WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-body interaction requires

  1. HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN TWO BODIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of model tests, potential flow theory, and viscous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method, the hydrodynamic interactions between two underwater bodies were investigated to determine the influencing factors, changing rule, interaction mechanism, and appropriate methods describing them. Some special phenomena were discovered in two series of near-wall interaction experiments. The mathematical model and predicting methods were presented for interacting forces near wall, and the calculation results agreed well with the experimental ones. From the comparisons among numerical results with respect to nonviscosity, numerical results with respect to viscosity, and measured results, data on the influence of viscosity on hydrodynamic interactions were obtained. For hydrodynamic interaction related to multi-body unsteady motions with six degrees of freedom that is difficult to simulate in tests, numerical predictions of unsteady interacting forces were given.

  2. On gravitational interactions between two bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Szybka, Sebastian J

    2014-01-01

    Many physicists, following Einstein, believe that the ultimate aim of theoretical physics is to find a unified theory of all interactions which would not depend on any free dimensionless constant, i.e., a dimensionless constant that is only empirically determinable. We do not know if such a theory exists. Moreover, if it exists, there seems to be no reason for it to be comprehensible for the human mind. On the other hand, as pointed out in Wigner's famous paper, human mathematics is unbelievably successful in natural science. This seeming paradox may be mitigated by assuming that the mathematical structure of physical reality has many `layers'. As time goes by, physicists discover new theories that correspond to the physical reality on the deeper and deeper level. In this essay, I will take a narrow approach and discuss the mathematical structure behind a single physical phenomenon - gravitational interaction between two bodies. The main aim of this essay is to put some recent developments of this topic in a ...

  3. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of random two-body interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Calvin W

    2010-01-01

    The input to the configuration-interaction shell model includes many dozens or hundreds of independent two-body matrix elements. Previous studies have shown that when fitting to experimental low-lying spectra, the greatest sensitivity is to only a few linear combinations of matrix elements. Here we consider interactions drawn from the two-body random ensemble, or TBRE, and find that the low-lying spectra are also most sensitive to only a few linear combinations of two-body matrix elements, in a fashion nearly indistinguishable from an interaction empirically fit to data. We find in particular the spectra for both the random and empirical interactions are sensitive to similar matrix elements, which we analyze using monopole and contact interactions.

  5. Spin Structure of Many-Body Systems with Two-Body Random Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L; Johnson, C W; Kaplan, Lev; Papenbrock, Thomas; Johnson, Calvin W.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the spin structure of many-fermion systems with a spin-conserving two-body random interaction. We find a strong dominance of spin-0 ground states and considerable correlations between energies and wave functions of low-lying states with different spin, but no indication of pairing. The spectral densities exhibit spin-dependent shapes and widths, and depend on the relative strengths of the spin-0 and spin-1 couplings in the two-body random matrix. The spin structure of low-lying states can largely be explained analytically.

  6. Regularities of many-body systems interacting by a two-body random ensemble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Y.M. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China) and Cyclotron Center, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research - RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) and Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210018 (China)]. E-mail: ymzhao@riken.jp; Arima, A. [Science Museum, Japan Science Foundation, 2-1 Kitanomaru-Koen, Chiyodaku, Tokyo 102-0091 (Japan); Yoshinaga, N. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-0625 (Japan)

    2004-10-01

    The ground states of all even-even nuclei have angular momentum, I, equal to zero, I=0, and positive parity, {pi}=+. This feature was believed to be a consequence of the attractive short-range interaction between nucleons. However, in the presence of two-body random interactions, the predominance of I{pi}=0+ ground states (0 g.s.) was found to be robust both for bosons and for an even number of fermions. For simple systems, such as d bosons, sp bosons, sd bosons, and a few fermions in single-j shells for small j, there are a few approaches to predict and/or explain spin I ground state (I g.s.) probabilities. An empirical approach to predict I g.s. probabilities is available for general cases, such as fermions in a single-j (j>72) or many-j shells and various boson systems, but a more fundamental understanding of the robustness of 0 g.s. dominance is still out of reach. Further interesting results are also reviewed concerning other robust phenomena of many-body systems in the presence of random two-body interactions, such as the odd-even staggering of binding energies, generic collectivity, the behavior of average energies, correlations, and regularities of many-body systems interacting by a displaced two-body random ensemble.

  7. Energy Centroids of Spin $I$ States by Random Two-body Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Y M; Ogawa, K

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study the behavior of energy centroids (denoted as $\\bar{E_I}$) of spin $I$ states in the presence of random two-body interactions, for systems ranging from very simple systems (e.g. single-$j$ shell for very small $j$) to very complicated systems (e.g., many-$j$ shells with different parities and with isospin degree of freedom). Regularities of $\\bar{E_I}$'s discussed in terms of the so-called geometric chaoticity (or quasi-randomness of two-body coefficients of fractional parentage) in earlier works are found to hold even for very simple systems in which one cannot assume the geometric chaoticity. It is shown that the inclusion of isospin and parity does not "break" the regularities of $\\bar{E_I}$'s.

  8. On the change of density of states in two-body interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We derive a general relation in two-body scattering theory that more directly relates the change of density of states (DDOS) due to interaction to the shape of the potential. The relation allows us to infer certain global properties of the DDOS from the global properties of the potential. In particular, we show that DDOS is negative at all energies and for all partial waves, for potentials that are more repulsive than $+1/r^2$ everywhere. This behavior represents a different class of global properties of DDOS from that described by the Levinson's theorem.

  9. Nuclear structure with unitarily transformed two-body plus phenomenological three-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Anneke

    2011-02-02

    calculate the {sup 4}He ground-state energy. As they are of direct interest for nuclear astrophysics collective excitation modes, namely giant resonances, are investigated in the framework of the Random Phase Approximation. Including the full three-body interaction would be very time-demanding. Therefore, a density-dependent two-body interaction is used instead. This simple interaction leads to a significant improvement in the description of the isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole resonances while the isoscalar monopole resonances remain in good agreement with experimental data compared to the results obtained with pure unitarily transformed two-body interactions. (orig.)

  10. One dimensional scattering of a two body interacting system by an infinite wall

    CERN Document Server

    Moro, A M; Gomez-Camacho, J

    2010-01-01

    The one-dimensional scattering of a two body interacting system by an infinite wall is studied in a quantum-mechanical framework. This problem contains some of the dynamical features present in the collision of atomic, molecular and nuclear systems. The scattering problem is solved exactly, for the case of a harmonic interaction between the fragments. The exact result is used to assess the validity of two different approximations to the scattering process. The adiabatic approximation, which considers that the relative co-ordinate is frozen during the scattering process, is found to be inadequate for this problem. The uncorrelated scattering approximation, which neglects the correlation between the fragments, gives results in accordance with the exact calculations when the scattering energy is high compared to the oscillator parameter.

  11. Hydrodynamic interactions between two bodies in waves in 3D time domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-fang; LI Ji-de; CAI Xin-gong; TIAN Ming-qi; Hao Jin-feng

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D time domain technique is adopted to calculate the coupled hydrodynamic interaction between two bodies without flare in waves. For verifying the code, two same cylinders are selected to calculate coupled hydrodynamic effects by comparison with the results obtained by 3D frequency method which has been proved to be efficient for solving such problems. In order to improve efficiency of calculation, the effect of history time has been discussed, and an improved method is presented. Moreover, the effect of lateral separation distance is also discussed in detail. The technique developed here may serve as a more rigorous tool to analyze the related transient problems of two ships doing underway replenishment in waves.

  12. Regularities in Many-body Systems Interacting by a Two-body Random Ensemble

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Y M; Yoshinaga, N

    2003-01-01

    The even-even nuclei always have zero ground state angular momenta $I$ and positive parities $\\pi$. This feature was believed to be just a consequence of the attractive short-range interactions between nucleons. However, in the presence of two-body random interactions, the predominance of $I^{\\pi}=0^+$ ground states (0 g.s.) was found to be robust both for bosons and for an even number of fermions. For simple systems, such as $d$ bosons, $sp$ bosons, $sd$ bosons, and a few fermions in single-$j$ shells for small $j$, there are a few approaches to predict and/or explain the distribution of angular momentum $I$ ground state probabilities. An empirical recipe to predict the $I$ g.s. probabilities is available for general cases, but a more fundamental understanding of the robustness of 0 g.s. dominance is still out of reach. Other interesting results are also reviewed concerning other robust phenomena of many-body systems in the presence of random interactions, such as odd-even staggering of binding energies, gen...

  13. Quartet correlations in N = Z nuclei induced by realistic two-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sambataro, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Sandulescu, N. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2017-03-15

    Two variational quartet models previously employed in a treatment of pairing forces are extended to the case of a general two-body interaction. One model approximates the nuclear states as a condensate of identical quartets with angular momentum J = 0 and isospin T = 0 while the other let these quartets to be all different from each other. With these models we investigate the role of alpha-like quartet correlations both in the ground state and in the lowest J = 0, T = 0 excited states of even-even N = Z nuclei in the sd -shell. We show that the ground-state correlations of these nuclei can be described to a good extent in terms of a condensate of alpha-like quartets. This turns out to be especially the case for the nucleus {sup 32}S for which the overlap between this condensate and the shell model wave function is found close to one. In the same nucleus, a similar overlap is found also in the case of the first excited 0{sup +} state. No clear correspondence is observed instead between the second excited states of the quartet models and the shell model eigenstates in all the cases examined. (orig.)

  14. Analytic, group-theoretic wave functions for confined, correlated N-body systems with general two-body interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, M.; Watson, D. K.; Loeser, J. G.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we develop an analytic N-body wave function for identical particles under quantum confinement with a general two-body interaction. A systematic approach to correlation is developed by combining three theoretical methods: dimensional perturbation theory, the FG method of Wilson et. al., and the group theory of the symmetric group. Analytic results are achieved for a completely general interaction potential. Unlike conventional perturbation methods which are applicable only for weakly interacting systems, this analytic approach is applicable to both weakly and strongly interacting systems. This method directly accounts for each two-body interaction, rather than an average interaction so even lowest-order results include beyond-mean-field effects. One major advantage is that N appears as a parameter in the analytical expressions for the energy so results for different N are easy to obtain.

  15. Insensitivity of the Yrast Spectra of Even-Even Nuclei to the T=0 two-body interaction matrix elements

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, S J Q; Robinson, Shadow J.Q.; Zamick, Larry

    2002-01-01

    Calculations of the spectra of various even-even nuclei in the fp shell ($^{44}$Ti, $^{46}$Ti, $^{48}$Cr, and $^{50}$Cr) are performed with two sets of two-body interaction matrix elements. The first set consists of the matrix elements of the FPD6 interaction. The second set have the same T=1 two-body matrix elements as the FPD6 interaction, but all the T=0 two-body matrix elements are set equal to zero. Despite the drastic differences between the two interactions, the spectra they yield are very similar and indeed it is difficult to say which set gives a better fit to experiment. That the results for the yrast spectra are insensitive to the presence or absence of T=0 two-body matrix elements is surprising because the only bound two nucleon system has T=0, namely the deuteron. Also there is the general folklore that T=0 matrix elements are responsible for nuclear collectivity. Electric quadrupole transition rates are also examined. It is found that the reintroduction of T=0 matrix elements leads to an enhance...

  16. An exactly solvable two-body problem with retarded interactions and radiation reaction in classical electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, R.; Villarroel, D.

    1997-11-01

    An exactly solvable two-body problem dealing with the Lorentz-Dirac equation is constructed in this paper. It corresponds to the motion of two identical charges rotating at opposite ends of a diameter, in a fixed circle, at constant angular velocity. The external electromagnetic field that allows this motion consists of a tangential time-independent electric field with a fixed value over the orbit circle, and a homogeneous time-independent magnetic field that points orthogonally to the orbit plane. Because of the geometrical symmetries of the charges' motion, in this case it is possible to obtain the rate of radiation emitted by the charges directly from the equation of motion. The rate of radiation is also calculated by studying the energy flux across a sphere of a very large radius, using the far retarded fields of the charges. Both calculations lead to the same result, in agreement with energy conservation.

  17. Program in C for studying characteristic properties of two-body interactions in the framework of spectral distribution theory

    CERN Document Server

    Launey, K D; Dytrych, T; Draayer, J P

    2014-01-01

    We present a program in C that employs spectral distribution theory for studies of characteristic properties of a many-particle quantum-mechanical system and the underlying few-body interaction. In particular, the program focuses on two-body nuclear interactions given in a JT-coupled harmonic oscillator basis and calculates correlation coefficients, a measure of similarity of any two interactions, as well as Hilbert-Schmidt norms specifying interaction strengths. An important feature of the program is its ability to identify the monopole part (centroid) of a 2-body interaction, as well as its 'density-dependent' one-body and two-body part, thereby providing key information on the evolution of shell gaps and binding energies for larger nuclear systems. As additional features, we provide statistical measures for 'density-dependent' interactions, as well as a mechanism to express an interaction in terms of two other interactions. This, in turn, allows one to identify, e.g., established features of the nuclear in...

  18. Two-body state with p -wave interaction in a one-dimensional waveguide under transversely anisotropic confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tian-You; Peng, Shi-Guo; Jiang, Kaijun

    2015-04-01

    We theoretically study two atoms with p -wave interaction in a one-dimensional waveguide, investigating how the transverse anisotropy of the confinement affects the two-body state, especially the properties of the resonance. For a bound-state solution, we find there are a total of three two-body bound states due to the richness of the orbital magnetic quantum number of the p -wave interaction, while only one bound state is supported by the s -wave interaction. Two of them become nondegenerate due to the breaking of the rotation symmetry under a transversely anisotropic confinement. For a scattering solution, the effective one-dimensional scattering amplitude and scattering length are derived. We find the position of the p -wave confinement-induced resonance shifts apparently versus the transverse anisotropy. In addition, a two-channel mechanism for the confinement-induced resonance in a one-dimensional waveguide is generalized to the p -wave interaction, which was previously proposed only for the s -wave interaction. All our calculations are based on the parametrization of the 40K-atom experiments and can thus be confirmed in future experiments.

  19. The thermal expansion of a face-centered cubic lattice with central two-body interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicknese, V.

    1965-01-01

    The thermal expansion e is calculated by minimizing the free energy, including the cubic and quartic phonon-interaction terms. The free energy is expanded to third order in e. The work is closely related to that of Maradudin and Maradudin, Flinn and Coldwell-Horsfall. The resulting formulas are appl

  20. A critical assessment of two-body and three-body interactions in water

    CERN Document Server

    Medders, Gregory R; Paesani, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The microscopic behavior of water under different conditions and in different environments remains the subject of intense debate. A great number of the controversies arise due to the contradictory predictions obtained within different theoretical models. Relative to conclusions derived from force fields or density functional theory, there is comparably less room to dispute highly-correlated electronic structure calculations. Unfortunately, such ab initio calculations are severely limited by system size. In this study, a detailed analysis of the two- and three-body water interactions evaluated at the CCSD(T) level is carried out to quantitatively assess the accuracy of several force fields, density functional theory, and ab initio-based interaction potentials that are commonly used in molecular simulations. Based on this analysis, a new model, HBB2-pol, is introduced which is capable of accurately mapping CCSD(T) results for water dimers and trimers into an efficient analytical function. The accuracy of HBB2-p...

  1. Mean field propagation of infinite dimensional Wigner measures with a singular two-body interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ammari, Zied

    2011-01-01

    We consider the quantum dynamics of many bosons systems in the mean field limit with a singular pair-interaction potential, including the attractive or repulsive Coulombic case in three dimensions. By using a measure transportation technique, we show that Wigner measures propagate along the nonlinear Hartree flow. Such property was previously proved only for bounded potentials in our previous works with a slightly different strategy.

  2. Relation between the change of density of states and the shape of the potential in two-body interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo

    2017-04-01

    We derive a general relation in two-body scattering theory that more directly relates the change of density of states (DDOS) due to interaction to the shape of the potential. The relation allows us to infer certain global properties of the DDOS from the global properties of the potential. In particular, we show that DDOS is negative at all energies and for all partial waves, for potentials that are more repulsive than +1 /r2 everywhere. This behavior represents a different class of global properties of DDOS from that described by the Levinson's theorem.

  3. Many-body Systems Interacting via a Two-body Random Ensemble; 1, Angular Momentum distribution in the ground states

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Y M; Yoshinaga, N

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the angular momentum distribution in the ground states of many-body systems interacting via a two-body random ensemble. Beginning with a few simple examples, a simple approach to predict P(I)'s, angular momenta I ground state (g.s.) probabilities, of a few solvable cases, such as fermions in a small single-j shell and d boson systems, is given. This method is generalized to predict P(I)'s of more complicated cases, such as even or odd number of fermions in a large single-j shell or a many-j shell, d-boson, sd-boson or sdg-boson systems, etc. By this method we are able to tell which interactions are essential to produce a sizable P(I) in a many-body system. The g.s. probability of maximum angular momentum $I_{max}$ is discussed. An argument on the microscopic foundation of our approach, and certain matrix elements which are useful to understand the observed regularities, are also given or addressed in detail. The low seniority chain of 0 g.s. by using the same set of two-body interact...

  4. Interacting quantum walkers: two-body bosonic and fermionic bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Luck, J. M.; Mallick, K.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the dynamics of bound states of two interacting particles, either bosons or fermions, performing a continuous-time quantum walk on a one-dimensional lattice. We consider the situation where the distance between both particles has a hard bound, and the richer situation where the particles are bound by a smooth confining potential. The main emphasis is on the velocity characterizing the ballistic spreading of these bound states, and on the structure of the asymptotic distribution profile of their center-of-mass coordinate. The latter profile generically exhibits many internal fronts.

  5. Analytic solutions for Wheeler-Feynman interaction: Two bodies in straight-line motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephas, Paul

    1992-02-01

    Analytic solutions are obtained for two point particles with any total energy that have charges of like sign and whose motions are confined to one dimension. These solutions are obtained by explicitly deriving the conserved quantities associated with Wheeler-Feynman interactions into forms that do not contain integrals but, rather, contain ``partial contributions'' to the momenta and potentials of particle two. The resulting conserved energy, momentum, and Lorentz momentum equations are separated in time to yield one set of equations with variables t1 and t2- (retarded) and another set with variables t1 and t1+ (advanced). These are solved to obtain auxiliary solutions x1r(t1) and x1a(t1), which are then combined for the case m1 = m2 to give the actual world lines x1(t1) and x2(t2). Comparison is made with a previous computer-generated exact solution for the same interaction and energy; good qualitative agreement is found, although some quantitative differences persist.

  6. Conserved quantities associated with conformal invariance for the Wheeler-Feynman two-body vector interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnitzler, D. [Linfield Research Institute, McMinneville, OR (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a unified derivation for obtaining all of these conserved quantities based on their relationship to the group of conformal transformations. In addition to including the well-known demonstration that the inhomogeneous Lorentz group of transformations leads to the conserved energy-momentum vector and to the conserved angular momentum-Lorentz momentum tensor, this work shows that the dilation transformation leads directly to the conserved dilation scalar without scaling of the mass, which was required in the original derivation, and that the acceleration transformation yields the conserved conformal vector, which was previously obtained without explicit use of the acceleration transformation.

  7. Analytical determination of the two-body gravitational interaction potential at the 4th post-Newtonian approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2013-01-01

    We complete the analytical determination, at the 4th post-Newtonian approximation, of the main radial potential describing the gravitational interaction of two bodies within the effective one-body formalism. The (non logarithmic) coefficient a_5 (nu) measuring this 4th post-Newtonian interaction potential is found to be linear in the symmetric mass ratio nu. Its nu-independent part a_5 (0) is obtained by an analytical gravitational self-force calculation that unambiguously resolves the formal infrared divergencies which currently impede its direct post-Newtonian calculation. Its nu-linear part a_5 (nu) - a_5 (0) is deduced from recent results of Jaranowski and Sch\\"afer, and is found to be significantly negative.

  8. Many-body Systems Interacting via a Two-body Random Ensemble average energy of each angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Y M; Yoshinaga, N

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the regularities of energy of each angular momentum $I$ averaged over all the states for a fixed angular momentum (denoted as $\\bar{E}_I$'s) in many-body systems interacting via a two-body random ensemble. It is found that $\\bar{E}_I$'s with $I \\sim I_{min}$ (minimum of $I$) or $I_{max}$ have large probabilities (denoted as ${\\cal P}(I)$) to be the lowest, and that ${\\cal P}(I)$ is close to zero elsewhere. A simple argument based on the randomness of the two-particle cfp's is given. A compact trajectory of the energy $\\bar{E}_I$ vs. $I(I+1)$ is found to be robust. Regular fluctuations of the $P(I)$ (the probability of finding $I$ to be the ground state) and ${\\cal P}(I)$ of even fermions in a single-$j$ shell and boson systems are found to be reverse, and argued by the dimension fluctuation of the model space. Other regularities, such as why there are 2 or 3 sizable ${\\cal P}(I)$'s with $I\\sim I_{min}$ and ${\\cal P}(I) \\ll {\\cal P}(I_{max})$'s with $I\\sim I_{max}$, why the coefficien...

  9. Use of Two-Body Correlated Basis Functions with van der Waals Interaction to Study the Shape-Independent Approximation for a Large Number of Trapped Interacting Bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekala, M. L.; Chakrabarti, B.; Das, T. K.; Rampho, G. J.; Sofianos, S. A.; Adam, R. M.; Haldar, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    We study the ground-state and the low-lying excitations of a trapped Bose gas in an isotropic harmonic potential for very small (˜ 3) to very large (˜ 10^7 ) particle numbers. We use the two-body correlated basis functions and the shape-dependent van der Waals interaction in our many-body calculations. We present an exhaustive study of the effect of inter-atomic correlations and the accuracy of the mean-field equations considering a wide range of particle numbers. We calculate the ground-state energy and the one-body density for different values of the van der Waals parameter C6 . We compare our results with those of the modified Gross-Pitaevskii results, the correlated Hartree hypernetted-chain equations (which also utilize the two-body correlated basis functions), as well as of the diffusion Monte Carlo for hard sphere interactions. We observe the effect of the attractive tail of the van der Waals potential in the calculations of the one-body density over the truly repulsive zero-range potential as used in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and discuss the finite-size effects. We also present the low-lying collective excitations which are well described by a hydrodynamic model in the large particle limit.

  10. Evidence for the two-body nature of the E1 transition operator in the sdf-interacting boson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barfield, A.F.; Brentano, P. von; Dewald, A.; Zell, K.O.; Zamfir, N.V.; Bucurescu, D.; Ivascu, M.; Scholten, O.

    1989-01-01

    Two new a absolute transition rates are reported for the nucleus /sup 144/Sm following an (..cap alpha.., ..cap alpha..') Coulomb excitation study. They are B(E3;3/sup -/ -> 0/sup +/)=(38+-3)W.u. and B(E1;3/sup -/ -> 2/sup +/)=2.8+-0.4)x10/sup -3/W.u. This large E1 matrix element, along with the previously known B(E1;1/sup -/ -> 0/sup +/) value support the interpretation of the 1/sup -/ state in this nucleus as 2-phonon 2/sup +/x3/sup -/ excitation. In the frame of the IBM-1+f-boson model we show the need for a two-body term in the E1 transition operator. Estimates for the strenghts of the one and two-body parts of the E1 transition operator are obtained from these experimental data.

  11. Realistic Two-body Interactions in Many-nucleon Systems: Correlated Motion beyond Single-particle Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sviratcheva, K.D.; Draayer, J.P.; /Louisiana State U. /Iowa State U. /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC

    2006-06-27

    In the framework of the theory of spectral distributions we perform an overall comparison of three modern realistic interactions, CD-Bonn, CD-Bonn+3terms, and GXPF1 in a broad range of nuclei in the upper fp shell and study their ability to account for the development of isovector pairing correlations and collective rotational motion in many-particle nuclear systems. Our findings reveal a close similarity between CD-Bonn and CD-Bonn+3terms, while both interactions possess features different from the ones of GXPF1. The GXPF1 interaction is used to determine the strength parameter of a quadrupole term that augments an isovector-pairing model interaction with Sp(4) dynamical symmetry, which in turn is shown to yield a reasonable agreement with the experimental low-lying energy spectra of {sup 58}Ni and {sup 58}Cu.

  12. New results for two-neutrino double beta decay with large particle-particle two body proton-neutron interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, A A; Simkovic, F; Faessler, A; Faessler, Amand

    2001-01-01

    A model many-body Hamiltonian describing an heterogenous system of paired protons and paired neutrons and interacting among themselves through monopole particle-hole and monopole particle-particle interactions is used to study the double beta decay of Fermi type. The states are described by time dependent approaches choosing as trial functions coherent states of the symmetry groups underlying the model Hamiltonian. One formalism, VP1, is fully equivalent with the standard pnQRPA and therefore fails at a critical value of the particle-particle interaction strength while another one, VP2, corresponds to a two step BCS treatment, i.e. the proton quasiparticles are paired with the neutron quasiparticles. In this way a harmonic description for the double beta transition amplitude is provided for any strength of the particle-particle interaction. The approximation quality is judged by comparing the actual results with the exact result as well as with those corresponding to various truncations of the boson expanded ...

  13. Gravitational self-force corrections to two-body tidal interactions and the effective one-body formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Tidal interactions have a significant influence on the late dynamics of compact binary systems, which constitute the prime targets of the upcoming network of gravitational-wave detectors. We refine the theoretical description of tidal interactions (hitherto known only to the second post-Newtonian level) by extending our recently developed analytic self-force formalism, for extreme mass-ratio binary systems, to the computation of several tidal invariants. Specifically, we compute, to linear order in the mass ratio and to the 7.5$^{\\rm th}$ post-Newtonian order, the following tidal invariants: the square and the cube of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal tensor, the square of the gravitomagnetic quadrupolar tidal tensor, and the square of the gravitoelectric octupolar tidal tensor. Our high-accuracy analytic results are compared to recent numerical self-force tidal data by Dolan et al. \\cite{Dolan:2014pja}, and, notably, provide an analytic understanding of the light ring asymptotic behavior found by them. W...

  14. Feynman Diagrams for Dispersion Interactions Out of Equilibrium -- Two-Body Potentials for Atoms with Initial Excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Haakh, Harald R; Henkel, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Diagrammatic techniques are well-known in the calculation of dispersion interactions between atoms or molecules. The multipolar coupling scheme combined with Feynman ordered diagrams significantly reduces the number of graphs compared to elementary stationary perturbation theory. We review calculations of van der Waals-Casimir-Polder forces, focusing on two atoms or molecules one of which is excited. In this case, calculations of the corresponding force are notorious for mathematical issues connected to the spontaneous decay of the excitation. Treating such unstable states in a full non-equilibrium theory provides a physical interpretation of apparent contradictions in previous results and underlines the importance of decay processes for the intermolecular potential. This may have important implications on reactions in biological systems, where excited states may be relatively long-lived and the resonant intermolecular force may result in directed Brownian motion.

  15. Effect of the band structure in a rigorous two-body model with long-range interactions in 1D optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Tom; Simoni, Andrea; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    We compute scattering and bound state properties for two ultracold molecules in a pure 1D optical lattice. We introduce reference functions with complex quasi-momentum that naturally account for the effect of excited energy bands. Our exact results for a short-range interaction are first compared with the simplest version of the standard Bose-Hubbard (BH) model. Such comparison allows us to highlight the effect of the excited bands, of the non-on-site interaction and of tunneling with distant neighbor, that are not taken into account in the BH model. The effective interaction can depend strongly on the particle quasi-momenta and can present a resonant behavior even in a deep lattice. As a second step, we study scattering of two polar particles in the optical lattice. Peculiar Wigner threshold laws stem from the interplay of the long range dipolar interaction and the presence of the energy bands. We finally assess the validity of an extended Bose-Hubbard model for dipolar gases based on our exact two-body calculations. This work was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (Contract No. ANR-12-BS04-0020-01).

  16. Energy and structural properties of N -boson clusters attached to three-body Efimov states: Two-body zero-range interactions and the role of the three-body regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yangqian; Blume, D.

    2015-09-01

    The low-energy spectrum of N -boson clusters with pairwise zero-range interactions is believed to be governed by a three-body parameter. We study the ground state of N -boson clusters with infinite two-body s -wave scattering length by performing ab initio Monte Carlo simulations. To prevent Thomas collapse, different finite-range three-body regulators are used. The energy and structural properties for the three-body Hamiltonian with two-body zero-range interactions and three-body regulator are in much better agreement with the "ideal zero-range Efimov theory" results than those for Hamiltonian with two-body finite-range interactions. For larger clusters we find that the ground-state energy and structural properties of the Hamiltonian with two-body zero-range interactions and finite-range three-body regulators are not universally determined by the three-body parameter, i.e., dependencies on the specific form of the three-body regulator are observed. For comparison, we consider Hamiltonian with two-body van der Waals interactions and no three-body regulator. For the interactions considered, the ground-state energy of the N -body clusters is—if scaled by the three-body ground-state energy—fairly universal, i.e., the dependence on the short-range details of the two-body van der Waals potentials is small. Our results are compared with those in the literature.

  17. Analytic determination of the eight-and-a-half post-Newtonian self-force contributions to the two-body gravitational interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2014-01-01

    We {\\it analytically} compute, to the eight-and-a-half post-Newtonian order, and to linear order in the mass ratio, the radial potential describing (within the effective one-body formalism) the gravitational interaction of two bodies, thereby extending previous analytic results. These results are obtained by applying analytical gravitational self-force theory (for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole) to Detweiler's gauge-invariant redshift variable. We emphasize the increase in \\lq\\lq transcendentality" of the numbers entering the post-Newtonian expansion coefficients as the order increases, in particular we note the appearance of $\\zeta(3)$ (as well as the square of Euler's constant $\\gamma$) starting at the seventh post-Newtonian order. We study the convergence of the post-Newtonian expansion as the expansion parameter $u=GM/(c^2r)$ leaves the weak-field domain $u\\ll 1$ to enter the strong field domain $u=O(1)$.

  18. The Calculation of Single-Nucleon Energies of Nuclei by Considering Two-Body Effective Interaction, n(k,ρ, and a Hartree-Fock Inspired Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mariji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleon single-particle energies (SPEs of the selected nuclei, that is, O16, Ca40, and Ni56, are obtained by using the diagonal matrix elements of two-body effective interaction, which generated through the lowest-order constrained variational (LOCV calculations for the symmetric nuclear matter with the Aυ18 phenomenological nucleon-nucleon potential. The SPEs at the major levels of nuclei are calculated by employing a Hartree-Fock inspired scheme in the spherical harmonic oscillator basis. In the scheme, the correlation influences are taken into account by imposing the nucleon effective mass factor on the radial wave functions of the major levels. Replacing the density-dependent one-body momentum distribution functions of nucleons, n(k,ρ, with the Heaviside functions, the role of n(k,ρ in the nucleon SPEs at the major levels of the selected closed shell nuclei is investigated. The best fit of spin-orbit splitting is taken into account when correcting the major levels of the nuclei by using the parameterized Wood-Saxon potential and the Aυ18 density-dependent mean field potential which is constructed by the LOCV method. Considering the point-like protons in the spherical Coulomb potential well, the single-proton energies are corrected. The results show the importance of including n(k,ρ, instead of the Heaviside functions, in the calculation of nucleon SPEs at the different levels, particularly the valence levels, of the closed shell nuclei.

  19. Two- and quasi-two-body strange particle final state production in. pi. /sup +/p interactions at low to intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, P.

    1982-10-01

    The two and quasi-two body final states ..sigma../sup +/K/sup +/, ..sigma../sup +/K* (892)/sup +/, ..sigma..*(1385)/sup +/K/sup +/, ..sigma..(1385)/sup +/K*(892)/sup +/ produced by neutral strangeness exchange in ..pi../sup +/p interactions are studied using our own 1-3 GeV/c data, comprising the 14 incident momenta of a two million picture bubble chamber experiment, in combination with the world data on the same and related channels. Because low energy resonance formation is not strongly coupled to the ..sigma..,..sigma..* production channels, at very modest incident momenta their dominant features are seen to be understandable in terms of high energy hypercharge exchange phenomenology. We find that Regge models fitted to data in the 10 to 20 GeV/c range adequately describe the ..sigma.. and ..sigma..* channels down to within a few hundred MeV/c of threshold and out to large center of mass scattering angles, and that over the range of the available world data weak exchange degeneracy expectations for these reactions are at least qualitatively successful. We observe that the SU(2), SU(3) flavor symmetries successfully describe these hypercharge exchange processes and relate them to charge exchange via sum rules and equalities expressing flavor independence of the strong interaction; in particular, we derive and test on the available world data a mass broken SU(3) sum rule for ..pi../sup +/p ..-->.. K/sup +/..sigma../sup +/, ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. K/sup 0/..lambda.., K/sup -/p ..-->.. anti K/sup 0/n and test over a wider range of momenta than before an earlier expression relating ..sigma..* and ..delta.. production. We also find at least qualitative agreement between quark model predictions for forward hypercharge exchange and the data, and we find that 90/sup 0/ hypercharge exchange cross sections also conform to the expectations of the quark constituent picture for hadrons.

  20. Five ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for hydrated NaCl and NaF. I. Two-body interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M; Kamarchik, Eugene

    2016-03-21

    We report full-dimensional, ab initio-based potentials and dipole moment surfaces for NaCl, NaF, Na(+)H2O, F(-)H2O, and Cl(-)H2O. The NaCl and NaF potentials are diabatic ones that dissociate to ions. These are obtained using spline fits to CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z energies. In addition, non-linear least square fits using the Born-Mayer-Huggins potential are presented, providing accurate parameters based strictly on the current ab initio energies. The long-range behavior of the NaCl and NaF potentials is shown to go, as expected, accurately to the point-charge Coulomb interaction. The three ion-H2O potentials are permutationally invariant fits to roughly 20,000 coupled cluster CCSD(T) energies (awCVTZ basis for Na(+) and aVTZ basis for Cl(-) and F(-)), over a large range of distances and H2O intramolecular configurations. These potentials are switched accurately in the long range to the analytical ion-dipole interactions, to improve computational efficiency. Dipole moment surfaces are fits to MP2 data; for the ion-ion cases, these are well described in the intermediate- and long-range by the simple point-charge expression. The performance of these new fits is examined by direct comparison to additional ab initio energies and dipole moments along various cuts. Equilibrium structures, harmonic frequencies, and electronic dissociation energies are also reported and compared to direct ab initio results. These indicate the high fidelity of the new PESs.

  1. Two-body quantum mechanical problem on spheres

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The quantum mechanical two-body problem with a central interaction on the sphere ${\\bf S}^{n}$ is considered. Using recent results in representation theory an ordinary differential equation for some energy levels is found. For several interactive potentials these energy levels are calculated in explicit form.

  2. Wave Function Structure in Two-Body Random Matrix Ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L; Kaplan, Lev; Papenbrock, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    We study the structure of eigenstates in two-body interaction random matrix ensembles and find significant deviations from random matrix theory expectations. The deviations are most prominent in the tails of the spectral density and indicate localization of the eigenstates in Fock space. Using ideas related to scar theory we derive an analytical formula that relates fluctuations in wave function intensities to fluctuations of the two-body interaction matrix elements. Numerical results for many-body fermion systems agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  3. High-energy two-body photoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Salin, P

    1974-01-01

    Considers three aspects of two-body photoproduction reactions: vector meson production as a tool to investigate properties of diffractive reactions; the occurrence of a possible J=0 fixed pole in the Compton amplitude; and pseudoscalar meson photoproduction. (73 refs).

  4. Two-Body Relaxation in Cosmological Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, J; Binney, James; Knebe, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The importance of two-body relaxation in cosmological simulations is explored with simulations in which there are two species of particles. The cases of mass ratio sqrt(2):1 and 4:1 are investigated. Simulations are run with both a fixed softening length and adaptive softening using the publicly available codes GADGET and MLAPM, respectively. The effects of two-body relaxation are detected in both the density profiles of halos and the mass function of halos. The effects are more pronounced with a fixed softening length, but even in this case they are not so large as to suggest that results obtained with one mass species are significantly affected by two-body relaxation. The simulations that use adaptive softening are slightly less affected by two-body relaxation and produce slightly higher central densities in the largest halos. They run about three times faster than the simulations that use a fixed softening length.

  5. Analysis of Multi-Stakeholder Requirements Using Requirement Interaction Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohayanti Hassan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Software requirements engineering is an imperative phase in the software development life cycle in every project regardless of the project size. In a project, different people are involved in the requirements engineering process, including requirement engineers, stakeholders, end users, and system designers. Amongst them, stakeholders play an essential role. Differences in goals and priorities of multiple stakeholders would make requirements management complex and difficult, which is a huge challenge for requirement engineers. From time to time, new requirements emerge and existing requirements need changes to fulfil stakeholders’ goals. Thus, such situation leads to high requirements volatility and low stability which causes overlapping and conflicting of requirements. The correctness and validity of requirements are of paramount importance as they are the key factors toward a successful system. A deep understanding of requirement management technique that conforms to users’ needs is crucial. Such technique of the concept is applied to the Labour Management System. In this study, we have discussed the implementation of analysis of multi-stakeholder requirements using requirement interaction matrix in the f. The study used real requirements to yield a solid and dependable result. We have documented the requirements using a template and assessed their respective volatility level. An algorithm is constructed to   show   that   the   technique has managed to minimize   the time   used   when   checking requirements.

  6. The two-body random spin ensemble and a new type of quantum phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizorn, Iztok; Prosen, Tomaz [Department of Physics, FMF, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mossmann, Stefan; Seligman, Thomas H [Instituto de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 62132 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)], E-mail: tomaz.prosen@fmf.uni-lj.si

    2008-02-15

    We study in this paper the properties of a two-body random matrix ensemble for distinguishable spins. We require the ensemble to be invariant under the group of local transformations and analyze a parametrization in terms of the group parameters and the remaining parameters associated with the 'entangling' part of the interaction. We then specialize to a spin chain with nearest-neighbour interactions and numerically find a new type of quantum-phase transition related to the strength of a random external field, i.e. the time-reversal-breaking one-body interaction term.

  7. The two-body random spin ensemble and a new type of quantum phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Prosen, Tomaž; Mossmann, Stefan; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2008-02-01

    We study in this paper the properties of a two-body random matrix ensemble for distinguishable spins. We require the ensemble to be invariant under the group of local transformations and analyze a parametrization in terms of the group parameters and the remaining parameters associated with the 'entangling' part of the interaction. We then specialize to a spin chain with nearest-neighbour interactions and numerically find a new type of quantum-phase transition related to the strength of a random external field, i.e. the time-reversal-breaking one-body interaction term.

  8. Separable approximation method for two-body relativistic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tandy, P.C.; Thaler, R.M.

    1988-03-01

    A method for defining a separable approximation to a given interaction within a two-body relativistic equation, such as the Bethe-Salpeter equation, is presented. The rank-N separable representation given here permits exact reproduction of the T matrix on the mass shell and half off the mass shell at N selected bound state and/or continuum values of the invariant mass. The method employed is a four-space generalization of the separable representation developed for Schroedinger interactions by Ernst, Shakin, and Thaler, supplemented by procedures for dealing with the relativistic spin structure in the case of Dirac particles.

  9. Separable approximation method for two-body relativistic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandy, P. C.; Thaler, R. M.

    1988-03-01

    A method for defining a separable approximation to a given interaction within a two-body relativistic equation, such as the Bethe-Salpeter equation, is presented. The rank-N separable representation given here permits exact reproduction of the T matrix on the mass shell and half off the mass shell at N selected bound state and/or continuum values of the invariant mass. The method employed is a four-space generalization of the separable representation developed for Schrödinger interactions by Ernst, Shakin, and Thaler, supplemented by procedures for dealing with the relativistic spin structure in the case of Dirac particles.

  10. Two-body bound states in quantum electrodynamics. [Rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepage, G.P.

    1978-07-01

    Novel formulations of the two-body bound state problem in quantum field theory are examined. While equal in rigor, these have several calculational advantages over the traditional Bethe-Salpeter formalism. In particular there exist exact solutions of the bound state equations for a Coulomb-like interaction in quantum electrodynamics. The corrections to such zeroth-order solutions can be systematically computed in a simple perturbation theory. These methods are illustrated by computing corrections to the orthopositronium decay rate and to the ground state splittings in positronium and muonium.

  11. Covariant Hamiltonian for the electromagnetic two-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Jayme

    2005-09-01

    We give a Hamiltonian formalism for the delay equations of motion of the electromagnetic two-body problem with arbitrary masses and with either repulsive or attractive interaction. This dynamical system based on action-at-a-distance electrodynamics appeared 100 years ago and it was popularized in the 1940s by the Wheeler and Feynman program to quantize it as a means to overcome the divergencies of perturbative QED. Our finite-dimensional implicit Hamiltonian is closed and involves no series expansions. As an application, the Hamiltonian formalism is used to construct a semiclassical canonical quantization based on the numerical trajectories of the attractive problem.

  12. Two-body bound states & the Bethe-Salpeter equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichowsky, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kennedy, M. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States). Physics Dept.; Strickland, M. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1995-01-18

    The Bethe-Salpeter formalism is used to study two-body bound states within a scalar theory: two scalar fields interacting via the exchange of a third massless scalar field. The Schwinger-Dyson equation is derived using functional and diagrammatic techniques, and the Bethe-Salpeter equation is obtained in an analogous way, showing it to be a two-particle generalization of the Schwinger-Dyson equation. The authors also present a numerical method for solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation without three-dimensional reduction. The ground and first excited state masses and wavefunctions are computed within the ladder approximation and space-like form factors are calculated.

  13. Matrix Elements of One- and Two-Body Operators in the Unitary Group Approach (II) - Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Lian-Rong; PAN Feng

    2001-01-01

    Simple analytical expressions for one- and two-body matrix elements in the unitary group approach to the configuration interaction problems of many-electron systems are obtained based on the previous results for general Un irreps.

  14. Two-body wave functions and compositeness from scattering amplitudes. I. General properties with schematic models

    CERN Document Server

    Sekihara, Takayasu

    2016-01-01

    For a general two-body bound state in quantum mechanics, both in the stable and decaying cases, we establish a way to extract its two-body wave function in momentum space from the scattering amplitude of the constituent two particles. For this purpose, we first show that the two-body wave function of the bound state corresponds to the residue of the off-shell scattering amplitude at the bound state pole. Then, we examine our scheme to extract the two-body wave function from the scattering amplitude in several schematic models. As a result, the two-body wave functions from the Lippmann--Schwinger equation coincides with that from the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for an energy-independent interaction. Of special interest is that the two-body wave function from the scattering amplitude is automatically scaled; the norm of the two-body wave function, to which we refer as the compositeness, is unity for an energy-independent interaction, while the compositeness deviates from unity for an energy-dependent interaction, ...

  15. Loschmidt echoes in two-body random matrix ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Prosen, Tomaž; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2007-07-01

    Fidelity decay is studied for quantum many-body systems with a dominant independent particle Hamiltonian resulting, e.g., from a mean field theory with a weak two-body interaction. The diagonal terms of the interaction are included in the unperturbed Hamiltonian, while the off-diagonal terms constitute the perturbation that distorts the echo. We give the linear response solution for this problem in a random matrix framework. While the ensemble average shows no surprising behavior, we find that the typical ensemble member as represented by the median displays a very slow fidelity decay known as “freeze.” Numerical calculations confirm this result and show that the ground state even on average displays the freeze. This may contribute to explanation of the “unreasonable” success of mean field theories.

  16. Micromagnetic simulation of two-body magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Lu, Jincheng; Yang, Yu; Lu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Rujun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2017-05-01

    Field-induced magnetization dynamics was investigated in a system of two magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropies and magnetostatic interaction. By using the micromagnetic simulation, ultralow switching field strength was found when the separation distance between the two particles reaches a critical small value on nanometer scale in the perpendicular configuration where the anisotropic axes of the two particles are perpendicular to the separation line. The switching field increases sharply when the separation is away from the critical distance. The same results were observed when varying the radius of particles. The micromagnetic results are consistent with the previous theoretical prediction where dipolar interaction between two single-domain magnetic particles was considered. Our present simulations offered further proofs and possibilities for the low-power applications of information storage as the two-body magnetic nanoparticles could be implemented as a composite information bit.

  17. A search for two body muon decay signals

    CERN Document Server

    Bayes, R; Davydov, Yu I; Depommier, P; Faszer, W; Fujiwara, M C; Gagliardi, C A; Gaponenko, A; Gill, D R; Grossheim, A; Gumplinger, P; Hasinoff, M D; Henderson, R S; Hillairet, A; Hu, J; Koetke, D D; MacDonald, R P; Marshall, G M; Mathie, E L; Mischke, R E; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Openshaw, R; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Selivanov, V; Sheffer, G; Shin, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Tacik, R; Tribble, R E

    2014-01-01

    Lepton family number violation is tested by searching for $\\mu^+\\to e^+X^0$ decays among the 5.8$\\times 10^8$ positive muon decay events analyzed by the TWIST collaboration. Limits are set on the production of both massless and massive $X^0$ bosons. The large angular acceptance of this experiment allows limits to be placed on anisotropic $\\mu^+\\to e^+X^0$ decays, which can arise from interactions violating both lepton flavor and parity conservation. Branching ratio limits of order $10^{-5}$\\ are obtained for boson masses of 10 - 80 MeV/c$^2$ and different asymmetries. For lighter bosons the asymmetry dependence is much stronger and the branching ratio limit varies up to $5.8 \\times 10^{-5}$. This is the first study that explicitly evaluates the limits for anisotropic two body muon decays.

  18. Advanced interactive television services require content synchronization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deventer, M.O. van; Stokking, H.M.; Niamut, O.A.; Walraven, F.A.; Klos, V.B.

    2008-01-01

    Advanced interactive television services, e.g. using IMS-based IPTV technology, enable users to interact with other users within the context of simultaneously consumed content, like broadcast television channels. Differences of content arrival time of 100 ms may already have a perceivable effect on

  19. Two-body dissipation effects on synthesis of superheavy elements

    CERN Document Server

    Tohyama, M

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the two-body dissipation effects on the synthesis of superheavy elements, we calculate low-energy collisions of the $N=50$ isotones ($^{82}$Ge, $^{84}$Se, $^{86}$Kr and $^{88}$Sr) on $^{208}$Pb using the time-dependent density-matrix theory (TDDM). TDDM is an extension of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory and can determine the time evolution of one-body and two-body density matrices. Thus TDDM describes both one-body and two-body dissipation of collective energies. It is shown that the two-body dissipation may increase fusion cross sections and enhance the synthesis of superheavy elements.

  20. Industrial requirements for interactive product configurators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queva, Matthieu Stéphane Benoit; Probst, Christian W.; Vikkelsøe, Per

    2009-01-01

    The demand for highly customized products at low cost is driving the industry towards Mass Customization. Interactive product configurators play an essential role in this new trend, and must be able to support more and more complex features. The purpose of this paper is, firstly, to identify requ...

  1. Strong Two--Body Decays of Light Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Ricken, R; Merten, D; Metsch, B C; Ricken, Ralf; Koll, Matthias; Merten, Dirk; Metsch, Bernard C.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present results on strong two-body decay widths of light $q\\bar q$ mesons calculated in a covariant quark model. The model is based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation in its instantaneous approximation and has already been used for computing the complete meson mass spectrum and many electroweak decay observables. Our approach relies on the use of a phenomenological confinement potential with an appropriate spinorial Dirac structure and 't Hooft's instanton--induced interaction as a residual force for pseudoscalar and scalar mesons. The transition matrix element for the decay of one initial meson into two final mesons is evaluated in lowest order by considering conventional decays via quark loops as well as Zweig rule violating instanton--induced decays generated by the six--quark vertex of 't Hooft's interaction; the latter mechanism only contributes if all mesons in the decay have zero total angular momentum. We show that the interference of both decay mechanisms plays an important role in the ...

  2. Requirements for user interaction support in future CACE environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole; Szymkat, M.

    1994-01-01

    Based on a review of user interaction modes and the specific needs of the CACE domain the paper describes requirements for user interaction in future CACE environments. Taking another look at the design process in CACE key areas in need of more user interaction support are pointed out. Three...

  3. The Sharma-Parthasarathy stochastic two-body problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cresson, J. [LMAP/Université de Pau, 64013 Pau (France); SYRTE/Observatoire de Paris, 75014 Paris (France); Pierret, F. [SYRTE/Observatoire de Paris, 75014 Paris (France); Puig, B. [IPRA/Université de Pau, 64013 Pau (France)

    2015-03-15

    We study the Sharma-Parthasarathy stochastic two-body problem introduced by Sharma and Parthasarathy in [“Dynamics of a stochastically perturbed two-body problem,” Proc. R. Soc. A 463, 979-1003 (2007)]. In particular, we focus on the preservation of some fundamental features of the classical two-body problem like the Hamiltonian structure and first integrals in the stochastic case. Numerical simulations are performed which illustrate the dynamical behaviour of the osculating elements as the semi-major axis, the eccentricity, and the pericenter. We also derive a stochastic version of Gauss’s equations in the planar case.

  4. The Sharma-Parthasarathy stochastic two-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresson, J.; Pierret, F.; Puig, B.

    2015-03-01

    We study the Sharma-Parthasarathy stochastic two-body problem introduced by Sharma and Parthasarathy in ["Dynamics of a stochastically perturbed two-body problem," Proc. R. Soc. A 463, 979-1003 (2007)]. In particular, we focus on the preservation of some fundamental features of the classical two-body problem like the Hamiltonian structure and first integrals in the stochastic case. Numerical simulations are performed which illustrate the dynamical behaviour of the osculating elements as the semi-major axis, the eccentricity, and the pericenter. We also derive a stochastic version of Gauss's equations in the planar case.

  5. Computation of Two-Body Matrix Elements From the Argonne $v_{18}$ Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mihaila, B; Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen H.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the computation of two-body matrix elements from the Argonne $v_{18}$ interaction. The matrix elements calculation is presented both in particle-particle and in particle-hole angular momentum coupling. The procedures developed here can be applied to the case of other NN potentials, provided that they have a similar operator format.

  6. Searching for new physics in two-body decays: Ideas and pitfalls

    CERN Document Server

    Arrieta Diaz, E; Büchler, A; Cieri, L J; Florez, A; Garces-Garcia, E; Gonçalves, B; Koetsveld, F; Leney, K J C; Marquez Falcon, H; Moncada, M; Quintero, P; Romero, D; Shaw, K; Swain, J; Zurita, M P

    2010-01-01

    Many new physics processes, and indeed many Standard Model interactions involve two-body decays. Although the kinematics are relatively simple, mistakes can easily be made when applying cuts to data in order to separate the signal from backgrounds. We present a short, but relevant list of possible sources of errors, and discuss the consequences of these.

  7. Exact two-body solutions and quantum defect theory of two-dimensional dipolar quantum gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Jianwen; Qi, Ran

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we provide the two-body exact solutions of the two-dimensional (2D) Schrödinger equation with isotropic +/- 1/{r}3 interactions. An analytic quantum defect theory is constructed based on these solutions and it is applied to investigate the scattering properties as well as two-body bound states of an ultracold polar molecules confined in a quasi-2D geometry. Interestingly, we find that for the attractive case, the scattering resonance happens simultaneously in all partial waves, which has not been observed in other systems. The effect of this feature on the scattering phase shift across such resonances is also illustrated.

  8. Relativistic two-body bound states in scalar QFT: variational basis-state approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emami-Razavi, Mohsen [Centre for Research in Earth and Space Science, York University, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Darewych, Jurij W [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2006-08-15

    We use the Hamiltonian formalism of quantum field theory and the variational basis-state method to derive relativistic coupled-state wave equations for scalar particles interacting via a massive or massless mediating scalar field (the scalar Yukawa model). A variational trial state comprised of two and four Fock-space states is used to derive coupled wave equations for a relativistic two (and four) body system. Approximate, variational two-body ground-state solutions of the relativistic equations are obtained for various strengths of coupling, for both massive and massless mediating fields. The results show that the inclusion of virtual pairs has a large effect on the two-body binding energy at strong coupling. A comparison of the two-body binding energies with other calculations is presented.

  9. Two-body physics in the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Liberto, M.; Recati, A.; Carusotto, I.; Menotti, C.

    2016-12-01

    We consider two interacting bosons in a dimerized Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) lattice. We identify a rich variety of two-body states. In particular, for open boundary conditions and moderate interactions, edge bound states (EBS) are present even for the dimerization that does not sustain single-particle edge states. Moreover, for large values of the interactions, we find a breaking of the standard bulk-boundary correspondence. Based on the mapping of two interacting particles in one dimension onto a single particle in two dimensions, we propose an experimentally realistic coupled optical fibers setup as quantum simulator of the two-body SSH model. This setup is able to highlight the localization properties of the states as well as the presence of a resonant scattering mechanism provided by a bound state that crosses the scattering continuum, revealing the closed-channel population in real time and real space.

  10. Design Requirements for Communication-Intensive Interactive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolchini, Davide; Garzotto, Franca; Paolini, Paolo

    Online interactive applications call for new requirements paradigms to capture the growing complexity of computer-mediated communication. Crafting successful interactive applications (such as websites and multimedia) involves modeling the requirements for the user experience, including those leading to content design, usable information architecture and interaction, in profound coordination with the communication goals of all stakeholders involved, ranging from persuasion to social engagement, to call for action. To face this grand challenge, we propose a methodology for modeling communication requirements and provide a set of operational conceptual tools to be used in complex projects with multiple stakeholders. Through examples from real-life projects and lessons-learned from direct experience, we draw on the concepts of brand, value, communication goals, information and persuasion requirements to systematically guide analysts to master the multifaceted connections of these elements as drivers to inform successful communication designs.

  11. A Tale of Three Equations Breit, Eddington-Guant, and Two-Body Dirac

    CERN Document Server

    Van Alstine, P; Alstine, Peter Van; Crater, Horace W.

    1997-01-01

    G.Breit's original paper of 1929 postulates the Breit equation as a correction to an earlier defective equation due to Eddington and Gaunt, containing a form of interaction suggested by Heisenberg and Pauli. We observe that manifestly covariant electromagnetic Two-Body Dirac equations previously obtained by us in the framework of Relativistic Constraint Mechanics reproduce the spectral results of the Breit equation but through an interaction structure that contains that of Eddington and Gaunt. By repeating for our equation the analysis that Breit used to demonstrate the superiority of his equation to that of Eddington and Gaunt, we show that the historically unfamiliar interaction structures of Two-Body Dirac equations (in Breit-like form) are just what is needed to correct the covariant Eddington Gaunt equation without resorting to Breit's version of retardation.

  12. Stochastic perturbation of the two-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Jacky, Cresson; Bénédicte, Puig

    2014-01-01

    We study the impact of a stochastic perturbation on the classical two-body problem in particular concerning the preservation of first integrals and the Hamiltonian structure. Numerical simulations are performed which illustrate the dynamical behavior of the osculating elements as the semi-major axis, the eccentricity and the pericenter. We also derive a stochastic version of Gauss's equations in the planar case.

  13. Stochastic perturbation of the two-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresson, J.; Pierret, F.; Puig, B.

    2013-11-01

    We study the impact of a stochastic perturbation on the classical two-body problem in particular concerning the preservation of first integrals and the Hamiltonian structure. Numerical simulations are performed which illustrate the dynamical behavior of the osculating elements as the semi-major axis, the eccentricity and the pericenter. We also derive a stochastic version of Gauss's equations in the planar case.

  14. Two-body threshold spectral analysis, the critical case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Erik; Wang, Xue Ping

    We study in dimension $d\\geq2$ low-energy spectral and scattering asymptotics for two-body $d$-dimensional Schrödinger operators with a radially symmetric potential falling off like $-\\gamma r^{-2},\\;\\gamma>0$. We consider angular momentum sectors, labelled by $l=0,1,\\dots$, for which $\\gamma...

  15. Exact phase space functional for two-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gracia-Bondía, José M

    2010-01-01

    The determination of the two-body density functional from its one-body density is achieved for Moshinsky's harmonium model, using a phase-space formulation, thereby resolving its phase dilemma. The corresponding sign rules can equivalently be obtained by minimizing the ground-state energy.

  16. RANS Simulation of the Heave Response of a Two-Body Floating Point Wave Absorber: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Y.; Li, Y.

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary study on a two-body floating wave absorbers is presented in this paper. A Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes computational method is applied for analyzing the hydrodynamic heave response of the absorber in operational wave conditions. The two-body floating wave absorber contains a float section and a submerged reaction section. For validation purposes, our model is first assumed to be locked. The two sections are forced to move together with each other. The locked single body model is used in a heave decay test, where the RANS result is validated with the experimental measurement. For the two-body floating point absorber simulation, the two sections are connected through a mass-spring-damper system, which is applied to simulate the power take-off mechanism under design wave conditions. Overall, the details of the flow around the absorber and its nonlinear interaction with waves are investigated, and the power absorption efficiency of the two-body floating wave absorber in waves with a constant value spring-damper system is examined.

  17. Distribution of level spacing ratios using one- plus two-body random matrix ensembles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N D Chavda

    2015-02-01

    Probability distribution (()) of the level spacing ratios has been introduced recently and is used to investigate many-body localization as well as to quantify the distance from integrability on finite size lattices. In this paper, we study the distribution of the ratio of consecutive level spacings using one-body plus two-body random matrix ensembles for finite interacting many-fermion and many-boson systems. () for these ensembles move steadily from the Poisson to the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) form as the two-body interaction strength is varied. Other related quantities are also used in the analysis to obtain critical strength c for the transition. The c values deduced using the () analysis are in good agreement with the results obtained using the nearest neighbour spacing distribution (NNSD) analysis.

  18. Separation of Potentials in the Two-Body Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Vasilyev, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the well-known solution of the two-body problem through the use of the concept of reduced mass, a solution is proposed involving separation of potentials. It is shown that each of the two point bodies moves in its own stationary potential well generated by the other body, and the magnitudes of these potentials are calculated. It is shown also that for each body separately the energy and the angular momentum laws are valid. The knowledge of the potentials in which the bodies are moving permits calculation of the trajectories of each body without resorting to the reduced mass. Key words: mechanics, two-body problem, gravitational potential, virial theorem.

  19. New fixed points of the renormalisation group for two-body scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birse, M.C. [The University of Manchester, Theoretical Physics Division, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); Epelbaum, E. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Gegelia, J. [Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia)

    2016-02-15

    We outline a separable matrix ansatz for the potentials in effective field theories of non-relativistic two-body systems with short-range interactions. We use this ansatz to construct new fixed points of the renormalisation-group equation for these potentials. New fixed points indicate a much richer structure than previously recognized in the RG flows of simple short-range potentials. (orig.)

  20. Atlas2bgeneral: Two-body resonance calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Tabaré

    2016-07-01

    For a massless test particle and given a planetary system, Atlas2bgeneral calculates all resonances in a given range of semimajor axes with all the planets taken one by one. Planets are assumed in fixed circular and coplanar orbits and the test particle with arbitrary orbit. A sample input data file to calculate the two-body resonances is available for use with the Fortran77 source code.

  1. Classical and Quantum Two-Body Problem in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Maheshwari, Amar; Todorov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The two-body problem in general relativity is reduced to the problem of an effective particle (with an energy-dependent relativistic reduced mass) in an external field. The effective potential is evaluated from the Born diagram of the linearized quantum theory of gravity. It reduces to a Schwarzschild-like potential with two different `Schwarzschild radii'. The results derived in a weak field approximation are expected to be relevant for relativistic velocities.

  2. Analysis of User Requirements in Interactive 3D Video Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyue Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of three dimensional (3D display technologies has resulted in a proliferation of 3D video production and broadcasting, attracting a lot of research into capture, compression and delivery of stereoscopic content. However, the predominant design practice of interactions with 3D video content has failed to address its differences and possibilities in comparison to the existing 2D video interactions. This paper presents a study of user requirements related to interaction with the stereoscopic 3D video. The study suggests that the change of view, zoom in/out, dynamic video browsing, and textual information are the most relevant interactions with stereoscopic 3D video. In addition, we identified a strong demand for object selection that resulted in a follow-up study of user preferences in 3D selection using virtual-hand and ray-casting metaphors. These results indicate that interaction modality affects users’ decision of object selection in terms of chosen location in 3D, while user attitudes do not have significant impact. Furthermore, the ray-casting-based interaction modality using Wiimote can outperform the volume-based interaction modality using mouse and keyboard for object positioning accuracy.

  3. Two-body bound state problem and nonsingular scattering equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartnik, E.A.; Haberzettl, H.; Sandhas, W.

    1986-11-01

    We present a new momentum space approach to the two-body problem in partial waves. In contrast to the usual momentum space approaches, we treat the bound state case with the help of an inhomogeneous integral equation which possesses solutions for all (negative) energies. The bound state energies and corresponding wave functions are identified by an additional condition. This procedure straightforwardly leads to a nonsingular formulation of the scattering problem in terms of essentially the same equation and thus unifies the descriptions of both energy regimes. We show that the properties of our momentum-space approach can be understood in terms of the so-called regular solution of the Schroedinger equation in position space. The unified description of the bound state and scattering energy regimes in terms of one single, real, and manifestly nonsingular equation allows us to construct an exact representation of the two-body off-shell T matrix in which all the bound state pole and scattering cut information is contained in one single separable term, the remainder being real, nonsingular, and vanishing half on-shell. Such a representation may be of considerable advantage as input in three-body Faddeev-type integral equations. We demonstrate the applicability of our method by calculating bound state and scattering data for the two-nucleon system with the s-wave Malfliet--Tjon III potential.

  4. Elderly’s Barriers and Requirements for Interactive TV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baunstrup, Mai; Larsen, Lars Bo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study to identify the problems and experiences that the elderly have using interactive TV (iTV) services. The study comprised an in-depth qualitative interview series backed up with a questionnaire survey; a list with the elderly’s interaction problems and the reasons...... for wanting or not wanting to use iTV services was developed. These findings in turn lead to the formulation of a set of user requirements. The paper presents the studies carried out and the resulting design recommendations for iTV services for the elderly. The recommendations also take cognitive...... and as physiological impairments into consideration. The recommendations propose on increased ease-of-use, transparency, colour schemes, familiarity and a reduced set of iTV services for the elderly. Ultimately, designers should aim at customizable interface profiles for future iTV devices and services to better...

  5. Nonleptonic two-body Bc-meson decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimuddin, Sk.; Kar, Susmita; Priyadarsini, M.; Barik, N.; Dash, P. C.

    2012-11-01

    We study the exclusive nonleptonic two-body Bc decays within factorization approximation, in the framework of the relativistic independent quark model based on a confining potential in the scalar-vector harmonic form. The relevant weak form factors and branching ratios for different decay modes (Bc→PP,PV,VP) are predicted in reasonable agreement with other quark model predictions. We find that the dominant contribution to the Bc-meson lifetime comes from the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Masakawa favored c¯→s¯, d¯ decay modes, and the most promising modes are found to be Bc-→B¯s0π-, Bc-→B¯s0ρ- and Bc-→B¯s⋆0π- with predicted branching ratios of 12.01, 9.96, and 8.61%, respectively, which might be easily detected at the hadron collider in the near future.

  6. Two-body Dirac equation approach to the deuteron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeao, A.P.; Castilho A, J.A.; Ferreira, P. Leal

    1996-06-01

    The two-body Dirac (Breit) equation with potentials associated to one-boson-exchanges with cutoff masses is solved for the deuteron and its observables calculated. The 16-component wave-function for the J{sup {pi}} = 1{sup +} state contains four independent radial functions which satisfy a system of four coupled differential equations of firs order. This system is numerically integrated, from infinity towards the origin, by fixing the value of the deuteron binding energy and imposing appropriate boundary conditions at infinity. For the exchange potential of the pion, a mixture of direct plus derivative couplings to the nucleon is considered. We varied the pion-nucleon coupling constant, and the best results of our calculations agree with the lower values recently determined for this constant. The present treatment differs from the more conventional ones in that non-relativistic reductions up to the order c{sup -2} are not used. (author). 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Visualized kinematics code for two-body nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The one or few nucleon transfer reaction has been a great tool for investigating the single-particle properties of a nucleus. Both stable and exotic beams are utilized to study transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics, respectively. Because many energy levels of the heavy recoil from the two-body nuclear reaction can be populated by using a single beam energy, identifying each populated state, which is not often trivial owing to high level-density of the nucleus, is essential. For identification of the energy levels, a visualized kinematics code called VISKIN has been developed by utilizing the Java programming language. The development procedure, usage, and application of the VISKIN is reported.

  8. Orbit Determination with the two-body Integrals. II

    CERN Document Server

    Gronchi, Giovanni F; Dimare, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The first integrals of the Kepler problem are used to compute preliminary orbits starting from two short observed arcs of a celestial body, which may be obtained either by optical or radar observations. We write polynomial equations for this problem, that we can solve using the powerful tools of computational Algebra. An algorithm to decide if the linkage of two short arcs is successful, i.e. if they belong to the same observed body, is proposed and tested numerically. In this paper we continue the research started in [Gronchi, Dimare, Milani, 'Orbit determination with the two-body intergrals', CMDA (2010) 107/3, 299-318], where the angular momentum and the energy integrals were used. A suitable component of the Laplace-Lenz vector in place of the energy turns out to be convenient, in fact the degree of the resulting system is reduced to less than half.

  9. A detailed study of nonperturbative solutions of two-body Dirac equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crater, H.W.; Becker, R.L.; Wong, C.Y.; Van Alstine, P.

    1992-12-01

    In quark model calculations of the meson spectrums fully covariant two-body Dirac equations dictated by Dirac's relativistic constraint mechanics gave a good fit to the entire meson mass spectrum for light quark mesons as well as heavy quark mesons with constituent world scalar and vector potentials depending on just one or two parameters. In this paper, we investigate the properties of these equations that made them work so well by solving them numerically for quantum electrodynamics (QED) and related field theories. The constraint formalism generates a relativistic quantum mechanics defined by two coupled Dirac equations on a sixteen component wave function which contain Lorentz covariant constituent potentials that are initially undetermined. An exact Pauli reduction leads to a second order relativistic Schroedinger-like equation for a reduced eight component wave function determined by an effective interaction -- the quasipotential. We first determine perturbatively to lowest order the relativistic quasipotential for the Schroedinger-like equation by comparing that form with one derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Insertion of this perturbative information into the minimal interaction structures of the two-body Dirac equations then completely determines their interaction structures. Then we give a procedure for constructing the full sixteen component solution to our coupled first-order Dirac equations from a solution of the second order equation for the reduced wave function. Next, we show that a perturbative treatment of these equations yields the standard spectral results for QED and related interactions.

  10. Two-body interactions in the reaction {sup 9}Be(n,{alpha}{alpha}nn) at 14 MeV. 2. Cross-section measurements; Interactions a deux corps dans la reaction {sup 9}Be(n,{alpha}{alpha}nn) a 14 MeV. 2. Mesure des sections efficaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorni, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-11-01

    We measure with a double time of flight spectrometer the momenta k{sub 1} and k{sub 2} of neutrons from the {sup 9}Be(n,nn){alpha}{alpha} reaction at E{sub n} = 14 MeV. After the analysis of corrections factors for the measurement of differential cross-sections, we appraise the importance of different interactions (nn,{sup 8}Be(0+): 1,8 {+-} 0.4 mb/sr{sup 2}, mn{sup 8}Be(2+): 2 {+-} 0,4 mb/sr{sup 2}, n{sup 9}Be, n{sup 8}Be, {alpha}-{alpha}) observed. Our results are compared with those In the literature. (author) [French] On mesure avec un spectrometre a double-temps-de-vol, les impulsions k{sub 1} et k{sub 2} des neutrons de la reaction {sup 9}Be (n,nn){alpha}{alpha} a E{sub n} = 14 MeV. Apres avoir analyse l'ensemble des facteurs de corrections a apporter aux mesures, pour determiner les sections efficaces differentielles, on estime l'importance des differentes interactions (nn{sup 8}Be(0+): 1,8 {+-} 0,4 mb/sr{sup 2}, nn{sup 8}Be(2+); 2 + 0,4 mb/sr{sup 2}, n{sup 9}Be, n{sup 8}Be, {alpha}-{alpha}) observees. Les valeurs obtenues sont ensuite comparees aux resultats anterieurs.

  11. Material loss in two-body collisions during planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, J.; Schäfer, C.; Maindl, T. I.; Burger, C.; Speith, R.

    2016-02-01

    During the formation process of a terrestrial planet, a planetary embryo does not only accrete smaller dust particles but also suffers collisions with larger planetesimals. When simulating these collisions, most N-body codes treat them as perfect merging events, i.e. the resulting body's mass is the sum of the previous ones. In our work, we aim to determine whether this assumption is a justified simplification, specifically focusing on bodies containing volatile elements, such as water. To analyze this, we have developed a new Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code that includes elasto-plastic dynamics, a damage model for brittle materials and self gravity. It makes use of the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) and runs on modern GPU architectures which allows for higher resolution in less calculation time. This enables us to take a precise look at two-body collisions and determine the amount of both transferred and ejected mass according to specific parameters such as mass ratio of impactor and target, porosity, impact velocity, impact angle and water distribution.

  12. Two-body relaxation in modified Newtonian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ciotti, L

    2004-01-01

    A naive extension to MOND of the standard computation of the two-body relaxation time Tb implies that Tb is comparable to the crossing time regardless of the number N of stars in the system. This computation is questionable in view of the non-linearity of MOND's field equation. A non-standard approach to the calculation of Tb is developed that can be extended to MOND whenever discreteness noise generates force fluctuations that are small compared to the mean-field force. It is shown that this approach yields standard Newtonian results for systems in which the mean density profile is either plane-parallel or spherical. In the plane-parallel case we find that in the deep-MOND regime Tbb scales with N as in the Newtonian case, but is shorter by the square of the factor by which MOND enhances the gravitational force over its Newtonian value for the same system. Application of these results to dwarf galaxies and groups and clusters of galaxies reveals that in MOND luminosity segregation should be far advanced in g...

  13. Determining robot actions for tasks requiring sensor interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budenske, John; Gini, Maria

    1989-01-01

    The performance of non-trivial tasks by a mobile robot has been a long term objective of robotic research. One of the major stumbling blocks to this goal is the conversion of the high-level planning goals and commands into the actuator and sensor processing controls. In order for a mobile robot to accomplish a non-trivial task, the task must be described in terms of primitive actions of the robot's actuators. Most non-trivial tasks require the robot to interact with its environment; thus necessitating coordination of sensor processing and actuator control to accomplish the task. The main contention is that the transformation from the high level description of the task to the primitive actions should be performed primarily at execution time, when knowledge about the environment can be obtained through sensors. It is proposed to produce the detailed plan of primitive actions by using a collection of low-level planning components that contain domain specific knowledge and knowledge about the available sensors, actuators, and sensor/actuator processing. This collection will perform signal and control processing as well as serve as a control interface between an actual mobile robot and a high-level planning system. Previous research has shown the usefulness of high-level planning systems to plan the coordination of activities such to achieve a goal, but none have been fully applied to actual mobile robots due to the complexity of interacting with sensors and actuators. This control interface is currently being implemented on a LABMATE mobile robot connected to a SUN workstation and will be developed such to enable the LABMATE to perform non-trivial, sensor-intensive tasks as specified by a planning system.

  14. Charmless hadronic two-body decays of Bs mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaw-Hwang; Cheng, Hai-Yang; Tseng, B.

    1999-04-01

    Two-body charmless nonleptonic decays of the Bs meson are studied within the framework of generalized factorization in which factorization is applied to the tree level matrix elements while the effective Wilson coefficients are μ and renormalization scheme independent, and nonfactorizable effects are parametrized in terms of Neffc(LL) and Neffc(LR), the effective numbers of colors arising from (V-A)(V-A) and (V-A)(V+A) four-quark operators, respectively. Branching ratios of Bs-->PP,PV,VV decays (P: pseudoscalar meson, V: vector meson) are calculated as a function of Neffc(LR) with two different considerations for Neffc(LL): (a) Neffc(LL) being fixed at the value of 2 and (b) Neffc(LL)=Neffc(LR). Tree and penguin transitions are classified into six different classes. We find the following. (i) The electroweak penguin contributions account for about 85% [for Neffc(LL)=2] of the decay rates of Bs-->ηπ, η'π, ηρ, η'ρ, φπ, φρ, which receive contributions only from tree and electroweak penguin diagrams; a measurement of them will provide a clean determination of the electroweak penguin coefficient a9. (ii) Electroweak penguin corrections to Bs-->ωη('),φη,ωφ,K(*)φ,φφ are in general as significant as QCD penguin effects and even play a dominant role; their decay rates depend strongly on Neffc(LR). (iii) The branching ratio of Bs-->ηη', the analogue of Bd-->η'K, is of order 2×10-5, which is only slightly larger than that of η'η',K*+ρ-,K+K-,K0K¯0 decay modes. (iv) The contribution from the η' charm content is important for Bs-->η'η', but less significant for Bs-->ηη'. (v) The decay rates for the final states K+(*)K-(*) follow the pattern Γ(B¯s-->K+K-)>Γ(B¯s-->K+K*-)>~Γ(B¯s-->K*+K*-)>Γ(B¯s-->K+*K-) and likewise for K0(*)K¯0(*), as a consequence of various interference effects between the penguin amplitudes governed by the effective QCD penguin coefficients a4 and a6.

  15. E-cadherin interactions are required for Langerhans cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayumi, Nobuko; Watanabe, Eri; Norose, Yoshihiko; Watari, Eiji; Kawana, Seiji; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2013-01-01

    Human skin contains the following two distinct DC subsets: (i) Langerhans cells (LCs), expressing Langerin but not DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), are predominantly localized in the epidermis; and (ii) dermal DCs, expressing DC-SIGN but not Langerin, are observed mainly in the dermis. It is not known whether localization in the epidermis provides cues for LC differentiation. Here, we show that E-cadherin expressed by epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) is crucial for differentiation of LCs. Monocytes differentiated into LC-like cells in presence of IL-4, GM-CSF, and TGF-β1. However, these LC-like cells expressed not only Langerin but also DC-SIGN. Notably, co-culturing of these LC-like cells with KCs expressing E-cadherin or recombinant E-cadherin strongly decreased expression of DC-SIGN and further induced a phenotype similar to purified epidermal LCs. Moreover, pretreatment of LC-like cells with anti-E-cadherin-specific antibody completely abolished their Langerin expression, indicating the requirement of E-cadherin–E-cadherin interactions for the differentiation into Langerin+ cells. These findings suggest that E-cadherin expressed by KCs provide environmental cues that induce differentiation of LCs in the epidermis. PMID:23135957

  16. One plus two-body random matrix ensembles with parity: Density of states and parity ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Vyas, Manan; Srivastava, P C

    2011-01-01

    One plus two-body embedded Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices with parity [EGOE(1+2)-$\\pi$] generated by a chaos producing two-body interaction in the presence of a mean-field, for spinless identical fermion systems, is defined in terms of two mixing parameters and a gap between the positive $(\\pi=+)$ and negative $(\\pi=-)$ parity single particle (sp) states. Numerical calculations are used to demonstrate, using realistic values of the mixing parameters appropriate for some nuclei, that this ensemble generates Gaussian form (with corrections) for fixed parity eigenvalue densities (i.e. state densities). The random matrix model also generates many features in parity ratios of state densities that are similar to those predicted by a method based on the Fermi-gas model for nuclei. We have also obtained a simple formula for the spectral variances defined over fixed-$(m_1,m_2)$ spaces, where $m_1$ is the number of fermions in the $+$ve parity sp states and $m_2$ is the number of fermions in the $-$ve ...

  17. Global solutions to the electrodynamic two-body problem on a straight line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, G.; Deckert, D.-A.; Dürr, D.; Hinrichs, G.

    2017-06-01

    The classical electrodynamic two-body problem has been a long standing open problem in mathematics. For motion constrained to the straight line, the interaction is similar to that of the two-body problem of classical gravitation. The additional complication is the presence of unbounded state-dependent delays in the Coulomb forces due to the finiteness of the speed of light. This circumstance renders the notion of local solutions meaningless, and therefore, straightforward ODE techniques cannot be applied. Here, we study the time-symmetric case, i.e., the Fokker-Schwarzschild-Tetrode (FST) equations, comprising both advanced and retarded delays. We extend the technique developed in Deckert and Hinrichs (J Differ Equ 260:6900-6929, 2016), where existence of FST solutions was proven on the half line, to ensure global existence—a result that had been obtained by Bauer (Ein Existenzsatz für die Wheeler-Feynman-Elektrodynamik, Herbert Utz Verlag, München, 1997). Due to the novel technique, the presented proof is shorter and more transparent but also relies on the idea to employ asymptotic data to characterize solutions.

  18. Braids in a two-body micro swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakhanloo, Mehdi; Jalali, Mir Abbas; Alam, M.-Reza

    2016-11-01

    Here we show that microswimmers' trajectories may get entangled as a result of their mutual hydrodynamic interactions, resulting in a group behavior that is significantly different from individual swimmers' trajectories. Specifically, we consider a two-swimmer motion of "Quadroar", a newly proposed swimmer consists of two axles of rotating disks connected through a linear reciprocating actuator. In the absence of hydrodynamic interaction, each microswimmer moves along a straight path. When hydrodynamic interaction is introduced, the two swimmers move along tightly woven trajectories whose properties depend on the swimmers' initial conditions. We also show that if swimmers are sent toward each other they may reach an equilibrium at which while they are swimming (i.e. spending energy) no net motion is achieved. We further discuss that since the streamlines of the flow induced by the Quadroar closely resemble the oscillatory flow field of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, our findings can thus be utilized to understand the interactions of microorganisms with each other.

  19. Effective Field Theory Description of Two-Body Resonance States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balalhabashi, Jaber

    2017-01-01

    The quantum-mechanical scattering of two particles around a resonance state appears in many areas of physics, for example in cold atoms near narrow, low-lying Feshbach resonances. We construct) an EFT that describes such scattering with contact, derivative interactions. We demonstrate that a careful choice of leading- and next-to-leading-order terms in an effective Lagrangian gives rise to a systematic expansion of the T matrix around the resonance, with controlled error estimates. We compare phase shifts and pole positions with those of a toy model. We are extending our EFT to include Coulomb interactions with the goal of describing nuclear resonances, such as those appearing in the scattering of alpha particles. This material is based upon work supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER41338.

  20. Effect of Tensor Range in Nuclear Two-Body Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feshbach, H.; Schwinger, J.; Harr, J. A.

    1949-11-01

    The interaction between neutron and proton in the triplet state is investigated, a wide variation in the values of both central and tensor ranges are included; the per cent D state in the deuteron and the effective triplet range have been computed; the results are applied tot he discussion of the magnetic moment of the deuteron, the photoelectric disintegration of the deuteron, and neutron-proton scattering.

  1. Elderly’s Barriers and Requirements for Interactive TV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baunstrup, Mai; Larsen, Lars Bo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study to identify the problems and experiences that the elderly have using interactive TV (iTV) services. The study comprised an in-depth qualitative interview series backed up with a questionnaire survey; a list with the elderly’s interaction problems and the reasons...

  2. Non-Collision Singularities in the Planar Two-Center-Two-Body Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jinxin; Dolgopyat, Dmitry

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study a restricted four-body problem called the planar two-center-two-body problem. In the plane, we have two fixed centers Q 1 and Q 2 of masses 1, and two moving bodies Q 3 and Q 4 of masses {μ≪ 1}. They interact via Newtonian potential. Q 3 is captured by Q 2, and Q 4 travels back and forth between two centers. Based on a model of Gerver, we prove that there is a Cantor set of initial conditions that lead to solutions of the Hamiltonian system whose velocities are accelerated to infinity within finite time avoiding all earlier collisions. This problem is a simplified model for the planar four-body problem case of the Painlevé conjecture.

  3. Regularization of the collision in the electromagnetic two-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Efrain Buksman; De Luca, Jayme

    2004-12-01

    We derive a differential equation that is regular at the collision of two equal-mass bodies with attractive interaction in the relativistic action-at-a-distance electrodynamics. We use the energy constant related to the Poincaré invariance of the theory to define finite variables with finite derivatives at the collision. The collision orbits are calculated numerically using the regular equation adapted in a self-consistent minimization method (a stable numerical method that chooses only nonrunaway solutions). This dynamical system appeared 100 years ago as an example of covariant time-symmetric two-body dynamics and acquired the status of electrodynamics in the 1940s by the works of Dirac, Wheeler, and Feynman. We outline the method with an emphasis on the physics of this complex conservative dynamical system.

  4. Low-Thrust Orbital Transfers in the Two-Body Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sukhanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-thrust transfers between given orbits within the two-body problem are considered; the thrust is assumed power limited. A simple method for obtaining the transfer trajectories based on the linearization of the motion near reference orbits is suggested. Required calculation accuracy can be reached by means of use of a proper number of the reference orbits. The method may be used in the case of a large number of the orbits around the attracting center; no averaging is necessary in this case. The suggested method also is applicable to the cases of partly given final orbit and if there are constraints on the thrust direction. The method gives an optimal solution to the linearized problem which is not optimal for the original nonlinear problem; the difference between the optimal solutions to the original and linearized problems is estimated using a numerical example. Also examples illustrating the method capacities are given.

  5. Calculation of the Two-body T-matrix in Configuration Space

    CERN Document Server

    Rawitscher, George

    2007-01-01

    A spectral integral method (IEM) for solving the two-body Schroedinger equation in configuration space is generalized to the calculation of the corresponding T-matrix. It is found that the desirable features of the IEM, such as the economy of mesh-points for a given required accuracy, are carried over also to the solution of the T-matrix. However the algorithm is considerably more complex, because the T-matrix is a function of two variables r and r', rather than only one variable r, and has a slope discontinuity at r=r'. For a simple exponential potential an accuracy of 7 significant figures is achieved, with the number N of Chebyshev support points in each partition equal to 17. For a potential with a large repulsive core, such as the potential between two He atoms, the accuracy decreases to 4 significant figures, but is restored to 7 if N is increased to 65.

  6. Reconstruction of two-body B decays in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068023

    2007-01-01

    The observed dominance of matter over antimatter in the Universe leads to the hypothesis of the Sakharov conditions for the laws of nature. One of them implies the breaking of the charge-parity (CP) symmetry. The violation of the CP symmetry has been observed in several decays of kaons and B mesons and is incorporated in the Standard Model via the CKM matrix, describing the quark transitions in the charged current weak interactions. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provides a copious source of bb quark pairs, offering an excellent facility to study CP violation in the B meson system. The LHC is a powerful pp collider, which will accelerate proton bunches in opposite directions in a ring of 27 km circumference. Protons will collide every 25 ns at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. It is foreseen to start operation in 2008. LHCb, one of the four experiments along the LHC ring, is dedicated to the study of CP violation and rare decays in the B meson system. Since bb pairs are mostly produced in a forward cone alo...

  7. Reconstruction of two-body B decays in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068023

    2007-01-01

    The observed dominance of matter over antimatter in the Universe leads to the hypothesis of the Sakharov conditions for the laws of nature. One of them implies the breaking of the charge-parity (CP) symmetry. The violation of the CP symmetry has been observed in several decays of kaons and B mesons and is incorporated in the Standard Model via the CKM matrix, describing the quark transitions in the charged current weak interactions. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provides a copious source of bb quark pairs, offering an excellent facility to study CP violation in the B meson system. The LHC is a powerful pp collider, which will accelerate proton bunches in opposite directions in a ring of 27 km circumference. Protons will collide every 25 ns at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. It is foreseen to start operation in 2008. LHCb, one of the four experiments along the LHC ring, is dedicated to the study of CP violation and rare decays in the B meson system. Since bb pairs are mostly produced in a forward cone alo...

  8. Electromagnetic two-body problem: recurrent dynamics in the presence of state-dependent delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Luca, Jayme [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Caixa Postal 676, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo 13565-905 (Brazil); Guglielmi, Nicola [Dipartimento di Matematica Pura ed Applicata, Universita degli Studi di L' Aquila, I-67010, L' Aquila (Italy); Humphries, Tony [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada); Politi, Antonio, E-mail: deluca@df.ufscar.b [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, CNR Via Madonna del Piano 10-Sesto, Fiorentino I-50019 (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    We study the electromagnetic two-body problem of classical electrodynamics as a prototype dynamical system with state-dependent delays. The equations of motion are analysed with reference to motion along a straight line in the presence of an electrostatic field. We consider the general electromagnetic equations of motion for point charges with advanced and retarded interactions and study two limits, (a) retarded-only interactions (Dirac electrodynamics) and (b) half-retarded plus half-advanced interactions (Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics). A fixed point is created where the electrostatic field balances the Coulombian attraction, and we use local analysis near this fixed point to derive necessary conditions for a Hopf bifurcation. In case (a), we study a Hopf bifurcation about an unphysical fixed point and find that it is subcritical. In case (b), there is a Hopf bifurcation about a physical fixed point and we study several families of periodic orbits near this point. The bifurcating periodic orbits are illustrated and simulated numerically, by introducing a surrogate dynamical system into the numerical analysis which transforms future data into past data by exploiting the periodicity, thus obtaining systems with only delays.

  9. Electromagnetic two-body problem: recurrent dynamics in the presence of state-dependent delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Jayme; Guglielmi, Nicola; Humphries, Tony; Politi, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    We study the electromagnetic two-body problem of classical electrodynamics as a prototype dynamical system with state-dependent delays. The equations of motion are analysed with reference to motion along a straight line in the presence of an electrostatic field. We consider the general electromagnetic equations of motion for point charges with advanced and retarded interactions and study two limits, (a) retarded-only interactions (Dirac electrodynamics) and (b) half-retarded plus half-advanced interactions (Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics). A fixed point is created where the electrostatic field balances the Coulombian attraction, and we use local analysis near this fixed point to derive necessary conditions for a Hopf bifurcation. In case (a), we study a Hopf bifurcation about an unphysical fixed point and find that it is subcritical. In case (b), there is a Hopf bifurcation about a physical fixed point and we study several families of periodic orbits near this point. The bifurcating periodic orbits are illustrated and simulated numerically, by introducing a surrogate dynamical system into the numerical analysis which transforms future data into past data by exploiting the periodicity, thus obtaining systems with only delays.

  10. Standardization of a Volumetric Displacement Measurement for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, K. W. Jr.; Kobrick, R. L.; Klaus, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A limitation has been identified in the existing test standards used for making controlled, two-body abrasion scratch measurements based solely on the width of the resultant score on the surface of the material. A new, more robust method is proposed for analyzing a surface scratch that takes into account the full three-dimensional profile of the displaced material. To accomplish this, a set of four volume- displacement metrics was systematically defined by normalizing the overall surface profile to denote statistically the area of relevance, termed the Zone of Interaction. From this baseline, depth of the trough and height of the plowed material are factored into the overall deformation assessment. Proof-of-concept data were collected and analyzed to demonstrate the performance of this proposed methodology. This technique takes advantage of advanced imaging capabilities that allow resolution of the scratched surface to be quantified in greater detail than was previously achievable. When reviewing existing data analysis techniques for conducting two-body abrasive scratch tests, it was found that the ASTM International Standard G 171 specified a generic metric based only on visually determined scratch width as a way to compare abraded materials. A limitation to this method was identified in that the scratch width is based on optical surface measurements, manually defined by approximating the boundaries, but does not consider the three-dimensional volume of material that was displaced. With large, potentially irregular deformations occurring on softer materials, it becomes unclear where to systematically determine the scratch width. Specifically, surface scratches on different samples may look the same from a top view, resulting in an identical scratch width measurement, but may vary in actual penetration depth and/or plowing deformation. Therefore, two different scratch profiles would be measured as having identical abrasion properties, although they differ

  11. Does interactivity require multimedia? The case of SAKI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Horwood

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available SAKI is a self-adaptive touch-typing tutor with a pedigree dating back to the mid-1950s. Even in its most recent form it eschews the temptation to present itself with the trimmings now commonly associated with microcomputer products. This paper argues that while the absence of such features may be a limiting factor in the commercial success of the program, SAKI is nevertheless a prime example of the way in which a computer can successfully react to and interact with a user, and indeed one which would actually lose educational value if it were to undergo an interface-lift. It should be noted that Eurotech is the official distributor of SAKI

  12. Smallness of tree-dominated charmless two-body baryonic B decay rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Chua, Chun-Khiang

    2015-02-01

    The long-awaited baryonic B decay B¯0→p p ¯ was recently observed by LHCb with a branching fraction of order 1 0-8. All the earlier model predictions are too large compared with experiment. In this work, we point out that for a given tree operator Oi, the contribution from its Fiertz transformed operator, an effect often missed in the literature, tends to cancel the internal W -emission amplitude induced from Oi. The wave function of low-lying baryons is symmetric in momenta and the quark flavor with the same chirality but antisymmetric in color indices. Using these symmetry properties and the chiral structure of weak interactions, we find that half of the Feynman diagrams responsible for internal W emission cancel. Since this feature holds in the charmless modes but not in the charmful ones, we advocate that the partial cancellation accounts for the smallness of the tree-dominated charmless two-body baryonic B decays. This also explains why most previous model calculations predicted too large rates as the above consideration was not taken into account. Finally, we emphasize that, contrary to the claim in the literature, the internal W -emission tree amplitude should be proportional to the Wilson coefficient c1+c2 rather than c1-c2.

  13. On the smallness of Tree-dominated Charmless Two-body Baryonic $B$ Decay Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Hai-Yang

    2014-01-01

    The long awaited baryonic $B$ decay $\\bar B{}^0\\to p\\bar p$ was recently observed by LHCb with a branching fraction of order $10^{-8}$. All the earlier model predictions are too large compared with experiment. In this work, we point out that for a given tree operator $O_i$, the contribution from its Fiertz transformed operator, an effect often missed in the literature, tends to cancel the internal $W$-emission amplitude induced from $O_i$. The wave function of low-lying baryons are symmetric in momenta and the quark flavor with the same chirality, but antisymmetric in color indices. Using these symmetry properties and the chiral structure of weak interactions, we find that half of the Feynman diagrams responsible for internal $W$-emission cancel. Since this feature holds in the charmless modes but not in the charmful ones, we advocate that the partial cancellation accounts for the smallness of the tree-dominated charmless two-body baryonic $B$ decays. This also explains why most previous model calculations pr...

  14. Spin-dependent two-body interactions from gravitational self-force computations

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato; Geralico, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We analytically compute, through the eight-and-a-half post-Newtonian order and the fourth-order in spin, the gravitational self-force correction to Detweiler's gauge invariant redshift function for a small mass in circular orbit around a Kerr black hole. Using the first law of mechanics for black hole binaries with spin [L.~Blanchet, A.~Buonanno and A.~Le Tiec, Phys.\\ Rev.\\ D {\\bf 87}, 024030 (2013)] we transcribe our results into a knowledge of various spin-dependent couplings, as encoded within the spinning effective-one-body model of T.~Damour and A.~Nagar [Phys.\\ Rev.\\ D {\\bf 90}, 044018 (2014)]. We also compare our analytical results to the (corrected) numerical self-force results of A.~G.~Shah, J.~L.~Friedman and T.~S.~Keidl [Phys.\\ Rev.\\ D {\\bf 86}, 084059 (2012)], from which we show how to directly extract physically relevant spin-dependent couplings.

  15. On The Dynamics and Design of a Two-body Wave Energy Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Changwei; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    A two-body wave energy converter oscillating in heave is studied in this paper. The energy is extracted through the relative motion between the floating and submerged bodies. A linearized model in the frequency domain is adopted to study the dynamics of such a two-body system with consideration of both the viscous damping and the hydrodynamic damping. The closed form solution of the maximum absorption power and corresponding power take-off parameters are obtained. The suboptimal and optimal designs for a two-body system are proposed based on the closed form solution. The physical insight of the optimal design is to have one of the damped natural frequencies of the two body system the same as, or as close as possible to, the excitation frequency. A case study is conducted to investigate the influence of the submerged body on the absorption power of a two-body system subjected to suboptimal and optimal design under regular and irregular wave excitations. It is found that the absorption power of the two-body system can be significantly higher than that of the single body system with the same floating buoy in both regular and irregular waves. In regular waves, it is found that the mass of the submerged body should be designed with an optimal value in order to achieve the maximum absorption power for the given floating buoy. The viscous damping on the submerged body should be as small as possible for a given mass in both regular and irregular waves.

  16. Detailed requirements document for the Interactive Financial Management System (IFMS), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    The detailed requirements for phase 1 (online fund control, subauthorization accounting, and accounts receivable functional capabilities) of the Interactive Financial Management System (IFMS) are described. This includes information on the following: systems requirements, performance requirements, test requirements, and production implementation. Most of the work is centered on systems requirements, and includes discussions on the following processes: resources authority, allotment, primary work authorization, reimbursable order acceptance, purchase request, obligation, cost accrual, cost distribution, disbursement, subauthorization performance, travel, accounts receivable, payroll, property, edit table maintenance, end-of-year, backup input. Other subjects covered include: external systems interfaces, general inquiries, general report requirements, communication requirements, and miscellaneous. Subjects covered under performance requirements include: response time, processing volumes, system reliability, and accuracy. Under test requirements come test data sources, general test approach, and acceptance criteria. Under production implementation come data base establishment, operational stages, and operational requirements.

  17. REAS: An Interactive Semi-Automated System for Software Requirements Elicitation Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Hamed Elazhary

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Faulty requirements specifications lead to developing a faulty software system. This may require repeating the whole software engineering cycle wasting time and money. This paper presents an interactive semi-automated system that is a compromise between two approaches. The first tries to avoid the introduction of imprecision while the software requirements are being written. The other attempts to detect and possibly correct many types of imprecision after the software requirements are written. This is achieved by imposing the use of a good writing style and by interactively emulating a conversation between the requirements engineer and the user. This helps free the requirements engineer from such a systematic task, helps in processing many ill-structured statements, and helps maintain consistency in the used terminology. Explanations produced by the system helps in detecting and correcting any missed imprecision. The proposed techniques are easy enough to be used by non-technical stakeholders in different domains

  18. Analysis of two-body nonleptonic B decays involving light mesons in the standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A.; Greub, C.

    1998-03-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of the exclusive nonleptonic decays of the B+/- and B0 mesons into two light mesons, some of which have been measured recently by the CLEO Collaboration. Our analysis is carried out in the context of an effective Hamiltonian based on the standard model (SM), using next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. We explicitly take into account the O(αs) penguin-loop diagrams of all four-Fermi operators and the O(αs) tree-level diagram of the chromomagnetic dipole operator, and give a prescription for including their effects in nonleptonic two-body decays. Using a factorization ansatz for the hadronic matrix elements, we show that existing data, in particular, the branching ratios B(B+/--->η'K+/-), B(B+/--->π+/-K0), B(B0(B0¯)-->π-/+K+/-), and B(B+/--->ωh+/-)(h+/-=π+/-,K+/-), can be accounted for in this approach. Thus, theoretical scenarios with a substantially enhanced Wilson coefficient of the chromomagnetic dipole operator (as compared to the SM) and/or those with a substantial color-singlet cc¯ component in the wave function of η' are not required by these data. We predict, among other decay rates, the branching ratios for the decays B0(B0¯)-->π+/-π-/+ and B+/--->π0π+/-, which are close to the present experimental limits. Implications of some of these measurements for the parameters of the CKM matrix are presented.

  19. Analytical treatment of the two-body problem with slowly varying mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahoma, W. A.; Abd El-Salam, F. A.; Ahmed, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    The present work is concerned with the two-body problem with varying mass in case of isotropic mass loss from both components of the binary systems. The law of mass variation used gives rise to a perturbed Keplerian problem depending on two small parameters. The problem is treated analytically in the Hamiltonian frame-work and the equations of motion are integrated using the Lie series developed and applied, separately by Delva (1984) and Hanslmeier (1984). A second order theory of the two bodies eject mass is constructed, returning the terms of the rate of change of mass up to second order in the small parameters of the problem.

  20. Analytical expressions for partial wave two-body Coulomb transition matrices at ground-state energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, V. F.

    2016-11-01

    Leaning upon the Fock method of the stereographic projection of the three-dimensional momentum space onto the four-dimensional unit sphere the possibility of the analytical solving of the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation for the partial wave two-body Coulomb transition matrix at the ground bound state energy has been studied. In this case new expressions for the partial p-, d- and f-wave two-body Coulomb transition matrices have been obtained in the simple analytical form. The developed approach can also be extended to determine analytically the partial wave Coulomb transition matrices at the energies of excited bound states.

  1. Analytical Treatment of the Two-Body Problem with Slowly Varying Mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W. A. Rahoma; F. A. Abd El-Salam; M. K. Ahmed

    2009-09-01

    The present work is concerned with the two-body problem with varying mass in case of isotropic mass loss from both components of the binary systems. The law of mass variation used gives rise to a perturbed Keplerian problem depending on two small parameters. The problem is treated analytically in the Hamiltonian frame-work and the equations of motion are integrated using the Lie series developed and applied, separately by Delva (1984) and Hanslmeier (1984). A second order theory of the two bodies eject mass is constructed, returning the terms of the rate of change of mass up to second order in the small parameters of the problem.

  2. Neutral weak-current two-body contributions in inclusive scattering from {sup 12}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovato, Alessandro [ANL; Gandolfi, Stefano [LANL; Carlson, Joseph [LANL; Pieper, S. C. [ANL; Schiavilla, Rocco [JLAB, ODU

    2014-05-01

    An {\\it ab initio} calculation of the sum rules of the neutral weak response functions in $^{12}$C is reported, based on a realistic Hamiltonian, including two- and three-nucleon potentials, and on realistic currents, consisting of one- and two-body terms. We find that the sum rules of the response functions associated with the longitudinal and transverse components of the (space-like) neutral current are largest and that a significant portion ($\\simeq 30$\\%) of the calculated strength is due to two-body terms. This fact may have implications for the MiniBooNE and other neutrino quasi-elastic scattering data on nuclei.

  3. Quasi-two-body decays $B\\to K\\rho\\to K\\pi\\pi$ in perturbative QCD approach

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wen-Fei

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the quasi-two-body decays $B\\to K\\rho\\to K\\pi\\pi$ in the perturbative QCD (PQCD) approach, in which final-state interactions between the pions in the resonant regions associated with the $P$-wave states $\\rho(770)$ and $\\rho^\\prime(1450)$ are factorized into two-pion distribution amplitudes. Adopting experimental inputs for the time-like pion form factors involved in two-pion distribution amplitudes, we calculate branching ratios and direct $CP$ asymmetries of the $B\\to K\\rho(770),K\\rho^\\prime(1450)\\to K\\pi\\pi$ modes. It is shown that agreement of theoretical results with data can be achieved, through which Gegenbauer moments of the $P$-wave two-pion distribution amplitudes are determined. The consistency between the three-body and two-body analyses of the $B\\to K\\rho(770)\\to K\\pi\\pi$ decays supports the PQCD factorization framework for exclusive hadronic $B$ meson decays.

  4. Realization of the Fredkin gate using a series of one- and two-body operators

    CERN Document Server

    Chau, H F; Chau, Hoi Fung; Wilczek, F

    1995-01-01

    The Fredkin 3-bit gate is universal for computational logic, and is reversible. Classically, it is impossible to do universal computation using reversible 2-bit gates only. Here we construct the Fredkin gate using a combination of two one-body and seven two-body reversible (quantum) operators.

  5. Two-body depolarized cils spectra of krypton and xenon at 295 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppi, M.; Moraldi, M.; Barocchi, F.; Magli, R.; Bafile, U.

    1981-10-01

    We have experimentally determined the two-body depolarized CILS spectra of krypton and xenon at room temperature between 2 and 120 cm-1. Comparison of the first three even experimental moments of the spectra with theoretical calculations shows, as in argon, the necessity of introducing a short-range negative contribution to the induced pair polarizability.

  6. 78 FR 54756 - Extension of Expiration Dates for Two Body System Listings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Part 404 RIN 0960-AH60 Extension of Expiration Dates for Two Body System Listings AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are extending the expiration dates of the... claims and continuing disability reviews. DATES: This final rule is effective on September 6, 2013....

  7. ASK1 physically interacts with COI1 and is required for male fertility in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴良英; 徐领会; 黄大昉; 李栒; 罗宽; 官春云

    2002-01-01

    Jasmonates are a new class of plant hormones that play important roles in plant development and plant defense. The COI1 gene was previously shown to be required for jasmonate- regulated plant fertility and defense. We demonstrated for the first time that COI1 interacts with the Arabidopsis SKP1-LIKE1 (ASK1) to form a complex that is required for jasmonate action in planta. Functional analysis by antisense strategy showed that ASK1 is involved in male fertility.

  8. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Abrasion of mechanical components and fabrics by soil on Earth is typically minimized by the effects of atmosphere and water. Potentially abrasive particles lose sharp and pointed geometrical features through erosion. In environments where such erosion does not exist, such as the vacuum of the Moon, particles retain sharp geometries associated with fracturing of their parent particles by micrometeorite impacts. The relationship between hardness of the abrasive and that of the material being abraded is well understood, such that the abrasive ability of a material can be estimated as a function of the ratio of the hardness of the two interacting materials. Knowing the abrasive nature of an environment (abrasive)/construction material is crucial to designing durable equipment for use in such surroundings. The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement; in some cases, considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for de tailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness par ameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Further - more, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized

  9. Consistent Energy-Based Atomistic/Continuum Coupling for Two-Body Potential: 1D and 2D Case

    CERN Document Server

    Shapeev, Alexander V

    2010-01-01

    This paper concerns the problem of consistent energy-based coupling of atomistic and continuum models of materials, limited to zero-temperature statics of simple crystalline materials. It has been widely recognized that the most practical coupled methods exhibit finite errors on the atomistic/continuum interface (which are often attributed to spurious forces called "ghost forces"). There are only few existing works that propose a coupling which is sufficiently accurate near the interface under certain limitations. In this paper a novel coupling that is free from "ghost forces" is proposed for a two-body interaction potential under the assumptions of either (i) one spatial dimension, or (ii) two spatial dimensions and piecewise affine finite elements for describing the continuum deformation. The computational efficiency of the proposed coupling is demonstrated with numerical experiments. The coupling strategy is based on judiciously defining the contributions of the atomistic bonds to the discrete and the cont...

  10. Direct interaction between two actin nucleators is required in Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Margot E

    2013-11-01

    Controlled actin assembly is crucial to a wide variety of cellular processes, including polarity establishment during early development. The recently discovered actin mesh, a structure that traverses the Drosophila oocyte during mid-oogenesis, is essential for proper establishment of the major body axes. Genetic experiments indicate that at least two proteins, Spire (Spir) and Cappuccino (Capu), are required to build this mesh. The spire and cappuccino genetic loci were first identified as maternal effect genes in Drosophila. Mutation in either locus results in the same phenotypes, including absence of the mesh, linking them functionally. Both proteins nucleate actin filaments. Spir and Capu also interact directly with each other in vitro, suggesting a novel synergistic mode of regulating actin. In order to understand how and why proteins with similar biochemical activity would be required in the same biological pathway, genetic experiments were designed to test whether a direct interaction between Spir and Capu is required during oogenesis. Indeed, data in this study indicate that Spir and Capu must interact directly with one another and then separate to function properly. Furthermore, these actin regulators are controlled by a combination of mechanisms, including interaction with one another, functional inhibition and regulation of their protein levels. Finally, this work demonstrates for the first time in a multicellular organism that the ability of a formin to assemble actin filaments is required for a specific structure.

  11. Direct interaction of the molecular scaffolds POSH and JIP is required for apoptotic activation of JNKs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukekov, Nickolay V; Xu, Zhiheng; Greene, Lloyd A

    2006-06-02

    A sequential pathway (the JNK pathway) that includes activation of Rac1/Cdc42, mixed lineage kinases, MAP kinase kinases 4 and 7, and JNKs plays a required role in many paradigms of apoptotic cell death. However, the means by which this pathway is assembled and directed toward apoptotic death has been unclear. Here, we report that propagation of the apoptotic JNK pathway requires the cooperative interaction of two molecular scaffolds, POSH and JIPs. POSH (plenty of SH3s) is a multidomain GTP-Rac1-interacting protein that binds and promotes activation of mixed lineage kinases. JIPs are reported to bind MAP kinase kinases 4/7 and JNKs. We find that POSH and JIPs directly associate with one another to form a multiprotein complex, PJAC (POSH-JIP apoptotic complex), that includes all of the known kinase components of the pathway. Our observations indicate that this complex is required for JNK activation and cell death in response to apoptotic stimuli.

  12. The two-body problem of a pseudo-rigid body and a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Vereshchagin, M.; Gózdziewski, K.;

    2012-01-01

    n this paper we consider the two-body problem of a spherical pseudo-rigid body and a rigid sphere. Due to the rotational and "re-labelling" symmetries, the system is shown to possess conservation of angular momentum and circulation. We follow a reduction procedure similar to that undertaken...... in the study of the two-body problem of a rigid body and a sphere so that the computed reduced non-canonical Hamiltonian takes a similar form. We then consider relative equilibria and show that the notions of locally central and planar equilibria coincide. Finally, we show that Riemann's theorem on pseudo......-rigid bodies has an extension to this system for planar relative equilibria....

  13. CP Violating Polarization Asymmetry in Charmless Two-Body Decays of Beauty Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    He, Min; Li, Guan-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Several baryons containing a heavy b-quark, the b-baryons, have been discovered. The charmless two-body decays of b-baryons can provide a new platform for CP violating studies in a similar way as charmless two-body decays of B-meson. In b-baryon decays there are new CP violating observable related to baryon polarization. We show that in the flavor $SU(3)$ limit there exist relations involve different combinations of the decay amplitudes compared with those in CP violating rate asymmetry. These new relations therefore provide interesting tests for the mechanism of CP in the standard model (SM) and flavor $SU(3)$ symmetry. Future data from LHCb can test these relations.

  14. Large-j Expansion Method for Two-Body Dirac Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askold Duviryak

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available By using symmetry properties, the two-body Dirac equation in coordinate representation is reduced to the coupled pair of radial second-order differential equations. Then the large-j expansion technique is used to solve a bound state problem. Linear-plus-Coulomb potentials of different spin structure are examined in order to describe the asymptotic degeneracy and fine splitting of light meson spectra.

  15. Two bodies gravitational system with variable mass and damping-antidamping effect due to star wind

    CERN Document Server

    López, G V

    2009-01-01

    We study two-bodies gravitational problem where the mass of one of the bodies varies and suffers a damping-antidamping effect due to star wind during its motion. A constant of motion, a Lagrangian and a Hamiltonian are given for the radial motion of the system, and the period of the body is studied using the constant of motion of the system. An application to the comet motion is given, using the comet Halley as an example.

  16. Kinematics of τ two-body decay near τ threshold at BESⅢ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫晓虎

    2010-01-01

    The kinematic properties of two-body decay near τ threshold are studied according to the special capacity of the BEPC accelerator and the BESⅢ detector.Explicitly presented are the transformations of energy and momentum of hadronic particles between different reference frames,and the corresponding distributions.A brand new method is proposed to obtain the energy spread of the accelerator by fitting the energy distribution of hadron from τ semi-leptonic decays.

  17. Identification of HIV-1 Vif regions required for CBF-β interaction and APOBEC3 suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Liu, Bin; Liu, Xin; Li, Zhaolong; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Wenyan

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vif requires core binding factor β (CBF-β) to degrade the host APOBEC3 restriction factors. Although a minimum domain and certain amino acids of HIV-1 Vif, including hydrophobic residues at the N-terminal, have been identified as critical sites for binding with CBF-β, other regions that potentially mediate this interaction need to be further investigated. Here, we mapped two new regions of HIV-1 Vif that are required for interaction with CBF-β by generating a series of single-site or multiple-site Vif mutants and testing their effect on the suppression of APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F). A number of the mutants, including G84A/SIEW86-89AAAA (84/86-89), E88A/W89A (88/89), G84A, W89A, L106S and I107S in the 84GxSIEW89 and L102ADQLI107 regions, affected Vif function by disrupting CBF-β binding. These Vif mutants also had altered interactions with CUL5, since CBF-β is known to facilitate the binding of Vif to CUL5. We further showed that this effect was not due to misfolding or conformational changes in Vif, as the mutants still maintained their interactions with other factors such as ElonginB, A3G and A3F. Notably, G84D and D104A had stronger effects on the Vif-CUL5 interaction than on the Vif-CBF-β interaction, indicating that they mainly influenced the CUL5 interaction and implying that the interaction of Vif with CUL5 contributes to the binding of Vif to CBF-β. These new binding interfaces with CBF-β in HIV-1 Vif provide novel targets for the development of HIV-1 inhibitors.

  18. The post-Keplerian orbital representations of the relativistic two-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klioner, S. A.; Kopeikin, S. M.

    1994-06-01

    Orbital parameterizations of the relativstic two-body problem due to Brumberg, Damour-Deruelle, Epstein-Haugan, and Blandford-Teukolsky as well as osculating elements are compared. Exact relations between constants describing the orbit in the parameterizations are derived. It is shown that all the parameterizations in question are valid not only in general relativity, but in a generic class of relatvistic theories of gravity. The obtained results provide us with an additional check of consistency of different models used in timing of binary pulsars.

  19. Probing SUSY CP Violation in Two-Body Stop Decays at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deppisch, Frank

    2009-01-01

    We study CP asymmetries in two-body decays of top squarks into neutralinos and sleptons at the LHC. These asymmetries are used to probe the CP phases possibly present in the stop and neutralino sector of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Taking into account bounds from experimental electric dipole moment searches, we identify areas in the mSUGRA parameter space where CP asymmetries can be sizeable and discuss the feasibility of their observation at the LHC. As a result, potentially detectable CP asymmetries in stop decays at the LHC are found, motivating further detailed experimental studies for probing SUSY CP phases.

  20. Probing SUSY CP violation in two-body stop decays at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppisch, Frank F.; Kittel, Olaf

    2009-09-01

    We study CP asymmetries in two-body decays of top squarks into neutralinos and sleptons at the LHC. These asymmetries are used to probe the CP phases possibly present in the stop and neutralino sector of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Taking into account bounds from experimental electric dipole moment searches, we identify areas in the mSUGRA parameter space where CP asymmetries can be sizeable and discuss the feasibility of their observation at the LHC. As a result, potentially detectable CP asymmetries in stop decays at the LHC are found, motivating further detailed experimental studies for probing SUSY CP phases.

  1. Intracellular disassembly and activity of pertussis toxin require interaction with ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, Roger D; Scanlon, Karen M; Taylor, Michael; Teter, Ken; Carbonetti, Nicholas H

    2016-08-01

    The active subunit (S1) of pertussis toxin (PT), a major virulence factor of Bordetella pertussis, ADP-ribosylates Gi proteins in the mammalian cell cytosol to inhibit GPCR signaling. The intracellular pathway of PT includes endocytosis and retrograde transport to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Subsequent translocation of S1 to the cytosol is presumably preceded by dissociation from the holotoxin. In vitro, such dissociation is stimulated by interaction of PT with ATP. To investigate the role of this interaction in cellular events, we engineered a form of PT (PTDM) with changes to two amino acids involved in the interaction with ATP. PTDM was reduced in (1) binding to ATP, (2) dissociability by interaction with ATP, (3) in vitro enzymatic activity and (4) cellular ADP-ribosylation activity. In cells treated with PTDM carrying target sequences for organelle-specific modifications, normal transport to the TGN and ER occurred, but N-glycosylation patterns of the S1 and S4 subunits were consistent with an inability of PTDM to dissociate in the ER. These results indicate a requirement for interaction with ATP for PT dissociation in the ER and cellular activity. They also indicate that the retrograde transport route is the cellular intoxication pathway for PT.

  2. The XMAP215-family protein DdCP224 is required for cortical interactions of microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hestermann Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions of peripheral microtubule tips with the cell cortex are of crucial importance for nuclear migration, spindle orientation, centrosome positioning and directional cell movement. Microtubule plus end binding proteins are thought to mediate interactions of microtubule tips with cortical actin and membrane proteins in a dynein-dependent manner. XMAP215-family proteins are main regulators of microtubule plus end dynamics but so far they have not been implicated in the interactions of microtubule tips with the cell cortex. Results Here we show that overexpression of an N-terminal fragment of DdCP224, the Dictyostelium XMAP215 homologue, caused a collapse of the radial microtubule cytoskeleton, whereby microtubules lost contact with the cell cortex and were dragged behind like a comet tail of an unusually motile centrosome. This phenotype was indistinguishable from mutants overexpressing fragments of the dynein heavy chain or intermediate chain. Moreover, it was accompanied by dispersal of the Golgi apparatus and reduced cortical localization of the dynein heavy chain indicating a disrupted dynein/dynactin interaction. The interference of DdCP224 with cortical dynein function is strongly supported by the observations that DdCP224 and its N-terminal fragment colocalize with dynein and coimmunoprecipitate with dynein and dynactin. Conclusions Our data show that XMAP215-like proteins are required for the interaction of microtubule plus ends with the cell cortex in interphase cells and strongly suggest that this function is mediated by dynein.

  3. Neutron-deuteron scattering calculations with W-matrix representation of the two-body input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartnik, E.A.; Haberzettl, H.; Januschke, T.; Kerwath, U.; Sandhas, W.

    1987-11-01

    Employing the W-matrix representation of the partial-wave T matrix introduced by Bartnik, Haberzettl, and Sandhas, we show for the example of the Malfliet-Tjon potentials I and III that the single-term separable part of the W-matrix representation, when used as input in three-nucleon neutron-deuteron scattering calculations, is fully capable of reproducing the exact results obtained by Kloet and Tjon. This approximate two-body input not only satisfies the two-body off-shell unitarity relation but, moreover, it also contains a parameter which may be used in optimizing the three-body data. We present numerical evidence that there exists a variational (minimum) principle for the determination of the three-body binding energy which allows one to choose this parameter also in the absence of an exact reference calculation. Our results for neutron-deuteron scattering show that it is precisely this choice of the parameter which provides optimal scattering data. We conclude that the W-matrix approach, despite its simplicity, is a remarkably efficient tool for high-quality three-nucleon calculations.

  4. Neutron-deuteron scattering calculations with W-matrix representation of the two-body input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartnik, E.A.; Haberzettl, H.; Januschke, T.; Kerwath, U.; Sandhas, W.

    1987-05-01

    Employing the W-matrix representation of the partial-wave T matrix introduced by Bartnik, Haberzettl, and Sandhas, we show for the example of the Malfliet-Tjon potentials I and III that the single-term separable part of the W-matrix representation, when used as input in three-nucleon neutron-deuteron scattering calculations, is fully capable of reproducing the exact results obtained by Kloet and Tjon. This approximate two-body input not only satisfies the two-body off-shell unitarity relation but, moreover, it also contains a parameter which may be used in optimizing the three-body data. We present numerical evidence that there exists a variational (minimum) principle for the determination of the three-body binding energy which allows one to choose this parameter also in the absence of an exact reference calculation. Our results for neutron-deuteron scattering show that it is precisely this choice of the parameter which provides optimal scattering data. We conclude that the W-matrix approach, despite its simplicity, is a remarkably efficient tool for high-quality three-nucleon calculations.

  5. Improving the Volume Dependence of Two-Body Binding Energies Calculated with Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Davoudi, Zohreh

    2011-01-01

    Volume modifications to the binding of two-body systems in large cubic volumes of extent L depend upon the total momentum and exponentially upon the ratio of L to the size of the boosted system. Recent work by Bour et al determined the momentum dependence of the leading volume modifications to nonrelativistic systems with periodic boundary conditions imposed on the single-particle wavefunctions, enabling them to numerically determine the scattering of such bound states using a low-energy effective field theory and Luschers finite-volume method. The calculation of bound nuclear systems directly from QCD using Lattice QCD has begun, and it is important to reduce the systematic uncertainty introduced into such calculations by the finite spatial extent of the gauge-field configurations. We extend the work of Bour et al from nonrelativistic quantum mechanics to quantum field theory by generalizing the work of Luscher and of Gottlieb and Rummukainen to boosted two-body bound states. The volume modifications to bind...

  6. Energy spectra of massive two-body decay products and mass measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Hong, Sungwoo; Kim, Doojin

    2016-01-01

    We have recently established a new method for measuring the mass of unstable particles produced at hadron colliders based on the analysis of the energy distribution of a massless product from their two-body decays. The central ingredient of our proposal is the remarkable result that, for an unpolarized decaying particle, the location of the peak in the energy distribution of the observed decay product is identical to the (fixed) value of the energy that this particle would have in the rest-frame of the decaying particle, which, in turn, is a simple function of the involved masses. In addition, we utilized the property that this energy distribution is symmetric around the location of peak when energy is plotted on a logarithmic scale. The general strategy was demonstrated in several specific cases, including both beyond the SM particles, as well as for the top quark. In the present work, we generalize this method to the case of a massive decay product from a two-body decay; this procedure is far from trivial b...

  7. FLS2-BAK1 extracellular domain interaction sites required for defense signaling activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Koller

    Full Text Available Signaling initiation by receptor-like kinases (RLKs at the plasma membrane of plant cells often requires regulatory leucine-rich repeat (LRR RLK proteins such as SERK or BIR proteins. The present work examined how the microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP receptor FLS2 builds signaling complexes with BAK1 (SERK3. We first, using in vivo methods that validate separate findings by others, demonstrated that flg22 (flagellin epitope ligand-initiated FLS2-BAK1 extracellular domain interactions can proceed independent of intracellular domain interactions. We then explored a candidate SERK protein interaction site in the extracellular domains (ectodomains; ECDs of the significantly different receptors FLS2, EFR (MAMP receptors, PEPR1 (damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP receptor, and BRI1 (hormone receptor. Repeat conservation mapping revealed a cluster of conserved solvent-exposed residues near the C-terminus of models of the folded LRR domains. However, site-directed mutagenesis of this conserved site in FLS2 did not impair FLS2-BAK1 ECD interactions, and mutations in the analogous site of EFR caused receptor maturation defects. Hence this conserved LRR C-terminal region apparently has functions other than mediating interactions with BAK1. In vivo tests of the subsequently published FLS2-flg22-BAK1 ECD co-crystal structure were then performed to functionally evaluate some of the unexpected configurations predicted by that crystal structure. In support of the crystal structure data, FLS2-BAK1 ECD interactions were no longer detected in in vivo co-immunoprecipitation experiments after site-directed mutagenesis of the FLS2 BAK1-interaction residues S554, Q530, Q627 or N674. In contrast, in vivo FLS2-mediated signaling persisted and was only minimally reduced, suggesting residual FLS2-BAK1 interaction and the limited sensitivity of co-immunoprecipitation data relative to in vivo assays for signaling outputs. However, Arabidopsis plants

  8. BRCA1 interaction of centrosomal protein Nlp is required for successful mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shunqian; Gao, Hua; Mazzacurati, Lucia; Wang, Yang; Fan, Wenhong; Chen, Qiang; Yu, Wei; Wang, Mingrong; Zhu, Xueliang; Zhang, Chuanmao; Zhan, Qimin

    2009-08-21

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is implicated in the control of mitotic progression, although the underlying mechanism(s) remains to be further defined. Deficiency of BRCA1 function leads to disrupted mitotic machinery and genomic instability. Here, we show that BRCA1 physically interacts and colocalizes with Nlp, an important molecule involved in centrosome maturation and spindle formation. Interestingly, Nlp centrosomal localization and its protein stability are regulated by normal cellular BRCA1 function because cells containing BRCA1 mutations or silenced for endogenous BRCA1 exhibit disrupted Nlp colocalization to centrosomes and enhanced Nlp degradation. Its is likely that the BRCA1 regulation of Nlp stability involves Plk1 suppression. Inhibition of endogenous Nlp via the small interfering RNA approach results in aberrant spindle formation, aborted chromosomal segregation, and aneuploidy, which mimic the phenotypes of disrupted BRCA1. Thus, BRCA1 interaction of Nlp might be required for the successful mitotic progression, and abnormalities of Nlp lead to genomic instability.

  9. EphB–ephrin-B2 interactions are required for thymus migration during organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Katie E.; Gordon, Julie; Cardenas, Kim; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Makinen, Taija; Grigorieva, Elena; Wilkinson, David G.; Blackburn, C. Clare; Richie, Ellen; Manley, Nancy R.; Adams, Ralf H.; Kioussis, Dimitris; Coles, Mark C.

    2010-01-01

    Thymus organogenesis requires coordinated interactions of multiple cell types, including neural crest (NC) cells, to orchestrate the formation, separation, and subsequent migration of the developing thymus from the third pharyngeal pouch to the thoracic cavity. The molecular mechanisms driving these processes are unclear; however, NC-derived mesenchyme has been shown to play an important role. Here, we show that, in the absence of ephrin-B2 expression on thymic NC-derived mesenchyme, the thymus remains in the cervical area instead of migrating into the thoracic cavity. Analysis of individual NC-derived thymic mesenchymal cells shows that, in the absence of ephrin-B2, their motility is impaired as a result of defective EphB receptor signaling. This implies a NC-derived cell-specific role of EphB–ephrin-B2 interactions in the collective migration of the thymic rudiment during organogenesis. PMID:20616004

  10. Sample size requirements for indirect association studies of gene-environment interactions (G x E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Rebecca; Beckmann, Lars; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2008-04-01

    Association studies accounting for gene-environment interactions (G x E) may be useful for detecting genetic effects. Although current technology enables very dense marker spacing in genetic association studies, the true disease variants may not be genotyped. Thus, causal genes are searched for by indirect association using genetic markers in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the true disease variants. Sample sizes needed to detect G x E effects in indirect case-control association studies depend on the true genetic main effects, disease allele frequencies, whether marker and disease allele frequencies match, LD between loci, main effects and prevalence of environmental exposures, and the magnitude of interactions. We explored variables influencing sample sizes needed to detect G x E, compared these sample sizes with those required to detect genetic marginal effects, and provide an algorithm for power and sample size estimations. Required sample sizes may be heavily inflated if LD between marker and disease loci decreases. More than 10,000 case-control pairs may be required to detect G x E. However, given weak true genetic main effects, moderate prevalence of environmental exposures, as well as strong interactions, G x E effects may be detected with smaller sample sizes than those needed for the detection of genetic marginal effects. Moreover, in this scenario, rare disease variants may only be detectable when G x E is included in the analyses. Thus, the analysis of G x E appears to be an attractive option for the detection of weak genetic main effects of rare variants that may not be detectable in the analysis of genetic marginal effects only.

  11. One-body and Two-body Fractional Parentage Coefficients for Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Cheng-guang

    2006-01-01

    A very effective tool,namely,the analytical expression of the fractional parentage coefficients (FPC),is introduced in this paper to deal with the total spin states of N-body spinor bosonic systems,where N is supposed to be large and the spin of each boson is one.In particular,the analytical forms of the one-body and two-body FPC for the total spin states with {N} and {N-1,1} permutation symmetries have been derived.These coefficients facilitate greatly the calculation of related matrix elements,and they can be used even in the case of N →∞.Theyappear as a powerful tool for the establishment of an improved theory of spinor Bose-Einstein condensation,where the eigenstates have the total spin S and its Z-component being both conserved.

  12. Charmless Hadronic Two-body Decays of $B_{u}$ and $B_{d}$ Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y H; Tseng, B; Yang, K C; Chen, Yaw-Hwang; Cheng, Hai-Yang; Yang, Kwei-Chou

    1999-01-01

    Two-body charmless nonleptonic decays of B_u and B_d mesons are studied within the framework of generalized factorization in which the effective Wilson coefficients $c^{eff}_i$ are renormalization-scale and -scheme independent while factorization is applied to the tree-level hadronic matrix elements. Contrary to previous studies, our $c_i^{eff}$ do not suffer from gauge and infrared problems. Nonfactorizable effects are parametrized in terms of N_c(LL) and N_c(LR), the effective numbers of colors arising from (V-A)(V-A) and (V-A)(V+A) four-quark operators, respectively. Tree and penguin transitions are classified into six different classes. The data of $B^-\\to\\rho^0\\pi^-$ and $B^-\\to\\phi K^-$ clearly indicate that $N_c(LR)\

  13. Parametric Study of Two-Body Floating-Point Wave Absorber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atena Amiri; Roozbeh Panahi; Soheil Radfar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive numerical simulation of a point wave absorber in deep water. Analyses are performed in both the frequency and time domains. The converter is a two-body floating-point absorber (FPA) with one degree of freedom in the heave direction. Its two parts are connected by a linear mass-spring-damper system. The commercial ANSYS-AQWA software used in this study performs well in considering validations. The velocity potential is obtained by assuming incompressible and irrotational flow. As such, we investigated the effects of wave characteristics on energy conversion and device efficiency, including wave height and wave period, as well as the device diameter, draft, geometry, and damping coefficient. To validate the model, we compared our numerical results with those from similar experiments. Our study results can clearly help to maximize the converter’s efficiency when considering specific conditions.

  14. Entropy theorems in classical mechanics, general relativity, and the gravitational two-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltean, Marius; Bonetti, Luca; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2016-09-01

    In classical Hamiltonian theories, entropy may be understood either as a statistical property of canonical systems or as a mechanical property, that is, as a monotonic function of the phase space along trajectories. In classical mechanics, there are theorems which have been proposed for proving the nonexistence of entropy in the latter sense. We explicate, clarify, and extend the proofs of these theorems to some standard matter (scalar and electromagnetic) field theories in curved spacetime, and then we show why these proofs fail in general relativity; due to properties of the gravitational Hamiltonian and phase space measures, the second law of thermodynamics holds. As a concrete application, we focus on the consequences of these results for the gravitational two-body problem, and in particular, we prove the noncompactness of the phase space of perturbed Schwarzschild-Droste spacetimes. We thus identify the lack of recurring orbits in phase space as a distinct sign of dissipation and hence entropy production.

  15. Branching ratios for pbarp annihilation at rest into two-body final states

    CERN Document Server

    Abele, A; Amsler, Claude; Baker, C A; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Bischoff, S; Blüm, P; Braune, K; Bugg, D V; Case, T; Crowe, K M; Degener, T; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Giarritta, P; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Heinzelmann, M; Herbstrith, A; Herz, M; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Hodd, C; Holtzhaussen, C; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Lakata, M; Landua, Rolf; Matthäy, H; McCrady, R; Meier, J; Meyer, C A; Montanet, Lucien; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Röthel, W; Spanier, S; Stöck, H; Strassburger, C; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Tischhäuser, M; Uman, I; Völcker, C; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K; Zou, B S

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of two-body branching ratios for pbarp annihilations at rest in liquid and gaseous (12 rho sub S sub T sub P) hydrogen are reported. Channels studied are pbarp-> pi sup 0 pi sup 0 ,pi sup 0 eta, K sup 0 sub S K sup 0 sub L , K sup + K sup -. The branching ratio for the pi sup 0 pi sup 0 channel in liquid H sub 2 is measured to be (6.14+-0.40)x10 sup - sup 4. The results are compared with those from other experiments. The fraction of P-state annihilation for a range of target densities from 0.002 rho sub S sub T sub P to liquid H sub 2 is determined. Values obtained include 0.11+-0.02 in liquid H sub 2 and 0.48+-0.04 in 12 rho sub S sub T sub P H sub 2 gas.

  16. a Study of the Charged Two-Body Decays of the Neutral D Mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kuang-Chung (K. C.).

    1995-01-01

    The charged two-body decays of D^0 mesons produced by 500 GeV/c pi -incident on platium and carbon foil targets at the Fermilab Tagged Particle Laboratory have been analyzed. Three measurements are presented in this thesis: (1) Branching Ratios of Charged Two-body Decays: {Gamma(D^0to K^+K^-)overGamma(D^0to K^-pi^+)}= 0.107+/-0.003 +/-0.003, {Gamma(D^0to pi^+pi^-)over Gamma(D ^0to K^-pi^+)} =0.040 +/-0.002+/-0.002, {Gamma(D^0 to K^+K^-)overGamma(D^0 topi^+pi^-)}=2.65+/-0.14 +/-0.13, and {Gamma(D^0 to K^-pi^-pi^+pi ^+)overGamma(D^0to K^ -pi^+)} =2.19+/-.0.3+/-.0.08; (2) Lifetime Difference: tau_ {KK}=0.414+/-0.012+/-0.014, tau _{Kpi}=0.409+/-0.003+/-0.004, with Deltagamma= {-}0.06 +/-0.15+/-0.15, or the upper limit of Mixing rate as {cal R}_sp {rm mix}{it y}<0.00079 (due to lifetime difference only) at mix 90% confidence level; and (3) CP Asymmetry Parameters: A_sp{CP}{BR}(K^+/- K^mp) = {-}0.018+/-0.054+/-0.012, A_sp{CP}{BR}( pi^+/-pi^mp) = { -}0.053+/-0.093+/-0.029, and A _sp{CP}{BR}(K3pi) - {-}0.018+/-0.023+/-0.002.. All measurements are consistent with most theoretical predictions and world average experimental values.

  17. Two-body wear of dental porcelain and substructure oxide ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentritt, Martin; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Hahnel, Sebastian; Handel, Gerhard; Kolbeck, Carola

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the two-body wear of different ceramics. Two-body wear tests were performed in a chewing simulator with steatite and enamel antagonists, respectively. Specimens were loaded in a pin-on-block design with a vertical load of 50 N for 1.2 × 10(5) cycles; (f = 1.6 Hz; lateral movement, 1 mm; mouth opening: 2 mm). Human enamel was used as a reference. Three zirconia ceramics, three veneering porcelains, two glass-infiltrated and one lithium disilicate ceramic were investigated. Veneering and lithium disilicate ceramics were glazed before testing. Surface roughness Ra (SP6, Perthen-Feinprüf, G) and wear depth were determined using a 3D scanner (Laserscan 3D, Willytec, G). SEM (Quanta FEG 400, FEI, USA) pictures of the worn specimens and antagonists were made for evaluating wear performance. Veneering porcelain provided wear traces between 71.2 and 124.1 μm (enamel antagonist) and 117.4 and 274.1 μm (steatite). Wear of the steatite antagonists varied between 0.618 and 2.85 mm². No wear was found for zirconia and glass-infiltrated substructure ceramics. Also, no wear was found for the corresponding antagonists. Wear of specimens and antagonists was strongly material dependent. No visible wear was found on zirconia and glass-infiltrated ceramics. Porcelain and lithium disilicate ceramic showed a comparable or lower wear than the enamel reference. Antagonist wear was found to be lower when specimens were made of substructure oxide ceramics instead of veneering porcelain. From the point of wear testing, zirconia may be used for the fabrication of fixed dental prosthesis without veneering.

  18. Implications of two-body fragment decay for the interpretation of emission chronology from velocity-gated correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Helgesson, J; Ekman, J; Helgesson, Johan; Ghetti, Roberta; Jorgen Ekman

    2006-01-01

    From velocity-gated small-angle correlation functions the emission chronology can be deduced for non-identical particles, if the emission is independent. This is not the case for non-identical particles that originate from two-body decay of fragments. Experimental results may contain contributions from both independent emission and two-body decay, so care is needed in interpreting the velocity-gated correlation functions. It is shown that in some special cases, it is still possible to deduce the emission chronology, even if there is a contribution from two-body decay.

  19. Calicivirus translation initiation requires an interaction between VPg and eIF4E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Ian; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Gioldasi, Ioanna; Gerondopoulos, Andreas; Natoni, Alessandro; Labrie, Louisette; Laliberté, Jean-François; Roberts, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Unlike other positive-stranded RNA viruses that use either a 5′-cap structure or an internal ribosome entry site to direct translation of their messenger RNA, calicivirus translation is dependent on the presence of a protein covalently linked to the 5′ end of the viral genome (VPg). We have shown a direct interaction of the calicivirus VPg with the cap-binding protein eIF4E. This interaction is required for calicivirus mRNA translation, as sequestration of eIF4E by 4E-BP1 inhibits translation. Functional analysis has shown that VPg does not interfere with the interaction between eIF4E and the cap structure or 4E-BP1, suggesting that VPg binds to eIF4E at a different site from both cap and 4E-BP1. This work lends support to the idea that calicivirus VPg acts as a novel ‘cap substitute' during initiation of translation on virus mRNA. PMID:16142217

  20. AKTIP/Ft1, a New Shelterin-Interacting Factor Required for Telomere Maintenance.

    KAUST Repository

    Burla, Romina

    2015-06-25

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect the ends of linear chromosomes from incomplete replication, degradation and detection as DNA breaks. Mammalian telomeres are protected by shelterin, a multiprotein complex that binds the TTAGGG telomeric repeats and recruits a series of additional factors that are essential for telomere function. Although many shelterin-associated proteins have been so far identified, the inventory of shelterin-interacting factors required for telomere maintenance is still largely incomplete. Here, we characterize AKTIP/Ft1 (human AKTIP and mouse Ft1 are orthologous), a novel mammalian shelterin-bound factor identified on the basis of its homology with the Drosophila telomere protein Pendolino. AKTIP/Ft1 shares homology with the E2 variant ubiquitin-conjugating (UEV) enzymes and has been previously implicated in the control of apoptosis and in vesicle trafficking. RNAi-mediated depletion of AKTIP results in formation of telomere dysfunction foci (TIFs). Consistent with these results, AKTIP interacts with telomeric DNA and binds the shelterin components TRF1 and TRF2 both in vivo and in vitro. Analysis of AKTIP- depleted human primary fibroblasts showed that they are defective in PCNA recruiting and arrest in the S phase due to the activation of the intra S checkpoint. Accordingly, AKTIP physically interacts with PCNA and the RPA70 DNA replication factor. Ft1-depleted p53-/- MEFs did not arrest in the S phase but displayed significant increases in multiple telomeric signals (MTS) and sister telomere associations (STAs), two hallmarks of defective telomere replication. In addition, we found an epistatic relation for MST formation between Ft1 and TRF1, which has been previously shown to be required for replication fork progression through telomeric DNA. Ch-IP experiments further suggested that in AKTIP-depleted cells undergoing the S phase, TRF1 is less tightly bound to telomeric DNA than in controls. Thus, our results collectively

  1. Tissue interaction is required for glenoid fossa development during temporomandibular joint formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Chao; Rohr, Joseph; Liu, Hongbing; He, Fenglei; Yu, Jian; Sun, Cheng; Li, Lu; Gu, Shuping; Chen, YiPing

    2011-11-01

    The mammalian temporomandibular joint (TMJ) develops from two distinct mesenchymal condensations that grow toward each other and ossify through different mechanisms, with the glenoid fossa undergoing intramembranous ossification while the condyle being endochondral in origin. In this study, we used various genetically modified mouse models to investigate tissue interaction between the condyle and glenoid fossa during TMJ formation in mice. We report that either absence or dislocation of the condyle results in an arrested glenoid fossa development. In both cases, glenoid fossa development was initiated, but failed to sustain, and became regressed subsequently. However, condyle development appears to be independent upon the presence of the forming glenoid fossa. In addition, we show that substitution of condyle by Meckel's cartilage is able to sustain glenoid fossa development. These observations suggest that proper signals from the developing condyle or Meckel's cartilage are required to sustain the glenoid fossa development.

  2. Lineage Specification of Ovarian Theca Cells Requires Multi-Cellular Interactions via Oocyte and Granulosa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Peng, Jia; Matzuk, Martin M.; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2015-01-01

    Organogenesis of the ovary is a highly orchestrated process involving multiple lineage determinations of ovarian surface epithelium, granulosa cells, and theca cells. While the sources of ovarian surface epithelium and granulosa cells are known, the origin(s) of theca progenitor cells have not been definitively identified. Here we show that theca cells derive from two sources: Wt1+ cells indigenous to the ovary and Gli1+ mesenchymal cells migrated from the mesonephros. These progenitors acquire theca lineage marker Gli1 in response to paracrine signals Desert hedgehog (Dhh) and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) from granulosa cells. Ovaries lacking Dhh/Ihh exhibit theca layer loss, blunted steroid production, arrested folliculogenesis, and failure to form corpora lutea. Production of Dhh/Ihh in granulosa cells requires Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) from the oocyte. Our studies provide the first genetic evidence for the origins of theca cells and reveal a multicellular interaction critical for the formation of a functional theca. PMID:25917826

  3. Self-organized criticality in glassy spin systems requires long-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Juan Carlos; Andrist, Ruben S.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir; Zimanyi, Gergerly T.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the conditions required for general spin systems with frustration and disorder to display self-organized criticality, a property which so far has been established in spin models only for the infinite-range Sherringtion-Kirkpatrick Ising spin-glass model [PRL 83, 1034 (1999)]. We study the avalanche and the magnetization jump distribution triggered by an external magnetic field in the short-range Edward-Anderson Ising spin glass for various space dimensions, between 2 and 8. Our numerical results, obtained on systems of unprecedented size, demonstrate that self-organized criticality is recovered only in the strict limit of infinite space dimensions (or equivalently of long-ranged interaction), and is not a generic property of spin-glass models in finite space dimensions.

  4. The interaction between the yeast telomerase RNA and the Est1 protein requires three structural elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Johnathan W; Tucey, Timothy M; Lundblad, Victoria

    2012-09-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the telomerase enzyme is composed of a 1.3-kb TLC1 RNA that forms a complex with Est2 (the catalytic subunit) and two regulatory proteins, Est1 and Est3. Previous work has identified a conserved 5-nt bulge, present in a long helical arm of TLC1, which mediates binding of Est1 to TLC1. However, increased expression of Est1 can bypass the consequences of removal of this RNA bulge, indicating that there are additional binding site(s) for Est1 on TLC1. We report here that a conserved single-stranded internal loop immediately adjacent to the bulge is also required for the Est1-RNA interaction; furthermore, a TLC1 variant that lacks this internal loop but retains the bulge cannot be suppressed by Est1 overexpression, arguing that the internal loop may be a more critical element for Est1 binding. An additional structural feature consisting of a single-stranded region at the base of the helix containing the bulge and internal loop also contributes to recognition of TLC1 by Est1, potentially by providing flexibility to this helical arm. Association of Est1 with each of these TLC1 motifs was assessed using a highly sensitive biochemical assay that simultaneously monitors the relative levels of the Est1 and Est2 proteins in the telomerase complex. The identification of three elements of TLC1 that are required for Est1 association provides a detailed view of this particular protein-RNA interaction.

  5. Fractal patterns of neural activity exist within the suprachiasmatic nucleus and require extrinsic network interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kun; Meijer, Johanna H; Shea, Steven A; vanderLeest, Henk Tjebbe; Pittman-Polletta, Benjamin; Houben, Thijs; van Oosterhout, Floor; Deboer, Tom; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian central circadian pacemaker (the suprachiasmatic nucleus, SCN) contains thousands of neurons that are coupled through a complex network of interactions. In addition to the established role of the SCN in generating rhythms of ~24 hours in many physiological functions, the SCN was recently shown to be necessary for normal self-similar/fractal organization of motor activity and heart rate over a wide range of time scales--from minutes to 24 hours. To test whether the neural network within the SCN is sufficient to generate such fractal patterns, we studied multi-unit neural activity of in vivo and in vitro SCNs in rodents. In vivo SCN-neural activity exhibited fractal patterns that are virtually identical in mice and rats and are similar to those in motor activity at time scales from minutes up to 10 hours. In addition, these patterns remained unchanged when the main afferent signal to the SCN, namely light, was removed. However, the fractal patterns of SCN-neural activity are not autonomous within the SCN as these patterns completely broke down in the isolated in vitro SCN despite persistence of circadian rhythmicity. Thus, SCN-neural activity is fractal in the intact organism and these fractal patterns require network interactions between the SCN and extra-SCN nodes. Such a fractal control network could underlie the fractal regulation observed in many physiological functions that involve the SCN, including motor control and heart rate regulation.

  6. Characterization of the TRBP domain required for Dicer interaction and function in RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Far Mohamed

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dicer, Ago2 and TRBP are the minimum components of the human RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC. While Dicer and Ago2 are RNases, TRBP is the double-stranded RNA binding protein (dsRBP that loads small interfering RNA into the RISC. TRBP binds directly to Dicer through its C-terminal domain. Results We show that the TRBP binding site in Dicer is a 165 amino acid (aa region located between the ATPase and the helicase domains. The binding site in TRBP is a 69 aa domain, called C4, located at the C-terminal end of TRBP. The TRBP1 and TRBP2 isoforms, but not TRBPs lacking the C4 site (TRBPsΔC4, co-immunoprecipitated with Dicer. The C4 domain is therefore necessary to bind Dicer, irrespective of the presence of RNA. Immunofluorescence shows that while full-length TRBPs colocalize with Dicer, TRBPsΔC4 do not. tarbp2-/- cells, which do not express TRBP, do not support RNA interference (RNAi mediated by short hairpin or micro RNAs against EGFP. Both TRBPs, but not TRBPsΔC4, were able to rescue RNAi function. In human cells with low RNAi activity, addition of TRBP1 or 2, but not TRBPsΔC4, rescued RNAi function. Conclusion The mapping of the interaction sites between TRBP and Dicer show unique domains that are required for their binding. Since TRBPsΔC4 do not interact or colocalize with Dicer, we suggest that TRBP and Dicer, both dsRBPs, do not interact through bound dsRNA. TRBPs, but not TRBPsΔC4, rescue RNAi activity in RNAi-compromised cells, indicating that the binding of Dicer to TRBP is critical for RNAi function.

  7. Analysis of charmless two-body B decays in factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Si-Hong; Zhang, Qi-An; Lue, Cai-Dian [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Lyu, Wei-Ran [Renmin University of China, Physics Department, Beijing (China)

    2017-02-15

    We analyze charmless two-body non-leptonic B decays B → PP, PV under the framework of a factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach, where P(V) denotes a light pseudoscalar (vector) meson. Compared with the conventional flavor diagram approach, we consider the flavor SU(3) breaking effect assisted by a factorization hypothesis for topological diagram amplitudes of different decay modes, factorizing out the corresponding decay constants and form factors. The non-perturbative parameters of topology diagram magnitudes χ and the strong phase φ are universal; they can be extracted by χ{sup 2} fit from current abundant experimental data of charmless B decays. The number of free parameters and the χ{sup 2} per degree of freedom are both reduced compared with previous analyses. With these best fitted parameters, we predict branching fractions and CP asymmetry parameters of nearly 100 B{sub u,d} and B{sub s} decay modes. The long-standing ππ and πK-CP puzzles are solved simultaneously. (orig.)

  8. Charmless Hadronic Two-body Decays of the $B_s$ Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y H; Tseng, B; Chen, Yaw-Hwang; Cheng, Hai-Yang

    1999-01-01

    Two-body charmless nonleptonic decays of the B_s meson are studied within the framework of generalized factorization in which factorization is applied to the tree level matrix elements while the effective Wilson coefficients are $\\mu$ and renormalization scheme independent, and nonfactorizable effects are parametrized in terms of N_c(LL) and N_c(LR), the effective numbers of colors arising from (V-A)(V-A) and (V-A)(V+A) four-quark operators, respectively. Branching ratios of $B_s\\to PP,PV,VV$ decays are calculated as a function of N_c(LR) with two different considerations for N_c(LL). We find that (i) the electroweak penguin contributions account for about 85% (for N_c(LL)=2) of the decay rates of $B_s\\to \\eta\\pi,\\eta'\\pi,\\eta\\rho,\\eta'\\rho,\\phi\\pi,\\phi\\rho$, which receive contributions only from tree and electroweak penguin diagrams; a measurement of them will provide a clean determination of the electroweak penguin coefficient a_9, (ii) electroweak penguin corrections to $B_s\\to\\omega as QCD penguin effects...

  9. Entropy theorems in classical mechanics, general relativity, and the gravitational two-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Oltean, Marius; Spallicci, Alessandro D A M; Sopuerta, Carlos F

    2016-01-01

    In classical Hamiltonian theories, entropy may be understood either as a statistical property of canonical systems, or as a mechanical property, that is, as a monotonic function of the phase space along trajectories. In classical mechanics, there are theorems which have been proposed for proving the non-existence of entropy in the latter sense. We explicate, clarify and extend the proofs of these theorems to some standard matter (scalar and electromagnetic) field theories in curved spacetime, and then we show why these proofs fail in general relativity; due to properties of the gravitational Hamiltonian and phase space measures, the second law of thermodynamics holds. As a concrete application, we focus on the consequences of these results for the gravitational two-body problem, and in particular, we prove the non-compactness of the phase space of perturbed Schwarzschild-Droste spacetimes. We thus identify the lack of recurring orbits in phase space as a distinct sign of dissipation and hence entropy producti...

  10. Reactive two-body and three-body collisions of Ba$^+$ in an ultracold Rb gas

    CERN Document Server

    Krükow, Artjom; Härter, Arne; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2016-01-01

    We analyze reactive collisions of a single Ba$^+$ ion in contact with an ultracold gas of Rb atoms at mK$\\times k_{\\mathrm{B}}$ collision energies. Mapping out the Ba$^+$ loss rate dependence on the Rb atom density we can discern two-body reactive collisions from three-body ones and for the first time determine both rate coefficients which are $k_2=3.1(6)(6)\\times 10^{-13}\\textrm{cm}^{3}\\textrm{s}^{-1}$ and $k_3=1.04(4)(45)\\times 10^{-24}\\textrm{cm}^{6}\\textrm{s}^{-1}$, respectively (statistical and systematic errors in parenthesis). Thus, the measured ternary recombination dominates over binary reactions even at moderate atom densities of $n\\approx 10^{12}\\: \\textrm{cm}^{-3}$. The results for Ba$^+$ and Rb are representative for a wide range of cold ion-atom systems and can serve as a guidance for the future development of the field of hybrid atom-ion research.

  11. Two-body and three-body contacts for identical Bosons near unitarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas

    2014-03-21

    In a recent experiment with ultracold trapped Rb85 atoms, Makotyn et al. studied a quantum-degenerate Bose gas in the unitary limit where its scattering length is infinitely large. We show that the observed momentum distributions are compatible with a universal relation that expresses the high-momentum tail in terms of the two-body contact C2 and the three-body contact C3. We determine the contact densities for the unitary Bose gas with number density n to be C2 ≈ 20 n(4/3) and C3 ≈ 2n(5/3). We also show that the observed atom loss rate is compatible with that from 3-atom inelastic collisions, which gives a contribution proportional to C3, but the loss rate is not compatible with that from 2-atom inelastic collisions, which gives a contribution proportional to C2. We point out that the contacts C2 and C3 could be measured independently by using the virial theorem near and at unitarity, respectively.

  12. Nonlocality in many-body quantum systems detected with two-body correlators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tura, J., E-mail: jordi.tura@icfo.es [ICFO—Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Augusiak, R.; Sainz, A.B. [ICFO—Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Lücke, B.; Klempt, C. [Institut für Quantenoptik, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Lewenstein, M.; Acín, A. [ICFO—Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); ICREA—Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Lluis Campanys 3, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    Contemporary understanding of correlations in quantum many-body systems and in quantum phase transitions is based to a large extent on the recent intensive studies of entanglement in many-body systems. In contrast, much less is known about the role of quantum nonlocality in these systems, mostly because the available multipartite Bell inequalities involve high-order correlations among many particles, which are hard to access theoretically, and even harder experimentally. Standard, “theorist- and experimentalist-friendly” many-body observables involve correlations among only few (one, two, rarely three...) particles. Typically, there is no multipartite Bell inequality for this scenario based on such low-order correlations. Recently, however, we have succeeded in constructing multipartite Bell inequalities that involve two- and one-body correlations only, and showed how they revealed the nonlocality in many-body systems relevant for nuclear and atomic physics [Tura et al., Science 344 (2014) 1256]. With the present contribution we continue our work on this problem. On the one hand, we present a detailed derivation of the above Bell inequalities, pertaining to permutation symmetry among the involved parties. On the other hand, we present a couple of new results concerning such Bell inequalities. First, we characterize their tightness. We then discuss maximal quantum violations of these inequalities in the general case, and their scaling with the number of parties. Moreover, we provide new classes of two-body Bell inequalities which reveal nonlocality of the Dicke states—ground states of physically relevant and experimentally realizable Hamiltonians. Finally, we shortly discuss various scenarios for nonlocality detection in mesoscopic systems of trapped ions or atoms, and by atoms trapped in the vicinity of designed nanostructures.

  13. Evidence for the two-body nature of the E1 transition operator in the sdf-interacting boson model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barfield, A. F.; von Brentano, P.; Dewald, A.; Zell, K. O.; Zamfir, N. V.; Bucurescu, D.; Ivaşcu, M.; Scholten, O.

    1989-01-01

    Two new absolute transition rates are reported for the nucleus144Sm following an ( α, α') Coulomb excitation study. They are B(E3; 3-→ 0+)=(38±3) W.u. and B(E1;3- → 2+)=(2.8±0.4)×10-3 W.u. This large E1 matrix element, along with the previously known B(E1; 1- →+) value support the interpretation of

  14. Covariant Spectator Theory of np scattering: Isoscalar interaction currents

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Using the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST), one boson exchange (OBE) models have been found that give precision fits to low energy np scattering and the deuteron binding energy. The boson-nucleon vertices used in these models contain a momentum dependence that requires a new class of interaction currents for use with electromagnetic interactions. Current conservation requires that these new interaction currents satisfy a two-body Ward-Takahashi identity, and using principals of simplicity and picture independence, these currents can be uniquely determined. The results lead to general formulae for a two-body current that can be expressed in terms of relativistic np wave functions, Psi, and two convenient truncated wave functions, ${\\it \\Psi}^{(2)}$ and $\\widehat {\\it \\Psi}$, which contain all of the information needed for the explicit evaluation of the contributions from the interaction current. These three wave functions can be calculated from the CST bound or scattering state equations (and their off-shell e...

  15. Glia ECM interactions are required to shape the Drosophila nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Silke; Schmidt, Imke; Klämbt, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Organs are characterized by a specific shape that is often remodeled during development. The dynamics of organ shape is in particular evident during the formation of the Drosophila nervous system. During embryonic stages the central nervous system compacts, whereas selective growth occurs during larval stages. The nervous system is covered by a layer of surface glial cells that form the blood brain barrier and a thick extracellular matrix called neural lamella. The size of the neural lamella is dynamically adjusted to the growing nervous system and we show here that perineurial glial cells secrete proteases to remodel this matrix. Moreover, an imbalance in proteolytic activity results in an abnormal shape of the nervous system. To identify further components controlling nervous system shape we performed an RNAi based screen and identified the gene nolo, which encodes an ADAMTS-like protein. We generated loss of function alleles and demonstrate a requirement in glial cells. Mutant nolo larvae, however, do not show an abnormal nervous system shape. The only predicted off-target of the nolo(dsRNA) is Oatp30B, which encodes an organic anion transporting protein characterized by an extracellular protease inhibitor domain. Loss of function mutants were generated and double mutant analyses demonstrate a genetic interaction between nolo and Oatp30B which prevented the generation of maternal zygotic mutant larvae.

  16. Caenorhabditis elegans-based screen identifies Salmonella virulence factors required for conserved host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenor, Jennifer L; McCormick, Beth A; Ausubel, Frederick M; Aballay, Alejandro

    2004-06-01

    A Caenorhabditis elegans-Salmonella enterica host-pathogen model was used to identify both novel and previously known S. enterica virulence factors (HilA, HilD, InvH, SptP, RhuM, Spi4-F, PipA, VsdA, RepC, Sb25, RfaL, GmhA, LeuO, CstA, and RecC), including several related to the type III secretion system (TTSS) encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Mutants corresponding to presumptive novel virulence-related genes exhibited diminished ability to invade epithelial cells and/or to induce polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration in a tissue culture model of mammalian enteropathogenesis. When expressed in C. elegans intestinal cells, the S. enterica TTSS-exported effector protein SptP inhibited a conserved p38 MAPK signaling pathway and suppressed the diminished pathogenicity phenotype of an S. enterica sptP mutant. These results show that C. elegans is an attractive model to study the interaction between Salmonella effector proteins and components of the innate immune response, in part because there is a remarkable overlap between Salmonella virulence factors required for human and nematode pathogenesis.

  17. Elastic electron-deuteron scattering and two-body current operators in the Light-Front Hamiltonian Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Frederico, Tobias; Pace, Emanuele; Salme`, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of the deuteron are investigated within a Light-Front Hamiltonian Dynamics framework, with a current operator that contains both one-body and two-body contributions. In this work, we are considering new two-body contributions, with a dynamical nature generated within a Yukawa model and a structure inspired by a recent analysis of the current operator, that acts on the three-dimensional valence component and fulfills the Ward-Takahashi identity. Preliminary results for the magnetic moment are shown.

  18. The leucine-rich repeats of LINGO-1 are not required for self-interaction or interaction with the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Thomas; Walmsley, Adrian Robert

    2012-02-10

    LINGO-1 (leucine rich repeat and Ig domain containing Nogo receptor interacting protein-1) is a central nervous system transmembrane protein which simultaneously interacts with the Nogo-66 receptor and p75(NTR) or TROY on neurons to form a receptor complex responsible for myelin-mediated neurite outgrowth inhibition. On oligodendroglial cells, LINGO-1 interacts with p75(NTR) to constitutively inhibit multiple aspects of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Recently, LINGO-1 was identified as an in vivo interacting partner of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and, correspondingly, cellular LINGO-1 expression was found to augment the release of the Abeta peptide, the potential causative agent of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the recombinant LINGO-1 ectodomain has been shown to self-interact in solution and after crystallisation. Here, we have used deletional mutagenesis to identify the regions on LINGO-1 that are involved in homo- and heterotypic interactions. We have found that the N-terminal region containing the leucine-rich repeats along with the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of LINGO-1 are not required for self-interaction or interaction with APP.

  19. Universal Two-Body Spectra of Ultracold Harmonically Trapped Atoms in Two and Three Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We consider the spectrum of two ultracold harmonically trapped atoms interacting via short-range interactions. The Green's function approach is used to unify the two and three dimensional cases. We derive criteria for the universality of the spectrum, i.e. its independence of the details...... experimentally available. In the two-dimensional case we discuss the p-wave channel in detail and demonstrate how the non-universality of the spectrum arises within the Green's function approach. We then show that the spectrum is not particularly sensitive to the short-distance details in the case when the two...

  20. Structural characteristics of an antigen required for its interaction with Ia and recognition by T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S;

    1987-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the residues within an immunogenic peptide that endow it with the capacity to interact with Ia and to be recognized by T cells is presented. Ia interacts with only a few of the peptide residues and overall exhibits a very broad specificity. Some residues appear to interact...... both with Ia and with T cells, leading to a model in which a peptide antigen is 'sandwiched' between Ia and the T-cell receptor....

  1. Induced two-body scattering resonances from a square-well potential with oscillating depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson Smith, D.

    2016-03-01

    In systems of ultracold atoms, pairwise interactions can be resonantly enhanced by a new mechanism which does not rely upon a magnetic Feshbach resonance. In this mechanism, interactions are controlled by tuning the frequency of an oscillating parallel component of the magnetic field close to the Bohr frequency for the transition to a two-atom bound state. The real part of the s-wave scattering length a has a resonance as a function of the oscillation frequency near the Bohr frequency. The resonance parameters can be controlled by varying the amplitude of the oscillating field. The amplitude also controls the imaginary part of a which arises predominantly because the oscillating field converts atom pairs into molecules. For the case of a shallow bound state in the scattering channel, the dimensionless resonance parameters are universal functions of the dimensionless oscillation amplitude.

  2. Generalized contour deformation method in momentum space two-body spectral structures and scattering amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, G; Vaagen, J S

    2003-01-01

    A generalized contour deformation method (GCDM) which combines complex rotation and translation in momentum space, is discussed. GCDM gives accurate results for bound, virtual (antibound), resonant and scattering states starting with a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. It provides a basis for full off-shell $t$-matrix calculations both for real and complex input energies. Results for both spectral structures and scattering amplitudes compare perfectly well with exact values for the separable Yamaguchi potential. Accurate calculation of virtual states in the Malfliet-Tjon and the realistic CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon interactions are presented. GCDM is also a promising method for the computation of in-medium properties such as the resummation of particle-particle and particle-hole diagrams in infinite nuclear matter. Implications for in-medium scattering are discussed.

  3. Sample Sizes Required to Detect Interactions between Two Binary Fixed-Effects in a Mixed-Effects Linear Regression Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Andrew C; Heo, Moonseong

    2009-01-15

    Mixed-effects linear regression models have become more widely used for analysis of repeatedly measured outcomes in clinical trials over the past decade. There are formulae and tables for estimating sample sizes required to detect the main effects of treatment and the treatment by time interactions for those models. A formula is proposed to estimate the sample size required to detect an interaction between two binary variables in a factorial design with repeated measures of a continuous outcome. The formula is based, in part, on the fact that the variance of an interaction is fourfold that of the main effect. A simulation study examines the statistical power associated with the resulting sample sizes in a mixed-effects linear regression model with a random intercept. The simulation varies the magnitude (Δ) of the standardized main effects and interactions, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ρ ), and the number (k) of repeated measures within-subject. The results of the simulation study verify that the sample size required to detect a 2 × 2 interaction in a mixed-effects linear regression model is fourfold that to detect a main effect of the same magnitude.

  4. Analysis of the spacial requirements for RNA-protein interactions within the N antitermination complex of bacteriophage lambda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiya, Satoru; Inaba, Mitsuru; Koh, Chang-Song; Uehara, Hiroaki; Masui, Naomi; Ishibashi, Masaya; Matsufuji, Senya; Harada, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    In bacteriophage lambda, formation of a transcriptional antitermination complex consisting of the lambda N protein, nut RNA transcript (boxA-boxB), host factors, and RNA polymerase is mediated by the interaction of the boxB RNA with the RNA-binding domain of N. In order to understand the spacial requirements of this boxB/N interaction within the complex, the effects of changes in the length of the nut site linker, the boxB stem, and the peptide spacer connecting the RNA-binding domain and activation domain of N were examined using a bacterial reporter system. As a result, we found that the requirements for the boxB stem length and N peptide linker length were optimized and strict. In contrast, when the boxB/N interaction was replaced by heterologous RNA/peptide interactions, the strict requirement for the length of the peptide linker and the RNA stem was relaxed, presumably due to the absence of the interaction between boxB/N and the host factor NusA in the wild-type complex. It was also shown that the decrease in activity upon stem lengthening could be partially suppressed by simultaneous lengthening of the RNA spacer, suggesting that a further understanding of the organization of the antitermination complex may provide insights into the engineering of functional ribonucleoprotein complexes.

  5. SDCCAG8 Interacts with RAB Effector Proteins RABEP2 and ERC1 and Is Required for Hedgehog Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Airik, Rannar; Schueler, Markus; Airik, Merlin

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Indeed, cell culture studies demonstrate the requirement of SDCCAG8 for ciliogenesis and Hh signaling. Using an affinity proteomics approach, we demonstrate that SDCCAG8 interacts with proteins of the centriolar satellites (OFD1, AZI1), of the endosomal sorting complex (RABEP2, ERC...

  6. The Videographic Requirements Gathering Method for Adolescent-Focused Interaction Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Peyton

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for conducting requirements gathering with adolescent populations. Called videographic requirements gathering, this technique makes use of mobile phone data capture and participant creation of media images. The videographic requirements gathering method can help researchers and designers gain intimate insight into adolescent lives while simultaneously reducing power imbalances. We provide rationale for this approach, pragmatics of using the method, and advice on overcoming common challenges facing researchers and designers relying on this technique.

  7. The required interactions among institutions involved with Research and Development in the power sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira Filho, X.; Medeiros, J.C.; Szechtman, M. [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the form which CEPEL (Brazilian Federal Research Center in Electric Energy) works for the Brazilian electric system, the interaction with associates, especially with ELETROBRAS (the Federal holding company in Brazil), the modern way of CEPEL operation and interactions with clients, the partnership in Research and Development, the CEPEL philosophy of transferring technology to its clients, and the cost-benefit analysis of Research and Development activities. (author) 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Experimental study of the two-body spin-orbit force

    CERN Document Server

    Burgunder, G; Nowacki, F; Giron, S; Hammache, F; Moukaddam, M; eville, N De S er; Beaumel, D; aceres, L C; ément, E Cl; Duchêne, G; Ebran, J P; Fernandez-Dominguez, B; Flavigny, F; Franchoo, S; Gibelin, J; Gillibert, A; évy, S Gr; Guillot, J; Lapoux, V; Lepailleur, A; Matea, I; Matta, A; Nalpas, L; Obertelli, A; Otsuka, T; Pancin, J; Poves, A; Raabe, R; Scarpaci, J A; Stefan, I; Stodel, C; Suzuki, T; Thomas, J C

    2014-01-01

    Energies and spectroscopic factors of the first $7/2^-$, $3/2^-$, $1/2^-$ and $5/2^-$ states in the $^{35}$Si$_{21}$ nucleus were determined by means of the (d,p) transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at GANIL using the MUST2 and EXOGAM detectors. By comparing the spectroscopic information on the $^{35}$Si and $^{37}$S isotones, a reduction of the $p_{3/2} - p_{1/2}$ spin-orbit splitting by about 25% is proposed, while the $f_{7/2} -f_{5/2}$ spin-orbit splitting seems to remain constant. These features, derived after having unfolded nuclear correlations using shell model calculations, have been attributed to the properties of the 2-body spin-orbit interaction, the amplitude of which is derived for the first time in an atomic nucleus. The present results, remarkably well reproduced by using several realistic nucleon-nucleon forces, provide a unique touchstone for the modeling of the spin-orbit interaction in atomic nuclei.

  9. Two-body coordinate system generation using body-fitted coordinate system and complex variable transformation. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    Attempts are made to generate acceptable coordinate systems for two-body configurations. The first method to be tried was to use the body-fitted coordinate system technique to obtain the best system. This technique alone did not produce very good results, so another approach was investigated. This new approach involved using a combination of the body fitted coordinate system procedure and a complex variable transformation method that was used successfully in conformal mapping.

  10. Two-body problem in general relativity: A heuristic guide for the Einstein-Rosen bridge and EPR paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, Galina

    2015-01-01

    Between 1935 and 1936, Einstein was occupied with the Schwarzschild solution and the singularity within it while working in Princeton on the unified field theory and with his assistant Nathan Rosen, on the theory of the Einstein-Rosen bridges. He was also occupied with quantum theory. He believed that quantum theory was an incomplete representation of real things. Together with Rosen and Boris Podolsky he invented the EPR paradox. I demonstrate that the two-body problem in general relativity ...

  11. The PPLA motif of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta is required for interaction with Fe65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Jeoung; Hyun, Sunghee; Chun, Jaesun; Shin, Sung Hwa; Lee, Kyung Eun; Yeon, Kwang Hum; Park, Tae Yoon; Kang, Sang Sun

    2008-07-31

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK 3 beta) is a serine/ threonine kinase that phosphorylates substrates such as beta-catenin and is involved in a variety of biological processes, including embryonic development, metabolism, tumorigenesis, and cell death. Here, we present evidence that human GSK 3beta is associated with Fe65, which has the characteristics of an adaptor protein, possessing a WW domain, and two phosphotyrosine interaction domains, PID1 and PID2. The GSK 3beta catalytic domain also contains a putative WW domain binding motif ((371)PPLA(374)), and we observed, using a pull down approach and co-immuno-precipitation, that it interacts physically with Fe65 via this motif. In addition, we detected co-localization of GSK 3beta and Fe65 by confocal microscopy, and this co-localization was disrupted by mutation of the putative WW domain binding motif of GSK 3beta.Finally, in transient transfection assays interaction of GSK 3 beta (wt) with Fe65 induced substantial cell apoptosis, whereas interaction with the GSK 3beta AALA mutant ((371)AALA(374)) did not, and we noted that phosphorylation of the Tyr 216 residue of the GSK 3beta AALA mutant was significantly reduced compared to that of GSK 3beta wild type. Thus, our observations indicate that GSK 3beta binds to Fe65 through its (371)PPLA(374) motif and that this interaction regulates apoptosis and phosphorylation of Tyr 216 of GSK 3beta.

  12. Variational Worldline Approximation for the Relativistic Two-Body Bound State in a Scalar Model

    CERN Document Server

    Barro-Bergfl"odt, K; Stingl, M

    2006-01-01

    We use the worldline representation of field theory together with a variational approximation to determine the lowest bound state in the scalar Wick-Cutkosky model where two equal-mass constituents interact via the exchange of mesons. Self-energy and vertex corrections are included approximately in a consistent way as well as crossed diagrams. Only vacuum-polarization effects of the heavy particles are neglected. In a path integral description of an appropriate current-current correlator an effective, retarded action is obtained by integrating out the meson field. As in the polaron problem we employ a quadratic trial action with variational functions to describe retardation and binding effects through multiple meson exchange.The variational equations for these functions are derived, discussed qualitatively and solved numerically. We compare our results with the ones from traditional approaches based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation and find an enhanced binding. For weak coupling this is worked out analytically ...

  13. Measurement of branching fractions and CP violation for charmless charged two-body B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Perazzini, Stefano

    Charmless charged two-body B decays are sensitive probes of the CKM matrix, that parameterize CP violation in the Standard Model (SM), and have the potential to reveal the presence of New Physics. The framework of CP violation within the SM, the role of the CKM matrix, with its basic formalism, and the current experimental status are presented. The theoretical tools commonly used to deal with hadronic B decays and an overview of the phenomenology of charmless two-body B decays are outlined. LHCb is one of the four main experiments operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), devoted to the measurement of CP violation and rare decays of charm and beauty hadrons. The LHCb detector is described, focusing on the technologies adopted for each sub-detector and summarizing their performances. The status-of-the-art of the LHCb measurements with charmless two-body B decays is then presented. Using the 37/pb of integrated luminosity collected at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV by LHCb during 2010, the direct CP asymmetries ACP(B0 -> ...

  14. Requirement for sex comb on midleg protein interactions in Drosophila polycomb group repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Aidan J; Mallin, Daniel R; Francis, Nicole J; Ketel, Carrie S; Stamm, Joyce; Voeller, Rochus K; Kingston, Robert E; Simon, Jeffrey A

    2004-07-01

    The Drosophila Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) protein is a transcriptional repressor of the Polycomb group (PcG). Although genetic studies establish SCM as a crucial PcG member, its molecular role is not known. To investigate how SCM might link to PcG complexes, we analyzed the in vivo role of a conserved protein interaction module, the SPM domain. This domain is found in SCM and in another PcG protein, Polyhomeotic (PH), which is a core component of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). SCM-PH interactions in vitro are mediated by their respective SPM domains. Yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays were used to isolate and characterize >30 missense mutations in the SPM domain of SCM. Genetic rescue assays showed that SCM repressor function in vivo is disrupted by mutations that impair SPM domain interactions in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of an isolated, wild-type SPM domain produced PcG loss-of-function phenotypes in flies. Coassembly of SCM with a reconstituted PRC1 core complex shows that SCM can partner with PRC1. However, gel filtration chromatography showed that the bulk of SCM is biochemically separable from PH in embryo nuclear extracts. These results suggest that SCM, although not a core component of PRC1, interacts and functions with PRC1 in gene silencing.

  15. Video Mediated Social Interaction Between Groups: System Requirements and Technology Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, D.; Usrsu, M.F.; Meenowa, J.; Cesar Garcia, P.S.; Kegel, I.; Bergström, K.; Bergström, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses results from research related to the use of television as a device that supports social interaction between close-knit groups in settings that include more than two locations, each location being potentially equipped with more than one camera. The paper introduces the notion of

  16. Detailed description of exclusive muon capture rates using realistic two-body forces

    CERN Document Server

    Giannaka, P G

    2015-01-01

    Starting from state-by-state calculations of exclusive rates of the ordinary muon capture (OMC), we evaluated total muon-capture rates for a set of light- and medium-weight nuclear isotopes. We employed a version of the proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA, for short) which uses as realistic nuclear forces the Bonn C-D one boson exchange potential. Special attention was paid on the percentage contribution to the total muon-capture rate of specific low-spin multipolarities resulting by summing over the corresponding multipole transitions. The nuclear method used offers the possibility of estimating separately the individual contributions to the total and partial rates of the polar-vector and axial-vector components of the weak interaction Hamiltonian for each accessible final state of the daughter nucleus. One of our main goals is to provide a reliable description of the charge changing transitions matrix elements entering the description of other similar semileptonic nuclear proce...

  17. Ligand requirements for involvement of PKCε in synergistic analgesic interactions between spinal μ and δ opioid receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, D J; Metcalf, M D; Kitto, K F; Messing, R O; Fairbanks, C A; Wilcox, G L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We recently found that PKCε was required for spinal analgesic synergy between two GPCRs, δ opioid receptors and α2A adrenoceptors, co-located in the same cellular subpopulation. We sought to determine if co-delivery of μ and δ opioid receptor agonists would similarly result in synergy requiring PKCε. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Combinations of μ and δ opioid receptor agonists were co-administered intrathecally by direct lumbar puncture to PKCε-wild-type (PKCε-WT) and -knockout (PKCε-KO) mice. Antinociception was assessed using the hot-water tail-flick assay. Drug interactions were evaluated by isobolographic analysis. KEY RESULTS All agonists produced comparable antinociception in both PKCε-WT and PKCε-KO mice. Of 19 agonist combinations that produced analgesic synergy, only 3 required PKCε for a synergistic interaction. In these three combinations, one of the agonists was morphine, although not all combinations involving morphine required PKCε. Morphine + deltorphin II and morphine + deltorphin I required PKCε for synergy, whereas a similar combination, morphine + deltorphin, did not. Additionally, morphine + oxymorphindole required PKCε for synergy, whereas a similar combination, morphine + oxycodindole, did not. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We discovered biased agonism for a specific signalling pathway at the level of spinally co-delivered opioid agonists. As the bias is only revealed by an appropriate ligand combination and cannot be accounted for by a single drug, it is likely that the receptors these agonists act on are interacting with each other. Our results support the existence of μ and δ opioid receptor heteromers at the spinal level in vivo. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24827408

  18. The C-Terminal Domain of Yeast PCNA Is Required for Physical And Functional Interactions With Cdc9 DNA Ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayakumar, S.; Chapados, B.R.; Schmidt, K.H.; Kolodner, R.D.; Tainer, J.A.; Tomkinson, A.E.

    2007-07-13

    There is compelling evidence that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a DNA sliding clamp, co-ordinates the processing and joining of Okazaki fragments during eukaryotic DNA replication. However, a detailed mechanistic understanding of functional PCNA:ligase I interactions has been incomplete. Here we present the co-crystal structure of yeast PCNA with a peptide encompassing the conserved PCNA interaction motif of Cdc9, yeast DNA ligase I. The Cdc9 peptide contacts both the inter-domain connector loop (IDCL) and residues near the C-terminus of PCNA. Complementary mutational and biochemical results demonstrate that these two interaction interfaces are required for complex formation both in the absence of DNA and when PCNA is topologically linked to DNA. Similar to the functionally homologous human proteins, yeast RFC interacts with and inhibits Cdc9 DNA ligase whereas the addition of PCNA alleviates inhibition by RFC. Here we show that the ability of PCNA to overcome RFC-mediated inhibition of Cdc9 is dependent upon both the IDCL and the C-terminal interaction interfaces of PCNA. Together these results demonstrate the functional significance of the {beta}-zipper structure formed between the C-terminal domain of PCNA and Cdc9 and reveal differences in the interactions of FEN-1 and Cdc9 with the two PCNA interfaces that may contribute to the coordinated, sequential action of these enzymes.

  19. Performance of Hybrid Photon Detectors and Studies of Two-Body Hadronic B Decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Carson, L; Parkes, C

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the CERN LHC accelerator will begin physics data taking in late 2009. LHCb aims to discover New Physics processes via precision measurements using heavy flavoured hadrons, such as $B$ and $D$ hadrons. This thesis describes studies relevant to measurements of $B$ decays to hadronic final states at LHCb. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counters of LHCb are crucial to the performance of such measurements. They use arrays of Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) as their photodetection system. Detailed results are presented from the characterisation programme of the entire sample of 557 HPDs that were produced. Their overall performance is found to be outstanding, with only 2.2\\% of HPDs judged to be unusable for the RICHes. The LHCb requirements and the contractual specifications are met and often exceeded in key areas. The measurement of the single photoelectron detection efficiency, $\\eta$, of the HPD anode is described in detail. The efficiency was measured as $\\eta=(87.9\\pm 1.4)\\%$. This va...

  20. A C. elegans sperm TRP protein required for sperm-egg interactions during fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X-Z Shawn; Sternberg, Paul W

    2003-08-08

    Fertilization, a critical step in animal reproduction, is triggered by a series of specialized sperm-egg interactions. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying fertilization are not well understood. Here, we identify a sperm-enriched C. elegans TRPC homolog, TRP-3. Mutations in trp-3 lead to sterility in both hermaphrodites and males due to a defect in their sperm. trp-3 mutant sperm are motile, but fail to fertilize oocytes after gamete contact. TRP-3 is initially localized in intracellular vesicles, and then translocates to the plasma membrane during sperm activation. This translocation coincides with a marked increase in store-operated calcium entry, providing an in vivo mechanism for the regulation of TRP-3 activity. As C. elegans oocytes lack egg coats, our data suggest that some TRPC family channels might function to mediate calcium influx during sperm-egg plasma membrane interactions leading to fertilization.

  1. Modeling and Simulation for Exploring Human-Robot Team Interaction Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudenhoeffer, Donald Dean; Bruemmer, David Jonathon; Davis, Midge Lee

    2001-12-01

    Small-sized and micro-robots will soon be available for deployment in large-scale forces. Consequently, the ability of a human operator to coordinate and interact with largescale robotic forces is of great interest. This paper describes the ways in which modeling and simulation have been used to explore new possibilities for human-robot interaction. The paper also discusses how these explorations have fed implementation of a unified set of command and control concepts for robotic force deployment. Modeling and simulation can play a major role in fielding robot teams in actual missions. While live testing is preferred, limitations in terms of technology, cost, and time often prohibit extensive experimentation with physical multi-robot systems. Simulation provides insight, focuses efforts, eliminates large areas of the possible solution space, and increases the quality of actual testing.

  2. The p25 Subunit of the Dynactin Complex is Required for Dynein-Early Endosome Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    dynein–early endosome interaction in the filamen- tous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. In filamentous fungi , dynein and its regulators are important for...backbone of the dynactin complex, and its loss leads to a disruption of the whole complex. In Drosoph- ila and in filamentous fungi such as N. crassa...how the motor is targeted to these cargoes is still a topic under investigation. In filamentous fungi and higher eukaryotic cells such as neurons

  3. Human-chromatin-related protein interactions identify a demethylase complex required for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Edyta; Ni, Zuyao; Pu, Shuye; Turinsky, Andrei L; Trimble, Sandra Smiley; Olsen, Jonathan B; Silverman-Gavrila, Rosalind; Silverman-Gavrila, Lorelei; Phanse, Sadhna; Guo, Hongbo; Zhong, Guoqing; Guo, Xinghua; Young, Peter; Bailey, Swneke; Roudeva, Denitza; Zhao, Dorothy; Hewel, Johannes; Li, Joyce; Gräslund, Susanne; Paduch, Marcin; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Lupien, Mathieu; Emili, Andrew; Wodak, Shoshana J; Greenblatt, Jack

    2014-07-10

    Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision) network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  4. Human-Chromatin-Related Protein Interactions Identify a Demethylase Complex Required for Chromosome Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Marcon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  5. Nuclear localization and interaction with COP1 are required for STO/BBX24 function during photomorphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huili; Marquardt, Katrin; Indorf, Martin; Jutt, Dominic; Kircher, Stefan; Neuhaus, Gunther; Rodríguez-Franco, Marta

    2011-08-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SALT TOLERANCE/B-BOX ZINC FINGER PROTEIN24 (STO/BBX24) is a negative regulator of the light signal transduction that localizes to the nucleus of plant cells and interacts with CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1) in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid system. The protein contains two B-box zinc-finger motives at the N terminus and a conserved motif at the C-terminal part required for the interaction with COP1. BBX24 accumulates during deetiolation of young seedlings in the first hours of exposure to light. However, this accumulation is transient and decreases after prolonged light irradiation. Here, we identified the amino acidic residues necessary for the nuclear import of the protein. In addition, we created mutated forms of the protein, and analyzed them by overexpression in the bbx24-1 mutant background. Our results indicate that the degradation of BBX24 occurs, or at least is initiated in the nucleus, and this nuclear localization is a prerequisite to fulfill its function in light signaling. Moreover, mutations in the region responsible for the interaction with COP1 revealed that a physical interaction of the proteins is also required for degradation of BBX24 in the light and for normal photomorphogenesis.

  6. Dengue virus NS1 protein interacts with the ribosomal protein RPL18: this interaction is required for viral translation and replication in Huh-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Salazar, Margot; Angel-Ambrocio, Antonio H; Soto-Acosta, Ruben; Bautista-Carbajal, Patricia; Hurtado-Monzon, Arianna M; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Ludert, Juan E; Del Angel, Rosa M

    2015-10-01

    Given dengue virus (DENV) genome austerity, it uses cellular molecules and structures for virion entry, translation and replication of the genome. NS1 is a multifunctional protein key to viral replication and pathogenesis. Identification of cellular proteins that interact with NS1 may help in further understanding the functions of NS1. In this paper we isolated a total of 64 proteins from DENV infected human hepatic cells (Huh-7) that interact with NS1 by affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation assays. The subcellular location and expression levels during infection of the ribosomal proteins RPS3a, RPL7, RPL18, RPL18a plus GAPDH were determined. None of these proteins changed their expression levels during infection; however, RPL-18 was redistributed to the perinuclear region after 48hpi. Silencing of the RPL-18 does not affect cell translation efficiency or viability, but it reduces significantly viral translation, replication and viral yield, suggesting that the RPL-18 is required during DENV replicative cycle.

  7. Intra- And Inter-Monomer Interactions are Required to Synergistically Facilitate ATP Hydrolysis in HSP90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, C.N.; Krukenberg, K.A.; Agard, D.A.

    2009-05-12

    Nucleotide-dependent conformational changes of the constitutively dimeric molecular chaperone Hsp90 are integral to its molecular mechanism. Recent full-length crystal structures (Protein Data Bank codes 2IOQ, 2CG9, AND 2IOP) of Hsp90 homologs reveal large scale quaternary domain rearrangements upon the addition of nucleotides. Although previous work has shown the importance of C-terminal domain dimerization for efficient ATP hydrolysis, which should imply cooperativity, other studies suggest that the two ATPases function independently. Using the crystal structures as a guide, we examined the role of intra- and intermonomer interactions in stabilizing the ATPase activity of a single active site within an intact dimer. This was accomplished by creating heterodimers that allow us to differentially mutate each monomer, probing the context in which particular residues are important for ATP hydrolysis. Although the ATPase activity of each monomer can function independently, we found that the activity of one monomer could be inhibited by the mutation of hydrophobic residues on the trans N-terminal domain (opposite monomer). Furthermore, these trans interactions are synergistically mediated by a loop on the cis middle domain. This loop contains hydrophobic residues as well as a critical arginine that provides a direct linkage to the {gamma}-phosphate of bound ATP. Small angle x-ray scattering demonstrates that deleterious mutations block domain closure in the presence of AMPPNP (5{prime}-adenylyl-{beta},{gamma}-imidodiphosphate), providing a direct linkage between structural changes and functional consequences. Together, these data indicate that both the cis monomer and the trans monomer and the intradomain and interdomain interactions cooperatively stabilize the active conformation of each active site and help explain the importance of dimer formation.

  8. Requirement for sex comb on midleg protein interactions in Drosophila polycomb group repression.

    OpenAIRE

    Aidan J Peterson; Mallin, Daniel R.; Francis, Nicole J.; Ketel, Carrie S.; Stamm, Joyce; Voeller, Rochus K.; Kingston, Robert E.; Jeffrey A Simon

    2004-01-01

    The Drosophila Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) protein is a transcriptional repressor of the Polycomb group (PcG). Although genetic studies establish SCM as a crucial PcG member, its molecular role is not known. To investigate how SCM might link to PcG complexes, we analyzed the in vivo role of a conserved protein interaction module, the SPM domain. This domain is found in SCM and in another PcG protein, Polyhomeotic (PH), which is a core component of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). SCM-PH int...

  9. Direct interaction between two actin nucleators is required in Drosophila oogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Quinlan, Margot E.

    2013-01-01

    Controlled actin assembly is crucial to a wide variety of cellular processes, including polarity establishment during early development. The recently discovered actin mesh, a structure that traverses the Drosophila oocyte during mid-oogenesis, is essential for proper establishment of the major body axes. Genetic experiments indicate that at least two proteins, Spire (Spir) and Cappuccino (Capu), are required to build this mesh. The spire and cappuccino genetic loci were first identified as ma...

  10. A dynamin-actin interaction is required for vesicle scission during endocytosis in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Sarah E; Smaczynska-de Rooij, Iwona I; Marklew, Christopher J; Allwood, Ellen G; Mishra, Ritu; Johnson, Simeon; Goldberg, Martin W; Ayscough, Kathryn R

    2015-03-30

    Actin is critical for endocytosis in yeast cells, and also in mammalian cells under tension. However, questions remain as to how force generated through actin polymerization is transmitted to the plasma membrane to drive invagination and scission. Here, we reveal that the yeast dynamin Vps1 binds and bundles filamentous actin. Mutational analysis of Vps1 in a helix of the stalk domain identifies a mutant RR457-458EE that binds actin more weakly. In vivo analysis of Vps1 function demonstrates that the mutation disrupts endocytosis but not other functions of Vps1 such as vacuolar trafficking or peroxisome fission. The mutant Vps1 is stably expressed in cells and co-localizes with the endocytic reporters Abp1 and the amphiphysin Rvs167. Detailed analysis of individual endocytic patch behavior indicates that the mutation causes aberrant movements in later stages of endocytosis, consistent with a scission defect. Ultrastructural analysis of yeast cells using electron microscopy reveals a significant increase in invagination depth, further supporting a role for the Vps1-actin interaction during scission. In vitro analysis of the mutant protein demonstrates that--like wild-type Vps1--it is able to form oligomeric rings, but, critically, it has lost its ability to bundle actin filaments into higher-order structures. A model is proposed in which actin filaments bind Vps1 during invagination, and this interaction is important to transduce the force of actin polymerization to the membrane to drive successful scission.

  11. Requirement for a conserved, tertiary interaction in the core of 23S ribosomal RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, C; Douthwaite, S

    1994-01-01

    A putative base-pairing interaction that determines the folding of the central region of 23S rRNA has been investigated by mutagenesis. Each of the possible base substitutions has been made at the phylogenetically covariant positions adenine-1262 (A1262) and U2017 in Escherichia coli 23S rRNA....... Every substitution that disrupts the potential for Watson-Crick base pairing between these positions reduces or abolishes the participation of 23S rRNA in protein synthesis. All mutant 23S rRNAs are assembled into 50S subunits, but the mutant subunits are less able to stably interact with 30S subunits...... to form translationally active ribosomes. The function of 23S rRNA is largely reestablished by introduction of an alternative G1262.C2017 or U1262.A2017 pair, although neither of these supports polysome formation quite as effectively as the wild-type pair. A 23S rRNA with a C1262.G2017 pair...

  12. Accurate phosphoregulation of kinetochore–microtubule affinity requires unconstrained molecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Sundin, Lynsie J.R.; DeLuca, Keith F.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation relies on dynamic interactions between microtubules (MTs) and the NDC80 complex, a major kinetochore MT-binding component. Phosphorylation at multiple residues of its Hec1 subunit may tune kinetochore–MT binding affinity for diverse mitotic functions, but molecular details of such phosphoregulation remain elusive. Using quantitative analyses of mitotic progression in mammalian cells, we show that Hec1 phosphorylation provides graded control of kinetochore–MT affinity. In contrast, modeling the kinetochore interface with repetitive MT binding sites predicts a switchlike response. To reconcile these findings, we hypothesize that interactions between NDC80 complexes and MTs are not constrained, i.e., the NDC80 complexes can alternate their binding between adjacent kinetochore MTs. Experiments using cells with phosphomimetic Hec1 mutants corroborate predictions of such a model but not of the repetitive sites model. We propose that accurate regulation of kinetochore–MT affinity is driven by incremental phosphorylation of an NDC80 molecular “lawn,” in which the NDC80–MT bonds reorganize dynamically in response to the number and stability of MT attachments. PMID:24982430

  13. Two-body problem in general relativity: A heuristic guide for the Einstein-Rosen bridge and EPR paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Galina

    2015-01-01

    Between 1935 and 1936, Einstein was occupied with the Schwarzschild solution and the singularity within it while working in Princeton on the unified field theory and with his assistant Nathan Rosen, on the theory of the Einstein-Rosen bridges. He was also occupied with quantum theory. He believed that quantum theory was an incomplete representation of real things. Together with Rosen and Boris Podolsky he invented the EPR paradox. I demonstrate that the two-body problem in general relativity was a heuristic guide in Einstein's and collaborators' 1935 work on the Einstein-Rosen bridge and EPR paradox.

  14. Complete Angular Distribution Measurements of Two-Body Deuteron Photodisintegration between 0.5 and 3 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Mirazita, M; Rossi, P; De Sanctis, E; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Bertozzi, W; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Vita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deppman, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D C; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Gai, M; Gavalian, G; Gilad, S; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Gordon, C I O; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M R; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kühn, J; Kuhn, S E; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Lawrence, D; Ji Li; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McCarthy, J; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Muccifora, V; Müller, J; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Brien, J T; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E A; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O I; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stavinsky, A V; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tkabladze, A; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zhang, B; Zhou, Z

    2004-01-01

    Nearly complete angular distributions of the two-body deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section have been measured using the CLAS detector and the tagged photon beam at JLab. The data cover photon energies between 0.5 and 3.0 GeV and center-of-mass proton scattering angles 10-160 degrees. The data show a persistent forward-backward angle asymmetry over the explored energy range, and are well-described by the non-perturbative Quark Gluon String Model.

  15. Exchanged naturality contributions from high-energy polarization measurements in two-body inclusive and exclusive reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ader, J P

    1974-01-01

    In the paper, dealing with high-energy quasi-two-body or multiparticle production, the authors focus on what can be learned about exchanged naturality amplitudes from final polarization measurements with polarized or unpolarized beam amd/or target. The separation of t- channel (boson exchange) and u-channel (baryon exchange) exchanges into components of natural and unnatural parity and the measure of naturality interferences are extensively studied in all cases which are now or will be soon available with present experimental techniques. Special attention is paid to the transversity amplitudes which are shown to be always naturality conserving. (19 refs).

  16. Ground State Properties of Many-Body Systems in the Two-Body Random Ensemble and Random Matrix Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, L F; Jacquod, P; Kusnezov, Dimitri; Jacquod, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    We explore generic ground-state and low-energy statistical properties of many-body bosonic and fermionic one- and two-body random ensembles (TBRE) in the dense limit, and contrast them with Random Matrix Theory (RMT). Weak differences in distribution tails can be attributed to the regularity or chaoticity of the corresponding Hamiltonians rather than the particle statistics. We finally show the universality of the distribution of the angular momentum gap between the lowest energy levels in consecutive J-sectors for the four models considered.

  17. Complete angular distribution measurements of two-body deuteron photodisintegration between 0.5 and 3 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirazita, M.; Ronchetti, F.; Rossi, P.; de Sanctis, E.; Adams, G.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Audit, G.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Ball, J. P.; Barrow, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bellis, M.; Benmouna, N.; Berman, B. L.; Bertozzi, W.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchigny, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Carman, D. S.; Carnahan, B.; Chen, S.; Cole, P. L.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crannell, H.; Cummings, J. P.; de Vita, R.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Denizli, H.; Dennis, L.; Deppman, A.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dhuga, K. S.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dytman, S.; Dzyubak, O. P.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Eugenio, P.; Fatemi, R.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Ficenec, J.; Forest, T. A.; Funsten, H.; Gai, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilad, S.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Gordon, C. I.; Griffioen, K.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hakobyan, R. S.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, K.; Hicks, R. S.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Kellie, J. D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kuhn, J.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Laget, J. M.; Lawrence, D.; Li, Ji; Lima, A. C.; Livingston, K.; Lukashin, K.; Manak, J. J.; Marchand, C.; McAleer, S.; McCarthy, J.; McNabb, J. W.; Mecking, B. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Melone, J. J.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Morand, L.; Morrow, S. A.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Brien, J. T.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peterson, G.; Philips, S. A.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P. D.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Santoro, J. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Schumacher, R. A.; Serov, V. S.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A. V.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, L. C.; Sober, D. I.; Spraker, M.; Stavinsky, A.; Stepanyan, S.; Stokes, B.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Tkabladze, A.; Todor, L.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Weygand, D. P.; Whisnant, C. S.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.; Zhang, B.; Zhou, Z.

    2004-07-01

    Nearly complete angular distributions of the two-body deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section have been measured using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer detector and the tagged photon beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The data cover photon energies between 0.5 and 3.0 GeV and center-of-mass proton scattering angles 10° 160° . The data show a persistent forward-backward angle asymmetry over the explored energy range, and are well described by the nonperturbative quark gluon string model.

  18. Analysis of Phosphorylation-dependent Protein Interactions of Adhesion and Degranulation Promoting Adaptor Protein (ADAP) Reveals Novel Interaction Partners Required for Chemokine-directed T cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuropka, Benno; Witte, Amelie; Sticht, Jana; Waldt, Natalie; Majkut, Paul; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Schraven, Burkhart; Krause, Eberhard; Kliche, Stefanie; Freund, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Stimulation of T cells leads to distinct changes of their adhesive and migratory properties. Signal propagation from activated receptors to integrins depends on scaffolding proteins such as the adhesion and degranulation promoting adaptor protein (ADAP)(1). Here we have comprehensively investigated the phosphotyrosine interactome of ADAP in T cells and define known and novel interaction partners of functional relevance. While most phosphosites reside in unstructured regions of the protein, thereby defining classical SH2 domain interaction sites for master regulators of T cell signaling such as SLP76, Fyn-kinase, and NCK, other binding events depend on structural context. Interaction proteomics using different ADAP constructs comprising most of the known phosphotyrosine motifs as well as the structured domains confirm that a distinct set of proteins is attracted by pY571 of ADAP, including the ζ-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa (ZAP70). The interaction of ADAP and ZAP70 is inducible upon stimulation either of the T cell receptor (TCR) or by chemokine. NMR spectroscopy reveals that the N-terminal SH2 domains within a ZAP70-tandem-SH2 construct is the major site of interaction with phosphorylated ADAP-hSH3(N) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) indicates an intermediate binding affinity (Kd = 2.3 μm). Interestingly, although T cell receptor dependent events such as T cell/antigen presenting cell (APC) conjugate formation and adhesion are not affected by mutation of Y571, migration of T cells along a chemokine gradient is compromised. Thus, although most phospho-sites in ADAP are linked to T cell receptor related functions we have identified a unique phosphotyrosine that is solely required for chemokine induced T cell behavior.

  19. Control of mRNA Export and Translation Termination by Inositol Hexakisphosphate Requires Specific Interaction with Gle1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcázar-Román, Abel R.; Bolger, Timothy A.; Wente, Susan R.

    2010-01-01

    The unidirectional translocation of messenger RNA (mRNA) through the aqueous channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is mediated by interactions between soluble mRNA export factors and distinct binding sites on the NPC. At the cytoplasmic side of the NPC, the conserved mRNA export factors Gle1 and inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) play an essential role in mRNA export by activating the ATPase activity of the DEAD-box protein Dbp5, promoting localized messenger ribonucleoprotein complex remodeling, and ensuring the directionality of the export process. In addition, Dbp5, Gle1, and IP6 are also required for proper translation termination. However, the specificity of the IP6-Gle1 interaction in vivo is unknown. Here, we characterize the biochemical interaction between Gle1 and IP6 and the relationship to Dbp5 binding and stimulation. We identify Gle1 residues required for IP6 binding and show that these residues are needed for IP6-dependent Dbp5 stimulation in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Gle1 is the primary target of IP6 for both mRNA export and translation termination in vivo. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, the IP6-binding mutants recapitulate all of the mRNA export and translation termination defects found in mutants depleted of IP6. We conclude that Gle1 specifically binds IP6 and that this interaction is required for the full potentiation of Dbp5 ATPase activity during both mRNA export and translation termination. PMID:20371601

  20. Implementation of a home-based interactive training system for fall prevention: requirements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Jörn; Haesner, Marten; Gövercin, Mehmet; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    A critical need exists for rehabilitation for improving older adults' physical abilities, especially in the field of fall prevention. Although virtual reality and ambient-assistive technology-based approaches are promising, they are cost intensive and frequently face significant obstacles during the developmental process. The authors of the current article developed a motivational interactive training system for fall prevention and stroke rehabilitation and planned a pilot study to measure its usability, user acceptance, and effect on physical abilities and quality of life. Usability results from a field trial are presented. The purpose of the current article is to describe the technological and organizational problems during the development process and field trial. Recommendations for overcoming these barriers are described. These experiences should be taken into account when planning further field trials with assistive technology and older adults.

  1. Sarm1-mediated axon degeneration requires both SAM and TIR interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdts, Josiah; Summers, Daniel W; Sasaki, Yo; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2013-08-14

    Axon degeneration is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that eliminates damaged or unneeded axons. Manipulation of this poorly understood pathway may allow treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. In an RNAi-based screen performed in cultured mouse DRG neurons, we observed strong suppression of injury-induced axon degeneration upon knockdown of Sarm1 [SARM (sterile α-motif-containing and armadillo-motif containing protein)]. We find that a SARM-dependent degeneration program is engaged by disparate neuronal insults: SARM ablation blocks axon degeneration induced by axotomy or vincristine treatment, while SARM acts in parallel with a soma-derived caspase-dependent pathway following trophic withdrawal. SARM is a multidomain protein that associates with neuronal mitochondria. Deletion of the N-terminal mitochondrial localization sequence disrupts SARM mitochondrial localization in neurons but does not alter its ability to promote axon degeneration. In contrast, mutation of either the SAM (sterile α motif) or TIR (Toll-interleukin-1 receptor) domains abolishes the ability of SARM to promote axonal degeneration, while a SARM mutant containing only these domains elicits axon degeneration and nonapoptotic neuronal death even in the absence of injury. Protein-protein interaction studies demonstrate that the SAM domains are necessary and sufficient to mediate SARM-SARM binding. SARM mutants lacking a TIR domain bind full-length SARM and exhibit strong dominant-negative activity. These results indicate that SARM plays an integral role in the dismantling of injured axons and support a model in which SAM-mediated multimerization is necessary for TIR-dependent engagement of a downstream destruction pathway. These findings suggest that inhibitors of SAM and TIR interactions represent therapeutic candidates for blocking pathological axon loss and neuronal cell death.

  2. Requirement of interaction between mast cells and skin dendritic cells to establish contact hypersensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Otsuka

    Full Text Available The role of mast cells (MCs in contact hypersensitivity (CHS remains controversial. This is due in part to the use of the MC-deficient Kit (W/Wv mouse model, since Kit (W/Wv mice congenitally lack other types of cells as a result of a point mutation in c-kit. A recent study indicated that the intronic enhancer (IE for Il4 gene transcription is essential for MCs but not in other cell types. The aim of this study is to re-evaluate the roles of MCs in CHS using mice in which MCs can be conditionally and specifically depleted. Transgenic Mas-TRECK mice in which MCs are depleted conditionally were newly generated using cell-type specific gene regulation by IE. Using this mouse, CHS and FITC-induced cutaneous DC migration were analyzed. Chemotaxis assay and cytoplasmic Ca²⁺ imaging were performed by co-culture of bone marrow-derived MCs (BMMCs and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs. In Mas-TRECK mice, CHS was attenuated when MCs were depleted during the sensitization phase. In addition, both maturation and migration of skin DCs were abrogated by MC depletion. Consistently, BMMCs enhanced maturation and chemotaxis of BMDC in ICAM-1 and TNF-α dependent manners Furthermore, stimulated BMDCs increased intracellular Ca²⁺ of MC upon direct interaction and up-regulated membrane-bound TNF-α on BMMCs. These results suggest that MCs enhance DC functions by interacting with DCs in the skin to establish the sensitization phase of CHS.

  3. Quasi-two-body decays B(s )→P ρ →P π π in the perturbative QCD approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya; Ma, Ai-Jun; Wang, Wen-Fei; Xiao, Zhen-Jun

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we calculate the C P -averaged branching ratios and the direct C P -violating asymmetries of the quasi-two-body decays B(s )→P (ρ →)π π by employing the perturbative QCD (PQCD) approach (here P stands for a light pseudoscalar meson π , K , η or η'). The vector current timelike form factor Fπ, which contains the final-state interactions between the pion pair in the resonant region associated with the P -wave states ρ (770 ) along with the two-pion distribution amplitudes, is employed to describe the interactions between the ρ and the pion pair under the hypothesis of the conserved vector current. We found that (a) the PQCD predictions for the branching ratios and the direct C P -violating asymmetries for most considered B(s )→P (ρ →)π π decays agree with currently available data within errors, (b) for B (B →π0ρ0→π0(π+π-) , the PQCD prediction is much smaller than the measured one, and (c) for the B+→π+(ρ0→)π+π- decay mode, there is a negative C P asymmetry (-27.5-3.7+3.0)% , which agrees with other theoretical predictions but is different in sign from those reported by the BABAR and LHCb Collaborations.

  4. SHANK-associated RH domain interacting protein (SHARPIN) is required for optimal NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Prajwal; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multimeric protein complex assembled in response to a wide array of pathogens and danger-associated molecular patterns. Despite the ability of NLRP3 to respond to diverse cues, the mechanisms controlling assembly of this complex are contested. Recently published studies show that HOIL-1, a member of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC), contributes to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. SHARPIN, along with HOIP and HOIL-1 assembles the LUBAC complex. Herein, we examined whether SHARPIN is required for the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. Utilizing Sharpincpdm macrophages (deficient in SHARPIN expression), we demonstrate that SHARPIN is required for optimal activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by both canonical and non-canonical stimuli. Furthermore, Sharpincpdm macrophages had dramatic defects in both NFκB and MAP kinase pathways, suggesting a role in transcriptional priming of the NLRP3 inflammasome. In conclusion, our study identified SHARPIN as a novel regulator of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:25637014

  5. Bacillus subtilis GlnR contains an autoinhibitory C-terminal domain required for the interaction with glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Lewis V; Fisher, Susan H

    2008-04-01

    The Bacillus subtilis GlnR transcription factor regulates gene expression in response to changes in nitrogen availability. Glutamine synthetase transmits the nitrogen regulatory signal to GlnR. The DNA-binding activity of GlnR is activated by a transient protein-protein interaction with feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase that stabilizes GlnR-DNA complexes. This signal transduction mechanism was analysed by creating mutant GlnR proteins with partial or complete truncations of their C-terminal domains. The truncated GlnR proteins were found to constitutively repress gene expression in vivo. This constitutive repression did not require glutamine synthetase. Purified mutant GlnR proteins bound DNA in vitro more tightly than wild-type GlnR protein and this binding was not activated by feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase. While full-length GlnR is monomeric, the truncated GlnR proteins contained significant levels of dimers. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of GlnR acts as an autoinhibitory domain that prevents GlnR dimerization and thus impedes DNA binding. The GlnR C-terminal domain is also required for the interaction between GlnR and feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase. Compared with the full-length GlnR protein, the truncated GlnR proteins were defective in their interaction with feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase in cross-linking experiments.

  6. First evidence for the two-body charmless baryonic decay $B^0 \\to p \\bar{p}$

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The results of a search for the rare two-body charmless baryonic decays $B^0 \\to p \\bar{p}$ and $B_s^0 \\to p \\bar{p}$ are reported. The analysis uses a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.9 fb$^{-1}$, of $pp$ collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. An excess of $B^0 \\to p \\bar{p}$ candidates with respect to background expectations is seen with a statistical significance of 3.3 standard deviations. This is the first evidence for a two-body charmless baryonic $B^0$ decay. No significant $B_s^0 \\to p \\bar{p}$ signal is observed, leading to an improvement of three orders of magnitude over previous bounds. If the excess events are interpreted as signal, the 68.3\\% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions are \\begin{eqnarray} \\cal{B}(\\rm{B}^0 \\to p \\bar{p}) & = & ( 1.47 \\,^{+0.62}_{-0.51} \\,^{+0.35}_{-0.14} ) \\times 10^{-8} \\,, \

  7. An extracellular siderophore is required to maintain the mutualistic interaction of Epichloe festucae with Lolium perenne.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Johnson

    Full Text Available We have identified from the mutualistic grass endophyte Epichloë festucae a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene (sidN encoding a siderophore synthetase. The enzymatic product of SidN is shown to be a novel extracellular siderophore designated as epichloënin A, related to ferrirubin from the ferrichrome family. Targeted gene disruption of sidN eliminated biosynthesis of epichloënin A in vitro and in planta. During iron-depleted axenic growth, ΔsidN mutants accumulated the pathway intermediate N(5-trans-anhydromevalonyl-N(5-hydroxyornithine (trans-AMHO, displayed sensitivity to oxidative stress and showed deficiencies in both polarized hyphal growth and sporulation. Infection of Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass with ΔsidN mutants resulted in perturbations of the endophyte-grass symbioses. Deviations from the characteristic tightly regulated synchronous growth of the fungus with its plant partner were observed and infected plants were stunted. Analysis of these plants by light and transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormalities in the distribution and localization of ΔsidN mutant hyphae as well as deformities in hyphal ultrastructure. We hypothesize that lack of epichloënin A alters iron homeostasis of the symbiotum, changing it from mutually beneficial to antagonistic. Iron itself or epichloënin A may serve as an important molecular/cellular signal for controlling fungal growth and hence the symbiotic interaction.

  8. Requirement of cellular DDX3 for hepatitis C virus replication is unrelated to its interaction with the viral core protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Allan G N; Dalrymple, David; Boulant, Steeve; McGivern, David R; Clayton, Reginald F; Scott, Martin J; Adair, Richard; Graham, Susan; Owsianka, Ania M; Targett-Adams, Paul; Li, Kui; Wakita, Takaji; McLauchlan, John; Lemon, Stanley M; Patel, Arvind H

    2010-01-01

    The cellular DEAD-box protein DDX3 was recently shown to be essential for hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Prior to that, we had reported that HCV core binds to DDX3 in yeast-two hybrid and transient transfection assays. Here, we confirm by co-immunoprecipitation that this interaction occurs in cells replicating the JFH1 virus. Consistent with this result, immunofluorescence staining of infected cells revealed a dramatic redistribution of cytoplasmic DDX3 by core protein to the virus assembly sites around lipid droplets. Given this close association of DDX3 with core and lipid droplets, and its involvement in virus replication, we investigated the importance of this host factor in the virus life cycle. Mutagenesis studies located a single amino acid in the N-terminal domain of JFH1 core that when changed to alanine significantly abrogated this interaction. Surprisingly, this mutation did not alter infectious virus production and RNA replication, indicating that the core-DDX3 interaction is dispensable in the HCV life cycle. Consistent with previous studies, siRNA-led knockdown of DDX3 lowered virus production and RNA replication levels of both WT JFH1 and the mutant virus unable to bind DDX3. Thus, our study shows for the first time that the requirement of DDX3 for HCV replication is unrelated to its interaction with the viral core protein.

  9. Drug/Nutrients Interaction in Neoplastic Patients Requiring Nutritional Support. Practical Advice with Special Focusing on Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Uomo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and cachexia are frequent complaints in neoplastic disease [1, 2]. Nutritional support and pain treatment still remain the main treatment option for the majority of patients with cancer, particularly for those affected by pancreatic cancer who very often present an advanced stage of the disease at moment of first diagnosis [3, 4, 5]. Therefore, in their clinical practice, physicians are faced with the need for parenteral or enteral nutrition and with the contemporary requirement of several drugs capable of interfering with the components of the nutritional admixture. Different drawbacks may arise from these drug/nutrient interactions, nullifying the pharmacological effect and/or the nutritional value [6]. The aim of this review is to summarize possible drug/nutrient interaction in neoplastic patients, particularly in those with pancreatic cancer, during external food supplementation.

  10. Pro-recombination role of Srs2 protein requires SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) but is independent of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolesar, Peter; Altmannova, Veronika; Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina;

    2016-01-01

    -interacting motif (SIM) of Srs2 is important for the interaction with several recombination factors. Lack of SIM, but not proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-interacting motif (PIM), leads to increased cell death under circumstances requiring homologous recombination for DNA repair. Simultaneous mutation...

  11. Huntingtin interacting proteins 14 and 14-like are required for chorioallantoic fusion during early placental development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shaun S; Hou, Juan; Sutton, Liza M; Garside, Victoria C; Mui, Katherine K N; Singaraja, Roshni R; Hayden, Michael R; Hoodless, Pamela A

    2015-01-15

    Huntington disease (HD) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms that is caused by a CAG expansion in the HTT gene. Palmitoylation is the addition of saturated fatty acids to proteins by DHHC palmitoylacyl transferases. HTT is palmitoylated by huntingtin interacting proteins 14 and 14-like (HIP14 and HIP14L or ZDHHC17 and 13 respectively). Mutant HTT is less palmitoylated and this reduction of palmitoylation accelerates its aggregation and increases cellular toxicity. Mouse models deficient in either Hip14 (Hip14(-/-)) or Hip14l (Hip14l(-/-)) develop HD-like phenotypes. The biological function of HTT palmitoylation and the role that loss of HTT palmitoylation plays in the pathogenesis of HD are unknown. To address these questions mice deficient for both genes were created. Loss of Hip14 and Hip14l leads to early embryonic lethality at day embryonic day 10-11 due to failed chorioallantoic fusion. The chorion is thickened and disorganized and the allantois does not fuse correctly with the chorion and forms a balloon-like shape compared to Hip14l(-/-); Hip14(+/+) littermate control embryos. Interestingly, the Hip14(-/-) ; Hip14(-/-) embryos share many features with the Htt(-/-) embryos, including folding of the yolk sac, a bulb shaped allantois, and a thickened and disorganized chorion. This may be due to a decrease in HTT palmitoylation. In Hip14(-/-); Hip14l(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts show a 25% decrease in HTT palmitoylation compared to wild type cells. This is the first description of a double PAT deficient mouse model where loss of a PAT or multiple PATs results in embryonic lethality in mammals. These results reinforce the physiological importance of palmitoylation during embryogenesis.

  12. Nuclear importation of Mariner transposases among eukaryotes: motif requirements and homo-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Véronique Demattei

    Full Text Available Mariner-like elements (MLEs are widespread transposable elements in animal genomes. They have been divided into at least five sub-families with differing host ranges. We investigated whether the ability of transposases encoded by Mos1, Himar1 and Mcmar1 to be actively imported into nuclei varies between host belonging to different eukaryotic taxa. Our findings demonstrate that nuclear importation could restrict the host range of some MLEs in certain eukaryotic lineages, depending on their expression level. We then focused on the nuclear localization signal (NLS in these proteins, and showed that the first 175 N-terminal residues in the three transposases were required for nuclear importation. We found that two components are involved in the nuclear importation of the Mos1 transposase: an SV40 NLS-like motif (position: aa 168 to 174, and a dimerization sub-domain located within the first 80 residues. Sequence analyses revealed that the dimerization moiety is conserved among MLE transposases, but the Himar1 and Mcmar1 transposases do not contain any conserved NLS motif. This suggests that other NLS-like motifs must intervene in these proteins. Finally, we showed that the over-expression of the Mos1 transposase prevents its nuclear importation in HeLa cells, due to the assembly of transposase aggregates in the cytoplasm.

  13. Residues of the UL25 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus That Are Required for Its Stable Interaction with Capsids ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Cockrell, Shelley K.; Huffman, Jamie B.; Toropova, Katerina; James F Conway; Homa, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated reco...

  14. Structural requirements for the interaction of 91 hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls with estrogen and thyroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmozhiraja, Sundaram; Shiraishi, Fujio; Okumura, Tameo; Iida, Mitsuru; Takigami, Hidetaka; Edmonds, John S; Morita, Masatoshi

    2005-03-01

    Estrogenic and thyroid activities of 91 monohydroxylated PCBs were measured with two-hybrid assays using yeast cells containing the human estrogen receptor ERalpha or human thyroid receptor TRalpha. Estrogenic activity of 30 of the 91 compounds, including all compounds active in the yeast two-hybrid assay, were also measured by a reporter gene assay employing Chinese hamster ovary cells. The mammalian cell assay was more sensitive than the yeast assay but the rank order of estrogenicities of the compounds were in broad agreement for the two assays. Results for estrogenicity and thyroid activity were analyzed by inspection and those for estrogenicity by a theoretical treatment. Inspection indicated para-hydroxyl was more likely to be estrogenically active than meta-, which was more likely to be active than ortho-; one ortho-chlorine was important for activity but additional ortho-chlorines did not increase activity; and 2 lateral chlorines or 2,4,6-chloro- substitution of the non-phenol ring were favorable. In contrast, thyroid activity appeared not to depend strongly on the position of the hydroxyl group although ortho-hydroxyls occurred in the most active compounds. Activity was usually associated with at least one ortho-chlorine, with 2 chlorines in the phenolic ring and, importantly, two chlorines in the non-phenolic ring, and with 1 or 2 chlorines ortho to the hydroxyl group. Examination of the torsion angle between the rings, in the theoretical examination of estrogenicity, suggested that perpendicular orientation (i.e., rigidity) was not essential for activity. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding of the phenolic groups to adjacent chlorines or to the pi-electron cloud of the non-phenol ring possibly decreased activity--the hydroxyl should be free of intramolecular interactions for maximum activity. It was difficult to predict the estrogenic activity of a congener from its obtained potential energy curve (PEC). In general, estrogenically active congeners had large

  15. The quasi-two-body decays $B_{(s)} \\to (D_{(s)},\\bar{D}_{(s)}) \\rho \\to (D_{(s)}, \\bar{D}_{(s)})\\pi \\pi$ in the perturbative QCD factorization approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Ai-Jun; Wang, Wen-Fei; Xiao, Zhen-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the $B_{(s)} \\to (D_{(s)},\\bar{D}_{(s)}) \\rho \\to (D_{(s)}, \\bar{D}_{(s)})\\pi \\pi$ decays by employing a framework for the quasi-two-body decays in the perturbative QCD(PQCD) factorization approach. We use the two-pion distribution amplitudes $\\Phi_{\\pi\\pi}$, which contains both resonant and nonresonant contributions from the pion pair to explain the final-state interactions between the pions in the resonant regions. We found that (a) for the four $B\\to (\\bar{D}^0,D^-) \\rho \\to (\\bar{D}^0,D^-) \\pi\\pi$ and $B_s \\to D_s^- \\rho^+ \\to D_s^- \\pi^+\\pi^0$ decays, the PQCD predictions for their branching ratios can be as large as $10^{-4}-10^{-2}$; (b) for other ten considered decays, the PQCD predictions for their decay rates are around $10^{-8}$ to $10^{-5}$ mainly due to strong CKM suppressions; and (c) the PQCD predictions based on the quasi-two-body and the two-body framework agree well with each other, and also be consistent with currently available experimental measurements.

  16. Visual capture and the experience of having two bodies – Evidence from two different virtual reality techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas eHeydrich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In neurology and psychiatry the detailed study of illusory own body perceptions has suggested close links between bodily processing and self-consciousness. One such illusory own body perception is heautoscopy where patients have the sensation of being reduplicated and to exist at two or even more locations. In previous experiments, using a video head-mounted display, self-location and self-identification were manipulated by applying conflicting visuo-tactile information. Yet the experienced singularity of the self was not affected, i.e. participants did not experience having multiple bodies or selves. In two experiments presented in this paper, we investigated self-location and self-identification while participants saw two virtual bodies (video-generated in study 1 and 3D computer generated in study 2 that were stroked either synchronously or asynchronously with their own body. In both experiments, we report that self-identification with two virtual bodies was stronger during synchronous stroking. Furthermore, in the video generated setup with synchronous stroking participants reported a greater feeling of having multiple bodies than in the control conditions. In study 1, but not in study 2, we report that self-location – measured by anterior posterior drift – was significantly shifted towards the two bodies in the synchronous condition only. Self-identification with two bodies, the sensation of having multiple bodies, and the changes in self-location show that the experienced singularity of the self can be studied experimentally. We discuss our data with respect to ownership for supernumerary hands and heautoscopy. We finally compare the effects of the video and 3D computer generated head-mounted display technology and discuss the possible benefits of using either technology to induce changes in illusory self-identification with a virtual body.

  17. Visual capture and the experience of having two bodies – Evidence from two different virtual reality techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydrich, Lukas; Dodds, Trevor J.; Aspell, Jane E.; Herbelin, Bruno; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Mohler, Betty J.; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    In neurology and psychiatry the detailed study of illusory own body perceptions has suggested close links between bodily processing and self-consciousness. One such illusory own body perception is heautoscopy where patients have the sensation of being reduplicated and to exist at two or even more locations. In previous experiments, using a video head-mounted display, self-location and self-identification were manipulated by applying conflicting visuo-tactile information. Yet the experienced singularity of the self was not affected, i.e., participants did not experience having multiple bodies or selves. In two experiments presented in this paper, we investigated self-location and self-identification while participants saw two virtual bodies (video-generated in study 1 and 3D computer generated in study 2) that were stroked either synchronously or asynchronously with their own body. In both experiments, we report that self-identification with two virtual bodies was stronger during synchronous stroking. Furthermore, in the video generated setup with synchronous stroking participants reported a greater feeling of having multiple bodies than in the control conditions. In study 1, but not in study 2, we report that self-location – measured by anterior posterior drift – was significantly shifted towards the two bodies in the synchronous condition only. Self-identification with two bodies, the sensation of having multiple bodies, and the changes in self-location show that the experienced singularity of the self can be studied experimentally. We discuss our data with respect to ownership for supernumerary hands and heautoscopy. We finally compare the effects of the video and 3D computer generated head-mounted display technology and discuss the possible benefits of using either technology to induce changes in illusory self-identification with a virtual body. PMID:24385970

  18. HFOLD - A program package for calculating two-body MSSM Higgs decays at full one-loop level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, W; Eberl, H; Hluchá, H

    2011-10-01

    HFOLD (Higgs Full One Loop Decays) is a Fortran program package for calculating all MSSM Higgs two-body decay widths and the corresponding branching ratios at full one-loop level. The package is done in the SUSY Parameter Analysis convention and supports the SUSY Les Houches Accord input and output format. PROGRAM SUMMARY: Program title: HFOLD Catalogue identifier: AEJG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJG_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 340 621 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 760 051 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Workstation, PC Operating system: Linux RAM: 524 288 000 Bytes Classification: 11.1 External routines: LoopTools 2.2 (http://www.feynarts.de/looptools/), SLHALib 2.2 (http://www.feynarts.de/slha/). The LoopTools code is included in the distribution package. Nature of problem: A future high-energy e+e- linear collider will be the best environment for the precise measurements of masses, cross sections, branching ratios, etc. Experimental accuracies are expected at the per-cent down to the per-mile level. These must be matched from the theoretical side. Therefore higher order calculations are mandatory. Solution method: This program package calculates all MSSM Higgs two-body decay widths and the corresponding branching ratios at full one-loop level. The renormalization is done in the DR scheme following the SUSY Parameter Analysis convention. The program supports the SUSY Les Houches Accord input and output format. Running time: The example provided takes only a few seconds to run.

  19. Two-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian for the time-symmetric two-body problem of the relativistic action-at-a-distance electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksman Hollander, Efrain; de Luca, Jayme

    2003-02-01

    We find a two-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian for the time-symmetric problem of straight line motion of two electrons in direct relativistic interaction. This time-symmetric dynamical system appeared 100 years ago and it was popularized in the 1940s by the work of Wheeler and Feynman in electrodynamics, which was left incomplete due to the lack of a Hamiltonian description. The form of our Hamiltonian is such that the action of a Lorentz transformation is explicitly described by a canonical transformation (with rescaling of the evolution parameter). The method is closed and defines the Hamitonian in implicit form without power expansions. We outline the method with an emphasis on the physics of this complex conservative dynamical system. The Hamiltonian orbits are calculated numerically at low energies using a self-consistent steepest-descent method (a stable numerical method that chooses only the nonrunaway solution). The two-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian suggests a simple prescription for the canonical quantization of the relativistic two-body problem.

  20. An Amphiphysin-Like Domain in Fus2p Is Required for Rvs161p Interaction and Cortical Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Stein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell–cell fusion fulfils essential roles in fertilization, development and tissue repair. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fusion between two haploid cells of opposite mating type generates the diploid zygote. Fus2p is a pheromone-induced protein that regulates cell wall removal during mating. Fus2p shuttles from the nucleus to localize at the shmoo tip, bound to Rvs161p, an amphiphysin. However, Rvs161p independently binds a second amphiphysin, Rvs167p, playing an essential role in endocytosis. To understand the basis of the Fus2p–Rvs161p interaction, we analyzed Fus2p structural domains. A previously described N-terminal domain (NTD is necessary and sufficient to regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic trafficking of Fus2p. The Dbl homology domain (DBH binds GTP-bound Cdc42p; binding is required for cell fusion, but not localization. We identified an approximately 200 amino acid region of Fus2p that is both necessary and sufficient for Rvs161p binding. The Rvs161p binding domain (RBD contains three predicted alpha-helices; structural modeling suggests that the RBD adopts an amphiphysin-like structure. The RBD contains a 13-amino-acid region, conserved with Rvs161p and other amphiphysins, which is essential for binding. Mutations in the RBD, predicted to affect membrane binding, abolish cell fusion without affecting Rvs161p binding. We propose that Fus2p/Rvs161p form a novel heterodimeric amphiphysin required for cell fusion. Rvs161p binding is required but not sufficient for Fus2p localization. Mutations in the C-terminal domain (CTD of Fus2p block localization, but not Rvs161p binding, causing a significant defect in cell fusion. We conclude that the Fus2p CTD mediates an additional, Rvs161p-independent interaction at the shmoo tip.

  1. BDNF stimulation of protein synthesis in cortical neurons requires the MAP kinase-interacting kinase MNK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genheden, Maja; Kenney, Justin W; Johnston, Harvey E; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D; Proud, Christopher G

    2015-01-21

    Although the MAP kinase-interacting kinases (MNKs) have been known for >15 years, their roles in the regulation of protein synthesis have remained obscure. Here, we explore the involvement of the MNKs in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-stimulated protein synthesis in cortical neurons from mice. Using a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches, we show that BDNF-induced upregulation of protein synthesis requires MEK/ERK signaling and the downstream kinase, MNK1, which phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E. Translation initiation is mediated by the interaction of eIF4E with the m(7)GTP cap of mRNA and with eIF4G. The latter interaction is inhibited by the interactions of eIF4E with partner proteins, such as CYFIP1, which acts as a translational repressor. We find that BDNF induces the release of CYFIP1 from eIF4E, and that this depends on MNK1. Finally, using a novel combination of BONCAT and SILAC, we identify a subset of proteins whose synthesis is upregulated by BDNF signaling via MNK1 in neurons. Interestingly, this subset of MNK1-sensitive proteins is enriched for functions involved in neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Additionally, we find significant overlap between our subset of proteins whose synthesis is regulated by MNK1 and those encoded by known FMRP-binding mRNAs. Together, our data implicate MNK1 as a key component of BDNF-mediated translational regulation in neurons.

  2. Sapovirus translation requires an interaction between VPg and the cap binding protein eIF4E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmillo, Myra; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Kim, Deok-Song; Goodfellow, Ian; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2014-11-01

    Sapoviruses of the Caliciviridae family of small RNA viruses are emerging pathogens that cause gastroenteritis in humans and animals. Molecular studies on human sapovirus have been hampered due to the lack of a cell culture system. In contrast, porcine sapovirus (PSaV) can be grown in cell culture, making it a suitable model for understanding the infectious cycle of sapoviruses and the related enteric caliciviruses. Caliciviruses are known to use a novel mechanism of protein synthesis that relies on the interaction of cellular translation initiation factors with the virus genome-encoded viral protein genome (VPg) protein, which is covalently linked to the 5' end of the viral genome. Using PSaV as a representative member of the Sapovirus genus, we characterized the role of the viral VPg protein in sapovirus translation. As observed for other caliciviruses, the PSaV genome was found to be covalently linked to VPg, and this linkage was required for the translation and the infectivity of viral RNA. The PSaV VPg protein was associated with the 4F subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF4F) complex in infected cells and bound directly to the eIF4E protein. As has been previously demonstrated for feline calicivirus, a member of the Vesivirus genus, PSaV translation required eIF4E and the interaction between eIF4E and eIF4G. Overall, our study provides new insights into the novel mechanism of sapovirus translation, suggesting that sapovirus VPg can hijack the cellular translation initiation mechanism by recruiting the eIF4F complex through a direct eIF4E interaction. Sapoviruses, which are members of the Caliciviridae family, are one of the causative agents of viral gastroenteritis in humans. However, human sapovirus remains noncultivable in cell culture, hampering the ability to characterize the virus infectious cycle. Here, we show that the VPg protein from porcine sapovirus, the only cultivatable sapovirus, is essential for viral translation and

  3. Nuclear localization of the transcriptional regulator MIER1α requires interaction with HDAC1/2 in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengnan Li

    Full Text Available MIER1α is a transcriptional regulator that functions in gene repression through its ability to interact with various chromatin modifiers and transcription factors. We have also shown that MIER1α interacts with ERα and inhibits estrogen-stimulated growth. While MIER1α is localized in the nucleus of MCF7 cells, previous studies have shown that it does not contain a nuclear localization signal. In this report, we investigate the mechanism involved in transporting MIER1α into the nucleus. We explored the possibility that MIER1α is transported into the nucleus through a 'piggyback' mechanism. One obvious choice is via interaction with ERα, however we demonstrate that nuclear targeting of MIER1α does not require ERα. Knockdown of ERα reduced protein expression to 22% of control, but did not alter the percentage of cells with nuclear MIER1α (98% nuclear with scrambled shRNA vs. 95% with ERα shRNA. Further evidence was obtained using two stable transfectants derived from the ER-negative MDA231 cell line: MC2 (ERα+ and VC5 (ERα-. Confocal analysis showed no difference in MIER1α localization (86% nuclear in MC2 vs. 89% in VC5. These data demonstrate that ERα is not involved in nuclear localization of MIER1α. To identify the critical MIER1α sequence, we performed a deletion analysis and determined that the ELM2 domain was necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization. This domain binds HDAC1 & 2, therefore we investigated their role. Confocal analysis of an MIER1α containing an ELM2 point mutation previously shown to abolish HDAC binding revealed that this mutation results in almost complete loss of nuclear targeting: 10% nuclear vs. 97% with WT-MIER1α. Moreover, double knockdown of HDAC1 and 2 caused a reduction in percent nuclear from 86% to 44%. The results of this study demonstrate that nuclear targeting of MIER1α requires an intact ELM2 domain and is dependent on interaction with HDAC1/2.

  4. Dynamic regulatory interactions of Polycomb group genes: MEDEA autoregulation is required for imprinted gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroux, Célia; Gagliardini, Valeria; Page, Damian R; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2006-05-01

    The imprinted Arabidopsis Polycomb group (PcG) gene MEDEA (MEA), which is homologous to Enhancer of Zeste [E(Z)], is maternally required for normal seed development. Here we show that, unlike known mammalian imprinted genes, MEA regulates its own imprinted expression: It down-regulates the maternal allele around fertilization and maintains the paternal allele silent later during seed development. Autorepression of the maternal MEA allele is direct and independent of the MEA-FIE (FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM) PcG complex, which is similar to the E(Z)-ESC (Extra sex combs) complex of animals, suggesting a novel mechanism. A complex network of cross-regulatory interactions among the other known members of the MEA-FIE PcG complex implies distinct functions that are dynamically regulated during reproduction.

  5. WNK3-SPAK interaction is required for the modulation of NCC and other members of the SLC12 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Alvarez, Diana; Vázquez, Norma; Castañeda-Bueno, María; de-Los-Heros, Paola; Cortes-González, César; Moreno, Erika; Meade, Patricia; Bobadilla, Norma A; Gamba, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    The serine/threonine with no lysine kinase 3 (WNK3) modulates the activity of the electroneutral cation-coupled chloride cotransporters (CCC) to promote Cl(-) influx and prevent Cl(-) efflux, thus fitting the profile for a putative "Cl(-)-sensing kinase". The Ste20-type kinases, SPAK/OSR1, become phosphorylated in response to reduction in intracellular chloride concentration and regulate the activity of NKCC1. Several studies have now shown that WNKs function upstream of SPAK/OSR1. This study was designed to analyze the role of WNK3-SPAK interaction in the regulation of CCCs with particular emphasis on NCC. In this study we used the functional expression system of Xenopus laevis oocytes to show that different SPAK binding sites in WNK3 ((241, 872, 1336)RFxV) are required for the kinase to have effects on CCCs. WNK3-F1337A no longer activated NKCC2, but the effects on NCC, NKCC1, and KCC4 were preserved. In contrast, the effects of WNK3 on these cotransporters were prevented in WNK3-F242A. The elimination of F873 had no consequence on WNK3 effects. WNK3 promoted NCC phosphorylation at threonine 58, even in the absence of the unique SPAK binding site of NCC, but this effect was abolished in the mutant WNK3-F242A. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that the effects of WNK3 upon NCC and other CCCs require the interaction and activation of the SPAK kinase. The effect is dependent on one of the three binding sites for SPAK that are present in WNK3, but not on the SPAK binding sites on the CCCs, which suggests that WNK3 is capable of binding both SPAK and CCCs to promote their phosphorylation. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. SDCCAG8 Interacts with RAB Effector Proteins RABEP2 and ERC1 and Is Required for Hedgehog Signaling.

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    Rannar Airik

    Full Text Available Recessive mutations in the SDCCAG8 gene cause a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy with Bardet-Biedl syndrome-like features in humans. Our previous characterization of the orthologous Sdccag8gt/gt mouse model recapitulated the retinal-renal disease phenotypes and identified impaired DNA damage response signaling as an underlying disease mechanism in the kidney. However, several other phenotypic and mechanistic features of Sdccag8gt/gt mice remained unexplored. Here we show that Sdccag8gt/gt mice exhibit developmental and structural abnormalities of the skeleton and limbs, suggesting impaired Hedgehog (Hh signaling. Indeed, cell culture studies demonstrate the requirement of SDCCAG8 for ciliogenesis and Hh signaling. Using an affinity proteomics approach, we demonstrate that SDCCAG8 interacts with proteins of the centriolar satellites (OFD1, AZI1, of the endosomal sorting complex (RABEP2, ERC1, and with non-muscle myosin motor proteins (MYH9, MYH10, MYH14 at the centrosome. Furthermore, we show that RABEP2 localization at the centrosome is regulated by SDCCAG8. siRNA mediated RABEP2 knockdown in hTERT-RPE1 cells leads to defective ciliogenesis, indicating a critical role for RABEP2 in this process. Together, this study identifies several centrosome-associated proteins as novel SDCCAG8 interaction partners, and provides new insights into the function of SDCCAG8 at this structure.

  7. The ribosomal biogenesis protein Utp21 interacts with Hsp90 and has differing requirements for Hsp90-associated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria R Tenge

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone Hsp90 buffers the effects of genetic variation by assisting the stabilization and folding of multiple clients critical for cell signaling and growth. We identified an interaction of Hsp90 and associated proteins with the essential nucleolar protein, Utp21, part of a large complex required for biogenesis of the small ribosomal subunit. The utp21-S602F mutation, which causes minor defects in otherwise wild-type yeast, exhibited severe or lethal growth defects when combined with mutations in Hsp90 or co-chaperones. WT Utp21 and Utp21-S602F exhibited similar interactions with Hsp90, and steady-state levels of WT Utp21 were reduced upon Hsp90 mutation or inhibition. Mutations in the human homolog of UTP21, WDR36, have been associated with adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Three different mutant forms of Utp21 analogous to glaucoma-associated WDR36 mutations exhibit reduced levels in yeast cells expressing mutations in Hsp90 or associated chaperones, suggesting that Hsp90 and co-chaperones buffer the effects of those mutations.

  8. The N-Terminal of Aquareovirus NS80 Is Required for Interacting with Viral Proteins and Viral Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Reovirus replication and assembly occurs within viral inclusion bodies that formed in specific intracellular compartments of cytoplasm in infected cells. Previous study indicated that aquareovirus NS80 is able to form inclusion bodies, and also can retain viral proteins within its inclusions. To better understand how NS80 performed in viral replication and assembly, the functional regions of NS80 associated with other viral proteins in aquareovirus replication were investigated in this study. Deletion mutational analysis and rotavirus NSP5-based protein association platform were used to detect association regions. Immunofluorescence images indicated that different N-terminal regions of NS80 could associate with viral proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 and NS38. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the interaction between VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 with different regions covering the N-terminal amino acid (aa, 1-471 of NS80, respectively. Moreover, removal of NS80 N-terminal sequences required for interaction with proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 not only prevented the capacity of NS80 to support viral replication in NS80 shRNA-based replication complementation assays, but also inhibited the expression of aquareovirus proteins, suggesting that N-terminal regions of NS80 are necessary for viral replication. These results provided a foundational basis for further understanding the role of NS80 in viral replication and assembly during aquareovirus infection.

  9. Compatibility in the Ustilago maydis-maize interaction requires inhibition of host cysteine proteases by the fungal effector Pit2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André N Mueller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The basidiomycete Ustilago maydis causes smut disease in maize, with large plant tumors being formed as the most prominent disease symptoms. During all steps of infection, U. maydis depends on a biotrophic interaction, which requires an efficient suppression of plant immunity. In a previous study, we identified the secreted effector protein Pit2, which is essential for maintenance of biotrophy and induction of tumors. Deletion mutants for pit2 successfully penetrate host cells but elicit various defense responses, which stops further fungal proliferation. We now show that Pit2 functions as an inhibitor of a set of apoplastic maize cysteine proteases, whose activity is directly linked with salicylic-acid-associated plant defenses. Consequently, protease inhibition by Pit2 is required for U. maydis virulence. Sequence comparisons with Pit2 orthologs from related smut fungi identified a conserved sequence motif. Mutation of this sequence caused loss of Pit2 function. Consequently, expression of the mutated protein in U. maydis could not restore virulence of the pit2 deletion mutant, indicating that the protease inhibition by Pit2 is essential for fungal virulence. Moreover, synthetic peptides of the conserved sequence motif showed full activity as protease inhibitor, which identifies this domain as a new, minimal protease inhibitor domain in plant-pathogenic fungi.

  10. SGT1 interacts with the Prf resistance protein and is required for Prf accumulation and Prf-mediated defense signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kud, Joanna; Zhao, Zhulu; Du, Xinran; Liu, Yule; Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Fangming

    2013-02-15

    The highly conserved eukaryotic co-chaperone SGT1 (suppressor of the G2 allele of skp1) is an important signaling component of plant defense responses and positively regulates disease resistance conferred by many resistance (R) proteins. In this study, we investigated the contribution of SGT1 in the Prf-mediated defense responses in both Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). SGT1 was demonstrated to interact with Prf in plant cells by co-immunoprecipitation. The requirement of SGT1 in the accumulation of Prf or autoactive Prf(D1416V) was determined by the degradation of these proteins in N. benthamiana, in which SGT1 was repressed by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Pseudomonas pathogen assay on the SGT1-silenced tomato plants implicates SGT1 is required for the Prf-mediated full resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). These results suggest that, in both N. benthamiana and tomato, SGT1 contributes to the Prf-mediated defense responses by stabilizing Prf protein via its co-chaperone activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Compatibility in the Ustilago maydis-maize interaction requires inhibition of host cysteine proteases by the fungal effector Pit2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, André N; Ziemann, Sebastian; Treitschke, Steffi; Aßmann, Daniela; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2013-02-01

    The basidiomycete Ustilago maydis causes smut disease in maize, with large plant tumors being formed as the most prominent disease symptoms. During all steps of infection, U. maydis depends on a biotrophic interaction, which requires an efficient suppression of plant immunity. In a previous study, we identified the secreted effector protein Pit2, which is essential for maintenance of biotrophy and induction of tumors. Deletion mutants for pit2 successfully penetrate host cells but elicit various defense responses, which stops further fungal proliferation. We now show that Pit2 functions as an inhibitor of a set of apoplastic maize cysteine proteases, whose activity is directly linked with salicylic-acid-associated plant defenses. Consequently, protease inhibition by Pit2 is required for U. maydis virulence. Sequence comparisons with Pit2 orthologs from related smut fungi identified a conserved sequence motif. Mutation of this sequence caused loss of Pit2 function. Consequently, expression of the mutated protein in U. maydis could not restore virulence of the pit2 deletion mutant, indicating that the protease inhibition by Pit2 is essential for fungal virulence. Moreover, synthetic peptides of the conserved sequence motif showed full activity as protease inhibitor, which identifies this domain as a new, minimal protease inhibitor domain in plant-pathogenic fungi.

  12. Two-body decays of gluino at full one-loop level in the quark-flavour violating MSSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Helmut; Ginina, Elena; Hidaka, Keisho

    2017-01-01

    We study the two-body decays of the gluino at full one-loop level in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with quark-flavour violation (QFV) in the squark sector. The renormalisation is done in the [Formula: see text] scheme. The gluon and photon radiations are included by adding the corresponding three-body decay widths. We discuss the dependence of the gluino decay widths on the QFV parameters. The main dependence stems from the [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] mixing in the decays to up-type squarks, and from the [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] mixing in the decays to down-type squarks due to the strong constraints from B-physics on the other quark-flavour-mixing parameters. The full one-loop corrections to the gluino decay widths are mostly negative and of the order of about -10%. The QFV part stays small in the total width but can vary up to -8% for the decay width into the lightest [Formula: see text] squark. For the corresponding branching ratio the effect is somehow washed out by at least a factor of two. The electroweak corrections can be as large as 35% of the SUSY QCD corrections.

  13. A global analysis of two-body D to VP decays within the framework of flavor symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Kuo, An-Li

    2016-01-01

    Two-body charmed meson decays $D\\to VP$ are studied within the framework of the diagrammatic approach. Under flavor SU(3) symmetry, all the flavor amplitude sizes and their associated strong phases are extracted by performing a $\\chi^2$ fit. Thanks to the recent measurement of $D_s^+\\to\\pi^+\\rho^0$, the magnitudes and the strong phases of the $W$-annihilation amplitudes $A_{P,V}$ have been extracted for the first time. As a consequence, the branching fractions of all the $D\\to VP$ decays are predicted, especially those modes that could not be predicted previously due to the unknown $A_{P,V}$. Our working assumption, the flavor SU(3) symmetry, is tested by comparing our predictions with experiment for the singly and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes based on the flavor amplitudes extracted from the Cabibbo-favored decays using the current data. The predictions for the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed channels are in good agreement with the data, while those for the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes are seen t...

  14. Measurement of Branching Fractions for Two-Body Charmless B Decays to Charged Pions and Kaons at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-08-28

    The authors present preliminary results of a search for charmless two-body B decays to charged pions and kaons using data collected by the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's PEP-II Storage ring. In a sample of 8.8 million produced B anti-B pairs the authors measure the branching fractions beta(B{sup 0} --> pi{sup +}pi{sup {minus}}) = (9.3{sub {minus}2.3{minus}1.4}{sup +2.6+1.2}) x 10{sup {minus}6} and beta(B{sup 0} --> K{sup +}pi{sup {minus}}) = (12.5{sub {minus}2.6{minus}1.7}{sup +3.0+1.3}) x 10{sup {minus}6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. For the decay B{sup 0} --> K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} they find no significant signal and set an upper limit of beta(B{sup 0} --> K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}) < 6.6 x 10{sup {minus}6} at the 90% confidence level.

  15. Dental materials for primary dentition: are they suitable for occlusal restorations? A two-body wear study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridou, D; Belli, R; Krämer, N; Petschelt, A; Lohbauer, U

    2015-04-01

    This was to evaluate the wear resistance of different materials, compomers, resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs), glass ionomer cements (GICs), used for posterior restorations in primary teeth and to compare the results with the reference material, amalgam. Eight specimens of each material were subjected to two-body wear test, using a chewing simulator. The wear region of each material was examined under a profilometer, measuring the vertical loss (μm) and the volume loss (mm(3)) of the materials. The results showed significant differences of vertical loss and volume loss of the test materials (p < 0.001). Amalgam had the highest wear resistance. Twinky Star (compomer) had the lowest vertical loss and volume loss. There was no significant difference of vertical loss among compomers, Dyract Extra, Dyract Flow and Dyract Posterior. Riva Self Cure (GIC) had no statistically significant difference compared with the compomers (except Twinky Star). No statistically significant difference was found also between Equia (GIC) and Ketac Moral (GIC) with Dyract Extra (Compomer). RMGICs were found to have the lowest wear resistance. For the statistical analysis, the PASW 20.0 (SPSS Statistics, IBM, Chicago) package was used. Means and standard deviations were measured with descriptive statistics and analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Compomers and some GICs, that have moderate wear resistance, may be sufficient for occlusal restorations in primary dentitions.

  16. Towards numerically robust multireference theories: The driven similarity renormalization group truncated to one- and two-body operators

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chenyang

    2016-01-01

    The first nonperturbative version of the multireference driven similarity renormalization group (MR-DSRG) theory [C. Li and F. A. Evangelista, J. Chem. Theory Comput. $\\mathbf{11}$, 2097 (2015)] is introduced. The renormalization group structure of the MR-DSRG equations ensures numerical robustness and avoidance of the intruder state problem, while the connected nature of the amplitude and energy equations guarantees size consistency and extensivity. We approximate the MR-DSRG equations by keeping only one- and two-body operators and using a linearized recursive commutator approximation of the Baker--Campbell--Hausdorff expansion [T. Yanai and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. $\\mathbf{124}$, 194106 (2006)]. The resulting MR-LDSRG(2) equations contain only 39 terms and scales as ${\\cal O}(N^2 N_{\\rm P}^2 N_{\\rm H}^2)$ where $N_{\\rm H}$, $N_{\\rm P}$, and $N$ correspond to the number of hole, particle, and total orbitals, respectively. Benchmark MR-LDSRG(2) computations on the hydrogen fluoride and molecular nitrog...

  17. Two-body decays of gluino at full one-loop level in the quark-flavour violating MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberl, Helmut; Ginina, Elena [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria); Hidaka, Keisho [Tokyo Gakugei University, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    We study the two-body decays of the gluino at full one-loop level in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with quark-flavour violation (QFV) in the squark sector. The renormalisation is done in the DR scheme. The gluon and photon radiations are included by adding the corresponding three-body decay widths. We discuss the dependence of the gluino decay widths on the QFV parameters. The main dependence stems from the c{sub R}-t{sub R} mixing in the decays to up-type squarks, and from the s{sub R}-b{sub R} mixing in the decays to down-type squarks due to the strong constraints from B-physics on the other quark-flavour-mixing parameters. The full one-loop corrections to the gluino decay widths are mostly negative and of the order of about -10%. The QFV part stays small in the total width but can vary up to -8% for the decay width into the lightest u squark. For the corresponding branching ratio the effect is somehow washed out by at least a factor of two. The electroweak corrections can be as large as 35% of the SUSY QCD corrections. (orig.)

  18. Measurement of time dependent CP asymmetries in charged charmless hadronic two-body B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Pennazzi, S

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four experiments that are installed at the protonproton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva. The experiment is at the latest stage of its setting-up. The first collisions at high energy in LHC are planned to mid-2008, with the first results on the experiments soon after. The LHCb detector is a single-arm spectrometer conceived to pursue an extensive study of CP violation in the B meson system, over-constraining the Standard Model predictions and looking for any possible effect beyond this theory, and to look for rare phenomena in the b quark sector with very high precision. The subject of the present work is the study of the non-leptonic B meson decays into charged charmless two-body final states. This class of decays has been extensively studied and it is still matter of great interest at the B-factories and at Tevatron. In fact the current knowledge of this class of decays in the Bd/Bu sector starts to be quite constrained, but the Bs still remains a field where a r...

  19. Two-body orbit expansion due to time-dependent relative acceleration rate of the cosmological scale factor

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    By phenomenologically assuming a slow temporal variation of the percent acceleration rate $\\ddot S S^{-1}$ of the cosmic scale factor $S(t)$, it is shown that the orbit of a local binary undergoes a secular expansion. To first order in the power expansion of $\\ddot S S^{-1}$ around the present epoch $t_0$, a non-vanishing shift per orbit $\\left\\langle\\Delta r\\right\\rangle$ of the two-body relative distance $r$ occurs for eccentric trajectories. A general relativistic expression, which turns out to be cubic in the Hubble parameter $H_0$ at the present epoch, is explicitly calculated for it in the case of matter-dominated epochs with Dark Energy. For a highly eccentric Oort comet orbit with period $P_{\\rm b}\\approx 31$ Myr, the general relativistic distance shift per orbit turns out to be of the order of $\\left\\langle\\Delta r\\right\\rangle\\approx 70$ km. For the Large Magellanic Cloud, assumed on a bound elliptic orbit around the Milky Way, the shift per orbit is of the order of $\\left\\langle\\Delta r\\right\\rangl...

  20. Cmv2b-AGO interaction is required for the suppression of RDR-dependent antiviral silencing in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yuan Fang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Using a transient plant system, it was previously found that the suppression of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV 2b protein relies on its double-strand (ds RNA binding capacity, but it is independent of its interaction with ARGONAUTE (AGO proteins. Thus, the biological meaning of the 2b-AGO interaction in the context of virus infection remains elusive. In this study, we created infectious clones of CMV mutants that expressed the 2b functional domains of dsRNA or AGO binding and tested the effect of these CMV mutants on viral pathogenicity. We found that the mutant CMV2b(1-76 expressing the 2b dsRNA-binding domain exhibited the same virulence as wild-type CMV in infection with either wild-type Arabidopsis or rdr1/6 plants with RDR1- and RDR6-deficient mutations. However, remarkably reduced viral RNA levels and increased virus (vsiRNAs were detected in CMV2b(1-76-infected Arabidopsis in comparison to CMV infection, which demonstrated that the 2b(1-76 deleted AGO-binding domain failed to suppress the RDR1/RDR6-dependent degradation of viral RNAs. The mutant CMV2b(8-111 expressing mutant 2b, in which the N-terminal 7 amino acid (aa was deleted, exhibited slightly reduced virulence, but not viral RNA levels, in both wild-type and rdr1/6 plants, which indicated that 2b retained the AGO-binding activity acquired the counter-RDRs degradation of viral RNAs. The deletion of the N-terminal 7 aa of 2b affected virulence due to the reduced affinity for long dsRNA. The mutant CMV2b(18-111 expressing mutant 2b lacked the N-terminal 17 aa but retained its AGO-binding activity greatly reduced virulence and viral RNA level. Together with the instability of both 2b(18-111-EGFP and RFP-AGO4 proteins when co-expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, our data demonstrates that the effect of 2b-AGO interaction on counter-RDRs antiviral defense required the presence of 2b dsRNA-binding activity. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the dsRNA-binding activity of the

  1. Combinatorial interactions are required for the efficient recruitment of pho repressive complex (PhoRC to polycomb response elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana G Kahn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb Group (PcG proteins are epigenetic repressors that control metazoan development and cell differentiation. In Drosophila, PcG proteins form five distinct complexes targeted to genes by Polycomb Response Elements (PREs. Of all PcG complexes PhoRC is the only one that contains a sequence-specific DNA binding subunit (PHO or PHOL, which led to a model that places PhoRC at the base of the recruitment hierarchy. Here we demonstrate that in vivo PHO is preferred to PHOL as a subunit of PhoRC and that PHO and PHOL associate with PREs and a subset of transcriptionally active promoters. Although the binding to the promoter sites depends on the quality of recognition sequences, the binding to PREs does not. Instead, the efficient recruitment of PhoRC to PREs requires the SFMBT subunit and crosstalk with Polycomb Repressive Complex 1. We find that human YY1 protein, the ortholog of PHO, binds sites at active promoters in the human genome but does not bind most PcG target genes, presumably because the interactions involved in the targeting to Drosophila PREs are lost in the mammalian lineage. We conclude that the recruitment of PhoRC to PREs is based on combinatorial interactions and propose that such a recruitment strategy is important to attenuate the binding of PcG proteins when the target genes are transcriptionally active. Our findings allow the appropriate placement of PhoRC in the PcG recruitment hierarchy and provide a rationale to explain why YY1 is unlikely to serve as a general recruiter of mammalian Polycomb complexes despite its reported ability to participate in PcG repression in flies.

  2. Two-Body Orbit Expansion Due to Time-Dependent Relative Acceleration Rate of the Cosmological Scale Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By phenomenologically assuming a slow temporal variation of the percent acceleration rate S̈S -1 of the cosmic scale factor S(t, it is shown that the orbit of a local binary undergoes a secular expansion. To first order in the power expansion of S̈S -1 around the present epoch t0, a non-vanishing shift per orbit (Δr of the two-body relative distance r occurs for eccentric trajectories. A general relativistic expression, which turns out to be cubic in the Hubble parameter H0 at the present epoch, is explicitly calculated for it in the case of matter-dominated epochs with Dark Energy. For a highly eccentric Oort comet orbit with period Pb ≈ 31 Myr, the general relativistic distance shift per orbit turns out to be of the order of (Δr ≈ 70 km. For the Large Magellanic Cloud, assumed on a bound elliptic orbit around the Milky Way, the shift per orbit is of the order of (Δr ≈ 2–4 pc. Our result has a general validity since it holds in any cosmological model admitting the Hubble law and a slowly varying S̈S-1(t. More generally, it is valid for an arbitrary Hooke-like extra-acceleration whose “elastic” parameter κ is slowly time-dependent, irrespectively of the physical mechanism which may lead to it. The coefficient κ1 of the first-order term of the power expansion of κ(t can be preliminarily constrained in a model-independent way down to a κ1 ≲ 2 x 10-13 year-3 level from latest Solar System’s planetary observations. The radial velocities of the double lined spectroscopic binary ALPHA Cen AB yield κ1 ≲ 10-8 year-3.

  3. Two-Body Orbit Expansion Due to Time-Dependent Relative Acceleration Rate of the Cosmological Scale Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    By phenomenologically assuming a slow temporal variation of the percent acceleration rate S̈S -1 of the cosmic scale factor S(t), it is shown that the orbit of a local binary undergoes a secular expansion. To first order in the power expansion of S̈S -1 around the present epoch t0, a non-vanishing shift per orbit (Δr) of the two-body relative distance r occurs for eccentric trajectories. A general relativistic expression, which turns out to be cubic in the Hubble parameter H0 at the present epoch, is explicitly calculated for it in the case of matter-dominated epochs with Dark Energy. For a highly eccentric Oort comet orbit with period Pb ≈ 31 Myr, the general relativistic distance shift per orbit turns out to be of the order of (Δr) ≈ 70 km. For the Large Magellanic Cloud, assumed on a bound elliptic orbit around the Milky Way, the shift per orbit is of the order of (Δr) ≈ 2-4 pc. Our result has a general validity since it holds in any cosmological model admitting the Hubble law and a slowly varying S̈S-1(t). More generally, it is valid for an arbitrary Hooke-like extra-acceleration whose "elastic" parameter κ is slowly time-dependent, irrespectively of the physical mechanism which may lead to it. The coefficient κ1 of the first-order term of the power expansion of κ(t) can be preliminarily constrained in a model-independent way down to a κ1 ≤ 2 x 10-13 year-3 level from latest Solar System's planetary observations. The radial velocities of the double lined spectroscopic binary ALPHA Cen AB yield κ1 ≤ 10-8 year-3.

  4. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  5. A synthetic interaction screen identifies factors selectively required for proliferation and TERT transcription in p53-deficient human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xie

    Full Text Available Numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations render cancer cells selectively dependent on specific genes and regulatory pathways, and represent potential vulnerabilities that can be therapeutically exploited. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi-based synthetic interaction screen to identify genes preferentially required for proliferation of p53-deficient (p53- human cancer cells. We find that compared to p53-competent (p53+ human cancer cell lines, diverse p53- human cancer cell lines are preferentially sensitive to loss of the transcription factor ETV1 and the DNA damage kinase ATR. In p53- cells, RNAi-mediated knockdown of ETV1 or ATR results in decreased expression of the telomerase catalytic subunit TERT leading to growth arrest, which can be reversed by ectopic TERT expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveals that ETV1 binds to a region downstream of the TERT transcriptional start-site in p53- but not p53+ cells. We find that the role of ATR is to phosphorylate and thereby stabilize ETV1. Our collective results identify a regulatory pathway involving ETV1, ATR, and TERT that is preferentially important for proliferation of diverse p53- cancer cells.

  6. Interaction with LC8 is required for Pak1 nuclear import and is indispensable for zebrafish development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Lightcap

    Full Text Available Pak1 (p21 activated kinase 1 is a serine/threonine kinase implicated in regulation of cell motility and survival and in malignant transformation of mammary epithelial cells. In addition, the dynein light chain, LC8, has been described to cooperate with Pak1 in malignant transformation of breast cancer cells. Pak1 itself may aid breast cancer development by phosphorylating nuclear proteins, including estrogen receptor alpha. Recently, we showed that the LC8 binding site on Pak1 is adjacent to the nuclear localization sequence (NLS required for Pak1 nuclear import. Here, we demonstrate that the LC8-Pak1 interaction is necessary for epidermal growth factor (EGF-induced nuclear import of Pak1 in MCF-7 cells, and that this event is contingent upon LC8-mediated Pak1 dimerization. In contrast, Pak2, which lacks an LC8 binding site but contains a nuclear localization sequence identical to that in Pak1, remains cytoplasmic upon EGF stimulation of MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, we show that severe developmental defects in zebrafish embryos caused by morpholino injections targeting Pak are partially rescued by co-injection of wild-type human Pak1, but not by co-injection of mutant Pak1 mRNA disrupting either the LC8 binding or the NLS site. Collectively, these results suggest that LC8 facilitates nuclear import of Pak1 and that this function is indispensable during vertebrate development.

  7. Yeast Dam1p is required to maintain spindle integrity during mitosis and interacts with the Mps1p kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M H; Bachant, J B; Castillo, A R; Giddings, T H; Winey, M

    1999-07-01

    We have identified a mutant allele of the DAM1 gene in a screen for mutations that are lethal in combination with the mps1-1 mutation. MPS1 encodes an essential protein kinase that is required for duplication of the spindle pole body and for the spindle assembly checkpoint. Mutations in six different genes were found to be lethal in combination with mps1-1, of which only DAM1 was novel. The remaining genes encode a checkpoint protein, Bub1p, and four chaperone proteins, Sti1p, Hsc82p, Cdc37p, and Ydj1p. DAM1 is an essential gene that encodes a protein recently described as a member of a microtubule binding complex. We report here that cells harboring the dam1-1 mutation fail to maintain spindle integrity during anaphase at the restrictive temperature. Consistent with this phenotype, DAM1 displays genetic interactions with STU1, CIN8, and KAR3, genes encoding proteins involved in spindle function. We have observed that a Dam1p-Myc fusion protein expressed at endogenous levels and localized by immunofluorescence microscopy, appears to be evenly distributed along short mitotic spindles but is found at the spindle poles at later times in mitosis.

  8. Residues of the UL25 protein of herpes simplex virus that are required for its stable interaction with capsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Shelley K; Huffman, Jamie B; Toropova, Katerina; Conway, James F; Homa, Fred L

    2011-05-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated recombinant viruses with either small truncations or amino acid substitutions in the UL25 N terminus. Studies of these mutants demonstrated that there are two important regions within the capsid binding domain. The first 27 amino acids are essential for capsid binding of UL25, while residues 26 to 39, which are highly conserved in the UL25 homologues of other alphaherpesviruses, were found to be critical for stable capsid binding. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of capsids containing either a small tag on the N terminus of UL25 or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused between amino acids 50 and 51 of UL25 demonstrate that residues 1 to 27 of UL25 contact the hexon adjacent to the penton. A second region, most likely centered on amino acids 26 to 39, contacts the triplex that is one removed from the penton. Importantly, both of these UL25 capsid binding regions are essential for the stable packaging of full-length viral genomes.

  9. Residues of the UL25 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus That Are Required for Its Stable Interaction with Capsids ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Shelley K.; Huffman, Jamie B.; Toropova, Katerina; Conway, James F.; Homa, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated recombinant viruses with either small truncations or amino acid substitutions in the UL25 N terminus. Studies of these mutants demonstrated that there are two important regions within the capsid binding domain. The first 27 amino acids are essential for capsid binding of UL25, while residues 26 to 39, which are highly conserved in the UL25 homologues of other alphaherpesviruses, were found to be critical for stable capsid binding. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of capsids containing either a small tag on the N terminus of UL25 or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused between amino acids 50 and 51 of UL25 demonstrate that residues 1 to 27 of UL25 contact the hexon adjacent to the penton. A second region, most likely centered on amino acids 26 to 39, contacts the triplex that is one removed from the penton. Importantly, both of these UL25 capsid binding regions are essential for the stable packaging of full-length viral genomes. PMID:21411517

  10. Efficient and Accurate Methods for the Geometry Optimization of Water Clusters: Application of Analytic Gradients for the Two-Body:Many-Body QM:QM Fragmentation Method to (H2O)n, n = 3-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Desiree M; Smith, Joshua R; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2011-09-13

    The structures of more than 70 low-lying water clusters ranging in size from (H2O)3 to (H2O)10 have been fully optimized with several different quantum mechanical electronic structure methods, including second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) in conjunction with correlation consistent triple-ζ basis sets (aug-cc-pVTZ for O and cc-pVTZ for H, abbreviated haTZ). Optimized structures obtained with less demanding computational procedures were compared to the MP2/haTZ ones using both MP2/haTZ single point energies and the root-mean-square (RMS) deviations of unweighted Cartesian coordinates. Based on these criteria, B3LYP/6-31+G(d,2p) substantially outperforms both HF/haTZ and MP2/6-31G*. B3LYP/6-31+G(d,2p) structures never deviate from the MP2/haTZ geometries by more than 0.44 kcal mol(-1) on the MP2/haTZ potential energy surface, whereas the errors associated with the HF/haTZ and MP2/6-31G* structures grow as large as 12.20 and 2.98 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The most accurate results, however, were obtained with the two-body:many-body QM:QM fragmentation method for weakly bound clusters, in which all one- and two-body interactions are calculated at the high-level, while a low-level calculation is performed on the entire cluster to capture the cooperative effects (nonadditivity). With the haTZ basis set, the MP2:HF two-body:many-body fragmentation method generates structures that deviate from the MP2/haTZ ones by 0.01 kcal mol(-1) on average and not by more than 0.03 kcal mol(-1).

  11. The Impact of Retained Austenite Characteristics on the Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Ultrahigh Strength Bainitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Balaji; Hodgson, Peter; Timokhina, Ilana; Beladi, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    the two-body abrasion.

  12. The interaction of boron with glycolipids is required to increase tolerance to stresses in Anabaena PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Isidro; Orús, Isabel; Bolaños, Luis; Bonilla, Ildefonso

    2014-10-01

    Boron (B) is an essential nutrient for heterocystous cyanobacteria growing under diazotrophic conditions. Under B-deficient conditions, the heterocyst envelope is highly disorganized, and the glycolipid layer is predominantly lost. Therefore, we examined whether B is implicated in the regulation of synthesis or processing and/or stability of glycolipids in Anabaena PCC 7120. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the expression of hglE was not significantly changed under B deficiency, suggesting that the synthesis of glycolipids during heterocyst formation was not compromised. In contrast, the overexpression of devB and hepA, encoding a glycolipid and a carbohydrate transporter, respectively, results in the instability of the envelope under B-deficient conditions. The capacity of borate to bind and stabilize molecules is considered the basis of any B biological function. Using a borate-binding-specific resin and thin layer chromatography, we detected the glycolipids that interact with B. Several heterocyst-specific glycolipids were detected as putative B ligands, suggesting a role for B in stabilizing the heterocyst envelope. Moreover, the glycolipids of Anabaena growing in non-diazotrophic conditions were also detected as putative B ligands. Although B is not essential for Anabaena under non-N2-fixing conditions, the presence of this micronutrient increased the tolerance of Anabaena to detergent treatment, salinity and hyperosmotic conditions. Taken together, the results of the present experiment suggest a beneficial role for B in environmental adaptation. Furthermore, we discuss the nutrient requirement for living organisms growing in nature and not under laboratory conditions.

  13. Assembly of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal stalk: binding of P1 proteins is required for the interaction of P2 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurdo, J; Parada, P; van den Berg, A; Nusspaumer, G; Jimenez-Diaz, A; Remacha, M; Ballesta, J P

    2000-08-01

    The yeast ribosomal stalk is formed by a protein pentamer made of the 38 kDa P0 and four 12 kDa acidic P1/P2. The interaction of recombinant acidic proteins P1 alpha and P2 beta with ribosomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae D4567, lacking all the 12 kDa stalk components, has been used to study the in vitro assembly of this important ribosomal structure. Stimulation of the ribosome activity was obtained by incubating simultaneously the particles with both proteins, which were nonphosphorylated initially and remained unmodified afterward. The N-terminus state, free or blocked, did not affect either the binding or reactivating activity of both proteins. Independent incubation with each protein did not affect the activity of the particles, however, protein P2 beta alone was unable to bind the ribosome whereas P1 alpha could. The binding of P1 alpha alone is a saturable process in acidic-protein-deficient ribosomes and does not take place in complete wild-type particles. Binding of P1 proteins in the absence of P2 proteins takes also place in vivo, when protein P1 beta is overexpressed in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, protein P2 beta is not detected in the ribosome in the P1-deficient D67 strain despite being accumulated in the cytoplasm. The results confirm that neither phosphorylation nor N-terminal blocking of the 12 kDa acidic proteins is required for the assembly and function of the yeast stalk. More importantly, and regardless of the involvement of other elements, they indicate that stalk assembling is a coordinated process, in which P1 proteins would provide a ribosomal anchorage to P2 proteins, and P2 components would confer functionality to the complex.

  14. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  15. An Epichloë festucae homologue of MOB3, a component of the STRIPAK complex, is required for the establishment of a mutualistic symbiotic interaction with Lolium perenne

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Kimberly A.; Becker, Yvonne; Helen L Fitzsimons; Scott, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Summary In both Sordaria macrospora and Neurospora crassa, components of the conserved STRIPAK (striatin‐interacting phosphatase and kinase) complex regulate cell–cell fusion, hyphal network development and fruiting body formation. Interestingly, a number of Epichloë festucae genes that are required for hyphal cell–cell fusion, such as noxA, noxR, proA, mpkA and mkkA, are also required for the establishment of a mutualistic symbiotic interaction with Lolium perenne. To determine whether MobC,...

  16. Search for Flavor-Changing Neutral Currents and Lepton-Family-Number Violation in Two-Body $D^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Pripstein, D A; Carey, T A; Chen, Y C; Childers, R L; Cooper, W E; Darden, C W; Gidal, G; Gounder, K N; Ho, P M; Isenhower, L D; Jansen, D M; Jeppesen, R G; Kaplan, D M; Kapustinsky, J S; Kiang, G C; Kowitt, M S; Lane, D W; Lederman, Leon Max; Leitch, M J; Lillberg, J W; Luebke, W R; Luk, K B; McGaughey, P L; Mishra, C S; Moss, J M; Peng, J C; Preston, R S; Sá, J W; Sadler, M E; Schnathorst, R G; Schub, M H; Tanikella, V; Teng, P K; Wilson, J R

    2000-01-01

    Results of a search for the three neutral charm decays, D0 -> mu e, D0 -> mu mu, and D0 -> e e, are presented. This study was based on data collected in Experiment 789 at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory using 800 GeV/c proton-Au and proton-Be interactions. No evidence is found for any of the decays. Upper limits on the branching ratios, at the 90% confidence level, are obtained.

  17. Methods of Numerical Analysis of One-Dimensional Two-Body Problem in Wheeler-Feynman Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, S. V.; Nikitin, I. N.; Urazmetov, W. F.

    Numerical methods for solutions of differential equations with deviating arguments describing one-dimensional ultra-relativistic scattering of two identical charged particles in Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics with half-retarded/half-advanced interaction are developed. Utilization of the methods for the physical problem analysis leads to the discovery of a bifurcation of solutions and breaking of their reflectional symmetry for particles asymptotic velocity v>0.937c in their center-of-mass frame.

  18. Covariant Spectator Theory of np scattering: Isoscalar interaction currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Franz L. [JLAB

    2014-06-01

    Using the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST), one boson exchange (OBE) models have been found that give precision fits to low energy $np$ scattering and the deuteron binding energy. The boson-nucleon vertices used in these models contain a momentum dependence that requires a new class of interaction currents for use with electromagnetic interactions. Current conservation requires that these new interaction currents satisfy a two-body Ward-Takahashi (WT), and using principals of {\\it simplicity\\/} and {\\it picture independence\\/}, these currents can be uniquely determined. The results lead to general formulae for a two-body current that can be expressed in terms of relativistic $np$ wave functions, ${\\it \\Psi}$, and two convenient truncated wave functions, ${\\it \\Psi}^{(2)}$ and $\\widehat {\\it \\Psi}$, which contain all of the information needed for the explicit evaluation of the contributions from the interaction current. These three wave functions can be calculated from the CST bound or scattering state equations (and their off-shell extrapolations). A companion paper uses this formalism to evaluate the deuteron magnetic moment.

  19. Direct interaction of FtsZ and MreB is required for septum synthesis and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Andrew K; Gerdes, Kenn

    2013-07-03

    How bacteria coordinate cell growth with division is not well understood. Bacterial cell elongation is controlled by actin-MreB while cell division is governed by tubulin-FtsZ. A ring-like structure containing FtsZ (the Z ring) at mid-cell attracts other cell division proteins to form the divisome, an essential protein assembly required for septum synthesis and cell separation. The Z ring exists at mid-cell during a major part of the cell cycle without contracting. Here, we show that MreB and FtsZ of Escherichia coli interact directly and that this interaction is required for Z ring contraction. We further show that the MreB-FtsZ interaction is required for transfer of cell-wall biosynthetic enzymes from the lateral to the mature divisome, allowing cells to synthesise the septum. Our observations show that bacterial cell division is coupled to cell elongation via a direct and essential interaction between FtsZ and MreB.

  20. About the Constant of Motion, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian of the Gravitational Attraction of Two Bodies with Variable Mass (Gylden-Meshcherskii problem)

    CERN Document Server

    López, G

    2007-01-01

    The Lagrangian, the Hamiltonian and the constant of motion of the gravitational attraction of two bodies when one of them has variable mass is considered. This is done by choosing the reference system in one of the bodies which allows to reduce the system of equations to 1-D problem. The trajectories found in the space position-velocity,(x,v), are qualitatively different from those on the space position-momentum,(x,p).

  1. ARF-Aux/IAA interactions through domain III/IV are not strictly required for auxin-responsive gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs), together with auxin/indole acetic acid proteins (Aux/IAAs), are transcription factors that play key roles in regulating auxin-responsive transcription in plants. Current models for auxin signaling predict that auxin response is dependent on ARF-Aux/IAA interactions mediated by the related protein-protein interaction domain (i.e., referred to as the CTD) found in the ARF and Aux/IAA C-terminal regions. When auxin concentrations in a cell are low, ARF activators r...

  2. Two-body scattering states in Minkowski space and the Nakanishi integral representation onto the null plane

    CERN Document Server

    Frederico, Tobias; Viviani, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The Nakanishi perturbative integral representation of the four-dimensional T-matrix is investigated in order to get a workable treatment for scattering states, solutions of the inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter Equation, in Minkowski space. The projection onto the null-plane of the four-dimensional inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter Equation plays a key role for devising an equation for the Nakanishi weight function (a real function), as in the homogeneous case that corresponds to bound states and it has been already studied within different frameworks. In this paper, the whole formal development is illustrated in detail and applied to a system, composed by two massive scalars interacting through the exchange of a massive scalar. The explicit expression of the scattering integral equations are also obtained in ladder approximation, and, as simple applications of our formalism, some limiting cases, like the zero-energy limit and the Wick-Cutkosky model in the continuum, are presented.

  3. The APP-Interacting Protein FE65 is Required for Hippocampus-Dependent Learning and Long-Term Potentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Moon, Changjong; Hu, Qubai; Wang, Baiping; Martin, George; Sun, Zhongsheng; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    FE65 is expressed predominantly in the brain and interacts with the C-terminal domain of [beta]-amyloid precursor protein (APP). We examined hippocampus-dependent memory and in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) at the CA1 synapses with isoform-specific FE65 knockout (p97FE65[superscript -/-]) mice. When examined using the Morris water maze,…

  4. Mutational analysis of Raf-1 cysteine rich domain: requirement for a cluster of basic aminoacids for interaction with phosphatidylserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta-Brears, T; Ghosh, S; Bell, R M

    1999-08-01

    Activation of Raf-1 kinase is preceded by a translocation of Raf-1 to the plasma membrane in response to external stimuli. The membrane localization of Raf-1 is facilitated through its interaction with activated Ras and with membrane phospholipids. Previous evidence suggests that the interaction of Raf-1 with Ras is mediated by two distinct domains within the N-terminal region of Raf-1 comprising amino acid residues 51-131 and residues 139-184, the latter of which codes for a zinc containing cysteine-rich domain. The cysteine-rich domain of Raf-1 is also reported to associate with other proteins, such as 14-3-3, and for selectively binding acidic phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylserine (PS). In the present study, we have investigated the consequences of progressive deletions and point mutations within the cysteine-rich domain of Raf-1 on its ability to bind PS. A reduced interaction with PS was observed in vitro for all deletion mutants of Raf-1 expressed either as full-length proteins or as fragments containing the isolated cysteine-rich domain. In particular, the cluster of basic amino acids R143, K144, and K148 appeared to be critical for interaction with PS, since substitution of all three residues to alanine resulted in a protein that failed to interact with liposomes enriched for PS. Expression of Raf-1 in vivo, containing point mutations in the cysteine-rich domain resulted in a truncated polypeptide that lacked both the Ras and PS binding sites and could no longer translocate to the plasma membrane upon serum stimulation. These results indicate that the basic residues 143, 144 and 148 in the anterior half of Raf-1 cysteine-rich domain play a role in the association with the lipid bilayer and possibly in protein stability, therefore they might contribute to Raf-1 localization and subsequent activation.

  5. Direct interaction of FliX and FlbD is required for their regulatory activity in Caulobacter crescentus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutton Rachel J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The temporal and spatial expression of late flagellar genes in Caulobacter crescentus is activated by the transcription factor FlbD and its partner trans-acting factor FliX. The physical interaction of these two proteins represents an alternative mechanism for regulating the activity of σ54 transcription factors. This study is to characterize the interaction of the two proteins and the consequences of the interaction on their regulatory activity. Results FliX and FlbD form stable complexes, which can stand the interference of 2.65 M NaCl. The stability of FliX and FlbD was affected by the co-existence of each other. Five FliX mutants (R71A, L85K, Δ117-118, T130L, and L136K were created by site-directed mutagenesis in conserved regions of the protein. All mutants were successfully expressed in both wild-type and ΔfliX Caulobacter strains. All but FliXL85K could rescue the motility and cell division defects of a ΔfliX mutant strain. The ability of FliX to regulate the transcription of class II and class III/IV flagellar promoters was fully diminished due to the L85K mutation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiment revealed that FliXL85K was unable to physically interact with FlbD. Conclusions FliX interacts with FlbD and thereby directly regulates the activity of FlbD in response to flagellar assembly. Mutations in highly conserved regions of FliX could severely affect the recognition between FliX and FlbD and hence interrupt the normal progression of flagellar synthesis and other developmental events in Caulobacter.

  6. Interaction between Escherichia coli DNA polymerase IV and single-stranded DNA-binding protein is required for DNA synthesis on SSB-coated DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukohri, Asako; Nishikawa, Yoshito; Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi; Maki, Hisaji

    2012-07-01

    DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) is one of three translesion polymerases in Escherichia coli. A mass spectrometry study revealed that single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) in lysates prepared from exponentially-growing cells has a strong affinity for column-immobilized Pol IV. We found that purified SSB binds directly to Pol IV in a pull-down assay, whereas SSBΔC8, a mutant protein lacking the C-terminal tail, failed to interact with Pol IV. These results show that the interaction between Pol IV and SSB is mediated by the C-terminal tail of SSB. When polymerase activity was tested on an SSBΔC8-coated template, we observed a strong inhibition of Pol IV activity. Competition experiments using a synthetic peptide containing the amino acid sequence of SSB tail revealed that the chain-elongating capacity of Pol IV was greatly impaired when the interaction between Pol IV and SSB tail was inhibited. These results demonstrate that Pol IV requires the interaction with the C-terminal tail of SSB to replicate DNA efficiently when the template ssDNA is covered with SSB. We speculate that at the primer/template junction, Pol IV interacts with the tail of the nearest SSB tetramer on the template, and that this interaction allows the polymerase to travel along the template while disassembling SSB.

  7. Sliding Clamp–DNA Interactions Are Required for Viability and Contribute to DNA Polymerase Management in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heltzel, J.; Scouten Ponticelli, S; Sanders, L; Duzen, J; Cody, V; Pace, J; Snell, E; Sutton, M

    2009-01-01

    Sliding clamp proteins topologically encircle DNA and play vital roles in coordinating the actions of various DNA replication, repair, and damage tolerance proteins. At least three distinct surfaces of the Escherichia coli {beta} clamp interact physically with the DNA that it topologically encircles. We utilized mutant {beta} clamp proteins bearing G66E and G174A substitutions ({beta}159), affecting the single-stranded DNA-binding region, or poly-Ala substitutions in place of residues 148-HQDVR-152 ({beta}148-152), affecting the double-stranded DNA binding region, to determine the biological relevance of clamp-DNA interactions. As part of this work, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of {beta}148-152, which verified that the poly-Ala substitutions failed to significantly alter the tertiary structure of the clamp. Based on functional assays, both {beta}159 and {beta}148-152 were impaired for loading and retention on a linear primed DNA in vitro. In the case of {beta}148-152, this defect was not due to altered interactions with the DnaX clamp loader, but rather was the result of impaired {beta}148-152-DNA interactions. Once loaded, {beta}148-152 was proficient for DNA polymerase III (Pol III) replication in vitro. In contrast, {beta}148-152 was severely impaired for Pol II and Pol IV replication and was similarly impaired for direct physical interactions with these Pols. Despite its ability to support Pol III replication in vitro, {beta}148-152 was unable to support viability of E. coli. Nevertheless, physiological levels of {beta}148-152 expressed from a plasmid efficiently complemented the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of a strain expressing {beta}159 (dnaN159), provided that Pol II and Pol IV were inactivated. Although this strain was impaired for Pol V-dependent mutagenesis, inactivation of Pol II and Pol IV restored the Pol V mutator phenotype. Taken together, these results support a model in which a sophisticated combination of competitive clamp

  8. Bioengineering of Improved Biomaterials Coatings for Extracorporeal Circulation Requires Extended Observation of Blood-Biomaterial Interaction under Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Kris N. J.; Aldenhoff, Yvette B. J.; van der Veen, Frederik H; Maessen, Jos G.; Leo H. Koole

    2007-01-01

    Extended use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) systems is often hampered by thrombus formation and infection. Part of these problems relates to imperfect hemocompatibility of the CPB circuitry. The engineering of biomaterial surfaces with genuine long-term hemocompatibility is essentially virgin territory in biomaterials science. For example, most experiments with the well-known Chandler loop model, for evaluation of blood-biomaterial interactions under flow, have be...

  9. Carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is required to modulate cardiac hypertrophy and attenuate autophagy during exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Willis, Monte S.; Min, Jin-Na; Wang, Shaobin; McDonough, Holly; Lockyer, Pamela; Wadosky, Kristine M.; Patterson, Cam

    2013-01-01

    The carboxyl terminus of HSP70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a ubiquitin ligase/co-chaperone critical for the maintenance of cardiac function. Mice lacking CHIP (CHIP −/−) suffer decreased survival, enhanced myocardial injury, and increased arrhythmias compared to wild type controls following challenge with cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury. Recent evidence implicates a role for CHIP in chaperone-assisted selective autophagy, a process that is associated with exercise-induced cardioprotecti...

  10. Both actin and polyproline interactions of Profilin-1 are required for migration, invasion and capillary morphogenesis of vascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhijie; Gau, David; Deasy, Bridget; Wells, Alan; Roy, Partha

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate how different ligand interactions of profilin-1 (Pfn1), an actin-binding protein that is upregulated during capillary morphogenesis of vascular endothelial cells (VEC), contribute to migration and capillary forming ability of VEC. We adopted a knockdown-knockin experimental system to stably express either fully-functional or mutants of Pfn1 that are impaired in binding to two of its major ligands, actin (H119E mutant) and proteins containing polyproline domains (H133S mutant), in a human dermal microvascular cell line (HmVEC) against near-null endogenous Pfn1 background. We found that silencing endogenous Pfn1 expression in HmVEC leads to slower random migration, reduced velocity of membrane protrusion and a significant impairment in matrigel-induced cord formation. Only re-expression of fully-functional but not any of the two ligand-binding deficient mutants of Pfn1 rescues the above defects. We further show that loss of Pfn1 expression in VEC inhibits three-dimensional capillary morphogenesis, MMP2 secretion and ECM invasion. VEC invasion through ECM is also inhibited when actin and polyproline interactions of Pfn1 are disrupted. Together, these experimental data demonstrate that Pfn1 regulates VEC migration, invasion and capillary morphogenesis through its interaction with both actin and proline-rich ligands. PMID:19607826

  11. Distinct mechanisms of recognizing endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III) protein IST1 by different microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Emily Z; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-03-27

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery is responsible for membrane remodeling in a number of biological processes including multivesicular body biogenesis, cytokinesis, and enveloped virus budding. In mammalian cells, efficient abscission during cytokinesis requires proper function of the ESCRT-III protein IST1, which binds to the microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin via its C-terminal MIT-interacting motif (MIM). Here, we studied the molecular interactions between IST1 and the three MIT domain-containing proteins to understand the structural basis that governs pairwise MIT-MIM interaction. Crystal structures of the three molecular complexes revealed that IST1 binds to the MIT domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin using two different mechanisms (MIM1 mode versus MIM3 mode). Structural comparison revealed that structural features in both MIT and MIM contribute to determine the specific binding mechanism. Within the IST1 MIM sequence, two phenylalanine residues were shown to be important in discriminating MIM1 versus MIM3 binding. These observations enabled us to deduce a preliminary binding code, which we applied to provide CHMP2A, a protein that normally only binds the MIT domain in the MIM1 mode, the additional ability to bind the MIT domain of Spartin in the MIM3 mode. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Distinct Mechanisms of Recognizing Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport III (ESCRT-III) Protein IST1 by Different Microtubule Interacting and Trafficking (MIT) Domains*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Emily Z.; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery is responsible for membrane remodeling in a number of biological processes including multivesicular body biogenesis, cytokinesis, and enveloped virus budding. In mammalian cells, efficient abscission during cytokinesis requires proper function of the ESCRT-III protein IST1, which binds to the microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin via its C-terminal MIT-interacting motif (MIM). Here, we studied the molecular interactions between IST1 and the three MIT domain-containing proteins to understand the structural basis that governs pairwise MIT-MIM interaction. Crystal structures of the three molecular complexes revealed that IST1 binds to the MIT domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin using two different mechanisms (MIM1 mode versus MIM3 mode). Structural comparison revealed that structural features in both MIT and MIM contribute to determine the specific binding mechanism. Within the IST1 MIM sequence, two phenylalanine residues were shown to be important in discriminating MIM1 versus MIM3 binding. These observations enabled us to deduce a preliminary binding code, which we applied to provide CHMP2A, a protein that normally only binds the MIT domain in the MIM1 mode, the additional ability to bind the MIT domain of Spartin in the MIM3 mode. PMID:25657007

  13. Flavour tagging with baryons and a study of two body $\\Lambda_b$ decays with the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Storey, James William

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb experiment will perform precision measurements of CP-violation and search for rare B decays at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is due to begin operation in 2008. The LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system provides the particle identification crucial for these studies. The Multi-Anode photomultiplier tube (MaPMT)is a candidate photon detector for the LHCb RICH system. Performance studies of the MaPMT in a charged particle beam at CERN demonstrate that the pulse shape of the BeetleMA readout ASIC does not return to zero after 125ns, which will lead to ghost pixel hits and the possible drift of the pedestal outside the dynamic range of the amplifier. Measurement of key CP asymmetries at LHCb requires that the flavour of the B-meson at creation is known. Flavour tagging using protons is shown to have potentially useful tagging performance, but the implementation is found to be challenging. A correlation between b-quark and Lambda flavour is observed for a Lambda produced in the same fragmentati...

  14. DNA annealing by Redβ is insufficient for homologous recombination and the additional requirements involve intra- and inter-molecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Erler, Axel; Fu, Jun; Kranz, Andrea; Tang, Jing; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Müller, Daniel; Sattler, Michael; Stewart, A. Francis

    2016-01-01

    Single strand annealing proteins (SSAPs) like Redβ initiate homologous recombination by annealing complementary DNA strands. We show that C-terminally truncated Redβ, whilst still able to promote annealing and nucleoprotein filament formation, is unable to mediate homologous recombination. Mutations of the C-terminal domain were evaluated using both single- and double stranded (ss and ds) substrates in recombination assays. Mutations of critical amino acids affected either dsDNA recombination or both ssDNA and dsDNA recombination indicating two separable functions, one of which is critical for dsDNA recombination and the second for recombination per se. As evaluated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, the dsDNA recombination function relates to the Redα-Redβ protein-protein interaction, which requires not only contacts in the C-terminal domain but also a region near the N-terminus. Because the nucleoprotein filament formed with C-terminally truncated Redβ has altered properties, the second C-terminal function could be due to an interaction required for functional filaments. Alternatively the second C-terminal function could indicate a requirement for a Redβ-host factor interaction. These data further advance the model for Red recombination and the proposition that Redβ and RAD52 SSAPs share ancestral and mechanistic roots. PMID:27708411

  15. Dynamic assembly of end-joining complexes requires interaction between Ku70/80 and XRCC4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.O. Mari (Pierre-Olivier); T.M. Luider (Theo); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); D.C. van Gent (Dik); B.I. Florea (Bogdan); S.P. Persengiev (Stephan); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); M. Modesti (Mauro); G. Giglia-Mari (Giuseppina); K. Bezstarosti (Karel); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractDNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) requires the assembly of several proteins on DNA ends. Although biochemical studies have elucidated several aspects of the NHEJ reaction mechanism, much less is known about NHEJ in living cells, mainly because of

  16. The LC7 Light Chains of Chlamydomonas Flagellar Dyneins Interact with Components Required for Both Motor Assembly and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBella, Linda M.; Sakato, Miho; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Pazour, Gregory J.; King, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    Members of the LC7/Roadblock family of light chains (LCs) have been found in both cytoplasmic and axonemal dyneins. LC7a was originally identified within Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein and associates with this motor's cargo-binding region. We describe here a novel member of this protein family, termed LC7b that is also present in the Chlamydomonas flagellum. Levels of LC7b are reduced ∼20% in axonemes isolated from strains lacking inner arm I1 and are ∼80% lower in the absence of the outer arms. When both dyneins are missing, LC7b levels are diminished to <10%. In oda9 axonemal extracts that completely lack outer arms, LC7b copurifies with inner arm I1, whereas in ida1 extracts that are devoid of I1 inner arms it associates with outer arm dynein. We also have observed that some LC7a is present in both isolated axonemes and purified 18S dynein from oda1, suggesting that it is also a component of both the outer arm and inner arm I1. Intriguingly, in axonemal extracts from the LC7a null mutant, oda15, which assembles ∼30% of its outer arms, LC7b fails to copurify with either dynein, suggesting that it interacts with LC7a. Furthermore, both the outer arm γ heavy chain and DC2 from the outer arm docking complex completely dissociate after salt extraction from oda15 axonemes. EDC cross-linking of purified dynein revealed that LC7b interacts with LC3, an outer dynein arm thioredoxin; DC2, an outer arm docking complex component; and also with the phosphoprotein IC138 from inner arm I1. These data suggest that LC7a stabilizes both the outer arms and inner arm I1 and that both LC7a and LC7b are involved in multiple intradynein interactions within both dyneins. PMID:15304520

  17. HCN-channel dendritic targeting requires bipartite interaction with TRIP8b and regulates antidepressant-like behavioral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y; Heuermann, R J; Lyman, K A; Fisher, D; Ismail, Q-A; Chetkovich, D M

    2017-03-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent psychiatric condition with limited therapeutic options beyond monoaminergic therapies. Although effective in some individuals, many patients fail to respond adequately to existing treatments, and new pharmacologic targets are needed. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels regulate excitability in neurons, and blocking HCN channel function has been proposed as a novel antidepressant strategy. However, systemic blockade of HCN channels produces cardiac effects that limit this approach. Knockout (KO) of the brain-specific HCN-channel auxiliary subunit tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b-interacting protein (TRIP8b) also produces antidepressant-like behavioral effects and suggests that inhibiting TRIP8b function could produce antidepressant-like effects without affecting the heart. We examined the structural basis of TRIP8b-mediated HCN-channel trafficking and its relationship with antidepressant-like behavior using a viral rescue approach in TRIP8b KO mice. We found that restoring TRIP8b to the hippocampus was sufficient to reverse the impaired HCN-channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavioral effects caused by TRIP8b KO. Moreover, we found that hippocampal expression of a mutated version of TRIP8b further impaired HCN-channel trafficking and increased the antidepressant-like behavioral phenotype of TRIP8b KO mice. Thus, modulating the TRIP8b-HCN interaction bidirectionally influences channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavior. Overall, our work suggests that small-molecule inhibitors of the interaction between TRIP8b and HCN should produce antidepressant-like behaviors and could represent a new paradigm for the treatment of MDD.

  18. Drug/Nutrients Interaction in Neoplastic Patients Requiring Nutritional Support. Practical Advice with Special Focusing on Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ilaria Uomo; Adele Savoia

    2008-01-01

    Malnutrition and cachexia are frequent complaints in neoplastic disease [1, 2]. Nutritional support and pain treatment still remain the main treatment option for the majority of patients with cancer, particularly for those affected by pancreatic cancer who very often present an advanced stage of the disease at moment of first diagnosis [3, 4, 5]. Therefore, in their clinical practice, physicians are faced with the need for parenteral or enteral nutrition and with the contemporary requirement ...

  19. Interaction with general transcription factor IIF (TFIIF) is required for the suppression of activated transcription by RPB5-mediating protein(RMP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    RMP was reported to regulate transcription via competing with HBx to bind the general transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) and interacting with RPB5 subunit of RNA polymerase Ⅱ as a corepressor of transcription regulator. However, our present research uncovered that RMP also regulates the transcription through interaction with the general transcription factors IIF (TFIIF), which assemble in the preinitiation complex and function in both transcription initiation and elongation. With in vitro pull-down assay and Far-Western analysis, we demonstrated that RMP could bind with bacterially expressed recombinant RAP30 and RAP74of TFIIF subunits. In the immunoprecipitation assay in COS 1 cells cotransfected with FLAG-tagged RMP or its mutants, GST-fused RAP30 and RAP74 were co-immunoprecipitated with RMP in approximately equal molar ratio, which suggests that RAP30 and RAP74 interact with RMP as a TFIIF complex. Interestingly both RAP30 and RAP74 interact with the same domain (D5) of the C-terminal RMP of 118-amino-acid residuals which overlaps with its TFIIB-binding domain. Internal deletion of D5 region of RMP abolished its binding ability with both subunits of TFIIF, while D5 domain alone was sufficient to interact with TFIIF subunits. The result of luciferase assay showed that overexpression of RMP, but not the mutant RMP lacking D5 region, suppressed the transcription activated by Gal-VP16, suggesting that interaction with TFIIF is required for RMP to suppress the activated transcription. The interaction between RMP and TFIIF may be an additional passway for RMP to regulate the transcription, or alternatively TFIIF may cooperate with RPB5 and TFIIB for the corepressor function of RMP.

  20. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; Devay, Rachel M; Lackner, Laura L; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya; Weissman, Jonathan S; Nunnari, Jodi

    2011-10-17

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane-associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria.

  1. T Cell Migration from Inflamed Skin to Draining Lymph Nodes Requires Intralymphatic Crawling Supported by ICAM-1/LFA-1 Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teijeira, Alvaro; Hunter, Morgan C; Russo, Erica; Proulx, Steven T; Frei, Thomas; Debes, Gudrun F; Coles, Marc; Melero, Ignacio; Detmar, Michael; Rouzaut, Ana; Halin, Cornelia

    2017-01-24

    T cells are the most abundant cell type found in afferent lymph, but their migration through lymphatic vessels (LVs) remains poorly understood. Performing intravital microscopy in the murine skin, we imaged T cell migration through afferent LVs in vivo. T cells entered into and actively migrated within lymphatic capillaries but were passively transported in contractile collecting vessels. Intralymphatic T cell number and motility were increased during contact-hypersensitivity-induced inflammation and dependent on ICAM-1/LFA-1 interactions. In vitro, blockade of endothelial cell-expressed ICAM-1 reduced T cell adhesion, crawling, and transmigration across lymphatic endothelium and decreased T cell advancement from capillaries into lymphatic collectors in skin explants. In vivo, T cell migration to draining lymph nodes was significantly reduced upon ICAM-1 or LFA-1 blockade. Our findings indicate that T cell migration through LVs occurs in distinct steps and reveal a key role for ICAM-1/LFA-1 interactions in this process.

  2. Two-Body Convection in the Mantle of the Earth: E/W Asymmetry, Under Astronomically Determined Tilt in g

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, R. C.

    2002-12-01

    Wegener to the present day [3], identifying a 'global tectonic polarity'; and westward drift, of which the asymmetry may be regarded as its engine. In sum, Earth's mantle is subject to three non-reversing force systems acting in the direction of causing net surface-west horizontal displacement, namely: I, Weak and tectonically insignificant forces ('tidal drag'), in unison constituting GH Darwin's tidal retarding couple; II, The forces inducing cumulative vorticity (TVI) [4] in an imperfectly elastic mantle, under passage of tidal M2. The operation of this system is ineluctable, and based on stress and energy consumption is likely to be significant, but its quantification requires separation of the marine from the bodily tidal energy dissipation utilizing secondary effects [4,5]; and III, Buoyancy-forces under convection now recognized as fundamental in geotectonics; - as normally modeled, greatly superadiabatic and dissipative, but within a field gconv minutely west-tilted, rather than artifically devoid of the Moon. Asymmetry of its internal gravity is unique to the asynchronous member of Kuiper's Earth-Moon double planet. The asymmetry distinguishes Earth's steady-state convection from the episodic regime of its moonless and almost non-rotating 'identical twin', Venus. Refs: [1] Tuoma, J. and J. Wisdom, 1994. Astron. J. 108(5) 1943-1961. [2] RCB, 2002. Episodes: J. Int. Geosc. 25(3), in pr. [3] Doglioni, C., 1993. J. Geol. Soc. 150, 991-1002. [4] RCB, 2000. Tectonic Consequences of Earth's Rotation (Oxford UP) s.4.3. [5] Lambeck, K., 1988. Geophysical Geodesy: The Slow Deformations of the Earth (Oxford UP) s. 11.3.

  3. About Galilean transformation on a mass variable system and two bodies gravitational system with variable mass and damping-anti damping effect due to star wind

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, G V

    2012-01-01

    We make an observation about Galilean transformation on a 1-D mass variable systems which leads us to the right way to deal with these systems. Then using this observation, we study two-bodies gravitational problem where the mass of one of the bodies varies and suffers a damping-anti damping effect due to star wind during its motion. for this system, a constant of motion, a Lagrangian and a Hamiltonian are given for the radial motion, and the period of the body is studied using the constant of motion of the system. An application to the comet motion is given, using the comet Halley as an example.

  4. Dissociative Recombination of BH2+: The Dominance of Two-Body Breakup and an Understanding of the Fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhaunerchyk, Vitali [Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Vigren, E. [Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Geppert, W. [Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Hamberg, M. [Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Danielsson, M. [Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Kaminska, M. [Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Larsson, Mats [Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Thomas, R. D. [Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Bahati Musafiri, Eric [ORNL; Vane, C Randy [ORNL

    2008-08-01

    The dissociative recombination of BH{sub 2}{sup +} has been studied at the storage ring CRYRING. The branching fraction analysis shows that dissociative recombination is dominated by the two-body BH+H channel constituting 56% of the total reactivity with the B+H+H and B+H2 channels being 35 and 9%, respectively. Both the measured reaction rate and fragmentation behavior are different than for previously studied XH{sub 2}{sup +} ions, which react both faster and predominantly dissociate through the full fragmentation channel. Explanations for such observations are discussed.

  5. Balancing the competing requirements of air-breathing and display behaviour during male-male interactions in Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, Lesley A; Portugal, Steven J; White, Craig R

    2013-02-01

    Air-breathing fish of the Anabantoidei group meet their metabolic requirements for oxygen through both aerial and aquatic gas exchange. Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens are anabantoids that frequently engage in aggressive male-male interactions which cause significant increases in metabolic rate and oxygen requirements. These interactions involve opercular flaring behaviour that is thought to limit aquatic oxygen uptake, and combines with the increase in metabolic rate to cause an increase in air-breathing behaviour. Air-breathing events interrupt display behaviour and increase risk of predation, raising the question of how Siamese fighting fish manage their oxygen requirements during agonistic encounters. Using open-flow respirometry, we measured rate of oxygen consumption in displaying fish to determine if males increase oxygen uptake per breath to minimise visits to the surface, or increase their reliance on aquatic oxygen uptake. We found that the increased oxygen requirements of Siamese fighting fish during display behaviour were met by increased oxygen uptake from the air with no significant changes in aquatic oxygen uptake. The increased aerial oxygen uptake was achieved almost entirely by an increase in air-breathing frequency. We conclude that limitations imposed by the reduced gill surface area of air-breathing fish restrict the ability of Siamese fighting fish to increase aquatic uptake, and limitations of the air-breathing organ of anabantoids largely restrict their capacity to increase oxygen uptake per breath. The resulting need to increase surfacing frequency during metabolically demanding agonistic encounters has presumably contributed to the evolution of the stereotyped surfacing behaviour seen during male-male interactions, during which one of the fish will lead the other to the surface, and each will take a breath of air.

  6. Interaction between workers during a short time window is required for bacterial symbiont transmission in Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Sarah E.; Thomas-Poulsen, Michael; Pinto-Tomás, Adrián;

    2014-01-01

    Stable associations between partners over time are critical for the evolution of mutualism. Hosts employ a variety of mechanisms to maintain specificity with bacterial associates. Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants farm a fungal cultivar as their primary nutrient source. These ants also carry a Pseudon......Stable associations between partners over time are critical for the evolution of mutualism. Hosts employ a variety of mechanisms to maintain specificity with bacterial associates. Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants farm a fungal cultivar as their primary nutrient source. These ants also carry...... occurred later than 2 hours post-eclosion (0% acquiring, n = 18). Our findings show that transmission of exosymbionts to newly eclosed major workers occurs through interactions with exosymbiont-covered workers within a narrow time window after eclosion. This mode of transmission likely helps ensure...

  7. HCN channel dendritic targeting requires bipartite interaction with TRIP8b and regulates antidepressant-like behavioral effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ye; Heuermann, Robert J.; Lyman, Kyle A.; Fisher, Daniel; Ismail, Quratul-Ain; Chetkovich, Dane M.

    2016-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder is a prevalent psychiatric condition with limited therapeutic options beyond monoaminergic therapies. Although effective in some individuals, many patients fail to respond adequately to existing treatments and new pharmacologic targets are needed. HCN channels regulate excitability in neurons and blocking HCN channel function has been proposed as a novel antidepressant strategy. However, systemic blockade of HCN channels produces cardiac effects that limit this approach. Knockout (KO) of the brain-specific HCN channel auxiliary subunit TRIP8b also produces antidepressant-like behavioral effects and suggests that inhibiting TRIP8b function could produce antidepressant-like effects without affecting the heart. We examined the structural basis of TRIP8b-mediated HCN channel trafficking and its relationship to antidepressant-like behavior using a viral rescue approach in TRIP8b KO mice. We found that restoring TRIP8b to the hippocampus was sufficient to reverse the impaired HCN channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavioral effects caused by TRIP8b KO. Moreover, we found that hippocampal expression of a mutated version of TRIP8b further impaired HCN channel trafficking and increased the antidepressant-like behavioral phenotype of TRIP8b KO mice. Thus, modulating the TRIP8b-HCN interaction bidirectionally influences channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavior. Overall, our work suggests that small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between TRIP8b and HCN should produce antidepressant-like behaviors and could represent a new paradigm for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder. PMID:27400855

  8. Mean deformation metrics for quantifying 3D cell-matrix interactions without requiring information about matrix material properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, David A; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Estrada, Jonathan B; Toyjanova, Jennet; Kesari, Haneesh; Reichner, Jonathan S; Franck, Christian

    2016-03-15

    Mechanobiology relates cellular processes to mechanical signals, such as determining the effect of variations in matrix stiffness with cell tractions. Cell traction recorded via traction force microscopy (TFM) commonly takes place on materials such as polyacrylamide- and polyethylene glycol-based gels. Such experiments remain limited in physiological relevance because cells natively migrate within complex tissue microenvironments that are spatially heterogeneous and hierarchical. Yet, TFM requires determination of the matrix constitutive law (stress-strain relationship), which is not always readily available. In addition, the currently achievable displacement resolution limits the accuracy of TFM for relatively small cells. To overcome these limitations, and increase the physiological relevance of in vitro experimental design, we present a new approach and a set of associated biomechanical signatures that are based purely on measurements of the matrix's displacements without requiring any knowledge of its constitutive laws. We show that our mean deformation metrics (MDM) approach can provide significant biophysical information without the need to explicitly determine cell tractions. In the process of demonstrating the use of our MDM approach, we succeeded in expanding the capability of our displacement measurement technique such that it can now measure the 3D deformations around relatively small cells (∼10 micrometers), such as neutrophils. Furthermore, we also report previously unseen deformation patterns generated by motile neutrophils in 3D collagen gels.

  9. Rbm15-Mkl1 interacts with the Setd1b histone H3-Lys4 methyltransferase via a SPOC domain that is required for cytokine-independent proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Heon Lee

    Full Text Available The Rbm15-Mkl1 fusion protein is associated with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL, although little is known regarding the molecular mechanism(s whereby this fusion protein contributes to leukemogenesis. Here, we show that both Rbm15 and the leukemogenic Rbm15-Mkl1 fusion protein interact with the Setd1b histone H3-Lys4 methyltransferase (also known as KMT2G. This interaction is direct and requires the Rbm15 SPOC domain and the Setd1b LSD motif. Over-expression of Rbm15-Mkl1 in the 6133 megakaryoblastic leukemia cell line, previously established by expression of the Rbm15-Mkl1 fusion protein in mice (Mercher et al., [2009] J. Clin. Invest. 119, 852-864, leads to decreased levels of endogenous Rbm15 and increased levels of endogenous Mkl1. These cells exhibit enhanced proliferation and cytokine-independent cell growth, which requires an intact Rbm15 SPOC domain that mediates interaction between the Rbm15-Mkl1 fusion protein and the Setd1b methyltransferase. These results reveal altered Setd1b complex function and consequent altered epigenetic regulation as a possible molecular mechanism that mediates the leukemogenic activity of the Rbm15-Mkl1 fusion protein in AMKL.

  10. Rbm15-Mkl1 interacts with the Setd1b histone H3-Lys4 methyltransferase via a SPOC domain that is required for cytokine-independent proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Heon; Skalnik, David G

    2012-01-01

    The Rbm15-Mkl1 fusion protein is associated with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL), although little is known regarding the molecular mechanism(s) whereby this fusion protein contributes to leukemogenesis. Here, we show that both Rbm15 and the leukemogenic Rbm15-Mkl1 fusion protein interact with the Setd1b histone H3-Lys4 methyltransferase (also known as KMT2G). This interaction is direct and requires the Rbm15 SPOC domain and the Setd1b LSD motif. Over-expression of Rbm15-Mkl1 in the 6133 megakaryoblastic leukemia cell line, previously established by expression of the Rbm15-Mkl1 fusion protein in mice (Mercher et al., [2009] J. Clin. Invest. 119, 852-864), leads to decreased levels of endogenous Rbm15 and increased levels of endogenous Mkl1. These cells exhibit enhanced proliferation and cytokine-independent cell growth, which requires an intact Rbm15 SPOC domain that mediates interaction between the Rbm15-Mkl1 fusion protein and the Setd1b methyltransferase. These results reveal altered Setd1b complex function and consequent altered epigenetic regulation as a possible molecular mechanism that mediates the leukemogenic activity of the Rbm15-Mkl1 fusion protein in AMKL.

  11. Dynamical study of sup 1 H(d,gamma) sup 3 He tensor observables in the energy range of 80 kev to 95 MeV tests of effective two-body models

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, A C

    2000-01-01

    Realistic interactions are used to study sup 1 H(d, gamma) sup 3 He tensor observables in the energy range of 80 keV to 95 MeV deuteron laboratory energy, as well as the differential cross section for the two-body photodisintegration of sup 3 He. The Siegert form of the E1 multipole operator in the long-wavelength limit is taken as the sole component of the electromagnetic interaction. The three-body Faddeev equations for the bound-state and continuum wave functions are solved using the Paris, Argonne V14, Bonn-A, and Bonn-B potentials. The corresponding nucleon-nucleon t-matrices are represented in a separable form using the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler representation. The Coulomb force between protons is neglected and no three-nucleon force is included. The contribution of nucleon-nucleon P-wave components to the observables is carefully studied, not only in the angular distribution of the observables, but also as a function of the deuteron laboratory energy for fixed centre-of-mass angle. Comparison with data is sh...

  12. Unique carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are required for high affinity binding between FcgammaRIII and antibodies lacking core fucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Claudia; Grau, Sandra; Jäger, Christiane; Sondermann, Peter; Brünker, Peter; Waldhauer, Inja; Hennig, Michael; Ruf, Armin; Rufer, Arne Christian; Stihle, Martine; Umaña, Pablo; Benz, Jörg

    2011-08-02

    Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key immune effector mechanism, relies on the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to Fcγ receptors expressed on immune cells. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a large increase in affinity for FcγRIIIa leading to an improved receptor-mediated effector function. Although afucosylated IgGs exist naturally, a next generation of recombinant therapeutic, glycoenginereed antibodies is currently being developed to exploit this finding. In this study, the crystal structures of a glycosylated Fcγ receptor complexed with either afucosylated or fucosylated Fc were determined allowing a detailed, molecular understanding of the regulatory role of Fc-oligosaccharide core fucosylation in improving ADCC. The structures reveal a unique type of interface consisting of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions between glycans of the receptor and the afucosylated Fc. In contrast, in the complex structure with fucosylated Fc, these contacts are weakened or nonexistent, explaining the decreased affinity for the receptor. These findings allow us to understand the higher efficacy of therapeutic antibodies lacking the core fucose and also suggest a unique mechanism by which the immune system can regulate antibody-mediated effector functions.

  13. Girdin-mediated interactions between cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton are required for epithelial morphogenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssin, Elise; Tepass, Ulrich; Laprise, Patrick

    2015-05-15

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is fundamental for epithelial tissue morphogenesis, physiology and repair. E-cadherin is a core transmembrane constituent of the zonula adherens (ZA), a belt-like adherens junction located at the apicolateral border in epithelial cells. The anchorage of ZA components to cortical actin filaments strengthens cell-cell cohesion and allows for junction contractility, which shapes epithelial tissues during development. Here, we report that the cytoskeletal adaptor protein Girdin physically and functionally interacts with components of the cadherin-catenin complex during Drosophila embryogenesis. Fly Girdin is broadly expressed throughout embryonic development and enriched at the ZA in epithelial tissues. Girdin associates with the cytoskeleton and co-precipitates with the cadherin-catenin complex protein α-Catenin (α-Cat). Girdin mutations strongly enhance adhesion defects associated with reduced DE-cadherin (DE-Cad) expression. Moreover, the fraction of DE-Cad molecules associated with the cytoskeleton decreases in the absence of Girdin, thereby identifying Girdin as a positive regulator of adherens junction function. Girdin mutant embryos display isolated epithelial cell cysts and rupture of the ventral midline, consistent with defects in cell-cell cohesion. In addition, loss of Girdin impairs the collective migration of epithelial cells, resulting in dorsal closure defects. We propose that Girdin stabilizes epithelial cell adhesion and promotes morphogenesis by regulating the linkage of the cadherin-catenin complex to the cytoskeleton.

  14. Bioengineering of Improved Biomaterials Coatings for Extracorporeal Circulation Requires Extended Observation of Blood-Biomaterial Interaction under Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris N. J. Stevens

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB systems is often hampered by thrombus formation and infection. Part of these problems relates to imperfect hemocompatibility of the CPB circuitry. The engineering of biomaterial surfaces with genuine long-term hemocompatibility is essentially virgin territory in biomaterials science. For example, most experiments with the well-known Chandler loop model, for evaluation of blood-biomaterial interactions under flow, have been described for a maximum duration of 2 hours only. This study reports a systematic evaluation of two commercial CPB tubings, each with a hemocompatible coating, and one uncoated control. The experiments comprised (i testing over 5 hours under flow, with human whole blood from 4 different donors; (ii measurement of essential blood parameters of hemocompatibility; (iii analysis of the luminal surfaces by scanning electron microscopy and thrombin generation time measurements. The dataset indicated differences in hemocompatibility of the tubings. Furthermore, it appeared that discrimination between biomaterial coatings can be made only after several hours of blood-biomaterial contact. Platelet counting, myeloperoxidase quantification, and scanning electron microscopy proved to be the most useful methods. These findings are believed to be relevant with respect to the bioengineering of extracorporeal devices that should function in contact with blood for extended time.

  15. Carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is required to modulate cardiac hypertrophy and attenuate autophagy during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S; Min, Jin-Na; Wang, Shaobin; McDonough, Holly; Lockyer, Pamela; Wadosky, Kristine M; Patterson, Cam

    2013-12-01

    The carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a ubiquitin ligase/cochaperone critical for the maintenance of cardiac function. Mice lacking CHIP (CHIP-/-) suffer decreased survival, enhanced myocardial injury and increased arrhythmias compared with wild-type controls following challenge with cardiac ischaemia reperfusion injury. Recent evidence implicates a role for CHIP in chaperone-assisted selective autophagy, a process that is associated with exercise-induced cardioprotection. To determine whether CHIP is involved in cardiac autophagy, we challenged CHIP-/- mice with voluntary exercise. CHIP-/- mice respond to exercise with an enhanced autophagic response that is associated with an exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy phenotype. No impairment of function was identified in the CHIP-/- mice by serial echocardiography over the 5 weeks of running, indicating that the cardiac hypertrophy was physiologic not pathologic in nature. It was further determined that CHIP plays a role in inhibiting Akt signalling and autophagy determined by autophagic flux in cardiomyocytes and in the intact heart. Taken together, cardiac CHIP appears to play a role in regulating autophagy during the development of cardiac hypertrophy, possibly by its role in supporting Akt signalling, induced by voluntary running in vivo. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The Arabidopsis CUL4-DDB1 complex interacts with MSI1 and is required to maintain MEDEA parental imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbliauskas, Eva; Lechner, Esther; Jaciubek, Miłosława; Berr, Alexandre; Pazhouhandeh, Maghsoud; Alioua, Malek; Cognat, Valerie; Brukhin, Vladimir; Koncz, Csaba; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Molinier, Jean; Genschik, Pascal

    2011-02-16

    Protein ubiquitylation regulates a broad variety of biological processes in all eukaryotes. Recent work identified a novel class of cullin-containing ubiquitin ligases (E3s) composed of CUL4, DDB1, and one WD40 protein, believed to act as a substrate receptor. Strikingly, CUL4-based E3 ligases (CRL4s) have important functions at the chromatin level, including responses to DNA damage in metazoans and plants and, in fission yeast, in heterochromatin silencing. Among putative CRL4 receptors we identified MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA1 (MSI1), which belongs to an evolutionary conserved protein family. MSI1-like proteins contribute to different protein complexes, including the epigenetic regulatory Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). Here, we provide evidence that Arabidopsis MSI1 physically interacts with DDB1A and is part of a multimeric protein complex including CUL4. CUL4 and DDB1 loss-of-function lead to embryo lethality. Interestingly, as in fis class mutants, cul4 mutants exhibit autonomous endosperm initiation and loss of parental imprinting of MEDEA, a target gene of the Arabidopsis PRC2 complex. In addition, after pollination both MEDEA transcript and protein accumulate in a cul4 mutant background. Overall, our work provides the first evidence of a physical and functional link between a CRL4 E3 ligase and a PRC2 complex, thus indicating a novel role of ubiquitylation in the repression of gene expression.

  17. The Axin/TNKS complex interacts with KIF3A and is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Ling Guo; Zhiyun Ye; Shu-Yong Lin; Sheng-Cai Lin; Cixiong Zhang; Qi Liu; Qinxi Li; Guili Lian; Di Wu; Xuebin Li; Wei Zhang; Yuemao Shen

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by the glucose transporter GLUT4 plays a central role in whole-body glucose homeostasis,dysregulation of which leads to type 2 diabetes.However,the molecular components and mechanisms regulating insulin-stimulated glucose uptake remain largely unclear.Here,we demonstrate that Axin interacts with the ADP-ribosylase tankyrase 2 (TNKS2) and the kinesin motor protein KIF3A,forming a ternary complex crucial for GLUT4 translocation in response to insulin.Specific knockdown of the individual components of the complex attenuated insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane.Importantly,TNKS2-/- mice exhibit reduced insulin sensitivity and higher blood glucose levels when re-fed after fasting.Mechanistically,we demonstrate that in the absence of insulin,Axin,TNKS and KIF3A are co-localized with GLUT4 on the trans-Golgi network.Insulin treatment suppresses the ADP-ribosylase activity of TNKS,leading to a reduction in ADP ribosylation and ubiquitination of both Axin and TNKS,and a concurrent stabilization of the complex.Inhibition of Akt,the major effector kinase of insulin signaling,abrogates the insulin-mediated complex stabilization.We have thus elucidated a new protein complex that is directly associated with the motor protein kinesin in insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation.

  18. Interaction between workers during a short time window is required for bacterial symbiont transmission in Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Sarah E; Poulsen, Michael; Pinto-Tomás, Adrián; Currie, Cameron R

    2014-01-01

    Stable associations between partners over time are critical for the evolution of mutualism. Hosts employ a variety of mechanisms to maintain specificity with bacterial associates. Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants farm a fungal cultivar as their primary nutrient source. These ants also carry a Pseudonocardia Actinobacteria exosymbiont on their bodies that produces antifungal compounds that help inhibit specialized parasites of the ants' fungal garden. Major workers emerge from their pupal cases (eclose) symbiont-free, but exhibit visible Actinobacterial coverage within 14 days post-eclosion. Using subcolony experiments, we investigate exosymbiont transmission within Acromyrmex colonies. We found successful transmission to newly eclosed major workers fostered by major workers with visible Actinobacteria in all cases (100% acquiring, n = 19). In contrast, newly eclosed major workers reared without exosymbiont-carrying major workers did not acquire visible Actinobacteria (0% acquiring, n = 73). We further show that the majority of ants exposed to major workers with exosymbionts within 2 hours of eclosion acquired bacteria (60.7% acquiring, n = 28), while normal acquisition did not occur when exposure occurred later than 2 hours post-eclosion (0% acquiring, n = 18). Our findings show that transmission of exosymbionts to newly eclosed major workers occurs through interactions with exosymbiont-covered workers within a narrow time window after eclosion. This mode of transmission likely helps ensure the defensive function within colonies, as well as specificity and partner fidelity in the ant-bacterium association.

  19. The Meckel-Gruber Syndrome proteins MKS1 and meckelin interact and are required for primary cilium formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawe, Helen R; Smith, Ursula M; Cullinane, Andrew R; Gerrelli, Dianne; Cox, Phillip; Badano, Jose L; Blair-Reid, Sarah; Sriram, Nisha; Katsanis, Nicholas; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Afford, Simon C; Copp, Andrew J; Kelly, Deirdre A; Gull, Keith; Johnson, Colin A

    2007-01-15

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is an autosomal recessive lethal malformation syndrome characterized by renal cystic dysplasia, central nervous system malformations (typically, posterior occipital encephalocele), and hepatic developmental defects. Two MKS genes, MKS1 and MKS3, have been identified recently. The present study describes the cellular, sub-cellular and functional characterization of the novel proteins, MKS1 and meckelin, encoded by these genes. In situ hybridization studies for MKS3 in early human embryos showed transcript localizations in agreement with the tissue phenotype of MKS patients. Both MKS proteins predominantly localized to epithelial cells, including proximal renal tubules and biliary epithelial cells. MKS1 localized to basal bodies, while meckelin localized both to the primary cilium and to the plasma membrane in ciliated cell-lines and primary cells. Meckelin protein with the Q376P missense mutation was unable to localize at the cell membrane. siRNA-mediated reduction of Mks1 and Mks3 expression in a ciliated epithelial cell-line blocked centriole migration to the apical membrane and consequent formation of the primary cilium. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that wild-type meckelin and MKS1 interact and, in three-dimensional tissue culture assays, epithelial branching morphogenesis was severely impaired. These results suggest that MKS proteins mediate a fundamental developmental stage of ciliary formation and epithelial morphogenesis.

  20. The Work-Energy Relation and Application of Two-Body System%两体问题的功能关系及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余嵘华; 肖苏

    2011-01-01

    两体系统的功能原理与机械能守恒是正确理解和解决某些实际力学问题的基础.文中分析了惯性参照系、质心参照系及相对参照系中两体系统的功能原理与机械能守恒,并结合具体的应用给出结论.%The principle of work-energy and the law of conservation of mechanical energy in two-body system is the base of understanding and solving some practical problems.The paper gives some analysis and useful discussion about theorem of kinetic energy and law of conservation of mechanical energy in two-body system in inertial system or center-of-mass system or relative reference system.At last,this paper gives some samples and some conclusions.

  1. Surface targeting of the dopamine transporter involves discrete epitopes in the distal C terminus but does not require canonical PDZ domain interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerggaard, Christian; Fog, Jacob U; Hastrup, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    are indispensable for proper targeting, PDZ domain interactions are not required. By progressive substitutions with beta2-adrenergic receptor sequence, and by triple-alanine substitutions in the hDAT C terminus, we examined the importance of epitopes preceding the LKV motif. Substitution of RHW(615...... deletion of this motif, hDAT was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 and Neuro2A cells, suggesting that PDZ domain interactions might be critical for hDAT targeting. Nonetheless, substitution of LKV with SLL, the type 1 PDZ-binding sequence from the beta2......-adrenergic receptor, did not disrupt plasma membrane targeting. Moreover, the addition of an alanine to the hDAT C terminus (+Ala), resulting in an LKVA termination sequence, or substitution of LKV with alanines (3xAla_618-620) prevented neither plasma membrane targeting nor targeting into sprouting neurites...

  2. Targeting of the Dopamine Transporter Involves Discrete Epitopes in the Distal C Terminus But Does Not Require Canonical PDZ Domain Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerggaard(Vægter), Christian; Fog, Jacob Ulrik; Hastrup, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    are indispensable for proper targeting, PDZ domain interactions are not required. By progressive substitutions with beta2-adrenergic receptor sequence, and by triple-alanine substitutions in the hDAT C terminus, we examined the importance of epitopes preceding the LKV motif. Substitution of RHW(615...... deletion of this motif, hDAT was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 and Neuro2A cells, suggesting that PDZ domain interactions might be critical for hDAT targeting. Nonetheless, substitution of LKV with SLL, the type 1 PDZ-binding sequence from the beta2......-adrenergic receptor, did not disrupt plasma membrane targeting. Moreover, the addition of an alanine to the hDAT C terminus (+Ala), resulting in an LKVA termination sequence, or substitution of LKV with alanines (3xAla_618-620) prevented neither plasma membrane targeting nor targeting into sprouting neurites...

  3. Immune-Mediated Nephropathy and Systemic Autoimmunity in Mice Does Not Require Receptor Interacting Protein Kinase 3 (RIPK3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradetti, Chelsea; Jog, Neelakshi R.; Gallucci, Stefania; Madaio, Michael; Balachandran, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    Immune mediated nephropathy is one of the most serious manifestations of lupus and is characterized by severe inflammation and necrosis that, if untreated, eventually leads to renal failure. Although lupus has a higher incidence in women, both sexes can develop lupus glomerulonephritis; nephritis in men develops earlier and is more severe than in women. It is therefore important to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating nephritis in each sex. Previous work by our lab found that the absence or pharmacological inhibition of Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1), an enzyme involved in DNA repair and necrotic cell death, affects only male mice and results in milder nephritis, with less in situ inflammation, and diminished incidence of necrotic lesions, allowing for higher survival rates. A second pathway mediating necrosis involves Receptor-Interacting Serine-Threonine Kinase 3 (RIPK3); in this study we sought to investigate the impact of RIPK3 on the development of lupus and nephritis in both sexes. To this end, we used two inducible murine models of lupus: chronic graft versus host disease (cGvHD) and pristane-induced lupus; and nephrotoxic serum (NTS)-induced nephritis as a model of immune mediated nephropathy. We found that the absence of RIPK3 has neither positive nor negative impact on the disease development or progression of lupus and nephritis in all three models, and in both male and female mice. We conclude that RIPK3 is dispensable for the pathogenesis of lupus and immune mediated nephropathy as to accelerate, worsen or ameliorate the disease. PMID:27669412

  4. LagC is required for cell-cell interactions that are essential for cell-type differentiation in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynes, J L; Clark, A M; Shaulsky, G; Kuspa, A; Loomis, W F; Firtel, R A

    1994-04-15

    Strain AK127 is a developmental mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum that was isolated by restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI). Mutant cells aggregate normally but are unable to proceed past the loose aggregate stage. The cloned gene, lagC (loose aggregate C), encodes a novel protein of 98 kD that contains an amino-terminal signal sequence and a putative carboxy-terminal transmembrane domain. The mutant strain AK127 shows no detectable lagC transcript upon Northern analysis, indicating that the observed phenotype is that of a null allele. Expression of the lagC cDNA in AK127 cells complements the arrest at the loose aggregate stage, indicating that the mutant phenotype results from disruption of the lagC gene. In wild-type cells, lagC mRNA is induced at the loose aggregate stage and is expressed through the remainder of development. lagC- null cells aggregate but then disaggregate and reaggregate to form small granular mounds. Mature spores are produced at an extremely low efficiency (rasD and CP2 and do not express the DIF-induced prestalk-specific gene ecmA or the cAMP-induced prespore-specific gene SP60 to significant levels. In chimeric organisms resulting from the coaggregation of lagC- null and wild-type cells, cell-type-specific gene expression is rescued in the lagC- null cells; however, lagC- prespore cells are localized to the posterior of the prespore region and do not form mature spores, suggesting that LagC protein has both no cell-autonomous and cell-autonomous functions. Overexpression of lagC from an actin promoter in both wild-type and lagC- cells causes a delay at the tight aggregate stage, the first stage requiring LagC activity. These results suggest that the LagC protein functions as a nondiffusible cell-cell signaling molecule that is required for multicellular development.

  5. Neto1 is a novel CUB-domain NMDA receptor-interacting protein required for synaptic plasticity and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ng

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, a major excitatory ligand-gated ion channel in the central nervous system (CNS, is a principal mediator of synaptic plasticity. Here we report that neuropilin tolloid-like 1 (Neto1, a complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1 (CUB domain-containing transmembrane protein, is a novel component of the NMDAR complex critical for maintaining the abundance of NR2A-containing NMDARs in the postsynaptic density. Neto1-null mice have depressed long-term potentiation (LTP at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, with the subunit dependency of LTP induction switching from the normal predominance of NR2A- to NR2B-NMDARs. NMDAR-dependent spatial learning and memory is depressed in Neto1-null mice, indicating that Neto1 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity and cognition. Remarkably, we also found that the deficits in LTP, learning, and memory in Neto1-null mice were rescued by the ampakine CX546 at doses without effect in wild-type. Together, our results establish the principle that auxiliary proteins are required for the normal abundance of NMDAR subunits at synapses, and demonstrate that an inherited learning defect can be rescued pharmacologically, a finding with therapeutic implications for humans.

  6. Interactions between NKT cells and Tregs are required for tolerance to combined bone marrow and organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, David; Tang, Xiaobin; Dutt, Suparna; Nador, Roland G; Strober, Samuel

    2012-02-09

    We used a model of combined bone marrow and heart transplantation, in which tolerance and stable chimerism is induced after conditioning with fractionated irradiation of the lymphoid tissues and anti-T-cell antibodies. Graft acceptance and chimerism required host CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg production of IL-10 that was in-turn enhanced by host invariant natural killer (NK) T-cell production of IL-4. Up-regulation of PD-1 on host Tregs, CD4(+)CD25(-) conventional T (Tcon) cells, and CD8(+) T cells was also enhanced by NKT cell production of IL-4. Up-regulated PD-1 expression on Tregs was linked to IL-10 secretion, on CD8(+) T cells was linked to Tim-3 expression, and on CD4(+) Tcon cells was associated with reduced IFNγ secretion. Changes in the expression of PD-1 were induced by the conditioning regimen, and declined after bone marrow transplantation. In conclusion, NKT cells in this model promoted changes in expression of negative costimulatory receptors and anti-inflammatory cytokines by Tregs and other T-cell subsets in an IL-4-dependent manner that resulted in tolerance to the bone marrow and organ grafts.

  7. The Caenorhabditis elegans matrix non-peptidase MNP-1 is required for neuronal cell migration and interacts with the Ror receptor tyrosine kinase CAM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Teresa R; Forrester, Wayne C

    2017-04-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for metazoan development. During Caenorhabditis elegans development many neuronal, muscle and other cell types migrate. Multiple classes of proteins have been implicated in cell migration including secreted guidance cues, receptors for guidance cues and intracellular proteins that respond to cues to polarize cells and produce the forces that move them. In addition, cell surface and secreted proteases have been identified that may clear the migratory route and process guidance cues. We report here that mnp-1 is required for neuronal cell and growth cone migrations. MNP-1 is expressed by migrating cells and functions cell autonomously for cell migrations. We also find a genetic interaction between mnp-1 and cam-1, which encodes a Ror receptor tyrosine kinase required for some of the same cell migrations.

  8. Cysteine 98 in CYP3A4 Contributes to Conformational Integrity Required for P450 Interaction with CYP Reductase†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Bo; Lampe, Jed N.; Roberts, Arthur G.; Atkins, William M.; Rodrigues, A. David; Nelson, Sidney D.

    2007-01-01

    dinucleotide phosphate consumption at a saturating reductase concentration. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that cysteine 98 in the B-C loop region significantly contributes to conformational integrity and catalytic activity of CYP3A4, and that this residue or residues nearby might be involved in an interaction with P450 reductase. PMID:16959210

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Proteins Interact with the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT Machinery via Ubiquitination To Facilitate Viral Envelopment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Barouch-Bentov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Enveloped viruses commonly utilize late-domain motifs, sometimes cooperatively with ubiquitin, to hijack the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT machinery for budding at the plasma membrane. However, the mechanisms underlying budding of viruses lacking defined late-domain motifs and budding into intracellular compartments are poorly characterized. Here, we map a network of hepatitis C virus (HCV protein interactions with the ESCRT machinery using a mammalian-cell-based protein interaction screen and reveal nine novel interactions. We identify HRS (hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate, an ESCRT-0 complex component, as an important entry point for HCV into the ESCRT pathway and validate its interactions with the HCV nonstructural (NS proteins NS2 and NS5A in HCV-infected cells. Infectivity assays indicate that HRS is an important factor for efficient HCV assembly. Specifically, by integrating capsid oligomerization assays, biophysical analysis of intracellular viral particles by continuous gradient centrifugations, proteolytic digestion protection, and RNase digestion protection assays, we show that HCV co-opts HRS to mediate a late assembly step, namely, envelopment. In the absence of defined late-domain motifs, K63-linked polyubiquitinated lysine residues in the HCV NS2 protein bind the HRS ubiquitin-interacting motif to facilitate assembly. Finally, ESCRT-III and VPS/VTA1 components are also recruited by HCV proteins to mediate assembly. These data uncover involvement of ESCRT proteins in intracellular budding of a virus lacking defined late-domain motifs and a novel mechanism by which HCV gains entry into the ESCRT network, with potential implications for other viruses.

  10. The amidation step of diphthamide biosynthesis in yeast requires DPH6, a gene identified through mining the DPH1-DPH5 interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanow Uthman

    Full Text Available Diphthamide is a highly modified histidine residue in eukaryal translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2 that is the target for irreversible ADP ribosylation by diphtheria toxin (DT. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the initial steps of diphthamide biosynthesis are well characterized and require the DPH1-DPH5 genes. However, the last pathway step-amidation of the intermediate diphthine to diphthamide-is ill-defined. Here we mine the genetic interaction landscapes of DPH1-DPH5 to identify a candidate gene for the elusive amidase (YLR143w/DPH6 and confirm involvement of a second gene (YBR246w/DPH7 in the amidation step. Like dph1-dph5, dph6 and dph7 mutants maintain eEF2 forms that evade inhibition by DT and sordarin, a diphthamide-dependent antifungal. Moreover, mass spectrometry shows that dph6 and dph7 mutants specifically accumulate diphthine-modified eEF2, demonstrating failure to complete the final amidation step. Consistent with an expected requirement for ATP in diphthine amidation, Dph6 contains an essential adenine nucleotide hydrolase domain and binds to eEF2. Dph6 is therefore a candidate for the elusive amidase, while Dph7 apparently couples diphthine synthase (Dph5 to diphthine amidation. The latter conclusion is based on our observation that dph7 mutants show drastically upregulated interaction between Dph5 and eEF2, indicating that their association is kept in check by Dph7. Physiologically, completion of diphthamide synthesis is required for optimal translational accuracy and cell growth, as indicated by shared traits among the dph mutants including increased ribosomal -1 frameshifting and altered responses to translation inhibitors. Through identification of Dph6 and Dph7 as components required for the amidation step of the diphthamide pathway, our work paves the way for a detailed mechanistic understanding of diphthamide formation.

  11. Three-Body Interacting Bosons in Free Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, D. S.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a method of controlling two- and three-body interactions in an ultracold Bose gas in any dimension. The method requires us to have two coupled internal single-particle states split in energy such that the upper state is occupied virtually but amply during collisions. By varying system parameters, one can switch off the two-body interaction while maintaining a strong three-body one. The mechanism can be implemented for dipolar bosons in the bilayer configuration with tunneling or in an atomic system by using radio-frequency fields to couple two hyperfine states. One can then aim to observe a purely three-body interacting gas, dilute self-trapped droplets, the paired superfluid phase, Pfaffian state, and other exotic phenomena.

  12. Many-body dispersion interactions from the exchange-hole dipole moment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-de-la-Roza, A; Johnson, Erin R

    2013-02-07

    In this article, we present the extension of the exchange-hole dipole moment model (XDM) of dispersion interactions to the calculation of two-body and three-body dispersion energy terms to any order, 2(l)-pole oscillator strengths, and polarizabilities. By using the newly-formulated coefficients, we study the relative importance of the higher-order two-body and the leading non-additive three-body (triple-dipole) interactions in gas-phase as well as in condensed systems. We show that the two-body terms up to R(-10), but not the terms of higher-order, are essential in the correct description of the dispersion energy, while there are a number of difficulties related to the choice of the damping function, which precludes the use three-body triple-dipole contributions in XDM. We conclude that further study is required before the three-body term can be used in production XDM density-functional calculations and point out the salient problems regarding its use.

  13. Asymmetric interaction paired with a super-rational strategy might resolve the tragedy of the commons without requiring recognition or negotiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun-Zhou; Wang, Rui-Wu; Jensen, Christopher X. J.; Li, Yao-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Avoiding the tragedy of the commons requires that one or more individuals in a group or partnership ``volunteer'', benefiting the group at a cost to themselves. Recognition and negotiation with social partners can maintain cooperation, but are often not possible. If recognition and negotiation are not always the mechanism by which cooperative partnerships avoid collective tragedies, what might explain the diverse social cooperation observed in nature? Assuming that individuals interact asymmetrically and that both ``weak'' and ``strong'' players employ a super-rational strategy, we find that tragedy of the commons can be avoided without requiring either recognition or negotiation. Whereas in the volunteer's dilemma game a rational ``strong'' player is less likely to volunteer to provide a common good in larger groups, we show that under a wide range of conditions a super-rational ``strong'' player is more likely to provide a common good. These results imply that the integration of super-rationality and asymmetric interaction might have the potential to resolve the tragedy of the commons. By illuminating the conditions under which players are likely to volunteer, we shed light on the patterns of volunteerism observed in variety of well-studied cooperative social systems, and explore how societies might avert social tragedies.

  14. Stimulation of translation by human Unr requires cold shock domains 2 and 4, and correlates with poly(A) binding protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Swagat; Anderson, Emma C

    2016-03-03

    The RNA binding protein Unr, which contains five cold shock domains, has several specific roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. It can act as an activator or inhibitor of translation initiation, promote mRNA turnover, or stabilise mRNA. Its role depends on the mRNA and other proteins to which it binds, which includes cytoplasmic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1). Since PABP1 binds to all polyadenylated mRNAs, and is involved in translation initiation by interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), we investigated whether Unr has a general role in translational control. We found that Unr strongly stimulates translation in vitro, and mutation of cold shock domains 2 or 4 inhibited its translation activity. The ability of Unr and its mutants to stimulate translation correlated with its ability to bind RNA, and to interact with PABP1. We found that Unr stimulated the binding of PABP1 to mRNA, and that Unr was required for the stable interaction of PABP1 and eIF4G in cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Unr reduced the overall level of cellular translation in cells, as well as that of cap-dependent and IRES-dependent reporters. These data describe a novel role for Unr in regulating cellular gene expression.

  15. RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in human cells reveals requirements for de novo initiation and protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Tragesser, Brady; Xu, Zhili; Stein, Barry; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Kao, C Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a model positive-strand RNA virus whose replication has been studied in a number of surrogate hosts. In transiently transfected human cells, the BMV polymerase 2a activated signaling by the innate immune receptor RIG-I, which recognizes de novo-initiated non-self-RNAs. Active-site mutations in 2a abolished RIG-I activation, and coexpression of the BMV 1a protein stimulated 2a activity. Mutations previously shown to abolish 1a and 2a interaction prevented the 1a-dependent enhancement of 2a activity. New insights into 1a-2a interaction include the findings that helicase active site of 1a is required to enhance 2a polymerase activity and that negatively charged amino acid residues between positions 110 and 120 of 2a contribute to interaction with the 1a helicase-like domain but not to the intrinsic polymerase activity. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the BMV 1a and 2a colocalized to perinuclear region in human cells. However, no perinuclear spherule-like structures were detected in human cells by immunoelectron microscopy. Sequencing of the RNAs coimmunoprecipitated with RIG-I revealed that the 2a-synthesized short RNAs are derived from the message used to translate 2a. That is, 2a exhibits a strong cis preference for BMV RNA2. Strikingly, the 2a RNA products had initiation sequences (5'-GUAAA-3') identical to those from the 5' sequence of the BMV genomic RNA2 and RNA3. These results show that the BMV 2a polymerase does not require other BMV proteins to initiate RNA synthesis but that the 1a helicase domain, and likely helicase activity, can affect RNA synthesis by 2a.

  16. A first-order secular theory for the post-Newtonian two-body problem with spin -- I: The restricted case

    CERN Document Server

    Biscani, Francesco; 10.1093/mnras/sts198

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the relativistic restricted two-body problem with spin employing a perturbation scheme based on Lie series. Starting from a post-Newtonian expansion of the field equations, we develop a first-order secular theory that reproduces well-known relativistic effects such as the precession of the pericentre and the Lense-Thirring and geodetic effects. Additionally, our theory takes into full account the complex interplay between the various relativistic effects, and provides a new explicit solution of the averaged equations of motion in terms of elliptic functions. Our analysis reveals the presence of particular configurations for which non-periodical behaviour can arise. The application of our results to real astrodynamical systems (such as Mercury-like and pulsar planets) highlights the contribution of relativistic effects to the long-term evolution of the spin and orbit of the secondary body.

  17. Comparison of two-body and three-body decomposition of ethanedial, propanal, propenal, n-butane, 1-butene, and 1,3-butadiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chih-Hao; Lee, Shih-Huang

    2012-01-01

    We investigated two-body (binary) and three-body (triple) dissociations of ethanedial, propanal, propenal, n-butane, 1-butene, and 1,3-butadiene on the ground potential-energy surfaces using quantum-chemical and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations; most attention is paid on the triple dissociation mechanisms. The triple dissociation includes elimination of a hydrogen molecule from a combination of two separate terminal hydrogen atoms; meanwhile, the rest part simultaneously decomposes to two stable fragments, e.g., C2H4, C2H2, or CO. Transition structures corresponding to the concerted triple dissociation were identified using the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory and total energies were computed using the method CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df, 2p). The forward barrier height of triple dissociation has a trend of ethanedial reaction enthalpy. Ratios of translational energies of three separate fragments could be estimated from the transition structure of triple dissociation. The synchronous concerted dissociation of propanal, propenal, and 1-butene leading to three different types of molecular fragments by breaking nonequivalent chemical bonds is rare. The triple dissociation of propanal, n-butane, 1-butene, and 1,3-butadiene were investigated for the first time. To outline a whole picture of dissociation mechanisms, some significant two-body dissociation channels were investigated for the calculations of product branching ratios. The triple dissociation plays an important role in the three carbonyl compounds, but plays a minor or negligible role in the three hydrocarbons.

  18. Moesin is required for HIV-1-induced CD4-CXCR4 interaction, F-actin redistribution, membrane fusion and viral infection in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero-Villar, Marta; Cabrero, José Román; Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Barroso-González, Jonathan; Alvarez-Losada, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) envelope regulates the initial attachment of viral particles to target cells through its association with CD4 and either CXCR4 or CCR5. Although F-actin is required for CD4 and CXCR4 redistribution, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this fundamental process in HIV infection. Using CD4(+) CXCR4(+) permissive human leukemic CEM T cells and primary lymphocytes, we have investigated whether HIV-1 Env might promote viral entry and infection by activating ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) proteins to regulate F-actin reorganization and CD4/CXCR4 co-clustering. The interaction of the X4-tropic protein HIV-1 gp120 with CD4 augments ezrin and moesin phosphorylation in human permissive T cells, thereby regulating ezrin-moesin activation. Moreover, the association and clustering of CD4-CXCR4 induced by HIV-1 gp120 requires moesin-mediated anchoring of actin in the plasma membrane. Suppression of moesin expression with dominant-negative N-moesin or specific moesin silencing impedes reorganization of F-actin and HIV-1 entry and infection mediated by the HIV-1 envelope protein complex. Therefore, we propose that activated moesin promotes F-actin redistribution and CD4-CXCR4 clustering and is also required for efficient X4-tropic HIV-1 infection in permissive lymphocytes.

  19. The host-dependent interaction of alpha-importins with influenza PB2 polymerase subunit is required for virus RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Resa-Infante

    Full Text Available The influenza virus polymerase is formed by the PB1, PB2 and PA subunits and is required for virus transcription and replication in the nucleus of infected cells. As PB2 is a relevant host-range determinant we expressed a TAP-tagged PB2 in human cells and isolated intracellular complexes. Alpha-importin was identified as a PB2-associated factor by proteomic analyses. To study the relevance of this interaction for virus replication we mutated the PB2 NLS and analysed the phenotype of mutant subunits, polymerase complexes and RNPs. While mutant PB2 proteins showed reduced nuclear accumulation, they formed polymerase complexes normally when co expressed with PB1 and PA. However, mutant RNPs generated with a viral CAT replicon showed up to hundred-fold reduced CAT accumulation. Rescue of nuclear localisation of mutant PB2 by insertion of an additional SV40 TAg-derived NLS did not revert the mutant phenotype of RNPs. Furthermore, determination of recombinant RNP accumulation in vivo indicated that PB2 NLS mutations drastically reduced virus RNA replication. These results indicate that, above and beyond its role in nuclear accumulation, PB2 interaction with alpha-importins is required for virus RNA replication. To ascertain whether PB2-alpha-importin binding could contribute to the adaptation of H5N1 avian viruses to man, their association in vivo was determined. Human alpha importin isoforms associated efficiently to PB2 protein of an H3N2 human virus but bound to diminished and variable extents to PB2 from H5N1 avian or human strains, suggesting that the function of alpha importin during RNA replication is important for the adaptation of avian viruses to the human host.

  20. Import of the transfer RNase colicin D requires site-specific interaction with the energy-transducing protein TonB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Liliana; Diaz, Nancy; Buckingham, Richard H; de Zamaroczy, Miklos

    2005-04-01

    The transfer RNase colicin D and ionophoric colicin B appropriate the outer membrane iron siderophore receptor FepA and share a common translocation requirement for the TonB pathway to cross the outer membrane. Despite the almost identical sequences of the N-terminal domains required for the translocation of colicins D and B, two spontaneous tonB mutations (Arg158Ser and Pro161Leu) completely abolished colicin D toxicity but did not affect either the sensitivity to other colicins or the FepA-dependent siderophore uptake capacity. The sensitivity to colicin D of both tonB mutants was fully restored by specific suppressor mutations in the TonB box of colicin D, at Ser18(Thr) and Met19(Ile), respectively. This demonstrates that the interaction of colicin D with TonB is critically dependent on certain residues close to position 160 in TonB and on the side chains of certain residues in the TonB box of colicin D. The effect of introducing the TonB boxes from other TonB-dependent receptors and colicins into colicins D and B was studied. The results of these and other changes in the two TonB boxes show that the role of residues at positions 18 and 19 in colicin D is strongly modulated by other nearby and/or distant residues and that the overall function of colicin D is much more dependent on the interaction with TonB involving the TonB box than is the function of colicin B.

  1. Late steps in cytoplasmic maturation of assembly-competent axonemal outer arm dynein in Chlamydomonas require interaction of ODA5 and ODA10 in a complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Anudariya B; Mitchell, David R

    2015-10-15

    Axonemal dyneins are multisubunit enzymes that must be preassembled in the cytoplasm, transported into cilia by intraflagellar transport, and bound to specific sites on doublet microtubules, where their activity facilitates microtubule sliding-based motility. Outer dynein arms (ODAs) require assembly factors to assist their preassembly, transport, and attachment to cargo (specific doublet A-tubule sites). In Chlamydomonas, three assembly factors--ODA5, ODA8, and ODA10--show genetic interactions and have been proposed to interact in a complex, but we recently showed that flagellar ODA8 does not copurify with ODA5 or ODA10. Here we show that ODA5 and ODA10 depend on each other for stability and coexist in a complex in both cytoplasmic and flagellar extracts. Immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy reveal that ODA10 in flagella localizes strictly to a proximal region of doublet number 1, which completely lacks ODAs in Chlamydomonas. Studies of the in vitro binding of ODAs to axonemal doublets reveal a role for the ODA5/ODA10 assembly complex in cytoplasmic maturation of ODAs into a form that can bind to doublet microtubules.

  2. Orbital effects of a monochromatic plane gravitational wave with ultra-low frequency incident on a gravitationally bound two-body system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We analytically compute the long-term orbital variations of a test particle orbiting a central body acted upon by an incident monochromatic plane gravitational wave. We assume that the characteristic size of the perturbed two-body system is much smaller than the wavelength of the wave. Moreover, we also suppose that the wave's frequency νg is much smaller than the particle's orbital one nb. We make neither a priori assumptions about the direction of the wavevector kˆ nor on the orbital configuration of the particle. While the semi-major axis a is left unaffected, the eccentricity e, the inclination I, the longitude of the ascending node Ω, the longitude of pericenter ϖ and the mean anomaly ℳ undergo non-vanishing long-term changes of the form dΨ/dt=F(Kij;e,I,Ω,ω,Ψ=e,I,Ω,ϖ,M, where Kij, i,j=1,2,3 are the coefficients of the tidal matrix K. Thus, in addition to the variations of its orientation in space, the shape of the orbit would be altered as well. Strictly speaking, such effects are not secular trends because of the slow modulation introduced by K and by the orbital elements themselves: they exhibit peculiar long-term temporal patterns which would be potentially of help for their detection in multidecadal analyses of extended data records of planetary observations of various kinds. In particular, they could be useful in performing independent tests of the inflation-driven ultra-low gravitational waves whose imprint may have been indirectly detected in the Cosmic Microwave Background by the Earth-based experiment BICEP2. Our calculation holds, in general, for any gravitationally bound two-body system whose orbital frequency nb is much larger than the frequency νg of the external wave, like, e.g., extrasolar planets and the stars orbiting the Galactic black hole. It is also valid for a generic perturbation of tidal type with constant coefficients over timescales of the order of the orbital period of the perturbed particle.

  3. Calcium requirement of phytochrome-mediated fern-spore germination: no direct phytochrome-calcium interaction in the phytochrome-initiated transduction chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuerlein, R.; Wayne, R.; Roux, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    Phytochrome-mediated germination of fern spores of Dryopteris paleacea Sw. was initiated by a saturating red-light (R) irradiation after 20 h of imbibition. For its realization external Ca2+ was required, with a threshold at a submicromolar concentration, and an optimum was reached around 10(-4) M. At concentrations > or = 10(-1) M only a reduced response was obtained, based probably on an unspecific osmotic or ionic effect. The germination response was inhibited by La3+, an antagonist of Ca2+. From these results it is concluded that Ca2+ influx from the medium into the spores may be an important event in phytochrome-mediated germination. In the absence of Ca2+ the R-stimulated system remained capable of responding to Ca2+, added as late as 40 h after R. Moreover, Ca2+ was effective even if added after the active form of phytochrome, Pfr, had been abolished by far-red (FR) 24 h after R. Thus, the primary effect of Pfr, that initiates the transduction chain, does not require calcium. "Coupling" of Pfr to subsequent dark reactions has been investigated by R-FR irradiations with various dark intervals. The resulting "escape kinetics" were characterized by a lag phase (6 h) and half-maximal escape from FR reversibility (19 h). These kinetics were not significantly changed by the presence or absence of calcium. Thus, direct interaction of Pfr and calcium is not a step in the transduction chain initiated by the active form of phytochrome.

  4. Predictive $CP$ Violating Relations for Charmless Two-body Decays of Beauty Baryons $\\Xi^{-,\\;0}_b$ and $\\Lambda_b^0$

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Several baryons containing a heavy b-quark have been discovered. The decays of these states provide new platform for testing the standard model (SM). We study $CP$ violation in SM for charmless two-body decays of the flavor $SU(3)$ anti-triplet beauty baryon (b-baryon) ${\\cal B} = (\\Xi^-_b,\\;\\Xi^0_b,\\;\\Lambda_b^0)$ in a model independent way. We found, in the flavor $SU(3)$ symmetry limit, a set of new predictive relations among the branching ratio $Br$ and $CP$ asymmetry $A_{CP}$ for $\\cal B$ decays. Neglecting small annihilation contributions, we find additional relations. In particular we find that $A_{CP}(\\Lambda_b^0\\to \\pi^- p)/A_{CP}(\\Lambda_b^0\\to K^- p) = - Br(\\Lambda_b^0 \\to K^- p)/Br(\\Lambda_b^0 \\to \\pi^- p)$ holds to a good approximation. This relation is consistent with recent data from CDF in signs and in values within 1$\\sigma$ error bars, but the central value is off. Future data from LHCb can test this relation and also other relations found.

  5. Measurement of branching fractions and search for CP-violating charge asymmetries in charmless two-body B decays into pions and kaons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Fan, Q; Gill, M S; Gowdy, S J; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Kirk, A; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; Mass, A; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Camanzi, B; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Dubrovin, M S; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Gaede, F; Johnson, D R; Michael, A K; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljevic, V; Fackler, O; Fujino, D; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Martin, R; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Lin, C S; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Wittlin, J; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Britton, D I; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L

    2001-10-08

    We present measurements, based on a sample of approximately 23x10(6) BB pairs, of the branching fractions and a search for CP-violating charge asymmetries in charmless hadronic decays of B mesons into two-body final states of kaons and pions. We find the branching fractions B(B0-->pi(+)pi(-)) = (4.1+/-1.0+/-0.7)x10(-6), B(B0-->K+pi(-)) = (16.7+/-1.6+/-1.3)x10(-6), B(B+-->K+pi(0)) = (10.8(+2.1)(-1.9)+/-1.0)x10(-6), B(B+-->K0pi(+)) = (18.2(+3.3)(-3.0)+/-2.0)x10(-6), B(B0-->K0pi(0)) = (8.2(+3.1)(-2.7)+/-1.2)x10(-6). We also report 90% confidence level upper limits for B meson decays to the pi(+)pi(0), K+K-, and K0K+ final states. In addition, charge asymmetries have been found to be consistent with zero, where the statistical precision is in the range of +/-0.10 to +/-0.18, depending on the decay mode.

  6. Evidence for the two-body charmless baryonic decay $B^+ \\to p \\kern 0.1em\\overline{\\kern -0.1em\\Lambda}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; 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    2016-01-01

    A search for the rare two-body charmless baryonic decay $B^+ \\to p \\kern 0.1em\\overline{\\kern -0.1em\\Lambda}$ is performed with $pp$ collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3\\mbox{fb}^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies of $7$ and $8\\mathrm{\\,Te\\kern -0.1em V}$. An excess of $B^+ \\to p \\kern 0.1em\\overline{\\kern -0.1em\\Lambda}$ candidates with respect to background expectations is seen with a statistical significance of 4.1 standard deviations, and constitutes the first evidence for this decay. The branching fraction, measured using the $B^+ \\to K^0_{\\mathrm S} \\pi^+$ decay for normalisation, is \\begin{eqnarray} \\mathcal{B}(B^+ \\to p \\kern 0.1em\\overline{\\kern -0.1em\\Lambda}) & = & ( 2.4 \\,^{+1.0}_{-0.8} \\pm 0.3 ) \\times 10^{-7} \\,, \

  7. Measurement of Branching Fractions and Search for CP-Violating Charge Asymmetries in Charmless Two-Body B Decays into Pions and Kaons

    CERN Document Server

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Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; Le Peltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, Andrea; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljevic, V; Fackler, O; Fujino, D; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; Van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J W; Martin, R; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J L; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Lin, C S; Moore, T B; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Wittlin, J; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Britton, D I; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De, G; Nardo; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R G; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F R; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versille, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martínez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M J; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Lü, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J S; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Jacques, P F; Kalelkar, M; Plano, R J; Adye, T; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, Gian P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, Roy; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N K; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K G; Bloom, Elliott D; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, Michael; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Grosso, P; Himel, Thomas M; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Manzin, G; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Petrak, S; Quinn, Helen R; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stahl, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Talby, M; Tanaka, H A; Trunov, A G; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Hart, E; Weidemann, A W; Benninger, T; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A V; Zanin, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Prest, M; Vallazza, E; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; De Silva, A; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Elmer, P; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu Sau Lan; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M B; Neal, H; Ollaboration, BABAR C

    2001-01-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions and a search for CP-violating charge asymmetries in charmless hadronic decays of B mesons into two-body final states of kaons and pions. The results are based on a data sample of approximately 23 million BB(bar) pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. We find the following branching fractions: BF(B0-->pi+pi-)= (4.1+/-1.0+/-0.7) x 10^{-6}, BF(B0-->K+pi-)=(16.7+/-1.6+/-1.3) x 10^{-6}, BF(B+-->K+pi0)=(10.8^{ +2.1}_{-1.9}+/-1.0) x 10^{-6}, BF(B+-->K0pi+)=(18.2^{+3.3}_{-3.0}+/-2. 0) x 10^{-6}, BF(B0-->K0pi0)=(8.2^{+3.1}_{-2.7}+/-1.2) x 10^{-6}. We also report the 90% confidence level upper limits BF(B0-->K+K-) pi+pi0) anti-K0K+) < 2.4 x 10^{-6}. In addition, charge asymmetries have been measured and found to be consistent with zero, where the statistical precision is in the range of +/-0.10 to +/-0.18, depending on the decay mode.

  8. Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B Meson Decays to Charmless Two-Body States Containing a K0

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Le Clerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmücker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; MacKay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Pioppi, M; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le, F; Diberder; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljevic, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Raven, G; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Cavoto, G; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Bellini, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-01-01

    We present measurements of branching fractions and \\CP-violating asymmetries in decays of $B$ mesons to two-body final states containing a \\Kz. The results are based on a data sample of approximately 88 million \\upsbb decays collected with the \\babar detector at the \\pep2 asymmetric-energy $B$ Factory at SLAC. We measure $\\BR(\\Bp\\to\\Kz\\pip) = (22.3 \\pm 1.7 \\pm 1.1)\\times 10^{-6}$, $\\BR(\\Bz\\to\\Kz\\piz) = (11.4\\pm 1.7\\pm 0.8)\\times 10^{-6}$, $\\BR(\\Bp\\to\\Kzb\\Kp) < 2.5\\times 10^{-6}$, and $\\BR(\\Bz\\to\\KzKzb) < 1.8\\times 10^{-6}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic, and the upper limits are at the 90% confidence level. In addition, the following \\CP-violating asymmetries have been measured: ${\\cal A}_{CP}(\\Bp\\to\\Kz\\pip) = -0.05 \\pm 0.08 \\pm 0.01$ and ${\\cal A}_{CP}(\\Bz\\to\\Kz\\piz) = 0.03 \\pm 0.36\\pm 0.11$.

  9. Co-simulation for performance prediction of integrated building and HVAC systems - An analysis of solution characteristics using a two-body system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trcka, Marija; L.M. Hensena, Jan; Wetter, Michael

    2010-06-21

    Integrated performance simulation of buildings and heating, ventilation and airconditioning (HVAC) systems can help reducing energy consumption and increasing occupant comfort. However, no single building performance simulation (BPS) tool offers suffcient capabilities and flexibilities to analyze integrated building systems and to enable rapid prototyping of innovative building and system technologies. One way to alleviate this problem is to use co-simulation to integrate different BPS tools. Co-simulation approach represents a particular case of simulation scenario where at least two simulators solve coupled differential-algebraic systems of equations and exchange data that couples these equations during the time integration. This article analyzes how co-simulation influences consistency, stability and accuracy of the numerical approximation to the solution. Consistency and zero-stability are studied for a general class of the problem, while a detailed consistency and absolute stability analysis is given for a simple two-body problem. Since the accuracy of the numerical approximation to the solution is reduced in co-simulation, the article concludes by discussing ways for how to improve accuracy.

  10. Measurement of CP asymmetries and branching fractions in two-body neutral B meson decays to charged pions and kaons with the BABAR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbin, Amir

    This dissertation presents a measurement of CP asymmetries and branching fractions for neutral B meson decays to two-body final states of charged pions and kaons. The results are obtained from a data sample of about 88 million Upsilon(4S) → BB¯ decays collected between 1999 and 2002 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. A fit to kinematic, topological, and particle identification information measures the charge-averaged branching fractions B (B0 → pi+pi -) = (4.7 +/- 0.6 +/- 0.2) x 10-6 and B (B0 → K+pi -) = (17.9 +/- 0.9 +/- 0.7) x 10-6 ; the 90% confidence level upper limit B (B0 → K+ K-) b-flavor tagging information measures the CP-violating parameters for B0 → pi +pi- decays Spipi = 0.02 +/- 0.34 +/- 0.05 [-0.54, +0.58] and Cpipi = -0.30 +/- 0.25 +/- 0.04 [-0.72, +0.12].

  11. Regulation of abiotic stress signalling by Arabidopsis C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 requires interaction with a k-homology domain-containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sil Jeong

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN (CTD PHOSPHATASE-LIKE 1 (CPL1 regulates plant transcriptional responses to diverse stress signals. Unlike typical CTD phosphatases, CPL1 contains two double-stranded (ds RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs at its C-terminus. Some dsRBMs can bind to dsRNA and/or other proteins, but the function of the CPL1 dsRBMs has remained obscure. Here, we report identification of REGULATOR OF CBF GENE EXPRESSION 3 (RCF3 as a CPL1-interacting protein. RCF3 co-purified with tandem-affinity-tagged CPL1 from cultured Arabidopsis cells and contains multiple K-homology (KH domains, which were predicted to be important for binding to single-stranded DNA/RNA. Yeast two-hybrid, luciferase complementation imaging, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses established that CPL1 and RCF3 strongly associate in vivo, an interaction mediated by the dsRBM1 of CPL1 and the KH3/KH4 domains of RCF3. Mapping of functional regions of CPL1 indicated that CPL1 in vivo function requires the dsRBM1, catalytic activity, and nuclear targeting of CPL1. Gene expression profiles of rcf3 and cpl1 mutants were similar during iron deficiency, but were distinct during the cold response. These results suggest that tethering CPL1 to RCF3 via dsRBM1 is part of the mechanism that confers specificity to CPL1-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  12. Requirement for the endocannabinoid system in social interaction impairment induced by coactivation of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in the piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenko, Michelle; Zhu, Yongyong; Dremencov, Eliyahu; Ren, Wei; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Xia

    2011-08-01

    The dopamine receptor family consists of D1-D5 receptors (D1R-D5R), and we explored the contributions of each dopamine receptor subtype in the piriform cortex (PirC) to social interaction impairment (SII). Rats received behavioral tests or electrophysiological recording of PirC neuronal activity after injection of the D1R/D5R agonist SKF38393, the D2R/D3R/D4R agonist quinpirole, or both, with or without pretreatment with dopamine receptor antagonists, D1R or D5R antisense oligonucleotides, the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM281, or the endocannabinoid transporter inhibitor VDM11. Systemic injection of SKF38393 and quinpirole together, but not each one alone, induced SII and increased PirC firing rate, which were blocked by D1R or D2R antagonist. Intra-PirC microinfusion of SKF38393 and quinpirole together, but not each one alone, also induced SII, which was blocked by D1R antisense oligonucleotides or D2R antagonist but not by D3R or D4R antagonist or D5R antisense oligonucleotides. SII induced by intra-PirC SKF38393/quinpirole was blocked by AM281 and enhanced by VDM11, whereas neither AM281 nor VDM11 alone affected social interaction behavior. Coadministration of SKF38393 and quinpirole produced anxiolytic effects without significant effects on locomotor activity, olfaction, and acquisition of olfactory short-term memory. These findings suggest that SII induced by coactivation of PirC D1R and D2R requires the endocannabinoid system.

  13. The receptor-like kinase SOBIR1 interacts with Brassica napus LepR3 and is required for Leptosphaeria maculans AvrLm1-triggered immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisong eMa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe fungus Leptosphaeria maculans (L. maculans is the causal agent of blackleg disease of canola/oilseed rape (Brassica napus worldwide. We previously reported cloning of the B. napus blackleg resistance gene, LepR3, which encodes a receptor-like protein. LepR3 triggers localised cell death upon recognition of its cognate Avr protein, AvrLm1. Here, we exploited the Nicotiana benthamiana model plant to investigate the recognition mechanism of AvrLm1 by LepR3. Co-expression of the LepR3/AvrLm1 gene pair in N. benthamiana resulted in development of a hypersensitive response (HR. However, a truncated AvrLm1 lacking its indigenous signal peptide was compromised in its ability to induce LepR3-mediated HR, indicating that AvrLm1 is perceived by LepR3 extracellularly. Structure-function analysis of the AvrLm1 protein revealed that the C-terminal region of AvrLm1 was required for LepR3-mediated HR in N. benthamiana and for resistance to L. maculans in B. napus. LepR3 was shown to be physically interacting with the B. napus receptor like kinase, SOBIR1 (BnSOBIR1. Silencing of NbSOBIR1 or NbSERK3 (BAK1 compromised LepR3-AvrLm1-dependent HR in N. benthamiana, suggesting that LepR3-mediated resistance to L. maculans in B. napus requires SOBIR1 and BAK1/SERK3. Using this model system, we determined that BnSOBIR1 and SERK3/BAK1 are essential partners in the LepR3 signalling complex and were able to define the AvrLm1 effector domain.

  14. Modified two-body potential approach to the peripheral direct capture astrophysical a+A->B+{gamma} reaction and asymptotic normalization coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igamov, S.B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, 702132 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Yarmukhamedov, R. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, 702132 Tashkent (Uzbekistan)]. E-mail: rakhim@inp.uz

    2007-01-01

    A modified two-body potential approach is proposed for determination of both the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) (or the respective nuclear vertex constant (NVC)) for the A+a->B (for the virtual decay B->A+a) from an analysis of the experimental S-factor for the peripheral direct capture a+A->B+{gamma} reaction and the astrophysical S-factor, S(E), at low experimentally inaccessible energy regions. The approach proposed involves two additional conditions which verify the peripheral character of the considered reaction and expresses S(E) in terms of the ANC. The connection between NVC (ANC) and the effective range parameters for Aa-scattering is derived. To test this approach we reanalyse the precise experimental astrophysical S-factors for t+{alpha}->Li7+{gamma} reaction at energies E=<1200 keV [C.R. Brune et al., Phys. Rev. C 50 (1994) 2205]. The same Wood-Saxon potential form both for the bound (t+{alpha})-state wave function and for the {alpha}t-scattering wave function is used to guarantee selfconsistency. New estimates have been obtained for the values of the ANC's (the NVC's) for the {alpha}+t->Li7(g.s.), {alpha}+t->Li7(0.478 MeV) and of S(E) at E=<50 keV. These ANC values have been used for getting information about the ''indirect'' measured values of the effective range parameters and the p-wave phase shift for {alpha}t-scattering in the energy range of 100-bar E-bar 180 keV.

  15. Two-body D sub s sup + decays to. eta. pi. sup + ,. eta. prime. pi. sup + ,. eta. rho. sup + ,. eta. prime. rho. sup + , and. phi. rho. sup +

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daoudi, M.; Ford, W.T.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Lohner, M.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lewis, J.D.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Nandi, S.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; O' Grady, C.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yelton, J.; Henderson, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Yamamoto, H.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoell; (CLEO Collaboration)

    1992-06-01

    We have made measurements of several {ital D}{sub {ital s}} branching ratios, relative to the {phi}{pi}{sup +} mode. We have observed two previously unseen two-body hadronic decays of the {ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup +}, namely {eta}{rho}{sup +} and {eta}{prime}{rho}{sup +}, and measured relative branching ratios of 2.86{plus minus}0.38{sub {minus}0.38}{sup +0.36} and 3.44{plus minus}0.62{sub {minus}0.46}{sup +0.44}, respectively. We have determined the relative branching ratio for the decay into {phi}{rho}{sup +} to be 1.86{plus minus}0.26{sub {minus}0.40}{sup +0.29}. In addition, we have measured relative branching ratios for the {eta}{pi}{sup +} and {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup +} states, for which there had previously been conflicting measurements; our results are 0.54{plus minus}0.09{plus minus}0.06 and 1.20{plus minus}0.15{plus minus}0.11, respectively. Combining these new measurements with previous results and using (3.7{plus minus}1.2)% for the value of {ital scrB}({ital D}{sub {ital s}}{r arrow}{phi}{pi}{sup +}), we can account for {approx}(79{plus minus}26)% of all {ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup +} decays. In addition we have also measured relative branching ratios or set upper limits on {ital D}{sup +} decays to all of the above-mentioned final states.

  16. Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Cold-Sprayed 20 vol.% Cubic BN-NiCrAl Nanocomposite Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Tao; Yang, Er-Juan; Shang, Fu-Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chen-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2014-10-01

    20 vol.% cubic boron nitride (cBN) dispersoid reinforced NiCrAl matrix nanocomposite coating was prepared by cold spray using mechanically alloyed nanostructured composite powders. The as-sprayed nanocomposite coating was annealed at a temperature of 750 °C to enhance the inter-particle bonding. Microstructure of spray powders and coatings was characterized. Vickers microhardness of the coatings was measured. Two-body abrasive wear behavior of the coatings was examined on a pin-on-disk test. It was found that, in mechanically alloyed composite powders, nano-sized and submicro-sized cBN particles are uniformly distributed in nanocrystalline NiCrAl matrix. Dense coating was deposited by cold spray at a gas temperature of 650 °C with the same phases and grain size as those of the starting powder. Vickers hardness test yielded a hardness of 1063 HV for the as-sprayed 20 vol.% cBN-NiCrAl coating. After annealed at 750 °C for 5 h, unbonded inter-particle boundaries were partially healed and evident grain growth of nanocrystalline NiCrAl was avoided. Wear resistance of the as-sprayed 20 vol.% cBN-NiCrAl nanocomposite coating was comparable to the HVOF-sprayed WC-12Co coating. Annealing of the nanocomposite coating resulted in the improvement of wear resistance by a factor of ~33% owing to the enhanced inter-particle bonding. Main material removal mechanisms during the abrasive wear are also discussed.

  17. Interaction of HP1 and Brg1/Brm with the globular domain of histone H3 is required for HP1-mediated repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lavigne

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The heterochromatin-enriched HP1 proteins play a critical role in regulation of transcription. These proteins contain two related domains known as the chromo- and the chromoshadow-domain. The chromo-domain binds histone H3 tails methylated on lysine 9. However, in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that the affinity of HP1 proteins to native methylated chromatin is relatively poor and that the opening of chromatin occurring during DNA replication facilitates their binding to nucleosomes. These observations prompted us to investigate whether HP1 proteins have additional histone binding activities, envisioning also affinity for regions potentially occluded by the nucleosome structure. We find that the chromoshadow-domain interacts with histone H3 in a region located partially inside the nucleosomal barrel at the entry/exit point of the nucleosome. Interestingly, this region is also contacted by the catalytic subunits of the human SWI/SNF complex. In vitro, efficient SWI/SNF remodeling requires this contact and is inhibited in the presence of HP1 proteins. The antagonism between SWI/SNF and HP1 proteins is also observed in vivo on a series of interferon-regulated genes. Finally, we show that SWI/SNF activity favors loading of HP1 proteins to chromatin both in vivo and in vitro. Altogether, our data suggest that HP1 chromoshadow-domains can benefit from the opening of nucleosomal structures to bind chromatin and that HP1 proteins use this property to detect and arrest unwanted chromatin remodeling.

  18. Seismic Shaking Table Requirements and Consideration of Fluid-Structure Interaction Effect in Seismic Response Analysis Model for In-Reactor Fuel Assembly Under Severe Earthquake Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kanghee; Yoon, Kyungho; Kang, Heungsoek; Lee, Youngho; Kim, Hyungkyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Dynamic response of fuel assembly can be significantly affected by added hydrodynamic mass and additional damping from the fluid and flow inside operating reactor core. Added mass or hydrodynamic virtual mass from surrounding fluid medium can be theoretically estimated by the potential flow theory. Solving Laplace equation in terms of velocity potential can leads to calculate mass components in the mass matrix of simplified fuel FE model. Additional damping from the fluid and the flow inside reactor core are originated from fluid drag and flow lift force, respectively. Lift force from axial flow can increase fuel assembly damping by twice compared to still fluid damping from the loop testing. In practice, fuel assembly damping should be measured by mockup loop testing and referred to published data in the literature. The justification is performed via time history analysis with simplified dynamic model using a group of fuel assembly in the core. Key check points in this analysis might be the integrity of intermediate spacer grids when impacting fuels into core shroud plate or into neighboring fuel assembly. Thus, dynamic displacement and impact force at grid elevations are the important structural parameters to be traced out during the analysis and the simulation testing. KAERI have a plan to develop dynamic analysis model and to setup test infrastructure for full scale and several fuel assembly rows seismic simulation testing. This paper briefly discuss on the reference earthquake accident scenario, shaking table requirements for full-scale seismic simulation testing, virtual testing issues before the hardware setup, and modelling issue related to fluid-structure interaction effect in accident core analysis.

  19. OsARID3, an AT-rich Interaction Domain-containing protein, is required for shoot meristem development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Zong, Wei; Hou, Xin; Yao, Jialing; Liu, Hongbo; Li, Xianghua; Zhao, Yunde; Xiong, Lizhong

    2015-09-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) produces all of the plant's aerial organs. The SAM is established either during embryogenesis or experimentally in in vitro tissue culture. Although several factors including the Class I KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOXI) proteins, auxin, and cytokinin are known to play essential roles in SAM development, the underlying mechanisms of SAM formation and maintenance are still largely not understood. Herein we demonstrate that OsARID3, a member of the rice (Oryza sativa) AT-rich Interaction Domain (ARID) family, is required for SAM development. Disruption of OsARID3 leads to a defective SAM, early seedling lethality, and impaired capacity of in vitro shoot regeneration. We show that the expression levels of several KNOXI genes and the biosynthetic genes for auxin and cytokinin are significantly altered in the Osarid3 mutant calli. Moreover, we determine that auxin concentrations are increased, whereas cytokinin levels are decreased, in Osarid3 calli. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation results demonstrate that OsARID3 binds directly to the KNOXI gene OSH71, the auxin biosynthetic genes OsYUC1 and OsYUC6, and the cytokinin biosynthetic genes OsIPT2 and OsIPT7. We also show through electrophoretic mobility shift assays that OsARID3 specifically binds to the AT-rich DNA sequences of the identified target genes. We conclude that OsARID3 is an AT-rich specific DNA-binding protein and that it plays a major role in SAM development in rice. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Carbohydrate-Carbohydrate Interactions Mediated by Sulfate Esters and Calcium Provide the Cell Adhesion Required for the Emergence of Early Metazoans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vilanova, Eduardo; Santos, Gustavo R C; Aquino, Rafael S; Valle-Delgado, Juan J; Anselmetti, Dario; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2016-01-01

    .... Cell adhesion in sponges is mediated by the calcium-dependent multivalent self-interactions of sulfated polysaccharides components of extracellular membrane-bound proteoglycans, namely aggregation factors...

  1. Three-body bound states with zero-range interaction in the Bethe-Salpeter approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ydrefors, E.; Alvarenga Nogueira, J. H.; Gigante, V.; Frederico, T.; Karmanov, V. A.

    2017-07-01

    The Bethe-Salpeter equation for three bosons with zero-range interaction is solved for the first time. For comparison the light-front equation is also solved. The input is the two-body scattering length and the outputs are the three-body binding energies, Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes and light-front wave functions. Three different regimes are analyzed: (i) For weak enough two-body interaction the three-body system is unbound. (ii) For stronger two-body interaction a three-body bound state appears. It provides an interesting example of a deeply bound Borromean system. (iii) For even stronger two-body interaction this state becomes unphysical with a negative mass squared. However, another physical (excited) state appears, found previously in light-front calculations. The Bethe-Salpeter approach implicitly incorporates three-body forces of relativistic origin, which are attractive and increase the binding energy.

  2. Identification of Amino Acid Residues in Fibroblast Growth Factor 14 (FGF14) Required for Structure-Function Interactions with Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Nav1.6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed R; Singh, Aditya K; Laezza, Fernanda

    2016-05-20

    The voltage-gated Na(+) (Nav) channel provides the basis for electrical excitability in the brain. This channel is regulated by a number of accessory proteins including fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14), a member of the intracellular FGF family. In addition to forming homodimers, FGF14 binds directly to the Nav1.6 channel C-tail, regulating channel gating and expression, properties that are required for intrinsic excitability in neurons. Seeking amino acid residues with unique roles at the protein-protein interaction interface (PPI) of FGF14·Nav1.6, we engineered model-guided mutations of FGF14 and validated their impact on the FGF14·Nav1.6 complex and the FGF14:FGF14 dimer formation using a luciferase assay. Divergence was found in the β-9 sheet of FGF14 where an alanine (Ala) mutation of Val-160 impaired binding to Nav1.6 but had no effect on FGF14:FGF14 dimer formation. Additional analysis revealed also a key role of residues Lys-74/Ile-76 at the N-terminal of FGF14 in the FGF14·Nav1.6 complex and FGF14:FGF14 dimer formation. Using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology, we demonstrated that either the FGF14(V160A) or the FGF14(K74A/I76A) mutation was sufficient to abolish the FGF14-dependent regulation of peak transient Na(+) currents and the voltage-dependent activation and steady-state inactivation of Nav1.6; but only V160A with a concomitant alanine mutation at Tyr-158 could impede FGF14-dependent modulation of the channel fast inactivation. Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy of purified proteins confirmed a stronger binding reduction of FGF14(V160A) to the Nav1.6 C-tail compared with FGF14(K74A/I76A) Altogether these studies indicate that the β-9 sheet and the N terminus of FGF14 are well positioned targets for drug development of PPI-based allosteric modulators of Nav channels.

  3. The PCNA interaction protein box sequence in Rad54 is an integral part of its ATPase domain and is required for efficient DNA repair and recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Sebesta, Marek; Sisakova, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Rad54 is an ATP-driven translocase involved in the genome maintenance pathway of homologous recombination (HR). Although its activity has been implicated in several steps of HR, its exact role(s) at each step are still not fully understood. We have identified a new interaction between Rad54...... and the replicative DNA clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). This interaction was only mildly weakened by the mutation of two key hydrophobic residues in the highly-conserved PCNA interaction motif (PIP-box) of Rad54 (Rad54-AA). Intriguingly, the rad54-AA mutant cells displayed sensitivity to DNA damage...

  4. AltMV TGB1 Nucleolar Localization Requires Homologous Interaction and Correlates with Cell Wall Localization Associated with Cell-to-Cell Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jiryun; Nam, Moon; Bae, Hanhong; Lee, Cheolho; Lee, Bong-Chun; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

    2013-12-01

    The Potexvirus Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) has multifunctional triple gene block (TGB) proteins, among which our studies have focused on the properties of the TGB1 protein. The TGB1 of AltMV has functions including RNA binding, RNA silencing suppression, and cell-to-cell movement, and is known to form homologous interactions. The helicase domains of AltMV TGB1 were separately mutated to identify which regions are involved in homologous TGB1 interactions. The yeast two hybrid system and Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) in planta were utilized to examine homologous interactions of the mutants. Helicase motif I of AltMV TGB1 was found to be critical to maintain homologous interactions. Mutations in the remaining helicase motifs did not inhibit TGB1 homologous interactions. In the absence of homologous interaction of TGB1, subcellular localization of helicase domain I mutants showed distinctively different patterns from that of WT TGB1. These results provide important information to study viral movement and replication of AltMV.

  5. The PCNA interaction protein box sequence in Rad54 is an integral part of its ATPase domain and is required for efficient DNA repair and recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C Burgess

    Full Text Available Rad54 is an ATP-driven translocase involved in the genome maintenance pathway of homologous recombination (HR. Although its activity has been implicated in several steps of HR, its exact role(s at each step are still not fully understood. We have identified a new interaction between Rad54 and the replicative DNA clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA. This interaction was only mildly weakened by the mutation of two key hydrophobic residues in the highly-conserved PCNA interaction motif (PIP-box of Rad54 (Rad54-AA. Intriguingly, the rad54-AA mutant cells displayed sensitivity to DNA damage and showed HR defects similar to the null mutant, despite retaining its ability to interact with HR proteins and to be recruited to HR foci in vivo. We therefore surmised that the PCNA interaction might be impaired in vivo and was unable to promote repair synthesis during HR. Indeed, the Rad54-AA mutant was defective in primer extension at the MAT locus as well as in vitro, but additional biochemical analysis revealed that this mutant also had diminished ATPase activity and an inability to promote D-loop formation. Further mutational analysis of the putative PIP-box uncovered that other phenotypically relevant mutants in this domain also resulted in a loss of ATPase activity. Therefore, we have found that although Rad54 interacts with PCNA, the PIP-box motif likely plays only a minor role in stabilizing the PCNA interaction, and rather, this conserved domain is probably an extension of the ATPase domain III.

  6. Experiment E89-044 of quasi-elastic diffusion 3He(e,e'p) at Jefferson Laboratory: Analyze cross sections of the two body breakup in parallel kinematics; Experience E89-044 de diffusion quasi-elastique 3he(e,e'p) au Jefferson Laboratory : analyse des sections efficaces de desintegration a deux corps en cinematique parallele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penel-Nottaris, Emilie [Univ. Joseph Fourier Grenoble (France)

    2004-07-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment has measured the 3He(e,e'p) reaction cross sections. The separation of the longitudinal and transverse response functions for the two-body breakup reaction in parallel kinematics allows to study the bound proton electromagnetic properties in the 3He nucleus and the involved nuclear mechanisms beyond impulse approximation. Preliminary cross sections show some disagreement with theoretical predictions for the forward angles kinematics around 0 MeV/c missing momenta, and sensitivity to final state interactions and 3He wave functions for missing momenta of 300 MeV/c.

  7. Identification of conserved amino acids in the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL8 protein required for DNA synthesis and UL52 primase interaction in the virus replisome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muylaert, Isabella; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Andersson, Torbjörn; Elias, Per

    2012-09-28

    We have used oriS-dependent transient replication assays to search for species-specific interactions within the herpes simplex virus replisome. Hybrid replisomes derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) failed to support DNA replication in cells. Moreover, the replisomes showed a preference for their cognate origin of replication. The results demonstrate that the herpesvirus replisome behaves as a molecular machine relying on functionally important interactions. We then searched for functional interactions in the replisome context by subjecting HSV-1 UL8 protein to extensive mutagenesis. 52 mutants were made by replacing single or clustered charged amino acids with alanines. Four mutants showed severe replication defects. Mutant A23 exhibited a lethal phenotype, and mutants A49, A52 and A53 had temperature-sensitive phenotypes. Mutants A49 and A53 did not interact with UL52 primase as determined by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Using GFP-tagged UL8, we demonstrate that all mutants were unable to support formation of ICP8-containing nuclear replication foci. Extended mutagenesis suggested that a highly conserved motif corresponding to mutant A49 serves an important role for establishing a physical contact between UL8 and UL52. The replication-defective mutations affected conserved amino acids, and similar phenotypes were observed when the corresponding mutations were introduced into EHV-1 UL8.

  8. The PCNA interaction protein box sequence in Rad54 is an integral part of its ATPase domain and is required for efficient DNA repair and recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Sebesta, Marek; Sisakova, Alexandra;

    2013-01-01

    Rad54 is an ATP-driven translocase involved in the genome maintenance pathway of homologous recombination (HR). Although its activity has been implicated in several steps of HR, its exact role(s) at each step are still not fully understood. We have identified a new interaction between Rad54 and t...

  9. Norovirus translation requires an interaction between the C Terminus of the genome-linked viral protein VPg and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Liliane; Bailey, Dalan; Leen, Eoin N; Emmott, Edward P; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Roberts, Lisa O; Curry, Stephen; Locker, Nicolas; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2014-08-01

    Viruses have evolved a variety of mechanisms to usurp the host cell translation machinery to enable translation of the viral genome in the presence of high levels of cellular mRNAs. Noroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis in man, have evolved a mechanism that relies on the interaction of translation initiation factors with the virus-encoded VPg protein covalently linked to the 5' end of the viral RNA. To further characterize this novel mechanism of translation initiation, we have used proteomics to identify the components of the norovirus translation initiation factor complex. This approach revealed that VPg binds directly to the eIF4F complex, with a high affinity interaction occurring between VPg and eIF4G. Mutational analyses indicated that the C-terminal region of VPg is important for the VPg-eIF4G interaction; viruses with mutations that alter or disrupt this interaction are debilitated or non-viable. Our results shed new light on the unusual mechanisms of protein-directed translation initiation.

  10. Study of ln s Physics in $\\bar{p}p$ Interactions at the Split Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment uses the Split Field Magnet detector to investigate the low p^t, ``ln~s'', type of interactions that dominate the @*p cross-section. Systematic comparisons will be made to pp interactions. \\\\ \\\\ Specific areas to be studied include elastic scattering in the regions 0.05 $<$ !t! $<$ 0.8 GeV|2 and 0.8 $<$ !t! $<$ 4.0 GeV|2, and the use of a minimum bias trigger to study topological cross-sections, inclusive spectra, and two-body correlations. Some specialized triggers, run simultaneously with the high t elastic scattering trigger, are being studied. Examples are a trigger requiring Cerenkov identification in a limited region of phase space, and a trigger to select diffractively produced events.

  11. Homology-based modeling of the Erwinia amylovora type III secretion chaperone DspF used to identify amino acids required for virulence and interaction with the effector DspE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Lindsay R; Wedemeyer, William J; Sundin, George W

    2010-09-01

    The structure of DspF, a type III secretion system (T3SS) chaperone required for virulence of the fruit tree pathogen Erwinia amylovora, was modeled based on predicted structural homology to characterized T3SS chaperones. This model guided the selection of 11 amino acid residues that were individually mutated to alanine via site-directed mutagenesis. Each mutant was assessed for its effect on virulence complementation, dimerization and interaction with the N-terminal chaperone-binding site of DspE. Four amino acid residues were identified that did not complement the virulence defect of a dspF knockout mutant, and three of these residues were required for interaction with the N-terminus of DspE. This study supports the significance of the predicted beta-sheet helix-binding groove in DspF chaperone function.

  12. Efficient trafficking of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus requires a VAMP-associated protein-interacting FFAT motif of CERT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Miyuki; Kumagai, Keigo; Nishijima, Masahiro; Hanada, Kentaro

    2006-10-01

    Ceramide is synthesized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transported to the Golgi apparatus by CERT for its conversion to sphingomyelin in mammalian cells. CERT has a pleck-strin homology (PH) domain for Golgi targeting and a START domain catalyzing the intermembrane transfer of ceramide. The region between the two domains contains a short peptide motif designated FFAT, which is supposed to interact with the ER-resident proteins VAP-A and VAP-B. Both VAPs were actually co-immunoprecipitated with CERT, and the CERT/VAP interaction was abolished by mutations in the FFAT motif. These mutations did not affect the Golgi targeting activity of CERT. Whereas mutations of neither the FFAT motif nor the PH domain inhibited the ceramide transfer activity of CERT in a cell-free system, they impaired the ER-to-Golgi transport of ceramide in intact and in semi-intact cells at near endogenous expression levels. By contrast, when overexpressed, both the FFAT motif and the PH domain mutants of CERT substantially supported the transport of ceramide from the ER to the site where sphingomyelin is produced. These results suggest that the Golgi-targeting PH domain and ER-interacting FFAT motif of CERT spatially restrict the random ceramide transfer activity of the START domain in cells.

  13. The β1-subunit of Na(v1.5 cardiac sodium channel is required for a dominant negative effect through α-α interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Mercier

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome (BrS is an inherited autosomal dominant cardiac channelopathy. Several mutations on the cardiac sodium channel Na(v1.5 which are responsible for BrS lead to misfolded proteins that do not traffic properly to the plasma membrane. In order to mimic patient heterozygosity, a trafficking defective mutant, R1432G was co-expressed with Wild Type (WT Na(v1.5 channels in HEK293T cells. This mutant significantly decreased the membrane Na current density when it was co-transfected with the WT channel. This dominant negative effect did not result in altered biophysical properties of Na(v1.5 channels. Luminometric experiments revealed that the expression of mutant proteins induced a significant reduction in membrane expression of WT channels. Interestingly, we have found that the auxiliary Na channel β(1-subunit was essential for this dominant negative effect. Indeed, the absence of the β(1-subunit prevented the decrease in WT sodium current density and surface proteins associated with the dominant negative effect. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated a physical interaction between Na channel α-subunits. This interaction occurred only when the β(1-subunit was present. Our findings reveal a new role for β(1-subunits in cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels by promoting α-α subunit interaction which can lead to a dominant negative effect when one of the α-subunits shows a trafficking defective mutation.

  14. Measurements of CP asymmetries and branching fractions of two-body charmless decays of B0 and B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morello, Michael Joseph [Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa (Italy)

    2007-12-19

    The thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 1 describes the theoretical framework of non-leptonic B$0\\atop{s}$ → H+h'- decays, with a simple overview of the CP violation mechanism within the Standard Model and of the most used phenomenological approaches in the evaluation of strong interaction contributions. The chapter contains also a review of the theoretical expectations and the current experimental measurements along with a discussion about the importance of studying such decays. Chapter 2 contains a general description of the Tevatron collider and of the CDF II detector. Chapter 3 is devoted to the description of the data sample used for the measurement and the method used in extracting the signal from the background. Particular attention is dedicated to the on-line trigger selection, which is crucial to collect a sample enriched in B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- decays. Chapter 4 shows how the information from kinematics and particle identification was used to achieve a statistical discrimination amongst modes to extract individual measurements. The available resolutions in mass or in particle identification are separately insufficient for an event-by-event separation of B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- modes. The choice of observables and the technique used to combine them is an important and innovative aspect of the analysis described in this thesis. Chapter 5 is devoted to the accurate determination of the invariant mass lineshape. This is a crucial ingredient for resolving overlapping mass peaks. This chapter details all resolution effects with particular attention at the tails due to the emission of low-energy photons from charged kaons and pions in the final state (FSR). For the first time the effect of FSR has been accurately accounted for in a CDF analysis. Chapter 6 describes how kinematic and PID information, discussed in chap. 4 and chap. 5 were combined in a maximum Likelihood fit

  15. Measurements of CP asymmetries and branching fractions of two-body charmless decays of B0 and B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morello, Michael Joseph [Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa (Italy)

    2007-12-19

    The thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 1 describes the theoretical framework of non-leptonic B$0\\atop{s}$ → H+h'- decays, with a simple overview of the CP violation mechanism within the Standard Model and of the most used phenomenological approaches in the evaluation of strong interaction contributions. The chapter contains also a review of the theoretical expectations and the current experimental measurements along with a discussion about the importance of studying such decays. Chapter 2 contains a general description of the Tevatron collider and of the CDF II detector. Chapter 3 is devoted to the description of the data sample used for the measurement and the method used in extracting the signal from the background. Particular attention is dedicated to the on-line trigger selection, which is crucial to collect a sample enriched in B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- decays. Chapter 4 shows how the information from kinematics and particle identification was used to achieve a statistical discrimination amongst modes to extract individual measurements. The available resolutions in mass or in particle identification are separately insufficient for an event-by-event separation of B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- modes. The choice of observables and the technique used to combine them is an important and innovative aspect of the analysis described in this thesis. Chapter 5 is devoted to the accurate determination of the invariant mass lineshape. This is a crucial ingredient for resolving overlapping mass peaks. This chapter details all resolution effects with particular attention at the tails due to the emission of low-energy photons from charged kaons and pions in the final state (FSR). For the first time the effect of FSR has been accurately accounted for in a CDF analysis. Chapter 6 describes how kinematic and PID information, discussed in chap. 4 and chap. 5 were combined in a maximum Likelihood fit

  16. Interaction between pre-treatment of dyeing and finishing and china standards requirements%印染前处理与中国标准要求

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建军; 董瑛

    2015-01-01

    The current standard requirements exert different effects in pre-treatment of dyeing and finishing which include mandatory standard, product standard, organic product standard, eco-textile standard, printed and dyed fabric standard and color fastness in wet processstandard. While the pre-treatment processes and technologies were controlled by these standards. The impact of pre-treatment on the standard of GB 18401, GB/T 19630, GB/T 18885, product standards and some requirements of color fastness in wet process were analyzed. The main technical points in pretreatment meet the requirements of the standard wasindicated.%印染前处理对我国现行的部分强制标准、产品标准、有机产品标准、生态纺织品标准、印染布标准和湿处理色牢度标准要求会有不同影响,这些标准也左右着印染加工的前处理工艺和技术。分析了前处理对GB 18401、GB/T 19630、GB/T 18885、部分产品标准及部分湿处理色牢度的相关影响,指出了满足标准要求的前处理技术要点。

  17. Endogenous 17ß-estradiol is required for activity-dependent long-term potentiation in the striatum: interaction with the dopaminergic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eTozzi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 17β-estradiol (E2, a neurosteroid synthesized by P450-aromatase (ARO, modulates various brain functions. We characterized the role of the locally synthesized E2 on striatal long-term synaptic plasticity and explored possible interactions between E2 receptors (ERs and dopamine (DA receptors in the dorsal striatum of adult male rats. Inhibition of E2 synthesis or antagonism of ERs prevented the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP in both medium spiny neurons (MSNs and cholinergic interneurons (ChIs. Activation of a D1-like DA receptor/cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway restored LTP. In MSNs exogenous E2 reversed the effect of ARO inhibition. Also antagonism of M1 muscarinic receptors prevented the D1-like receptor-mediated restoration of LTP confirming a role for ChIs in controlling the E2-mediated LTP of MSNs. A novel striatal interaction, occurring between ERs and D1-like receptors in both MSNs and ChIs, might be critical to regulate basal ganglia physiology and to compensate synaptic alterations in Parkinson's disease.

  18. The COOH-terminal domain of the JIL-1 histone H3S10 kinase interacts with histone H3 and is required for correct targeting to chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaomin; Cai, Weili; Deng, Huai; Zhang, Weiguo; Krencik, Robert; Girton, Jack; Johansen, Jørgen; Johansen, Kristen M

    2008-11-21

    The JIL-1 histone H3S10 kinase in Drosophila localizes specifically to euchromatic interband regions of polytene chromosomes and is enriched 2-fold on the male X chromosome. JIL-1 can be divided into four main domains including an NH(2)-terminal domain, two separate kinase domains, and a COOH-terminal domain. Our results demonstrate that the COOH-terminal domain of JIL-1 is necessary and sufficient for correct chromosome targeting to autosomes but that both COOH- and NH(2)-terminal sequences are necessary for enrichment on the male X chromosome. We furthermore show that a small 53-amino acid region within the COOH-terminal domain can interact with the tail region of histone H3, suggesting that this interaction is necessary for the correct chromatin targeting of the JIL-1 kinase. Interestingly, our data indicate that the COOH-terminal domain alone is sufficient to rescue JIL-1 null mutant polytene chromosome defects including those of the male X chromosome. Nonetheless, we also found that a truncated JIL-1 protein which was without the COOH-terminal domain but retained histone H3S10 kinase activity was able to rescue autosome as well as partially rescue male X polytene chromosome morphology. Taken together these findings indicate that JIL-1 may participate in regulating chromatin structure by multiple and partially redundant mechanisms.

  19. Kv channel gating requires a compatible S4-S5 linker and bottom part of S6, constrained by non-interacting residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labro, Alain J; Raes, Adam L; Grottesi, Alessandro; Van Hoorick, Diane; Sansom, Mark S P; Snyders, Dirk J

    2008-12-01

    Voltage-dependent K(+) channels transfer the voltage sensor movement into gate opening or closure through an electromechanical coupling. To test functionally whether an interaction between the S4-S5 linker (L45) and the cytoplasmic end of S6 (S6(T)) constitutes this coupling, the L45 in hKv1.5 was replaced by corresponding hKv2.1 sequence. This exchange was not tolerated but could be rescued by also swapping S6(T). Exchanging both L45 and S6(T) transferred hKv2.1 kinetics to an hKv1.5 background while preserving the voltage dependence. A one-by-one residue substitution scan of L45 and S6(T) in hKv1.5 further shows that S6(T) needs to be alpha-helical and forms a "crevice" in which residues I422 and T426 of L45 reside. These residues transfer the mechanical energy onto the S6(T) crevice, whereas other residues in S6(T) and L45 that are not involved in the interaction maintain the correct structure of the coupling.

  20. Diagonalization of the Hamiltonian of Two-body Coupling Interaction in the Magnetic Ordered Material%磁有序物质中二体耦合形式哈密顿量的对角化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成泰民; 冮铁臣

    2006-01-01

    利用Schwinger角动量表象的转动变换, 玻戈留玻夫变换, 压缩变换等幺正变换,对H∧k=A1a+kak+A2b+kbk+(Ba+kb+k+B*akbk)+(Ca+kbk+C*b+kak)形式磁有序物质的二体耦合哈密顿量进行了对角化. 并以正方反铁磁晶格为例说明了这一方法的正确性及通用性, 且其物理思想清晰,方法易于掌握.

  1. Pollen Killer Gene S35 Function Requires Interaction with an Activator That Maps Close to S24, Another Pollen Killer Gene in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Kubo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pollen killer genes disable noncarrier pollens, and are responsible for male sterility and segregation distortion in hybrid populations of distantly related plant species. The genetic networks and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pollen killer system remain largely unknown. Two pollen killer genes, S24 and S35, have been found in an intersubspecific cross of Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica. The effect of S24 is counteracted by an unlinked locus EFS. Additionally, S35 has been proposed to interact with S24 to induce pollen sterility. These genetic interactions are suggestive of a single S24-centric genetic pathway (EFS–S24–S35 for the pollen killer system. To examine this hypothetical genetic pathway, the S35 and the S24 regions were further characterized and genetically dissected in this study. Our results indicated that S35 causes pollen sterility independently of both the EFS and S24 genes, but is dependent on a novel gene close to the S24 locus, named incentive for killing pollen (INK. We confirmed the phenotypic effect of the INK gene separately from the S24 gene, and identified the INK locus within an interval of less than 0.6 Mb on rice chromosome 5. This study characterized the genetic effect of the two independent genetic pathways of INK–S35 and EFS–S24 in indica–japonica hybrid progeny. Our results provide clear evidence that hybrid male sterility in rice is caused by several pollen killer networks with multiple factors positively and negatively regulating pollen killer genes.

  2. Herpesvirus telomerase RNA(vTR)-dependent lymphoma formation does not require interaction of vTR with telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Benedikt B; Trapp, Sascha; Jarosinski, Keith W; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2010-08-26

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex involved in the maintenance of telomeres, a protective structure at the distal ends of chromosomes. The enzyme complex contains two main components, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the catalytic subunit, and telomerase RNA (TR), which serves as a template for the addition of telomeric repeats (TTAGGG)(n). Marek's disease virus (MDV), an oncogenic herpesvirus inducing fatal lymphoma in chickens, encodes a TR homologue, viral TR (vTR), which significantly contributes to MDV-induced lymphomagenesis. As recent studies have suggested that TRs possess functions independently of telomerase activity, we investigated if the tumor-promoting properties of MDV vTR are dependent on formation of a functional telomerase complex. The P6.1 stem-loop of TR is known to mediate TR-TERT complex formation and we show here that interaction of vTR with TERT and, consequently, telomerase activity was efficiently abrogated by the disruption of the vTR P6.1 stem-loop (P6.1mut). Recombinant MDV carrying the P6.1mut stem-loop mutation were generated and tested for their behavior in the natural host in vivo. In contrast to viruses lacking vTR, all animals infected with the P6.1mut viruses developed MDV-induced lymphomas, but onset of tumor formation was significantly delayed. P6.1mut viruses induced enhanced metastasis, indicating functionality of non-complexed vTR in tumor dissemination. We discovered that RPL22, a cellular factor involved in T-cell development and virus-induced transformation, directly interacts with wild-type and mutant vTR and is, consequently, relocalized to the nucleoplasm. Our study provides the first evidence that expression of TR, in this case encoded by a herpesvirus, is pro-oncogenic in the absence of telomerase activity.

  3. Herpesvirus telomerase RNA(vTR-dependent lymphoma formation does not require interaction of vTR with telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt B Kaufer

    Full Text Available Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex involved in the maintenance of telomeres, a protective structure at the distal ends of chromosomes. The enzyme complex contains two main components, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, the catalytic subunit, and telomerase RNA (TR, which serves as a template for the addition of telomeric repeats (TTAGGG(n. Marek's disease virus (MDV, an oncogenic herpesvirus inducing fatal lymphoma in chickens, encodes a TR homologue, viral TR (vTR, which significantly contributes to MDV-induced lymphomagenesis. As recent studies have suggested that TRs possess functions independently of telomerase activity, we investigated if the tumor-promoting properties of MDV vTR are dependent on formation of a functional telomerase complex. The P6.1 stem-loop of TR is known to mediate TR-TERT complex formation and we show here that interaction of vTR with TERT and, consequently, telomerase activity was efficiently abrogated by the disruption of the vTR P6.1 stem-loop (P6.1mut. Recombinant MDV carrying the P6.1mut stem-loop mutation were generated and tested for their behavior in the natural host in vivo. In contrast to viruses lacking vTR, all animals infected with the P6.1mut viruses developed MDV-induced lymphomas, but onset of tumor formation was significantly delayed. P6.1mut viruses induced enhanced metastasis, indicating functionality of non-complexed vTR in tumor dissemination. We discovered that RPL22, a cellular factor involved in T-cell development and virus-induced transformation, directly interacts with wild-type and mutant vTR and is, consequently, relocalized to the nucleoplasm. Our study provides the first evidence that expression of TR, in this case encoded by a herpesvirus, is pro-oncogenic in the absence of telomerase activity.

  4. Direct interaction of FtsZ and MreB is required for septum synthesis and cell division in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Andrew K.; Gerdes, Kenn

    2013-01-01

    How bacteria coordinate cell growth with division is not well understood. Bacterial cell elongation is controlled by actin–MreB while cell division is governed by tubulin–FtsZ. A ring-like structure containing FtsZ (the Z ring) at mid-cell attracts other cell division proteins to form the divisome, an essential protein assembly required for septum synthesis and cell separation. The Z ring exists at mid-cell during a major part of the cell cycle without contracting. Here, we show that MreB and...

  5. Fission yeast Mog1p homologue, which interacts with the small GTPase Ran, is required for mitosis-to-interphase transition and poly(A)(+) RNA metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatebayashi, K; Tani, T; Ikeda, H

    2001-04-01

    We have cloned and characterized the Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene mog1(+), which encodes a protein with homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mog1p participating in the Ran-GTPase system. The S. pombe Mog1p is predominantly localized in the nucleus. In contrast to the S. cerevisiae MOG1 gene, the S. pombe mog1(+) gene is essential for cell viability. mog1(+) is required for the mitosis-to-interphase transition, as the mog1-1 mutant arrests at restrictive temperatures as septated, binucleated cells with highly condensed chromosomes and an aberrant nuclear envelope. FACS analysis showed that these cells do not undergo a subsequent round of DNA replication. Surprisingly, also unlike the Delta mog1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, the mog1-1 mutation causes nucleolar accumulation of poly(A)(+) RNA at the restrictive temperature in S. pombe, but the signals do not overlap with the fibrillarin-rich region of the nucleolus. Thus, we found that mog1(+) is required for the mitosis-to-interphase transition and a class of RNA metabolism. In our attempt to identify suppressors of mog1-1, we isolated the spi1(+) gene, which encodes the fission yeast homologue of Ran. We found that overexpression of Spi1p rescues the S. pombe Delta mog1 cells from death. On the basis of these results, we conclude that mog1(+) is involved in the Ran-GTPase system.

  6. Study of Two-Body B Decays to Kaons and Pions Observation of $B \\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}, B \\to K^{\\pm}\\pi^{0}$, and $B \\to K^{0}\\pi^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Cronin-Hennessy, D; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Ugolini, D W; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Kopp, S E; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Eigen, G; Lipeles, E; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Gronberg, J B; Hill, T S; Lange, D J; Morrison, R J; Nelson, H N; Briere, R A; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Roy, J D; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Thies, P G; Valant-Spaight, B L; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Davis, R; Kravchenko, I V; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Mahmood, A H; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lorenc, J; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Menon, N; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V

    2000-01-01

    We have studied charmless hadronic decays of B mesons into two-body final states with kaons and pions and observe three new processes with the following branching fractions: BR(B-> pi+ pi-) = (4.3^{+1.6}_{-1.4} \\pm 0.5) \\times 10^{-6}, BR(B-> K0 pi0) = (14.6^{+5.9+2.4}_{-5.1-3.3}) \\times 10^{-6}, and BR(B-> K+- pi0) = (11.6^{+3.0+1.4}_{-2.7-1.3}) \\times 10^{-6}. We also update our previous measurements for the decays B->K+- pi-+ and B-> K0 pi+-.

  7. Hypusine is required for a sequence-specific interaction of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A with postsystematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, A; Chen, K Y

    2001-01-26

    Hypusine is formed through a spermidine-dependent posttranslational modification of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) at a specific lysine residue. The reaction is catalyzed by deoxyhypusine synthase and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase. eIF-5A is the only protein in eukaryotes and archaebacteria known to contain hypusine. Although both eIF-5A and deoxyhypusine synthase are essential genes for cell survival and proliferation, the precise biological function of eIF-5A is unclear. We have previously proposed that eIF-5A may function as a bimodular protein, capable of interacting with protein and nucleic acid (Liu, Y. P., Nemeroff, M., Yan, Y. P., and Chen, K. Y. (1997) Biol. Signals 6, 166-174). Here we used the method of systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) to identify the sequence specificity of the potential eIF-5A RNA targets. The post-SELEX RNA obtained after 16 rounds of selection exhibited a significant increase in binding affinity for eIF-5A with an apparent dissociation constant of 1 x 10(-7) m. The hypusine residue was found to be critical for this sequence-specific binding. The post-SELEX RNAs shared a high sequence homology characterized by two conserved motifs, UAACCA and AAUGUCACAC. The consensus sequence was determined as AAAUGUCACAC by sequence alignment and binding studies. BLAST analysis indicated that this sequence was present in > 400 human expressed sequence tag sequences. The C terminus of eIF-5A contains a cold shock domain-like structure, similar to that present in cold shock protein A (CspA). However, unlike CspA, the binding of eIF-5A to either the post-SELEX RNA or the 5'-untranslated region of CspA mRNA did not affect the sensitivity of these RNAs to ribonucleases. These data suggest that the physiological significance of eIF-5A-RNA interaction depends on hypusine and the core motif of the target RNA.

  8. The Maize Imprinted Gene Floury3 Encodes a PLATZ Protein Required for tRNA and 5S rRNA Transcription Through Interaction with RNA Polymerase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Wang, Jiechen; Ye, Jianwei; Zheng, Xixi; Xiang, Xiaoli; Li, Changsheng; Fu, Miaomiao; Wang, Qiong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Yongrui

    2017-09-05

    Maize (Zea mays) floury3 (fl3) is a classic semi-dominant negative mutant that exhibits severe defects in the endosperm but fl3 plants otherwise appear normal. We cloned the fl3 gene and determined that it encodes a PLATZ (plant AT-rich sequence- and zinc-binding) protein. The mutation in fl3 resulted in an Asn to His replacement in the conserved PLATZ domain, creating a dominant allele. Fl3 is specifically expressed in starchy endosperm cells and regulated by genomic imprinting, which leads to the suppressed expression of fl3 when transmitted through the male, perhaps as a consequence the semi-dominant behavior. Yeast two-hybrid screening and bimolecular luciferase complementation (BiLC) experiments revealed that FL3 interacts with the RNA polymerase III subunit 53 (RPC53) and transcription factor class C 1 (TFC1), two critical factors of the RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) transcription complex. In the fl3 endosperm, the levels of many tRNAs and 5S rRNA that are transcribed by RNAPIII are significantly reduced, suggesting that the incorrectly folded fl3 protein may impair the function of RNAPIII. The transcriptome is dramatically altered in fl3 mutants, in which the down-regulated genes are primarily enriched in pathways related to translation, ribosome, misfolded protein responses and nutrient reservoir activity. Collectively, these changes may lead to defects in endosperm development and storage reserve filling in fl3 seeds. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  9. The Arabidopsis CUL4–DDB1 complex interacts with MSI1 and is required to maintain MEDEA parental imprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbliauskas, Eva; Lechner, Esther; Jaciubek, Miłosława; Berr, Alexandre; Pazhouhandeh, Maghsoud; Alioua, Malek; Cognat, Valerie; Brukhin, Vladimir; Koncz, Csaba; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Molinier, Jean; Genschik, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Protein ubiquitylation regulates a broad variety of biological processes in all eukaryotes. Recent work identified a novel class of cullin-containing ubiquitin ligases (E3s) composed of CUL4, DDB1, and one WD40 protein, believed to act as a substrate receptor. Strikingly, CUL4-based E3 ligases (CRL4s) have important functions at the chromatin level, including responses to DNA damage in metazoans and plants and, in fission yeast, in heterochromatin silencing. Among putative CRL4 receptors we identified MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA1 (MSI1), which belongs to an evolutionary conserved protein family. MSI1-like proteins contribute to different protein complexes, including the epigenetic regulatory Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). Here, we provide evidence that Arabidopsis MSI1 physically interacts with DDB1A and is part of a multimeric protein complex including CUL4. CUL4 and DDB1 loss-of-function lead to embryo lethality. Interestingly, as in fis class mutants, cul4 mutants exhibit autonomous endosperm initiation and loss of parental imprinting of MEDEA, a target gene of the Arabidopsis PRC2 complex. In addition, after pollination both MEDEA transcript and protein accumulate in a cul4 mutant background. Overall, our work provides the first evidence of a physical and functional link between a CRL4 E3 ligase and a PRC2 complex, thus indicating a novel role of ubiquitylation in the repression of gene expression. PMID:21240189

  10. Arabidopsis TAF1 is an MRE11-interacting protein required for resistance to genotoxic stress and viability of the male gametophyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Drury, Georgina E; Blundell-Hunter, George; West, Christopher E

    2015-11-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by recombination pathways is essential for plant growth and fertility. The recombination endonuclease MRE11 plays important roles in sensing and repair of DNA DSBs. Here we demonstrate protein interaction between Arabidopsis MRE11 and the histone acetyltransferase TAF1, a TATA-binding protein Associated Factor (TAF) of the RNA polymerase II transcription initiation factor complex TFIID. Arabidopsis has two TAF1 homologues termed TAF1 and TAF1b and mutant taf1b lines are viable and fertile. In contrast, taf1 null mutations are lethal, demonstrating that TAF1 is an essential gene. Heterozygous taf1+/- plants display abnormal segregation of the mutant allele resulting from defects in pollen tube development, indicating that TAF1 is important for gamete viability. Characterization of an allelic series of taf1 lines revealed that hypomorphic mutants are viable but display developmental defects and reduced plant fertility. Hypersensitivity of taf1 mutants lacking the C-terminal bromodomain to X-rays and mitomycin C, but not to other forms of abiotic stress, established a specific role for TAF1 in plant DNA repair processes. Collectively these studies reveal a function for TAF1 in plant resistance to genotoxic stress, providing further insight into the molecular mechanisms of the DNA damage response in plants.

  11. Few interacting fermions in one-dimensional harmonic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Sowiński, Tomasz; Dutta, Omjyoti; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    We study spin-1/2 fermions, interacting via a two-body contact potential, in a one-dimensional harmonic trap. Applying exact diagonalization, we investigate the behavior at finite interaction strength, and discuss the role of a ground state degeneracy which occurs for sufficiently strong repulsive interaction. Even low temperature or a completely depolarizing channel may then dramatically influence the system's behavior. We calculate level occupation numbers as signatures of thermalization, and we discuss the mechanisms to break the degeneracy.

  12. Developmental alterations of the C. elegans male anal depressor morphology and function require sex-specific cell autonomous and cell non-autonomous interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; René García, L

    2015-02-01

    We studied the Caenorhabditis elegans anal depressor development in larval males and hermaphrodites to address how a differentiated cell sex-specifically changes its morphology prior to adulthood. In both sexes, the larval anal depressor muscle is used for defecation behavior. However in the adult males, the muscle's sarcomere is reorganized to facilitate copulation. To address when the changes occur in the anal depressor, we used YFP:actin to monitor, and mutant analysis, laser-ablation and transgenic feminization to perturb the cell's morphological dynamics. In L1 and L2 stage larva, the muscle of both sexes has similar sarcomere morphology, but the hermaphrodite sex-determination system promotes more growth. The male anal depressor begins to change in the L3 stage, first by retracting its muscle arm from the neurons of the defecation circuit. Then the muscle's ventral region develops a slit that demarcates an anterior and posterior domain. This demarcation is not dependent on the anal depressor's intrinsic genetic sex, but is influenced by extrinsic interactions with the developing male sex muscles. However, subsequent changes are dependent on the cell's sex. In the L4 stage, the anterior domain first disassembles the dorsal-ventral sarcomere region and develops filopodia that elongates anteriorly towards the spicule muscles. Later, the posterior domain dissembles the remnants of its sarcomere, but still retains a vestigial attachment to the ventral body wall. Finally, the anterior domain attaches to the sex muscles, and then reassembles an anterior-posteriorly oriented sarcomere. Our work identifies key steps in the dimorphic re-sculpting of the anal depressor that are regulated by genetic sex and by cell-cell signaling.

  13. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  14. Physical Interaction of T Cells with Dendritic Cells is not Required for the Immunomodulatory Effects of the Edible Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruud Wilbers

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mushrooms are well known for their immunomodulating capacities. However, little is known about how mushroom-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs affect T cells. Therefore we investigated the effect of mushroom compounds derived from seven edible mushroom species on DCs, their fate in DCs and the effect of the mushroom-stimulated DCs on T cells. Each mushroom species stimulated DCs in a different manner as was revealed from the DC’s cytokine response. Assessing DC maturation revealed that only one mushroom species, Agaricus subrufescens, induced complete DC maturation. The other six mushroom species upregulated MHC-II and CD86 expression, but did not significantly affect the expression of CD40 and CD11c. Nevertheless, mushroom compounds of all investigated mushroom species are endocytosed by DCs. Endocytosis is most likely mediated by C-type lectin receptors (CLRs because CLR binding is Ca2+ dependent and EGTA reduces TNF-α secretion with more than 90%. Laminarin partly inhibited TNF-α secretion indicating that the CLR dectin-1, among other CLRs, is involved in binding mushroom compounds. Stimulated DCs were shown to stimulate T cells, however, physical contact of DCs and T cells is not required. Because CLRs seem to play a prominent role in DC stimulation, mushrooms may function as a carbohydrate containing adjuvant to be used in conjunction with anti-fungal vaccines.

  15. Generation of T-follicular helper cells in vitro: requirement for BCR cross-linking and cognate B- and T-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenbrander, Anne; Grewe, Bastian; Nemazee, David; Überla, Klaus; Temchura, Vladimir

    2017-09-07

    The minimal requirements for in vitro modeling of the natural CD4(+) T-cell differentiation into T follicular helper (TFH) cells are still under investigation. We co-cultured wild type and TCR-transgenic CD4(+) T-cells from naïve mice with dendritic cells and BCR-transgenic B-cells in the presence of HIV-derived virus-like particles containing matched B- and T-cell epitopes. This co-culturing induced co-expression of TFH-master regulator transcription factor BCL-6 and CXCR5 in up to 10% of the wild type and up to 40% of the TCR-transgenic CD4(+) T-cells. Phenotypic markers, production of IL-21 and isotype switching of the B-cells to IgG1 further indicated a helper function of the induced TFH-cells in vitro. Dendritic cells supported the generation of functional TFH-cells, but were unable to induce them without cognate B-cells. Thus, our study presents a robust experimental system for efficient generation of functionally active TFH-cells in vitro and confirms the importance of cognate B- and T-cell cross-talk for the TFH differentiation process. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Interaction of Yna1 and Yna2 Is Required for Nuclear Accumulation and Transcriptional Activation of the Nitrate Assimilation Pathway in the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Silvestrini

    Full Text Available A few yeasts, including Hansenula polymorpha are able to assimilate nitrate and use it as nitrogen source. The genes necessary for nitrate assimilation are organised in this organism as a cluster comprising those encoding nitrate reductase (YNR1, nitrite reductase (YNI1, a high affinity transporter (YNT1, as well as the two pathway specific Zn(II2Cys2 transcriptional activators (YNA1, YNA2. Yna1p and Yna2p mediate induction of the system and here we show that their functions are interdependent. Yna1p activates YNA2 as well as its own (YNA1 transcription thus forming a nitrate-dependent autoactivation loop. Using a split-YFP approach we demonstrate here that Yna1p and Yna2p form a heterodimer independently of the inducer and despite both Yna1p and Yna2p can occupy the target promoter as mono- or homodimer individually, these proteins are transcriptionally incompetent. Subsequently, the transcription factors target genes containing a conserved DNA motif (termed nitrate-UAS determined in this work by in vitro and in vivo protein-DNA interaction studies. These events lead to a rearrangement of the chromatin landscape on the target promoters and are associated with the onset of transcription of these target genes. In contrast to other fungi and plants, in which nuclear accumulation of the pathway-specific transcription factors only occur in the presence of nitrate, Yna1p and Yna2p are constitutively nuclear in H. polymorpha. Yna2p is needed for this nuclear accumulation and Yna1p is incapable of strictly positioning in the nucleus without Yna2p. In vivo DNA footprinting and ChIP analyses revealed that the permanently nuclear Yna1p/Yna2p heterodimer only binds to the nitrate-UAS when the inducer is present. The nitrate-dependent up-regulation of one partner protein in the heterodimeric complex is functionally similar to the nitrate-dependent activation of nuclear accumulation in other systems.

  17. Interaction of Yna1 and Yna2 Is Required for Nuclear Accumulation and Transcriptional Activation of the Nitrate Assimilation Pathway in the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrini, Lucia; Rossi, Beatrice; Gallmetzer, Andreas; Mathieu, Martine; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Berardi, Enrico; Strauss, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    A few yeasts, including Hansenula polymorpha are able to assimilate nitrate and use it as nitrogen source. The genes necessary for nitrate assimilation are organised in this organism as a cluster comprising those encoding nitrate reductase (YNR1), nitrite reductase (YNI1), a high affinity transporter (YNT1), as well as the two pathway specific Zn(II)2Cys2 transcriptional activators (YNA1, YNA2). Yna1p and Yna2p mediate induction of the system and here we show that their functions are interdependent. Yna1p activates YNA2 as well as its own (YNA1) transcription thus forming a nitrate-dependent autoactivation loop. Using a split-YFP approach we demonstrate here that Yna1p and Yna2p form a heterodimer independently of the inducer and despite both Yna1p and Yna2p can occupy the target promoter as mono- or homodimer individually, these proteins are transcriptionally incompetent. Subsequently, the transcription factors target genes containing a conserved DNA motif (termed nitrate-UAS) determined in this work by in vitro and in vivo protein-DNA interaction studies. These events lead to a rearrangement of the chromatin landscape on the target promoters and are associated with the onset of transcription of these target genes. In contrast to other fungi and plants, in which nuclear accumulation of the pathway-specific transcription factors only occur in the presence of nitrate, Yna1p and Yna2p are constitutively nuclear in H. polymorpha. Yna2p is needed for this nuclear accumulation and Yna1p is incapable of strictly positioning in the nucleus without Yna2p. In vivo DNA footprinting and ChIP analyses revealed that the permanently nuclear Yna1p/Yna2p heterodimer only binds to the nitrate-UAS when the inducer is present. The nitrate-dependent up-regulation of one partner protein in the heterodimeric complex is functionally similar to the nitrate-dependent activation of nuclear accumulation in other systems.

  18. High Energy Two-Body Deuteron Photodisintegration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terburg, Bart Paul [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1999-07-31

    The differential cross section for two-­body deuteron photodisintegration was measured at photon energies between 0.8 and 4.0 GeV and center­of­mass angles θcm =37°, 53°, 70°, and 90° as part of CEBAF experiment E89­012. Constituent counting rules predict a scaling of this cross section at asymptotic energies. In previous experiments this scaling has surprisingly been observed at energies between 1.4 and 2.8 GeV at 90°. The results from this experiment are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements at lower energies. The data at 70° and 90° show a constituent counting rule behavior up to 4.0 GeV photon energy. The 37° and 53°g data do not agree with the constituent counting rule prediction. The new data are compared with a variety of theoretical models inspired by quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and traditional hadronic nuclear physics.

  19. High Energy Two-Body Deuteron Photodisintegration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terburg, Bart

    1999-07-31

    The differential cross section for two­body deuteron photodisintegration was measured at photon energies between 0.8 and 4.0 GeV and center­of­mass angles theta_cm =37deg, 53deg, 70deg, and 90deg as part of CEBAF experiment E89­012. Constituent counting rules predict a scaling of this cross section at asymptotic energies. In previous experiments this scaling has surprisingly been observed at energies between 1.4 and 2.8 GeV at 90deg. The results from this experiment are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements at lower energies. The data at 70deg and 90deg show a constituent counting rule behavior up to 4.0 GeV photon energy. The 37deg and 53deg data do not agree with the constituent counting rule prediction. The new data are compared with a variety of theoretical models inspired by quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and traditional hadronic nuclear physics.

  20. Comparison of MAPK specificity across the ETS transcription factor family identifies a high-affinity ERK interaction required for ERG function in prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Nagarathinam; Kedage, Vivekananda; Hollenhorst, Peter C

    2015-02-19

    The RAS/MAPK signaling pathway can regulate gene expression by phosphorylating and altering the function of some, but not all, ETS transcription factors. ETS family transcription factors bind similar DNA sequences and can compete for genomic binding sites. However, MAPK regulation varies across the ETS family. Therefore, changing the ETS factor bound to a cis-regulatory element can alter MAPK regulation of gene expression. To understand RAS/MAPK regulated gene expression programs, comprehensive knowledge of the ETS family members that are MAPK targets and relative MAPK targeting efficiency across the family is needed. An in vitro kinase assay was used to rank-order 27 human ETS family transcription factors based on phosphorylation by ERK2, JNK1, and p38α. Many novel MAPK targets and specificities were identified within the ETS family, including the identification of the prostate cancer oncoprotein ERG as a specific target of ERK2. ERK2 phosphorylation of ERG S215 required a DEF docking domain and was necessary for ERG to activate transcription of cell migration genes and promote prostate cell migration. The ability of ERK2 to bind ERG with higher affinity than ETS1 provided a potential molecular explanation for why ERG overexpression drives migration of prostate cells with low levels of RAS/ERK signaling, while ETS1 has a similar function only when RAS/ERK signaling is high. The rank ordering of ETS transcription factors as MAPK targets provides an important resource for understanding ETS proteins as mediators of MAPK signaling. This is emphasized by the difference in rank order of ERG and ETS1, which allows these factors to have distinct roles based on the level of RAS/ERK signaling present in the cell.

  1. A rice transient assay system identifies a novel domain in NRR required for interaction with NH1/OsNPR1 and inhibition of NH1-mediated transcriptional activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern Mawsheng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arabidopsis NPR1 is a master regulator of systemic acquired resistance. NPR1 binds to TGA transcription factors and functions as a transcriptional co-activator. In rice, NH1/OsNPR1 functions to enhance innate immunity. NRR disrupts NH1 function, when over-expressed. Results We have established a rice transient protoplast assay to demonstrate that NH1 is a transcriptional co-activator and that NRR represses NH1-mediated activation. We identified three NRR homologues (RH1, RH2, and RH3. RH1 and RH3, but not RH2, also effectively repress NH1-mediated transcriptional activation. NRR, RH1, RH2, and RH3 share sequence similarity in a region beyond the previously identified NPR1-interacting domain. This region is required for strong interaction with NH1. A double point mutation, W66A/F70A, in this novel NH1-interacting domain severely reduces interaction with NH1. Mutation W66A/F70A also greatly reduces the ability of NRR to repress NH1-mediated activation. RH2 carries a deviation (amino acids AV in this region as compared to consensus sequences (amino acids ED among NRR, RH1, and RH3. A substitution (AV to ED in RH2 results in strong binding of mutant RH2ED to NH1 and effective repression of NH1-mediated activation. Conclusions The protoplast-based transient system can be used to dissect protein domains associated with their functions. Our results demonstrate that the ability of NRR and its homologues to repress NH1-mediated transcriptional activation is tightly correlated with their ability to bind to NH1. Furthermore, a sequence is identified as a novel NH1-interacting domain. Importantly, this novel sequence is widely present in plant species, from cereals to castor bean plants, to poplar trees, to Arabidopsis, indicating its significance in plants.

  2. Energy Centroids in the presence of random interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Y M; Yoshida, N; Ogawa, K; Yoshinaga, N; Kota, V K B

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study energy centroids such as those with fixed spin and isospin, those with fixed irreducible representations for bosons, in the presence of random two-body and/or three-body interactions. Our results show that regularities of energy centroids of fixed spin states reported in earlier works are more robust than expected.

  3. Higgs particles interacting via a scalar Dark Matter field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Yajnavalkya; Darewych, Jurij

    2016-07-01

    We study a system of two Higgs particles, interacting via a scalar Dark Matter mediating field. The variational method in the Hamiltonian formalism of QFT is used to derive relativistic wave equations for the two-Higgs system, using a truncated Fock-space trial state. Approximate solutions of the two-body equations are used to examine the existence of Higgs bound states.

  4. Interaction of the M4 Segment with Other Transmembrane Segments Is Required for Surface Expression of Mammalian α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salussolia, Catherine L.; Corrales, Alexandra; Talukder, Iehab; Kazi, Rashek; Akgul, Gulcan; Bowen, Mark; Wollmuth, Lonnie P.

    2011-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels with a modular structure. The ion channel itself shares structural similarity, albeit an inverted membrane topology, with P-loop channels. Like P-loop channels, prokaryotic GluR subunits (e.g. GluR0) have two transmembrane segments. In contrast, eukaryotic GluRs have an additional transmembrane segment (M4), located C-terminal to the ion channel core. However, the structural/functional significance of this additional transmembrane segment is poorly defined. Although topologically similar to GluR0, mammalian AMPA receptor (GluA1) subunits lacking the M4 segment do not display surface expression. This lack of expression is not due to the M4 segment serving as an anchor to the ligand-binding domain because insertion of an artificial polyleucine transmembrane segment does not rescue surface expression. Specific interactions between M4 and the ligand-binding domain are also unlikely because insertion of polyglycines into the linker connecting them has no deleterious effects on function or surface expression. However, tryptophan and cysteine scanning mutagenesis of the M4 segment, as well as recovery of function in the polyleucine background, defined a unique face of the M4 helix that is required for GluR surface expression. In the AMPA receptor structure, this face forms intersubunit contacts with the transmembrane helices of the ion channel core (M1 and M3) from another subunit within the homotetramer. Thus, our experiments show that a highly specific interaction of the M4 segment with an adjacent subunit is required for surface expression of AMPA receptors. This interaction may represent a mechanism for regulating AMPA receptor biogenesis. PMID:21930708

  5. Cyber Security Risks and Requirements for Customer Interaction of Smart Grid%互动用电方式下的信息安全风险与安全需求分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘念; 张建华

    2011-01-01

    互动用电是智能电网的基本特征之一,针对因互动用电方式而引入的信息安全风险和安全需求展开研究.首先,从风险分析的角度,将互动用电方式下的信息安全与广域环境下的电力信息安全进行定性比较,重点论述了二者在威胁产生的客观条件、主观动机和事故后果等方面的差异.在此基础上,结合互动用电的业务流程和高级量测体系的特点,从保密性、完整性和可用性等信息安全需求出发,提炼出可用性评估、密钥管理和异常行为检测等3个方面的难点问题.%Customer interaction is one of the basic features of the smart grid. The study is focused on the risk and demand of cyber security stemming from customer interaction. First, in the perspective of risk analysis, the cyber security of customer interaction is qualitatively compared with that of wide area power cyber security with emphasis on the difference between the two in terms of the objective condition, subjective motivation, and consequence of threat. Furthermore, by referring to the business process of customer interaction and features of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), the related difficulties including availability assessment, key management and abnormal action detection, are extracted from the cyber security requirements such as confidentiality, integrity and availability.

  6. Republication of: New solutions to Einstein's equations of gravitation. B. Explicit determination of static, axially symmetric fields. By Rudolf Bach. With a supplement on the static two-body problem. By H. Weyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Rudolf; Weyl, Hermann

    2012-03-01

    This is the English translation of the third of a series of 3 papers by Hermann Weyl (the third one jointly with Rudolf Bach), first published in 1917-1922, in which the authors derived and discussed the now-famous Weyl two-body static axially symmetric vacuum solution of Einstein's equations. The English translations of the other two papers are published alongside this one. The papers have been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for re-publication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. This republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Gernot Neugebauer, David Petroff and Bahram Mashhoon, and by a brief biography of R. Bach, written by H. Goenner.

  7. Search for the pair production of third-generation squarks with two-body decays to a bottom or charm quark and a neutralino in proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Starodumov, Andrei; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Mohammed, Yasser; Salama, Elsayed; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Lomidze, David; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Albert, Andreas; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Malte; Karavdina, Anastasia; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Lapsien, Tobias; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Fallavollita, Francesco; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bianco, Michele; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Verweij, Marta; Wardle, Nicholas; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Caminada, Lea; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Seitz, Claudia; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Adiguzel, Aytul; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Nazlim Agaras, Merve; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Davignon, Olivier; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Bainbridge, Robert; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Elwood, Adam; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Matsushita, Takashi; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Palladino, Vito; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Smith, Caleb; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Pazzini, Jacopo; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Si, Weinan; Wang, Long; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Santra, Arka; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Trauger, Hallie; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Benaglia, Andrea; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Higginbotham, Samuel; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Peng, Cheng-Chieh; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Ciesielski, Robert; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Sturdy, Jared; Zaleski, Shawn; Brodski, Michael; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    Results are presented from a search for the pair production of third-generation squarks in proton-proton collision events with two-body decays to bottom or charm quarks and a neutralino, which produces a significant imbalance in the transverse momentum. The search is performed using a sample of proton-proton collision data at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$^{-1}$. No statistically significant excess of events is observed beyond the expected contribution from standard model processes. Exclusion limits are set in the context of simplified models of bottom or top squark pair production. Models with bottom squark masses up to 1220 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for light neutralinos, and models with top squark masses of 510 GeV are excluded assuming that the mass splitting between the top squark and the neutralino is small.

  8. Hadronic Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding hadronic interactions is crucial for investigating the properties of unstable hadrons, since measuring physical quantities for unstable hadrons including the resonance mass and decay width requires simultaneous calculations of final scattering states. Recent studies of hadronic scatterings and decays are reviewed from this point of view. The nuceon-nucleon and multi-nucleon interactions are very important to understand the formation of nucleus from the first principle of QCD. These interactions have been studied mainly by two methods, due originally to L\\"uscher and to HALQCD. The results obtained from the two methods are compared in three channels, $I=2$ two-pion, H-dibaryon, and two-nucleon channels. So far the results from the two methods for the two-nucleon channels are different even at the level of the presence or absence of bound states. We then discuss possible uncertainties in each method. Recent results on the binding energy for helium nuclei are also reviewed.

  9. Domain Structure of the Redβ Single-Strand Annealing Protein: the C-terminal Domain is Required for Fine-Tuning DNA-binding Properties, Interaction with the Exonuclease Partner, and Recombination in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher E; Bell, Charles E

    2016-02-13

    Redβ is a component of the Red recombination system of bacteriophage λ that promotes a single strand annealing (SSA) reaction to generate end-to-end concatemers of the phage genome for packaging. Redβ interacts with λ exonuclease (λexo), the other component of the Red system, to form a "synaptosome" complex that somehow integrates the end resection and annealing steps of the reaction. Previous work using limited proteolysis and chemical modification revealed that Redβ consists of an N-terminal DNA binding domain, residues 1-177, and a flexible C-terminal "tail", residues 178-261. Here, we quantitatively compare the binding of the full-length protein (Redβ(FL)) and the N-terminal domain (Redβ(177)) to different lengths of ssDNA substrate and annealed duplex product. We find that in general, Redβ(FL) binds more tightly to annealed duplex product than to ssDNA substrate, while Redβ(177) binds more tightly to ssDNA. In addition, the C-terminal region of Redβ corresponding to residues 182-261 was purified and found to fold into an α-helical domain that is required for the interaction with λexo to form the synaptosome complex. Deletion analysis of Redβ revealed that removal of just eleven residues from the C-terminus disrupts the interaction with λexo as well as ssDNA and dsDNA recombination in vivo. By contrast, the determinants for self-oligomerization of Redβ appear to reside solely within the N-terminal domain. The subtle but significant differences in the relative binding of Redβ(FL) and Redβ(177) to ssDNA substrate and annealed duplex product may be important for Redβ to function as a SSA protein in vivo.

  10. Software requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegers, Karl E

    2003-01-01

    Without formal, verifiable software requirements-and an effective system for managing them-the programs that developers think they've agreed to build often will not be the same products their customers are expecting. In SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS, Second Edition, requirements engineering authority Karl Wiegers amplifies the best practices presented in his original award-winning text?now a mainstay for anyone participating in the software development process. In this book, you'll discover effective techniques for managing the requirements engineering process all the way through the development cy

  11. Energy requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, Christian V.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of the appropriate energy and nutritional requirements of a newborn infant requires a clear goal of the energy and other compounds to be administered, valid methods to measure energy balance and body composition, and knowledge of the neonatal metabolic capacities. Providing an appr

  12. Energy requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, Christian V.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.

    The determination of the appropriate energy and nutritional requirements of a newborn infant requires a clear goal of the energy and other compounds to be administered, valid methods to measure energy balance and body composition, and knowledge of the neonatal metabolic capacities. Providing an

  13. Non-local separable solutions of two interacting particles in a harmonic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Santander, C., E-mail: cglezsantander@fis.ucm.e [GISC, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Dominguez-Adame, F. [GISC, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-01-17

    We calculate the energy levels of two particles trapped in a harmonic potential. The actual two-body potential, assumed to be spherically symmetric, is replaced by a projective operator (non-local separable potential) to determine the energy levels in a closed form. This approach overcomes the limitations of the regularized Fermi pseudopotential when the characteristic length of the two-body interaction potential is of the order of the size of the harmonic trap. In addition, we recover the results obtained with the Fermi pseudopotential when the length of the interaction is much smaller than the size of the trap.

  14. Search for the pair production of third-generation squarks with two-body decays to a bottom or charm quark and a neutralino in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-07-23

    Results are presented from a search for the pair production of third-generation squarks in proton-proton collision events with two-body decays to bottom or charm quarks and a neutralino, which produces a significant imbalance in the transverse momentum. The search is performed using a sample of proton-proton collision data at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 inverse-femtobarns. No statistically significant excess of events is observed beyond the expected contribution from standard model processes. Exclusion limits are set in the context of simplified models of bottom or top squark pair production. Models with bottom squark masses up to 1220 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for light neutralinos, and models with top squark masses of 510 GeV are excluded assuming that the mass splitting between the top squark and the neutralino is small.

  15. Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B-Meson Decays to the Charmless Two-Body States K0pi+, K0barK+, and K0K0bar

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Bailey, S; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bóna, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Borgland, A W; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brochard, F; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bulten, H; Burchat, Patricia R; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Côté, D; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Christ, S; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Colecchia, F; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cormack, C M; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L M; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Buono, L; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Dickopp, M; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dorigo, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckmann, R; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Elsen, E E; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Farbin, A; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B J; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J M; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Geddes, N I; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M; Grancagnolo, S; Green, M G; Greene, M G; Grenier, G J; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hart, P A; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hicheur, A; Hill, E J; Hitlin, D G; Höcker, A; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Honscheid, K; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Ivanchenko, V N; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Laplace, S; Latham, T E; Lau, Y P; Lavin, D; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, H; Libby, J; Lillard, V; Lista, L; Liu, R; LoSecco, J M; Lo Vetere, M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, A; Lü, C; Luitz, S; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lüth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lyon, A J; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Manfredi, P F; Mangeol, D J J; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Meyer, T I; Meyer, W T; Miftakov, V; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Paick, K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petrak, S; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Pivk, M; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Re, V; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Roe, N A; Röthel, W; Ronan, Michael T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Rubin, A E; Ryd, A; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Sandrelli, F; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schott, G; Schrenk, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shelkov, V G; Shen, B C; Simani, M C; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Sloane, R J; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Soha, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spradlin, P; Stängle, H; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; T'Jampens, S; Tan, P; Tantot, L; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thiessen, D; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Treadwell, E; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Vuagnin, G; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walsh, J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, S; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yéche, C; Yi, J; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; De Sangro, R; Del Re, D; La Vaissière, C de

    2004-01-01

    We present preliminary measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries in decays of B mesons to two-body final states containing a K0. The results are based on a data sample of approximately 227 million Upsilon(4S) decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We measure BF(B+ --> K0pi+) = (26.0 +/- 1.3 +/- 1.0) x 10-6, BF(B+ --> K0barK+) = (1.45 +0.53 -0.46 +/- 0.11) x 10-6 ( K0K0bar) = (1.19 +0.40 -0.35 +/- 0.13) x 10^-6, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic, and the upper limit is at a 90% confidence level. The significance of the BF(B+ --> K0barK+) and BF(B0 --> K0K0bar) results are 3.5 sigma and 4.5 sigma, respectively, including systematic uncertainties. In addition, we obtain a measurement of the CP-violating asymmetry for the BF(B+ --> K0pi+) mode and we determine a 90% confidence-level interval for the asymmetry in the BF(B+ --> K0barK+) mode: ACP(B+ --> K0pi+) = -0.087 +/- 0.046 +/- 0.010 and ACP(B+ -->...

  16. Requirements dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Knowing ‘what’ to build is an integral part of an Information System Development, and it is generally understood that this, which is known as Requirements, is achievable through a process of understanding, communication and management. It is currently maintained by the Requirements theorists that successful system design clarifies the interrelations between information and its representations...

  17. Hydrodynamic interactions in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Leonardo, R.; Keen, S.; Ianni, F.; Leach, J.; Padgett, M. J.; Ruocco, G.

    2008-09-01

    We measure hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal particles confined in a thin sheet of fluid. The reduced dimensionality, compared to a bulk fluid, increases dramatically the range of couplings. Using optical tweezers we force a two body system along the eigenmodes of the mobility tensor and find that eigenmobilities change logarithmically with particle separation. At a hundred radii distance, the mobilities for rigid and relative motions differ by a factor of 2, whereas in bulk fluids, they would be practically indistinguishable. A two dimensional counterpart of Oseen hydrodynamic tensor quantitatively reproduces the observed behavior, once the relevant boundary conditions are recognized. These results highlight the importance of dimensionality for transport and interactions in colloidal systems and proteins in biological membranes.

  18. Spin-dependent effective interactions for halo nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Garrido, E; Jensen, A S

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the spin-dependence of the effective two-body interactions appropriate for three-body computations. The only reasonable choice seems to be the fine and hyperfine interactions known for atomic electrons interacting with the nucleus. One exception is the nucleon-nucleon interaction imposing a different type of symmetry. We use the two-neutron halo nucleus 11Li as illustration. We demonstrate that models with the wrong spin-dependence are basically without predictive power. The Pauli forbidden core and valence states must be consistently treated.

  19. Circuit design for multi-body interactions in superconducting quantum annealing systems with applications to a scalable architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancellor, N.; Zohren, S.; Warburton, P. A.

    2017-06-01

    Quantum annealing provides a way of solving optimization problems by encoding them as Ising spin models which are implemented using physical qubits. The solution of the optimization problem then corresponds to the ground state of the system. Quantum tunneling is harnessed to enable the system to move to the ground state in a potentially high non-convex energy landscape. A major difficulty in encoding optimization problems in physical quantum annealing devices is the fact that many real world optimization problems require interactions of higher connectivity, as well as multi-body terms beyond the limitations of the physical hardware. In this work we address the question of how to implement multi-body interactions using hardware which natively only provides two-body interactions. The main result is an efficient circuit design of such multi-body terms using superconducting flux qubits in which effective N-body interactions are implemented using N ancilla qubits and only two inductive couplers. It is then shown how this circuit can be used as the unit cell of a scalable architecture by applying it to a recently proposed embedding technique for constructing an architecture of logical qubits with arbitrary connectivity using physical qubits which have nearest-neighbor four-body interactions. It is further shown that this design is robust to non-linear effects in the coupling loops, as well as mismatches in some of the circuit parameters.

  20. RNA-binding protein L1TD1 interacts with LIN28 via RNA and is required for human embryonic stem cell self-renewal and cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närvä, Elisa; Rahkonen, Nelly; Emani, Maheswara Reddy; Lund, Riikka; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Nästi, Juuso; Autio, Reija; Rasool, Omid; Denessiouk, Konstantin; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2012-03-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have a unique capacity to self-renew and differentiate into all the cell types found in human body. Although the transcriptional regulators of pluripotency are well studied, the role of cytoplasmic regulators is still poorly characterized. Here, we report a new stem cell-specific RNA-binding protein L1TD1 (ECAT11, FLJ10884) required for hESC self-renewal and cancer cell proliferation. Depletion of L1TD1 results in immediate downregulation of OCT4 and NANOG. Furthermore, we demonstrate that OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG all bind to the promoter of L1TD1. Moreover, L1TD1 is highly expressed in seminomas, and depletion of L1TD1 in these cancer cells influences self-renewal and proliferation. We show that L1TD1 colocalizes and interacts with LIN28 via RNA and directly with RNA helicase A (RHA). LIN28 has been reported to regulate translation of OCT4 in complex with RHA. Thus, we hypothesize that L1TD1 is part of the L1TD1-RHA-LIN28 complex that could influence levels of OCT4. Our results strongly suggest that L1TD1 has an important role in the regulation of stemness.

  1. Caenorhabditis elegans UNC-96 is a new component of M-lines that interacts with UNC-98 and paramyosin and is required in adult muscle for assembly and/or maintenance of thick filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Kristina B; Miller, Rachel K; Tinley, Tina L; Sheth, Seema; Qadota, Hiroshi; Benian, Guy M

    2006-09-01

    To gain further insight into the molecular architecture, assembly, and maintenance of the sarcomere, we have carried out a molecular analysis of the UNC-96 protein in the muscle of Caenorhabditis elegans. By polarized light microscopy of body wall muscle, unc-96 mutants display reduced myofibrillar organization and characteristic birefringent "needles." By immunofluorescent staining of known myofibril components, unc-96 mutants show major defects in the organization of M-lines and in the localization of a major thick filament component, paramyosin. In unc-96 mutants, the birefringent needles, which contain both UNC-98 and paramyosin, can be suppressed by starvation or by exposure to reduced temperature. UNC-96 is a novel approximately 47-kDa polypeptide that has no recognizable domains. Antibodies generated to UNC-96 localize the protein to the M-line, a region of the sarcomere in which thick filaments are cross-linked. By genetic and biochemical criteria, UNC-96 interacts with UNC-98, a previously described component of M-lines, and paramyosin. Additionally, UNC-96 copurifies with native thick filaments. A model is presented in which UNC-96 is required in adult muscle to promote thick filament assembly and/or maintenance.

  2. Angular momentum I ground state probabilities of boson systems interacting by random interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Y M; Yoshinaga, N

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we report our systematic calculations of angular momentum $I$ ground state probabilities ($P(I)$) of boson systems with spin $l$ in the presence of random two-body interactions. It is found that the P(0) dominance is usually not true for a system with an odd number of bosons, while it is valid for an even number of bosons, which indicates that the P(0) dominance is partly connected to the even number of identical particles. It is also noticed that the $P(I_{max})$'s of bosons with spin $l$ do not follow the 1/N ($N=l+1$, referring to the number of independent two-body matrix elements) relation. The properties of the $P(I)$'s obtained in boson systems with spin $l$ are discussed.

  3. Few-body interactions in frozen Rydberg gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faoro, Riccardo; Pelle, Bruno; Zuliani, Alexandre

    2016-12-01

    The strong dipole-dipole coupling and the Stark tunability make Förster resonances an attractive tool for the implementation of quantum gates. In this direction a generalization to a N-body process would be a powerful instrument to implement multi-qubit gate and it will also path the way to the understanding of many-body physics. In this review, we give a general introduction on Förster resonances, also known as two-body FRET, giving an overview of the different application in quantum engineering and quantum simulation. Then we will describe an analogous process, the quasi-forbidden FRET, which is related to the Stark mixing due to the presence of an external electric field. We will then focus on its use in a peculiar four-body FRET. The second part of this review is focused on our study of few-body interactions in a cold gas of Cs Rydberg atoms. After a detailed description of a series of quasi-forbidden resonances detected in the proximity of an allowed two-body FRET we will show our most promising result: the observation of a three-body FRET. This process corresponds to a generalization of the usual two-body FRET, where a third atom serves as a relay for the energy transport. This relay also compensates for the energy mismatch which prevents a direct two-body FRET between the donor and the acceptor, but on the other side allowed a three-body process; for this reason, the three-body FRET observed is a "Borromean" process. It can be generalized for any quantum system displaying two-body FRET from quasi-degenerate levels. We also predict N-body FRET, based on the same interaction scheme. Three-body FRET thus promises important applications in the formation of macro-trimers, implementation of few-body quantum gates, few-body entanglement or heralded entanglement.

  4. Applications of the Similarity Renormalization Group to the Nuclear Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Jurgenson, E D

    2009-01-01

    The Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) is investigated as a powerful yet practical method to modify nuclear potentials so as to reduce computational requirements for calculations of observables. The key feature of SRG transformations that leads to computational benefits is the decoupling of low-energy nuclear physics from high-energy details of the inter-nucleon interaction. We examine decoupling quantitatively for two-body observables and few-body binding energies. The universal nature of this decoupling is illustrated and errors from suppressing high-momentum modes above the decoupling scale are shown to be perturbatively small. To explore the SRG evolution of many-body forces, we use as a laboratory a one-dimensional system of bosons with short-range repulsion and mid-range attraction, which emulates realistic nuclear forces. The free-space SRG is implemented for few-body systems in a symmetrized harmonic oscillator basis using a recursive construction analogous to no-core shell model implementations. ...

  5. Patterns of the ground states in the presence of random interactions : Nucleon systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, YM; Arima, A; Shimizu, N; Ogawa, K; Yoshinaga, N; Scholten, O

    2004-01-01

    We present our results on properties of ground states for nucleonic systems in the presence of random two-body interactions. In particular, we calculate probability distributions for parity, seniority, spectroscopic (i.e., in the laboratory frame) quadrupole moments, and discuss a clustering in the

  6. On the configuration of systems of interacting particle with minimum potential energy per particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ventevogel, W.J.; Nijboer, B.R.A.

    1979-01-01

    In continuation of previous work we extend the class of two-body potentials, either repulsive or of generalized Lennard-Jones type, for which it can be proved that among all configurations of an infinite one-dimensional system of interacting particles (with fixed density in the case of repulsive int

  7. P- and T-odd two-nucleon interaction and the deuteron electric dipole moment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, CP; Timmermans, RGE

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear physics relevant to the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the deuteron is addressed. The general operator structure of the P- and T-odd nucleon-nucleon interaction is discussed and applied to the two-body contributions of the deuteron EDM, which can be calculated in terms of P- and T-odd m

  8. Higgs particles interacting via a scalar Dark Matter field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Yajnavalkya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a system of two Higgs particles, interacting via a scalar Dark Matter mediating field. The variational method in the Hamiltonian formalism of QFT is used to derive relativistic wave equations for the two-Higgs system, using a truncated Fock-space trial state. Approximate solutions of the two-body equations are used to examine the existence of Higgs bound states.

  9. Many-body fits of phase-equivalent effective interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Calvin W

    2010-01-01

    In many-body theory it is often useful to renormalize short-distance, high-momentum components of an interaction via unitary transformations. Such transformations preserve the on-shell physical observables of the two-body system (mostly phase-shifts, hence unitarily-connected effective interactions are often called phase-equivalent), while modifying off-shell T-matrix elements influential in many-body systems. In this paper I lay out a general and systematic approach for controlling the off-shell behavior of an effective interaction, which can be adjusted to many-body properties, and present an application to trapped fermions at the unitary

  10. Aspects, Dependencies, and Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitchyan, R; Fabry, J.; Bergmans, Lodewijk; Südholt, M.; Consel, C.

    2007-01-01

    For Aspect-Oriented Software Development (AOSD) the topic of Aspects, Dependencies and Interactions is of high importance across the whole range of development activities – from requirements engineering through to language design. Aspect interactions must be adequately addressed all across the softw

  11. Design Principles for Interactive Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The book addresses the crucial intersection of human-computer interaction (HCI) and software engineering by asking both what users require from interactive systems and what developers need to produce well-engineered software. Needs are expressed as......The book addresses the crucial intersection of human-computer interaction (HCI) and software engineering by asking both what users require from interactive systems and what developers need to produce well-engineered software. Needs are expressed as...

  12. Scaling and universality in two dimensions: three-body bound states with short-ranged interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellotti, F F; Frederico, T [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, DCTA, 12.228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Yamashita, M T [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP-Univ Estadual Paulista, CP 70532-2, CEP 01156-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fedorov, D V; Jensen, A S; Zinner, N T, E-mail: zinner@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy-Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, bygn. 1520, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark)

    2011-10-28

    The momentum space zero-range model is used to investigate universal properties of three interacting particles confined to two dimensions. The pertinent equations are first formulated for a system of two identical and one distinct particle and the two different two-body subsystems are characterized by two-body energies and masses. The three-body energy in units of one of the two-body energies is a universal function of the other two-body energy and the mass ratio. We derive convenient analytical formulae for calculations of the three-body energy as a function of these two independent parameters and exhibit the results as universal curves. In particular, we show that the three-body system can have any number of stable bound states. When the mass ratio of the distinct to identical particles is greater than 0.22, we find that at most two stable bound states exist, while for two heavy and one light mass an increasing number of bound states is possible. The specific number of stable bound states depends on the ratio of two-body bound state energies and on the mass ratio, and we map out an energy-mass phase diagram of the number of stable bound states. Realizable systems of both fermions and bosons are discussed in this framework.

  13. Interaction of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev response element RNA and U6 snRNA requires deoxyhypusine or hypusine modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y P; Nemeroff, M; Yan, Y P; Chen, K Y

    1997-01-01

    Hypusine formation on the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) precursor represents a unique posttranslational modification that is ubiquitously present in eukaryotic cells and archaebacteria. Specific inhibition of deoxyhypusine synthase leads to growth arrest and cell death. The precise cellular function of eIF-5A and the physiological significance of hypusine modification are not clear. Although the methionyl-puromycin synthesis has been suggested to be the functional assay for eIF-5A activity in vitro, the role of eIF-5A in protein synthesis has not been established. Recent studies have suggested that eIF-5A may be the cellular target of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex proteins. Motif analysis suggested that eIF-5A resembles a bimodular RNA-binding protein in that it contains a stretch of basic amino acids clustered at the N-terminal region and a leucine-rich stretch at the C-terminal region. Using Rev target RNA, RRE, as a model, we tested the hypothesis that eIF-5A may be an RNA-binding protein. We found that both deoxyhypusine and hypusine-containing eIF-5A can bind to the 252-nt RRE RNA, as determined by a gel mobility shift assay. In contrast, the unmodified eIF-5A precursor cannot. Deoxyhypusine-containing eIF-5A, but not its precursor, could also cause supershift of the Rev stem-loop IIB RRE complex. Preliminary studies also indicated that eIF-5A can bind to RNA such as U6 snRNA and that deoxyhypusine modification appears to be required for the binding. The ability of eIF-5A to directly interact with RNA suggests that deoxyhypusine formation of eIF-5A may be related to its role in RNA processing and protein synthesis. Our study also suggests the possibility of using a gel mobility shift assay for eIF-5A-RNA binding as a functional assay for deoxyhypusine and hypusine formation.

  14. Electromagnetic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bosanac, Slobodan Danko

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to theoretical methods used in the extreme circumstances of very strong electromagnetic fields. The development of high power lasers, ultrafast processes, manipulation of electromagnetic fields and the use of very fast charged particles interacting with other charges requires an adequate theoretical description. Because of the very strong electromagnetic field, traditional theoretical approaches, which have primarily a perturbative character, have to be replaced by descriptions going beyond them. In the book an extension of the semi-classical radiation theory and classical dynamics for particles is performed to analyze single charged atoms and dipoles submitted to electromagnetic pulses. Special attention is given to the important problem of field reaction and controlling dynamics of charges by an electromagnetic field.

  15. Electromagnetic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosanac, Slobodan Danko [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia). Physical Chemistry

    2016-07-01

    This book is devoted to theoretical methods used in the extreme circumstances of very strong electromagnetic fields. The development of high power lasers, ultrafast processes, manipulation of electromagnetic fields and the use of very fast charged particles interacting with other charges requires an adequate theoretical description. Because of the very strong electromagnetic field, traditional theoretical approaches, which have primarily a perturbative character, have to be replaced by descriptions going beyond them. In the book an extension of the semi-classical radiation theory and classical dynamics for particles is performed to analyze single charged atoms and dipoles submitted to electromagnetic pulses. Special attention is given to the important problem of field reaction and controlling dynamics of charges by an electromagnetic field.

  16. Peculiar features of the interaction potential between hydrogen and antihydrogen at intermediate separations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee Teck-Ghee; Wong Cheuk-Yin; Wang Lee-Shien

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the interaction potential between a hydrogen and an antihydrogen using the second-order perturbation theory within the framework of the four-body system in a separable two-body basis. It finds that the H-H interaction potential possesses the peculiar features of a shallow local minimum located around interatomic separations of r ~ 6a.u. and a barrier rising at r<~ 5a.u.

  17. Nucleon-nucleon interaction with one-pion exchange and instanton-induced interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanamali, C. S.; Kumar, K. B. Vijaya

    2016-11-01

    Singlet (S10) and triplet (S31) nucleon-nucleon potentials are obtained in the framework of the SU(2) nonrelativistic quark model using the resonating-group method in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The full Hamiltonian used in the investigation includes the kinetic energy, two-body confinement potential, one-gluon-exchange potential (OGEP), one-pion exchange potential (OPEP), and instanton induced interaction (III), which includes the effect of quark exchange between the nucleons. The contribution of the OGEP, III, and OPEP to the nucleon-nucleon adiabatic potential is discussed.

  18. Food-drug interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between food and drugs may inadvertently reduce or increase the drug effect. The majority of clinically relevant food-drug interactions are caused by food-induced changes in the bioavailability of the drug. Since the bioavailability and clinical effect of most drugs are correlated......, the bioavailability is an important pharmacokinetic effect parameter. However, in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of a food-drug interaction, the impact of food intake on the clinical effect of the drug has to be quantified as well. As a result of quality review in healthcare systems, healthcare providers...... are increasingly required to develop methods for identifying and preventing adverse food-drug interactions. In this review of original literature, we have tried to provide both pharmacokinetic and clinical effect parameters of clinically relevant food-drug interactions. The most important interactions are those...

  19. Semi-Empirical Effective Interactions for Inelastic Scattering Derived from the Reid Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiase, J. O.; Sharma, L. K.; Winkoun, D. P.; Hosaka, A.

    2001-09-01

    An effective local interaction suitable for inelastic scattering is constructed from the Reid soft - core potential. We proceed in two stages: We first calculated a set of relative two - body matrix elements in a variational approach using the Reid soft-core potential folded with two-body correlation functions. In the second stage we constructed a potential for inelastic scattering by fitting the matrix elements to a sum of Yukawa central, tensor and spin-orbit terms to the set of relative two - body matrix elements obtained in the first stage by a least squares fitting procedure. The ranges of the new potential were selected to ensure the OPEP tails in the relevant channels as well as the short - range part of the interaction. It is found that the results of our variational techniques are very similar to the G - matrix calculations of Bertsch and co - workers in the singlet - even, triplet - even, tensor - even and spin-orbit odd channels thus putting our calculations of two - body matrix elements of nuclear forces in these channels on a sound footing. However, there exist major differences in the singlet - odd, triplet - odd, tensor - odd and spin - orbit even channels which casts some doubt on our understanding of nuclear forces in these channels.

  20. Faraday Waves in Cold-Atom Systems with Two- and Three-Body Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomio, Lauro; Gammal, A.; Abdullaev, F. K.

    2017-03-01

    We report an investigation on Bose-Einstein condensates with two-body (cubic) and three-body (quintic) interactions in the corresponding nonlinear Schrödinger equation, considering s-wave two-body scattering length a_s periodically varying in time. For the quintic interacting term, the dependence on a_s was considered within two models, being quadratic or quartic. It was shown that parametric instabilities can lead to th e generation of Faraday wave resonances in this system, with wavelengths depending on the background scattering length, as well as on the corresponding modulation parameters. A few sample results are shown here for repulsive a_s, in case of quadratic and quartic three-body interactions. The effect of dissipation is also verified on the amplitude of the resonances. Analytical predictions for the resonance positions are confirmed by our numerical simulations.

  1. The helicase, DDX3X, interacts with poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1) and caprin-1 at the leading edge of migrating fibroblasts and is required for efficient cell spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copsey, Alice C; Cooper, Simon; Parker, Robert; Lineham, Ella; Lapworth, Cuzack; Jallad, Deema; Sweet, Steve; Morley, Simon J

    2017-08-30

    DDX3X, a helicase, can interact directly with mRNA and translation initiation factors, regulating the selective translation of mRNAs that contain a structured 5' untranslated region. This activity modulates the expression of mRNAs controlling cell cycle progression and mRNAs regulating actin dynamics, contributing to cell adhesion and motility. Previously, we have shown that ribosomes and translation initiation factors localise to the leading edge of migrating fibroblasts in loci enriched with actively translating ribosomes, thereby promoting steady-state levels of ArpC2 and Rac1 proteins at the leading edge of cells during spreading. As DDX3X can regulate Rac1 levels, cell motility and metastasis, we have examined DDX3X protein interactions and localisation using many complementary approaches. We now show that DDX3X can physically interact and co-localise with poly(A)-binding protein 1 and caprin-1 at the leading edge of spreading cells. Furthermore, as depletion of DDX3X leads to decreased cell motility, this provides a functional link between DDX3X, caprin-1 and initiation factors at the leading edge of migrating cells to promote cell migration and spreading. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Spa32 interaction with the inner-membrane Spa40 component of the type III secretion system of Shigella flexneri is required for the control of the needle length by a molecular tape measure mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botteaux, Anne; Sani, Musa; Kayath, Christian A.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaim; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaïm

    2008-01-01

    The effectors of enterocyte invasion by Shigella are dependent on a type III secretion system that contains a needle whose length average does not exceed 50 nm. Previously, we reported that Spa32 is required for needle length control as well as to switch substrate specificity from MxiH to Ipa

  3. Maturation of the cytochrome cd 1 nitrite reductase NirS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires transient interactions between the three proteins NirS, NirN and NirF

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The periplasmic cytochrome cd 1 nitrite reductase NirS occurring in denitrifying bacteria such as the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa contains the essential tetrapyrrole cofactors haem c and haem d 1. Whereas the haem c is incorporated into NirS by the cytochrome c maturation system I, nothing is known about the insertion of the haem d 1 into NirS. Here, we show by co-immunoprecipitation that NirS interacts with the potential haem d 1 insertion protein NirN in vivo. This NirS–NirN inter...

  4. Knowing requires data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Ramon C.

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater-flow models are often calibrated using a limited number of observations relative to the unknown inputs required for the model. This is especially true for models that simulate groundwater surface-water interactions. In this case, subsurface temperature sensors can be an efficient means for collecting long-term data that capture the transient nature of physical processes such as seepage losses. Continuous and spatially dense network of diverse observation data can be used to improve knowledge of important physical drivers, conceptualize and calibrate variably saturated groundwater flow models. An example is presented for which the results of such analysis were used to help guide irrigation districts and water management decisions on costly upgrades to conveyance systems to improve water usage, farm productivity and restoration efforts to improve downstream water quality and ecosystems.

  5. Interactive Mathematics Textbooks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinclair, Robert

    1999-01-01

    We claim that important considerations have been overlooked in designinginteractive mathematics educational software in the past.In particular,most previous work has concentrated on how to make use ofpre-existing software in mathematics education, rather than firstasking the more...... fundamentalquestion of which requirements mathematics education puts on software, and thendesigning software to fulfil these requirements.We present a working prototype system which takes a script defining an interactivemathematicaldocument and then provides a reader with an interactive realization of thatdocument....

  6. Yet1p and Yet3p, the yeast homologs of BAP29 and BAP31, interact with the endoplasmic reticulum translocation apparatus and are required for inositol prototrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Joshua D; Barlowe, Charles

    2010-06-11

    The mammalian B-cell receptor-associated proteins of 29 and 31 kDa (BAP29 and BAP31) are conserved integral membrane proteins that have reported roles in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control, ER export of secretory cargo, and programmed cell death. In this study we investigated the yeast homologs of BAP29 and BAP31, known as Yet1p and Yet3p, to gain insight on cellular function. We found that Yet1p forms a complex with Yet3p (Yet complex) and that complex assembly was important for subunit stability and proper ER localization. The Yet complex was not efficiently packaged into ER-derived COPII vesicles and therefore does not appear to act as an ER export receptor. Instead, a fraction of the Yet complex was detected in association with the ER translocation apparatus (Sec complex). Specific mutations in the Sec complex or Yet complex influenced these interactions. Moreover, associations between the Yet complex and Sec complex were increased by ER stress and diminished when protein translocation substrates were depleted. Surprisingly, yet1Delta and yet3Delta mutant strains displayed inositol starvation-related growth defects. In accord with the biochemical data, these growth defects were exacerbated by a combination of certain mutations in the Sec complex with yet1Delta or yet3Delta mutations. We propose a model for the Yet-Sec complex interaction that places Yet1p and Yet3p at the translocation pore to manage biogenesis of specific transmembrane secretory proteins.

  7. Comparing Extended System Interactions with Motions in Softened Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Eric I

    2015-01-01

    Using an $N$-body evolution code that does not rely on softened potentials, I have created a suite of interacting binary cluster simulations. The motions of the centers-of-mass of the clusters have been tracked and compared to the trajectories of point masses interacting via one of four different softened potential prescriptions. There is a robust, nearly linear relationship between the impact parameter of the cluster interaction and the point-mass softening length that best approximates the cluster centers-of-mass motion. In an $N$-body simulation that adopts a fixed softening length, such a relationship leads to regimes where two-body effects, like dynamical friction, can be either larger or smaller than the corresponding cluster situation. Further consideration of more specific $N$-body simulations leads to an estimate that roughly 10 per cent of point-mass interactions in an $N$-body simulation will experience two-body effects larger than those for equivalent clusters.

  8. Revisiting the Meaning of Requirements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Jin

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the meaning of requirements can help elicit the real world requirements and refine their specifications. But what do the requirements of a desired software mean is not a well-explained question yet though there are many software development methods available. This paper suggests that the meaning of requirements could be depicted by the will-to-be environments of the desired software, and the optative interactions of the software with its environments as well as the causal relationships among these interactions. This paper also emphasizes the necessity of distinguishing the external manifestation from the internal structure of each system component during the process of requirements decomposition and refinement. Several decomposition strategies have been given to support the continuous decomposition. The external manifestation and the internal structure of the system component have been defined. The roles of the knowledge about the environments have been explicitly described. A simple but meaningful example embedded in the paper illustrates the main ideas as well as how to conduct the requirements decomposition and refinement by using these proposed strategies.

  9. Section 4: Requirements Intertwining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucopoulos, Pericles

    Business analysts are being asked to develop increasingly complex and varied business systems that need to cater to the changing and dynamic market conditions of the new economy. This is particularly acute in today’s turbulent business environment where powerful forces such as deregulation, globalisation, mergers, advances in information and telecommunications technologies, and increasing education of people provide opportunities for organising work in ways that have never before been possible. Enterprises attempt to create wealth either by getting better at improving their products and services or by harnessing creativity and human-centred management to create innovative solutions. In these business settings, requirements become critical in bridging system solutions to organisational and societal problems. They intertwine organisational, social, cognitive, and implementation considerations and they can provide unique insights to change in systems and their business context. Such design situations often involve multiple stakeholders from different participating organisations, subcontractors, divisions, etc., who may have a diversity of expertise, come from different organisational cultures and often have competing goals. The success or failure of many projects depends, to a large extent, on understanding the contextual setting of requirements and their interaction amongst a diverse population of stakeholders.

  10. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    as an interpretation of palpability, comprising usability as well as patient empowerment and socially performative issues. We present a prototype environment for video recording during physiotherapeutical consultation which illustrates our current thoughts on explicit interaction and serves as material for further......We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction...

  11. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin;

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  12. Study of the neon interaction cross section using the Glauber model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Suhel; Usmani, A.A.; Khan, Z.A. [Aligarh Muslim University, Department of Physics, Aligarh (India); Chauhan, Deeksha [United College of Engineering and Research, Naini, Allahabad (India)

    2016-05-15

    Working within the framework of the Coulomb-modified correlation expansion for the Glauber model S-matrix, we calculate the interaction cross section (σ{sub I}) of neon isotopes, {sup 17-32}Ne, on {sup 12}C at 240 MeV/nucleon. The calculations involve i) up to the two-body density term in the correlation expansion, and ii) the single Gaussian approximation for the nucleon-nucleon amplitude. The colliding nuclei are described with Slater determinants consisting of the harmonic oscillator single-particle wave functions. The sole input of the density of each colliding nucleus, the oscillator constant, is fixed from the respective root-mean-square (rms) radius calculated using the relativistic mean-field approach. It is found that the calculated results for σ{sub I} generally provide fairly good agreement with the experimental data except for {sup 31}Ne, for which the required rms neutron radius comes closer to the one obtained earlier using the extended (halo-like) neutron density distribution. This finding is also supported by our predicted differential cross section of {sup 31}Ne on {sup 12}C at 240 MeV/nucleon. However, as expected, the results of the present analysis are unable to discriminate between the halo and non-halo structure of {sup 31}Ne. In conclusion, our results suggest that the present calculations can be considered as a good starting point to predict the rms matter radii of exotic neutron-rich nuclei. (orig.)

  13. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  14. Shape regulation generates elastic interaction between active force dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Golkov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The organization of live cells to tissues is associated with the mechanical interaction between cells, which is mediated through their mechanical environment. We model live cells as spherical active force dipoles surrounded by an infinite elastic matrix, and analytically evaluate their elastic interaction energy for different scenarios of their regulatory behavior. For purely dilational eigenstrains the elastic interaction energy between any two bodies vanishes. We identify mechanical interactions between active cells applying non isotropic displacements with a regulation mechanism designed so that they will preserve their spherical shape. We express the resultant non-isotropic deformation field by a multipole expansion in terms of spherical harmonics. Mechanical self-regulation of live cells is not fully understood, and we compare homeostatic (set point) force applied by the cells on their environment versus homeostatic displacements on their surface. By including or excluding the first term of the expansion...

  15. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pumareja, Dulce Trinidad

    2013-01-01

    Requirements evolution is a generally known problem in software development. Requirements are known to change all throughout a system's lifecycle. Nevertheless, requirements evolution is a poorly understood phenomenon. Most studies on requirements evolution focus on changes to written specifications

  16. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter;

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing interest in considering aesthetic aspects in the design of interactive systems. A set of approaches are emerging each representing different applications of the terminology as well as different inherent assumptions on the role of the user, designer and interaction ideals....... In this paper, we use the concept of Pragmatist Aesthetics to provide a framework for distinguishing between different approaches to aesthetics. Moreover, we use our own design cases to illustrate how pragmatist aesthetics is a promising path to follow in the context of designing interactive systems......, as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  17. Repulsively interacting fermions in a two-dimensional deformed trap with spin-orbit coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchukov, O. V.; Fedorov, D. V.; Jensen, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a two-dimensional system of fermions with two internal (spin) degrees of freedom. It is confined by a deformed harmonic trap and subject to a Zeeman field, Rashba or Dresselhaus one-body spin-orbit couplings and two-body short range repulsion. We obtain self-consistent mean-field $...... that cold atoms may be used to study quantum chaos both in the presence and absence of interactions....

  18. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

  19. Type 2 innate lymphoid cell suppression by regulatory T cells attenuates airway hyperreactivity and requires inducible T-cell costimulator-inducible T-cell costimulator ligand interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Diamanda; Lewis, Gavin; Aron, Jennifer L; Wang, Bowen; Banie, Homayon; Sankaranarayanan, Ishwarya; Galle-Treger, Lauriane; Maazi, Hadi; Lo, Richard; Freeman, Gordon J; Sharpe, Arlene H; Soroosh, Pejman; Akbari, Omid

    2017-05-01

    Atopic diseases, including asthma, exacerbate type 2 immune responses and involve a number of immune cell types, including regulatory T (Treg) cells and the emerging type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s). Although ILC2s are potent producers of type 2 cytokines, the regulation of ILC2 activation and function is not well understood. In the present study, for the first time, we evaluate how Treg cells interact with pulmonary ILC2s and control their function. ILC2s and Treg cells were evaluated by using in vitro suppression assays, cell-contact assays, and gene expression panels. Also, human ILC2s and Treg cells were adoptively transferred into NOD SCID γC-deficient mice, which were given isotype or anti-inducible T-cell costimulator ligand (ICOSL) antibodies and then challenged with IL-33 and assessed for airway hyperreactivity. We show that induced Treg cells, but not natural Treg cells, effectively suppress the production of the ILC2-driven proinflammatory cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, our data reveal the necessity of inducible T-cell costimulator (ICOS)-ICOS ligand cell contact for Treg cell-mediated ILC2 suppression alongside the suppressive cytokines TGF-β and IL-10. Using a translational approach, we then demonstrate that human induced Treg cells suppress syngeneic human ILC2s through ICOSL to control airway inflammation in a humanized ILC2 mouse model. These findings suggest that peripheral expansion of induced Treg cells can serve as a promising therapeutic target against ILC2-dependent asthma. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge G. Morfín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  1. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  2. Entanglement Observables and Witnesses for Interacting Quantum Spin Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, L A; Sarandy, M S; Lidar, D A

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the detection of entanglement in interacting quantum spin systems. First, thermodynamic Hamiltonian-based witnesses are computed for a general class of one-dimensional spin-1/2 models. Second, we introduce optimal bipartite entanglement observables. We show that a bipartite entanglement measure can generally be associated to a set of independent two-body spin observables whose expectation values can be used to witness entanglement. The number of necessary observables is ruled by the symmetries of the model. Illustrative examples are presented.

  3. Interacting shells in AdS spacetime and chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2016-07-01

    We study the simplest two-body problem in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetime: two, infinitely thin, concentric spherical shells of matter. We include only gravitational interaction between the two shells, but we show that the dynamics of this system is highly nontrivial. We observe prompt collapse to a black hole, delayed collapse and even perpetual oscillatory motion, depending on the initial location of the shells (or their energy content). The system exhibits critical behavior, and we show strong hints that it is also chaotic.

  4. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  5. Efimov effect for three interacting bosonic dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujun; D'Incao, J P; Greene, Chris H

    2011-06-10

    Three oriented bosonic dipoles are treated by using the hyperspherical adiabatic representation, providing numerical evidence that the Efimov effect persists near a two-dipole resonance and in a system where angular momentum is not conserved. Our results further show that the Efimov features in scattering observables become universal, with a known three-body parameter; i.e., the resonance energies depend only on the two-body physics, which also has implications for the universal spectrum of the four-dipole problem. Moreover, the Efimov states should be long-lived, which is favorable for their creation and manipulation in ultracold dipolar gases. Finally, deeply bound two-dipole states are shown to be relatively stable against collisions with a third dipole, owing to the emergence of a repulsive interaction originating in the angular momentum nonconservation for this system.

  6. 0{sup +} dominance with random interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arima, A [Science Museum, Japan Science Foundation, 2-1 Kitanomaru-Koen, Chiyodaku, Tokyo 102-0091 (Japan); Yoshinaga, N [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama City 338-8570 (Japan); Zhao, Y M [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2005-01-01

    The ground states of all even-even nuclei have angular momentum equal to zero, I = 0, and positive parity, {pi} = +. This feature was believed to be a consequence of the attractive short-range interaction between nucleons. However, a predominance of I{sup {pi}} = 0{sup +} ground states was discovered in 1998 using the two-body random ensemble. Since then many efforts have been devoted to understanding and solving this problem from a lot of viewpoints. Still, the underlying physical origin of the I{sup {pi}} = 0{sup +} dominance has not been fully understood. Our recent progress in understanding the 0{sup +}dominance of many-body systems is shown.

  7. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi;

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  8. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  9. Neutrino Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    McFarland, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes a series of three lectures on interactions of neutrinos . The lectures begin with a pedagogical foundation and then explore topics of interest to current and future neutrino oscillation and cross-section experiments.

  10. Hard Two-Body Photodisintegration of He3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, I.; Ilieva, Y.; Gilman, R.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Piasetzky, E.; Strauch, S.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Allada, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Beck, A.; Beck, S.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Berman, B. L.; Biselli, A. S.; Boeglin, W.; Bono, J.; Bookwalter, C.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bubis, N.; Burkert, V.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Cisbani, E.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; Cusanno, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; de Jager, C. W.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Dutta, C.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garibaldi, F.; Geagla, O.; Gevorgyan, N.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glister, J.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Katramatou, A. T.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Khrosinkova, E.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Lee, B.; LeRose, J. J.; Lewis, S.; Lindgren, R.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McCullough, E.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D.; Meyer, C. A.; Michaels, R.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Moffit, B.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Nepali, C. S.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Petratos, G. G.; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rodriguez, I.; Ron, G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saha, A.; Saini, M. S.; Sarty, A. J.; Sawatzky, B.; Saylor, N. A.; Schott, D.; Schulte, E.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Shneor, R.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wang, Y.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, M. H.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zheng, X.; Zonta, I.

    2013-06-01

    We have measured cross sections for the γHe3→pd reaction at photon energies of 0.4-1.4 GeV and a center-of-mass angle of 90°. We observe dimensional scaling above 0.7 GeV at this center-of-mass angle. This is the first observation of dimensional scaling in the photodisintegration of a nucleus heavier than the deuteron.

  11. Hard Two-body Photodisintegration of 3He

    CERN Document Server

    Pomerantz, I; Gilman, R; Higinbotham, D W; Piasetzky, E; Strauch, S; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Allada, K; Amaryan, M J; Pereira, S Anefalos; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Beck, A; Beck, S; Bedlinskiy, I; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Boeglin, W; Bono, J; Bookwalter, C; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bubis, N; Burkert, V; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Chirapatpimol, K; Cisbani, E; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; Cusanno, F; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; de Jager, C W; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; Dutta, C; Egiyan, H; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Fleming, J A; Fradi, A; Garibaldi, F; Geagla, O; Gevorgyan, N; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Glister, J; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Harrison, N; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jiang, X; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Katramatou, A T; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal, P; Khrosinkova, E; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Kvaltine, N D; Lee, B; LeRose, J J; Lewis, S; Lindgren, R; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Mao, Y; Martinez, D; Mayer, M; McCullough, E; McKinnon, B; Meekins, D; Meyer, C A; Michaels, R; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Moffit, B; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Camacho, C Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Nepali, C S; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Petratos, G G; Phelps, E; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rodriguez, I; Ron, G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saha, A; Saini, M S; Sarty, A J; Sawatzky, B; Saylor, N A; Schott, D; Schulte, E; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Seraydaryan, H; Shneor, R; Smith, G D; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Wang, Y; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, M H; Yan, X; Yao, H; Zachariou, N; Zhan, X; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zheng, X; Zonta, I

    2013-01-01

    We have measured cross sections for the gamma+3He->p+d reaction at photon energies of 0.4 - 1.4 GeV and a center-of-mass angle of 90 deg. We observe dimensional scaling above 0.7 GeV at this center-of-mass angle. This is the first observation of dimensional scaling in the photodisintegration of a nucleus heavier than the deuteron.

  12. Two-Body Reactions at Large Transverse Momentum

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Large-angle exclusive reactions are studied, in particular elastic scattering and @*p annihilations into @p|+@p|- and K|+K|-. In a previous geometry, the 90|0 c.m. region was covered. The present geometry covers the -t range from about 1 to 8 (GeV/c)|2. The aim is to tie these two regions together and attem understading of large-angle scattering up to our highest energies. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment uses a 1 m liquid H^2 target surrounded by scintillator and lead sandwiches for vetoing neutral and charged particles missing the acceptance. An aerogel Cerenkov counter in the recoil arm can be used to veto charged pions above 0.8 GeV/c. Otherwise the events are selected as previously with fast coincidence matrices using pulses from arrays of scintillator counters. Identification of particles is carried out with threshold Cerenkov counters and iron calorimeters. MWPC's are used to establish the trajectories of the particles.

  13. The Queen's Two Bodies: Sor Juana and New Spain's Vicereines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, George Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The work of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz contains many examples of positive representations of the Queens of Spain and the Vicereines of New Spain. These poetic portraits serve to counter the primarily misogynistic portrayals of ruling women of the seventeenth century. Most importantly, Sor Juana increased the visibility of the vicereine in colonial…

  14. Jacobi-Integral Method For Two-Body Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Victor R.; Gottlieb, Robert G.; Fraietta, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    Jacobi-integral method enables efficient, accurate computation of trajectory of natural satellite or spacecraft perturbed by component of gravitational potential depending explicitly on both position and time. Instead of total energy, Jacobi integral, which is energylike constant of motion in this case, embedded in Newtonian differential equations of motion. Trajectories computed in fewer steps. With modifications, applicable to such terrestrial problems as motions of rotors and of beams of electrically charged particles in changing electrical and magnetic fields.

  15. A New Conservative Scheme for Solving the Two Body Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Vogelaere [23], Scraton [20] and others). Also, linear multistep methods of the form k k’= h2 O.jYn+j = Sjfn+j (2) j=0 J=o exist. See, for example, Henrici ...equations based on trigonometric polynomials, Numer. Math., a, 381-397 (1961). 11. P. Henrici , Discrete Variable Methods in Ordinary Differen- tial

  16. The Two-Body Problem of Classical Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    and 7., are continuous positive functions of bounded variation . tApplied Mathematics Department 5640, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM...gi is a continuous function of bounded variation . This generalized Lipschitz-type condition is indeed satisfied in the electrodynamics case. The m

  17. Searches for CP violation in two-body charm decays

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073698

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb experiment recorded data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 $fb^{-1}$ during its first run of data taking. These data yield the largest samples of charmed hadrons in the world and are used to search for CP violation in the $D^0$ system. Among the many measurements performed at LHCb, a measurement of the direct CP asymmetry in $D^0 \\rightarrow K_S^0 K_S^0$ decays is presented and is found to be $A_{CP}(D^0 \\rightarrow K_S^0 K_S^0) = (-2.9 \\pm 5.2 \\pm 2.2)\\, \\%, $ where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This represents a significant improvement in precision over the previous measurement of this parameter. Measurements of the parameter $A^\\Gamma$, defined as the CP asymmetry of the $D^0$ effective lifetime when decaying to a CP eigenstate, are also presented. Using semi-leptonic b-hadron decays to tag the flavour of the $D^0$ meson at production with the $K^+K^-$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final states yields $A^\\Gamma(K^+K^-) = (-0.134 \\pm 0.077^{+0.026}_{-0.034})\\, \\%...

  18. The unexplored landscape of two-body resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Nathaniel; Kong, Kyoungchul; Ng, Yvonne; Whiteson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We propose a strategy for searching for theoretically-unanticipated new physics which avoids a large trials factor by focusing on experimental strengths. Searches for resonances decaying into pairs of visible particles are experimentally very powerful due to the localized mass peaks and have a rich history of discovery. Yet, due to a focus on subsets of theoretically-motivated models, the landscape of such resonances is far from thoroughly explored. We survey the existing set of searches, identify untapped experimental opportunities and discuss the theoretical constraints on models which would generate such resonances.

  19. Evidence for Two-Body Hadronic Decays of the Upsilon

    CERN Document Server

    Dytman, S A; Müller, J A; Nam, S; Savinov, V; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Park, C S; Park, W; Thayer, J B; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S R; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Mountain, R; Muramatsu, H; Nandakumar, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Bornheim, A; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Boisvert, V; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Magerkurth, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Patterson, J R; Pedlar, T K; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Richichi, S J; Riley, D; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Warburton, A; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Potlia, V; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Li, S Z; Poling, R A; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L

    2003-01-01

    We describe a search for hadronic decays of the Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S) resonances to the exclusive final states rho pi, K*(892) Kbar, rho a2(1320), omega f2(1270), phi f2'(1525), K*(892) K2*(1430)bar, b1(1235) pi, K1(1270) Kbar, and K1(1400) Kbar. Upper limits at 90% CL are set for all these decays from all three resonances below 33x10**-6; in particular, B(Y(1S)--> rho pi) phi f2'(1525)) = (7 +3-2(stat) +-1(syst)) x 10**-6 and B(Y(1S) --> K1(1400) Kbar) = (14 +4-3(stat) +-2(syst)) x 10**-6. Production of K1(1270) Kbar in Y(1S) decay is suppressed relative to that of K1(1400) Kbar. These results add another piece to the challenging ``rho-pi puzzle'' of the charmonium system, placing constraints on models of how quantum chromodynamics should be applied to heavy quarkonia. All results are preliminary.

  20. Renormalized two-body low-energy scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Erik

    For a class of long-range potentials, including ultra-strong perturbations of the attractive Coulomb potential in dimension d≥3, we introduce a stationary scattering theory for Schrödinger operators which is regular at zero energy. In particular it is well defined at this energy, and we use it to...

  1. Yukawa model on a lattice: two body states

    CERN Document Server

    De Soto, F; Roiesnel, C; Boucaud, P; Leroy, J P; Pène, O; Boucaud, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    We present first results of the solutions of the Yukawa model as a Quantum Field Theory (QFT) solved non perturbatively with the help of lattice calculations. In particular we will focus on the possibility of binding two nucleons in the QFT, compared to the non relativistic result.

  2. Two body scattering length of Yukawa model on a lattice

    CERN Document Server

    De Soto, F; Roiesnel, C; Boucaud, P; Leroy, J P; Pène, O; Boucaud, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    The extraction of scattering parameters from Euclidean simulations of a Yukawa model in a finite volume with periodic boundary conditions is analyzed both in non relativistic quantum mechanics and in quantum field theory.

  3. Interactive Workspaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst

    augmented reality, interactive building elements, and mobile devices to support new ways of working in a diversity of application domains with work situations ranging from individual work, through local collaboration, to distributed collaboration. The work situations may take place in offices/project rooms...... or in the field. The types of tasks may range from adhoc to more planned forms of interaction. We involve users from specific application domains and use settings continuously in our research following a participatory design approach....

  4. Requirements Analysis for Information-Intensive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, E. D.; Hartsough, C.; Morris, R. V.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Report discusses role of requirements analysis in development of information-intensive systems. System examined from variety of human viewpoints during design, development, and implementation. Such examination, called requirements analysis, ensures system simultaneously meets number of distinct but interacting needs. Viewpoints defined and integrated to help attain objectives.

  5. Hyperon-Nucleon Interaction in a Quark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, M

    1993-01-01

    A lecture given at the International School Seminar on {\\sl Hadrons and Nuclei from QCD}, Tsuruga-Vladivostok-Sapporo, August-September, 1993. A realistic hyperon ($Y$)-nucleon ($N$) interaction based on the quark model and the one-boson-exchange potential is constructed. The Nijmegen potential model D with the SU(3) flavor symmetry is modified with a quark exchange interaction at the short-distance, which replaces the short-range repulsive core in the original model. The flavor-spin dependences of the short-range repulsion are qualitatively different from the original hard-core potential. We also study a two-body weak decay, $\\Lambda N \\to NN$, in the quark model. An effective weak interaction, where one-loop QCD corrections are explicitly taken into account, is employed. Differences from the conventional meson-exchange processes are discussed.

  6. Calculation of local pressure tensors in systems with many-body interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Paul, Wolfgang; Binder, Kurt

    2005-12-01

    Local pressures are important in the calculation of interface tensions and in analyzing micromechanical behavior. The calculation of local pressures in computer simulations has been limited to systems with pairwise interactions between the particles, which is not sufficient for chemically detailed systems with many-body potentials such as angles and torsions. We introduce a method to calculate local pressures in systems with n-body interactions (n=2,3,4,) based on a micromechanical definition of the pressure tensor. The local pressure consists of a kinetic contribution from the linear momentum of the particles and an internal contribution from dissected many-body interactions by infinitesimal areas. To define dissection by a small area, respective n-body interactions are divided into two geometric centers, effectively reducing them to two-body interactions. Consistency with hydrodynamics-derived formulas for systems with two-body interactions [J. H. Irving and J. G. Kirkwood, J. Chem. Phys. 18, 817 (1950)], for average cross-sectional pressures [B. D. Todd, D. J. Evans, and P. J. Daivis, Phys. Rev. E 52, 1627 (1995)], and for volume averaged pressures (virial formula) is shown. As a simple numerical example, we discuss liquid propane in a cubic box. Local, cross-sectional, and volume-averaged pressures as well as relative contributions from two-body and three-body forces are analyzed with the proposed method, showing full numerical equivalence with the existing approaches. The method allows computing local pressures in the presence of many-body interactions in atomistic simulations of complex materials and biological systems.

  7. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  8. The Topology of the l-Arginine Exporter ArgO Conforms to an Nin-Cout Configuration in Escherichia coli: Requirement for the Cytoplasmic N-Terminal Domain, Functional Helical Interactions, and an Aspartate Pair for ArgO Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathania, Amit; Gupta, Arvind Kumar; Dubey, Swati; Gopal, Balasubramanian; Sardesai, Abhijit A

    2016-12-01

    ArgO and LysE are members of the LysE family of exporter proteins and ordinarily mediate the export of l-arginine (Arg) in Escherichia coli and l-lysine (Lys) and Arg in Corynebacterium glutamicum, respectively. Under certain conditions, ArgO also mediates Lys export. To delineate the arrangement of ArgO in the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, we have employed a combination of cysteine accessibility in situ, alkaline phosphatase fusion reporters, and protein modeling to arrive at a topological model of ArgO. Our studies indicate that ArgO assumes an Nin-Cout configuration, potentially forming a five-transmembrane helix bundle flanked by a cytoplasmic N-terminal domain (NTD) comprising roughly its first 38 to 43 amino acyl residues and a short periplasmic C-terminal region (CTR). Mutagenesis studies indicate that the CTR, but not the NTD, is dispensable for ArgO function in vivo and that a pair of conserved aspartate residues, located near the opposing edges of the cytoplasmic membrane, may play a pivotal role in facilitating transmembrane Arg flux. Additional studies on amino acid substitutions that impair ArgO function in vivo and their derivatives bearing compensatory amino acid alterations indicate a role for intramolecular interactions in the Arg export mechanism, and some interactions are corroborated by normal-mode analyses. Lastly, our studies suggest that ArgO may exist as a monomer in vivo, thus highlighting the requirement for intramolecular interactions in ArgO, as opposed to interactions across multiple ArgO monomers, in the formation of an Arg-translocating conduit.

  9. Interaction Widget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Mads

    2003-01-01

    This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced in t...... in the pattern. The intended audience of the pattern is developers and researchers within the field of human computer interaction.......This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced...

  10. Interactive governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Torfing, Jacob; Peters, B. Guy

    Governance has become one of the most commonly used concepts in contemporary political science. It is, however, often used to mean a variety of different things. This book helps to clarify this conceptual muddle by concentrating on one variety of governance-interactive governance. The authors argue...... that although the state may remain important for many aspects of governing, interactions between state and society represent an important, and perhaps increasingly important, dimension of governance. These interactions may be with social actors such as networks, with market actors or with other governments......, but all these forms represent means of governing involving mixtures of state action with the actions of other entities.This book explores thoroughly this meaning of governance, and links it to broader questions of governance. In the process of explicating this dimension of governance the authors also...

  11. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    distance functions. The frontier is given by an explicit quantile, e.g. “the best 90 %”. Using the explanatory model of the inefficiency, the user can adjust the frontiers by submitting state variables that influence the inefficiency. An efficiency study of Danish dairy farms is implemented......We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  12. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Make cool stuff. If you're a designer or artist without a lot of programming experience, this book will teach you to work with 2D and 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, and electronic circuitry to create all sorts of interesting and compelling experiences -- online and off. Programming Interactivity explains programming and electrical engineering basics, and introduces three freely available tools created specifically for artists and designers: Processing, a Java-based programming language and environment for building projects on the desktop, Web, or mobile phonesArduino, a system t

  13. Collocated Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E. Fischer, Joel; Porcheron, Martin; Lucero, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    In the 25 years since Ellis, Gibbs, and Rein proposed the time-space taxonomy, research in the ‘same time, same place’ quadrant has diversified, perhaps even fragmented. This one-day workshop will bring together researchers with diverse, yet convergent interests in tabletop, surface, mobile......, and wearable technologies, spaces and spatial interaction, and those interested in the social aspects of interaction, such as conversation analysis and ethnomethodology. These communities have matured considerably, and produced significant exemplars of systems, methods, and studies concerned with collocated...

  14. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is a tool...

  15. Interactive governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Torfing, Jacob; Peters, B. Guy

    that although the state may remain important for many aspects of governing, interactions between state and society represent an important, and perhaps increasingly important, dimension of governance. These interactions may be with social actors such as networks, with market actors or with other governments...... explore some of the more fundamental questions about governance theory. For example, although governance is talked about a great deal political science has done relatively little about how to measure this concept. Likewise, the term multi-level governance has become widely used but its important...

  16. Investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, D.R.; Haberzettl, H.; Maximon, L.C.; Parke, W.C.

    1992-07-01

    In order to make it easy for the reader to see the specific research carried out and the progress made, the following report of progress is done by topic. Each item has a format layout of Topic, Investigators, Objective, Significance, and Description of Progress, followed at the end by the relevant references. As is clear from the topics listed, the emphasis of the George Washington University (GWU) theory group has been on the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body nuclei. Both low- and intermediate-energy electromagnetic disintegration of these nuclei is considered. When the excitation energy of the target nucleus is low, the aim has been to handle the continuum part of the theoretical work numerically with no approximations, that is, by means of full three- or four-body dynamics. When structure questions axe the issue, numerically accurate calculations axe always carried through, limited only by the underlying two-body or three-body interactions used as input. Implicit in our work is the question of how far one can go within the traditional nuclear physics framework, i.e., nucleons and mesons in a nonrelativistic setting. Our central goal is to carry through state-of-the-art fewbody calculations that wig serve as a means of determining at what point standard nuclear physics requires quark degrees of freedom in order to understand the phenomena in question. So far, in the problems considered, there has been no evidence of the necessity to go beyond the traditional approach, though we always keep in mind that possibility. As our work is involved with questions in the intermediate-energy realm, moving from a nonrelativistic framework to a relativistic one is always a consideration. Currently, for the problems that have been pursued in this domain of energy, the issues concern far more the mechanisms of the reactions and structural questions than the need to move to relativistic dynamics.

  17. Discovering system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  18. Interactive Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik; Reng, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2015, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in November/December 2015. The 18 revised full papers and 13 short papers presented together with 9 posters, 9 workshop descriptions, an...

  19. Interactive Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean K.

    1997-01-01

    Presents guiding principles for developing interactive lessons for the World Wide Web. Describes "Amazing Space: Education Online from the Hubble Space Telescope", a program where students study spectacular Hubble Space Telescope images of stars and star-forming regions to learn about the life cycle of stars and the creation of atoms. (JRH)

  20. Interactive Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik; Reng, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2015, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in November/December 2015. The 18 revised full papers and 13 short papers presented together with 9 posters, 9 workshop descriptions...