogen content. The surface area and pore volume of the adsorbent carbonized at 700 °C were found to be 266 m(2) g(-1) and 0.25 cm(3) g(-1) respectively. CO2 uptake profile for the developed adsorbents showed that the maximum CO2 adsorption occurred within ca. 100 s. CO2 uptake of 0.792 mmol g(-1) at 30 °C was exhibited by carbon obtained at 700 °C with complete regenerability in three adsorption-desorption cycles. Furthermore, kinetics of CO2 adsorption on the developed adsorbents was studied by fitting the experimental data of CO2 uptake to three kinetic models with best fit being obtained by fractional order kinetic model with error% within range of 5%. Adsorbent surface was found to be energetically heterogeneous as suggested by Temkin isotherm model. Also the isosteric heat of adsorption for CO2 was observed to increase from ca. 30-44 kJ mol(-1) with increase in surface coverage.

  9. Nanostructured carbon electrodes for laccase-catalyzed oxygen reduction without added mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolarczyk, Krzysztof; Nazaruk, Ewa [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Rogalski, Jerzy [Department of Biochemistry, Maria Curie Sklodowska University, Sklodowskiej Sq 3, Lublin 20-031 (Poland); Bilewicz, Renata [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: bilewicz@chem.uw.edu.pl

    2008-04-20

    Reduction of dioxygen catalyzed by laccase was studied at carbon electrodes without any added mediators. On bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) the catalytic reduction did not take place. However, when the same substrate was decorated with carbon nanotubes or carbon microcrystals the dioxygen reduction started at 0.6 V versus Ag/AgCl, which is close to the formal potential of the laccase used. Four different matrices: lecithin, hydrophobin, Nafion and lipid liquid-crystalline cubic phase were employed for hosting fungal laccase from Cerrena unicolor. The carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles present on the electrode provided electrical connectivity between the electrode and the enzyme active sites. Direct electrochemistry of the enzyme itself was observed in deoxygenated solutions and its catalytic activity towards dioxygen reduction was demonstrated. The stabilities of the hosted enzymes, the reduction potentials and ratios of catalytic to background currents were compared. The boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes prepolarized to high anodic potentials exhibited behavior similar to that of nanotube covered GCE pointing to the formation of nanostructures during the anodic pretreatment. BDD is a promising substrate in terms of potential of dioxygen reduction, however the catalytic current densities are not large enough for practical applications, therefore as shown in this paper, it should be additionally decorated with carbon particles being in direct contact with the electrode surface.

  10. Electrochemical Performance of Glucose/Oxygen Biofuel Cells Based on Carbon Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Min-Hye; Das, Gautam; Yoon, Hyon Hee

    2016-03-01

    The electrochemical performance of glucose/oxygen biofuel cells based on carbon nanostructures was investigated in the present study. Different types of carbon nanomaterials, including multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), functionalized MWCNT (f-MWCNT), carbon nanofibers (CNF), and functionalized CNF (f-CNF) were examined for electrode fabrications. The anode for glucose/oxygen biofuel cells were prepared by sequential coating of carbon nanomaterials, charge transfer complex (CTC), glucose oxidase (GOx) and nafion membrane. The anode was then integrated with a bilirubin oxidase-immobilized cathode for the biofuel cell test. It was found that the electrochemical performance of the enzyme electrodes was remarkably enhanced by the amalgamation of carbon nanomaterials with the CTC. The biofuel cell with anode comprising of f-CNF and the cathode with MWCNT exhibited the best electrochemical performance with a maximum power density of 210 μW/cm2 at a cell voltage of 0.44 V for 20 mM glucose concentration, which is comparable with the best power density value reported earlier.

  11. Two-dimensional gauge theoretic supergravities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangemi, D.; Leblanc, M.

    1994-05-01

    We investigate two-dimensional supergravity theories, which can be built from a topological and gauge invariant action defined on an ordinary surface. One is the N = 1 supersymmetric extension of the Jackiw-Teitelboim model presented by Chamseddine in a superspace formalism. We complement the proof of Montano, Aoaki and Sonnenschein that this extension is topological and gauge invariant, based on the graded de Sitter algebra. Not only do the equations of motion correspond to the supergravity ones and do gauge transformations encompass local supersymmetries, but we also identify the ∫-theory with the superfield formalism action written by Chamseddine. Next, we show that the N = 1 supersymmetric extension of string-inspired two-dimensional dilaton gravity put forward by Park and Strominger cannot be written as a ∫-theory. As an alternative, we propose two topological and gauge theories that are based on a graded extension of the extended Poincaré algebra and satisfy a vanishing-curvature condition. Both models are supersymmetric extensions of the string-inspired dilaton gravity.

  12. Two-Dimensional Theory of Scientific Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Yaghmaie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific representation is an interesting topic for philosophers of science, many of whom have recently explored it from different points of view. There are currently two competing approaches to the issue: cognitive and non-cognitive, and each of them claims its own merits over the other. This article tries to provide a hybrid theory of scientific representation, called Two-Dimensional Theory of Scientific Representation, which has the merits of the two accounts and is free of their shortcomings. To do this, we will argue that although scientific representation needs to use the notion of intentionality, such a notion is defined and realized in a simply structural form contrary to what cognitive approach says about intentionality. After a short introduction, the second part of the paper is devoted to introducing theories of scientific representation briefly. In the third part, the structural accounts of representation will be criticized. The next step is to introduce the two-dimensional theory which involves two key components: fixing and structural fitness. It will be argued that fitness is an objective and non-intentional relation, while fixing is intentional.

  13. Two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhenyue; Deng, Junkai; Chandrakumara, Ganaka G.; Yan, Wenyi; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for micro-/nano-technologies, stimuli-responsive shape memory materials at nanoscale have recently attracted great research interests. However, by reducing the size of conventional shape memory materials down to approximately nanometre range, the shape memory effect diminishes. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we report the discovery of a shape memory effect in a two-dimensional atomically thin graphene oxide crystal with ordered epoxy groups, namely C8O. A maximum recoverable strain of 14.5% is achieved as a result of reversible phase transition between two intrinsically stable phases. Our calculations conclude co-existence of the two stable phases in a coherent crystal lattice, giving rise to the possibility of constructing multiple temporary shapes in a single material, thus, enabling highly desirable programmability. With an atomic thickness, excellent shape memory mechanical properties and electric field stimulus, the discovery of a two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide opens a path for the development of exceptional micro-/nano-electromechanical devices.

  14. Meta-code for systematic analysis of chemical addition (SACHA): application to fluorination of C70 and carbon nanostructure growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewels, Christopher P; Lier, Gregory Van; Geerlings, Paul; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2007-01-01

    We present a new computer program able to systematically study chemical addition to and growth or evolution of carbon nanostructures. SACHA is a meta-code able to exploit a wide variety of pre-existing molecular structure codes, automating the otherwise onerous task of constructing, running, and analyzing the large number of input files that are required when exploring structural isomers and addition paths. By way of examples we consider fluorination of the fullerene cage C70 and carbon nanostructure growth through C2 addition. We discuss the possibilities for extension of this technique to rapidly and efficiently explore structural energy landscapes and application to other areas of chemical and materials research.

  15. A hierarchical nanostructured carbon nanofiber-In2S3 photocatalyst with high photodegradation and disinfection abilities under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Li, An Ran; Tai, Ming Hang; Liu, Zhao Yang; Sun, Darren Delai

    2014-06-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of pollutants under visible light provides a new door to solve the water contamination problem by utilizing free and renewable sunlight. The search for highly efficient photocatalysts with hierarchical nanostructures remains crucial for accessing this new door. In this work, a new hierarchical nanostructured photocatalyst is designed and synthesized, for the first time, by anchoring In2S3 flower-like nanostructures on non-woven carbon nanofiber (CNF). The nanostructures of these CNF-In2S3 composites were fine-tuned, with the aim of achieving the highest photocatalytic activity under visible light. The formation mechanism of the hierarchical nanostructure is also investigated. The results indicate that the optimized hierarchical CNF-In2S3 photocatalyst is superior in photodegradation and disinfection efficiency to that of pure In2S3 under visible-light irradiation. The prominent photocatalytic activities of these hierarchical CNF-In2S3 photocatalysts can be attributed to the excellent properties of enhanced light absorption, large surface area, and efficient charge separation, which are all derived from the special three-dimensional hierarchical nanostructures. Therefore, this work presents the great potential of this hierarchical nanostructured CNF-In2S3 photocatalyst in practical environmental remediation fields.

  16. Existence and Stability of Two-Dimensional Compact-Like Discrete Breathers in Discrete Two-Dimensional Monatomic Square Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quan; TIAN Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional compact-like discrete breathers in discrete two-dimensional monatomic square lattices are investigated by discussing a generafized discrete two-dimensional monatomic model.It is proven that the twodimensional compact-like discrete breathers exist not only in two-dimensional soft Ф4 potentials but also in hard two-dimensional Ф4 potentials and pure two-dimensional K4 lattices.The measurements of the two-dimensional compact-like discrete breather cores in soft and hard two-dimensional Ф4 potential are determined by coupling parameter K4,while those in pure two-dimensional K4 lattices have no coupling with parameter K4.The stabilities of the two-dimensional compact-like discrete breathers correlate closely to the coupling parameter K4 and the boundary condition of lattices.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of One-dimensional and Two-Dimensional Porphyrin Polymers* (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Porphyrin polymers are of interest in relation to conductive materials[1, 2], catalysts for photosynthetic charge separation[3], or the fundamental features in biological systems[4]. There have been many versatile studies about them[5,6]. The one-dimensional “Shish Kebab” porphyrin polymers synthesized with a new method different from those reported and Schiff base porphyrin polymers with two-dimensional nano-structure have provided a new field of study. The present paper covers highly ordered porphyrin polymers.

  18. Plasmonic Properties of Nanostructured Diamond Like Carbon/Silver Nanocomposite Films with Nanohole Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarūnas MEŠKINIS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic properties of the diamond like carbon nanocomposite films with embedded silver nanoparticles with patterned nanohole arrays were analyzed in this study. The films were deposited by unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering of silver target. Nanopatterning of the films was performed by combining electron beam nanolithography and ion beam etching techniques. Modeling of plasmonic properties was done using the classical Maxwell-Garnett theory. Modeling data and experimental results were in good accordance. Formation of the nanohole pattern in diamond like carbon films doped with silver resulted in decreased intensity of the surface plasmon resonance absorbance peak. No new absorbance or transmittance peaks were observed after the nanopattering. It was explained by extraordinary transmission effect in nanostructured DLC : Ag film films due to plasmon polariton resonance inside of the nanoholes.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.13193

  19. Suspended HOPG nanosheets for HOPG nanoresonator engineering and new carbon nanostructure synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, F [Laboratory for Integrated Micro Mechatronic Systems/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (UMI 2820), Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Debray, A [Canon Research Center, Canon Incorporated, 3-30-2 Shimomaruko, Ohta-ku, Tokyo 146-8501 (Japan); Martin, P [Laboratory for Integrated Micro Mechatronic Systems/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (UMI 2820), Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Fujita, H [Laboratory for Integrated Micro Mechatronic Systems/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (UMI 2820), Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Kawakatsu, H [Laboratory for Integrated Micro Mechatronic Systems/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (UMI 2820), Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2006-10-28

    Suspended highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) nanosheets (10-300 nm thick) were created by direct mechanical cleavage of a bulk HOPG crystal onto silicon micropillars and microtracks. We show that suspended HOPG nanosheets can be used to engineer HOPG nanoresonators such as membranes, bridges, and cantilevers as thin as 28 carbon atom layers. We measured by Doppler laser heterodyne interferometry that the discrete vibration modes of an HOPG nanosheet membrane and the resonance frequency of a FIB-created HOPG microcantilever lie in the MHz frequency regime. Moreover, a new carbon nanostructure, named 'nanolace', was synthesized by focused ion beam (FIB) sputtering of suspended HOPG nanosheets. Graphite nanosheets suspended on micropillars were eroded by a FIB to create self-oriented pseudo-periodical ripples. Additional sputtering and subsequent milling of these ripples led to the formation of honeycomb-like shaped nanolaces suspended and linked by ribbons.

  20. R & D on carbon nanostructures in Russia: scientometric analysis, 1990–2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terekhov, Alexander I., E-mail: a.i.terekhov@mail.ru [Central Economics and Mathematics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-15

    The analysis, based on scientific publications and patents, was conducted to form an understanding of the overall scientific and technology landscape in the field of carbon nanostructures and determine Russia’s place on it. The scientific publications came from the Science Citation Index Expanded database (DB SCIE); the patent information was extracted from databases of the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), and Russian Federal Service for Intellectual Property (Rospatent). We used also data about research projects, obtained via information systems of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR). Bibliometric methods are used to rank countries, institutions, and scientists, contributing to the carbon nanostructures research. We analyze the current state and trends of the research in Russia as compared to other countries, and the contribution and impact of its institutions, especially research of the “highest quality.” Considerable focus is on research collaboration and its relationship with citation impact. Patent datasets are used to determine the composition of participants of innovative processes and international patent activity of Russian inventors in the field, and to identify the most active representatives of small and medium business and some technological developments ripe for commercialization. The article contains a critical analysis of the findings, including a policy discussion of the country’s scientific authorities.

  1. One-dimensional carbon nanostructures for terahertz electron-beam radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantiwanichapan, Khwanchai; Swan, Anna K.; Paiella, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    One-dimensional carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanoribbons can feature near-ballistic electronic transport over micron-scale distances even at room temperature. As a result, these materials provide a uniquely suited solid-state platform for radiation mechanisms that so far have been the exclusive domain of electron beams in vacuum. Here we consider the generation of terahertz light based on two such mechanisms, namely, the emission of cyclotronlike radiation in a sinusoidally corrugated nanowire (where periodic angular motion is produced by the mechanical corrugation rather than an externally applied magnetic field), and the Smith-Purcell effect in a rectilinear nanowire over a dielectric grating. In both cases, the radiation properties of the individual charge carriers are investigated via full-wave electrodynamic simulations, including dephasing effects caused by carrier collisions. The overall light output is then computed with a standard model of charge transport for two particularly suitable types of carbon nanostructures, i.e., zigzag graphene nanoribbons and armchair single-wall nanotubes. Relatively sharp emission peaks at geometrically tunable terahertz frequencies are obtained in each case. The corresponding output powers are experimentally accessible even with individual nanowires, and can be scaled to technologically significant levels using array configurations. These radiation mechanisms therefore represent a promising paradigm for light emission in condensed matter, which may find important applications in nanoelectronics and terahertz photonics.

  2. R & D on carbon nanostructures in Russia: scientometric analysis, 1990-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhov, Alexander I.

    2015-02-01

    The analysis, based on scientific publications and patents, was conducted to form an understanding of the overall scientific and technology landscape in the field of carbon nanostructures and determine Russia's place on it. The scientific publications came from the Science Citation Index Expanded database (DB SCIE); the patent information was extracted from databases of the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), and Russian Federal Service for Intellectual Property (Rospatent). We used also data about research projects, obtained via information systems of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR). Bibliometric methods are used to rank countries, institutions, and scientists, contributing to the carbon nanostructures research. We analyze the current state and trends of the research in Russia as compared to other countries, and the contribution and impact of its institutions, especially research of the "highest quality." Considerable focus is on research collaboration and its relationship with citation impact. Patent datasets are used to determine the composition of participants of innovative processes and international patent activity of Russian inventors in the field, and to identify the most active representatives of small and medium business and some technological developments ripe for commercialization. The article contains a critical analysis of the findings, including a policy discussion of the country's scientific authorities.

  3. Morphology, Microstructure, and Hydrogen Content of Carbon Nanostructures Obtained by PECVD at Various Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Acosta Gentoiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures were obtained by acetylene injection into an argon plasma jet in the presence of hydrogen. The samples were synthesized in similar conditions, except that the substrate deposition temperatures TD were varied, ranging from 473 to 973 K. A strong dependence of morphology, structure, and graphitization upon TD was found. We obtained vertical aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs at low temperatures as 473 K, amorphous carbon nanoparticles (CNPs at temperatures from about 573 to 673 K, and carbon nanowalls (CNWs at high temperatures from 773 to 973 K. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used to substantiate the differences in these material types. It is known that hydrogen concentration modifies strongly the properties of the materials. Different concentrations of hydrogen-bonded carbon could be identified in amorphous CNP, VA-CNT, and CNW. Also, the H : C ratios along depth were determined for the obtained materials.

  4. Anisotropic Thermal Properties of Nanostructured Magnetic, Carbon and Hybrid Magnetic - Carbon Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Sylvester

    In this dissertation research we investigated thermal properties of three groups of nanostructured materials: (i) magnetic; (ii) reduced graphene oxide films; and (iii) hybrid magnetic -- graphite -- graphene composites. The thermal measurements were conducted using the transient "hot disk" and "laser flash" techniques. The rare-earth free nanostructured SrFe12O19 permanent magnets were produced by the current activated pressure assisted densification technique. The thermal conductivity of the nanostructured bulk magnets was found to range from 3.8 to 5.6 W/mK for the in-plane and 2.36 W/mk to 2.65 W/mK for the cross-plane directions, respectively. The heat conduction was dominated by phonons near the room temperature. The anisotropy of heat conduction was explained by the brick-like alignment of crystalline grains with the longer grain size in-plane direction. The thermal conductivity scales up with the average grain size and mass density of the material revealing weak temperature dependence. Using the nanostructured ferromagnetic Fe3O4 composites as an example system, we incorporated graphene and graphite fillers into magnetic material without changing their morphology. It was demonstrated that addition of 5 wt. % of equal mixture of graphene and graphite flakes to the composite results in a factor of x2.6 enhancement of the thermal conductivity without significant degradation of the saturation magnetization. We investigated thermal conductivity of free-standing reduced graphene oxide films subjected to a high-temperature treatment of up to 1000°C. It was found that the high-temperature annealing dramatically increased the in-plane thermal conductivity, K, of the films from ˜3 W/mK to ˜61 W/mK at room temperature. The cross-plane thermal conductivity, K⊥, revealed an interesting opposite trend of decreasing to a very small value of ˜0.09 W/mK in the reduced graphene oxide films annealed at 1000°C. The obtained films demonstrated an exceptionally strong

  5. Optimal excitation of two dimensional Holmboe instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Navid C

    2010-01-01

    Highly stratified shear layers are rendered unstable even at high stratifications by Holmboe instabilities when the density stratification is concentrated in a small region of the shear layer. These instabilities may cause mixing in highly stratified environments. However these instabilities occur in tongues for a limited range of parameters. We perform Generalized Stability analysis of the two dimensional perturbation dynamics of an inviscid Boussinesq stratified shear layer and show that Holmboe instabilities at high Richardson numbers can be excited by their adjoints at amplitudes that are orders of magnitude larger than by introducing initially the unstable mode itself. We also determine the optimal growth that obtains for parameters for which there is no instability. We find that there is potential for large transient growth regardless of whether the background flow is exponentially stable or not and that the characteristic structure of the Holmboe instability asymptotically emerges for parameter values ...

  6. Phonon hydrodynamics in two-dimensional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepellotti, Andrea; Fugallo, Giorgia; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco; Marzari, Nicola

    2015-03-06

    The conduction of heat in two dimensions displays a wealth of fascinating phenomena of key relevance to the scientific understanding and technological applications of graphene and related materials. Here, we use density-functional perturbation theory and an exact, variational solution of the Boltzmann transport equation to study fully from first-principles phonon transport and heat conductivity in graphene, boron nitride, molybdenum disulphide and the functionalized derivatives graphane and fluorographene. In all these materials, and at variance with typical three-dimensional solids, normal processes keep dominating over Umklapp scattering well-above cryogenic conditions, extending to room temperature and more. As a result, novel regimes emerge, with Poiseuille and Ziman hydrodynamics, hitherto typically confined to ultra-low temperatures, characterizing transport at ordinary conditions. Most remarkably, several of these two-dimensional materials admit wave-like heat diffusion, with second sound present at room temperature and above in graphene, boron nitride and graphane.

  7. Probabilistic Universality in two-dimensional Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyubich, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we continue to explore infinitely renormalizable H\\'enon maps with small Jacobian. It was shown in [CLM] that contrary to the one-dimensional intuition, the Cantor attractor of such a map is non-rigid and the conjugacy with the one-dimensional Cantor attractor is at most 1/2-H\\"older. Another formulation of this phenomenon is that the scaling structure of the H\\'enon Cantor attractor differs from its one-dimensional counterpart. However, in this paper we prove that the weight assigned by the canonical invariant measure to these bad spots tends to zero on microscopic scales. This phenomenon is called {\\it Probabilistic Universality}. It implies, in particular, that the Hausdorff dimension of the canonical measure is universal. In this way, universality and rigidity phenomena of one-dimensional dynamics assume a probabilistic nature in the two-dimensional world.

  8. Two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Shaikh; S S Desai; A K Patra

    2004-08-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector has been developed. The detector is a 3He + Kr filled multiwire proportional counter with charge division position readout and has a sensitive area of 345 mm × 345 mm, pixel size 5 mm × 5 mm, active depth 25 mm and is designed for efficiency of 70% for 4 Å neutrons. The detector is tested with 0.5 bar 3He + 1.5 bar krypton gas mixture in active chamber and 2 bar 4He in compensating chamber. The pulse height spectrum recorded at an anode potential of 2000 V shows energy resolution of ∼ 25% for the 764 keV peak. A spatial resolution of 8 mm × 6 mm is achieved. The detector is suitable for SANS studies in the range of 0.02–0.25 Å-1.

  9. Two-dimensional heterostructures for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials provide slit-shaped ion diffusion channels that enable fast movement of lithium and other ions. However, electronic conductivity, the number of intercalation sites, and stability during extended cycling are also crucial for building high-performance energy storage devices. While individual 2D materials, such as graphene, show some of the required properties, none of them can offer all properties needed to maximize energy density, power density, and cycle life. Here we argue that stacking different 2D materials into heterostructured architectures opens an opportunity to construct electrodes that would combine the advantages of the individual building blocks while eliminating the associated shortcomings. We discuss characteristics of common 2D materials and provide examples of 2D heterostructured electrodes that showed new phenomena leading to superior electrochemical performance. We also consider electrode fabrication approaches and finally outline future steps to create 2D heterostructured electrodes that could greatly expand current energy storage technologies.

  10. Rationally synthesized two-dimensional polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, John W; Dichtel, William R

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic polymers exhibit diverse and useful properties and influence most aspects of modern life. Many polymerization methods provide linear or branched macromolecules, frequently with outstanding functional-group tolerance and molecular weight control. In contrast, extending polymerization strategies to two-dimensional periodic structures is in its infancy, and successful examples have emerged only recently through molecular framework, surface science and crystal engineering approaches. In this Review, we describe successful 2D polymerization strategies, as well as seminal research that inspired their development. These methods include the synthesis of 2D covalent organic frameworks as layered crystals and thin films, surface-mediated polymerization of polyfunctional monomers, and solid-state topochemical polymerizations. Early application targets of 2D polymers include gas separation and storage, optoelectronic devices and membranes, each of which might benefit from predictable long-range molecular organization inherent to this macromolecular architecture.

  11. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T.; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α , may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5 /3 , but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α =3 . Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5 /3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows.

  12. Local doping of two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dillon; Velasco, Jr, Jairo; Ju, Long; Kahn, Salman; Lee, Juwon; Germany, Chad E.; Zettl, Alexander K.; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael F.

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to locally doping two-dimensional (2D) materials. In one aspect, an assembly including a substrate, a first insulator disposed on the substrate, a second insulator disposed on the first insulator, and a 2D material disposed on the second insulator is formed. A first voltage is applied between the 2D material and the substrate. With the first voltage applied between the 2D material and the substrate, a second voltage is applied between the 2D material and a probe positioned proximate the 2D material. The second voltage between the 2D material and the probe is removed. The first voltage between the 2D material and the substrate is removed. A portion of the 2D material proximate the probe when the second voltage was applied has a different electron density compared to a remainder of the 2D material.

  13. Two-dimensional fourier transform spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFlores, Lauren; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-10-25

    The present invention relates to a system and methods for acquiring two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D FT) spectra. Overlap of a collinear pulse pair and probe induce a molecular response which is collected by spectral dispersion of the signal modulated probe beam. Simultaneous collection of the molecular response, pulse timing and characteristics permit real time phasing and rapid acquisition of spectra. Full spectra are acquired as a function of pulse pair timings and numerically transformed to achieve the full frequency-frequency spectrum. This method demonstrates the ability to acquire information on molecular dynamics, couplings and structure in a simple apparatus. Multi-dimensional methods can be used for diagnostic and analytical measurements in the biological, biomedical, and chemical fields.

  14. Two-dimensional fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFlores, Lauren; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-09-03

    The present invention relates to a system and methods for acquiring two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D FT) spectra. Overlap of a collinear pulse pair and probe induce a molecular response which is collected by spectral dispersion of the signal modulated probe beam. Simultaneous collection of the molecular response, pulse timing and characteristics permit real time phasing and rapid acquisition of spectra. Full spectra are acquired as a function of pulse pair timings and numerically transformed to achieve the full frequency-frequency spectrum. This method demonstrates the ability to acquire information on molecular dynamics, couplings and structure in a simple apparatus. Multi-dimensional methods can be used for diagnostic and analytical measurements in the biological, biomedical, and chemical fields.

  15. FACE RECOGNITION USING TWO DIMENSIONAL LAPLACIAN EIGENMAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jiangfeng; Yuan Baozong; Pei Bingnan

    2008-01-01

    Recently,some research efforts have shown that face images possibly reside on a nonlinear sub-manifold. Though Laplacianfaces method considered the manifold structures of the face images,it has limits to solve face recognition problem. This paper proposes a new feature extraction method,Two Dimensional Laplacian EigenMap (2DLEM),which especially considers the manifold structures of the face images,and extracts the proper features from face image matrix directly by using a linear transformation. As opposed to Laplacianfaces,2DLEM extracts features directly from 2D images without a vectorization preprocessing. To test 2DLEM and evaluate its performance,a series of ex-periments are performed on the ORL database and the Yale database. Moreover,several experiments are performed to compare the performance of three 2D methods. The experiments show that 2DLEM achieves the best performance.

  16. Equivalency of two-dimensional algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Gildemar Carneiro dos; Pomponet Filho, Balbino Jose S. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), BA (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Let us consider a vector z = xi + yj over the field of real numbers, whose basis (i,j) satisfy a given algebra. Any property of this algebra will be reflected in any function of z, so we can state that the knowledge of the properties of an algebra leads to more general conclusions than the knowledge of the properties of a function. However structural properties of an algebra do not change when this algebra suffers a linear transformation, though the structural constants defining this algebra do change. We say that two algebras are equivalent to each other whenever they are related by a linear transformation. In this case, we have found that some relations between the structural constants are sufficient to recognize whether or not an algebra is equivalent to another. In spite that the basis transform linearly, the structural constants change like a third order tensor, but some combinations of these tensors result in a linear transformation, allowing to write the entries of the transformation matrix as function of the structural constants. Eventually, a systematic way to find the transformation matrix between these equivalent algebras is obtained. In this sense, we have performed the thorough classification of associative commutative two-dimensional algebras, and find that even non-division algebra may be helpful in solving non-linear dynamic systems. The Mandelbrot set was used to have a pictorial view of each algebra, since equivalent algebras result in the same pattern. Presently we have succeeded in classifying some non-associative two-dimensional algebras, a task more difficult than for associative one. (author)

  17. Mechanics of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures: Atomistic, continuum, and multi-scale approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Arash

    A new multiscale modeling technique called the Consistent Atomic-scale Finite Element (CAFE) method is introduced. Unlike traditional approaches for linking the atomic structure to its equivalent continuum, this method directly connects the atomic degrees of freedom to a reduced set of finite element degrees of freedom without passing through an intermediate homogenized continuum. As a result, there is no need to introduce stress and strain measures at the atomic level. The Tersoff-Brenner interatomic potential is used to calculate the consistent tangent stiffness matrix of the structure. In this finite element formulation, all local and non-local interactions between carbon atoms are taken into account using overlapping finite elements. In addition, a consistent hierarchical finite element modeling technique is developed for adaptively coarsening and refining the mesh over different parts of the model. This process is consistent with the underlying atomic structure and, by refining the mesh to the scale of atomic spacing, molecular dynamic results can be recovered. This method is valid across the scales and can be used to concurrently model atomistic and continuum phenomena so, in contrast with most other multi-scale methods, there is no need to introduce artificial boundaries for coupling atomistic and continuum regions. Effect of the length scale of the nanostructure is also included in the model by building the hierarchy of elements from bottom up using a finite size atom cluster as the building block. To be consistent with the bravais multi-lattice structure of sp2-bonded carbon, two independent displacement fields are used for reducing the order of the model. Sparse structure of the stiffness matrix of these nanostructures is exploited to reduce the memory requirement and to speed up the formation of the system matrices and solution of the equilibrium equations. Applicability of the method is shown with several examples of the nonlinear mechanics of carbon

  18. Efficient and versatile fibrous adsorbent based on magnetic amphiphilic composites of chrysotile/carbon nanostructures for the removal of ethynilestradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Ana Paula C; Purceno, Aluir D; de Paula, Camila C A; da Silva, Julio César C; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2013-03-15

    In this work, chrysotile was used as support to grow carbon nanotubes and nanofibers to produce fibrous amphiphilic magnetic nanostructured composites. Iron impregnated on the chrysotile surface at 1, 5 and 15 wt% was used as catalyst to grow carbon nanostructures by CVD (chemical vapor deposition) with ethanol at 800°C. Raman, TG/DTA, Mössbauer, XRD, BET, SEM, TEM, elemental analyses and contact angle measurements suggested the formation of a complex amphiphilic material containing up to 21% of nanostructured hydrophobic carbon supported on hydrophilic Mg silicate fibers with magnetic Fe cores protected by carbon coating. Adsorption tests for the hormone ethynilestradiol (EE), a hazardous water contaminant, showed remarkable adsorption capacities even compared to high surface area activated carbon and multiwall carbon nanotubes. These results are discussed in terms of the hydrophobic surface of the carbon nanotubes and nanofibers completely exposed and accessible for the adsorption of the EE molecules combined with the hydrophilic Mg silicate surface which allows good dispersion in water. The composites are magnetic and after adsorption the dispersed particles can be removed by a simple magnetic process. Moreover, the fibrous composites can be conformed as threads, screens and pellets to produce different filtering media.

  19. Influence of hydrogen on chemical vapour synthesis of different carbon nanostructures using propane as precursor and nickel as catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Sahoo; H Mamgain; C Jacob

    2014-10-01

    The role of hydrogen in the catalytic chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes using sputtered nickel thin film as a catalyst is explained in this work. The growth of different carbon nanostructures with the variation in the precursor gas content was studied by keeping all other process parameters constant and using sputtered Ni thin film as a catalyst. The catalyst granule size, its external morphology and the resulting products were analysed. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and carbon nanoribbons (CNRs) were observed under different growth conditions. The different conditions of growth leading to form tubes, fibres or ribbons were analysed by varying the flow ratio of propane and hydrogen gas during the high temperature growth. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies confirmed the above structures under different growth conditions. The role of hydrogen on the surface passivation behaviour of the Ni catalyst and its correlative effect on the growth of carbon nanostructures is analysed. This direct approach can, in principle, be used to synthesize different types of carbon nanostructures by tailoring the hydrogen concentration.

  20. Carbon-based nanostructured surfaces for enhanced phase-change cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj Kousalya, Arun

    To maintain acceptable device temperatures in the new generation of electronic devices under development for high-power applications, conventional liquid cooling schemes will likely be superseded by multi-phase cooling solutions to provide substantial enhancement to the cooling capability. The central theme of the current work is to investigate the two-phase thermal performance of carbon-based nanostructured coatings in passive and pumped liquid-vapor phase-change cooling schemes. Quantification of the critical parameters that influence thermal performance of the carbon nanostructured boiling surfaces presented herein will lead to improved understanding of the underlying evaporative and boiling mechanisms in such surfaces. A flow boiling experimental facility is developed to generate consistent and accurate heat transfer performance curves with degassed and deionized water as the working fluid. New means of boiling heat transfer enhancement by altering surface characteristics such as surface energy and wettability through light-surface interactions is explored in this work. In this regard, carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings are exposed to low-intensity irradiation emitted from a light emitting diode and the subcooled flow boiling performance is compared against a non-irradiated CNT-coated copper surface. A considerable reduction in surface superheat and enhancement in average heat transfer coefficient is observed. In another work involving CNTs, the thermal performance of CNT-integrated sintered wick structures is evaluated in a passively cooled vapor chamber. A physical vapor deposition process is used to coat the CNTs with varying thicknesses of copper to promote surface wetting with the working fluid, water. Thermal performance of the bare sintered copper powder sample and the copper-functionalized CNT-coated sintered copper powder wick samples is compared using an experimental facility that simulates the capillary fluid feeding conditions of a vapor chamber

  1. Physical properties of low-dimensional sp 2 -based carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, V.; Souza Filho, A. G.; Barros, E. B.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    The last two decades have witnessed a tremendous growth in the development and understanding of sp 2 carbon-based nanostructures. The impact of this research has led to a number of fundamental discoveries that have played a central role in the understanding of many aspects of materials physics and their applications. Much of this progress has been enabled by the development of new techniques to prepare, modify, and assemble low-dimensional materials into devices. The field has also benefited greatly from much progress in theoretical and computational modeling, as well as from advances in characterization techniques developed to probe and manipulate single atomic layers, nanoribbons, and nanotubes. Some of the most fundamental physical properties of sp2 carbon-based nanostructures are reviewed and their role as model systems for solid-state physics in one and two dimensions is highlighted. The objective of this review is to provide a thorough account on current understanding of how the details of the atomic structure affect phonons, electrons, and transport in these nanomaterials. The review starts with a description of the behavior of single-layer and few-layer graphene and then expands into the analysis of nanoribbons and nanotubes in terms of their reduced dimensionality and curvature. How the properties can be modified and tailored for specific applications is then discussed. The review concludes with a historical perspective and considers some open questions concerning future directions in the physics of low-dimensional systems and their impact on continued advances in solid-state physics, and also looks beyond carbon nanosystems.

  2. Two Dimensional Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanorods with Tunable Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharon, Sigalit; Etgar, Lioz

    2016-05-11

    Organo-metal halide perovskite is an efficient light harvester in photovoltaic solar cells. Organometal halide perovskite is used mainly in its "bulk" form in the solar cell. Confined perovskite nanostructures could be a promising candidate for efficient optoelectronic devices, taking advantage of the superior bulk properties of organo-metal halide perovskite, as well as the nanoscale properties. In this paper, we present facile low-temperature synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) lead halide perovskite nanorods (NRs). These NRs show a shift to higher energies in the absorbance and in the photoluminescence compared to the bulk material, which supports their 2D structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the NRs demonstrates their 2D nature combined with the tetragonal 3D perovskite structure. In addition, by alternating the halide composition, we were able to tune the optical properties of the NRs. Fast Fourier transform, and electron diffraction show the tetragonal structure of these NRs. By varying the ligands ratio (e.g., octylammonium to oleic acid) in the synthesis, we were able to provide the formation mechanism of these novel 2D perovskite NRs. The 2D perovskite NRs are promising candidates for a variety of optoelectronic applications, such as light-emitting diodes, lasing, solar cells, and sensors.

  3. Subsurface imaging of two-dimensional materials at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinelli, Franco; Pingue, Pasqualantonio; Kay, Nicholas D.; Kolosov, Oleg V.

    2017-02-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) represents a powerful tool that, in the past 30 years, has allowed for the investigation of material surfaces in unprecedented ways at the nanoscale level. However, SPM has shown very little capability for depth penetration, which several nanotechnology applications require. Subsurface imaging has been achieved only in a few cases, when subsurface features influence the physical properties of the surface, such as the electronic states or the heat transfer. Ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM), an adaption of the contact mode atomic force microscopy, can dynamically measure the stiffness of the elastic contact between the probing tip and the sample surface. In particular, UFM has proven highly sensitive to the near-surface elastic field in non-homogeneous samples. In this paper, we present an investigation of two-dimensional (2D) materials, namely flakes of graphite and molybdenum disulphide placed on structured polymeric substrates. We show that UFM can non-destructively distinguish suspended and supported areas and localise defects, such as buckling or delamination of adjacent monolayers, generated by residual stress. Specifically, UFM can probe small variations in the local indentation induced by the mechanical interaction between the tip and the sample. Therefore, any change in the elastic modulus within the volume perturbed by the applied load or the flexural bending of the suspended areas can be detected and imaged. These investigation capabilities are very promising in order to study the buried interfaces of nanostructured 2D materials such as in graphene-based devices.

  4. Two-dimensional gas of massless Dirac fermions in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselov, K S; Geim, A K; Morozov, S V; Jiang, D; Katsnelson, M I; Grigorieva, I V; Dubonos, S V; Firsov, A A

    2005-11-10

    Quantum electrodynamics (resulting from the merger of quantum mechanics and relativity theory) has provided a clear understanding of phenomena ranging from particle physics to cosmology and from astrophysics to quantum chemistry. The ideas underlying quantum electrodynamics also influence the theory of condensed matter, but quantum relativistic effects are usually minute in the known experimental systems that can be described accurately by the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation. Here we report an experimental study of a condensed-matter system (graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon) in which electron transport is essentially governed by Dirac's (relativistic) equation. The charge carriers in graphene mimic relativistic particles with zero rest mass and have an effective 'speed of light' c* approximately 10(6) m s(-1). Our study reveals a variety of unusual phenomena that are characteristic of two-dimensional Dirac fermions. In particular we have observed the following: first, graphene's conductivity never falls below a minimum value corresponding to the quantum unit of conductance, even when concentrations of charge carriers tend to zero; second, the integer quantum Hall effect in graphene is anomalous in that it occurs at half-integer filling factors; and third, the cyclotron mass m(c) of massless carriers in graphene is described by E = m(c)c*2. This two-dimensional system is not only interesting in itself but also allows access to the subtle and rich physics of quantum electrodynamics in a bench-top experiment.

  5. Promotion of water-mediated carbon removal by nanostructured barium oxide/nickel interfaces in solid oxide fuel cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Lei; Choi, YongMan; Qin, Wentao; Chen, Haiyan; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Ping; Bai, Jianming; Tyson, Trevor A; Liu, Meilin

    2011-01-01

    ...), CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750°C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate...

  6. On numerical evaluation of two-dimensional phase integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lessow, H.; Rusch, W.; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans

    1975-01-01

    The relative advantages of several common numerical integration algorithms used in computing two-dimensional phase integrals are evaluated.......The relative advantages of several common numerical integration algorithms used in computing two-dimensional phase integrals are evaluated....

  7. Electron field emission characteristics of different surface morphologies of ZnO nanostructures coated on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuan-Wei; Lian, Huan-Bin; Cai, Jhen-Hong; Wang, Yao-Te; Lee, Kuei-Yi

    2011-12-01

    The optimal carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles with a hexagonal arrangement were synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). To enhance the electron field emission characteristics of the pristine CNTs, the zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures coated on CNT bundles using another TCVD technique. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the ZnO nanostructures were grown onto the CNT surface uniformly, and the surface morphology of ZnO nanostructures varied with the distance between the CNT bundle and the zinc acetate. The results of field emissions showed that the ZnO nanostructures grown onto the CNTs could improve the electron field emission characteristics. The enhancement of field emission characteristics was attributed to the increase of emission sites formed by the nanostructures of ZnO grown onto the CNT surface, and each ZnO nanostructure could be regarded as an individual field emission site. In addition, ZnO-coated CNT bundles exhibited a good emission uniformity and stable current density. These results demonstrated that ZnO-coated CNTs is a promising field emitter material.

  8. The van der Waals coefficients between carbon nanostructures and small molecules: A time-dependent density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, C; Ghanty, T K; Banerjee, Arup; Chakrabarti, Aparna

    2009-10-28

    We employ all-electron ab initio time-dependent density functional theory based method to calculate the long-range dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient, namely, the van der Waals (vdW) coefficient (C(6)) between fullerenes and finite-length carbon nanotubes as well as between these structures and different small molecules. Our aim is to accurately estimate the strength of the long-range vdW interaction in terms of the C(6) coefficients between these systems and also compare these values as a function of shape and size. The dispersion coefficients are obtained via Casimir-Polder relation. The calculations are carried out with the asymptotically correct exchange-correlation potential-the statistical average of orbital potential. It is observed from our calculations that the C(6) coefficients of the carbon nanotubes increase nonlinearly with length, which implies a much stronger vdW interaction between the longer carbon nanostructures compared with the shorter ones. Additionally, it is found that the values of C(6) and polarizability are about 40%-50% lower for the carbon cages when compared with the results corresponding to the quasi-one-dimensional nanotubes with equivalent number of atoms. From our calculations of the vdW coefficients between the small molecules and the carbon nanostructures, it is observed that for H(2), the C(6) value is much larger compared with that of He. It is found that the rare gas atoms have very low values of vdW coefficient with the carbon nanostructures. In contrast, it is found that other gas molecules, including the ones that are environmentally important, possess much higher C(6) values. Carbon tetrachloride as well as chlorine molecule show very high C(6) values with themselves as well as with the carbon nanostructures. This is due to the presence of the weakly bound seven electrons in the valence state for the halogen atoms, which makes these compounds much more polarizable compared with the others.

  9. Carbon Nanostructure: Its Evolution During its Impact Upon Soot Growth and Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The proposed work is a ground-based study to define and quantify soot nanostructural changes in response to growth conditions, thermal and oxidative treatments and to quantify their impact upon further oxidation and growth of highly ordered carbon materials. Experimental data relating soot oxidation rates to multiple oxidizing species concentrations will directly test for additive or synergistic soot oxidation rates. Such validation is central for assessing the applicability of individual soot oxidation rates and designing oxidative strategies for controlling soot loadings in and emissions from turbulent combustion processes. Through these experiments, new insights into soot nanostructure evolution during and its impact upon oxidation by O2 and OH will be realized. It is expected that the results of this effort will spawn new research directions in future microgravity and 1g environments. Issues raised by positive or even negative demonstration of the hypotheses of this proposal have direct bearing on modelling and controlling soot formation and its destruction in nearly every combustion process producing soot.

  10. Two-Dimensional Porous Micro/Nano Metal Oxides Templated by Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hailiang; Zhou, Xufeng; Zheng, Chao; Liu, Zhaoping

    2015-06-10

    Novel two-dimensional (2D) porous metal oxides with micro-/nanoarchitecture have been successfully fabricated using graphene oxide (GO) as a typical sacrificial template. GO as a 2D template ensures that the growth and fusion of metal oxides nanoparticles is restricted in the 2D plane. A series of metal oxides (NiO, Fe2O3, Co3O4, Mn2O3, and NiFe2O4) with similar nanostructure were investigated using this simple method. Some of these special nanostructured materials, such as NiO, when being used as anode for lithium-ion batteries, can exhibit high specific capacity, good rate performance, and cycling stability. Importantly, this strategy of creating a 2D porous micro/nano architecture can be easily extended to controllably synthesize other binary/polynary metal oxides nanostructures for lithium-ion batteries or other applications.

  11. On the stability of conventional and nano-structured carbon-based catalysts in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene under industrially relevant conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarubina, Valeriya; Talebi, Hesamoddin; Nederlof, Christian; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Melian-Cabrera, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Relevant carbon-based materials, home-made carbon-silica hybrids, commercial activated carbon, and nanostructured multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were tested in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB). Special attention was given to the reaction conditions, using a relatively concen

  12. Excitation, detection, and electrostatic manipulation of terahertz-frequency range plasmons in a two-dimensional electron system

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jingbo; Wood, Christopher D; Mistry, Divyang; Li, Lianhe; Muchenje, Wilson; Rosamond, Mark C; Chen, Li; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Cunningham, John E

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy employing free-space radiation has frequently been used to probe the elementary excitations of low-dimensional systems. The diffraction limit blocks its use for the in-plane study of individual laterally defined nanostructures, however. Here, we demonstrate a planar terahertz-frequency plasmonic circuit in which photoconductive material is monolithically integrated with a two-dimensional electron system. Plasmons with a broad spectral range (up to ~400 GHz) are excited by injecting picosecond-duration pulses, generated and detected by a photoconductive semiconductor, into a high mobility two-dimensional electron system. Using voltage modulation of a Schottky gate overlying the two-dimensional electron system, we form a tuneable plasmonic cavity, and observe electrostatic manipulation of the plasmon resonances. Our technique offers a direct route to access the picosecond dynamics of confined transport in a broad range of lateral nanostructures.

  13. Optical properties of carbon nanostructures produced by laser irradiation on chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Enrique Vigueras; López, Susana Hernández; Camacho López, Marco A.; Contreras, Delfino Reyes; Farías-Mancilla, Rurik; Flores-Gallardo, Sergio G.; Hernández-Escobar, Claudia A.; Zaragoza-Contreras, E. Armando

    2016-10-01

    This research focused on the nanosecond (Nd: YAG-1064 nm) laser pulse effect on the optical and morphological properties of chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Two suspensions of MWCNT in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were prepared, one was submitted to laser pulses for 10 min while the other (blank) was only mechanically homogenized during the same time. Following the laser irradiation, the suspension acquired a yellow-amber color, in contrast to the black translucent appearance of the blank. UV-vis spectroscopy confirmed this observation, showing the blank a higher absorption. Additionally, photoluminescence measurements exhibited a broad blue-green emission band both in the blank and irradiated suspension when excited at 369 nm, showing the blank a lower intensity. However, a modification in the excitation wavelength produced a violet to green tuning in the irradiated suspension, which did not occur in the blank. Lastly, the electron microscopy analysis of the treated nanotubes showed the abundant formation of amorphous carbon, nanocages, and nanotube unzipping, exhibiting the intense surface modification produced by the laser pulse. Nanotube surface modification and the coexistence with the new carbon nanostructures were considered as the conductive conditions for optical properties modification.

  14. Perspective: Two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has been developed for studies of photochemical reaction mechanisms and structural heterogeneity in complex systems. The 2DRR method can leverage electronic resonance enhancement to selectively probe chromophores embedded in complex environments (e.g., a cofactor in a protein). In addition, correlations between the two dimensions of the 2DRR spectrum reveal information that is not available in traditional Raman techniques. For example, distributions of reactant and product geometries can be correlated in systems that undergo chemical reactions on the femtosecond time scale. Structural heterogeneity in an ensemble may also be reflected in the 2D spectroscopic line shapes of both reactive and non-reactive systems. In this perspective article, these capabilities of 2DRR spectroscopy are discussed in the context of recent applications to the photodissociation reactions of triiodide and myoglobin. We also address key differences between the signal generation mechanisms for 2DRR and off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopies. Most notably, it has been shown that these two techniques are subject to a tradeoff between sensitivity to anharmonicity and susceptibility to artifacts. Overall, recent experimental developments and applications of the 2DRR method suggest great potential for the future of the technique.

  15. Janus spectra in two-dimensional flows

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    In theory, large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows and other two-dimensional flows may host two distinct types of turbulent energy spectra---in one, $\\alpha$, the spectral exponent of velocity fluctuations, equals $3$ and the fluctuations are dissipated at the small scales, and in the other, $\\alpha=5/3$ and the fluctuations are dissipated at the large scales---but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed $\\alpha = 3$. Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which $\\alpha$ has transitioned from $3$ to $5/3$ for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to $3$ for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows...

  16. Comparative Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Doreen; König, Simone

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional comparative fluorescence gel electrophoresis (CoFGE) uses an internal standard to increase the reproducibility of coordinate assignment for protein spots visualized on 2D polyacrylamide gels. This is particularly important for samples, which need to be compared without the availability of replicates and thus cannot be studied using differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE). CoFGE corrects for gel-to-gel variability by co-running with the sample proteome a standardized marker grid of 80-100 nodes, which is formed by a set of purified proteins. Differentiation of reference and analyte is possible by the use of two fluorescent dyes. Variations in the y-dimension (molecular weight) are corrected by the marker grid. For the optional control of the x-dimension (pI), azo dyes can be used. Experiments are possible in both vertical and horizontal (h) electrophoresis devices, but hCoFGE is much easier to perform. For data analysis, commercial software capable of warping can be adapted.

  17. Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals: Disorder Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Markus R; Graczykowski, Bartlomiej; Reparaz, Juan Sebastian; El Sachat, Alexandros; Sledzinska, Marianna; Alzina, Francesc; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M

    2016-09-14

    The design and fabrication of phononic crystals (PnCs) hold the key to control the propagation of heat and sound at the nanoscale. However, there is a lack of experimental studies addressing the impact of order/disorder on the phononic properties of PnCs. Here, we present a comparative investigation of the influence of disorder on the hypersonic and thermal properties of two-dimensional PnCs. PnCs of ordered and disordered lattices are fabricated of circular holes with equal filling fractions in free-standing Si membranes. Ultrafast pump and probe spectroscopy (asynchronous optical sampling) and Raman thermometry based on a novel two-laser approach are used to study the phononic properties in the gigahertz (GHz) and terahertz (THz) regime, respectively. Finite element method simulations of the phonon dispersion relation and three-dimensional displacement fields furthermore enable the unique identification of the different hypersonic vibrations. The increase of surface roughness and the introduction of short-range disorder are shown to modify the phonon dispersion and phonon coherence in the hypersonic (GHz) range without affecting the room-temperature thermal conductivity. On the basis of these findings, we suggest a criteria for predicting phonon coherence as a function of roughness and disorder.

  18. Two-dimensional topological photonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Chen; He, Cheng; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Shi-Ning; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2017-09-01

    The topological phase of matter, originally proposed and first demonstrated in fermionic electronic systems, has drawn considerable research attention in the past decades due to its robust transport of edge states and its potential with respect to future quantum information, communication, and computation. Recently, searching for such a unique material phase in bosonic systems has become a hot research topic worldwide. So far, many bosonic topological models and methods for realizing them have been discovered in photonic systems, acoustic systems, mechanical systems, etc. These discoveries have certainly yielded vast opportunities in designing material phases and related properties in the topological domain. In this review, we first focus on some of the representative photonic topological models and employ the underlying Dirac model to analyze the edge states and geometric phase. On the basis of these models, three common types of two-dimensional topological photonic systems are discussed: 1) photonic quantum Hall effect with broken time-reversal symmetry; 2) photonic topological insulator and the associated pseudo-time-reversal symmetry-protected mechanism; 3) time/space periodically modulated photonic Floquet topological insulator. Finally, we provide a summary and extension of this emerging field, including a brief introduction to the Weyl point in three-dimensional systems.

  19. Radiation effects on two-dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, R.C. II; Robinson, J.A. [Department of Materials Science, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Center for Two-Dimensional Layered Materials, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Shi, T. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Silva, E.C. [GlobalFoundries, Malta, NY (United States); Jovanovic, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The effects of electromagnetic and particle irradiation on two-dimensional materials (2DMs) are discussed in this review. Radiation creates defects that impact the structure and electronic performance of materials. Determining the impact of these defects is important for developing 2DM-based devices for use in high-radiation environments, such as space or nuclear reactors. As such, most experimental studies have been focused on determining total ionizing dose damage to 2DMs and devices. Total dose experiments using X-rays, gamma rays, electrons, protons, and heavy ions are summarized in this review. We briefly discuss the possibility of investigating single event effects in 2DMs based on initial ion beam irradiation experiments and the development of 2DM-based integrated circuits. Additionally, beneficial uses of irradiation such as ion implantation to dope materials or electron-beam and helium-beam etching to shape materials have begun to be used on 2DMs and are reviewed as well. For non-ionizing radiation, such as low-energy photons, we review the literature on 2DM-based photo-detection from terahertz to UV. The majority of photo-detecting devices operate in the visible and UV range, and for this reason they are the focus of this review. However, we review the progress in developing 2DMs for detecting infrared and terahertz radiation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Photodetectors based on two dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lou; Zhongzhu, Liang; Guozhen, Shen

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials with unique properties have received a great deal of attention in recent years. This family of materials has rapidly established themselves as intriguing building blocks for versatile nanoelectronic devices that offer promising potential for use in next generation optoelectronics, such as photodetectors. Furthermore, their optoelectronic performance can be adjusted by varying the number of layers. They have demonstrated excellent light absorption, enabling ultrafast and ultrasensitive detection of light in photodetectors, especially in their single-layer structure. Moreover, due to their atomic thickness, outstanding mechanical flexibility, and large breaking strength, these materials have been of great interest for use in flexible devices and strain engineering. Toward that end, several kinds of photodetectors based on 2D materials have been reported. Here, we present a review of the state-of-the-art in photodetectors based on graphene and other 2D materials, such as the graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and so on. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61377033, 61574132, 61504136) and the State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Asymptotics for Two-dimensional Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nam, Phan Thanh; Portmann, Fabian; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the ground state energy of an atom confined to two dimensions with an infinitely heavy nucleus of charge $Z>0$ and $N$ quantum electrons of charge -1 is $E(N,Z)=-{1/2}Z^2\\ln Z+(E^{\\TF}(\\lambda)+{1/2}c^{\\rm H})Z^2+o(Z^2)$ when $Z\\to \\infty$ and $N/Z\\to \\lambda$, where $E^{\\TF}(\\lambd......We prove that the ground state energy of an atom confined to two dimensions with an infinitely heavy nucleus of charge $Z>0$ and $N$ quantum electrons of charge -1 is $E(N,Z)=-{1/2}Z^2\\ln Z+(E^{\\TF}(\\lambda)+{1/2}c^{\\rm H})Z^2+o(Z^2)$ when $Z\\to \\infty$ and $N/Z\\to \\lambda$, where $E......^{\\TF}(\\lambda)$ is given by a Thomas-Fermi type variational problem and $c^{\\rm H}\\approx -2.2339$ is an explicit constant. We also show that the radius of a two-dimensional neutral atom is unbounded when $Z\\to \\infty$, which is contrary to the expected behavior of three-dimensional atoms....

  2. Synthesis of borophenes: Anisotropic, two-dimensional boron polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannix, Andrew J.; Zhou, Xiang-Feng; Kiraly, Brian; Wood, Joshua D.; Alducin, Diego; Myers, Benjamin D.; Liu, Xiaolong; Fisher, Brandon L.; Santiago, Ulises; Guest, Jeffrey R.; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Ponce, Arturo; Oganov, Artem R.; Hersam, Mark C.; Guisinger, Nathan P.

    2016-01-01

    At the atomic-cluster scale, pure boron is markedly similar to carbon, forming simple planar molecules and cage-like fullerenes.Theoretical studies predict that two-dimensional (2D) boron sheets will adopt an atomic configuration similar to that of boron atomic clusters. We synthesized atomically thin, crystalline 2D boron sheets (i.e., borophene) on silver surfaces under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Atomic-scale characterization, supported by theoretical calculations, revealed structures reminiscent of fused boron clusters with multiple scales of anisotropic, out-of-plane buckling. Unlike bulk boron allotropes, borophene shows metallic characteristics that are consistent with predictions of a highly anisotropic, 2D metal. PMID:26680195

  3. Geometric dependence of transport and universal behavior in three dimensional carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leizhi; Yin, Ming; Jaroszynski, Jan; Park, Ju-Hyun; Mbamalu, Godwin; Datta, Timir

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanostructures with the spherical voids exhibit interesting temperature and magnetic field dependent transport properties. By increasing the void size, the structures are tuned from metallic to insulating; in addition, the magnetoresistance (MR) is enhanced. Our investigation in the magnetic fields (B) up to 18 T at temperatures (T) from 250 mK to 20 K shows that at high temperatures (T > 2 K), the MR crosses over from quadratic to a non-saturating linear dependence with increasing magnetic field. Furthermore, all MR data in this temperature regime collapse onto a single curve as a universal function of B/T, following Kohler's rule. Remarkably, the MR also exhibits orientation insensitivity, i.e., it displays a response independent of the direction on the magnetic field.

  4. Correlation between macro- and nano-scopic measurements of carbon nanostructured paper elastic modulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, Yamila M.; Al Ghaferi, Amal, E-mail: aalghaferi@masdar.ac.ae, E-mail: mchiesa@masdar.ac.ae; Chiesa, Matteo, E-mail: aalghaferi@masdar.ac.ae, E-mail: mchiesa@masdar.ac.ae [Laboratory for Energy and Nanosciences, Institute Center for Energy (iEnergy), Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-07-20

    Extensive work has been done in order to determine the bulk elastic modulus of isotropic samples from force curves acquired with atomic force microscopy. However, new challenges are encountered given the development of new materials constructed of one-dimensional anisotropic building blocks, such as carbon nanostructured paper. In the present work, we establish a reliable framework to correlate the elastic modulus values obtained by amplitude modulation atomic force microscope force curves, a nanoscopic technique, with that determined by traditional macroscopic tensile testing. In order to do so, several techniques involving image processing, statistical analysis, and simulations are used to find the appropriate path to understand how macroscopic properties arise from anisotropic nanoscale components, and ultimately, being able to calculate the value of bulk elastic modulus.

  5. Nanostructured metal/carbon hybrids for electrocatalysis by direct carbonization of inverse micelle multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yu Jin; Jang, Yoon Hee; Han, Sang-Beom; Khatua, Dibyendu; Hess, Claudia; Ahn, Hyungju; Ryu, Du Yeol; Shin, Kwanwoo; Park, Kyung-Won; Steinhart, Martin; Kim, Dong Ha

    2013-02-26

    A synthetic strategy for the fabrication of graphitic carbon nanomaterials containing highly dispersed arrays of metal nanoparticles is reported. This synthetic strategy involves successive deposition of inverse micelle monolayers containing a metal precursor and reduction of the latter, followed by direct carbonization of the obtained multilayer structure of inverse micelles containing metal nanoparticles. Thus, a "direct-carbonization" concept, in which the block copolymer simultaneously serves as soft template and as carbon source, was combined with a multilayer buildup protocol. The inner architecture of the multilayer structures consisting of carbon and metal nanoparticles was studied by X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy imaging. The hexagonal near ordering of the metal nanoparticles in the block copolymer micelle multilayers was by and large conserved after carbonization. The resulting carbon structures containing multilayers of highly dispersed metal nanoparticles exhibit superior electrocatalytic activity in formic acid and methanol oxidation, suggesting that they are promising electrode materials for fuel cells.

  6. Theoretical studies of structure-property relations in graphene-based carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2014-03-01

    This presentation focuses on establishing relations between atomic structure, electronic structure, and properties in graphene-based carbon nanostructures through first-principles density functional theory calculations and molecular-dynamics simulations. We have analyzed carbon nanostructure formation from twisted bilayer graphene, upon creation of interlayer covalent C-C bonds due to patterned hydrogenation or fluorination. For small twist angles and twist angles near 30 degrees, interlayer covalent bonding generates superlattices of diamond-like nanocrystals and of fullerene-like configurations, respectively, embedded within the graphene layers. The electronic band gaps of these superlattices can be tuned through selective chemical functionalization and creation of interlayer bonds, and range from a few meV to over 1.2 eV. The mechanical properties of these superstructures also can be precisely tuned by controlling the extent of chemical functionalization. Importantly, the shear modulus is shown to increase monotonically with the fraction of sp3-hybridized C-C bonds. We have also studied collective interactions of multiple defects such as random distributions of vacancies in single-layer graphene (SLG). We find that a crystalline-to-amorphous structural transition occurs at vacancy concentrations of 5-10% over a broad temperature range. The structure of our defect-induced amorphized graphene is in excellent agreement with experimental observations of SLG exposed to a high electron irradiation dose. Simulations of tensile tests on these irradiated graphene sheets identify trends for the ultimate tensile strength, failure strain, and toughness as a function of vacancy concentration. The vacancy-induced amorphization transition is accompanied by a brittle-to-ductile transition in the failure response of irradiated graphene sheets and even heavily damaged samples exhibit tensile strengths near 30 GPa, in significant excess of those typical of engineering materials.

  7. Magnetic amphiphilic hybrid carbon nanotubes containing N-doped and undoped sections: powerful tensioactive nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purceno, Aluir D.; Machado, Bruno F.; Teixeira, Ana Paula C.; Medeiros, Tayline V.; Benyounes, Anas; Beausoleil, Julien; Menezes, Helvecio C.; Cardeal, Zenilda L.; Lago, Rochel M.; Serp, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    In this work, unique amphiphilic magnetic hybrid carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized and used as tensioactive nanostructures in different applications. These CNTs interact very well with aqueous media due to the hydrophilic N-doped section, whereas the undoped hydrophobic one has strong affinity for organic molecules. The amphiphilic character combined with the magnetic properties of these CNTs opens the door to completely new and exciting applications in adsorption science and catalysis. These amphiphilic N-doped CNTs can also be used as powerful tensioactive emulsification structures. They can emulsify water/organic mixtures and by a simple magnetic separation the emulsion can be easily broken. We demonstrate the application of these CNTs in the efficient adsorption of various molecules, in addition to promoting biphasic processes in three different reactions, i.e. transesterification of soybean oil, quinoline extractive oxidation with H2O2 and a metal-catalyzed aqueous oxidation of heptanol with molecular oxygen.In this work, unique amphiphilic magnetic hybrid carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized and used as tensioactive nanostructures in different applications. These CNTs interact very well with aqueous media due to the hydrophilic N-doped section, whereas the undoped hydrophobic one has strong affinity for organic molecules. The amphiphilic character combined with the magnetic properties of these CNTs opens the door to completely new and exciting applications in adsorption science and catalysis. These amphiphilic N-doped CNTs can also be used as powerful tensioactive emulsification structures. They can emulsify water/organic mixtures and by a simple magnetic separation the emulsion can be easily broken. We demonstrate the application of these CNTs in the efficient adsorption of various molecules, in addition to promoting biphasic processes in three different reactions, i.e. transesterification of soybean oil, quinoline extractive oxidation with H2O2 and

  8. Flexible supercapacitors with high areal capacitance based on hierarchical carbon tubular nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Su, Hai; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Binbin; Chun, Fengjun; Chu, Xiang; He, Weidong; Yang, Weiqing

    2016-11-01

    Hierarchical structure design can greatly enhance the unique properties of primary material(s) but suffers from complicated preparation process and difficult self-assembly of materials with different dimensionalities. Here we report on the growth of single carbon tubular nanostructures with hierarchical structure (hCTNs) through a simple method based on direct conversion of carbon dioxide. Resorting to in-situ transformation and self-assembly of carbon micro/nano-structures, the obtained hCTNs are blood-like multichannel hierarchy composed of one large channel across the hCTNs and plenty of small branches connected to each other. Due to the unique pore structure and high surface area, these hCTN-based flexible supercapacitors possess the highest areal capacitance of ∼320 mF cm-2, as well as good rate-capability and excellent cycling stability (95% retention after 2500 cycles). It was established that this method can control the morphology, size, and density of hCTNs and effectively construct hCTNs well anchored to the various substrates. Our work unambiguously demonstrated the potential of hCTNs for large flexible supercapacitors and integrated energy management electronics.

  9. Laser-induced synthesis of a nanostructured polymer-like metal-carbon complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelian, S.; Kutrovskaya, S.; Kucherik, A.; Osipov, A.; Povolotckaia, A.; Povolotskiy, A.; Manshina, A.

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of nanotructured metal-carbon materials by laser irradiation is an actual branch of laser physics and nanotechnology. Laser sources with different pulse duration allow changing the heating rate with realization of different transition scenarios and synthesis materials with various physical properties. We study the process of the formation of nanostructured metal-clusters and complexes using laser irradiation of colloidal systems which were consisted of carbon micro- nanoparticles and nanoparticles of noble metals. For carbon nanoparticles synthesis we use the method of laser ablation in liquid. For the realization of different regimes of laser surface modification of the target (glassycarbon and shungite) and the formation of micro- nanoparticles in a liquid the YAG:Nd laser with a pulse duration from 0.5 ms up to 20 ms (pulse energy up to 50J) was applied. We have used the CW-laser with moderate intensity in liquid (water or ethanol) for nanoparticle of noble metals synthesis. Thus, colloidal systems were obtained by using CW-laser with λ = 1.06 μm, I ~ 105-6 W/cm2, and t = 10 min. The average size of resulting particles was approximately about 10 to 100 nm. The nanoparticle obtaining was provided in the colloidal solution with different laser parameters. In this work we have investigated the mechanism of the metal-carbon cluster formation during the process of irradiation of colloidal system which were consisted of separate carbon, silver and gold nanoparticles. This system was irradiated by nanosecond laser (100 ns) with average power up to 50W.

  10. Interaction of two-dimensional magnetoexcitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumanov, E. V.; Podlesny, I. V.; Moskalenko, S. A.; Liberman, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    We study interaction of the two-dimensional magnetoexcitons with in-plane wave vector k→∥ = 0 , taking into account the influence of the excited Landau levels (ELLs) and of the external electric field perpendicular to the surface of the quantum well and parallel to the external magnetic field. It is shown that the account of the ELLs gives rise to the repulsion between the spinless magnetoexcitons with k→∥ = 0 in the Fock approximation, with the interaction constant g decreasing inverse proportional to the magnetic field strength B (g (0) ∼ 1 / B) . In the presence of the perpendicular electric field the Rashba spin-orbit coupling (RSOC), Zeeman splitting (ZS) and nonparabolicity of the heavy-hole dispersion law affect the Landau quantization of the electrons and holes. They move along the new cyclotron orbits, change their Coulomb interactions and cause the interaction between 2D magnetoexcitons with k→∥ = 0 . The changes of the Coulomb interactions caused by the electrons and by the holes moving with new cyclotron orbits are characterized by some coefficients, which in the absence of the electric field turn to be unity. The differences between these coefficients of the electron-hole pairs forming the magnetoexcitons determine their affinities to the interactions. The interactions between the homogeneous, semihomogeneous and heterogeneous magnetoexcitons forming the symmetric states with the same signs of their affinities are attractive whereas in the case of different sign affinities are repulsive. In the heterogeneous asymmetric states the interactions have opposite signs in comparison with the symmetric states. In all these cases the interaction constant g have the dependence g (0) 1 /√{ B} .

  11. Carbon/Clay nanostructured composite obtained by hydrothermal method; Compositos nanoestruturados carbono/argila obtidos por metodo hidotermico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barin, G.B.; Bispo, T.S.; Gimenez, I.F.; Barreto, L.S., E-mail: gabriela.borin@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Souza Filho, A.G. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2010-07-01

    The development of strategies for converting biomass into useful materials, more efficient energy carrier and / or hydrogen storage is shown a key issue for the present and future. Carbon nanostructure can be obtained by severe processing techniques such as arc discharge, chemical deposition and catalyzed pyrolysis of organic compounds. In this study we used hydrothermal methods for obtaining nanostructured composites of carbon / clay. To this end, we used coir dust and special clays. The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman. The presence of the D band at 1350 cm{sup -1} in the Raman spectrum shows the formation of amorphous carbon with particle size of about 8.85 nm. (author)

  12. Carbon/Clay nanostructured composite obtained by hydrothermal method; Compositos nanoestruturados carbono/argila obtidos por metodo hidotermico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barin, G.B.; Bispo, T.S.; Gimenez, I.F.; Barreto, L.S., E-mail: gabriela.borin@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Souza Filho, A.G. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2010-07-01

    The development of strategies for converting biomass into useful materials, more efficient energy carrier and / or hydrogen storage is shown a key issue for the present and future. Carbon nanostructure can be obtained by severe processing techniques such as arc discharge, chemical deposition and catalyzed pyrolysis of organic compounds. In this study we used hydrothermal methods for obtaining nanostructured composites of carbon / clay. To this end, we used coir dust and special clays. The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman. The presence of the D band at 1350 cm{sup -1} in the Raman spectrum shows the formation of amorphous carbon with particle size of about 8.85 nm. (author)

  13. Tailoring the carbon nanostructures grown on the surface of Ni-Al bimetallic nanoparticles in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Whi Dong; Ahn, Ji Young; Lee, Dong Geun; Lee, Hyung Woo; Hong, Suck Won; Park, Hyun Seol; Kim, Soo H

    2011-10-15

    A gas-phase, one-step method for producing various aerosol carbon nanostructures is described. The carbon nanostructures can be selectively tailored with either straight, coiled, or sea urchin-like structures by controlling the size of Ni-Al bimetallic nanoparticles and the reaction temperature. The carbon nanostructures were grown using both conventional spray pyrolysis and thermal chemical vapor deposition. Bimetallic nanoparticles with catalytic Ni (guest) and non-catalytic Al (host) matrix were reacted with acetylene and hydrogen gases. At the processing temperature range of 650-800 °C, high concentration straight carbon nanotubes (S-CNTs) with a small amount of coiled carbon nanotubes (C-CNTs) can be grown on the surface of seeded bimetallic nanoparticle size 100 nm, resulting from the significant size reduction of the available Ni sites due to thermal expansion of molten Al matrix sites without consumption of Al matrix. However, at the processing temperature range of 500-650 °C, C-CNTs can be grown on the bimetallic nanoparticle size 100 nm due to the isolation of Ni sites in the Al matrix. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Two-dimensional materials and their prospects in transistor electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwierz, F; Pezoldt, J; Granzner, R

    2015-05-14

    During the past decade, two-dimensional materials have attracted incredible interest from the electronic device community. The first two-dimensional material studied in detail was graphene and, since 2007, it has intensively been explored as a material for electronic devices, in particular, transistors. While graphene transistors are still on the agenda, researchers have extended their work to two-dimensional materials beyond graphene and the number of two-dimensional materials under examination has literally exploded recently. Meanwhile several hundreds of different two-dimensional materials are known, a substantial part of them is considered useful for transistors, and experimental transistors with channels of different two-dimensional materials have been demonstrated. In spite of the rapid progress in the field, the prospects of two-dimensional transistors still remain vague and optimistic opinions face rather reserved assessments. The intention of the present paper is to shed more light on the merits and drawbacks of two-dimensional materials for transistor electronics and to add a few more facets to the ongoing discussion on the prospects of two-dimensional transistors. To this end, we compose a wish list of properties for a good transistor channel material and examine to what extent the two-dimensional materials fulfill the criteria of the list. The state-of-the-art two-dimensional transistors are reviewed and a balanced view of both the pros and cons of these devices is provided.

  15. Ion-modulated nonlinear electronic transport in carbon nanotube bundle/RbAg4I5 thin film composite nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Lin; Zhang, Wei; Wei, Jinquan; Gu, Bingfu

    2014-01-01

    We have explored the ion-modulated electronic transport properties of mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) composite nanostructures made of superionic conductor RbAg4I5 films and carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle spiderwebs. Our experimental and theoretical studies indicate that the formation of ion-electron bound states (IEBSs) leads to strong ion-electron interference effect and interesting electronic transport of CNT, such as nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and novel temperature dependence of the current. With increasing temperature, the hybrid nanostructures show rich phases with different dependence of current on temperature, which is related to the structural phase transition of RbAg4I5 and the transition of dissociation of IEBSs. The ion-modulation of the electric conductivity in such MIEC composite nanostructures with great tunability has been used to design new ionic-electronic composite nano-devices with function like field effect transistor.

  16. SCAPS, a two-dimensional ion detector for mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Faraday Cup (FC) and electron multiplier (EM) are of the most popular ion detector for mass spectrometer. FC is used for high-count-rate ion measurements and EM can detect from single ion. However, FC is difficult to detect lower intensities less than kilo-cps, and EM loses ion counts higher than Mega-cps. Thus, FC and EM are used complementary each other, but they both belong to zero-dimensional detector. On the other hand, micro channel plate (MCP) is a popular ion signal amplifier with two-dimensional capability, but additional detection system must be attached to detect the amplified signals. Two-dimensional readout for the MCP signals, however, have not achieve the level of FC and EM systems. A stacked CMOS active pixel sensor (SCAPS) has been developed to detect two-dimensional ion variations for a spatial area using semiconductor technology [1-8]. The SCAPS is an integrated type multi-detector, which is different from EM and FC, and is composed of more than 500×500 pixels (micro-detectors) for imaging of cm-area with a pixel of less than 20 µm in square. The SCAPS can be detected from single ion to 100 kilo-count ions per one pixel. Thus, SCAPS can be accumulated up to several giga-count ions for total pixels, i.e. for total imaging area. The SCAPS has been applied to stigmatic ion optics of secondary ion mass spectrometer, as a detector of isotope microscope [9]. The isotope microscope has capabilities of quantitative isotope images of hundred-micrometer area on a sample with sub-micrometer resolution and permil precision, and of two-dimensional mass spectrum on cm-scale of mass dispersion plane of a sector magnet with ten-micrometer resolution. The performance has been applied to two-dimensional isotope spatial distribution for mainly hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen of natural (extra-terrestrial and terrestrial) samples and samples simulated natural processes [e.g. 10-17]. References: [1] Matsumoto, K., et al. (1993) IEEE Trans. Electron Dev. 40

  17. Modified glassy carbon electrodes based on carbon nanostructures for ultrasensitive electrochemical determination of furazolidone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahrokhian, Saeed, E-mail: shahrokhian@sharif.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, Leila [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghalkhani, Masoumeh [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Lavizan, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for advanced technology, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Lavizan, Tehran, 16788 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Furazolidone (Fu) was investigated on the surface of the glassy carbon electrode modified with different carbon nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanoparticles (CNPs), nanodiamond-graphite (NDG), graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and RGO-CNT hybrids (various ratios) using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The results of voltammetric studies exhibited a considerable increase in the cathodic peak current of Fu at the RGO modified GCE, compared to other modified electrodes and also bare GCE. The surface morphology and nature of the RGO film was thoroughly characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The modified electrode showed two linear dynamic ranges of 0.001–2.0 μM and 2.0–10.0 μM with a detection limit of 0.3 nM for the voltammetric determination of Fu. This sensor was used successfully for Fu determination in pharmaceutical and clinical preparations. - Highlights: • The electrochemical behavior of Furazolidone (Fu) was investigated on the surface of the modified electrode with different carbon nanomaterials by Linear sweep voltammetry. • Two linear dynamic ranges and a low detection limit were obtained. • The modified electrode was applied for the detection of Fu in pharmaceutical and clinical preparations.

  18. Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures as Support Material for Nanoparticulate Noble-Metal Catalysts in Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mikkel Juul; Veltzé, Sune; Skou, Eivind Morten

    In polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) a fuel - usually hydrogen - and oxygen are combined to produce electricity and water in an electrochemical process, which is commonly carried out at 60-80 °C. For oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation to occur at such low temperatures platinum...... at high electrical potentials encountered occasionally in fuel cells. Other nanostructures of carbon are being investigated as alternatives to carbon black as they have several beneficial properties. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) are an example of one type of these promising materials. Like...

  19. Mechanical behavior of carbon nanotube and graphene junction as a building block for 3D carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Moradi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of defects in junction area of 1D and 2D carbon nanostructures has a major impact on properties of their 3D structures. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulation is utilized to examine the mechanical behavior of graphene sheet (GS in carbon nanotube (CNT-GS junctions. The tensile load was applied along the GS in connection with CNTs of different chiralities. The adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order potential was chosen to model C-C interactions. It provided a reliable model for CNT, GS and their junctions. The results revealed that the connection of CNT to the GS with a hole could improve the mechanical properties of defective GS, which appeared to be independent of CNT type. It was found that the high strength C-C bonds postpone the crack propagation and motivates new crack nucleation. When a hole or CNT placed on the GS, it caused stress concentration, exactly along a line on its side. The lower mechanical properties were consequently associated with crack nucleation and propagation on both sides in a way that cracks encountered each other during the failure; while, the cracks in pristine GS propagate parallel to each other and could not encounter each other.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of magnetic nanostructured thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Zhi-Qiang; Yutaka Abe; Jiang Dong-Hua; Lin Hai; Yoshitake Yamazakia; Wu Chen-Xu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using Monte Carlo simulation, we have compared the magnetic properties between nanostructured thin films and two-dimensional crystalline solids. The dependence of nanostructured properties on the interaction between particles that constitute the nanostructured thin films is also studied. The result shows that the parameters in the interaction potential have an important effect on the properties of nanostructured thin films at the transition temperatures.

  1. Nanostructured films from phthalocyanine and carbon nanotubes: surface morphology and electrical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Jackeline B; Gomes, Douglas J C; Justina, Vanessa D; Lima, Aline M F; Olivati, Clarissa A; Silva, Josmary R; de Souza, Nara C

    2012-02-01

    We report on the investigation of the surface morphology and DC conductivity of nanostructured layer-by-layer (LbL) films from nickel tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine (NiTsPc) alternated with either multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs/NiTsPc) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in chitosan (MWNTs+Ch/NiTsPc). We have explored the surface morphology of the films by using fractal concepts and dynamic scale laws. The MWNTs/NiTsPc LbL films were found to have a fractal dimension of ca. 2, indicating a quasi Euclidean surface. MWNTs+Ch/NiTsPc LbL films are described by the Lai-Das Sarma-Villain (LDV) model, which predicts the deposition of particles and their subsequent relaxation. An increase in the wetting contact angle of MWNTs+Ch/NiTsPc LbL films was observed, as compared with MWNTs/NiTsPc LbL films, which presented an increase in the fractal dimension of the first system. Room temperature conductivities were found be ca. 0.45 S/cm for MWNTs/NiTsPc and 1.35 S/cm for MWNTs+Ch/NiTsPc.

  2. Synthesis and Electrochemical Performance of Polyacrylonitrile Carbon Nanostructure Microspheres for Supercapacitor Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimgjie Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylonitrile (PAN carbon nanostructure microspheres (CNM with the average particle size of 200 nm were prepared in the range of 500 to 800°C. The precursors of CNM were obtained through soap-free emulsion polymerization followed by freeze drying, oxidative stabilization, and half-carbonization. KOH was employed as the activation agent of the precursor material, and the ratio between KOH and the precursor was selected as 2 : 1. The element content, pore structure, nitrogen-containing functional groups, and microstructure characterization were characterized via elemental analysis, N2 adsorption at low temperature, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and the electrochemical properties were examined as well. The results revealed that the CNM displayed specific surface area as high as 2134 m2/g and the total pore volume could reach 2.01 cm3/g when the activation temperature was 700°C. Furthermore, its specific capacitance in 3 M KOH and 1 M organic electrolyte could reach 311 F/g and 179 F/g, respectively. And, also, abundant functional groups of N-5 and N-6 were rich in the surface of the material, which could cause Faraday reaction and got the increasing specific capacitance via improvement of the wettability of the electrode material.

  3. Wetting behaviour of carbon nitride nanostructures grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Kamal, Shafarina Azlinda; Ritikos, Richard; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2015-02-01

    Tuning the wettability of various coating materials by simply controlling the deposition parameters is essential for various specific applications. In this work, carbon nitride (CNx) films were deposited on silicon (1 1 1) substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition employing parallel plate electrode configuration. Effects of varying the electrode distance (DE) on the films' structure and bonding properties were investigated using Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The wettability of the films was analyzed using water contact angle measurements. At high DE, the CNx films' surface was smooth and uniform. This changed into fibrous nanostructures when DE was decreased. Surface roughness of the films increased with this morphological transformation. Nitrogen incorporation increased with decrease in DE which manifested the increase in both relative intensities of Cdbnd N to Cdbnd C and Nsbnd H to Osbnd H bonds. sp2-C to sp3-C ratio increased as DE decreased due to greater deformation of sp2 bonded carbon at lower DE. The films' characteristics changed from hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic with the decrease in DE. Roughness ratio, surface porosity and surface energy calculated from contact angle measurements were strongly dependent on the morphology, surface roughness and bonding properties of the films.

  4. Quantum holographic encoding in a two-dimensional electron gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Christopher

    2010-05-26

    The advent of bottom-up atomic manipulation heralded a new horizon for attainable information density, as it allowed a bit of information to be represented by a single atom. The discrete spacing between atoms in condensed matter has thus set a rigid limit on the maximum possible information density. While modern technologies are still far from this scale, all theoretical downscaling of devices terminates at this spatial limit. Here, however, we break this barrier with electronic quantum encoding scaled to subatomic densities. We use atomic manipulation to first construct open nanostructures - 'molecular holograms' - which in turn concentrate information into a medium free of lattice constraints: the quantum states of a two-dimensional degenerate Fermi gas of electrons. The information embedded in the holograms is transcoded at even smaller length scales into an atomically uniform area of a copper surface, where it is densely projected into both two spatial degrees of freedom and a third holographic dimension mapped to energy. In analogy to optical volume holography, this requires precise amplitude and phase engineering of electron wavefunctions to assemble pages of information volumetrically. This data is read out by mapping the energy-resolved electron density of states with a scanning tunnelling microscope. As the projection and readout are both extremely near-field, and because we use native quantum states rather than an external beam, we are not limited by lensing or collimation and can create electronically projected objects with features as small as {approx}0.3 nm. These techniques reach unprecedented densities exceeding 20 bits/nm{sup 2} and place tens of bits into a single fermionic state.

  5. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N.; Hilty, Florentine M.; Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Zimmermann, Michael B.

    2016-10-01

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO3) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO3 made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO3 and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO3, with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca2P2O7 with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO3) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H3PO4 calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO3 nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  6. Surface Anchoring of Nematic Phase on Carbon Nanotubes: Nanostructure of Ultra-High Temperature Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogale, Amod A

    2012-04-27

    consisting of strong carbon fibers embedded in a carbon matrix are needed. Such carbon/carbon (C/C) composites have been used in aerospace industry to produce missile nose cones, space shuttle leading edge, and aircraft brake-pads. However, radiation-tolerance of such materials is not adequately known because only limited radiation studies have been performed on C/C composites, which suggest that pitch-based carbon fibers have better dimensional stability than that of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based fibers [4]. The thermodynamically-stable state of graphitic crystalline packing of carbon atoms derived from mesophase pitch leads to a greater stability during neutron irradiation [5]. The specific objectives of this project were: (i) to generating novel carbonaceous nanostructures, (ii) measure extent of graphitic crystallinity and the extent of anisotropy, and (iii) collaborate with the Carbon Materials group at Oak Ridge National Lab to have neutron irradiation studies and post-irradiation examinations conducted on the carbon fibers produced in this research project.

  7. Ullmann-like reactions for the synthesis of complex two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quardokus, Rebecca C.; Tewary, V. K.; DelRio, Frank W.

    2016-11-01

    Engineering two-dimensional materials through surface-confined synthetic techniques is a promising avenue for designing new materials with tailored properties. Developing and understanding reaction mechanisms for surface-confined synthesis of two-dimensional materials requires atomic-level characterization and chemical analysis. Beggan et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 365602) used scanning tunneling microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the formation mechanism of surface-confined Ullmann-like coupling of thiophene substituted porphyrins on Ag(111). Upon surface deposition, bromine is dissociated and the porphyrins couple with surface adatoms to create linear strands and hexagonally packed molecules. Annealing the sample results in covalently-bonded networks of thienylporphyrin derivatives. A deeper understanding of surface-confined Ullmann-like coupling has the potential to lead to precision-engineered nano-structures through synthetic techniques. Contribution of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, not subject to copyright in the United States of America.

  8. Towards lightweight nanocomposite coatings for corrosion inhibition: Graphene, carbon nanotubes, and nanostructured magnesium as case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Robert Vincent, III

    The field of nanocomposites is a burgeoning area of research due to the interest in the remarkable properties which can be achieved through their use in a variety of applications, including corrosion resistant coatings. Lightweighting is of increasing importance in the world today due to the ever growing push towards energy efficiency and the green movement and in recent years there has been a vast amount of research performed in the area of developing lightweight nanocomposites for corrosion inhibition. Many new composite materials have been developed through the use of newly developed nanomaterials (including carbonaceous and metallic constituents) and their specialized incorporation in the coating matrix materials. We start with a general review on the development of hybrid nanostructured composites for corrosion protection of base metals from a sustainability perspective in Chapter 1. This review demonstrates the ever swelling requirements for a paradigm shift in the way that we protect metals against corrosion due to the costs and environmental concerns that exist with currently used technology. In Chapter 2, we delve into the much required understanding of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide through near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy measurements to elucidate information about the electronic structure upon incorporation of nitrogen within the structure. For successful integration of the carbonaceous nanomaterials into a composite coating, a full swath of knowledge is necessary. Within this work we have shown that upon chemical defunctionalization of graphene oxide to reduced graphene oxide by means of hydrazine treatment, nitrogen is incorporated into the structure in the form of a pyrazole ring. In Chapter 3, we demonstrate that by way of in situ polymerization, graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes can be incorporated within a polymer (polyetherimide, PEI) matrix. Two systems have been developed including graphene and

  9. The convolution theorem for two-dimensional continuous wavelet transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG CHI

    2013-01-01

    In this paper , application of two -dimensional continuous wavelet transform to image processes is studied. We first show that the convolution and correlation of two continuous wavelets satisfy the required admissibility and regularity conditions ,and then we derive the convolution and correlation theorem for two-dimensional continuous wavelet transform. Finally, we present numerical example showing the usefulness of applying the convolution theorem for two -dimensional continuous wavelet transform to perform image restoration in the presence of additive noise.

  10. Nanostructured carbon electrocatalyst supports for intermediate-temperature fuel cells: Single-walled versus multi-walled structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papandrew, Alexander B.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; Tian, Mengkun; Tennyson, Wesley D.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Geohegan, David B.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    It is unknown if nanostructured carbons possess the requisite electrochemical stability to be used as catalyst supports in the cathode of intermediate-temperature solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) based on the CsH2PO4 electrolyte. To investigate this application, single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were used as supports for Pt catalysts in SAFCs operating at 250 °C. SWNH-based cathodes display greater maximum activity than their MWNT-based counterparts at a cell voltage of 0.8 V, but are unstable in the SAFC cathode as a consequence of electrochemical carbon corrosion. MWNT-based cells are resistant to this effect and capable of operation for at least 160 h at 0.6 V and 250 °C. Cells fabricated with nanostructured carbon supports are more active (52 mA cm-1vs. 28 mA cm-1 at 0.8 V) than state-of-the-art carbon-free formulations while simultaneously displaying enhanced Pt utilization (40 mA mgPt-1vs. 16 mA mgPt-1 at 0.8 V). These results suggest that MWNTs are a viable support material for developing stable, high-performance, low-cost air electrodes for solid-state electrochemical devices operating above 230 °C.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of One-dimensional and Two-Dimensional Porphyrin Polymers* (

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Xiang-qing

    2001-01-01

    Porphyrin polymers are of interest in relation to conductive materials[1, 2], catalysts for  photosynthetic charge separation[3], or the fundamental features in biological systems[4].There have been many versatile studies about them[5,6]. The one-dimensional “Shish Kebab”porphyrin polymers synthesized with a new method different from those reported and Schiff base porphyrin polymers with two-dimensional nano-structure have provided a new field of study. The present paper covers highly ordered porphyrin polymers.……

  12. Characterization of metal contacts for two-dimensional MoS{sub 2} nanoflakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, Sumeet, E-mail: madhu.bhaskaran@rmit.edu.au, E-mail: kourosh.kalantar@rmit.edu.au, E-mail: sumeet.walia@rmit.edu.au; Balendhran, Sivacarendran; Sriram, Sharath; Bhaskaran, Madhu, E-mail: madhu.bhaskaran@rmit.edu.au, E-mail: kourosh.kalantar@rmit.edu.au, E-mail: sumeet.walia@rmit.edu.au [Functional Materials and Microsystems Research Group, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Wang, Yichao; Ab Kadir, Rosmalini; Sabirin Zoolfakar, Ahmad; Atkin, Paul; Zhen Ou, Jian; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh, E-mail: madhu.bhaskaran@rmit.edu.au, E-mail: kourosh.kalantar@rmit.edu.au, E-mail: sumeet.walia@rmit.edu.au [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia)

    2013-12-02

    While layered materials are increasingly investigated for their potential in nanoelectronics, their functionality and efficiency depend on charge injection into the materials via metallic contacts. This work explores the characteristics of different metals (aluminium, tungsten, gold, and platinum) deposited on to nanostructured thin films made of two-dimensional (2D) MoS{sub 2} flakes. Metals are chosen based on their work functions relative to the electron affinity of MoS{sub 2}. It is observed, and analytically verified that lower work functions of the contact metals lead to smaller Schottky barrier heights and consequently higher charge carrier injection through the contacts.

  13. Oriented carbon nanostructures grown by hot-filament plasma-enhanced CVD from self-assembled Co-based catalyst on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleaca, Claudiu Teodor; Morjan, Ion; Rodica, Alexandrescu; Dumitrache, Florian; Soare, Iuliana; Gavrila-Florescu, Lavinia; Sandu, Ion; Dutu, Elena; Le Normand, François; Faerber, Jacques

    2012-03-01

    We report the synthesis of coral- and caterpillar-like carbon nanostructures assemblies starting from cobalt nitrate ethanol solutions deposited by drop-casting onto blank or carbon nanoparticles film covered Si(1 0 0) substrates. The seeded films were pre-treated with glow discharge hydrogen plasma aided by hot-filaments at 550 °C followed by introduction of acetylene at 700 °C. The resultant carbon nanostructure assemblies contain a high density of aligned carbon nanotubes/nanofibers (CNTs/CNFs). The influence of the forces that act during liquid-mediated self-assembly of Co catalyst precursor is discussed.

  14. Etude du stockage de l'hydrogene sur des nanostructures de carbone microporeuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Le stockage de l'hydrogene par adsorption sur des adsorbants nano-structures a ete etudie sous differentes conditions de pression et de temperature. Les adsorbants etudies sont principalement des nanotubes de carbone a simple paroi ainsi que des structures metallo-organiques. Les mesures ont ete realisees a l'aide de systemes gravimetriques et volumetriques tres sensibles specialement mis au point pour de petits echantillons necessitant un degazage in situ. Les appareils developpes, au nombre de quatre, comprennent deux systemes gravimetriques et deux systemes volumetriques. Ensemble, ces systemes couvrent la plage de pressions (0-100) bars ainsi que la plage de temperatures (77-295) K. Les differentes analyses montrent que l'adsorption d'hydrogene sur les adsorbants nano-structures etudies est maximale a 77 K et varie entre environ (1.5 et 4) % masse. A temperature ambiante, l'adsorption croit lineairement avec la pression et demeure sous les 1% masse pour des pressions inferieures a 100 bars. L'adsorption d'hydrogene sur ces materiaux dans ces conditions se compare notamment a celle obtenue sur des charbons actives. La modelisation de l'adsorption a egalement ete realisee dans des conditions cryogeniques a l'aide du modele de Dubinin-Astakhov sous une forme adaptee pour l'adsorption supercritique. Les enthalpies d'adsorption calculees a partir de ce modele varient sous les 6 kJ/mole et sont donc consistantes avec des processus de physisorption. L'applicabilite du modele de Dubinin-Astakhov suggere que l'adsorption d'hydrogene puisse etre representee par un processus de remplissage des pores par un pseudo-liquide. Ces travaux s'inscrivent dans un contexte ou la capacite d'adsorption reelle des nanostructures de carbone est sujette a la controverse. En consequence, l'approche experimentale adoptee se distingue par les differentes demarches mises de l'avant pour l'obtention de mesures fiables sur des echantillons de faibles masses ainsi que par son caractere

  15. Nanostructured silver and platinum modified carbon fiber microelectrodes coated with nafion for H2O2 determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Halouzka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber microelectrodes equipped with nanostructured metals(platinum and silver and covered with a Nafion layer constitutesensitive H2O2 sensors. Metallic layers on carbon fibers wereprepared by surfactant assisted electrodeposition. In the case ofsilver, the procedure leads to coating which is composed of porous,partially aggregated and crystalline deposits containing silvernanoparticles. The electrodeposition of platinum leads to carbonfiber decorated with clusters of platinum nanoparticles. Aftercoating the electrodes with protective and antiinterference barriermade of Nafion, the sensing properties of the preparedmicroelectrodes towards hydrogen peroxide are investigated.

  16. Controlling synthesis of carbon nanostructures by plasma means in arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga; Shashurin, Alexey; Torrey, Jon; Raitses, Yevgeny; Keidar, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Thermal stability of SWNTs at conditions of atmospheric arc is crucial for determination of region of their synthesis in arc and in general for clarification of the thermal regime of SWNT in arc plasmas. We investigated electrical resistance dependence on temperature of mats of SWNTs under variable pressures in helium atmosphere, in the air and in vacuum in high temperature ranges (300-1200K) which closely mimic conditions during the synthesis in arc discharge. Dependence of SWNT resistance on temperature exhibits similar ``V-shape'' behavior for all applied conditions which characterized by two temperatures: Tmin (temperature of the minimum of resistance) and Tcr (temperature of destruction of SWNT bundles). It is found that Tmin and Tcr increased with helium pressure, so that at 500 Torr Tcr was 1100K, while Tmin -900K. This is the temperature that corresponds to buffer region between the arc plasma and helium background in arc discharge. Based on that it can be suggested that region of formation of SWNTs in arc should be close to arc periphery. Our study also demonstrates a strong effect of electric and magnetic fields on properties and growth conditions of SWNTs and other carbon nanostructures such as graphene. These effects are quantified by variety of diagnostics tools: SEM, TEM, AFM - microcopies, TGA, RAMAN and UV-vis-NIR.

  17. Longitudinal vibration and instabilities of carbon nanotubes conveying fluid considering size effects of nanoflow and nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oveissi, Soheil; Eftekhari, S. Ali; Toghraie, Davood

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effects of small-scale of the both nanoflow and nanostructure on the vibrational response of fluid flowing single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated. To this purpose, two various flowing fluids, the air-nano-flow and the water nano-flow using Knudsen number, and two different continuum theories, the nonlocal theory and the strain-inertia gradient theory are studied. Nano-rod model is used to model the fluid-structure interaction, and Galerkin method of weighted residual is utilizing to solve and discretize the governing obtained equations. It is found that the critical flow velocity decreases as the wave number increases, excluding the first mode divergence that it has the least value among of the other instabilities if the strain-inertia gradient theory is employed. Moreover, it is observed that Kn effect has considerable impact on the reduction of critical velocities especially for the air-flow flowing through the CNT. In addition, by increasing a nonlocal parameter and Knudsen number the critical flow velocity decreases but it increases as the characteristic length related to the strain-inertia gradient theory increases.

  18. Sub-5 nm nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition using a carbon nanotube template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Hyo; Kim, Ji Weon; Lee, Seung-Mo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Shim, Joon Hyung; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanostructures having diameters of sub-5 nm is very a important issue for bottom-up nanofabrication of nanoscale devices. In this work, we report a highly controllable method to create sub-5 nm nano-trenches and nanowires by combining area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as templates. Alumina nano-trenches having a depth of 2.6 ∼ 3.0 nm and SiO2 nano-trenches having a depth of 1.9 ∼ 2.2 nm fully guided by the SWNTs have been formed on SiO2/Si substrate. Through infilling ZnO material by ALD in alumina nano-trenches, well-defined ZnO nanowires having a thickness of 3.1 ∼ 3.3 nm have been fabricated. In order to improve the electrical properties of ZnO nanowires, as-fabricated ZnO nanowires by ALD were annealed at 350 °C in air for 60 min. As a result, we successfully demonstrated that as-synthesized ZnO nanowire using a specific template can be made for various high-density resistive components in the nanoelectronics industry.

  19. Plasma-Enabled Carbon Nanostructures for Early Diagnosis of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafique Pineda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures (CNs are amongst the most promising biorecognition nanomaterials due to their unprecedented optical, electrical and structural properties. As such, CNs may be harnessed to tackle the detrimental public health and socio-economic adversities associated with neurodegenerative diseases (NDs. In particular, CNs may be tailored for a specific determination of biomarkers indicative of NDs. However, the realization of such a biosensor represents a significant technological challenge in the uniform fabrication of CNs with outstanding qualities in order to facilitate a highly-sensitive detection of biomarkers suspended in complex biological environments. Notably, the versatility of plasma-based techniques for the synthesis and surface modification of CNs may be embraced to optimize the biorecognition performance and capabilities. This review surveys the recent advances in CN-based biosensors, and highlights the benefits of plasma-processing techniques to enable, enhance, and tailor the performance and optimize the fabrication of CNs, towards the construction of biosensors with unparalleled performance for the early diagnosis of NDs, via a plethora of energy-efficient, environmentally-benign, and inexpensive approaches.

  20. The Chandrasekhar's Equation for Two-Dimensional Hypothetical White Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    De, Sanchari

    2014-01-01

    In this article we have extended the original work of Chandrasekhar on the structure of white dwarfs to the two-dimensional case. Although such two-dimensional stellar objects are hypothetical in nature, we strongly believe that the work presented in this article may be prescribed as Master of Science level class problem for the students in physics.

  1. Beginning Introductory Physics with Two-Dimensional Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2009-01-01

    During the session on "Introductory College Physics Textbooks" at the 2007 Summer Meeting of the AAPT, there was a brief discussion about whether introductory physics should begin with one-dimensional motion or two-dimensional motion. Here we present the case that by starting with two-dimensional motion, we are able to introduce a considerable…

  2. Spatiotemporal surface solitons in two-dimensional photonic lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Dumitru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Lederer, Falk; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2007-11-01

    We analyze spatiotemporal light localization in truncated two-dimensional photonic lattices and demonstrate the existence of two-dimensional surface light bullets localized in the lattice corners or the edges. We study the families of the spatiotemporal surface solitons and their properties such as bistability and compare them with the modes located deep inside the photonic lattice.

  3. Explorative data analysis of two-dimensional electrophoresis gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, J.; Gottlieb, D.M.; Petersen, Marianne Kjerstine;

    2004-01-01

    Methods for classification of two-dimensional (2-DE) electrophoresis gels based on multivariate data analysis are demonstrated. Two-dimensional gels of ten wheat varieties are analyzed and it is demonstrated how to classify the wheat varieties in two qualities and a method for initial screening...

  4. Mechanics of Apparent Horizon in Two Dimensional Dilaton Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we give a definition of apparent horizon in a two dimensional general dilaton gravity theory. With this definition, we construct the mechanics of the apparent horizon by introducing a quasi-local energy of the theory. Our discussion generalizes the apparent horizons mechanics in general spherically symmetric spactimes in four or higher dimensions to the two dimensional dilaton gravity case.

  5. Topological aspect of disclinations in two-dimensional crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Wei-Kai; Zhu Tao; Chen Yong; Ren Ji-Rong

    2009-01-01

    By using topological current theory, this paper studies the inner topological structure of disclinations during the melting of two-dimensional systems. From two-dimensional elasticity theory, it finds that there are topological currents for topological defects in homogeneous equation. The evolution of disclinations is studied, and the branch conditions for generating, annihilating, crossing, splitting and merging of disclinations are given.

  6. Improving Osteoblast Response In Vitro by a Nanostructured Thin Film with Titanium Carbide and Titanium Oxides Clustered around Graphitic Carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Longo

    Full Text Available Recently, we introduced a new deposition method, based on Ion Plating Plasma Assisted technology, to coat titanium implants with a thin but hard nanostructured layer composed of titanium carbide and titanium oxides, clustered around graphitic carbon. The nanostructured layer has a double effect: protects the bulk titanium against the harsh conditions of biological tissues and in the same time has a stimulating action on osteoblasts.The aim of this work is to describe the biological effects of this layer on osteoblasts cultured in vitro. We demonstrate that the nanostructured layer causes an overexpression of many early genes correlated to proteins involved in bone turnover and an increase in the number of surface receptors for α3β1 integrin, talin, paxillin. Analyses at single-cell level, by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and single cell force spectroscopy, show how the proliferation, adhesion and spreading of cells cultured on coated titanium samples are higher than on uncoated titanium ones. Finally, the chemistry of the layer induces a better formation of blood clots and a higher number of adhered platelets, compared to the uncoated cases, and these are useful features to improve the speed of implant osseointegration.In summary, the nanostructured TiC film, due to its physical and chemical properties, can be used to protect the implants and to improve their acceptance by the bone.

  7. Nanostructured biointerfacing of metals with carbon nanotube/chitosan hybrids by electrodeposition for cell stimulation and therapeutics delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kapil D; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Han, Cheol-Min; Lee, Ja-Yeon; Singh, Rajendra K; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-11-26

    Exploring the biological interfaces of metallic implants has been an important issue in achieving biofunctional success. Here we develop a biointerface with nanotopological features and bioactive composition, comprising a carbon nanotube (CNT) and chitosan (Chi) hybrid, via an electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The physicochemical properties, in vitro biocompatibility, and protein delivering capacity of the decorated nanohybrid layer were investigated, to address its potential usefulness as bone regenerating implants. Over a wide compositional range, the nanostructured hybrid interfaces were successfully formed with varying thicknesses, depending on the electrodeposition parameters. CNT-Chi hybrid interfaces showed a time-sequenced degradation in saline water, and a rapid induction of hydroxyapatite mineral in a simulated body fluid. The nanostructured hybrid substrates stimulated the initial adhesion events of the osteoblastic cells, including cell adhesion rate, spreading behaviors, and expression of adhesive proteins. The nanostructured hybrid interfaces significantly improved the adsorption of protein molecules, which was enabled by the surface charge interaction, and increased surface area of the nanotopology. Furthermore, the incorporated protein was released at a highly sustained rate, profiling a diffusion-controlled pattern over a couple of weeks, suggesting the possible usefulness as a protein delivery device. Collectively, the nanostructured hybrid CNT-Chi layer, implemented by an electrodeposition, is considered a biocompatible, cell-stimulating, and protein-delivering biointerface of metallic implants.

  8. Evaluation of first-row transition metal oxides supported on clay minerals for catalytic growth of carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Jankovic, Lubos [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Gournis, Dimitrios [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)], E-mail: dgourni@cc.uoi.gr; Trikalitis, Pantelis N. [Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, GR-71409 Heraklion (Greece); Bakas, Thomas [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)], E-mail: tbakas@cc.uoi.gr

    2008-08-25

    In the present work we employed various transition metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) loaded on different smectite clays (laponite and montmorillonite) as catalysts in synthesis of carbon nanostructures (mainly nanotubes) and we report the effect of the nature of the catalytic centers and type of aluminosilicate layers in the morphology, quality and structure on the final products. Owing to their unique swelling, ion-exchange and intercalation properties smectite clays were easily, uniformly and reproducibly loaded with metal cations. Different homoionic forms of montmorillonite and laponite were prepared containing first-row transition metals and the synthesis of carbon nanostructures was carried out at 700 deg. C using an acetylene/nitrogen mixture. A variety of analytical techniques (XRD, Raman, SEM, TEM and thermal analysis) were used to fully characterize the final materials. Iron-, cobalt-, nickel- and manganese-exchanged clays showed to be effective catalysts for the production of carbon nanotubes, while acetylene decomposition over copper-exchanged clays resulted to the creation of carbon spheres. The resulting hybrid systems are particularly attractive for polymer reinforcing applications since the combined action of clay-carbon nanotubes in polymer matrixes can provide outstanding properties to the resulting composite materials.

  9. Using the carbon nanotube (CNT)/CNT interaction to obtain hybrid conductive nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J.; Silva, A.; Bretas, R., E-mail: joaopaulofsbrasil@hotmail.com, E-mail: bretas@ufscar.br [Department of Materials Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235, PO Box 676, São Carlos, SP, 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2015-05-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine unique physical, electrical, chemical, thermal and mechanical properties with a huge surface area that qualify them to a broad range of applications. These potential applications, however, are often limited due to the strong inter-tubes van der Waals interactions, which results in poor dispersion in polymeric matrixes or solvents in general. Thus, the goal of this work was to use this limitation as an advantage, to produce novel conductive hybrid nanostructures, which consist of nonwoven Nylon 6 (PA6) mats of electrospun nanofibers with a large amount of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) strongly attached and adsorbed on the nanofibers´ surfaces. To produce such structures, the MWCNT were previously functionalized with carboxylic groups and subsequently incorporated in the nanofibers by two subsequent steps: i) preparation of nonwoven mats of PA6/MWCNT by electrospinning and ii) treatment of the mats in an aqueous dispersion of MWCNT/Triton X–100. Analyses of UV-visible light showed that carboxylic groups were actually inserted in the MWCNT. Thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) showed that the amount of adsorbed MWCNT on the fibers´ surfaces at the end of the procedure was approximately 12 times higher than after the first step. Micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed this result and electrical conductivities measurements of the MWCNT/PA6, after the treatment in the aqueous solution, showed that these structures had conductivity of 10-2 S/m. It was concluded that the adhesion of CNTs at the surface of the nanofibers occurred due a combination of two types of bonding: hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic groups of the functionalized CNT and the PA6 and van der Waals interactions between the CNTs.

  10. Using the carbon nanotube (CNT)/CNT interaction to obtain hybrid conductive nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J.; Silva, A.; Bretas, R.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine unique physical, electrical, chemical, thermal and mechanical properties with a huge surface area that qualify them to a broad range of applications. These potential applications, however, are often limited due to the strong inter-tubes van der Waals interactions, which results in poor dispersion in polymeric matrixes or solvents in general. Thus, the goal of this work was to use this limitation as an advantage, to produce novel conductive hybrid nanostructures, which consist of nonwoven Nylon 6 (PA6) mats of electrospun nanofibers with a large amount of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) strongly attached and adsorbed on the nanofiberś surfaces. To produce such structures, the MWCNT were previously functionalized with carboxylic groups and subsequently incorporated in the nanofibers by two subsequent steps: i) preparation of nonwoven mats of PA6/MWCNT by electrospinning and ii) treatment of the mats in an aqueous dispersion of MWCNT/Triton X-100. Analyses of UV-visible light showed that carboxylic groups were actually inserted in the MWCNT. Thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) showed that the amount of adsorbed MWCNT on the fiberś surfaces at the end of the procedure was approximately 12 times higher than after the first step. Micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed this result and electrical conductivities measurements of the MWCNT/PA6, after the treatment in the aqueous solution, showed that these structures had conductivity of 10-2 S/m. It was concluded that the adhesion of CNTs at the surface of the nanofibers occurred due a combination of two types of bonding: hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic groups of the functionalized CNT and the PA6 and van der Waals interactions between the CNTs.

  11. Invariant Subspaces of the Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Evolution Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunrong Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop the symmetry-related methods to study invariant subspaces of the two-dimensional nonlinear differential operators. The conditional Lie–Bäcklund symmetry and Lie point symmetry methods are used to construct invariant subspaces of two-dimensional differential operators. We first apply the multiple conditional Lie–Bäcklund symmetries to derive invariant subspaces of the two-dimensional operators. As an application, the invariant subspaces for a class of two-dimensional nonlinear quadratic operators are provided. Furthermore, the invariant subspace method in one-dimensional space combined with the Lie symmetry reduction method and the change of variables is used to obtain invariant subspaces of the two-dimensional nonlinear operators.

  12. Carbon nanostructures and graphite-coated metal nanostructures obtained by pyrolysis of ruthenocene and ruthenocene–ferrocene mixtures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L S Panchakarla; A Govindaraj

    2007-02-01

    Pyrolysis of ruthenocene carried out in an atmosphere of argon or hydrogen is found to give rise to spherical nanoparticles of carbon with diameters in the 10–200 nm range. Pyrolysis of ruthenocene as well as mixtures of ruthenocene and ethylene in hydrogen gives rise to spherical nanoparticles, which contain a high proportion of 3 carbon. Under certain conditions, pyrolysis of ruthenocene gives rise to graphite coated ruthenium nanoparticles as well as worm-like carbon structures. Pyrolysis of mixtures of ruthenocene and ferrocene gives rise to nanoparticles or nanorods of FeRu alloys, the composition depending upon the composition of the original mixture. Nanorods of the Ru and FeRu alloys encapsulated in the carbon nanotubes are also formed in the pyrolysis reaction.

  13. Soluble, Exfoliated Two-Dimensional Nanosheets as Excellent Aqueous Lubricants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenling; Cao, Yanlin; Tian, Pengyi; Guo, Fei; Tian, Yu; Zheng, Wen; Ji, Xuqiang; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-11-30

    Dispersion in water of two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets is conducive to their practical applications in fundamental science communities due to their abundance, low cost, and ecofriendliness. However, it is difficult to achieve stable aqueous 2D material suspensions because of the intrinsic hydrophobic properties of the layered materials. Here, we report an effective and economic way of producing various 2D nanosheets (h-BN, MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and graphene) as aqueous dispersions using carbon quantum dots (CQDs) as exfoliation agents and stabilizers. The dispersion was prepared through a liquid phase exfoliation. The as-synthesized stable 2D nanosheets based dispersions were characterized by UV-vis, HRTEM, AFM, Raman, XPS, and XRD. The solutions based on CQD decorated 2D nanosheets were utilized as aqueous lubricants, which realized a friction coefficient as low as 0.02 and even achieved a superlubricity under certain working conditions. The excellent lubricating properties were attributed to the synergetic effects of the 2D nanosheets and CQDs, such as good dispersion stability and easy-sliding interlayer structure. This work thus proposes a novel strategy for the design and preparation of high-performance water based green lubricants.

  14. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, Lisa [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Fang, Fang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Keskar, Gayatri [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-12-23

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  15. Effects of confinement in meso-porous silica and carbon nano-structures; Etude des effets de confinement dans la silice mesoporeuse et dans certaines nanostructures carbonees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, V

    2006-07-15

    Physico-chemical properties of materials can be strongly modified by confinement because of the quantum effects that appear at such small length scales and also because of the effects of the confinement itself. The aim of this thesis is to show that both the nature of the confining material and the size of the pores and cavities have a strong impact on the confined material. We first show the effect of the pore size of the host meso-porous silica on the temperature of the solid-solid phase transition of silver selenide, a semiconducting material with enhanced magnetoresistive properties under non-stoichiometric conditions. Narrowing the pores from 20 nm to 2 nm raises the phase transition temperature from 139 C to 146 C. This result can be explained by considering the interaction between the confining and confined materials as a driving force. The effects of confinement are also studied in the case of hydrogen and deuterium inside cavities of organized carbon nano-structures. The effects that appear in the adsorption/desorption cycles are much stronger with carbon nano-horns as the host material than with C60 pea-pods and single-walled carbon nano-tubes. (author)

  16. Synthesis of two-dimensional materials by selective extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguib, Michael; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted much attention in the past decade. They offer high specific surface area, as well as electronic structure and properties that differ from their bulk counterparts due to the low dimensionality. Graphene is the best known and the most studied 2D material, but metal oxides and hydroxides (including clays), dichalcogenides, boron nitride (BN), and other materials that are one or several atoms thick are receiving increasing attention. They may deliver a combination of properties that cannot be provided by other materials. The most common synthesis approach in general is by reacting different elements or compounds to form a new compound. However, this approach does not necessarily work well for low-dimensional structures, since it favors formation of energetically preferred 3D (bulk) solids. Many 2D materials are produced by exfoliation of van der Waals solids, such as graphite or MoS2, breaking large particles into 2D layers. However, these approaches are not universal; for example, 2D transition metal carbides cannot be produced by any of them. An alternative but less studied way of material synthesis is the selective extraction process, which is based on the difference in reactivity and stability between the different components (elements or structural units) of the original material. It can be achieved using thermal, chemical, or electrochemical processes. Many 2D materials have been synthesized using selective extraction, such as graphene from SiC, transition metal oxides (TMO) from layered 3D salts, and transition metal carbides or carbonitrides (MXenes) from MAX phases. Selective extraction synthesis is critically important when the bonds between the building blocks of the material are too strong (e.g., in carbides) to be broken mechanically in order to form nanostructures. Unlike extractive metallurgy, where the extracted metal is the goal of the process, selective extraction of one or more elements from

  17. Two-dimensional discrete gap breathers in a two-dimensional discrete diatomic Klein-Gordon lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quan; QIANG Tian

    2009-01-01

    We study the existence and stability of two-dimensional discrete breathers in a two-dimensional discrete diatomic Klein-Gordon lattice consisting of alternating light and heavy atoms, with nearest-neighbor harmonic coupling.Localized solutions to the corresponding nonlinear differential equations with frequencies inside the gap of the linear wave spectrum, i.e. two-dimensional gap breathers, are investigated numerically. The numerical results of the corresponding algebraic equations demonstrate the possibility of the existence of two-dimensional gap breathers with three types of symmetries, i.e., symmetric, twin-antisymmetric and single-antisymmetric. Their stability depends on the nonlinear on-site potential (soft or hard), the interaction potential (attractive or repulsive)and the center of the two-dimensional gap breather (on a light or a heavy atom).

  18. Notched Long-Period Fiber Grating with an Amine-Modified Surface Nanostructure for Carbon Dioxide Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janw-Wei Wu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fabrication and application of a notched long-period fiber grating (NLPFG with an amine-modified surface nanostructure for carbon dioxide (CO2 gas sensing. The NLPFG with the modified surface nanostructure was fabricated by using inductively coupled plasma (ICP etching with an Ag nanoparticle etching barrier. The experimental results show that the spectra were changed with the CO2 gas flow within 12 min. Thereafter, the spectra of the NLPFG remained steady and unchanged. During the absorption process, the transmission loss was decreased by approximately 2.019 dB, and the decreased rate of transmission loss was 0.163 dB/min. The sensitivity was about −0.089 dB/%. These results demonstrate that the NLPFG CO2 gas sensor has the advantages of steady performance, repeatability, and low cost. Therefore, the NLPFG can be utilized as a reliable CO2 gas sensor.

  19. Chemically Integrated Inorganic-Graphene Two-Dimensional Hybrid Materials for Flexible Energy Storage Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lele; Zhu, Yue; Li, Hongsen; Yu, Guihua

    2016-12-01

    State-of-the-art energy storage devices are capable of delivering reasonably high energy density (lithium ion batteries) or high power density (supercapacitors). There is an increasing need for these power sources with not only superior electrochemical performance, but also exceptional flexibility. Graphene has come on to the scene and advancements are being made in integration of various electrochemically active compounds onto graphene or its derivatives so as to utilize their flexibility. Many innovative synthesis techniques have led to novel graphene-based hybrid two-dimensional nanostructures. Here, the chemically integrated inorganic-graphene hybrid two-dimensional materials and their applications for energy storage devices are examined. First, the synthesis and characterization of different kinds of inorganic-graphene hybrid nanostructures are summarized, and then the most relevant applications of inorganic-graphene hybrid materials in flexible energy storage devices are reviewed. The general design rules of using graphene-based hybrid 2D materials for energy storage devices and their current limitations and future potential to advance energy storage technologies are also discussed.

  20. Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 2 -2 0 Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway C oa st al a n d H yd ra u lic s La b or at...distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-12-20 September 2012 Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway Stephen H. Scott, Jeremy A...A two-dimensional Adaptive Hydraulics (AdH) hydrodynamic model was developed to simulate the Moose Creek Floodway. The Floodway is located

  1. RESEARCH ON TWO-DIMENSIONAL LDA FOR FACE RECOGNITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Ke; Zhu Xiuchang

    2006-01-01

    The letter presents an improved two-dimensional linear discriminant analysis method for feature extraction. Compared with the current two-dimensional methods for feature extraction, the improved two-dimensional linear discriminant analysis method makes full use of not only the row and the column direction information of face images but also the discriminant information among different classes. The method is evaluated using the Nanjing University of Science and Technology (NUST) 603 face database and the Aleix Martinez and Robert Benavente (AR) face database. Experimental results show that the method in the letter is feasible and effective.

  2. ONE-DIMENSIONAL AND TWO-DIMENSIONAL LEADERSHIP STYLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Stefanović

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to motivate their group members to perform certain tasks, leaders use different leadership styles. These styles are based on leaders' backgrounds, knowledge, values, experiences, and expectations. The one-dimensional styles, used by many world leaders, are autocratic and democratic styles. These styles lie on the two opposite sides of the leadership spectrum. In order to precisely define the leadership styles on the spectrum between the autocratic leadership style and the democratic leadership style, leadership theory researchers use two dimensional matrices. The two-dimensional matrices define leadership styles on the basis of different parameters. By using these parameters, one can identify two-dimensional styles.

  3. Towards nano-organic chemistry: perspectives for a bottom-up approach to the synthesis of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Francesco; Baldoni, Matteo; Sgamellotti, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Low-dimensional carbon nanostructures, such as nanotubes and graphenes, represent one of the most promising classes of materials, in view of their potential use in nanotechnology. However, their exploitation in applications is often hindered by difficulties in their synthesis and purification. Despite the huge efforts by the research community, the production of nanostructured carbon materials with controlled properties is still beyond reach. Nonetheless, this step is nowadays mandatory for significant progresses in the realization of advanced applications and devices based on low-dimensional carbon nanostructures. Although promising alternative routes for the fabrication of nanostructured carbon materials have recently been proposed, a comprehensive understanding of the key factors governing the bottom-up assembly of simple precursors to form complex systems with tailored properties is still at its early stages. In this paper, following a survey of recent experimental efforts in the bottom-up synthesis of carbon nanostructures, we attempt to clarify generalized criteria for the design of suitable precursors that can be used as building blocks in the production of complex systems based on sp2 carbon atoms and discuss potential synthetic strategies. In particular, the approaches presented in this feature article are based on the application of concepts borrowed from traditional organic chemistry, such as valence-bond theory and Clar sextet theory, and on their extension to the case of complex carbon nanomaterials. We also present and discuss a validation of these approaches through first-principle calculations on prototypical systems. Detailed studies on the processes involved in the bottom-up fabrication of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures are expected to pave the way for the design and optimization of precursors and efficient synthetic routes, thus allowing the development of novel materials with controlled morphology and properties that can be used in

  4. Cytocompatibility and biocompatibility of nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite spheres for bone repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    CALASANS-MAIA, Mônica Diuana; de MELO, Bruno Raposo; ALVES, Adriana Terezinha Neves Novellino; RESENDE, Rodrigo Figueiredo de Brito; LOURO, Rafael Seabra; SARTORETTO, Suelen Cristina; GRANJEIRO, José Mauro; ALVES, Gutemberg Gomes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo biological responses to nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite/calcium alginate (CHA) microspheres used for alveolar bone repair, compared to sintered hydroxyapatite (HA). Material and Methods The maxillary central incisors of 45 Wistar rats were extracted, and the dental sockets were filled with HA, CHA, and blood clot (control group) (n=5/period/group). After 7, 21 and 42 days, the samples of bone with the biomaterials were obtained for histological and histomorphometric analysis, and the plasma levels of RANKL and OPG were determined via immunoassay. Statistical analysis was performed by Two-Way ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey test at 95% level of significance. Results The CHA and HA microspheres were cytocompatible with both human and murine cells on an in vitro assay. Histological analysis showed the time-dependent increase of newly formed bone in control group characterized by an intense osteoblast activity. In HA and CHA groups, the presence of a slight granulation reaction around the spheres was observed after seven days, which was reduced by the 42nd day. A considerable amount of newly formed bone was observed surrounding the CHA spheres and the biomaterials particles at 42-day time point compared with HA. Histomorphometric analysis showed a significant increase of newly formed bone in CHA group compared with HA after 21 and 42 days from surgery, moreover, CHA showed almost 2-fold greater biosorption than HA at 42 days (two-way ANOVA, p<0.05) indicating greater biosorption. An increase in the RANKL/OPG ratio was observed in the CHA group on the 7th day. Conclusion CHA spheres were osteoconductive and presented earlier biosorption, inducing early increases in the levels of proteins involved in resorption. PMID:26814461

  5. Water desorption from nanostructured graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Anna; Hellberg, Lars; Grönbeck, Henrik; Chakarov, Dinko

    2013-12-21

    Water interaction with nanostructured graphite surfaces is strongly dependent on the surface morphology. In this work, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) has been used to study water ice desorption from a nanostructured graphite surface. This model surface was fabricated by hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL) along with oxygen plasma etching and consists of a rough carbon surface covered by well defined structures of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The results are compared with those from pristine HOPG and a rough (oxygen plasma etched) carbon surface without graphite nanostructures. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The TPD experiments were conducted for H2O coverages obtained after exposures between 0.2 and 55 langmuir (L) and reveal a complex desorption behaviour. The spectra from the nanostructured surface show additional, coverage dependent desorption peaks. They are assigned to water bound in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen-bonded networks, defect-bound water, and to water intercalated into the graphite structures. The intercalation is more pronounced for the nanostructured graphite surface in comparison to HOPG surfaces because of a higher concentration of intersheet openings. From the TPD spectra, the desorption energies for water bound in 2D and 3D (multilayer) networks were determined to be 0.32 ± 0.06 and 0.41 ± 0.03 eV per molecule, respectively. An upper limit for the desorption energy for defect-bound water was estimated to be 1 eV per molecule.

  6. Redox-enzymes, cells and micro-organisms acting on carbon nanostructures transformation: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Amedea B; Paula, Amauri J; Durán, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are actual nanomaterials with many applications in different industrial areas, with increasing potentialities in the field of nanomedicine. Recently, different proactive approaches on toxicology and safety management have become the focus of intense interest once the industrial production of these materials had a significant growth in the last years, even though their short- and long-term behaviors are not yet fully understood. The most important concerns involving these carbon-based nanomaterials are their stability and potential effects of their life cycles on animals, humans, and environment. In this context, this mini review discuss the biodegradability of these materials, particularly through redox-enzymes, micro-organisms and cells, to contribute toward the design of biocompatible and biodegradable functionalized carbon nanostructures, in order to use these materials safely and with minimum impact on the environment.

  7. Nanostructured TiO2-coated activated carbon composite as an electrode material for asymmetric hybrid capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Ok; Lee, Joong Kee

    2012-02-01

    A nanostructured TiO2-coated activated carbon (TAC) composite was synthesized by a modified sol-gel reaction and employed it as a negative electrode active material for an asymmetric hybrid capacitor. The structural characterization showed that the TiO2 nano-layer was deposited on the surface of the activated carbon and the TAC composite has a highly mesoporous structure. The evaluation of electrochemical characteristics of the TAC electrode was carried out by galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The obtained specific capacitance of the TAC composite was 42.87 F/g, which showed by 27.1% higher than that of the activated carbon (AC). The TAC composite also exhibited an excellent cycle performance and kept 95% of initial capacitance over 500 cycles.

  8. A study of two-dimensional magnetic polaron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; ZHANG; Huaihong; FENG; Mang; WANG; Kelin

    2006-01-01

    By using the variational method and anneal simulation, we study in this paper the self-trapped magnetic polaron (STMP) in two-dimensional anti-ferromagnetic material and the bound magnetic polaron (BMP) in ferromagnetic material. Schwinger angular momentum theory is applied to changing the problem into a coupling problem of carriers and two types of Bosons. Our calculation shows that there are single-peak and multi-peak structures in the two-dimensional STMP. For the ferromagnetic material, the properties of the two-dimensional BMP are almost the same as that in one-dimensional case; but for the anti-ferromagnetic material, the two-dimensional STMP structure is much richer than the one-dimensional case.

  9. UPWIND DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHODS FOR TWO DIMENSIONAL NEUTRON TRANSPORT EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁光伟; 沈智军; 闫伟

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the upwind discontinuous Galerkin methods with triangle meshes for two dimensional neutron transport equations will be studied.The stability for both of the semi-discrete and full-discrete method will be proved.

  10. Two-Dimensionally-Modulated, Magnetic Structure of Neodymium Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Bente; Bak, P.

    1979-01-01

    The incipient magnetic order of dhcp Nd is described by a two-dimensional, incommensurably modulated structure ("triple-q" structure). The ordering is accompanied by a lattice distortion that forms a similar pattern....

  11. Entanglement Entropy for time dependent two dimensional holographic superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Mazhari, N S; Myrzakulov, Kairat; Myrzakulov, R

    2016-01-01

    We studied entanglement entropy for a time dependent two dimensional holographic superconductor. We showed that the conserved charge of the system plays the role of the critical parameter to have condensation.

  12. Decoherence in a Landau Quantized Two Dimensional Electron Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGill Stephen A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the dynamics of a high mobility two-dimensional electron gas as a function of temperature. The presence of satellite reflections in the sample and magnet can be modeled in the time-domain.

  13. Quantization of Two-Dimensional Gravity with Dynamical Torsion

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, P M

    1999-01-01

    We consider two-dimensional gravity with dynamical torsion in the Batalin - Vilkovisky and Batalin - Lavrov - Tyutin formalisms of gauge theories quantization as well as in the background field method.

  14. Spatiotemporal dissipative solitons in two-dimensional photonic lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Dumitru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Lederer, Falk; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2008-11-01

    We analyze spatiotemporal dissipative solitons in two-dimensional photonic lattices in the presence of gain and loss. In the framework of the continuous-discrete cubic-quintic Ginzburg-Landau model, we demonstrate the existence of novel classes of two-dimensional spatiotemporal dissipative lattice solitons, which also include surface solitons located in the corners or at the edges of the truncated two-dimensional photonic lattice. We find the domains of existence and stability of such spatiotemporal dissipative solitons in the relevant parameter space, for both on-site and intersite lattice solitons. We show that the on-site solitons are stable in the whole domain of their existence, whereas most of the intersite solitons are unstable. We describe the scenarios of the instability-induced dynamics of dissipative solitons in two-dimensional lattices.

  15. Bound states of two-dimensional relativistic harmonic oscillators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Wen-Chao

    2004-01-01

    We give the exact normalized bound state wavefunctions and energy expressions of the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations with equal scalar and vector harmonic oscillator potentials in the two-dimensional space.

  16. A two-dimensional polymer prepared by organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, Patrick; Erni, Rolf; Schweizer, W Bernd; Rossell, Marta D; King, Benjamin T; Bauer, Thomas; Götzinger, Stephan; Schlüter, A Dieter; Sakamoto, Junji

    2012-02-05

    Synthetic polymers are widely used materials, as attested by a production of more than 200 millions of tons per year, and are typically composed of linear repeat units. They may also be branched or irregularly crosslinked. Here, we introduce a two-dimensional polymer with internal periodicity composed of areal repeat units. This is an extension of Staudinger's polymerization concept (to form macromolecules by covalently linking repeat units together), but in two dimensions. A well-known example of such a two-dimensional polymer is graphene, but its thermolytic synthesis precludes molecular design on demand. Here, we have rationally synthesized an ordered, non-equilibrium two-dimensional polymer far beyond molecular dimensions. The procedure includes the crystallization of a specifically designed photoreactive monomer into a layered structure, a photo-polymerization step within the crystal and a solvent-induced delamination step that isolates individual two-dimensional polymers as free-standing, monolayered molecular sheets.

  17. Second invariant for two-dimensional classical super systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Mishra; Roshan Lal; Veena Mishra

    2003-10-01

    Construction of superpotentials for two-dimensional classical super systems (for ≥ 2) is carried out. Some interesting potentials have been studied in their super form and also their integrability.

  18. Extreme paths in oriented two-dimensional percolation

    OpenAIRE

    Andjel, E. D.; Gray, L. F.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; A useful result about leftmost and rightmost paths in two dimensional bond percolation is proved. This result was introduced without proof in \\cite{G} in the context of the contact process in continuous time. As discussed here, it also holds for several related models, including the discrete time contact process and two dimensional site percolation. Among the consequences are a natural monotonicity in the probability of percolation between different sites and a somewha...

  19. Two Dimensional Nucleation Process by Monte Carlo Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    T., Irisawa; K., Matsumoto; Y., Arima; T., Kan; Computer Center, Gakushuin University; Department of Physics, Gakushuin University

    1997-01-01

    Two dimensional nucleation process on substrate is investigated by Monte Carlo simulation, and the critical nucleus size and its waiting time are measured with a high accuracy. In order to measure the critical nucleus with a high accuracy, we calculate the attachment and the detachment rate to the nucleus directly, and define the critical nucleus size when both rate are equal. Using the kinematical nucleation theory by Nishioka, it is found that, our obtained kinematical two dimensional criti...

  20. Controlled Interactions between Two Dimensional Layered Inorganic Nanosheets and Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-15

    polymers . 2. Introduction . Research objectives: This research aims to study the physical (van der Waals forces: crystal epitaxy and π-π...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0071 Controlled Interactions between Two Dimensional Layered Inorganic Nanosheets and Polymers Cheolmin Park YONSEI UNIVERSITY...Interactions between Two Dimensional Layered Inorganic Nanosheets and Polymers 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4054 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT

  1. Two-Dimensional Weak Pseudomanifolds on Eight Vertices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basudeb Datta; Nandini Nilakantan

    2002-05-01

    We explicitly determine all the two-dimensional weak pseudomanifolds on 8 vertices. We prove that there are (up to isomorphism) exactly 95 such weak pseudomanifolds, 44 of which are combinatorial 2-manifolds. These 95 weak pseudomanifolds triangulate 16 topological spaces. As a consequence, we prove that there are exactly three 8-vertex two-dimensional orientable pseudomanifolds which allow degree three maps to the 4-vertex 2-sphere.

  2. Noncatalytic hydrogenation of decene-1 with hydrogen accumulated in a hybrid carbon nanostructure in nanosized membrane reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    Studies on the creation of nanosized membrane reactors (NMRs) of a new generation with accumulated hydrogen and a regulated volume of reaction zone were continued at the next stage. Hydrogenation was performed in the pores of ceramic membranes with hydrogen preliminarily adsorbed in mono- and multilayered orientated carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs)—a new hybrid carbon nanostructure formed on the inner pore surface. Quantitative determination of hydrogen adsorption in OCNTGs was performed using TRUMEM ultrafiltration membranes with D av = 50 and 90 nm and showed that hydrogen adsorption was up to ˜1.5% of the mass of OCNTG. The instrumentation and procedure for noncatalytic hydrogenation of decene-1 at 250-350°C using hydrogen accumulated and stored in OCNTG were developed. The conversion of decene-1 into decane was ˜0.2-1.8% at hydrogenation temperatures of 250 and 350°C, respectively. The rate constants and activation energy of hydrogenation were determined. The latter was found to be 94.5 kJ/mol, which is much smaller than the values typical for noncatalytic hydrogenations and very close to the values characteristic for catalytic reactions. The quantitative distribution of the reacting compounds in each pore regarded as a nanosized membrane reactor was determined. The activity of hydrogen adsorbed in a 2D carbon nanostructure was evaluated. Possible mechanisms of noncatalytic hydrogenation were discussed.

  3. Promotion of water-mediated carbon removal by nanostructured barium oxide/nickel interfaces in solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Choi, YongMan; Qin, Wentao; Chen, Haiyan; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Ping; Bai, Jianming; Tyson, Trevor A; Liu, Meilin

    2011-06-21

    The existing Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) perform poorly in carbon-containing fuels because of coking and deactivation at desired operating temperatures. Here we report a new anode with nanostructured barium oxide/nickel (BaO/Ni) interfaces for low-cost SOFCs, demonstrating high power density and stability in C(3)H(8), CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750°C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate water-mediated carbon removal reactions. Density functional theory calculations predict that the dissociated OH from H(2)O on BaO reacts with C on Ni near the BaO/Ni interface to produce CO and H species, which are then electrochemically oxidized at the triple-phase boundaries of the anode. This anode offers potential for ushering in a new generation of SOFCs for efficient, low-emission conversion of readily available fuels to electricity.

  4. A hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Ag nanoparticles electrodeposited on natural nano-structure attapulgite modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huihui; Zhang, Zhe; Cai, Dongqing; Zhang, Shengyi; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin; Wu, Zhengyan

    2011-10-30

    A novel strategy to fabricate hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) sensor was developed by electrodepositing Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on a glassy carbon electrode modified with natural nano-structure attapulgite (ATP). The result of electrochemical experiments showed that such constructed sensor had a favorable catalytic ability to reduce H(2)O(2). The good catalytic activity of the sensor was ascribed to the ATP that facilitated the formation and homogenous distribution of small Ag NPs. The resulted sensor achieved 95% of the steady-state current within 2s and had a 2.4 μM detection limit of H(2)O(2).

  5. Controllable modification of nanostructured carbon with hollow macroporous core/mesoporous shell and its application as templates in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaona; Xia, Min; Yan, Qingzhi; Ge, Changchun

    2016-10-01

    Controllable modification of hydrophilic groups on tubular nanostructured carbon with hollow macroporous core/mesoporous shell (TNC-HMC/MS) was systematically studied and the mesoporous structure of TNC-HMC/MS has been kept. Different oxidants were used to modify the TNC-HMC/MS. Results revealed that the TNC-HMC/MS could be modified with carboxyl or hydroxy by different oxidants. More importantly, the BET/BJH results indicated that the mesoporous shell of TNC-HMC/MS has not been destroyed. In addition, water-soluble ammonium metatungstate has been encapsulated into the hollow core of TNC-HMC/MS and formed nanodot, bamboo-like and nanowire morphology.

  6. First-principles study of two-dimensional van der Waals heterojunctions

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wei; Yang, Jinlong

    2015-01-01

    Research on graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as silicene, germanene, phosphorene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), graphitic zinc oxide (g-ZnO) and molybdenum disulphide (MoS2), has recently received considerable interest owing to their outstanding properties and wide applications. Looking beyond this field, combining the electronic structures of 2D materials in ultrathin van der Waals heterojunctions has also emerged to widely study th...

  7. Solvothermal synthesis of carbon coated N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanostructures with enhanced visible light catalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Xuemin, E-mail: yanzhangmm2002@163.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China); Kang Jialing; Gao Lin; Xiong Lin; Mei Ping [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitosan was used as carbon and nitrogen resource to modify TiO{sub 2} nanostructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocomposites with mesostructure were obtained by one-step solvothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon species were modified on the surface of TiO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen was doped into the anatase titania lattice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CTS-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites show superior visible light photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Visible light-active carbon coated N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanostructures(CTS-TiO{sub 2}) were prepared by a facile one-step solvothermal method with chitosan as carbon and nitrogen resource at 180 Degree-Sign C. The as-prepared samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The CTS-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites possess anatase phase of nanocrystalline structure with average particle size of about 5-7 nm. A wormhole mesostructure can be observed in the CTS-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites due to the constituent agglomerated of nanoparticles. It has been evidenced that the nitrogen was doped into the anatase titania lattice and the carbon species were modified on the surface of TiO{sub 2}. The photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared photocatalysts were measured by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation at {lambda} {>=} 400 nm. The results show that CTS-TiO{sub 2} nanostructures display a higher visible light photocatalytic activity than pure TiO{sub 2}, commercial P25 and C-coated TiO{sub 2} (C-TiO{sub 2}) photocatalysts. The higher photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the band-gap narrowed by N-doping and the accelerated separation of the photo-generated electrons

  8. Precise 3D printing of micro/nanostructures using highly conductive carbon nanotube-thiol-acrylate composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Xiong, W.; Jiang, L. J.; Zhou, Y. S.; Lu, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) is of increasing interest due to its unique combination of truly three-dimensional (3D) fabrication capability and ultrahigh spatial resolution of ~40 nm. However, the stringent requirements of non-linear resins seriously limit the material functionality of 3D printing via TPP. Precise fabrication of 3D micro/nanostructures with multi-functionalities such as high electrical conductivity and mechanical strength is still a long-standing challenge. In this work, TPP fabrication of arbitrary 3D micro/nanostructures using multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-thiolacrylate (MTA) composite resins has been developed. Up to 0.2 wt% MWNTs have been incorporated into thiol-acrylate resins to form highly stable and uniform composite photoresists without obvious degradation for one week at room temperature. Various functional 3D micro/nanostructures including woodpiles, micro-coils, spiral-like photonic crystals, suspended micro-bridges, micro-gears and complex micro-cars have been successfully fabricated. The MTA composite resin offers significant enhancements in electrical conductivity and mechanical strength, and on the same time, preserving high optical transmittance and flexibility. Tightly controlled alignment of MWNTs and the strong anisotropy effect were confirmed. Microelectronic devices including capacitors and resistors made of the MTA composite polymer were demonstrated. The 3D micro/nanofabrication using the MTA composite resins enables the precise 3D printing of micro/nanostructures of high electrical conductivity and mechanical strength, which is expected to lead a wide range of device applications, including micro/nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), integrated photonics and 3D electronics.

  9. Synthesis, structure and spectroscopic characteristics of Ti(O,C)$_2$/carbon nanostructured globules with visible light photocatalytic activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V N KRASIL’NIKOV; E V SHALAEVA; I V BAKLANOVA; M A MELKOZEROVA; M V KUZNETSOV; E V ZABOLOTSKAYA; O I GYRDASOVA; L YU BULDAKOVA; A M MURZAKAEV

    2016-10-01

    A morphology-controlled facile synthesis of titanium-glycolate precursors with subsequent annealing in He and air atmospheres has been exploited for the production of nanostructured composite globules, whiskers and plates of C-modified titanium dioxide. Characterisation tests proved the as-obtained globule composites to exclusively exhibit high-specific surface area (up to 150–170 m$^2$ g$^{−1}$), thus being useful for photocatalytic applications inthe visible-light region. The combination of the electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of three kinds of carbon in the globules: a small bandgap (with measured width of 0.8 eV) amorphous carbon surrounding the anatase nanocrystallites,C-containing radicals including carbonates on the surface of TiO$_2$ and interstitial carbon in the oxygen position of the TiO$_2$ lattice. It was found that the maximum visible-light photocatalytic activity of the globules is determinedby the optimal surface concentration of amorphous carbon of about 0.002 wt.% m$^{−2}$. Under these conditions, the highest synergic photosensitising effect on TiO$_2$ nanocrystallites of all three kinds of carbon is expected.

  10. LDRD final report on synthesis of shape-and size-controlled platinum and platinum alloy nanostructures on carbon with improved durability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelnutt, John Allen; Garcia, Robert M.; Song, Yujiang; Moreno, Andres M.; Stanis, Ronald J.

    2008-10-01

    This project is aimed to gain added durability by supporting ripening-resistant dendritic platinum and/or platinum-based alloy nanostructures on carbon. We have developed a new synthetic approach suitable for directly supporting dendritic nanostructures on VXC-72 carbon black (CB), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The key of the synthesis is to creating a unique supporting/confining reaction environment by incorporating carbon within lipid bilayer relying on a hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. In order to realize size uniformity control over the supported dendritic nanostructures, a fast photocatalytic seeding method based on tin(IV) porphyrins (SnP) developed at Sandia was applied to the synthesis by using SnP-containing liposomes under tungsten light irradiation. For concept approval, one created dendritic platinum nanostructure supported on CB was fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for durability examination via potential cycling. It appears that carbon supporting is essentially beneficial to an enhanced durability according to our preliminary results.

  11. Hybrid nanostructured microporous carbon-mesoporous carbon doped titanium dioxide/sulfur composite positive electrode materials for rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, Tilahun Awoke; Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Wotango, Aselefech Sorsa; Pan, Chun-Jern; Chen, Hung-Ming; Haregewoin, Atetegeb Meazah; Cheng, Ju-Hsiang; Su, Wei-Nien; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we design hybrid nanostructured microporous carbon-mesoporous carbon doped titanium dioxide/sulfur composite (MC-Meso C-doped TiO2/S) as a positive electrode material for lithium-sulfur batteries. The hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 host material is produced by a low-cost, hydrothermal and annealing process. The resulting conductive material shows dual microporous and mesoporous behavior which enhances the effective trapping of sulfur and polysulfides. The hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2/S composite material possesses rutile TiO2 nanotube structure with successful carbon doping while sulfur is uniformly distributed in the hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 composite materials after the melt-infusion process. The electrochemical measurement of the hybrid material also shows improved cycle stability and rate performance with high sulfur loading (61.04%). The material delivers an initial discharge capacity of 802 mAh g-1 and maintains it at 578 mAh g-1 with a columbic efficiency greater than 97.1% after 140 cycles at 0.1 C. This improvement is thought to be attributed to the unique hybrid nanostructure of the MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 host and the good dispersion of sulfur in the narrow pores of the MC spheres and the mesoporous C-doped TiO2 support.

  12. Controlled synthesis of carbon-encapsulated copper nanostructures by using smectite clays as nanotemplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros; Colomer, Jean-François; Maccallini, Enrico; Jankovič, Lubos; Rudolf, Petra; Gournis, Dimitrios

    2012-07-23

    Rhomboidal and spherical metallic-copper nanostructures were encapsulated within well-formed graphitic shells by using a simple chemical method that involved the catalytic decomposition of acetylene over a copper catalyst that was supported on different smectite clays surfaces by ion-exchange. These metallic-copper nanostructures could be separated from the inorganic support and remained stable for months. The choice of the clay support influenced both the shape and the size of the synthesized Cu nanostructures. The synthesized materials and the supported catalysts from which they were produced were studied in detail by TEM and SEM, powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, as well as by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Tracking dynamics of two-dimensional continuous attractor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, C. C. Alan; Wong, K. Y. Michael; Wu, Si

    2009-12-01

    We introduce an analytically solvable model of two-dimensional continuous attractor neural networks (CANNs). The synaptic input and the neuronal response form Gaussian bumps in the absence of external stimuli, and enable the network to track external stimuli by its translational displacement in the two-dimensional space. Basis functions of the two-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator in polar coordinates are introduced to describe the distortion modes of the Gaussian bump. The perturbative method is applied to analyze its dynamics. Testing the method by considering the network behavior when the external stimulus abruptly changes its position, we obtain results of the reaction time and the amplitudes of various distortion modes, with excellent agreement with simulation results.

  14. Electronics and optoelectronics of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing Hua; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Kis, Andras; Coleman, Jonathan N; Strano, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene have renewed interest in inorganic, two-dimensional materials with unique electronic and optical attributes. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are layered materials with strong in-plane bonding and weak out-of-plane interactions enabling exfoliation into two-dimensional layers of single unit cell thickness. Although TMDCs have been studied for decades, recent advances in nanoscale materials characterization and device fabrication have opened up new opportunities for two-dimensional layers of thin TMDCs in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. TMDCs such as MoS(2), MoSe(2), WS(2) and WSe(2) have sizable bandgaps that change from indirect to direct in single layers, allowing applications such as transistors, photodetectors and electroluminescent devices. We review the historical development of TMDCs, methods for preparing atomically thin layers, their electronic and optical properties, and prospects for future advances in electronics and optoelectronics.

  15. Hamiltonian formalism of two-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Maxim V

    2014-12-08

    In this paper, the two-dimensional Benney system describing long wave propagation of a finite depth fluid motion and the multi-dimensional Russo-Smereka kinetic equation describing a bubbly flow are considered. The Hamiltonian approach established by J. Gibbons for the one-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation is extended to a multi-dimensional case. A local Hamiltonian structure associated with the hydrodynamic lattice of moments derived by D. J. Benney is constructed. A relationship between this hydrodynamic lattice of moments and the two-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation is found. In the two-dimensional case, a Hamiltonian hydrodynamic lattice for the Russo-Smereka kinetic model is constructed. Simple hydrodynamic reductions are presented.

  16. Control Operator for the Two-Dimensional Energized Wave Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Augustus REJU

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the analytical model for the construction of the two-dimensional Energized wave equation. The control operator is given in term of space and time t independent variables. The integral quadratic objective cost functional is subject to the constraint of two-dimensional Energized diffusion, Heat and a source. The operator that shall be obtained extends the Conjugate Gradient method (ECGM as developed by Hestenes et al (1952, [1]. The new operator enables the computation of the penalty cost, optimal controls and state trajectories of the two-dimensional energized wave equation when apply to the Conjugate Gradient methods in (Waziri & Reju, LEJPT & LJS, Issues 9, 2006, [2-4] to appear in this series.

  17. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy Using Incoherent Light: Theoretical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Daniel B; Sutor, Erika J; Hendrickson, Rebecca A; Gealy, M W; Ulness, Darin J

    2012-01-01

    Electronic energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs over a range of time scales and under a variety of intermolecular coupling conditions. Recent work has shown that electronic coupling between chromophores can lead to coherent oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements of pigment-protein complexes measured with femtosecond laser pulses. A persistent issue in the field is to reconcile the results of measurements performed using femtosecond laser pulses with physiological illumination conditions. Noisy-light spectroscopy can begin to address this question. In this work we present the theoretical analysis of incoherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, I(4) 2D ES. Simulations reveal diagonal peaks, cross peaks, and coherent oscillations similar to those observed in femtosecond two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments. The results also expose fundamental differences between the femtosecond-pulse and noisy-light techniques; the differences lead to new challenges and opp...

  18. A two-dimensional spin liquid in quantum kagome ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquilla, Juan; Hao, Zhihao; Melko, Roger G

    2015-06-22

    Actively sought since the turn of the century, two-dimensional quantum spin liquids (QSLs) are exotic phases of matter where magnetic moments remain disordered even at zero temperature. Despite ongoing searches, QSLs remain elusive, due to a lack of concrete knowledge of the microscopic mechanisms that inhibit magnetic order in materials. Here we study a model for a broad class of frustrated magnetic rare-earth pyrochlore materials called quantum spin ices. When subject to an external magnetic field along the [111] crystallographic direction, the resulting interactions contain a mix of geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations in decoupled two-dimensional kagome planes. Using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we identify a set of interactions sufficient to promote a groundstate with no magnetic long-range order, and a gap to excitations, consistent with a Z2 spin liquid phase. This suggests an experimental procedure to search for two-dimensional QSLs within a class of pyrochlore quantum spin ice materials.

  19. Spectral Radiative Properties of Two-Dimensional Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yimin; Han, Yuge; Zhou, Yue

    2012-12-01

    Spectral radiative properties of two-dimensional rough surfaces are important for both academic research and practical applications. Besides material properties, surface structures have impact on the spectral radiative properties of rough surfaces. Based on the finite difference time domain algorithm, this paper studies the spectral energy propagation process on a two-dimensional rough surface and analyzes the effect of different factors such as the surface structure, angle, and polarization state of the incident wave on the spectral radiative properties of the two-dimensional rough surface. To quantitatively investigate the spatial distribution of energy reflected from the rough surface, the concept of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function is introduced. Correlation analysis between the reflectance and different impact factors is conducted to evaluate the influence degree. Comparison between the theoretical and experimental data is given to elucidate the accuracy of the computational code. This study is beneficial to optimizing the surface structures of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells.

  20. Two dimensional convolute integers for machine vision and image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas R.

    1988-01-01

    Machine vision and image recognition require sophisticated image processing prior to the application of Artificial Intelligence. Two Dimensional Convolute Integer Technology is an innovative mathematical approach for addressing machine vision and image recognition. This new technology generates a family of digital operators for addressing optical images and related two dimensional data sets. The operators are regression generated, integer valued, zero phase shifting, convoluting, frequency sensitive, two dimensional low pass, high pass and band pass filters that are mathematically equivalent to surface fitted partial derivatives. These operators are applied non-recursively either as classical convolutions (replacement point values), interstitial point generators (bandwidth broadening or resolution enhancement), or as missing value calculators (compensation for dead array element values). These operators show frequency sensitive feature selection scale invariant properties. Such tasks as boundary/edge enhancement and noise or small size pixel disturbance removal can readily be accomplished. For feature selection tight band pass operators are essential. Results from test cases are given.

  1. Optical modulators with two-dimensional layered materials

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Zhipei; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that two-dimensional layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this review, we cover the state-of-the-art of optical modulators based on two-dimensional layered materials including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as two-dimensional heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon/fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  2. Two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness is reviewed mainly from the experimental point of view. The superconducting systems treated here involve a variety of materials and forms: elemental metal ultrathin films and atomic layers on semiconductor surfaces; interfaces and superlattices of heterostructures made of cuprates, perovskite oxides, and rare-earth metal heavy-fermion compounds; interfaces of electric-double-layer transistors; graphene and atomic sheets of transition metal dichalcogenide; iron selenide and organic conductors on oxide and metal surfaces, respectively. Unique phenomena arising from the ultimate two dimensionality of the system and the physics behind them are discussed.

  3. TreePM Method for Two-Dimensional Cosmological Simulations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suryadeep Ray

    2004-09-01

    We describe the two-dimensional TreePM method in this paper. The 2d TreePM code is an accurate and efficient technique to carry out large two-dimensional N-body simulations in cosmology. This hybrid code combines the 2d Barnes and Hut Tree method and the 2d Particle–Mesh method. We describe the splitting of force between the PM and the Tree parts. We also estimate error in force for a realistic configuration. Finally, we discuss some tests of the code.

  4. Singular analysis of two-dimensional bifurcation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Bifurcation properties of two-dimensional bifurcation system are studied in this paper.Universal unfolding and transition sets of the bifurcation equations are obtained.The whole parametric plane is divided into several different persistent regions according to the type of motion,and the different qualitative bifurcation diagrams in different persistent regions are given.The bifurcation properties of the two-dimensional bifurcation system are compared with its reduced one-dimensional system.It is found that the system which is reduced to one dimension has lost many bifurcation properties.

  5. Critical Behaviour of a Two-Dimensional Random Antiferromagnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Birgeneau, R. J.; Guggenheim, H. J.

    1976-01-01

    A neutron scattering study of the order parameter, correlation length and staggered susceptibility of the two-dimensional random antiferromagnet Rb2Mn0.5Ni0.5F4 is reported. The system is found to exhibit a well-defined phase transition with critical exponents identical to those of the isomorphou...... pure materials K2NiF4 and K2MnF4. Thus, in these systems, which have the asymptotic critical behaviour of the two-dimensional Ising model, randomness has no measurable effect on the phase-transition behaviour....

  6. Nonlinear excitations in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Rasmussen, Kim; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1995-01-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of electronic excitations interacting with acoustic phonons in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities. We show that the problem is reduced to the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a varying coefficient. The latter represents the influence of the imp......We study the nonlinear dynamics of electronic excitations interacting with acoustic phonons in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities. We show that the problem is reduced to the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a varying coefficient. The latter represents the influence...... excitations. Analytical results are in good agreement with numerical simulations of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation....

  7. Vortices in the Two-Dimensional Simple Exclusion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodineau, T.; Derrida, B.; Lebowitz, Joel L.

    2008-06-01

    We show that the fluctuations of the partial current in two dimensional diffusive systems are dominated by vortices leading to a different scaling from the one predicted by the hydrodynamic large deviation theory. This is supported by exact computations of the variance of partial current fluctuations for the symmetric simple exclusion process on general graphs. On a two-dimensional torus, our exact expressions are compared to the results of numerical simulations. They confirm the logarithmic dependence on the system size of the fluctuations of the partial flux. The impact of the vortices on the validity of the fluctuation relation for partial currents is also discussed in an Appendix.

  8. Two-dimensional hazard estimation for longevity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Peter; Guillen, M.; Nielsen, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    the two-dimensional mortality surface. Furthermore we look at aggregated synthetic population metrics as 'population life expectancy' and 'population survival probability'. For Danish women these metrics indicate decreasing mortality with respect to chronological time. The metrics can not directly be used......We investigate developments in Danish mortality based on data from 1974-1998 working in a two-dimensional model with chronological time and age as the two dimensions. The analyses are done with non-parametric kernel hazard estimation techniques. The only assumption is that the mortality surface...... for analysis of economic implications arising from mortality changes....

  9. Field analysis of two-dimensional focusing grating couplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsboom, P.-P.; Frankena, H. J.

    1995-05-01

    A different technique was developed by which several two-dimensional dielectric optical gratings, consisting 100 or more corrugations, were treated in a numerical reliable approach. The numerical examples that were presented were restricted to gratings made up of sequences of waveguide sections symmetric about the x = 0 plane. The newly developed method was effectively used to investigate the field produced by a two-dimensional focusing grating coupler. Focal-region fields were determined for three symmetrical gratings with 19, 50, and 124 corrugations. For focusing grating coupler with limited length, high-frequency intensity variations were noted in the focal region.

  10. Self-assembly of two-dimensional DNA crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Cheng; CHEN Yaqing; WEI Shuai; YOU Xiaozeng; XIAO Shoujun

    2004-01-01

    Self-assembly of synthetic oligonucleotides into two-dimensional lattices presents a 'bottom-up' approach to the fabrication of devices on nanometer scale. We report the design and observation of two-dimensional crystalline forms of DNAs that are composed of twenty-one plane oligonucleotides and one phosphate-modified oligonucleotide. These synthetic sequences are designed to self-assemble into four double-crossover (DX) DNA tiles. The 'sticky ends' of these tiles that associate according to Watson-Crick's base pairing are programmed to build up specific periodic patterns upto tens of microns. The patterned crystals are visualized by the transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Dynamics of vortex interactions in two-dimensional flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, A.H.; Naulin, V.

    2002-01-01

    a critical value, a(c). Using the Weiss-field, a(c) is estimated for vortex patches. Introducing an effective radius for vortices with distributed vorticity, we find that 3.3 a(c) ...The dynamics and interaction of like-signed vortex structures in two dimensional flows are investigated by means of direct numerical solutions of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Two vortices with distributed vorticity merge when their distance relative to their radius, d/R-0l. is below...

  12. Two-dimensional assignment with merged measurements using Langrangrian relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briers, Mark; Maskell, Simon; Philpott, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Closely spaced targets can result in merged measurements, which complicate data association. Such merged measurements violate any assumption that each measurement relates to a single target. As a result, it is not possible to use the auction algorithm in its simplest form (or other two-dimensional assignment algorithms) to solve the two-dimensional target-to-measurement assignment problem. We propose an approach that uses the auction algorithm together with Lagrangian relaxation to incorporate the additional constraints resulting from the presence of merged measurements. We conclude with some simulated results displaying the concepts introduced, and discuss the application of this research within a particle filter context.

  13. Two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffenberger, Werner; Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2002-10-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann model for the simulation of two-dimensional magnetohydro dynamic (MHD) flows. The model is an extension of a hydrodynamic lattice Boltzman model with 9 velocities on a square lattice resulting in a model with 17 velocities. Earlier lattice Boltzmann models for two-dimensional MHD used a bidirectional streaming rule. However, the use of such a bidirectional streaming rule is not necessary. In our model, the standard streaming rule is used, allowing smaller viscosities. To control the viscosity and the resistivity independently, a matrix collision operator is used. The model is then applied to the Hartmann flow, giving reasonable results.

  14. Quasinormal frequencies of asymptotically flat two-dimensional black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Ortega, A

    2011-01-01

    We discuss whether the minimally coupled massless Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields have well defined quasinormal modes in single horizon, asymptotically flat two-dimensional black holes. To get the result we solve the equations of motion in the massless limit and we also calculate the effective potentials of Schrodinger type equations. Furthermore we calculate exactly the quasinormal frequencies of the Dirac field propagating in the two-dimensional uncharged Witten black hole. We compare our results on its quasinormal frequencies with other already published.

  15. Spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Deuretzbacher, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas. Through spin-changing collisions, two clouds with opposite spin orientations are spontaneously created in a Bose-Einstein condensate. After ballistic expansion, both clouds acquire ring-shaped density distributions with superimp......We have investigated spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas. Through spin-changing collisions, two clouds with opposite spin orientations are spontaneously created in a Bose-Einstein condensate. After ballistic expansion, both clouds acquire ring-shaped density distributions...

  16. Ultrathin two-dimensional inorganic materials: new opportunities for solid state nanochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongfu; Gao, Shan; Lei, Fengcai; Xiao, Chong; Xie, Yi

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: The ultimate goal of solid state chemistry is to gain a clear correlation between atomic, defect, and electronic structure and intrinsic properties of solid state materials. Solid materials can generally be classified as amorphous, quasicrystalline, and crystalline based on their atomic arrangement, in which crystalline materials can be further divided into single crystals, microcrystals, and nanocrystals. Conventional solid state chemistry mainly focuses on studying single crystals and microcrystals, while recently nanocrystals have become a hot research topic in the field of solid state chemistry. As more and more nanocrystalline materials have been artificially fabricated, the solid state chemistry for studying those nanosolids has become a new subdiscipline: solid state nanochemistry. However, solid state nanochemistry, usually called "nanochemistry" for short, primarily studies the microstructures and macroscopic properties of a nanomaterial's aggregation states. Due to abundant microstructures in the aggregation states, it is only possible to build a simple but imprecise correlation between the microscopic morphology and the macroscopic properties of the nanostructures. Notably, atomically thin two-dimensional inorganic materials provide an ideal platform to establish clear structure-property relationships in the field of solid state nanochemistry, thanks to their homogeneous dispersion without the assistance of a capping ligand. In addition, their atomic structures including coordination number, bond length, and disorder degree of the examined atoms can be clearly disclosed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Also, their more exposed interior atoms would inevitably induce the formation of various defects, which would have a non-negligible effect on their physicochemical properties. Based on the obtained atomic and defect structural characteristics, density-functional calculations are performed to study their electronic structures

  17. Controlled Synthesis of Carbon-Encapsulated Copper Nanostructures by Using Smectite Clays as Nanotemplates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros; Colomer, Jean-Francois; Maccallini, Enrico; Jankovic, Lubos; Rudolf, Petra; Gournis, Dimitrios; Jankovič, Lubos

    2012-01-01

    Rhomboidal and spherical metallic-copper nanostructures were encapsulated within well-formed graphitic shells by using a simple chemical method that involved the catalytic decomposition of acetylene over a copper catalyst that was supported on different smectite clays surfaces by ion-exchange. These

  18. Controlled Synthesis of Carbon-Encapsulated Copper Nanostructures by Using Smectite Clays as Nanotemplates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros; Colomer, Jean-Francois; Maccallini, Enrico; Jankovic, Lubos; Rudolf, Petra; Gournis, Dimitrios; Jankovič, Lubos

    2012-01-01

    Rhomboidal and spherical metallic-copper nanostructures were encapsulated within well-formed graphitic shells by using a simple chemical method that involved the catalytic decomposition of acetylene over a copper catalyst that was supported on different smectite clays surfaces by ion-exchange. These

  19. On some classes of two-dimensional local models in discrete two-dimensional monatomic FPU lattice with cubic and quartic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Quan; Tian Qiang

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the two-dimensional discrete monatomic Fermi-Pasta-Ulam lattice, by using the method of multiple-scale and the quasi-discreteness approach. By taking into account the interaction between the atoms in the lattice and their nearest neighbours, it obtains some classes of two-dimensional local models as follows: two-dimensional bright and dark discrete soliton trains, two-dimensional bright and dark line discrete breathers, and two-dimensional bright and dark discrete breather.

  20. Mapping two-dimensional polar active fluids to two-dimensional soap and one-dimensional sandblasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Leiming; Lee, Chiu Fan; Toner, John

    2016-07-01

    Active fluids and growing interfaces are two well-studied but very different non-equilibrium systems. Each exhibits non-equilibrium behaviour distinct from that of their equilibrium counterparts. Here we demonstrate a surprising connection between these two: the ordered phase of incompressible polar active fluids in two spatial dimensions without momentum conservation, and growing one-dimensional interfaces (that is, the 1+1-dimensional Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation), in fact belong to the same universality class. This universality class also includes two equilibrium systems: two-dimensional smectic liquid crystals, and a peculiar kind of constrained two-dimensional ferromagnet. We use these connections to show that two-dimensional incompressible flocks are robust against fluctuations, and exhibit universal long-ranged, anisotropic spatio-temporal correlations of those fluctuations. We also thereby determine the exact values of the anisotropy exponent ζ and the roughness exponents χx,y that characterize these correlations.

  1. Two-grain nanoindentation using the quasicontinuum method: Two-dimensional model approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, Rodrigo A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Fisicoquimica de Cordoba (INFIQC), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones, Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Edificio Integrador, Ciudad Universitaria, Cordoba, CP 5000 (Argentina)]. E-mail: riglesias@mail.fcq.unc.edu.ar; Leiva, Ezequiel P.M. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Fisicoquimica de Cordoba (INFIQC), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones, Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Edificio Integrador, Ciudad Universitaria, Cordoba, CP 5000 (Argentina)

    2006-06-15

    The quasicontinuum method (two-dimensional) developed by Tadmor et al. [Tadmor EB, Ortiz M, Phillips R. Philos Mag 1996;73:1529] is applied to an indentation process taking account of the atomic structure of the indenter and the substrate subject to indentation. Slip vectors, dislocation nucleation and nanostructure formation are analyzed for different indenter materials (Ag, Cu and Pd) and indenter crystal orientations. Slip vectors near to the contact region show that, depending on the material and orientation of the indenter, plastic deformations occur either inside the indenter or the substrate. Long-range material deformations appear during the indentation or retraction of the indenter. All of these aspects mainly dictate the formation of nanoclusters or nanoholes on the substrate surface.

  2. Piezoelectric two-dimensional nanosheets/anionic layer heterojunction for efficient direct current power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwon-Ho; Kumar, Brijesh; Lee, Keun Young; Park, Hyun-Kyu; Lee, Ju-Hyuck; Lee, Hyun Hwi; Jun, Hoin; Lee, Dongyun; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2013-06-01

    Direct current (DC) piezoelectric power generator is promising for the miniaturization of a power package and self-powering of nanorobots and body-implanted devices. Hence, we report the first use of two-dimensional (2D) zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructure and an anionic nanoclay layer to generate piezoelectric DC output power. The device, made from 2D nanosheets and an anionic nanoclay layer heterojunction, has potential to be the smallest size power package, and could be used to charge wireless nano/micro scale systems without the use of rectifier circuits to convert alternating current into DC to store the generated power. The combined effect of buckling behaviour of the ZnO nanosheets, a self-formed anionic nanoclay layer, and coupled semiconducting and piezoelectric properties of ZnO nanosheets contributes to efficient DC power generation. The networked ZnO nanosheets proved to be structurally stable under huge external mechanical loads.

  3. Improvement of the electrical contact resistance at rough interfaces using two dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jianchen; Pan, Chengbin; Lanza, Mario, E-mail: mlanza@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano & Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nanoscience and Technology, Soochow University, 199 Ren-Ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Li, Heng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); CAPT, HEDPS and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shen, Panpan; Sun, Hui; Duan, Huiling [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, CAPT, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-07

    Reducing the electronic contact resistance at the interfaces of nanostructured materials is a major goal for many kinds of planar and three dimensional devices. In this work, we develop a method to enhance the electronic transport at rough interfaces by inserting a two dimensional flexible and conductive graphene sheet. We observe that an ultra-thin graphene layer with a thickness of 0.35 nm can remarkably reduce the roughness of a sample in a factor of 40%, avoiding the use of thick coatings, leading to a more homogeneous current flow, and extraordinarily increasing the total current compared to the graphene-free counterpart. Due to its simplicity and performance enhancement, this methodology can be of interest to many interface and device designers.

  4. Two-Dimensional Supramolecular Polymers Embodying Large Unilamellar Vesicles in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shigui; Polen, Shane M; Wang, Lu; Yamasaki, Makoto; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2016-09-07

    We hereby describe a strategy for obtaining novel topological nanostructures consisting of dual-cavity basket 1, forming a curved monolayer of large unilamellar vesicles in water (CAC < 0.25 μM), and bivalent guests 4/5 populating the cavities of such bolaamphiphilic hosts. On the basis of the results of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering measurements, we postulated that divalent guest molecules 4/5 cover the curved vesicular surface in a lateral fashion to satisfy the complexation [2 + 2] valency and thereby give stable two-dimensional supramolecular polymers [1⊂4]n and [1⊂5]n. The results of experimental studies are also supported with coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics. Our discovery about the assembly of novel vesicular structures could be of interest for stabilization/functionalization of liposomal surfaces as well as detection of polyvalent molecules and removal of targeted substances from aqueous environments.

  5. Immobilization of single argon atoms in nano-cages of two-dimensional zeolite model systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Mengen; Akter, Nusnin; Kestell, John D.; Boscoboinik, Alejandro M.; Kim, Taejin; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Lu, Deyu; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal

    2017-07-01

    The confinement of noble gases on nanostructured surfaces, in contrast to bulk materials, at non-cryogenic temperatures represents a formidable challenge. In this work, individual Ar atoms are trapped at 300 K in nano-cages consisting of (alumino)silicate hexagonal prisms forming a two-dimensional array on a planar surface. The trapping of Ar atoms is detected in situ using synchrotron-based ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The atoms remain in the cages upon heating to 400 K. The trapping and release of Ar is studied combining surface science methods and density functional theory calculations. While the frameworks stay intact with the inclusion of Ar atoms, the permeability of gasses (for example, CO) through them is significantly affected, making these structures also interesting candidates for tunable atomic and molecular sieves. These findings enable the study of individually confined noble gas atoms using surface science methods, opening up new opportunities for fundamental research.

  6. Experimental demonstration of the microscopic origin of circular dichroism in two-dimensional metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanikaev, A B; Arju, N; Fan, Z; Purtseladze, D; Lu, F; Lee, J; Sarriugarte, P; Schnell, M; Hillenbrand, R; Belkin, M A; Shvets, G

    2016-06-22

    Optical activity and circular dichroism are fascinating physical phenomena originating from the interaction of light with chiral molecules or other nano objects lacking mirror symmetries in three-dimensional (3D) space. While chiral optical properties are weak in most of naturally occurring materials, they can be engineered and significantly enhanced in synthetic optical media known as chiral metamaterials, where the spatial symmetry of their building blocks is broken on a nanoscale. Although originally discovered in 3D structures, circular dichroism can also emerge in a two-dimensional (2D) metasurface. The origin of the resulting circular dichroism is rather subtle, and is related to non-radiative (Ohmic) dissipation of the constituent metamolecules. Because such dissipation occurs on a nanoscale, this effect has never been experimentally probed and visualized. Using a suite of recently developed nanoscale-measurement tools, we establish that the circular dichroism in a nanostructured metasurface occurs due to handedness-dependent Ohmic heating.

  7. Immobilization of single argon atoms in nano-cages of two-dimensional zeolite model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Mengen; Akter, Nusnin; Kestell, John D; Boscoboinik, Alejandro M; Kim, Taejin; Stacchiola, Dario J; Lu, Deyu; Boscoboinik, J Anibal

    2017-07-17

    The confinement of noble gases on nanostructured surfaces, in contrast to bulk materials, at non-cryogenic temperatures represents a formidable challenge. In this work, individual Ar atoms are trapped at 300 K in nano-cages consisting of (alumino)silicate hexagonal prisms forming a two-dimensional array on a planar surface. The trapping of Ar atoms is detected in situ using synchrotron-based ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The atoms remain in the cages upon heating to 400 K. The trapping and release of Ar is studied combining surface science methods and density functional theory calculations. While the frameworks stay intact with the inclusion of Ar atoms, the permeability of gasses (for example, CO) through them is significantly affected, making these structures also interesting candidates for tunable atomic and molecular sieves. These findings enable the study of individually confined noble gas atoms using surface science methods, opening up new opportunities for fundamental research.

  8. Piezoelectric two-dimensional nanosheets/anionic layer heterojunction for efficient direct current power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwon-Ho; Kumar, Brijesh; Lee, Keun Young; Park, Hyun-Kyu; Lee, Ju-Hyuck; Lee, Hyun Hwi; Jun, Hoin; Lee, Dongyun; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Direct current (DC) piezoelectric power generator is promising for the miniaturization of a power package and self-powering of nanorobots and body-implanted devices. Hence, we report the first use of two-dimensional (2D) zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructure and an anionic nanoclay layer to generate piezoelectric DC output power. The device, made from 2D nanosheets and an anionic nanoclay layer heterojunction, has potential to be the smallest size power package, and could be used to charge wireless nano/micro scale systems without the use of rectifier circuits to convert alternating current into DC to store the generated power. The combined effect of buckling behaviour of the ZnO nanosheets, a self-formed anionic nanoclay layer, and coupled semiconducting and piezoelectric properties of ZnO nanosheets contributes to efficient DC power generation. The networked ZnO nanosheets proved to be structurally stable under huge external mechanical loads.

  9. Waiting Time Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Knoester, Jasper

    We review recent work on the waiting time dynamics of coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. This dynamics can reveal chemical and physical processes that take place on the femto- and picosecond time scale, which is faster than the time scale that may be probed by, for example,

  10. The partition function of two-dimensional string theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Moore, Gregory; Plesser, Ronen

    1993-04-01

    We derive a compact and explicit expression for the generating functional of all correlation functions of tachyon operators in two-dimensional string theory. This expression makes manifest relations of the c = 1 system to KP flow nd W 1 + ∞ constraints. Moreover we derive a Kontsevich-Penner integral representation of this generating functional.

  11. The partition function of two-dimensional string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, R. (School of Natural Sciences, Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States) Dept. of Mathematics, Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Moore, G.; Plesser, R. (Dept. of Physics, Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

    1993-04-12

    We derive a compact and explicit expression for the generating functional of all correlation functions of tachyon operators in two-dimensional string theory. This expression makes manifest relations of the c=1 system to KP flow and W[sub 1+[infinity

  12. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of a Model Dimer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokhorenko V.I.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional spectra of a dimer were measured to determine the timescale for electronic decoherence at room temperature. Anti-correlated beats in the crosspeaks were observed only during the period corresponding to the measured homogeneous lifetime.

  13. Torque magnetometry studies of two-dimensional electron systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaapman, Maaike Ruth

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the magnetization two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs). To detect the typically small magnetization, a sensitive magnetometer with optical angular detection was developed. The magnetometer uses a quadrant detector to measure the rotation of the sample. By mounting

  14. Low-frequency scattering from two-dimensional perfect conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thorkild; Yaghjian, A.D

    1991-01-01

    Exact expressions have been obtained for the leading terms in the low-frequency expansions of the far fields scattered from three different types of two-dimensional perfect conductors: a cylinder with finite cross section, a cylindrical bump on an infinite ground plane, and a cylindrical dent...

  15. Two-Dimensional Mesoscale-Ordered Conducting Polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shaohua; Zhang, Jian; Dong, Renhao; Gordiichuk, Pavlo; Zhang, Tao; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Mai, Yiyong; Liu, Feng; Herrmann, Andreas; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of numerous two-dimensional (2D) materials with structural ordering at the atomic or molecular level, direct construction of mesoscale-ordered superstructures within a 2D monolayer remains an enormous challenge. Here, we report the synergic manipulation of two types of assem

  16. Piezoelectricity and Piezomagnetism: Duality in two-dimensional checkerboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fel, Leonid G.

    2002-05-01

    The duality approach in two-dimensional two-component regular checkerboards is extended to piezoelectricity and piezomagnetism. The relation between the effective piezoelectric and piezomagnetic moduli is found for a checkerboard with the p6'mm'-plane symmetry group (dichromatic triangle).

  17. Specification of a Two-Dimensional Test Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    This paper describes the geometry and other boundary conditions for a test case which can be used to test different two-dimensional CFD codes in the lEA Annex 20 work. The given supply opening is large compared with practical openings. Therefore, this geometry will reduce the need for a high number...... of grid points in the wall jet region....

  18. Operator splitting for two-dimensional incompressible fluid equations

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, Helge; Karper, Trygve K

    2011-01-01

    We analyze splitting algorithms for a class of two-dimensional fluid equations, which includes the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the surface quasi-geostrophic equation. Our main result is that the Godunov and Strang splitting methods converge with the expected rates provided the initial data are sufficiently regular.

  19. Chaotic dynamics for two-dimensional tent maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumariño, Antonio; Ángel Rodríguez, José; Carles Tatjer, Joan; Vigil, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    For a two-dimensional extension of the classical one-dimensional family of tent maps, we prove the existence of an open set of parameters for which the respective transformation presents a strange attractor with two positive Lyapounov exponents. Moreover, periodic orbits are dense on this attractor and the attractor supports a unique ergodic invariant probability measure.

  20. Divorticity and dihelicity in two-dimensional hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shivamoggi, B.K.; van Heijst, G.J.F.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    A framework is developed based on the concepts of divorticity B (≡×ω, ω being the vorticity) and dihelicity g (≡vB) for discussing the theoretical structure underlying two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamics. This formulation leads to the global and Lagrange invariants that could impose significant...

  1. Spin-orbit torques in two-dimensional Rashba ferromagnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qaiumzadeh, A.; Duine, R. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830127; Titov, M.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization dynamics in single-domain ferromagnets can be triggered by a charge current if the spin-orbit coupling is sufficiently strong. We apply functional Keldysh theory to investigate spin-orbit torques in metallic two-dimensional Rashba ferromagnets in the presence of spin-dependent

  2. Numerical blowup in two-dimensional Boussinesq equations

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Zhaohua

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we perform a three-stage numerical relay to investigate the finite time singularity in the two-dimensional Boussinesq approximation equations. The initial asymmetric condition is the middle-stage output of a $2048^2$ run, the highest resolution in our study is $40960^2$, and some signals of numerical blowup are observed.

  3. Exact two-dimensional superconformal R symmetry and c extremization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benini, Francesco; Bobev, Nikolay

    2013-02-08

    We uncover a general principle dubbed c extremization, which determines the exact R symmetry of a two-dimensional unitary superconformal field theory with N=(0,2) supersymmetry. To illustrate its utility, we study superconformal theories obtained by twisted compactifications of four-dimensional N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory on Riemann surfaces and construct their gravity duals.

  4. Zero sound in a two-dimensional dipolar Fermi gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Z.K.; Matveenko, S.I.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2013-01-01

    We study zero sound in a weakly interacting two-dimensional (2D) gas of single-component fermionic dipoles (polar molecules or atoms with a large magnetic moment) tilted with respect to the plane of their translational motion. It is shown that the propagation of zero sound is provided by both mean-f

  5. Topology optimization of two-dimensional elastic wave barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hoorickx, C.; Sigmund, Ole; Schevenels, M.

    2016-01-01

    Topology optimization is a method that optimally distributes material in a given design domain. In this paper, topology optimization is used to design two-dimensional wave barriers embedded in an elastic halfspace. First, harmonic vibration sources are considered, and stiffened material is insert...

  6. Non perturbative methods in two dimensional quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, Elcio; Rothe, Klaus D

    1991-01-01

    This book is a survey of methods used in the study of two-dimensional models in quantum field theory as well as applications of these theories in physics. It covers the subject since the first model, studied in the fifties, up to modern developments in string theories, and includes exact solutions, non-perturbative methods of study, and nonlinear sigma models.

  7. Thermodynamics of Two-Dimensional Black-Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Nappi, Chiara R.; Pasquinucci, Andrea

    1992-01-01

    We explore the thermodynamics of a general class of two dimensional dilatonic black-holes. A simple prescription is given that allows us to compute the mass, entropy and thermodynamic potentials, with results in agreement with those obtained by other methods, when available.

  8. Influence of index contrast in two dimensional photonic crystal lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette Marie; Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner;

    2010-01-01

    The influence of index contrast variations for obtaining single-mode operation and low threshold in dye doped polymer two dimensional photonic crystal (PhC) lasers is investigated. We consider lasers made from Pyrromethene 597 doped Ormocore imprinted with a rectangular lattice PhC having a cavit...

  9. Magnetic order in two-dimensional nanoparticle assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgescu, M

    2008-01-01

    This thesis involves a fundamental study of two-dimensional arrays of magnetic nanoparticles using non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy, Magnetic Force Microscopy, and Atomic Force Spectroscopy. The goal is to acquire a better understanding of the interactions between magnetic nanoparticles and the

  10. Dynamical phase transitions in the two-dimensional ANNNI model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, M.N.; Derrida, B.

    1988-06-01

    We study the phase diagram of the two-dimensional anisotropic next-nearest neighbor Ising (ANNNI) model by comparing the time evolution of two distinct spin configurations submitted to the same thermal noise. We clearly se several dynamical transitions between ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, antiphase, and floating phases. These dynamical transitions seem to occur rather close to the transition lines determined previously in the literature.

  11. Two-dimensional static black holes with pointlike sources

    CERN Document Server

    Melis, M

    2004-01-01

    We study the static black hole solutions of generalized two-dimensional dilaton-gravity theories generated by pointlike mass sources, in the hypothesis that the matter is conformally coupled. We also discuss the motion of test particles. Due to conformal coupling, these follow the geodesics of a metric obtained by rescaling the canonical metric with the dilaton.

  12. Magnetic order in two-dimensional nanoparticle assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgescu, M

    2008-01-01

    This thesis involves a fundamental study of two-dimensional arrays of magnetic nanoparticles using non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy, Magnetic Force Microscopy, and Atomic Force Spectroscopy. The goal is to acquire a better understanding of the interactions between magnetic nanoparticles and the r

  13. Two-Dimensional Chirality in Three-Dimensional Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintner, Claude E.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of two-dimensional chirality is used to enhance students' understanding of three-dimensional stereochemistry. This chirality is used as a key to teaching/understanding such concepts as enaniotropism, diastereotopism, pseudoasymmetry, retention/inversion of configuration, and stereochemical results of addition to double bonds. (JN)

  14. Field analysis of two-dimensional focusing grating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsboom, P.P.; Frankena, H.J.

    1995-01-01

    The method that we have developed [P-P. Borsboom, Ph.D. dissertation (Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands); P-P. Borsboom and H. J. Frankena, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 12, 1134–1141 (1995)] is successfully applied to a two-dimensional focusing grating coupler. The field in the focal regi

  15. Torque magnetometry studies of two-dimensional electron systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaapman, Maaike Ruth

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the magnetization two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs). To detect the typically small magnetization, a sensitive magnetometer with optical angular detection was developed. The magnetometer uses a quadrant detector to measure the rotation of the sample. By mounting

  16. Two-Dimensional Mesoscale-Ordered Conducting Polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shaohua; Zhang, Jian; Dong, Renhao; Gordiichuk, Pavlo; Zhang, Tao; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Mai, Yiyong; Liu, Feng; Herrmann, Andreas; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of numerous two-dimensional (2D) materials with structural ordering at the atomic or molecular level, direct construction of mesoscale-ordered superstructures within a 2D monolayer remains an enormous challenge. Here, we report the synergic manipulation of two types of

  17. Vibrations of Thin Piezoelectric Shallow Shells: Two-Dimensional Approximation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Sabu

    2003-08-01

    In this paper we consider the eigenvalue problem for piezoelectric shallow shells and we show that, as the thickness of the shell goes to zero, the eigensolutions of the three-dimensional piezoelectric shells converge to the eigensolutions of a two-dimensional eigenvalue problem.

  18. Two-dimensional effects in nonlinear Kronig-Penney models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Rasmussen, Kim

    1997-01-01

    An analysis of two-dimensional (2D) effects in the nonlinear Kronig-Penney model is presented. We establish an effective one-dimensional description of the 2D effects, resulting in a set of pseudodifferential equations. The stationary states of the 2D system and their stability is studied...

  19. Forensic potential of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampat, A.; Lopatka, M.; Sjerps, M.; Vivo-Truyols, G.; Schoenmakers, P.; van Asten, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the application of comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) gas chromatography (GC × GC) in forensic science is reviewed. The peer-reviewed publications on the forensic use of GC × GC and 2D gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC × GC-MS) have been studied in detail, not o

  20. Easy interpretation of optical two-dimensional correlation spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazonder, K.; Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Wiersma, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate that the value of the underlying frequency-frequency correlation function can be retrieved from a two-dimensional optical correlation spectrum through a simple relationship. The proposed method yields both intuitive clues and a quantitative measure of the dynamics of the system. The t