WorldWideScience

Sample records for two shock timing

  1. Shock-Timing Experiment Using a Two-Step Radiation Pulse with a Polystyrene Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feng; PENG Xiao-Shi; JIAO Chun-Ye; LIU Shen-Ye; JIANG Xiao-Hua; DING Yong-Kun

    2011-01-01

    @@ A shock-timing experiment plays an important role in inertial confinement fusion studies, and the timing of multiple shock waves is crucial to the performance of inertial confinement fusion ignition targets.We present an experimental observation of a shock wave driven by a two-step radiation pulse in a polystyrene target.The experiment is carried out at Shen Guang 11 Yuan Xing (SGNYX) laser facility in China, and the generation and coalescence of the two shock waves, originating from each of the two radiation steps, is clearly seen with two velocity interferometers.This two-shock-wave coalescence is also simulated by the radioactive hydrodynamic code of a multi-1D program.The experimental measurements are compared with the simulations and quite good agreements are found, with relatively small discrepancies in shock timing.

  2. Early time implosion symmetry from two-axis shock-timing measurements on indirect drive NIF experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J. D., E-mail: moody4@llnl.gov; Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Munro, D. H.; Barker, D. A.; Baker, K. L.; Döppner, T.; Hash, N. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; LaFortune, K.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacGowan, B. J.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Widmayer, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Nikroo, A.; Giraldez, E. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Boehly, T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    An innovative technique has been developed and used to measure the shock propagation speed along two orthogonal axes in an inertial confinement fusion indirect drive implosion target. This development builds on an existing target and diagnostic platform for measuring the shock propagation along a single axis. A 0.4 mm square aluminum mirror is installed in the ablator capsule which adds a second orthogonal view of the x-ray-driven shock speeds. The new technique adds capability for symmetry control along two directions of the shocks launched in the ablator by the laser-generated hohlraum x-ray flux. Laser power adjustments in four different azimuthal cones based on the results of this measurement can reduce time-dependent symmetry swings during the implosion. Analysis of a large data set provides experimental sensitivities of the shock parameters to the overall laser delivery and in some cases shows the effects of laser asymmetries on the pole and equator shock measurements.

  3. Time-dependent simulation of oblique MHD cosmic-ray shocks using the two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Adam; Jones, T. W.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1995-01-01

    Using a new, second-order accurate numerical method we present dynamical simulations of oblique MHD cosmic-ray (CR)-modified plane shock evolution. Most of the calculations are done with a two-fluid model for diffusive shock acceleration, but we provide also comparisons between a typical shock computed that way against calculations carried out using the more complete, momentum-dependent, diffusion-advection equation. We also illustrate a test showing that these simulations evolve to dynamical equilibria consistent with previously published steady state analytic calculations for such shocks. In order to improve understanding of the dynamical role of magnetic fields in shocks modified by CR pressure we have explored for time asymptotic states the parameter space of upstream fast mode Mach number, M(sub f), and plasma beta. We compile the results into maps of dynamical steady state CR acceleration efficiency, epsilon(sub c). We have run simulations using constant, and nonisotropic, obliquity (and hence spatially) dependent forms of the diffusion coefficient kappa. Comparison of the results shows that while the final steady states achieved are the same in each case, the history of CR-MHD shocks can be strongly modified by variations in kappa and, therefore, in the acceleration timescale. Also, the coupling of CR and MHD in low beta, oblique shocks substantially influences the transient density spike that forms in strongly CR-modified shocks. We find that inside the density spike a MHD slow mode wave can be generated that eventually steepens into a shock. A strong layer develops within the density spike, driven by MHD stresses. We conjecture that currents in the shear layer could, in nonplanar flows, results in enhanced particle accretion through drift acceleration.

  4. Suppressive and Facilitative Effects of Shock Intensity and Interresponse Times Followed by Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everly, Jessica B.; Perone, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although response-dependent shock often suppresses responding, response facilitation can occur. In two experiments, we examined the suppressive and facilitative effects of shock by manipulating shock intensity and the interresponse times that produced shock. Rats' lever presses were reinforced on a variable-interval 40-s schedule of food…

  5. Suppressive and Facilitative Effects of Shock Intensity and Interresponse Times Followed by Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everly, Jessica B.; Perone, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although response-dependent shock often suppresses responding, response facilitation can occur. In two experiments, we examined the suppressive and facilitative effects of shock by manipulating shock intensity and the interresponse times that produced shock. Rats' lever presses were reinforced on a variable-interval 40-s schedule of food…

  6. Two-Dimensional Thermal Shock Problem of Generalized Magneto-Thermoelasticity with a Time-Fractional Heat Conduction Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachher, M.; Sarkar, N.

    2016-11-01

    An electromagneto-thermoelastic coupled problem for a homogeneous, isotropic, thermally and electrically conducting half-space solid whose surface is subjected to a thermal shock is considered in two-dimensional space. The equations of the theory of generalized electromagneto-thermoelasticity with fractional derivative heat transfer allowing the second sound effects are considered. An initial magnetic field acts parallel to the plane boundary of the half-space. The normal mode analysis and the eigenvalue approach techniques are used to solve the resulting nondimensional coupled field equations for the three theories. Numerical results for the temperature, displacements and thermal stresses distributions are presented graphically and discussed. A comparison is made with the results obtained in the presence and absence of the magnetic field.

  7. Collisionless Weibel shocks: Full formation mechanism and timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Stockem, A. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Narayan, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Silva, L. O. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-07-15

    Collisionless shocks in plasmas play an important role in space physics (Earth's bow shock) and astrophysics (supernova remnants, relativistic jets, gamma-ray bursts, high energy cosmic rays). While the formation of a fluid shock through the steepening of a large amplitude sound wave has been understood for long, there is currently no detailed picture of the mechanism responsible for the formation of a collisionless shock. We unravel the physical mechanism at work and show that an electromagnetic Weibel shock always forms when two relativistic collisionless, initially unmagnetized, plasma shells encounter. The predicted shock formation time is in good agreement with 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of counterstreaming pair plasmas. By predicting the shock formation time, experimental setups aiming at producing such shocks can be optimised to favourable conditions.

  8. Advances in NIF Shock Timing Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, Harry

    2012-10-01

    Experiments are underway to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to multiple shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of all four shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). Experiments are now routinely conducted in a mirrored keyhole geometry, which allows for simultaneous diagnosis of the shock timing at both the hohlraum pole and equator. Further modifications are being made to improve the surrogacy to ignition hohlraums by replacing the standard liquid deuterium (D2) capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. These experiments will remove any possible surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporate the physics of shock release from the ice layer, which is absent in current experiments. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  9. Results from Recent NIF Shock Timing Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Kline, J. L.; Bowers, M. W.; Le Pape, S.; Farley, D. R.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Moody, J. D.; Eggert, J. H.; Munro, D. H.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Clark, D.; Nikroo, A.; Moreno, K. A.; Kroll, J. J.; Hamza, A. V.; Barker, D. A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2011-10-01

    Experiments are underway to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to multiple shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of all four shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). The tuned pulse shape resulting from these experiments has been tested in ignition capsule implosions and demonstrates a considerable improvement in fuel adiabat. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Two-Dimensional Shock Initiation Process of Cast Composition B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄风雷; 胡湘渝

    2004-01-01

    A two-streak high-speed photography measuring system is designed, which can successfully record the reactive shock front and the reaction profile within the run distance of shock initiation under two-dimensional shock initiation. The strong reaction delay time and the shape of reaction shock front are determined in the cast composition B (RDX/TNT/60/40). A low level reaction zone has been found and analyzed.

  11. Shock wave of vapor-liquid two-phase flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangju ZHAO; Fei WANG; Hong GAO; Jingwen TANG; Yuexiang YUAN

    2008-01-01

    The shock wave of vapor-liquid two-phase flow in a pressure-gain steam injector is studied by build-ing a mathematic model and making calculations. The results show that after the shock, the vapor is nearly com-pletely condensed. The upstream Mach number and the volume ratio of vapor have a great effect on the shock. The pressure and Mach number of two-phase shock con-form to the shock of ideal gas. The analysis of available energy shows that the shock is an irreversible process with entropy increase.

  12. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  13. Times New Materials Company Enhancing the Technical Innovation of Building Shock Absorption and Shock Insulation Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Tian

    2012-01-01

    To enhance the technical innovation and market promotion of building shock absorption and shock insulation products, to promote institute-enterprise cooperation and realize complementary advantage, on March 27, Zhuzhou Times New Materials Technology Co., Ltd. concluded Framework Agreement on the Joint R&D Strategic Cooperation of Building Shock Absorption and Shock Insulation Products with Yunnan Earthquake Engineering Institute in Kunming. Both parties will fully exert their technology and resource advantages, and develop and promote shock absorption and shock insulation products jointly in the form of strategic partners.

  14. Holographic flow visualization of time-varying shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Rapid-double-exposure, diffuse-illumination holography is evaluated analytically and experimentally as a flow visualization method for time-varying shock waves. Conditions are determined that minimize the distance (localization error) between the surface or curve of interference-fringe localization and the shock surface. Treated specifically are the cases of shock waves in a transonic compressor rotor for which there is laser anemometer data for comparison and shock waves in a flutter cascade.

  15. SHORT ACCELERATION TIMES FROM SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G., E-mail: silvia.perri@fis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci, I-87036 Rende (Italy)

    2015-12-10

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks allows particle transport properties to be inferred. The frequently observed power-law decay upstream, indeed, implies a superdiffusive particle transport when the level of magnetic field variance does not change as the time interval from the shock front increases. In this context, a superdiffusive shock acceleration (SSA) theory has been developed, allowing us to make predictions of the acceleration times. In this work we estimate for a number of interplanetary shocks, including the solar wind termination shock, the acceleration times for energetic protons in the framework of SSA and we compare the results with the acceleration times predicted by standard diffusive shock acceleration. The acceleration times due to SSA are found to be much shorter than in the classical model, and also shorter than the interplanetary shock lifetimes. This decrease of the acceleration times is due to the scale-free nature of the particle displacements in the framework of superdiffusion. Indeed, very long displacements are possible, increasing the probability for particles far from the front of the shock to return, and short displacements have a high probability of occurrence, increasing the chances for particles close to the front to cross the shock many times.

  16. Two-temperature radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of electron thermal conduction on radiative shock structure is studied for both one- and two-temperature plasmas. The dimensionless ratio of the conductive length to the cooling length determines whether or not conduction is important, and shock jump conditions with conduction are established for a collisionless shock front. Approximate solutions are obtained, with the assumptions that the ionization state of the gas is constant and the cooling rate is a function of temperature alone. In the absence of magnetic fields, these solutions indicate that conduction noticeably influences normal-abundance interstellar shocks with velocities 50-100 km/s and dramatically affects metal-dominated shocks over a wide range of shock velocities.

  17. Shock Formation in Electron-Ion Plasmas: Mechanism and Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret, Antoine; Stockem Novo, Anne; Ricardo, Fonseca; Luis, Silva

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the formation of a collisionless shock in electron-ion plasmas in theory and simulations. In initially un-magnetized relativistic plasmas, such shocks are triggered by the Weibel instability. While in pair plasmas the shock starts forming right after the instability saturates, it is not so in electron-ion plasmas because the Weibel filaments at saturation are too small. An additional merging phase is therefore necessary for them to efficiently stop the flow. We derive a theoretical model for the shock formation time, taking into account filament merging in the nonlinear phase of the Weibel instability. This process is much slower than in electron-positron pair shocks, and so the shock formation is longer by a factor proportional to √{mi /me } ln(mi /me).

  18. Two-dimensional dispersive shock waves in dissipative optical media

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V

    2013-01-01

    We study generation of two-dimensional dispersive shock waves and oblique dark solitons upon interaction of tilted plane waves with negative refractive index defects embedded into defocusing material with linear gain and two-photon absorption. Different evolution regimes are encountered including the formation of well-localized disturbances for input tilts below critical one, and generation of extended shock waves containing multiple intensity oscillations in the "upstream" region and gradually vanishing oblique dark solitons in "downstream" region for input tilts exceeding critical one. The generation of stable dispersive shock waves is possible only below certain critical defect strength.

  19. Configuration of Shock Waves in Two-Dimensional Overexpanded Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masashi Kashitani; Yutaka Yamaguchi; Yoshiaki Miyazato; Mitsuharu Masuda; Kazuyasu Matsuo

    2003-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been carried out to obtain the clear understanding of a shock wave transition associated with a steady two-dimensional overexpanded flow. Two-dimensional inviscid theory with respect to a shock wave reflection is used in the present study on the characteristic of shock waves. The results obtained from the flow analysis are compared with those obtained from flow visualizations. It is shown that in the region of regular reflection, the angle of an incident shock wave becomes lower than that calculated by two shock theory with an increment in the ratio pe/pb of the nozzle exit pressure pe to the back pressure pb. It is indicated that the configuration of shock waves in overexpanded jets is influenced by the divergent angle at the nozzle exit. Also it is shown from the flow visualization that a series of shock waves move into the nozzle inside with a decrease in pressure ratio pe/pb, even if the pe/pb is under overexpanded conditions.

  20. Shock Timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Robey, H. F.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Krauter, K. G.; Frieders, G.; Ross, G. F.; Jackson, J. L.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2011-06-01

    Experiments are proceeding to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). The results of these measurements will be used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, T.

    1973-01-01

    Time-resolved spectra have been obtained behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon at initial pressures of 0.1 and 1.0 torr using a rotating drum spectrograph and the OSU (The Ohio State University) arc-driven shock tube. These spectra were used to determine the qualitative nature of the flow as well as for making estimates of the available test time. The (n+1,n) and (n,n) band spectra of N2(+) (1st negative) were observed in the test gas behind incident shock waves in air at p1=1.0 torr and Us=9-10 km/sec. Behind reflected shock waves in air, the continuum of spectra appeared to cover almost the entire wavelength of 2,500-7,000 A for the shock-heated test gas. For xenon, the spectra for the incident shock wave cases for p1=0.1 torr show an interesting structure in which two intensely bright regions are witnessed in the time direction. The spectra obtained behind reflected shock waves in xenon were also dominated by continuum radiation but included strong absorption spectra due to FeI and FeII from the moment the reflected shock passed and on.

  2. [Heart failure and anaphylactic shock. A report of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdier, F; Petitjeans, F; Griffet, V; Caignault, J-R; Guerard, S

    2011-04-01

    Anaphylactic shock can sometimes take the appearance of heart failure, in relation to an acute coronary syndrome, even with normal coronary arteries, that we illustrate by two observations. We firstly report the case of an anaphylactic shock caused by succinylcholine, after anesthesia induction for inguinal hernia surgery in a 50-year-old man with cardiovascular risks, who presented with ventricular fibrillation followed by a cardiac arrest. An acute and severe anterior coronary syndrome was suspected and treated with thrombolysis. Then the electrocardiogram normalized, as well as the left ventricular function. No significant coronary stenosis was retrospectively revealed by coronarography, and a severe coronary vasospasm induced by the anaphylactic reaction was confirmed. We also describe the case of an anaphylactoid shock caused by cisatracurium infusion, that occurred at the beginning of an adnexectomy in a 55-year-old woman without any particular history. She presented with a cardiogenic shock after intravenous administration of epinephrine. The echocardiograpghic evaluation pointed out an aspect of stress-induced cardiomyopathy, and the coronarography showed normal coronary arteries. The left ventricular dysfunction completely normalized, strongly suggesting the diagnosis of Takotsubo-like syndrome after the anaphylactic shock and its treatment. Both of these cases point out the major interest of cardiologic and allergic evaluation in case of heart failure during general anesthesia. Coronary vasospasm and stress-induced cardiomyopathy are two pathologies that may be observed during anaphylactic shock, and their diagnosis should be considered after elimination of coronary thrombosis.

  3. Slow shocks and conduction fronts from Petschek reconnection of skewed magnetic fields: two-fluid effects

    CERN Document Server

    Longcope, D W

    2010-01-01

    In models of fast magnetic reconnection, flux transfer occurs within a small portion of a current sheet triggering stored magnetic energy to be thermalized by shocks. When the initial current sheet separates magnetic fields which are not perfectly anti-parallel, i.e. they are skewed, magnetic energy is first converted to bulk kinetic energy and then thermalized in slow magnetosonic shocks. We show that the latter resemble parallel shocks or hydrodynamic shocks for all skew angles except those very near the anti-parallel limit. As for parallel shocks, the structures of reconnection-driven slow shocks are best studied using two-fluid equations in which ions and electrons have independent temperature. Time-dependent solutions of these equations can be used to predict and understand the shocks from reconnection of skewed magnetic fields. The results differ from those found using a single-fluid model such as magnetohydrodynamics. In the two-fluid model electrons are heated indirectly and thus carry a heat flux alw...

  4. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy measurements of shocked liquid deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. E.; Knudson, M. D.; Carlson, A. L.; Dunham, G. S.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Hanson, D. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy has been used to measure the shock pressure steadiness, emissivity, and temperature of liquid deuterium shocked to 22-90 GPa. The shock was produced using magnetically accelerated flyer plate impact, and spectra were acquired with a suite of four fiber-optic-coupled spectrometers with streak camera detectors. The shock pressure changes by an average of -1.2% over the 10-30 ns cell transit time, determined from the relative changes in the shock front self-emission with time. The shock front reflectivity was measured from 5140Å and 5320Å laser light reflected from the D2 shock. The emissivity inferred from the reflectivity measurements was in reasonably good agreement with quantum molecular dynamics simulation predictions. The spectral radiance wavelength dependence was found to agree well (average normalized χ2=1.6 ) with a Planckian multiplied by the emissivity. The shock front temperature was determined from the emissivity and the wavelength-dependent shock self-emission. Thirty-seven temperature measurements spanning the 22-90 GPa range were accumulated. The large number of temperature measurements enables a comparison of the scatter in the data with expectations for a Gaussian distribution. This facilitates determination of uncertainties that incorporate both apparatus contributions and otherwise unquantified systematic effects that cause self-emission variations from one experiment to another. Agreement between temperatures determined from the absolute spectral radiance and from the relative shape of the spectrum further substantiates the absence of systematic biases. The weighted mean temperature uncertainties were as low as ±3-4% , enabling the discrimination between competing models for the D2 equation of state (EOS). The temperature results agree well with models that predict a maximum compression of ˜4.4 . Softer models that predict approximately sixfold compression are inconsistent with the data to a very high

  5. Initial NIF Shock Timing Experiments: Comparison with Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Giraldez, E.; Castro, C.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    Initial experiments are underway to demonstrate the techniques required to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) and DANTE. The results of these measurements will be used to set the precision pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  6. Blast shocks in quasi-two-dimensional supersonic granular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, J F; Cassagne, J; Kellay, H

    2009-11-27

    In a thin, dilute, and fast flowing granular layer, the impact of a small sphere generates a fast growing hole devoid of matter. The growth of this hole is studied in detail, and its dynamics is found to mimic that of blast shocks in gases. This dynamics can be decomposed into two stages: a fast initial stage (the blast) and a slower growth regime whose growth velocity is given by the speed of sound in the medium used. A simple model using ingredients already invoked for the case of blast shocks in gases but including the inelastic nature of collisions between grains accounts accurately for our results. The system studied here allows for a detailed study of the full dynamics of a blast as it relaxes from a strong to a weak shock and later to an acoustic disturbance.

  7. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92196 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  8. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, P. M.; Robey, H. F.; Boehly, T. R.; Alger, E.; Azevedo, S.; Berzins, L. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Bowers, M. W.; Brereton, S. J.; Callahan, D.; Castro, C.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Coffee, K. R.; Datte, P. S.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Dzenitis, E.; Edwards, M. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Fair, J.; Farley, D. R.; Frieders, G.; Gibson, C. R.; Giraldez, E.; Haan, S.; Haid, B.; Hamza, A. V.; Haynam, C.; Hicks, D. G.; Holunga, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Jancaitis, K.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D.; Kline, J. L.; Krauter, K. G.; Kroll, J. J.; LaFortune, K. N.; Le Pape, S.; Malsbury, T.; Mapoles, E. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moreno, K.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Parham, T.; Pollaine, S.; Radousky, H. B.; Ross, G. F.; Sater, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaw, M.; Smith, R. F.; Sterne, P. A.; Thomas, C. A.; Throop, A.; Town, R. P. J.; Trummer, D.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Walters, C. F.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C.; Young, B. K.; Atherton, L. J.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Moses, E. I.

    2013-11-01

    An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  9. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celliers P.M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  10. Prediction of shock arrival times from CME and flare data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Marlon; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the Shock Arrival Model (SARM) for predicting shock arrival times for distances from 0.72 AU to 8.7 AU by using coronal mass ejections (CME) and flare data. SARM is an aerodynamic drag model described by a differential equation that has been calibrated with a data set of 120 shocks observed from 1997 to 2010 by minimizing the mean absolute error (MAE), normalized to 1 AU. SARM should be used with CME data (radial, earthward, or plane-of-sky speeds) and flare data (peak flux, duration, and location). In the case of 1 AU, the MAE and the median of absolute errors were 7.0 h and 5.0 h, respectively, using the available CME/flare data. The best results for 1 AU (an MAE of 5.8 h) were obtained using both CME data, either radial or cone model-estimated speeds, and flare data. For the prediction of shock arrivals at distances from 0.72 AU to 8.7 AU, the normalized MAE and the median were 7.1 h and 5.1 h, respectively, using the available CME/flare data. SARM was also calibrated to be used with CME data alone or flare data alone, obtaining normalized MAE errors of 8.9 h and 8.6 h, respectively, for all shock events. The model verification was carried out with an additional data set of 20 shocks observed from 2010 to 2012 with radial CME speeds to compare SARM with the empirical ESA model and the numerical MHD-based ENLIL model. The results show that the ENLIL's MAE was lower than the SARM's MAE, which was lower than the ESA's MAE. The SARM's best results were obtained when both flare and true CME speeds were used.

  11. Nonstationarity of a two-dimensional perpendicular shock: Competing mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembège, Bertrand; Savoini, Philippe; Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2009-03-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are used for analyzing in detail different nonstationary behaviors of a perpendicular supercritical shock. A recent study by Hellinger et al. (2007) has shown that the front of a supercritical shock can be dominated by the emission of large-amplitude whistler waves. These waves inhibit the self-reformation driven by the reflected ions; then, the shock front appears almost ``quasi-stationary.'' The present study stresses new complementary results. First, for a fixed β i value, the whistler waves emission (WWE) persists for high M A above a critical Mach number (i.e., M A >= M A WWE). The quasi-stationarity is only apparent and disappears when considering the full 3-D field profiles. Second, for lower M A , the self-reformation is retrieved and becomes dominant as the amplitude of the whistler waves becomes negligible. Third, there exists a transition regime in M A within which both processes compete each other. Fourth, these results are observed for a strictly perpendicular shock only as B 0 is within the simulation plane. When B 0 is out of the simulation plane, no whistler waves emission is evidenced and only self-reformation is recovered. Fifth, the occurrence and disappearance of the nonlinear whistler waves are well recovered in both 2-D PIC and 2-D hybrid simulations. The impacts on the results of the mass ratio (2-D PIC simulations), of the resistivity and spatial resolution (2-D hybrid simulations), and of the size of the simulation box along the shock front are analyzed in detail.

  12. The role of interplanetary shock orientation on SC/SI rise time and geoeffectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumaran, R.; Veenadhari, B.; Ebihara, Y.; Kumar, Sandeep; Prasad, D. S. V. V. D.

    2017-03-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks interact with the Earth's magnetosphere, resulting in compression of the magnetosphere which in turn increases the Earth's magnetic field termed as Sudden commencement/Sudden impulse (SC/SI). Apart from IP shock speed and solar wind dynamic pressure, IP shock orientation angle also plays a major role in deciding the SC rise time. In the present study, the IP shock orientation angle and SC/SI rise time for 179 IP shocks are estimated which occurred during solar cycle 23. More than 50% of the Shock orientations are in the range of 140°-160°. The SC/SI rise time decreases with the increase in the orientation angle and IP shock speed. In this work, the type of IP shocks i.e., Radio loud (RL) and Radio quiet (RQ) are examined in connection with SC/SI rise time. The RL associated IP shock speeds show a better correlation than RQ shocks with SC/SI rise time irrespective of the orientation angle. Magnetic Cloud (MC) associated shocks dominate in producing less rise time when compared to Ejecta (EJ) shocks. Magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are used for three different IP shock orientation categories to see the importance of orientation angle in determining the geoeffectiveness. Simulations results reveal that shocks hitting parallel to the magnetosphere are more geoeffective as compared to oblique shocks by means of change in magnetic field, pressure and Field Aligned Current (FAC).

  13. Surface Ship Shock Modeling and Simulation: Two-Dimensional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young S. Shin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling and simulation of the response of a surface ship system to underwater explosion requires an understanding of many different subject areas. These include the process of underwater explosion events, shock wave propagation, explosion gas bubble behavior and bubble-pulse loading, bulk and local cavitation, free surface effect, fluid-structure interaction, and structural dynamics. This paper investigates the effects of fluid-structure interaction and cavitation on the response of a surface ship using USA-NASTRAN-CFA code. First, the one-dimensional Bleich-Sandler model is used to validate the approach, and second, the underwater shock response of a two-dimensional mid-section model of a surface ship is predicted with a surrounding fluid model using a constitutive equation of a bilinear fluid which does not allow transmission of negative pressures.

  14. Empirical estimation of the arrival time of ICME Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Mosalam

    Empirical estimation of the arrival time of ICME Shocks Mosalam Shaltout1 ,M.Youssef 1and R.Mawad2 1 National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG) ,Helwan -Cairo-Egypt Email: mosalamshaltout@hotmail.com 2 Faculty of Science-Monifiia University-Physics Department-Shiben Al-Koum -Monifiia-Egypt We are got the Data of the SSC events from Preliminary Reports of the ISGI (Institut de Physique du Globe, France) .Also we are selected the same CME interval 1996-2005 from SOHO/LASCO/C2.We have estimated the arrival time of ICME shocks during solar cycle 23rd (1996-2005), we take the Sudden storm commencement SSC as a indicator of the arrival of CMEs at the Earth's Magnetosphere (ICME).Under our model ,we selected 203 ICME shock-SSC associated events, we got an imperial relation between CME velocity and their travel time, from which we obtained high correlation between them, R=0.75.

  15. Experimental evidence for collisional shock formation via two obliquely merging supersonic plasma jets

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Elizabeth C; Hsu, Scott C; Adams, Colin S; Gilmore, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    We report spatially resolved experimental measurements of the oblique merging of two supersonic laboratory plasma jets. The jets are formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns using injected argon, and have electron density $\\sim 10^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$, electron temperature $\\approx 1.4$ eV, ionization fraction near unity, and velocity $\\approx 40$ km/s just prior to merging. The jet merging produces a few-cm-thick stagnation layer, as observed in both fast-framing camera images and multi-chord interferometer data, consistent with collisional shock formation [E. C. Merritt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 085003 (2013)]. The observed stagnation layer emission morphology is consistent with hydrodynamic oblique shock theory at early times, and then undergoes an evolution at later times that is coincident with the theoretically predicted transition to detached shock formation.

  16. Interaction of shock waves in gas dynamics: Uniform in time asymptotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. García-Alvarado

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We construct a uniform in time asymptotics describing the interaction of two isothermal shock waves with opposite directions of motion. We show that any smooth regularization of the problem implies the realization of the stable scenario of interaction.

  17. Results from Direct-Drive Shock-Timing Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, P. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Dixit, S.

    2016-10-01

    The timing of multiple shocks is critical to set an inertial confinement capsule on a desired adiabat. Several factors including laser-energy deposition, heat conduction, and equation of state determine the adiabat of the compressing shell. Dual-axis cone-in-shell experiments, performed with plastic, (CH) shells and solid spheres, are used to diagnose the first shock velocity and the catch up of subsequent shocks at the National Ignition Facility. The shocks are launched with multiple pickets, expected to be used in ignition-relevant designs, at two different intensities. In separate experiments, continuous pulse shapes are also diagnosed. The measurements are compared to two-dimensional DRACO simulations that include the effects of nonlocal heat transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and the first-principles equation of state of CH. Designs that could potentially diagnose late-time energy coupling through shocks are also presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Time-dependent pressure distribution in microstructured shocked materials using fluorescent dye probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Christensen, James M.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    We have used fluorescent probes for time-resolved microscopy of shocked particulate media. By embedding rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye in silica nano- and micro-particles, we have created superemissive ultrafast pressure probes. We used silica-embedded dye particles to obtain stroboscopic fluorescence images of shocked sand-like media. Shock effects on microstructured media and micropressure distributions can be determined from shock-induced emission intensity loss, with high time and space resolution.

  19. Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock can be caused by any condition that reduces blood flow, including: Heart problems (such as heart attack or heart failure ) Low blood volume (as with heavy bleeding or dehydration ) Changes in blood vessels (as with infection ...

  20. Climate Shocks and the Timing of Migration from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrotzki, Raphael J; DeWaard, Jack

    2016-09-01

    Although evidence is increasing that climate shocks influence human migration, it is unclear exactly when people migrate after a climate shock. A climate shock might be followed by an immediate migration response. Alternatively, migration, as an adaptive strategy of last resort, might be delayed and employed only after available in-situ (in-place) adaptive strategies are exhausted. In this paper, we explore the temporally lagged association between a climate shock and future migration. Using multilevel event-history models, we analyze the risk of Mexico-U.S. migration over a seven-year period after a climate shock. Consistent with a delayed response pattern, we find that the risk of migration is low immediately after a climate shock and increases as households pursue and cycle through in-situ adaptive strategies available to them. However, about three years after the climate shock, the risk of migration decreases, suggesting that households are eventually successful in adapting in-situ.

  1. A Global Solution to a Two-dimensional Riemann Problem Involving Shocks as Free Boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxi Zheng

    2003-01-01

    We present a global solution to a Riemann problem for the pressure gradient system of equations.The Riemann problem has initially two shock waves and two contact discontinuities. The angle between the two shock waves is set initially to be close to 180 degrees. The solution has a shock wave that is usually regarded as a free boundary in the self-similar variable plane. Our main contribution in methodology is handling the tangential oblique derivative boundary values.

  2. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temporal, M., E-mail: mauro.temporal@hotmail.com [Centre de Mathématiques et de Leurs Applications, ENS Cachan and CNRS, 61 Av. du President Wilson, F-94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Canaud, B. [CEA, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Garbett, W. J. [AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Ramis, R. [ETSI Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front.

  3. Parallel implementation of geometrical shock dynamics for two dimensional converging shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shi; Liu, Kuang; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-10-01

    Geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) theory is an appealing method to predict the shock motion in the sense that it is more computationally efficient than solving the traditional Euler equations, especially for converging shock waves. However, to solve and optimize large scale configurations, the main bottleneck is the computational cost. Among the existing numerical GSD schemes, there is only one that has been implemented on parallel computers, with the purpose to analyze detonation waves. To extend the computational advantage of the GSD theory to more general applications such as converging shock waves, a numerical implementation using a spatial decomposition method has been coupled with a front tracking approach on parallel computers. In addition, an efficient tridiagonal system solver for massively parallel computers has been applied to resolve the most expensive function in this implementation, resulting in an efficiency of 0.93 while using 32 HPCC cores. Moreover, symmetric boundary conditions have been developed to further reduce the computational cost, achieving a speedup of 19.26 for a 12-sided polygonal converging shock.

  4. Time fractional effect on ion acoustic shock waves in ion-pair plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahed, H. G., E-mail: hgomaa-eg@hotmail.com [Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Physics Department (Saudi Arabia); El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, A. A. [Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The nonlinear properties of ion acoustic shock waves are studied. The Burgers equation is derived and converted into the time fractional Burgers equation by Agrawal’s method. Using the Adomian decomposition method, shock wave solutions of the time fractional Burgers equation are constructed. The effect of the time fractional parameter on the shock wave properties in ion-pair plasma is investigated. The results obtained may be important in investigating the broadband electrostatic shock noise in D- and F-regions of Earth’s ionosphere.

  5. Shock formation in magnetised electron-positron plasmas: mechanism and timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Bret, A.; Sinha, U.

    2016-10-01

    The shock formation process in electron-positron pair plasmas is investigated in the presence of an ambient perpendicular magnetic field. In initially unmagnetised plasmas, which are dominated by the Weibel or filamentation instability, the shock formation time is a multiple of the saturation time of the linear instability. While in weakly magnetised plasmas the mechanism is still the same, higher magnetisations induce synchrotron maser modes such that the shock formation is dominated by magnetic reflection. As a consequence the formation times are reduced. The focus is on the detailed picture of the particle kinetics, in which the transition between Weibel and magneto-hydrodynamic shocks can be clearly identified.

  6. Eigenvalue approach on a two-dimensional thermal shock problem with weak, normal and strong conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Faris S.; Abbas, Ibrahim A.

    2016-08-01

    The present paper is devoted to the study of a two-dimensional thermal shock problem with weak, normal and strong conductivity using the eigenvalue approach. The governing equations are taken in the context of the new consideration of heat conduction with fractional order generalized thermoelasticity with the Lord-Shulman model (LS model). The bounding surface of the half-space is taken to be traction free and subjected to a time-dependent thermal shock. The Laplace and the exponential Fourier transform techniques are used to obtain the analytical solutions in the transformed domain by the eigenvalue approach. Numerical computations have been done for copper-like material for weak, normal and strong conductivity and the results are presented graphically to estimate the effects of the fractional order parameter.

  7. Microstructure in two- and three-dimensional hybrid simulations of perpendicular collisionless shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, David; Hellinger, Petr; Gingell, Imogen; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2016-08-01

    Supercritical collisionless perpendicular shocks have an average macrostructure determined primarily by the dynamics of ions specularly reflected at the magnetic ramp. Within the overall macrostructure, instabilities, both linear and nonlinear, generate fluctuations and microstructure. To identify the sources of such microstructure, high-resolution two- and three-dimensional simulations have been carried out using the hybrid method, wherein the ions are treated as particles and the electron response is modelled as a massless fluid. We confirm the results of earlier two-dimensional (2-D) simulations showing both field-parallel aligned propagating fluctuations and fluctuations carried by the reflected-gyrating ions. In addition, it is shown that, for 2-D simulations of the shock coplanarity plane, the presence of short-wavelength fluctuations in all magnetic components is associated with the ion Weibel instability driven at the upstream edge of the foot by the reflected-gyrating ions. In 3-D simulations we show for the first time that the dominant microstructure is due to a coupling between field-parallel propagating fluctuations in the ramp and the motion of the reflected ions. This results in a pattern of fluctuations counter-propagating across the surface of the shock at an angle inclined to the magnetic field direction, due to a combination of field-parallel motion at the Alfvén speed of the ramp and motion in the sense of gyration of the reflected ions.

  8. Punishment of an extinguishing shock-avoidance response by time-out from positive reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, M R

    1966-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of punishment by time-out from positive reinforcement on the extinction of discriminated shock-avoidance responding. Subjects were trained initially to bar press for food on an intermittent schedule of reinforcement and, concurrently, to avoid shock at the onset of a warning signal. Experiment I compared avoidance extinction performance under no punishment and when avoidance responding resulted in a 30-sec TO from reinforced appetitive responding. In Exp II, the contingent use of TO punishment was compared with its random, or noncontingent use. The results of both experiments showed that in the absence of punishment, avoidance extinction was characterized by short latencies and nearly 100% avoidance responding. Avoidance responding in extinction was little affected by noncontingent TO punishment. When TO was made contingent upon avoidance responding, however, avoidance latencies immediately increased and the frequency of avoidance responses subsequently decreased to zero.

  9. Shock Induced Shear Strength in Two HMX Based Polymer Bonded Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Jeremy; Taylor, Peter; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth

    2015-06-01

    The response of energetic materials to shock loading has largely concentrated on their detonation behaviour. However, they can also be considered to be structural materials in their own right, and hence their response to a purely mechanical shock loading is also of interest. Therefore we present results from two HMX based polymer bonded explosives, EDC37 and EDC32, where we investigate the shock induced shear strength behind the shock front. Results are discussed in terms of microstructure and differences of the binder phases.

  10. Improvements of the shock arrival times at the Earth model STOA

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, H -L

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of the shocks' arrival times (SATs) at the Earth is very important for space weather forecast. There is a well-known SAT model, STOA, which is widely used in the space weather forecast. However, the shock transit time from STOA model usually has a relative large error compared to the real measurements. In addition, STOA tends to yield too much `yes' prediction, which causes a large number of false alarms. Therefore, in this work, we work on the modification of STOA model. First, we give a new method to calculate the shock transit time by modifying the way to use the solar wind speed in STOA model. Second, we develop new criteria for deciding whether the shock will arrive at the Earth with the help of the sunspot numbers and the angle distances of the flare events. It is shown that our work can improve the SATs prediction significantly, especially the prediction of flare events without shocks arriving at the Earth.

  11. Time-resolved study of laser initiated shock wave propagation in superfluid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Allan; Buelna, Xavier; Popov, Evgeny; Eloranta, Jussi

    2016-09-01

    Intense shock waves in superfluid 4He between 1.7 and 2.1 K are generated by rapidly expanding confined plasma from laser ablation of a metal target immersed in the liquid. The resulting shock fronts in the liquid with initial velocities up to ca. Mach 10 are visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography. These high intensity shocks decay within 500 ns into less energetic shock waves traveling at Mach 2, which have their lifetime in the microsecond time scale. Based on the analysis using the classical Rankine-Hugoniot theory, the shock fronts created remain in the solid phase up to 1 μs and the associated thermodynamic state appears outside the previously studied region. The extrapolated initial shock pressure of 0.5 GPa is comparable to typical plasma pressures produced during liquid phase laser ablation. A secondary shock originating from fast heat propagation on the metal surface is also observed and a lower limit estimate for the heat propagation velocity is measured as 7 × 104 m/s. In the long-time limit, the high intensity shocks turn into liquid state waves that propagate near the speed of sound.

  12. Single-shot Raman spectroscopy and time-resolved reflectivity of a shocked TATB-based explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Philippe; Saint-Amans, Charles; Doucet, Michel; de Resseguier, Thibaut

    2015-06-01

    Single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiments under shockwave loading were performed in order to get information on the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a TATB-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects on the H-bonding network present in TATB. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Time-resolved reflectivity measurements under shock compression seem to indicate that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  13. EFFECT OF DIGITAL BLOCK ON SPAO2, LAG TIME AND HEIGHT OF PLETHYSMOGRAPHIC WAYE OF PULSE OXIMETER BY SIMULATED SHOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K TAVAKKOL

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulse oximetry is impaired by hypotention and peripheral vasoconstriction. Digital block may cause to increase tissue perfusion and improve the parameters of pulse oximetry. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of digital block on SPa02, lag time and height of plethysmographic wave of pulse oximeter by simulated shock in upper extrimity. Methods. In an experimental study, 34 Paitents under general anesthesia and elective surgery were selected. Lag time and height of pletysmographic wave and SPa02 had been measured in two fingers shocked by cooling, elevation of hand and inflation of cuff; then, compared to opposite middle finger as control. shocked Middle finger were blocked by lidocaine 2% and these parameters were measured in the 15th and 20th minutes after digital block. Data analysis was performed by SPSS using ANOVA. Results. Mean height of plethysmographic wave in blocked finger was signihcontly taller than shocked and control fingers in the 15th minute (respectively, 16.9±6, 10.8 ± 4. 3,10.7 ± 4.3, P < 0.05 and the 20th minute afters digital block (21.1 ± 5.8, 11.8 ± 4.3, 11.2 ± 3.9, P < 0.05. There were not significalt differences between three fingers in lag time and SPa02. Discussion. This study documents effect of digital block, undergoing shock condition in improving the parameters of pulse oximetry.

  14. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the dra...

  15. A cylindrical converging shock tube for shock-interface studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xisheng; Si, Ting; Yang, Jiming; Zhai, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    A shock tube facility for generating a cylindrical converging shock wave is developed in this work. Based on the shock dynamics theory, a specific wall profile is designed for the test section of the shock tube to transfer a planar shock into a cylindrical one. The shock front in the converging part obtained from experiment presents a perfect circular shape, which proves the feasibility and reliability of the method. The time variations of the shock strength obtained from numerical simulation, experiment, and theoretical estimation show the desired converging effect in the shock tube test section. Particular emphasis is then placed on the problem of shock-interface interaction induced by cylindrical converging shock waves. For this purpose, membrane-less gas cylinder is adopted to form the interface between two different fluids while the laser sheet technique to visualize the flow field. The result shows that it is convenient to perform such experiments in this facility.

  16. A New Prediction Method for the Arrival Time of Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xueshang; Zhao, Xinhua

    2006-10-01

    Solar transient activities such as solar flares, disappearing filaments, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are solar manifestations of interplanetary (IP) disturbances. Forecasting the arrival time at the near Earth space of the associated interplanetary shocks following these solar disturbances is an important aspect in space weather forecasting because the shock arrival usually marks the geomagnetic storm sudden commencement (SSC) when the IMF Bz component is appropriately southward and/or the solar wind dynamic pressure behind the shock is sufficiently large. Combining the analytical study for the propagation of the blast wave from a point source in a moving, steady-state, medium with variable density (wei, 1982; wei and dryer 1991) with the energy estimation method in the ISPM model (smith and dryer 1990, 1995), we present a new shock propagation model (called SPM below) for predicting the arrival time of interplanetary shocks at Earth. The duration of the X-ray flare, the initial shock speed and the total energy of the transient event are used for predicting the arrival of the associated shocks in our model. Especially, the background speed, i.e., the convection effect of the solar wind is considered in this model. Applying this model to 165 solar events during the periods of January 1979 to October 1989 and February 1997 to August 2002, we found that our model could be practically equivalent to the prevalent models of STOA, ISPM and HAFv.2 in forecasting the shock arrival time. The absolute error in the transit time in our model is not larger than those of the other three models for the same sample events. Also, the prediction test shows that the relative error of our model is ≤10% for 27.88% of all events, ≤30% for 71.52%, and ≤50% for 85.46%, which is comparable to the relative errors of the other models. These results might demonstrate a potential capability of our model in terms of real-time forecasting.

  17. Probing Shock Breakout with Serendipitous GALEX Detections of Two SNLS Type II-P Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gezari, Suvi; Basa, Stephane; Martin, D Chris; Neill, James D; Woosley, S E; Hillier, D John; Astier, Pierre; Balam, Dave; Balland, Christophe; Bazin, Gurvan; Carlberg, Ray; Conley, Alex; Forster, Karl; Fouchez, Dominique; Friedman, Peter G; Guy, Julien; Hardin, Delphine; Hook, Isobel; Howell, D Andrew; Du, Jeremy Le; Lidman, Chris; Mazure, Alain; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris; Regnault, Nicolas; Schiminovich, David; Sullivan, Mark; Wyder, Ted K

    2008-01-01

    We report the serendipitous detection by GALEX of fast ( 1 mag) UV emission from two Type II Plateau (II-P) supernovae (SNe) at z=0.185 and 0.324 discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). Optical photometry and VLT spectroscopy 2 weeks after the GALEX detections link the onset of UV emission to the time of shock breakout. Using radiation hydrodymanics and non-LTE radiative transfer simulations, and starting from a standard red supergiant (RSG; Type II-P SN progenitor) star evolved self-consistently from the main sequence to iron core collapse, we model the shock breakout phase and the 55 hours that follow. Although our one-temperature treatment prevents us from modeling the radiative precursor, the small RSG atmospheric scale height suggests a < 2000 s duration. A duration of many hours would require an extended low-density envelope, incompatible with our RSG envelope structure. In our model, the breakout signature is a luminous (M_FUV ~ -20) thermal < 1 hr-long soft X-ray burst (lambda_peak ~ 9...

  18. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex.

  19. Time-resolved lattice measurements of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milathianaki, Despina

    The response of materials under extreme temperature and pressure conditions is a topic of great significance because of its relevance in astrophysics, geophysics, and inertial confinement fusion. In recent years, environments exceeding several hundred gigapascals in pressure have been produced in the laboratory via laser-based dynamic loading techniques. Shock-loading is of particular interest as the shock provides a fiducial for measuring time-dependent processes in the lattice such as phase transitions. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction is the only technique that offers an insight into these shock-induced processes at the relevant spatial (atomic) and temporal scales. In this study, nanosecond resolution x-ray diffraction techniques were developed and implemented towards the study of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials. More specifically, the capability of a focusing x-ray diffraction geometry in high-resolution in situ lattice measurements was demonstrated by probing shock-compressed Cu and amorphous metallic glass samples. In addition, simultaneous lattice and free surface velocity measurements of shock-compressed Mg in the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) and shock-induced body centered cubic (bcc) phases between 12 and 45 GPa were performed. These measurements revealed x-ray diffraction signals consistent with a compressed bcc lattice above a shock pressure of 26.2+/-1.3 GPa, thus capturing for the first time direct lattice evidence of a shock-induced hcp to bcc phase transition in Mg. Our measurement of the hcp-bcc phase boundary in Mg was found to be consistent with the calculated boundary from generalized pseudopotential theory in the pressure and temperature region intersected by the principal shock Hugoniot. Furthermore, the subnanosecond timescale of the phase transition implied by the shock-loading conditions was in agreement with the kinetics of a martensitic transformation. In conclusion, we report on the progress and

  20. Shocks and finite-time singularities in Hele-Shaw flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodorescu, Razvan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiegmann, P [UNIV OF MONTREAL; Lee, S-y [UNIV OF CHICAGO

    2008-01-01

    Hele-Shaw flow at vanishing surface tension is ill-defined. In finite time, the flow develops cusplike singularities. We show that the ill-defined problem admits a weak dispersive solution when singularities give rise to a graph of shock waves propagating in the viscous fluid. The graph of shocks grows and branches. Velocity and pressure jump across the shock. We formulate a few simple physical principles which single out the dispersive solution and interpret shocks as lines of decompressed fluid. We also formulate the dispersive solution in algebro-geometrical terms as an evolution of Krichever-Boutroux complex curve. We study in details the most generic (2,3) cusp singularity which gives rise to an elementary branching event. This solution is self-similar and expressed in terms of elliptic functions.

  1. Time dependent diffusive shock acceleration and its application to middle aged supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Xiaping

    2016-01-01

    Recent gamma-ray observations show that middle aged supernova remnants (SNRs) interacting with molecular clouds (MCs) can be sources of both GeV and TeV emission. Based on the MC association, two scenarios have been proposed to explain the observed gamma-ray emission. In one, energetic cosmic ray (CR) particles escape from the SNR and then illuminate nearby MCs, producing gamma-ray emission, while the other involves direct interaction between the SNR and MC. In the direct interaction scenario, re-acceleration of pre-existing CRs in the ambient medium is investigated while particles injected from the thermal pool are neglected in view of the slow shock speeds in middle aged SNRs. However, standard diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) theory produces a steady state particle spectrum that is too flat compared to observations, which suggests that the high energy part of the observed spectrum has not yet reached a steady state. We derive a time dependent DSA solution in the test particle limit for re-acceleration of...

  2. Impact of the Timing of Morphine Administration on Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Lethal Endotoxic Shock in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Tomoko; Kato, Hidehito; Ozaki, Makoto; Yagi, Junji

    2016-05-01

    Sepsis is a serious condition related to systemic inflammation, organ dysfunction, and organ failure. It is a subset of the cytokine storm caused by dysregulation of cytokine production. Morphine influences the severity of infection in vivo and in vitro because it regulates cytokine production. We investigated the immunological function of morphine using a mouse model of septic shock. We treated mice with α-galactosylceramide (2 μg/mouse) to induce lethal endotoxic shock following a challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1.5 μg/mouse). This model represents acute lung injury and respiratory failure, and reflects the clinical features of severe septic shock. We evaluated the effect of the timing of morphine (0.8 mg/mouse) administration on the survival rate, cytokine production in vivo, and histological changes of mice with LPS-mediated lethal endotoxic shock. Morphine treatment before LPS challenge suppressed lethal endotoxic shock. In contrast, when we administered after LPS, morphine exacerbated lethal endotoxic shock; hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed a marked increase in the accumulation of infiltrates comprising polymorphonuclear leukocytes and mononuclear cells in the lung; and Elastica van Gieson staining revealed the destruction of alveoli. The plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, monocyte-chemotactic protein-1, and interleukin-12 in the group treated with morphine after LPS challenge were higher than those treated with morphine before LPS challenge. In conclusion, one of the factors that determine whether morphine exacerbates or inhibits infection is the timing of its administration. Morphine treatment before shock improved the survival rate, and morphine treatment after shock decreased the rate of survival.

  3. Time-dependent MHD shocks and line intensity ratios in the HH 30 jet: A focus on cooling function and numerical resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Tesileanu, O; Mignone, A; Bodo, G; Bacciotti, F

    2009-01-01

    The coupling between time-dependent, multidimensional MHD numerical codes and radiative line emission is of utmost importance in the studies of the interplay between dynamical and radiative processes in many astrophysical environments, with particular interest for problems involving radiative shocks. There is a widespread consensus that line emitting knots observed in Herbig-Haro jets can be interpreted as radiative shocks. In this paper we address two different aspects relevant to the time-dependent calculations of the line intensity ratios of forbidden transitions, resulting from the excitation by planar, time-dependent radiative shocks traveling in a stratified medium. The first one concerns the impact of the radiation and ionization processes included in the cooling model, and the second one the effects of the numerical grid resolution. In this paper we apply the AMR methodology to the treatment of radiating shocks and show how this method is able to vastly reduce the integration time. The technique is ap...

  4. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  5. When Do Internal Shocks End and External Shocks Begin? Early-Time Broadband Modelling of GRB 051111

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, N R; Perley, D; Huang, K Y; Urata, Y; Prochaska, J X; Bloom, J S; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Kocevski, D; Chen, H W; Qiu, Y; Kuo, P H; Huang, F Y; Ip, W H; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Tashiro, M; Makishima, K; Nishihara, S; Sarugaku, Y

    2006-01-01

    Even with the renaissance in gamma-ray burst (GRB) research fostered by the Swift satellite, few bursts have both contemporaneous observations at long wavelengths and exquisite observations at later times across the electromagnetic spectrum. We present here contemporaneous imaging with the KAIT robotic optical telescope, dense optical sampling with Lulin, and supplemented with infrared data from PAIRITEL and radio to gamma-ray data from the literature. For the first time, we can test the constancy of microphysical parameters in the internal-external shock paradigm and carefully trace the flow of energy from the GRB to the surrounding medium. KAIT data taken 10^21 cm^-2), indicate a low dust-to-metals ratio and a possible over-abundance of the light metals. An apparent small ratio of total to selective extinction (R_V~ 2) and time constancy of both optical and X-ray spectra argue against dust destruction by the GRB itself.

  6. Well-posed Euler model of shock-induced two-phase flow in bubbly liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukhvatullina, R. R.; Frolov, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    A well-posed mathematical model of non-isothermal two-phase two-velocity flow of bubbly liquid is proposed. The model is based on the two-phase Euler equations with the introduction of an additional pressure at the gas bubble surface, which ensures the well-posedness of the Cauchy problem for a system of governing equations with homogeneous initial conditions, and the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for radial pulsations of gas bubbles. The applicability conditions of the model are formulated. The model is validated by comparing one-dimensional calculations of shock wave propagation in liquids with gas bubbles with a gas volume fraction of 0.005-0.3 with experimental data. The model is shown to provide satisfactory results for the shock propagation velocity, pressure profiles, and the shock-induced motion of the bubbly liquid column.

  7. Transient bond scission of polytetrafluoroethylene under laser-induced shock compression studied by nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazutaka; Wakabayashi, Kunihiko; Konodo, Ken-Ichi

    2001-06-01

    Nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy has been performed to study polymer films, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), under laser driven shock compression at laser power density of 4.0 GW/cm^2. The overtone-mode line of PTFE showed red shift (18 cm-1) at delay time of 9.3 ns due to the shock compression and corresponding pressure was estimated to be approximately 2.7 GPa by analyzing static and shock compression data. The estimated pressure was in good agreement with that estimated by ablation pressure in glass-confined geometry. A new vibrational line at 1900 cm-1 appeared only under shock compression and was assigned to the C=C streching in transient species such as a monomer (C_2F_4) produced by the shock-induced bond scission. Intensity of the new line increased with increasing delay time along propagation of the shock compression with a shock velocity of 2.5 km/s.

  8. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of shock-wave induced decomposition in cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) crystals: anisotropic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Nhan C; Dreger, Zbigniew A; Gupta, Yogendra M; Hooks, Daniel E

    2010-11-04

    Plate impact experiments on the (210), (100), and (111) planes were performed to examine the role of crystalline anisotropy on the shock-induced decomposition of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) crystals. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy was used to probe the decomposition of single crystals shocked to peak stresses ranging between 7 and 20 GPa. Emission produced by decomposition intermediates was analyzed in terms of induction time to emission, emission intensity, and the emission spectra shapes as a function of stress and time. Utilizing these features, we found that the shock-induced decomposition of RDX crystals exhibits considerable anisotropy. Crystals shocked on the (210) and (100) planes were more sensitive to decomposition than crystals shocked on the (111) plane. The possible sources of the observed anisotropy are discussed with regard to the inelastic deformation mechanisms of shocked RDX. Our results suggest that, despite the anisotropy observed for shock initiation, decomposition pathways for all three orientations are similar.

  9. Timing, method and discontinuation of hydrocortisone administration for septic shock patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Estrada, Miguel A; Chávez-Peña, Quetzalcóatl; Reynoso-Estrella, Claudia I; Rios-Zermeño, Jorge; Aguilera-González, Pável E; García-Soto, Miguel A; Aguirre-Avalos, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    AIM To characterize the prescribing patterns for hydrocortisone for patients with septic shock and perform an exploratory analysis in order to identify the variables associated with better outcomes. METHODS This prospective cohort study included 59 patients with septic shock who received stress-dose hydrocortisone. It was performed at 2 critical care units in academic hospitals from June 1st, 2015, to July 31st, 2016. Demographic data, comorbidities, medical management details, adverse effects related to corticosteroids, and outcomes were collected after the critical care physician indicated initiation of hydrocortisone. Univariate comparison between continuous and bolus administration of hydrocortisone was performed, including multivariate analysis, as well as Kaplan-Meier analysis to compare the proportion of shock reversal at 7 d after presentation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves determined the best cut-off criteria for initiation of hydrocortisone associated with the highest probability of shock reversal. We addressed the effects of the taper strategy for discontinuation of hydrocortisone, noting risk of shock relapse and adverse effects. RESULTS All-cause 30-d mortality was 42%. Hydrocortisone was administered as a continuous infusion in 54.2% of patients; time to reversal of shock was 49 h longer in patients who were given a bolus administration [59 h (range, 47.5-90.5) vs 108 h (range, 63.2-189); P = 0.001]. The maximal dose of norepinephrine after initiation of hydrocortisone was lower in patients on continuous infusion [0.19 μg/kg per minute (range, 0.11-0.28 μg)] compared with patients who were given bolus [0.34 μg/kg per minute (range, 0.16-0.49); P = 0.004]. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a higher proportion of shock reversal at 7 d in patients with continuous infusion compared to those given bolus (83% vs 63%; P = 0.004). There was a good correlation between time to initiation of hydrocortisone and time to reversal of shock (r = 0

  10. Mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates: Shock tube ignition delay time measurements and chemical kinetic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    AlRamadan, Abdullah S.

    2015-10-01

    The demand for fuels with high anti-knock quality has historically been rising, and will continue to increase with the development of downsized and turbocharged spark-ignition engines. Butanol isomers, such as 2-butanol and tert-butanol, have high octane ratings (RON of 105 and 107, respectively), and thus mixed butanols (68.8% by volume of 2-butanol and 31.2% by volume of tert-butanol) can be added to the conventional petroleum-derived gasoline fuels to improve octane performance. In the present work, the effect of mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates has been investigated in a high-pressure shock tube facility. The ignition delay times of mixed butanols stoichiometric mixtures were measured at 20 and 40bar over a temperature range of 800-1200K. Next, 10vol% and 20vol% of mixed butanols (MB) were blended with two different toluene/n-heptane/iso-octane (TPRF) fuel blends having octane ratings of RON 90/MON 81.7 and RON 84.6/MON 79.3. These MB/TPRF mixtures were investigated in the shock tube conditions similar to those mentioned above. A chemical kinetic model was developed to simulate the low- and high-temperature oxidation of mixed butanols and MB/TPRF blends. The proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data with some deviations at low temperatures. The effect of mixed butanols addition to TPRFs is marginal when examining the ignition delay times at high temperatures. However, when extended to lower temperatures (T < 850K), the model shows that the mixed butanols addition to TPRFs causes the ignition delay times to increase and hence behaves like an octane booster at engine-like conditions. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  11. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional fluid flow with strong shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, P.; Colella, P.

    1984-04-01

    Results of an extensive comparison of numerical methods for simulating hydrodynamics are presented and discussed. This study focuses on the simulation of fluid flows with strong shocks in two dimensions. By ''strong shocks,'' we here refer to shocks in which there is substantial entropy production. For the case of shocks in air, we therefore refer to Mach numbers of three and greater. For flows containing such strong shocks we find that a careful treatment of flow discontinuities is of greatest importance in obtaining accurate numerical results. Three aproaches to treating discontinuities in the flow are discussed-artificial viscosity, blending of low- and high-order-accurate fluxes, and the use of nonlinear solutions to Riemann's problem. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach are discussed and illustrated by computed results for three test problems. In this comparison we have focused our attention entirely upon the performance of schemes for differencing the hydrodynamic equations. We have regarded the nature of the grid upon which such differencing schemes are applied as an independent issue outside the scope of this work. Therefore we have restricted our study to the case of uniform, square computational zones in Cartesian coordinates. For simplicity we have further restricted our attention to two-dimensional difference schemes which are built out of symmetrized products of one-dimensional difference operators.

  12. Two Types of Whistler Instabilities in the Foot of Quasi-perpendicular Supercritical Shocks: a Poynting Flux Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschietti, L.; Lembege, B.

    2016-12-01

    Supercritical shocks in collisionless plasmas are characterized by a substantial population of ions reflected off of the steep shock ramp. These ions carry a significant amount of energy and are fundamental to the transformation of directed kinetic energy into thermal energy. For quasi-perpendicular geometries and as seen in the normal incidence frame (NIF), the velocity of the reflected ions is mostly directed at 90o to the magnetic field Bo. Streaming instabilities can develop, which are excited by the relative drifts between incoming ions, reflected ions, and electrons across the shock's foot. Two types of waves from the whistler branch and with frequencies in the lower-hybrid range are shown to be unstable:Oblique waves with wavelengths a fraction of the ion inertia length that propagate toward upstream at angles about 50o to Bo. Quasi-perpendicular waves with wavelengths several times the electron inertia length that propagate toward downstream at angles larger than 80o to Bo. For each type of whistlers we perform electromagnetic pseudo-oblique 1D PIC simulations. These are carried out in the proper frame where the total momentum density vanishes. Field data issued from the simulations are used to construct hodograms and compute the Poynting fluxes. We apply the Lorentz transformation in order to express the results in the NIF, where they can be discussed and compared to measurements from Cluster at Earth's bow shock [Sundkvist D, et al., PRL 108, 2012].

  13. Time-dependent Diffusive Shock Acceleration in Slow Supernova Remnant Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Xiaping

    2014-01-01

    Recent gamma ray observations show that middle aged supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds can be sources of both GeV and TeV emission. Models involving re-acceleration of pre-existing cosmic rays in the ambient medium and direct interaction between supernova remnant and molecular clouds have been proposed to explain the observed gamma ray emission. For the re-acceleration process, standard DSA theory in the test particle limit produces a steady state particle spectrum that is too flat compared to observations, which suggests that the high energy part of the observed spectrum has not yet reached a steady state. We derive a time dependent DSA solution in the test particle limit for situations involving re-acceleration of pre-existing cosmic rays in the preshock medium. Simple estimates with our time dependent DSA solution plus a molecular cloud interaction model can reproduce the overall shape of the spectra of IC 443 and W44 from GeV to TeV energies through pure $\\pi^0$-decay emission. We allow ...

  14. The Impact of Timing of Antibiotics on Outcomes in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Sarah A.; Miller, W. Ryan; Pryor, Jason; Puskarich, Michael A.; Jones, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to systematically review and meta-analyze the available data on the association between timing of antibiotic administration and mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock. Data Sources and Study Selection A comprehensive search was performed using a pre-defined protocol. Inclusion criteria: adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock, reported time to antibiotic administration in relation to ED triage and/or shock recognition, and mortality. Exclusion criteria: immunosuppressed populations, review article, editorial, or non-human studies. Data Extraction Two reviewers screened abstracts with a third reviewer arbitrating. The effect of time to antibiotic administration on mortality was based on current guideline recommendations: 1) administration within 3 hours of ED triage; 2) administration within 1 hour of severe sepsis/septic shock recognition. Odds Ratios (OR) were calculated using a random effect model. The primary outcome was mortality. Data Synthesis 1123 publications were identified and 11 were included in the analysis. Among the 11 included studies, 16,178 patients were evaluable for antibiotic administration from ED triage. Patients who received antibiotics more than 3 hours after ED triage (antibiotic administration from severe sepsis/septic shock recognition. Patients who received antibiotics more than 1 hour after severe sepsis/shock recognition (5 hours in antibiotic administration from severe sepsis/shock recognition. Conclusion Using the available pooled data we found no significant mortality benefit of administering antibiotics within 3 hours of ED triage or within 1 hour of shock recognition in severe sepsis and septic shock. These results suggest that currently recommended timing metrics as measures of quality of care are not supported by the available evidence. PMID:26121073

  15. MAGNETIC VARIANCES AND PITCH-ANGLE SCATTERING TIMES UPSTREAM OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano, E-mail: silvia.perri@fis.unical.it, E-mail: gaetano.zimbardo@fis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy)

    2012-07-20

    Recent observations of power-law time profiles of energetic particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks have shown the possibility of anomalous, superdiffusive transport for energetic particles throughout the heliosphere. Those findings call for an accurate investigation of the magnetic field fluctuation properties at the resonance frequencies upstream of the shock's fronts. Normalized magnetic field variances, indeed, play a crucial role in the determination of the pitch-angle scattering times and then of the transport regime. The present analysis investigates the time behavior of the normalized variances of the magnetic field fluctuations, measured by the Ulysses spacecraft upstream of corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks, for those events which exhibit superdiffusion for energetic electrons. We find a quasi-constant value for the normalized magnetic field variances from about 10 hr to 100 hr from the shock front. This rules out the presence of a varying diffusion coefficient and confirms the possibility of superdiffusion for energetic electrons. A statistical analysis of the scattering times obtained from the magnetic fluctuations upstream of the CIR events has also been performed; the resulting power-law distributions of scattering times imply long range correlations and weak pitch-angle scattering, and the power-law slopes are in qualitative agreement with superdiffusive processes described by a Levy random walk.

  16. Expected Time To Recruitment In A Two Grade Manpower System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.SRIDHARAN,

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a two graded organization is considered in which depletion of manpower occurs due to its policy decisions. Three mathematical models are constructed by assuming the loss of man-hours and the inter-decision times form an order statistics. Mean and variance of time to recruitment are obtained using an univariate recruitment policy based on shock model approach and the analytical results are numerically illustrated by assuming different distributions for the thresholds. The influence of the nodal parameters on the system characteristics is studied and relevant conclusions are presented.

  17. Essays on the predictability of oil shocks and yield curves for real-time output growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Amelie B.

    This dissertation is a collection of three essays that revisits the long-standing puzzle of the apparently disproportionate effect of oil prices in the economy by examining output growth predictability with real-time data. Each study of the predictive content of oil shocks is from a different perspective by using newly developed real-time datasets, which allows for replicating the economic environment faced by policymakers in real time. The first study extends the conventional set of models of output growth determination by investigating predictability of models that incorporate various functional forms of oil prices and real-time data. The results are supportive of the relationship of GDP and oil in the context of Granger causality with real-time data. In the second essay, I use oil shocks to predict the economy is changing direction earlier than would be predicted by solely using initial GDP releases. The model provides compelling evidence of negative GDP growth predictability in response to oil price shocks, which could shorten the "recognition lag" for successful implementation of discretionary counter-cyclical policies. In the third essay, I evaluate short-horizon output growth predictability using real-time data for different sample periods. I find strong evidence of predictability at the one-quarter and four-quarter horizon for the United States. The major result of the paper is that we reject the null hypothesis of no predictability against an alternative hypothesis of predictability with oil shocks that include yield curves in the forecasting regression. This relationship suggests the combination of monetary policy and oil shocks are important for subsequent GDP growth.

  18. Numerical Study of Shock Wave Attenuation in Two-Dimensional Ducts Using Solid Obstacles: How to Utilize Shock Focusing Techniques to Attenuate Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on shock wave mitigation in channels has been a topic of much attention in the shock wave community. One approach to attenuate an incident shock wave is to use obstacles of various geometries arranged in different patterns. This work is inspired by the study from Chaudhuri et al. (2013, in which cylinders, squares and triangles placed in staggered and non-staggered subsequent columns were used to attenuate a planar incident shock wave. Here, we present numerical simulations using a different obstacle pattern. Instead of using a matrix of obstacles, an arrangement of square or cylindrical obstacles placed along a logarithmic spiral curve is investigated, which is motivated by our previous work on shock focusing using logarithmic spirals. Results show that obstacles placed along a logarithmic spiral can delay both the transmitted and the reflected shock wave. For different incident shock Mach numbers, away from the logarithmic spiral design Mach number, this shape is effective to either delay the transmitted or the reflected shock wave. Results also confirm that the degree of attenuation depends on the obstacle shape, effective flow area and obstacle arrangement, much like other obstacle configurations.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of stone fragments in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy using a time reversal operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2017-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used widely in the noninvasive treatment of kidney calculi. The fine fragments less than 2 mm in size can be discharged by urination, which determines the success of ESWL. Although ultrasonic and fluorescent imaging are used to localize the calculi, it's challenging to monitor the stone comminution progress, especially at the late stage of ESWL when fragments spread out as a cloud. The lack of real-time and quantitative evaluation makes this procedure semi-blind, resulting in either under- or over-treatment after the legal number of pulses required by FDA. The time reversal operator (TRO) method has the ability to detect point-like scatterers, and the number of non-zero eigenvalues of TRO is equal to that of the scatterers. In this study, the validation of TRO method to identify stones was illustrated from both numerical and experimental results for one to two stones with various sizes and locations. Furthermore, the parameters affecting the performance of TRO method has also been investigated. Overall, TRO method is effective in identifying the fragments in a stone cluster in real-time. Further development of a detection system and evaluation of its performance both in vitro and in vivo during ESWL is necessary for application.

  20. SELECTIVE EVALUATION OF TWO URINARY ENZYMES (NAG AND AAP BEFORE AND AFTER UNILATERAL SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Nikoobakht

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological effects extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL is not precisely known. We have evaluated two urinary enzymes activity N-acetyl-B-D-glucosamine (NAG and alanine amino peptidase (AAP before and after unilateral ESWL as markers for renal parenchymal damage. Forty eight patients with kidney stones (mean age 39 who had presented for the first time or at least one year after their previous lithotripsy underwent ESWL. Urinary specimens were collected before and after first, third and seventh days of lithotripsy and NAG, AAP were evaluated. These enzymes displayed the greatest activity 24 hours after ESWL with significant difference compared to the control group, (P < 0.05 versus 0.02. Elevation of urinary enzymes activity correlated with stone size particularly stones larger than 2 cm. These data suggest that there is some tubular and parenchymal damage induced by ESWL that needs time to get improved. The higher urinary enzyme activity in patients with larger stones ( > 2 cm is probably related to injury resulting from passage of smaller stones, produced after lithotripsy of a large stone, and it is suggested that these patients are treated with a safer procedure.

  1. Dispersive shock waves in the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili and two dimensional Benjamin-Ono equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablowitz, Mark J.; Demirci, Ali; Ma, Yi-Ping

    2016-10-01

    Dispersive shock waves (DSWs) in the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation and two dimensional Benjamin-Ono (2DBO) equation are considered using step like initial data along a parabolic front. Employing a parabolic similarity reduction exactly reduces the study of such DSWs in two space one time (2 + 1) dimensions to finding DSW solutions of (1 + 1) dimensional equations. With this ansatz, the KP and 2DBO equations can be exactly reduced to the cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries (cKdV) and cylindrical Benjamin-Ono (cBO) equations, respectively. Whitham modulation equations which describe DSW evolution in the cKdV and cBO equations are derived and Riemann type variables are introduced. DSWs obtained from the numerical solutions of the corresponding Whitham systems and direct numerical simulations of the cKdV and cBO equations are compared with very good agreement obtained. In turn, DSWs obtained from direct numerical simulations of the KP and 2DBO equations are compared with the cKdV and cBO equations, again with good agreement. It is concluded that the (2 + 1) DSW behavior along self similar parabolic fronts can be effectively described by the DSW solutions of the reduced (1 + 1) dimensional equations.

  2. Antibodies to two major chicken heat shock proteins cross-react with similar proteins in widely divergent species.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, P M; Schlesinger, M J

    1982-01-01

    Three of the proteins induced by heat shock of chicken embryo fibroblasts have been purified, and rabbit antibodies have been raised against them. These antibodies have been used in radioimmune precipitation reactions and in a solid-phase immune assay to detect antigenic material in non-heat-shocked chicken tissues and in extracts of widely different species ranging from yeast to mammalian tissue culture cells and human erythrocyte ghosts. Antibodies to two of the major chicken heat shock pro...

  3. Two decades of circadian time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, M H; Maywood, E S; Reddy, A B

    2008-06-01

    Circadian rhythms coordinate our physiology at a fundamental level. Over the last 20 years, we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our perception of what the clocks driving such rhythms actually are, moving from 'black boxes' to talking about autoregulatory transcriptional/post-translational feedback loops with identified molecular components. We also now know that the pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) is not our only clock but quite the opposite because circadian clocks abound in our bodies, driving local rhythms of cellular metabolism, and synchronised to each other and to solar time, by cues from the SCN. This discovery of dispersed local clocks has far-reaching implications for understanding our physiology and the pathological consequences of clock dysfunction, revealing that clocks are critical in a variety of metabolic and neurological conditions, all of which have long-term morbidity attributable to them. Without the currently available molecular framework, these insights would have not have been possible. In the circadian future, a growing appreciation of the systems-level functioning of these clocks and their various cerebral and visceral outputs, will likely stimulate the development of novel therapies for major illnesses.

  4. Oblique Ion Two-Stream Instability in the Foot Region of a Collisionless Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic behavior of a collisionless plasma in the foot region of high Mach number perpendicular shocks is investigated through the two-dimensional linear analysis and electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulations are double periodic and taken as a proxy for the situation in the foot. The linear analysis for relatively cold unmagnetized plasmas with a reflected proton beam shows that obliquely propagating Buneman instability is strongly excited. We also found that when the electron temperature is much higher than the proton temperature, the most unstable mode is the highly obliquely propagating ion two-stream instability excited through the resonance between ion plasma oscillations of the background protons and of the beam protons, rather than the ion acoustic instability that is dominant for parallel propagation. To investigate nonlinear behavior of the ion two-stream instability, we have made PIC simulations for the shock foot region in which the initial state satisfies the Buneman i...

  5. Chandra observation of two shock fronts in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2146

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, H R; Fabian, A C; Baum, S A; Donahue, M; Edge, A C; McNamara, B R; O'Dea, C P

    2010-01-01

    We present a new Chandra observation of the galaxy cluster Abell 2146 which has revealed a complex merging system with a gas structure that is remarkably similar to the Bullet cluster (eg. Markevitch et al. 2002). The X-ray image and temperature map show a cool 2-3 keV subcluster with a ram pressure stripped tail of gas just exiting the disrupted 6-7 keV primary cluster. From the sharp jump in the temperature and density of the gas, we determine that the subcluster is preceded by a bow shock with a Mach number M=2.2+/-0.8, corresponding to a velocity v=2200^{+1000}_{-900} km/s relative to the main cluster. We estimate that the subcluster passed through the primary core only 0.1-0.3 Gyr ago. In addition, we observe a slower upstream shock propagating through the outer region of the primary cluster and calculate a Mach number M=1.7+/-0.3. Based on the measured shock Mach numbers M~2 and the strength of the upstream shock, we argue that the mass ratio between the two merging clusters is between 3 and 4 to one. B...

  6. Effect of two volume responsiveness evaluation methods on fluid resuscitation and prognosis in septic shock patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Qianghong; Yan Jing; Cai Guolong; Chen Jin; Li Li; Hu Caibao

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have reported the effect of different volume responsiveness evaluation methods on volume therapy results and prognosis.This study was carried out to investigate the effect of two volume responsiveness evaluation methods,stroke volume variation (SW) and stroke volume changes before and after passive leg raising (PLR-ASV),on fluid resuscitation and prognosis in septic shock patients.Methods Septic shock patients admitted to the Department of Critical Care Medicine of Zhejiang Hospital,China,from March 2011 to March 2013,who were under controlled ventilation and without arrhythmia,were studied.Patients were randomly assigned to the SVV group or the PLR-ASV group.The SVV group used the Pulse Indication Continuous Cardiac Output monitoring of SW,and responsiveness was defined as SW->12%.The PLR-ASV group used ASV before and after PLR as the indicator,and responsiveness was defined as ASV >15%.Six hours after fluid resuscitation,changes in tissue perfusion indicators (lactate,lactate clearance rate,central venous oxygen saturation (SCVO2),base excess (BE)),organ function indicators (white blood cell count,neutrophil percentage,platelet count,total protein,albumin,alanine aminotransferase,total and direct bilirubin,blood urea nitrogen,serum creatinine,serum creatine kinase,oxygenation index),fluid balance (6-and 24-hour fluid input) and the use of cardiotonic drugs (dobutamine),prognostic indicators (the time and rate of achieving early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) standards,duration of mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit stay,and 28-day mortality) were observed.Results Six hours after fluid resuscitation,there were no significant differences in temperature,heart rate,blood pressure,SpO2,organ function indicators,or tissue perfusion indicators between the two groups (P >0.06).The 6-and 24-hour fluid input was slightly less in the SW group than in the PLR-ASV group,but the difference was not statistically significant (P >0

  7. Analytical linear theory for the interaction of a planar shock wave with a two- or three-dimensional random isotropic density field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete Ruiz de Lira, C; Velikovich, A L; Wouchuk, J G

    2011-05-01

    We present an analytical linear model describing the interaction of a planar shock wave with an isotropic random pattern of density nonuniformities. This kind of interaction is important in inertial confinement fusion where shocks travel into weakly inhomogeneous cryogenic deuterium-wicked foams, and also in astrophysics, where shocks interact with interstellar density clumps. The model presented here is based on the exact theory of space and time evolution of the perturbed quantities generated by a corrugated shock wave traveling into a small-amplitude single-mode density field. Corresponding averages in both two and three dimensions are obtained as closed analytical expressions for the turbulent kinetic energy, acoustic energy flux, density amplification, and vorticity generation downstream. They are given as explicit functions of the two parameters (adiabatic exponent γ and shock strength M(1)) that govern the dynamics of the problem. In addition, these explicit formulas are simplified in the important asymptotic limits of weak and strong shocks and highly compressible fluids. © 2011 American Physical Society

  8. Analytical linear theory for the interaction of a planar shock wave with a two- or three-dimensional random isotropic density field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete Ruiz de Lira, C.; Velikovich, A. L.; Wouchuk, J. G.

    2011-05-01

    We present an analytical linear model describing the interaction of a planar shock wave with an isotropic random pattern of density nonuniformities. This kind of interaction is important in inertial confinement fusion where shocks travel into weakly inhomogeneous cryogenic deuterium-wicked foams, and also in astrophysics, where shocks interact with interstellar density clumps. The model presented here is based on the exact theory of space and time evolution of the perturbed quantities generated by a corrugated shock wave traveling into a small-amplitude single-mode density field. Corresponding averages in both two and three dimensions are obtained as closed analytical expressions for the turbulent kinetic energy, acoustic energy flux, density amplification, and vorticity generation downstream. They are given as explicit functions of the two parameters (adiabatic exponent γ and shock strength M1) that govern the dynamics of the problem. In addition, these explicit formulas are simplified in the important asymptotic limits of weak and strong shocks and highly compressible fluids.

  9. The fingerprints of photoionization and shock-ionization in two CSS sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaldi, Victoria; Feinstein, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the ionization state of the extended emission-line regions (EELRs) around two compact steep-spectrum (CSS) radio galaxies, 3C 268.3 and 3C 303.1, in order to identify the contribution of photoionization and shock-ionization. We perform a new spectroscopical (long-slit) analysis with GMOS/Gemini with the slit oriented in the radio-jet direction, where outflows are known to exist. The [Ne V] λ3426 emission is the most interesting feature of the spectra and the one key to breaking the degeneracy between the models: since this emission-line is more extended than He II, it challenges the ionization structure proposed by any photoionization model, also its intensity relative to H β does not behave as expected with respect to the ionization parameter U in the same scenario. On the contrary, when it is compared to the intensity of [O II] λ3727/H β and all these results are joined, the whole scenario is plausible to be explained as emission coming from the hot, compressed, shocked gas in shock-ionization models. Although the model fitting is strongly sensitive to the chosen line ratios, it argues for the presence of external and strong ionizing fields, such as the precursor field created by the shock or/and the AGN radiation field. In this paper, we show how AGN photoionization and shock-ionization triggered by jet-cloud interaction work together in these EELRs in order to explain the observed trends and line-ratio behaviours in a kinematically acceptable way.

  10. Shock tube/time-of-flight mass spectrometer for high temperature kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, Robert S; Giri, Binod R; Kiefer, John H

    2007-03-01

    A shock tube (ST) with online, time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF-MS) detection has been constructed for the study of elementary reactions at high temperature. The ST and TOF-MS are coupled by a differentially pumped molecular beam sampling interface, which ensures that the samples entering the TOF-MS are not contaminated by gases drawn from the cold end wall thermal boundary layer in the ST. Additionally, the interface allows a large range of postshock pressures to be used in the shock tube while maintaining high vacuum in the TOF-MS. The apparatus and the details of the sampling system are described along with an analysis in which cooling of the sampled gases and minimization of thermal boundary layer effects are discussed. The accuracy of kinetic measurements made with the apparatus has been tested by investigating the thermal unimolecular dissociation of cyclohexene to ethylene and 1,3-butadiene, a well characterized reaction for which considerable literature data that are in good agreement exist. The experiments were performed at nominal reflected shock wave pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr, and temperatures ranging from 1260 to 1430 K. The rate coefficients obtained are compared with the earlier shock tube studies and are found to be in very good agreement. As expected no significant difference is observed in the rate constant between pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr.

  11. Assessment of In Situ Time Resolved Shock Experiments at Synchrotron Light Sources*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belak, J.; Ilavsky, J.; Hessler, J. P.

    2005-07-01

    Prior to fielding in situ time resolved experiments of shock wave loading at the Advanced Photon Source, we have performed feasibility experiments assessing a single photon bunch. Using single and poly-crystal Al, Ti, V and Cu shock to incipient spallation on the gas gun, samples were prepared from slices normal to the spall plane of thickness 100-500 microns. In addition, single crystal Al of thickness 500 microns was shocked to incipient spallation and soft recovered using the LLNL e-gun mini-flyer system. The e-gun mini-flyer impacts the sample target producing a 10's ns flat-top shock transient. Here, we present results for imaging, small-angle scattering (SAS), and diffraction. In particular, there is little SAS away from the spall plane and significant SAS at the spall plane, demonstrating the presence of sub-micron voids. * Use of the Advanced Photon Source was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 and work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  12. Reynolds stress turbulence model applied to two-phase pressurized thermal shocks in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mérigoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr; Laviéville, Jérôme; Mimouni, Stéphane; Guingo, Mathieu; Baudry, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • NEPTUNE-CFD is used to model two-phase PTS. • k-ε model did produce some satisfactory results but also highlights some weaknesses. • A more advanced turbulence model has been developed, validated and applied for PTS. • Coupled with LIM, the first results confirmed the increased accuracy of the approach. - Abstract: Nuclear power plants are subjected to a variety of ageing mechanisms and, at the same time, exposed to potential pressurized thermal shock (PTS) – characterized by a rapid cooling of the internal Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) surface. In this context, NEPTUNE-CFD is used to model two-phase PTS and give an assessment on the structural integrity of the RPV. The first available choice was to use standard first order turbulence model (k-ε) to model high-Reynolds number flows encountered in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary circuits. In a first attempt, the use of k-ε model did produce some satisfactory results in terms of condensation rate and temperature field distribution on integral experiments, but also highlights some weaknesses in the way to model highly anisotropic turbulence. One way to improve the turbulence prediction – and consequently the temperature field distribution – is to opt for more advanced Reynolds Stress turbulence Model. After various verification and validation steps on separated effects cases – co-current air/steam-water stratified flows in rectangular channels, water jet impingements on water pool free surfaces – this Reynolds Stress turbulence Model (R{sub ij}-ε SSG) has been applied for the first time to thermal free surface flows under industrial conditions on COSI and TOPFLOW-PTS experiments. Coupled with the Large Interface Model, the first results confirmed the adequacy and increased accuracy of the approach in an industrial context.

  13. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: The first precision tuning series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robey H.F.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignition implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004] are driven with a very carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the fuel on a low adiabat. The first series of precision tuning experiments on NIF have been performed. These experiments use optical diagnostics to directly measure the strength and timing of all four shocks inside the hohlraum-driven, cryogenic deuterium-filled capsule interior. The results of these experiments are presented demonstrating a significant decrease in the fuel adiabat over previously un-tuned implosions. The impact of the improved adiabat on fuel compression is confirmed in related deuterium-tritium (DT layered capsule implosions by measurement of fuel areal density (ρR, which show the highest fuel compression (ρR ∼ 1.0 g/cm2 measured to date.

  14. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis of Listeria monocytogenes submitted to a redox shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Maria; Guével, Blandine; Com, Emmanuelle; Haddad, Nabila; Rossero, Albert; Bogard, Philippe; Prévost, Hervé; Guillou, Sandrine

    2013-02-21

    The influence of redox alteration on the growth and proteomic pattern of Listeria monocytogenes was investigated. A redox shock was induced in cultures by addition of 3mM ferricyanide (FeCN) and 6mM dithiothreitol (DTT) to increase or to decrease respectively the redox potential naturally occurring at the beginning of growth. In both conditions, the reducing and oxidizing redox shock had a strong influence, decreasing the maximum growth rate by half compared to a control culture. The proteomic analysis of L. monocytogenes performed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) exhibited twenty-three proteins differentially expressed (P<0.05), among these, many were oxidoreductases, and proteins involved in cellular metabolism (glycolysis, protein synthesis), detoxification (kat) or adhesion (Lmo1634).

  15. [Necrotizing fasciitis and group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome in two patients without risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Gaytán, Juan Jacobo; Guajardo-Lara, Claudia Elena; Valdovinos-Chávez, Salvador Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis associated to group A streptococcus (S. pyogenes) infection is a deep-seated infection of the subcutaneous tissue that results in progressive destruction of fascia and fat, with a high mortality rate due to a rapid progression of the illness to shock and multiple organ dysfunction. The challenge is to perform a prompt diagnosis because it is often confused with a minor soft-tissue infection. This infection should be aggressively treated with systemic antimicrobials, surgical debridement, and critical care. We present two cases of necrotizing fasciitis associated to infection with Streptococcus pyogenes patients developed myonecrosis and toxic shock syndrome within the following 24 hours after admission. In addition, we reviewed the pathogenic mechanism, diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome and discuss published treatment recommendations.

  16. Microstructure in two- and three-dimensional hybrid simulations of perpendicular collisionless shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, David; Gingell, Peter W; Trávníček, Pavel M

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical collisionless perpendicular shocks have an average macrostructure determined primarily by the dynamics of ions specularly reflected at the magnetic ramp. Within the overall macrostructure, instabilities, both linear and nonlinear, generate fluctuations and microstructure. To identify the sources of such microstructure, high-resolution two- and three-dimensional simulations have been carried out using the hybrid method, wherein the ions are treated as particles and the electron response is modelled as a massless fluid. We confirm the results of earlier 2-D simulations showing both field-parallel aligned propagating fluctuations and fluctuations carried by the reflected-gyrating ions. In addition, it is shown that, for 2-D simulations of the shock coplanarity plane, the presence of short-wavelength fluctuations in all magnetic components is associated with the ion Weibel instability driven at the upstream edge of the foot by the reflected-gyrating ions. In 3-D simulations we show for the first tim...

  17. Time-dependence in Relativistic Collisionless Shocks: Theory of the Variable "Wisps" in the Crab Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Spitkovsky, A; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Arons, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    We describe results from time-dependent numerical modeling of the collisionless reverse shock terminating the pulsar wind in the Crab Nebula. We treat the upstream relativistic wind as composed of ions and electron-positron plasma embedded in a toroidal magnetic field, flowing radially outward from the pulsar in a sector around the rotational equator. The relativistic cyclotron instability of the ion gyrational orbit downstream of the leading shock in the electron-positron pairs launches outward propagating magnetosonic waves. Because of the fresh supply of ions crossing the shock, this time-dependent process achieves a limit-cycle, in which the waves are launched with periodicity on the order of the ion Larmor time. Compressions in the magnetic field and pair density associated with these waves, as well as their propagation speed, semi-quantitatively reproduce the behavior of the wisp and ring features described in recent observations obtained using the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-Ray Observator...

  18. Time-Dependent MHD Shocks and Line Emission: The Case of the DG Tau Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Massaglia, S; Bodo, G

    2005-01-01

    The line emission from a growing number of Herbig-Haro jets can be observed and resolved at angular distances smaller than a few arcseconds from the central source. The interpretation of this emission is problematic, since the simplest model of a cooling jet cannot sustain it. It has been suggested that what one actually observes are shocked regions with a filling factor of $\\sim 1%$. In this framework, up to now, comparisons with observations have been based on stationary shock models. Here we introduce for the first time the self-consistent dynamics of such shocks and we show that considering their properties at different times, i.e. locations, we can reproduce observational data of the DG Tau microjet. In particular, we can interpret the spatial behavior of the [SII]6716/6731 and [NII]/[OI]6583/6300 line intensity ratios adopting a set of physical parameters that yield values of mass loss rates and magnetic fields consistent with previous estimates. We also obtain the values of the mean ionization fraction...

  19. Time-Resolved Broadband Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy behind Shock Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugi, Akira; Shiina, Hiroumi; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo

    2016-04-07

    A fast and sensitive broadband absorption technique for measurements of high-temperature chemical kinetics and spectroscopy has been developed by applying broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) in a shock tube. The developed method has effective absorption path lengths of 60-200 cm, or cavity enhancement factors of 12-40, over a wavelength range of 280-420 nm, and is capable of simultaneously recording absorption time profiles over an ∼32 nm spectral bandpass in a single experiment with temporal and spectral resolutions of 5 μs and 2 nm, respectively. The accuracy of the kinetic and spectroscopic measurements was examined by investigating high-temperature reactions and absorption spectra of formaldehyde behind reflected shock waves using 1,3,5-trioxane as a precursor. The rate constants obtained for the thermal decomposition reactions of 1,3,5-trioxane (to three formaldehyde molecules) and formaldehyde (to HCO + H) agreed well with the literature data. High-temperature absorption cross sections of formaldehyde between 280 and 410 nm have been determined at the post-reflected-shock temperatures of 955, 1265, and 1708 K. The results demonstrate the applicability of the BBCEAS technique to time- and wavelength-resolved sensitive absorption measurements at high temperatures.

  20. Glucocorticoid administration in sepsis and septic shock: time for a paradigm change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, E; Fiaccadori, E; Taccone, F S; Vincent, J L

    2014-09-01

    The use of corticosteroids in patients with septic shock remains controversial. Questions remain regarding the more appropriate dose, the optimal timing to initiate therapy, the selection of patients who will benefit most from the treatment and the exact mechanisms involved in their effectiveness. Recent studies have highlighted that, in critically ill patients, corticosteroid metabolism was reduced and associated with high circulating cortisol levels. Hence the required doses of hydrocortisone may be lower than the currently recommended doses in septic shock (i.e. 200 mg/day). However, altered expression and/or function of corticosteroid receptors may still suggest that higher hydrocortisone doses are necessary to overcome this so-called "steroid-resistance". In this article, we summarized these recent concepts and discussed how they could influence the administration of corticosteroids in such patients.

  1. Development of Time Measuring Technique to Measure the Shock Speed during the Propagation in the Free Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study of wave propagation in the free atmosphere, it is desirable to obtain time measurements to an accuracy of microsecond level. An experiment has been conducted to measure the wave speed during the propagation in the free atmosphere by the present technique. Due to sudden rupture of the diaphragm for the chamber pressure of 4.2 kg/cm2 and a wave generating in a shock tube travels with subsonic speed and the measured incident wave Mach number is 0.8 which leaves the shock tube in the free atmosphere. The measured travelling time of the incident wave to travel 61.5 cm distance in the shock tube is 2200 μsec and the same technique can apply to measure the shock wave speed. Several trigger points are installed at the exit of the shock tube in the open atmosphere to measure the strength of the wave propagation. It is observed that the wave strength decreases during the wave propagation in free atmosphere. Due to spherical expansion behind the wave, the pressure across the wave decreases. A numerical simulation is also conducted on supersonic shock wave to determine the shock speed and the travelling time in the free atmosphere. The pressures across shock wave at different locations of the shock wave are determined by solving the Euler equations and the simulation results indicate that the shock speed decreases during the propagation in the free atmosphere. In both experimental and numerical results, it is observed that the strength of the wave propagation in the free atmosphere decreases continuously due to spherical expansion.  The present technique can also be used to measure the supersonic jet velocity, the velocity of bullet and any particle velocity in subsonic or supersonic ranges.

  2. Observation of off-Hugoniot shocked states with ultrafast time resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, M; Crowhurst, J; Bastea, S; Zaug, J

    2010-02-23

    We apply ultrafast single shot interferometry to determine the pressure and density of argon shocked from up to 7.8 GPa static initial pressure in a diamond anvil cell. This method enables the observation of thermodynamic states distinct from those observed in either single shock or isothermal compression experiments, and the observation of ultrafast dynamics in shocked materials. We also present a straightforward method for interpreting ultrafast shock wave data which determines the index of refraction at the shock front, and the particle and shock velocities for shock waves in transparent materials. Based on these methods, we observe shocked thermodynamic states between the room temperature isotherm of argon and the shock adiabat of cryogenic argon at final shock pressures up to 28 GPa.

  3. Verification, validation and application of NEPTUNE-CFD to two-phase Pressurized Thermal Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mérigoux, N., E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr [Electricité de France, R& D Division, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Laviéville, J.; Mimouni, S.; Guingo, M.; Baudry, C. [Electricité de France, R& D Division, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Bellet, S., E-mail: serge.bellet@edf.fr [Electricité de France, Thermal & Nuclear Studies and Projects Division, 12-14 Avenue Dutriévoz, 69628 Villeurbanne (France)

    2017-02-15

    Nuclear Power Plants are subjected to a variety of ageing mechanisms and, at the same time, exposed to potential Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) – characterized by a rapid cooling of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) wall. In this context, NEPTUNE-CFD is developed and used to model two-phase PTS in an industrial configuration, providing temperature and pressure fields required to assess the integrity of the RPV. Furthermore, when using CFD for nuclear safety demonstration purposes, EDF applies a methodology based on physical analysis, verification, validation and application to industrial scale (V&V), to demonstrate the quality of, and the confidence in results obtained. By following this methodology, each step must be proved to be consistent with the others, and with the final goal of the calculations. To this effect, a chart demonstrating how far the validation step of NEPTUNE-CFD is covering the PTS application will be drawn. A selection of the code verification and validation cases against different experiments will be described. For results consistency, a single and mature set of models – resulting from the knowledge acquired during the code development over the last decade – has been used. From these development and validation feedbacks, a methodology has been set up to perform industrial computations. Finally, the guidelines of this methodology based on NEPTUNE-CFD and SYRTHES coupling – to take into account the conjugate heat transfer between liquid and solid – will be presented. A short overview of the engineering approach will be given – starting from the meshing process, up to the results post-treatment and analysis.

  4. DAM-BREAK SHOCK WAVES WITH FLOATING DEBRIS: EXPERIMENTALANALYSIS AND TWO-PHASE MODELLING

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Mambretti; Daniele De Wrachien; Enrico Larcan

    2008-01-01

    To predict floods and debris flow dynamics a numerical model, based on 1D De Saint Venant (SV) equations, was developed. The McCormack – Jameson shock capturing scheme was employed for the solution of the equations, written in a conservative law form. This technique was applied to determine both the propagation and the profile of a two – phase debris flow resulting from the instantaneous and complete collapse of a storage dam. To validate the model, comparisons have been made between its pred...

  5. Hypovolemic shock after labial and lingual frenulectomy: A report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Lauren F; Gomez, Gabriel; Overton, Lewis J; McClain, Wade G

    2017-09-01

    Lingual and labial frenulectomy are commonly performed as an outpatient procedure, either in an office setting or under general anesthesia. Frenulectomy is generally regarded by both otolaryngologists and dentists as a straightforward and low-risk procedure with limited evidence-based indications and similarly few contraindications. We describe two cases of hypovolemic shock occurring after outpatient frenulectomy requiring emergent interventions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and blood transfusion. These rare, but life-threatening outcomes warrant recognition as potential complications for the presumed benign labial and lingual frenulectomy. We additionally briefly review indications for upper labial and lingual frenulectomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Coronal Shock Waves, EUV Waves, and Their Relation to CMEs. III. Shock-Associated CME/EUV Wave in an Event with a Two-Component EUV Transient

    CERN Document Server

    Grechnev, V V; Uralov, A M; Chertok, I M; Eselevich, M V; Eselevich, V G; Rudenko, G V; Kubo, Y

    2011-01-01

    On 17 January 2010, STEREO-B observed in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white light a large-scale dome-shaped expanding coronal transient with perfectly connected off-limb and on-disk signatures. Veronig et al. (2010, ApJL 716, 57) concluded that the dome was formed by a weak shock wave. We have revealed two EUV components, one of which corresponded to this transient. All of its properties found from EUV, white light, and a metric type II burst match expectations for a freely expanding coronal shock wave including correspondence to the fast-mode speed distribution, while the transient sweeping over the solar surface had a speed typical of EUV waves. The shock wave was presumably excited by an abrupt filament eruption. Both a weak shock approximation and a power-law fit match kinematics of the transient near the Sun. Moreover, the power-law fit matches expansion of the CME leading edge up to 24 solar radii. The second, quasi-stationary EUV component near the dimming was presumably associated with a stretched CM...

  7. A Bicharacteristic Scheme for the Numerical Computation of Two-Dimensional Converging Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, U E; Meier, Uwe E.; Demmig, Frank

    1997-01-01

    A 2d unsteady bicharacteristic scheme with shock fitting is presented and its characteristic step, shock point step and boundary step are described. The bicharacteristic scheme is compared with an UNO scheme and the Moretti scheme. Its capabilities are illustrated by computing a converging, deformed shock wave.

  8. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Holst, B.; Tóth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Powell, K. G.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-06-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1 ns. Later times are calculated with the CRASH code. CRASH solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties are consistent with order-of-magnitude estimates. The synthetic radiographs produced can be used for comparison with future nozzle experiments at high-energy-density laser facilities.

  9. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I V; Daldorff, L K S; Powell, K G; Drake, R P

    2011-01-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1ns. The later times are calculated with the CRASH code. This code solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties a...

  10. Application of the space-time conservation element and solution element method to shock-tube problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    1994-01-01

    An Euler solver based on the method of space-time conservation element and solution element is in this paper to simulate shock-tube flows involving shock waves, contact discontinuities, expansion waves and their intersections. Seven test problems are considered to examine the capability of this method. The numerical results, when compared with exact solutions and/or numerical solutions by other methods, indicate that the present method can accurately resolve strong shock and contact discontinuities without using any ad hoc techniques which are used only at the neighborhood of a discontinuity.

  11. Time resolved spectra in the infrared absorption and emission from shock heated hydrocarbons. [in interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S. H.; Borchardt, D. B.

    1990-01-01

    The wavelength range of a previously constructed multichannel fast recording spectrometer was extended to the mid-infrared. With the initial configuration, light intensities were recorded simultaneously with a silicon-diode array simultaneously at 20 adjacent wavelengths, each with a 20-micron time resolution. For studies in the infrared, the silicon diodes were replaced by a 20-element PbSe array of similar dimensions, cooled by a three-stage thermoelectric device. It is proposed that infrared emissions could be due to shock-heated low molecular-weight hydrocarbons. The full Swan band system appeared in time-integrated emission spectra from shock-heated C2H2; no soot was generated. At low resolution, the profiles on the high-frequency side of the black body maximum show no distinctive features. These could be fitted to Planck curves, with temperatures that declined with time from an initial high that was intermediate between T5 (no conversion) and T5(eq).

  12. Fundamental constraints on two-time physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piceno, E.; Rosado, A.; Sadurní, E.

    2016-10-01

    We show that generalizations of classical and quantum dynamics with two times lead to a fundamentally constrained evolution. At the level of classical physics, Newton's second law is extended and exactly integrated in a (1 + 2) -dimensional space, leading to effective single-time evolution for any initial condition. The cases 2 + 2 and 3 + 2 are also analyzed. In the domain of quantum mechanics, we follow strictly the hypothesis of probability conservation by extending the Heisenberg picture to unitary evolution with two times. As a result, the observability of two temporal axes is constrained by a generalized uncertainty relation involving level spacings, total duration of the effect and Planck's constant.

  13. Pulse transit time variability analysis in an animal model of endotoxic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Collin H H; Chan, Gregory S H; Middleton, Paul M; Cave, Grant; Harvey, Martyn; Javed, Faizan; Savkin, Andrey V; Lovell, Nigel H

    2010-01-01

    The use of non-invasively measured pulse transit time (PTT) to monitor the cardiovascular systems in critically ill patients, like sepsis, can be of significant clinical value. In this study, the potential of PTT and its variability in cardiovascular system monitoring in a mechanically ventilated and anesthetized rabbit model of endotoxic shock was assessed. Eight adult New Zealand white rabbits, which were treated with endotoxin bolus infusion, were studied. Measurements of PTT, pre-ejection period (PEP), and vascular transit time (VTT) were obtained in pre- and post-intervention stages (before and 90 minutes after the administration of endotoxin). The decrease in mean PTT (p VTT (p VTT (R(2) ≥ 0.84 with positive slope). Computation of coherence and phase shift in the ventilating frequency band (HF: 0.50 - 0.75 Hz) showed that the respiratory variation in PTT was synchronized with both PEP and VTT (coherence > 0.84 with phase shift less than one cardiac beat). These results highlighted the potential value of PTT and its respiratory variation in characterizing the pathophysioloigcal hemodynamic change in endotoxic shock.

  14. Determination of the arrival time of ICME Shock to Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Mosalam; Mahrous, Ayman; Shaltout, Mosalam; Youssef, Mohamed; Ramy Mawad, Rr.

    . We are estimated the arrival time of ICME shock to the Earth's magnetosphere during the solar cycle 23rd , for the period 1996-2005, by using certain temporal and spatial conditions. We selected the Data of the SSC events from Preliminary Reports of the ISGI (Institut de Physique du Globe, France). While the associated CMES during the same period are selected from SOHO/LASCO/C2. We construct a numerical model to estimate the arrival time of the CME reached the Earth's magnetosphere. According to our model, we found high correlation between CMEs and their shocks (R = 75%). In addition , we studied the characteristics of the CMEs which reached to Earth's magnetosphere. Also we examined the relation between the logarithms of the halo CME energy and the duration of the associated intense geomagnetic storms(Dst < -100nT ). We found a significant correlation (R = 0.82) between the length of the duration of the intense geomagnetic storms and the related halo CME energies. This means that the halo CMEs events is the main source of the energy transfer processes into the Earth's magnetosphere.

  15. [Cardiogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houegnifioh, Komlanvi Kafui; Gfeller, Etienne; Garcia, Wenceslao; Ribordy, Vincent

    2014-08-13

    Cardiogenic shock, especially when it complicates a myocardial infarction, is still associated with high mortality rate. Emergency department or first care physicians are often the first providers to assess the cardiogenic shock patient, and plays thereby a key role in achieving a timely diagnosis and treatment. This review will detail the actual physiopathology understanding of the cardiogenic shock, its diagnosis and management focusing on the care within the emergency department.

  16. Simulation of shock-induced melting of Ni using molecular dynamics coupled to a two-temperature model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koči, L.; Bringa, E. M.; Ivanov, D. S.; Hawreliak, J.; McNaney, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Zhigilei, L. V.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Remington, B. A.; Ahuja, R.

    2006-07-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we study shock-induced melting in Ni with an embedded atom method (EAM). Dynamic melting is probed by the pair correlation function, and we find a melting lattice temperature of Tmelt=6400±300K for a melting pressure of Pmelt=275±10GPa . When a combined MD+TTM (two-temperature model) approach is used to include electronic heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling, Pmelt and Tmelt change. For a given pressure, the temperature behind the shock decreases due to electronic heat diffusion into the cold, unshocked material. This cooling of the material behind the shock slightly increases the melting pressure compared to simulations without electronic heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling. The decrease in the temperature behind the shock front is enhanced if the electron-phonon coupling is artificially made larger. We also explore the feasibility of using x-ray diffraction to detect melting.

  17. Submerged circular cylindrical shell subjected to two consecutive shock waves: Resonance-like phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovlev, S.; Seaton, C. T.; Sigrist, J.-F.

    2013-10-01

    A submerged evacuated circular cylindrical shell subjected to a sequence of two external shock waves generated at the same source is considered. A semi-analytical model combining the classical methods of mathematical physics with the finite-difference methodology is developed and employed to simulate the interaction. Both the hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the problem are considered, and it is demonstrated that varying the delay between the first and second wavefronts has a very significant effect on the stress-strain state of the structure. In particular, it is shown that for certain values of the delay, the constructive superposition of the elastic waves travelling around the shell results in a 'resonance-like' increase of the structural stress in certain regions. The respective stress can be so high that it sometimes exceeds the overall maximum stress observed in the same structure but subjected to a single-front shock wave with the same parameters, in some cases by as much as 50%. A detailed parametric analysis of the observed phenomenon is carried out, and an easy-to-use diagram summarizing the finding is proposed to aim the pre-design analysis of engineering structures.

  18. The fingerprints of Photoionization and Shock-Ionization in two CSS sources

    CERN Document Server

    Reynaldi, V

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the ionization state of the Extended Emission-Line Regions (EELRs) around two compact steep-spectrum (CSS) radio galaxies, 3C~268.3 and 3C~303.1, in order to identify the contribution of photoionization and shock-ionization. We perform a new spectroscopical (long-slit) analysis with GMOS/Gemini with the slit oriented in the radio-jet direction, where outflows are known to exist. The [Ne V]$\\lambda 3426$ emission is the most interesting feature of the spectra and the key to breaking the degeneracy between the models: since this emission-line is more extended than HeII, it challenges the ionization structure proposed by any photoionization model, also its intensity relative to H$\\beta$ does not behave as expected with respect to the ionization parameter U in the same scenario. On the contrary, when it is compared to the intensity of [OII]$\\lambda3727$/H$\\beta$ and all these results are joined, the whole scenario is plausible to be explained as emission coming from the hot, compressed, shocked gas...

  19. Precision Shock Timing Measurements to set the Fuel Adiabat in Ignition Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, Peter

    2011-10-01

    An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements both in the target design and in the physics packages in the radiation-hydrodynamic codes used to design and model these targets. We can set an accurately tuned pulse shape within a series of approximately 5 shots. The results and interpretation of these tuning experiments will be described. In collaboration with: T.R. Boehly, H.F. Robey, J.L. Kline, D.R. Farley, S. Le Pape, J.D. Moody, R.E. Olson, D.H. Munro, J.L. Milovich, P.A. Sterne, O.S. Jones, D.A. Callahan, A. Nikroo, J.J. Kroll, J.B. Horner, A.V. Hamza, S.D. Bhandarkar, J.H. Eggert, R.F. Smith, D.G. Hicks, H.-S Park, B.K. Young, W.W. Hsing, G.W. Collins, O.L. Landen and the NIC team. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. (U) Implementation and demonstration of a time-resolved pyrometry/spectroscopy capability in shock compression experiments on metal oxide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, Peter Marvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lang, Jr., John Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dattelbaum, Dana Mcgraw [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scharff, Robert Jason [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Temperature is notably the most difficult quantity to measure in shock compression experiments; however, it is critical for accurately constraining theoretical or tabular equations of state. Until now, the temperature achieved during the shock loading of porous materials could only be calculated. The technique presented in this report measures, for the first time, the shocked temperature of porous systems.

  1. Jamestown and Disneyland: Two Places in Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrofani, E. Robert; Tideman, Robert

    This unit for high school students uses two dissimilar places in time; (2) Jamestown, Virginia, founded in 1607, one of the earliest settlements in the United States and (2) Disneyland, California, built in 1956, an institution of contemporary culture. The lessons address two fundamental questions in geography: (1) where? and (2) why here rather…

  2. Effects of household shocks and poverty on the timing of traditional male circumcision and HIV risk in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramani, Atheendar S; Maughan-Brown, Brendan

    2013-06-01

    Poverty may influence HIV risk by increasing vulnerability to economic shocks and thereby preventing key health investments. We explored this possibility by examining the relationship between household shocks and the timing of traditional male circumcision, a practice associated with considerable expense and whose HIV-prevention benefits are larger when done earlier, even within young adulthood. Using unique data on a sample of Xhosa men, a group that almost universally practices traditional circumcision, we found that respondents in the poorest households delayed circumcision by 2 years if a household member experienced loss of income or death and/or illness. The impact of these shocks declined with increasing household income. Our findings suggest that interventions that work to mitigate the impact of shocks among the poor may be useful in HIV prevention efforts. More generally, they illustrate that the relationship between HIV and wealth may be more nuanced than assumed in previous work.

  3. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bersier, David [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Fransson, Claes [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason [Spitzer Science Center, MS 314-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Quimby, Robert [Kavli IPMU (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-06-20

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ∼10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  4. A time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau phase field formalism for shock-induced phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Belof, Jonathan L.; Benedict, Lorin X.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-field models have become popular in the last two decades to describe a host of free-boundary problems. The strength of the method relies on implicitly describing the dynamics of surfaces and interfaces by a continuous scalar field that enters the global grand free energy functional of the system. Here we explore the potential utility of this method in order to describe shock-induced phase transitions. To this end we make use of the Multiphase Field Theory (MFT) to account for the existence of multiple phases during the transition, and we couple MFT to a hydrodynamic model in the context of a new LLNL code for phase transitions, SAMSA. As a demonstration of this approach, we apply our code to the α - ɛ-Fe phase transition under shock wave loading conditions and compare our results with experiments of Jensen et. al. [J. Appl. Phys., 105:103502 (2009)] and Barker and Hollenbach [J. Appl. Phys., 45:4872 (1974)].

  5. Identification of two types of whistler instabilities excited in the foot of quasi-perpendicular supercritical shocks: a Poynting flux analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschietti, Laurent; Lembege, Bertrand

    2017-04-01

    Supercritical shocks in collisionless plasmas are characterized by the presence of a noticeable fraction of ions that are reflected off of the shock front and form a foot upstream of the ramp. These ions carry a significant amount of energy; they are the source of microturbulence within the shock front itself and play a key role in transforming the directed bulk energy (upstream) into thermal energy (downstream). For quasi-perpendicular geometries and as seen in the normal incidence frame (NIF), the velocity of the reflected ions is mostly directed at 90° to the magnetic field Bo. Streaming instabilities can develop, which are excited by the relative drifts between the populations of incoming ions, reflected ions, and electrons across Bo in the shock's foot. Two types of waves from the whistler branch and with frequencies in the lower-hybrid range are shown to be unstable: 1) Oblique waves with wavelengths a fraction of the ion inertia length which propagate toward upstream at angles about 50° to Bo. 2) Quasi-perpendicular waves with wavelengths several times the electron inertia length which propagate toward downstream at angles larger than 80° to Bo. For each type of whistler we perform electromagnetic pseudo-oblique 1D PIC simulations. These are carried out in the proper frame where the total momentum density vanishes. Field data issued from the simulations are used to construct hodograms and compute the Poynting fluxes. We apply the Lorentz transformation in order to express the results in the shock frame, specifically the normal incidence frame. The outcome is then discussed and compared to previous simulations [Comisel et al, Ann. Geophys. 29, 2011] and to measurements at Earth's bow shock from Cluster [Sundkvist et al, PRL 108, 2012] and more recently from the MMS mission .

  6. A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang time at the NIF (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, H G; Sio, H; Frenje, J A; Magoon, J; Agliata, A; Shoup, M; Ayers, S; Bailey, C G; Gatu Johnson, M; Zylstra, A B; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Sèguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Kimbrough, J R; Mackinnon, A; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Clancy, T; Zacharias, R; House, A; Döppner, T; Park, H S; LePape, S; Landen, O; Meezan, N; Robey, H; Glebov, V U; Hohenberger, M; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Li, C; Parat, J; Olson, R; Kline, J; Kilkenny, J

    2014-11-01

    A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock- and compression-bang time using D(3)He-fusion protons and DD-fusion neutrons, respectively, at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This capability, in combination with shock-burn weighted areal density measurements, will significantly constrain the modeling of the implosion dynamics. This design is an upgrade to the existing particle time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, which records bang times using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than ±70 ps [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D902 (2012)]. The inclusion of a deflecting magnet will increase D(3)He-proton signal-to-background by a factor of 1000, allowing for the first time simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D(3)He-filled surrogate implosions at the NIF.

  7. A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang time at the NIF (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinderknecht, H. G., E-mail: hgr@mit.edu; Sio, H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Sèguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Magoon, J.; Agliata, A.; Shoup, M.; Glebov, V. U.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ayers, S.; Bailey, C. G.; Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock- and compression-bang time using D{sup 3}He-fusion protons and DD-fusion neutrons, respectively, at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This capability, in combination with shock-burn weighted areal density measurements, will significantly constrain the modeling of the implosion dynamics. This design is an upgrade to the existing particle time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, which records bang times using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than ±70 ps [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D902 (2012)]. The inclusion of a deflecting magnet will increase D{sup 3}He-proton signal-to-background by a factor of 1000, allowing for the first time simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D{sup 3}He-filled surrogate implosions at the NIF.

  8. Stereoscopic study of the kinematic evolution of a coronal mass ejection and its driven shock from the sun to the earth and the prediction of their arrival times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Phillip; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: phess4@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the complete evolution of a coronal mass ejection (CME). We have tracked the evolution of both the ejecta and its shock, and further fit the evolution of the fronts to a simple but physics-based analytical model. This study focuses on the CME initiated on the Sun on 2012 July 12 and arriving at the Earth on 2012 July 14. Shock and ejecta fronts were observed by white light images, as well as in situ by the Advanced Composition Explorer satellite. We find that the propagation of the two fronts is not completely dependent upon one another, but can each be modeled in the heliosphere with a drag model that assumes the dominant force of affecting CME evolution to be the aerodynamic drag force of the ambient solar wind. Results indicate that the CME ejecta front undergoes a more rapid deceleration than the shock front within 50 R {sub ☉} and therefore the propagation of the two fronts is not completely coupled in the heliosphere. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, as well as data from time-elongation stack plots and in situ signatures, we show that the drag model can accurately describe the behavior of each front, but is more effective with the ejecta. We also show that without the in situ data, based on measurements out to 80 R {sub ☉} combined with the general values for drag model parameters, the arrival of both the shock and ejecta can be predicted within four hours of arrival.

  9. Time-resolved detection of temperature, concentration, and pressure in a shock tube by intracavity absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first application of intracavity absorption spectroscopy (ICAS) for monitoring species concentration, total pressure, and temperature in shock-tube experiments. ICAS with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of absorption spectra of shock-heated C2H2. The measurements are performed in a spectral range between 6512 and 6542 cm-1, including many absorption lines of C2H2, with a time resolution of 100 µs and an effective absorption path length of 15 m. Up to 18-times increase of the total pressure and a temperature rise of up to 1200 K have been monitored. Due to the ability of simultaneously recording many absorption lines in a broad spectral range, the presented technique can also be applied to multi-component analysis of transient single-shot processes in reactive gas mixtures in shock tubes, pulse detonation engines, or explosions.

  10. Quasiperpendicular high Mach number Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, A H; Dougherty, M K; Burgess, D; Fujimoto, M; Hospodarsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasi-perpendicular shocks across two orders of magnitude in Alfven Mach number (MA) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted timescale of ~0.3 {\\tau}c, where {\\tau}c is the ion gyroperio...

  11. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Properties of Shocks in Two-Dimensional Yukawa Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciante, M.; Murillo, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Particle-level simulations of shocked plasmas are carried out to examine kinetic properties not captured by hydrodynamic models. In particular, molecular dynamics simulations of 2D Yukawa plasmas with variable couplings and screening lengths are used to examine shock features unique to plasmas, including the presence of dispersive shock structures for weak shocks. A phase-space analysis reveals several kinetic properties, including anisotropic velocity distributions, non-Maxwellian tails, and the presence of fast particles ahead of the shock, even for moderately low Mach numbers. We also examine the thermodynamics (Rankine-Hugoniot relations) of recent experiments [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 015002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.015002] and find no anomalies in their equations of state.

  12. Timing Variations in Two Balkan Percussion Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Goldberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many songs and dance pieces from the Balkan Peninsula employ aksak meter, in which two categorically different durations, long and short, coexist in the sequence of beats that performers emphasize and listeners move to. This paper analyzes the durations of aksak beats and measures in two recorded percussion performances that use a particular aksak beat sequence, long-short-short. The results suggest that the timing of beats varies in conjunction with factors including melodic grouping and interaction among members of a performing ensemble and audience. Timing variation linked to melodic groups occurs on a solo recording of a Macedonian Romani folk song. The performer, Muzafer Bizlim, taps an ostinato while singing, and the timing of his taps seems to mark some local and large-scale group boundaries. Melodic organization also seems relevant to the timing of beats and measures on a recording of Bulgarian percussionist Mitko Popov playing the tŭpan, a double-headed bass drum, in a small folk music ensemble. In Popov’s performance, however, timing differences might be related to characteristics of the ensemble dynamic, such as the coordination of multiple musical participants. These interpretations generate possibilities for future study of timing variations in relation to rhythm and meter.

  13. The Two-Time Interpretation and Macroscopic Time-Reversibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakir Aharonov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The two-state vector formalism motivates a time-symmetric interpretation of quantum mechanics that entails a resolution of the measurement problem. We revisit a post-selection-assisted collapse model previously suggested by us, claiming that unlike the thermodynamic arrow of time, it can lead to reversible dynamics at the macroscopic level. In addition, the proposed scheme enables us to characterize the classical-quantum boundary. We discuss the limitations of this approach and its broad implications for other areas of physics.

  14. Time-frequency analysis of wheel-rail shock in the presence of wheel flat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Ding

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Against the deficiencies of traditional time domain and frequency domain analysis in detecting wheel-rail (W-R system hidden risks which wheel flats generate, the time-frequency characteristics of W-R shock caused by wheel flat are analyzed and the vehicle-rail dynamic model with wheel flat is investigated. The 10 degrees of freedom (DOF vehicle model is built up. 90-DOF rail model is constructed. The wheel flat excitation model is built up. The vehicle-track coupling dynamic model including wheel flat excitation is set up through nonlinear Hertzian contact theory. The vertical accelerations of axle box are calculated at different speeds and flat sizes based on the vehicle-track coupling dynamic model with wheel flat. Frequency slice wavelet transform (FSWT is employed to analyze time-frequency characteristics of axle box accelerations to detect the W-R noncontact risks s which the traditional time domain or frequency domain method does not analyze. The results show that the small flat size and high running speed lead to high frequency W-R impact. Large flat size and high running speed result in momentary loss of W-R contact, and there exist security risks between wheel and rail. The conclusion that the phase of axle box accelerations is same to W-R forces lays a theoretical foundation of monitoring W-R contact safety from axle box acceleration instead of traditional W-R force detection.

  15. Intersexual differences of heat shock response between two amphipods (Eulimnogammarus verrucosus and Eulimnogammarus cyaneus) in Lake Baikal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedulina, Daria; Meyer, Michael F.; Gurkov, Anton; Kondratjeva, Ekaterina; Baduev, Boris; Gusdorf, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Acute temperature fluctuations are common in surface waters, and aquatic organisms may manifest physiological responses to punctuated temperature spikes long before behavioral responses. Ectotherms, especially cryophilic stenotherms such as those endemic to Lake Baikal (Siberia), may demonstrate specialized physiological responses to acute temperature increases because their proteomes have evolved to function most efficiently at lower temperatures (e.g., <10 °C). Therefore, our study questioned the nature and degree of variation in physiological response to acute thermal stress in two congenerous, endemic Baikal amphipod species, Eulimnogammarus verrucosus and Eulimnogammarus cyaneus. We hypothesized that because interspecific and intersexual thermosensitivity varies significantly among ectotherms, there would be divergent intersexual and interspecific strategies to withstand acute thermal stress, manifested in different protein compositions and concentrations. We exposed individuals to the species’ respective LT50 for one hour followed by a three-hour recovery period. We then performed 1D-PAGE, Western blotting, 2D-PAGE, and Mass Spectrometry techniques and assessed relative intersexual and interspecific changes in proteomic composition and heat shock protein 70 level. Our results demonstrate that females tend to be more sensitive to an acute thermal stimulus than males, most likely because females allocate significant energy to reproduction and less to heat shock response, evidenced by females’ significantly lower LT50time. Lower level of Hsp70 was found in females of the thermosensitive E. verrucosus compared to males of this species. No intersexual differences were found in Hsp70 level in thermotolerant E. cyaneus. Higher levels of hemocyanin subunits and arginine kinase were found in E. cyaneus females after heat shock and recovery compared to males, which was not found for E. verrucosus, suggesting interspecific mechanisms for E. cyaneus’s higher

  16. Crossover dynamics of dispersive shocks in Bose-Einstein condensates characterized by two- and three-body interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Crosta, M.

    2012-04-10

    We show that the perturbative nonlinearity associated with three-atom interactions, competing with standard two-body repulsive interactions, can change dramatically the evolution of one-dimensional (1D) dispersive shock waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate. In particular, we prove the existence of a rich crossover dynamics, ranging from the formation of multiple shocks regularized by nonlinear oscillations culminating in coexisting dark and antidark matter waves to 1D-soliton collapse. For a given scattering length, all these different regimes can be accessed by varying the density of atoms in the condensate.

  17. Observations on the non-mixed length and unsteady shock motion in a two dimensional supersonic ejector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Srisha M. V.; Jagadeesh, Gopalan

    2014-03-01

    Key features that drive the operation of a supersonic ejector are the complex gasdynamic interactions of the primary and secondary flows within a variable area duct and the phenomenon of compressible turbulent mixing between them, which have to be understood at a fundamental level. An experimental study has been carried out on the mixing characteristics of a two dimensional supersonic ejector with a supersonic primary flow (air) of Mach number 2.48 and the secondary flow (subsonic) which is induced from the ambient. The non-mixed length, which is the length within the ejector for which the primary and secondary flow remain visually distinct is used to characterize the mixing in the ejector. The operating pressures, flow rates and wall static pressures along the ejector have been measured. Two flow visualization tools have been implemented—time resolved schlieren and laser scattering flow visualization. An important contribution has been the development of in-house image processing algorithms on the MATLAB platform to detect the non-mixed length from the schlieren and laser scattering images. The ratio of mass flow rates of the secondary flow to primary flow (entrainment ratio) has been varied in a range of 0.15-0.69 for two locations of the primary nozzle in the ejector duct. Representative cases have been computed using commercial CFD tool (Fluent) to supplement the experiments. Significant outcomes of the study are—the non-mixed length quantified from the flow visualization images is observed to lie within 4.5 to 5.2 times the height of the mixing duct which is confirmed by the wall static pressure profiles. The flow through the supersonic ejector in the mixed regime is explained using corroborative evidences from different diagnostic tools. A reduction of the non-mixed length by 46.7% is observed at operating conditions when the nozzle is sufficiently overexpanded. The disturbance caused to the mixing layer due to unsteady shock-boundary layer interactions

  18. Thermal shock behavior of fine grained W-Y2O3 materials fabricated via two different manufacturing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingyue; Zhou, Zhangjian; Zhong, Ming; Tan, Jun; Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Thermal shock resistance of fine grained W-Y2O3 materials fabricated by two different manufacturing technologies (i.e. spark plasma sintering and high temperature sintering in combination with hot rolling deformation) was examined under transient high heat loads below and slightly above the melting threshold of pure tungsten. The tests were performed with the electron beam test facility EMS-60 at Southwestern Institute of Physics, China. The comparison of the thermal shock response in this work showed that the deformed W-Y2O3 performed a superior behavior to spark plasma sintered W-Y2O3 in suppressing the crack formation, melting resistance and recrystallization resistance. The thermo-physical properties and mechanical characterizations necessary for understanding the thermal shock response of these materials were also presented and discussed.

  19. Toxic shock syndrome in two CAPD patients with Staphylococcus aureus exit-site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altiparmak, Mehmet R; Demirel, Hande; Mert, Ali; Serdengecti, Kamil; Ataman, Rezzan

    2003-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is an illness defined by the occurrence of fever, rash, hypotension, multiple organ system dysfunction, and desquamation. Nonmenstrual TSS is often associated with surgical or nonsurgical cutaneous infections, which are rarely purulent or inflamed (Reingold AL, et al. Nonmenstrual toxic shock syndrome: a review of 130 cases. Ann Intern Med 1982; 96:871-4). Toxic shock syndrome associated with peritoneal exit-site infection but without peritonitis is extremely unusual (Sherbotie JR, et al. Toxic shock syndrome with Staphylococcus aureus exit-site infection in a patient on peritoneal dialysis. Am J Kidney Dis 1990; 15:80-3). We describe 2 patients that met the Centers for Disease Control case definition of TSS secondary to a peritoneal dialysis catheter exit-site infection with signs of mild inflammation and growth of Staphylococcus aureus, but with no evidence of peritonitis.

  20. Two-Dimensional Regular Shock Reflection for the Pressure Gradient System of Conservation Laws

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxi Zheng

    2006-01-01

    We establish the existence of a global solution to a regular reflection of a shock hitting a ramp for the pressure gradient system of equations. The set-up of the reflection is the same as that of Mach's experiment for the compressible Euler system, i.e., a straight shock hitting a ramp. We assume that the angle of the ramp is close to 90 degrees. The solution has a reflected bow shock wave, called the diffraction of the planar shock at the compressive corner, which is mathematically regarded as a free boundary in the self-similar variable plane.The pressure gradient system of three equations is a subsystem, and an approximation, of the full Euler system,and we offer a couple of derivations.

  1. Study on Mach stems induced by interaction of planar shock waves on two intersecting wedges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaoxiang Xiang; Chun Wang; Honghui Teng; Yang Yang; Zonglin Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The properties of Mach stems in hypersonic corner flow induced by Mach interaction over 3D inter-secting wedges were studied theoretically and numerically. A new method called “spatial dimension reduction” was used to analyze theoretically the location and Mach num-ber behind Mach stems. By using this approach, the problem of 3D steady shock/shock interaction over 3D intersecting wedges was transformed into a 2D moving one on cross sec-tions, which can be solved by shock-polar theory and shock dynamics theory. The properties of Mach interaction over 3D intersecting wedges can be analyzed with the new method, including pressure, temperature, density in the vicinity of triple points, location, and Mach number behind Mach stems. Theoretical results were compared with numerical results, and good agreement was obtained. Also, the influence of Mach number and wedge angle on the properties of a 3D Mach stem was studied.

  2. Calculating the number of shock waves, expulsion time, and optimum stone parameters based on noncontrast computerized tomography characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Khaled; Abdeldaeim, Hussein; Youssif, Mohamed; Assem, Akram

    2013-11-01

    To define the parameters that accompanied a successful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), namely the number of shock waves (SWs), expulsion time (ET), mean stone density (MSD), and the skin-to-stone distance (SSD). A total of 368 patients diagnosed with renal calculi using noncontrast computerized tomography had their MSD, diameter, and SSD recorded. All patients were treated using a Siemens lithotripter. ESWL success meant a stone-free status or presence of residual fragments 934 HUs and SSD >99 mm. The required number of SWs and the expected ET can be anticipated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lunar highland meteorite Dhofar 026 and Apollo sample 15418: Two strongly shocked, partially melted, granulitic breccias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B. A.; James, O.B.; Taylor, L.A.; Nazarov, M.A.; Barsukova, L.D.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of lunar meteorite Dhofar 026, and comparison to Apollo sample 15418, indicate that Dhofar 026 is a strongly shocked granulitic breccia (or a fragmental breccia consisting almost entirely of granulitic breccia clasts) that experienced considerable post-shock heating, probably as a result of diffusion of heat into the rock from an external, hotter source. The shock converted plagioclase to maskelynite, indicating that the shock pressure was between 30 and 45 GPa. The post-shock heating raised the rock's temperature to about 1200 ??C; as a result, the maskelynite devitrified, and extensive partial melting took place. The melting was concentrated in pyroxene-rich areas; all pyroxene melted. As the rock cooled, the partial melts crystallized with fine-grained, subophitic-poikilitic textures. Sample 15418 is a strongly shocked granulitic breccia that had a similar history, but evidence for this history is better preserved than in Dhofar 026. The fact that Dhofar 026 was previously interpreted as an impact melt breccia underscores the importance of detailed petrographic study in interpretation of lunar rocks that have complex textures. The name "impact melt" has, in past studies, been applied only to rocks in which the melt fraction formed by shock-induced total fusion. Recently, however, this name has also been applied to rocks containing melt formed by heating of the rocks by conductive heat transfer, assuming that impact is the ultimate source of the heat. We urge that the name "impact melt" be restricted to rocks in which the bulk of the melt formed by shock-induced fusion to avoid confusion engendered by applying the same name to rocks melted by different processes. ?? Meteoritical Society, 2004.

  4. Interaction-powered supernovae: Rise-time vs. peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Ofek, E O; Tal, D; Sullivan, M; Gal-Yam, A; Kulkarni, S R; Nugent, P E; Ben-Ami, S; Bersier, D; Cao, Y; Cenko, S B; De Cia, A; Filippenko, A V; Fransson, C; Kasliwal, M M; Laher, R; Surace, J; Quimby, R; Yaron, O

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limit...

  5. Investigation of the unsteadiness of a shock-reflection interaction with time-resolved particle image velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Jöbsis, A.J.P.; Scarano, F.; Souverein, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of an impinging shock/boundary layer interaction atMach 2 and under incipient separation conditions, has been investigated experimentally by means of high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV). The available PIV acquisition rate of up to 20 kHz permits a time-resolved c

  6. Mid Frequency Shock Response Determination by Using Energy Flow Method and Time Domain Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hyun Woo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shock induced vibration can be more crucial in the mid frequency range where the dynamic couplings with structural parts and components play important roles. To estimate the behavior of structures in this frequency range where conventional analytical schemes, such as statistical energy analysis (SEA and finite element analysis (FEA methods may become inaccurate, many alternative methodologies have been tried up to date. This study presents an effective and practical method to accurately predict transient responses in the mid frequency range without having to resort to the large computational efforts. Specifically, the present study employs the more realistic frequency response functions (FRFs from the energy flow method (EFM which is a hybrid method combining the pseudo SEA equation (or SEA-Like equation and modal information obtained by the finite element analysis (FEA. Furthermore, to obtain the time responses synthesized with modal characteristics, a time domain correction is practiced with the input force signal and the reference FRF on a position of the response subsystem. A numerical simulation is performed for a simple five plate model to show its suitability and effectiveness over the standard analytical schemes.

  7. DAM-BREAK SHOCK WAVES WITH FLOATING DEBRIS: EXPERIMENTALANALYSIS AND TWO-PHASE MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Mambretti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available To predict floods and debris flow dynamics a numerical model, based on 1D De Saint Venant (SV equations, was developed. The McCormack – Jameson shock capturing scheme was employed for the solution of the equations, written in a conservative law form. This technique was applied to determine both the propagation and the profile of a two – phase debris flow resulting from the instantaneous and complete collapse of a storage dam. To validate the model, comparisons have been made between its predictions and laboratory measurements concerning flows of water and homogeneous granular mixtures in a uniform geometry flume reproducing dam – break waves. Agreements between computational and experimental results are considered very satisfactory for mature (non – stratified debris flows, which embrace most real cases. To better predict immature (stratified flows, the model should be improved in order to feature, in a more realistic way, the distribution of the particles of different size within the mixture. On the whole, the model proposed can easily be extended to channels with arbitrary cross sections for debris flow routing, as well as for solving different problems of unsteady flow in open channels by incorporating the appropriate initial and boundary conditions.

  8. Gravity in two-time physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bars, Itzhak

    2008-06-01

    The field theoretic action for gravitational interactions in d+2 dimensions is constructed in the formalism of two-time (2T) physics. General relativity in d dimensions emerges as a shadow of this theory with one less time and one less space dimensions. The gravitational constant turns out to be a shadow of a dilaton field in d+2 dimensions that appears as a constant to observers stuck in d dimensions. If elementary scalar fields play a role in the fundamental theory (such as Higgs fields in the standard model coupled to gravity), then their shadows in d dimensions must necessarily be conformal scalars. This has the physical consequence that the gravitational constant changes at each phase transition (inflation, grand unification, electroweak, etc.), implying interesting new scenarios in cosmological applications. The fundamental action for pure gravity, which includes the spacetime metric GMN(X), the dilaton Ω(X), and an additional auxiliary scalar field W(X), all in d+2 dimensions with two times, has a mix of gauge symmetries to produce appropriate constraints that remove all ghosts or redundant degrees of freedom. The action produces on-shell classical field equations of motion in d+2 dimensions, with enough constraints for the theory to be in agreement with classical general relativity in d dimensions. Therefore this action describes the correct classical gravitational physics directly in d+2 dimensions. Taken together with previous similar work on the standard model of particles and forces, the present paper shows that 2T physics is a general consistent framework for a physical theory. Furthermore, the 2T-physics approach reveals more physical information for observers stuck in the shadow in d dimensions in the form of hidden symmetries and dualities, that are largely concealed in the usual one-time formulation of physics.

  9. Small doses of arginine vasopressin in combination with norepinephrine "buy" time for definitive treatment for uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liangming; Tian, Kunlun; Xue, Mingying; Zhu, Yu; Lan, Dan; Peng, Xiaoyong; Wu, Yue; Li, Tao

    2013-11-01

    Implementation of fluid resuscitation and blood transfusion are greatly limited in prehospital or evacuation settings after severe trauma or war wounds. With uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock rats, we investigated if arginine vasopressin (AVP) in combination with norepinephrine (NE) is independent (or slightly dependent) of fluid resuscitation and can "buy" time for the subsequently definitive treatment of traumatic hemorrhagic shock in the present study. The results showed that AVP (0.4 U/kg) alone or with NE (3 μg/kg) with one-eighth and one-fourth volumes of total blood volume of lactated Ringer's infusion significantly increased and maintained the mean arterial pressure. Among all groups, 0.4 U/kg of AVP + NE (3 μg/kg) with one-eighth volume of lactated Ringer's infusion had the best effect: it significantly increased and maintained hemodynamics and prolonged the survival time. This early treatment strategy significantly improved the effects of subsequently definitive treatments (after bleeding controlled): it increased the subsequent survival, improved the hemodynamic parameters, improved the cardiac function, and increased the tissue blood flow and oxygen delivery. These results suggested that early application of small doses of AVP (0.4 U/kg) + NE before bleeding control can "buy" time for the definitive treatment of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock, which may be an effective measure for the early treatment of traumatic hemorrhagic shock.

  10. Computing Normal Shock-Isotropic Turbulence Interaction With Tetrahedral Meshes and the Space-Time CESE Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this study is scale-resolving simulations of the canonical normal shock- isotropic turbulence interaction using unstructured tetrahedral meshes and the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) method. Despite decades of development in unstructured mesh methods and its potential benefits of ease of mesh generation around complex geometries and mesh adaptation, direct numerical or large-eddy simulations of turbulent flows are predominantly carried out using structured hexahedral meshes. This is due to the lack of consistent multi-dimensional numerical formulations in conventional schemes for unstructured meshes that can resolve multiple physical scales and flow discontinuities simultaneously. The CESE method - due to its Riemann-solver-free shock capturing capabilities, non-dissipative baseline schemes, and flux conservation in time as well as space - has the potential to accurately simulate turbulent flows using tetrahedral meshes. As part of the study, various regimes of the shock-turbulence interaction (wrinkled and broken shock regimes) will be investigated along with a study on how adaptive refinement of tetrahedral meshes benefits this problem. The research funding for this paper has been provided by Revolutionary Computational Aerosciences (RCA) subproject under the NASA Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Program (TACP).

  11. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Y M; Turneaure, Stefan J; Perkins, K; Zimmerman, K; Arganbright, N; Shen, G; Chow, P

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization∕x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  12. Signature of Accretion Shocks in Emitted Radiation From a Two Temperature Advective Flows Around Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, S; Mandal, Samir; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2005-01-01

    Centrifugal barrier supported boundary layer (CENBOL) of a black hole affects the spectrum exactly in the same way the boundary layer of a neutron star does. The CENBOL is produced due to standing or oscillating shock waves and these shocks accelerate electrons very efficiently and produce a power-law distribution. The accelerated particles in turn emit synchrotron radiation in presence of the magnetic field. We study the spectral properties of an accretion disk as a function of the shock strength, compression ratio, flow accretion rate and flow geometry. In the absence of a satisfactory description of magnetic fields inside the advective disk, we consider the presence of only stochastic fields and use the ratio of the field energy density to the gravitational energy density to be a parameter. Not surprisingly, stronger fields produce stronger humps due to synchrotron radiation. We not only include `conventional' synchrotron emission and Comptonization due to Maxwell-Bolzmann electrons in the gas, we also com...

  13. The Stop-Only-While-Shocking algorithm reduces hands-off time by 17% during cardiopulmonary resuscitation - a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch Hansen, Lars; Mohammed, Anna; Pedersen, Magnus; Folkestad, Lars; Brodersen, Jacob; Hey, Thomas; Lyhne Christensen, Nicolaj; Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Bendix, Kristoffer; Hansen, Morten R; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2016-12-01

    Reducing hands-off time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is believed to increase survival after cardiac arrests because of the sustaining of organ perfusion. The aim of our study was to investigate whether charging the defibrillator before rhythm analyses and shock delivery significantly reduced hands-off time compared with the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2010 CPR guideline algorithm in full-scale cardiac arrest scenarios. The study was designed as a full-scale cardiac arrest simulation study including administration of drugs. Participants were randomized into using the Stop-Only-While-Shocking (SOWS) algorithm or the ERC2010 algorithm. In SOWS, chest compressions were only interrupted for a post-charging rhythm analysis and immediate shock delivery. A Resusci Anne HLR-D manikin and a LIFEPACK 20 defibrillator were used. The manikin recorded time and chest compressions. Sample size was calculated with an α of 0.05 and 80% power showed that we should test four scenarios with each algorithm. Twenty-nine physicians participated in 11 scenarios. Hands-off time was significantly reduced 17% using the SOWS algorithm compared with ERC2010 [22.1% (SD 2.3) hands-off time vs. 26.6% (SD 4.8); P<0.05]. In full-scale cardiac arrest simulations, a minor change consisting of charging the defibrillator before rhythm check reduces hands-off time by 17% compared with ERC2010 guidelines.

  14. Expression patterns of two heat-shock cognate 70 genes during immune responses and larval development of the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P; Jiang, X F; Guo, W B; Yan, J; Zhou, K Y

    2016-09-16

    Two heat-shock protein (HSP) 70 family transcripts, heat-shock protein 70 cognate 5 and heat-shock protein 70 cognate 3 (designated as EsHSC70-5 and EsHSC70-3, respectively), were isolated from the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis and their expression profiles were evaluated for their responsiveness to larval development and immune challenge in adult crabs. The HSPs exhibited 45-89% identity with other heat-shock proteins, and they shared similar structural features. EsHSC70 mRNA expression was detected not only during infection but also during the developmental larval stages. The EsHSC70s were enriched, and their expression fluctuated during early development. EsHSC70 mRNA expression was significantly induced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenge in all of the tissues studied (P < 0.05). Expression of EsHSC70 mRNA in the hepatopancreas and at the early zoeal stages was particularly pronounced, and the two EsHSC70s exhibited differential expression patterns both chronologically and spatially. The EsHSC70-5 mRNA level was significantly downregulated in the intestine and gills compared to that in controls at nearly all time points, and was expressed at a lower level after the bacterial challenge, indicating that EsHSC70-5 and EsHSC70-3 respond to immune challenges. The stage-specific enrichment of EsHSC70 transcripts in crabs suggests that these stress proteins play an essential role during brachyurization events.

  15. Declining mortality due to severe sepsis and septic shock in Spanish intensive care units: A two-cohort study in 2005 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, B; Ferrer, R; Suarez, D; Romay, E; Piacentini, E; Gomà, G; Martínez, M L; Artigas, A

    To analyze the evolution of sepsis-related mortality in Spanish Intensive Care Units (ICUs) following introduction of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines and the relationship with sepsis process-of-care. A prospective cohort study was carried out, with the inclusion of all consecutive patients presenting severe sepsis or septic shock admitted to 41 Spanish ICUs during two time periods: 2005 (Edusepsis study pre-intervention group) and 2011 (ABISS-Edusepsis study pre-intervention group). Patients with severe sepsis or septic shock admitted to Spanish ICUs. All ICU admissions from the emergency department or wards and all ICU patients with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock. A total of 1348 patients were included: 630 in the 2005 group and 718 in the 2011 group. None. ICU mortality, 28-day mortality and Hospital mortality, hospital length of stay, ICU length of stay and compliance with the resuscitation bundle. Compliance with the resuscitation bundle was significantly greater in the 2011 group (5.7% vs. 9.9%; p=0.005), and was associated to lower mortality (OR 0.602 [0.365-0.994]; p=0.048). The 2011 group had lower absolute in-hospital mortality (44.0% vs. 32.6%; p=0.01), 28-day mortality (36.5% vs. 23.0%; p=0.01), and adjusted mortality (OR 0.64 [0.49-0.83], p=0.001). Mortality related to severe sepsis or septic shock in Spain decreased between two patient cohorts in 2005 and 2011, and was attributable to earliness and improvement in sepsis care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantum-based Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shock-induced Reactions with Time-resolved Raman Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, Marc; Sanville, Edward; Coe, Joshua; Niklasson, Anders

    2012-02-01

    Shock-induced reactions in liquid hydrocarbons have been studied using quantum-based, self-consistent tight-binding (SC-TB) molecular dynamics simulations with an accurate and transferable model for interatomic bonding. Our SC-TB code LATTE enables explicit simulations of shock compression using the universal liquid Hugoniot. Furthermore, the effects of adiabatic shock heating are captured precisely using Niklasson's energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics formalism. We have been able to perform relatively large-scale SC-TB simulations by either taking advantage of the sparsity of the density matrix to achieve O(N) performance or by using graphics processing units to accelerate O(N^3) algorithms. We have developed the capability for the on-the-fly computation of Raman spectra from the Fourier transform of the polarizability autocorrelation function via the density matrix perturbation theory of Niklasson and Challacombe. These time-resolved Raman spectra enable us compare the results of our simulations with identical diagnostics collected experimentally. We will illustrate these capabilities with a series of simulations of shock-induced reaction paths in a number of simple molecules.

  17. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN AND ABOVE POST-FLARE LOOPS: TWO-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATION AND A SIMPLIFIED MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Naoki; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Matsumoto, Takuma, E-mail: takasao@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    Solar flares are an explosive phenomenon where super-sonic flows and shocks are expected in and above the post-flare loops. To understand the dynamics of post-flare loops, a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (2D MHD) simulation of a solar flare has been carried out. We found new shock structures in and above the post-flare loops, which were not resolved in the previous work by Yokoyama and Shibata. To study the dynamics of flows along the reconnected magnetic field, the kinematics and energetics of the plasma are investigated along selected field lines. It is found that shocks are crucial to determine the thermal and flow structures in the post-flare loops. On the basis of the 2D MHD simulation, we developed a new post-flare loop model, which we defined as the pseudo-2D MHD model. The model is based on the one-dimensional (1D) MHD equations, where all variables depend on one space dimension, and all the three components of the magnetic and velocity fields are considered. Our pseudo-2D model includes many features of the multi-dimensional MHD processes related to magnetic reconnection (particularly MHD shocks), which the previous 1D hydrodynamic models are not able to include. We compared the shock formation and energetics of a specific field line in the 2D calculation with those in our pseudo-2D MHD model, and found that they give similar results. This model will allow us to study the evolution of the post-flare loops in a wide parameter space without expensive computational cost or neglecting important physics associated with magnetic reconnection.

  18. Perturbative Analysis of Two-Temperature Radiative Shocks with Multiple Cooling Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Saxton, C J; Saxton, Curtis J.; Wu, Kinwah

    1999-01-01

    The structure of the hot downstream region below a radiative accretion shock, such as that of an accreting compact object, may oscillate due to a global thermal instability. The oscillatory behaviour depends on the functional forms of the cooling processes, the energy exchanges of electrons and ions in the shock-heated matter, and the boundary conditions. We analyse the stability of a shock with unequal electron and ion temperatures, where the cooling consists of thermal bremsstrahlung radiation which promotes instability, plus a competing process which tends to stabilize the shock. The effect of transverse perturbations is considered also. As an illustration, we study the special case in which the stabilizing cooling process is of order 3/20 in density and 5/2 in temperature, which is an approximation for the effects of cyclotron cooling in magnetic cataclysmic variables. We vary the efficiency of the second cooling process, the strength of the electron-ion exchange and the ratio of electron and ion pressure...

  19. Studying areal density evolution in D-3He implosions at the National Ignition Facility using pTOF-measured shock- and compression-bang times and WRF-measured shock and compression ρR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, N.; Sio, H.; Lahmann, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Meezan, N.; Casey, D. T.; Baker, K.; Khan, S.; Thomas, C. A.; Spears, B. K.; Barbosa, F.; Bionta, R. M.; Zylstra, A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the time evolution of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments is critical for making further improvements on the road to ignition. In an ICF implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) shocks are launched into the ablator by a laser pulse. These shocks coalesce at the fuel-shell interface and then converge at the center of the implosion which causes significant heating and a period of nuclear burn (``shock phase''), followed by a compression phase due to the imploding shell. The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) and the magnetic particle-time-of-flight (magPTOF) detectors were developed to measure both the shock and compression bang-times in NIF D-3He implosions. These timing measurements in combination with shock and compression areal densities (ρR) from wedge range filters (WRFs) provide a direct measurement of ρR evolution, which can be used to guide theory and heavily constrain simulations. This presentation shows a first analysis of ρR evolution from shock phase to compression phase in a variety of NIF implosions as measured by pTOF and WRFs. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  20. An Analytical Method for Calculating the Satellite Bow Shock/Magnetopause Interception Positions and Times

    CERN Document Server

    Atanassov, Atanas Marinov

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a presentation of analytical solution of the problem of calculating the places and moments of intersection of satellite trajectories with elements of the Earth's magnetosphere (bow shock and magnetopause). The satellite motion is presented in a Kepler's approximation. Magnetopause and bow shock are described by second-order surfaces- elliptic paraboloides. These surfaces are employed as situational conditions for determining the points of intersection they have (if any) with the satellite trajectory. The situational condition is herein transformed into the plane of Kepler's orbit, thereafter it is reduced to a second-order plane curve- quadric (ellipse or parabola). The solution of this system, containing the equation of this curve and Kepler's ellipse equation, allows determining the places where orbits intersect with the magnetopause or the bow shock. The solution of this system is suggested to be given by reducing the system to a fourth-order equation.

  1. A novel particle time of flight diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D3He and DT implosions at the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Zylstra, A B; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Frenje, J A; Waugh, C J; Li, C K; Sèguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Kimbrough, J R; MacPhee, A; Collins, G W; Hicks, D; Mackinnon, A; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Clancy, T; Zacharias, R; Döppner, T; Park, H S; LePape, S; Landen, O; Meezan, N; Moses, E I; Glebov, V U; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Olson, R; Kline, J; Kilkenny, J

    2012-10-01

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, fielded alongside a wedge range-filter (WRF) proton spectrometer, will provide an absolute timing for the shock-burn weighted ρR measurements that will validate the modeling of implosion dynamics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In the first phase of the project, pTOF has recorded accurate bang times in cryogenic DT, DT exploding pusher, and D(3)He implosions using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than ±70 ps. In the second phase of the project, a deflecting magnet will be incorporated into the pTOF design for simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D(3)He-filled surrogate implosions using D(3)He protons and DD-neutrons, respectively.

  2. Sequential shock induced switch tests for Eglin Air Force Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cech, R.D.

    1994-08-11

    Tests were performed at EG&G Mound Applied Technologies to investigate the effect of using the tangential shock wave from detonating Extex explosive to cause shock conduction of a Kapton dielectric. Two voltages (600 and 4000) were switched from a 600 pF capacitor. Timing between four shock switches and four pin switches was found and compared during a single detonation event. Electrical conduction was observed between shock switches and the current paths were found.

  3. Experiments on a Miniature Hypervelocity Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Douglas; Johnson, Carl; Murphy, Michael; Lieber, Mark; MIMS Team

    2013-06-01

    A miniature explosively-driven shock tube, based on the Voitenko compressor design, has been designed to produce shock speeds in light gases in excess of 80 km/s. Voitenko compressors over 1 meter in diameter have been reported but here experiments on miniature shock tubes with ~1-mm bore diameters are described. In this design a 12-mm diameter explosive pellet drives a metal plate into a hemispherical gas compression chamber. Downstream from the piston a mica diaphragm separates the gas from an evacuated shock tube which is confined by a massive polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) block. The diaphragm eventually ruptures under the applied pressure loading and the compressed gases escape into the evacuated shock tube at hyper velocities. The progress of gas shocks in the tube and bow shocks in the PMMA are monitored with an ultra-high-speed imaging system, the Shock Wave Image Framing Technique (SWIFT). The resulting time-resolved images yield two-dimensional visualizations of shock geometry and progression. By measuring both the gas and bow shocks, accurate and unequivocal measurements of shock position history are obtained. The experimental results were compared with those of hydrocode modeling to optimize the design. The first experiments were suboptimum in that the velocities were ~16 km/s. Progress with these experiments will be reported.

  4. Three- and Two- Dimensional Simulations of Re-shock Experiments at High Energy Densities at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Stephan; Huntington, Channing; Nagel, Sabrina

    2016-10-01

    We present simulations of recent high-energy-density (HED) re-shock experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments study the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability growth that occurs after successive shocks transit a sinusoidally-perturbed interface between materials of different densities. The shock tube is driven at one or both ends using indirect-drive laser cavities or hohlraums. X-ray area-backlit imaging is used to visualize the growth at different times. Our simulations are done with the three-dimensional, radiation hydrodynamics code ARES, developed at LLNL. We show the instabilitygrowth rate, inferred from the experimental radiographs, agrees well with our 2D and 3D simulations. We also discuss some 3D geometrical effects, suggested by our simulations, which could deteriorate the images at late times, unless properly accounted for in the experiment design. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE- AC52-06NA27279. LLNL-ABS-680789.

  5. Cardiogenic shock: a failure in reperfusion. Time for a strategic change?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); I.P. Kay (Ian Patrick)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractCardiogenic shock secondary to acute myocardial infarction results in the death of most affected indi- viduals. This grim reality persists in spite of vigorous attempts at providing inotropic support using phar- macological agents, thrombolytic regimes and intra- aortic balloon pumping.

  6. Counter-driver shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamba, T.; Nguyen, T. M.; Takeya, K.; Harasaki, T.; Iwakawa, A.; Sasoh, A.

    2015-11-01

    A "counter-driver" shock tube was developed. In this device, two counter drivers are actuated with an appropriate delay time to generate the interaction between a shock wave and a flow in the opposite direction which is induced by another shock wave. The conditions for the counter drivers can be set independently. Each driver is activated by a separate electrically controlled diaphragm rupture device, in which a pneumatic piston drives a rupture needle with a temporal jitter of better than 1.1 ms. Operation demonstrations were conducted to evaluate the practical performance.

  7. Isolation of two strong poly (U binding proteins from moderate halophile Halomonas eurihalina and their identification as cold shock proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Kumari Garapati

    Full Text Available Cold shock proteins (Csp are known to be expressed in response to sudden decrease in temperature. They are thought to be involved in a number of cellular processes viz., RNA chaperone activity, translation, transcription, nucleoid condensation. During our studies on ribosomal protein S1 in moderate halophile Halomonas eurihalina, we observed the presence of two strong poly (U binding proteins in abundance in cell extracts from cells grown under normal growth conditions. The proteins can be isolated in a single step using Poly (U cellulose chromatography. The proteins were identified as major cold shock proteins belonging to Csp A family by MALDI-TOF and bioinformatic analysis. Csp 12 kDa was found in both exponential and stationary phases whereas Csp 8 kDa is found only in exponential phase.

  8. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien-Chih Liu, James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of falling molten lithium or Li2BeF4 (Flibe) jets encircles the reactor`s central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel. X-rays from the fusion microexplosion will ablate a thin layer of blanket material from the surfaces which face toward the fusion site. This generates a highly energetic vapor, which mostly coalesces in the central cavity. The blast expansion from the central cavity generates a shock which propagates through the segmented blanket - a complex geometry, gas-continuous two-phase medium. The impulse that the blast gives to the liquid as it vents past, the gas shock on the chamber wall, and ultimately the liquid impact on the wall are all important quantities to the HYLIFE structural designers.

  9. Real-time X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Shocked Polycrystalline Tin and Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dane V. Morgan, Don Macy, Gerald Stevens

    2008-11-22

    A new, fast, single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic for determining phase transitions in shocked polycrystalline materials has been developed. The diagnostic consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, producing line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 35-ns pulse. The characteristic Kα lines from the selected anodes of silver and molybdenum are used to produce the diffraction patterns, with thin foil filters employed to remove the characteristic Kβ line emission. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 3-mm by 6-mm spot and 1° full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) angular divergence in a Bragg-reflecting geometry. For the experiments described in this report, the angle between the incident beam and the sample surface was 8.5°. A Debye-Scherrer diffraction image was produced on a phosphor located 76 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. The phosphor image was coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera through a coherent fiberoptic bundle. Dynamic single-pulse XRD experiments were conducted with thin foil samples of tin, shock loaded with a 1-mm vitreous carbon back window. Detasheet high explosive with a 2-mm-thick aluminum buffer was used to shock the sample. Analysis of the dynamic shock-loaded tin XRD images revealed a phase transformation of the tin beta phase into an amorphous or liquid state. Identical experiments with shock-loaded aluminum indicated compression of the face-centered-cubic (fcc) aluminum lattice with no phase transformation.

  10. Shallow water analogue of the standing accretion shock instability: experimental demonstration and a two-dimensional model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Masset, Frédéric; Guilet, Jérôme; Durand, Gilles

    2012-02-03

    Despite the sphericity of the collapsing stellar core, the birth conditions of neutron stars can be highly nonspherical due to a hydrodynamical instability of the shocked accretion flow. Here we report the first laboratory experiment of a shallow water analogue, based on the physics of hydraulic jumps. Both the experiment and its shallow water modeling demonstrate a robust linear instability and nonlinear properties of symmetry breaking, in a system which is one million times smaller and about one hundred times slower than its astrophysical analogue.

  11. Accuracy of a real-time continuous glucose monitoring system in children with septic shock: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhudesai, Sumant; Kanjani, Amruta; Bhagat, Isha; Ravikumar, Karnam G.; Ramachandran, Bala

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this prospective, observational study was to determine the accuracy of a real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in children with septic shock. Subjects and Methods: Children aged 30 days to 18 years admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit with septic shock were included. A real-time CGMS sensor was used to obtain interstitial glucose readings. CGMS readings were compared statistically with simultaneous laboratory blood glucose (BG). Results: Nineteen children were included, and 235 pairs of BG-CGMS readings were obtained. BG and CGMS had a correlation coefficient of 0.61 (P 180 mg/dL, 44%, 100%, and 76.9% readings were in zones A and B, respectively (P 141 mg/dL predicted hyperglycemia (sensitivity 84.6%, specificity 89.6%, AUC = 0.87). Conclusion: CGMS provides a fairly, accurate estimate of BG in children with septic shock. It is unaffected by a variety of clinical variables. The accuracy over extremes of blood sugar may be a concern. We recommend larger studies to evaluate its use for the early detection of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. PMID:26730114

  12. Accuracy of a real-time continuous glucose monitoring system in children with septic shock: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumant Prabhudesai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this prospective, observational study was to determine the accuracy of a real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS in children with septic shock. Subjects and Methods: Children aged 30 days to 18 years admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit with septic shock were included. A real-time CGMS sensor was used to obtain interstitial glucose readings. CGMS readings were compared statistically with simultaneous laboratory blood glucose (BG. Results: Nineteen children were included, and 235 pairs of BG-CGMS readings were obtained. BG and CGMS had a correlation coefficient of 0.61 (P 180 mg/dL, 44%, 100%, and 76.9% readings were in zones A and B, respectively (P 141 mg/dL predicted hyperglycemia (sensitivity 84.6%, specificity 89.6%, AUC = 0.87. Conclusion: CGMS provides a fairly, accurate estimate of BG in children with septic shock. It is unaffected by a variety of clinical variables. The accuracy over extremes of blood sugar may be a concern. We recommend larger studies to evaluate its use for the early detection of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia.

  13. Three-dimensional, time-dependent, MHD model of a solar flare-generated interplanetary shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, M.; Wu, S. T.; Han, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    A three-dimensional time-dependent MHD model of the propagation of an interplanetary shock wave into an ambient three-dimensional heliospheric solar wind is initialized with a peak velocity of 1000 km/s at the center of a right circular cone of 18 deg included angle at 18 solar radii. Differences from a previous 2-1/2 simulation (Wu et al., 1983; Gislason et al., 1984; Dryer et al., 1984) include diminuation of the solar peak velocity and concentration of the peak density at each radius. The IMF magnitude starts with high-latitude peaks, and helical-like IMF rotation is noted due to a large-amplitude nonlinear Alfven wave in the shocked plasma.

  14. Water as carrier of information of heat shock and drug effect between two groups of Adhatoda vasica plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N C Sukul

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Adhatoda vasica Nees plants were grown in 50 earthen pots, which were divided into 5 batches A, B, C, D, and E. Of these A, B and C, D were arranged into two separate parallel pairs. One leaf of each plant of an adjacent pair was immersed in sterile tap water in a beaker. Adjacent beakers in each pair A B or C D were connected by polythene tubes containing wet cotton threads. One leaf of each plant of A was given heat shock by immersing a leaf in hot water for 5 min. One leaf of each plant of C was treated with Cantharis vesicatoria 200c. Batch E served as the unstressed and untreated control. One hour after heat shock or drug treatment all the leaves were harvested and their proteins were extracted by chilled protein extraction buffer. Proteins were separated by Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC. Protein profiles of A, B and C, D showed marked similarity with respect to expression and repression of some proteins. It is concluded that the effect of heat shock and drug treatment is transmitted through water in the capillaries of cotton threads connecting the pairs of plants. It is assumed that heat shock or drug treatment altered locally the water structure in the leaves which was propagated through global network of water structure over the protein network in the whole plants, and from there to the interfacial water in the beakers and cotton threads. A homeopathic potency is thought to be specifically structured water which influences the water structure in the treated organism.

  15. 冲击间隔服从泊松分布的δ冲击模型的可靠性分析%The reliability analysis of the δ -shock model based on interarrival time follows Poisson distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何雪; 冶建华; 陈丽雅

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a kind of δ-shock model, assuming that the system suffer from shock which interarrival time follows the Poisson distribution. The system will failure if some interarrival time between two successive shocks is less than some threshold δ. This paper calculate the distribution of shock number and shock arrival times and find the probability distribution and expectations of system lifetime using induction method.%讨论了一种特殊的δ冲击模型,假设系统受到到达时间间隔服从泊松分布的冲击,当连续两次冲击的时间间隔超过门限值δ时,系统失效。我们计算了此类δ冲击模型系统冲击到达次数和冲击到达时刻的分布,并且进一步求出了系统寿命的概率分布和期望。

  16. Time-Dependent, Multifluid, Magnetohydrodynamic Shock Waves with Grain Dynamics I. Formulation and Numerical Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Ciolek, G E; Ciolek, Glenn E.; Roberge, Wayne G.

    2002-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers on the effects of dust on the formation, propagation, and structure of nonlinear MHD waves and MHD shocks in weakly-ionized plasmas. We model the plasma as a system of 9 interacting fluids, consisting of the neutral gas, ions, electrons, and 6 grain fluids comprised of very small grains or PAHs and classical grains in different charge states. We formulate the governing equations for perpendicular shocks under approximations appropriate for dense molecular clouds, protostellar cores, and protoplanetary disks. We describe a code that obtains numerical solutions using a finite difference method, and estabish its accuracy by comparing numerical and exact solutions for special cases.

  17. New Bayesian inference method using two steps of Markov chain Monte Carlo and its application to shock tube experiment data of Furan oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang

    2016-01-06

    A new Bayesian inference method has been developed and applied to Furan shock tube experimental data for efficient statistical inferences of the Arrhenius parameters of two OH radical consumption reactions. The collected experimental data, which consist of time series signals of OH radical concentrations of 14 shock tube experiments, may require several days for MCMC computations even with the support of a fast surrogate of the combustion simulation model, while the new method reduces it to several hours by splitting the process into two steps of MCMC: the first inference of rate constants and the second inference of the Arrhenius parameters. Each step has low dimensional parameter spaces and the second step does not need the executions of the combustion simulation. Furthermore, the new approach has more flexibility in choosing the ranges of the inference parameters, and the higher speed and flexibility enable the more accurate inferences and the analyses of the propagation of errors in the measured temperatures and the alignment of the experimental time to the inference results.

  18. Bank loan components and the time-varying effects of monetary policy shocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. den Haan; S.W. Sumner; G.M. Yamashiro

    2011-01-01

    The impulse response function (IRF) of an aggregate variable is time-varying if the IRFs of its components are different from each other and the relative magnitudes of the components are not constant—two conditions likely to be true in practice. We model the behaviour of loan components and document

  19. The Stop-Only-While-Shocking algorithm reduces hands-off time by 17% during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Koch; Mohammed, Anna; Pedersen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reducing hands-off time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is believed to increase survival after cardiac arrests because of the sustaining of organ perfusion. The aim of our study was to investigate whether charging the defibrillator before rhythm analyses and shock delivery...... significantly reduced hands-off time compared with the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2010 CPR guideline algorithm in full-scale cardiac arrest scenarios. METHODS: The study was designed as a full-scale cardiac arrest simulation study including administration of drugs. Participants were randomized...

  20. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhitao; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Xiao, Pan; Christensen, James; Zhou, Min; Summers, Christopher J.; Dlott, Dana D.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2016-07-01

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  1. Contrasting Early and Late Shock Effects on the L Chondrite Parent Body: Evidence from Ar Ages and Olivine Microstructures for Two Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, A. M.; Clay, P. L.; Hugo, R.; Joy, K. H.; Busemann, H.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss Ar age and olivine microstructure data for two L6 chondrites that provide a case study of contrasting shock effects in similar chondritic materials deformed in different epochs and under different conditions.

  2. Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors for Measuring Transient Detonation/Shock Behavior;Time-of-Arrival Detection and Waveform Determination.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, Marcus Alexander; Willis, Michael David; Covert, Timothy Todd

    2014-09-01

    The miniaturization of explosive components has driven the need for a corresponding miniaturization of the current diagnostic techniques available to measure the explosive phenomena. Laser interferometry and the use of spectrally coated optical windows have proven to be an essential interrogation technique to acquire particle velocity time history data in one- dimensional gas gun and relatively large-scale explosive experiments. A new diagnostic technique described herein allows for experimental measurement of apparent particle velocity time histories in microscale explosive configurations and can be applied to shocks/non-shocks in inert materials. The diagnostic, Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors (EFOS), has been tested in challenging microscopic experimental configurations that give confidence in the technique's ability to measure the apparent particle velocity time histories of an explosive with pressure outputs in the tenths of kilobars to several kilobars. Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors also allow for several measurements to be acquired in a single experiment because they are microscopic, thus reducing the number of experiments necessary. The future of EFOS technology will focus on further miniaturization, material selection appropriate for the operating pressure regime, and extensive hydrocode and optical analysis to transform apparent particle velocity time histories into true particle velocity time histories as well as the more meaningful pressure time histories.

  3. Scaling behavior of the earthquake intertime distribution: influence of large shocks and time scales in the Omori law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippiello, Eugenio; Corral, Alvaro; Bottiglieri, Milena; Godano, Cataldo; de Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2012-12-01

    We present a study of the earthquake intertime distribution D(Δt) for a California catalog in temporal periods of short duration T. We compare experimental results with theoretical predictions and analytical approximate solutions. For the majority of intervals, rescaling intertimes by the average rate leads to collapse of the distributions D(Δt) on a universal curve, whose functional form is well fitted by a Gamma distribution. The remaining intervals, exhibiting a more complex D(Δt), are all characterized by the presence of large shocks. These results can be understood in terms of the relevance of the ratio between the characteristic time c in the Omori law and T: Intervals with Gamma-like behavior are indeed characterized by a vanishing c/T. The above features are also investigated by means of numerical simulations of the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. This study shows that collapse of D(Δt) is also observed in numerical catalogs; however, the fit with a Gamma distribution is possible only assuming that c depends on the main-shock magnitude m. This result confirms that the dependence of c on m, previously observed for m>6 main shocks, extends also to small m>2.

  4. Time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau type Multiphase Field for description of shock-induced Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Belof, Jonathan; Benedict, Lorin

    2015-06-01

    Phase-field models have become popular in last two decades to describe a host of free-boundary problems. The strength of the method relies on implicitly describing the dynamics of surfaces and interfaces by continuous scalar field that enter in the global grand free energy functional of the system. We adapt this method in order to describe shock-induced phase transition. To this end we make use of the Multiphase Field Theory (MFT) to account for the existence of multiple phases during the transition. In this talk I will initially describe the constitutive equations that couple the dynamic of the phase field with that of the thermodynamic fields like T, P, c etc. I will then give details on developing a thermodynamically consistent phase-field interpolation function for multiple-phase system in the context of shock-induced phase-transition. At the end I will briefly comment on relating the dynamics of the interfaces in the shock/ramp compression to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation. This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Appropriate evaluation and treatment of heart failure patients after implantable cardioverter-defibrillator discharge: time to go beyond the initial shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Joseph D; Saxonhouse, Sherry J; Woo, Gregory W; Burkart, Thomas A; Miles, William M; Conti, Jamie B; Schofield, Richard S; Sears, Samuel F; Aranda, Juan M

    2009-11-24

    Multiple clinical trials support the use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) for prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure (HF). Unfortunately, several complicating issues have arisen from the universal use of ICDs in HF patients. An estimated 20% to 35% of HF patients who receive an ICD for primary prevention will experience an appropriate shock within 1 to 3 years of implant, and one-third of patients will experience an inappropriate shock. An ICD shock is associated with a 2- to 5-fold increase in mortality, with the most common cause being progressive HF. The median time from initial ICD shock to death ranges from 168 to 294 days depending on HF etiology and the appropriateness of the ICD therapy. Despite this prognosis, current guidelines do not provide a clear stepwise approach to managing these high-risk patients. An ICD shock increases HF event risk and should trigger a thorough evaluation to determine the etiology of the shock and guide subsequent therapeutic interventions. Several combinations of pharmacologic and device-based interventions such as adding amiodarone to baseline beta-blocker therapy, adjusting ICD sensitivity, and employing antitachycardia pacing may reduce future appropriate and inappropriate shocks. Aggressive HF surveillance and management is required after an ICD shock, as the risk of sudden cardiac death is transformed to an increased HF event risk.

  6. A surface-micromachining-based inertial micro-switch with compliant cantilever beam as movable electrode for enduring high shock and prolonging contact time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qiu [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Micro/Nano Fabrication, School of Electronics Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Yang, Zhuoqing, E-mail: yzhuoqing@sjtu.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Micro/Nano Fabrication, School of Electronics Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Fu, Bo; Li, Jianhua; Wu, Hao [Huaihai Industrial Group Co., Ltd., Changzhi, Shanxi Province, 046012 (China); Zhang, Qihuan; Sun, Yunna; Ding, Guifu; Zhao, Xiaolin [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Micro/Nano Fabrication, School of Electronics Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • The designed cantilever beam attached to the proof mass can endure a larger shock acceleration (∼1000 g order of magnitude) compared to those traditional designs (∼100 g order of magnitude). • Effect of the pulse width on the threshold acceleration, the response time and the contact time is investigated. • A constraint sleeve structure is introduced to lower the off-axis sensitivity. - Abstract: A novel laterally-driven inertial micro-switch with two L-shaped elastic cantilever beams as the movable electrode, which is attached to the proof mass, is proposed in this paper. The advantage of this design is that the contact time of the inertial micro-switch can be prolonged. Meanwhile, the micro-switch can withstand a higher shock than the traditional designs whose cantilever beams are attached to the fixed electrode. The designed inertial micro-switch was simulated and optimized with ANSYS software and fabricated on a quartz substrate by surface micromachining technology. The simulated result demonstrates that the threshold acceleration (a{sub ths}) under stable switch-on state is about 288 g and the contact time is about 198 μs when the pulse width of acceleration loads is 1 ms. At the same time, it indicates that the threshold acceleration, the response time and the contact time of designed micro-switch all increase with the pulse width of acceleration loads. The simulation of impact process in non-sensitive direction shows that the introduced constraint sleeve structure in the novel inertial micro-switch can lower the off-axis sensitivity. The fabricated micro-switch prototype has been tested by a standard dropping hammer system under shock accelerations with various amplitudes and pulse widths. The experimental measurements show that the contact time is about 150 μs when the threshold acceleration is about 288 g. It also indicates that the response time and the contact time both increase with the pulse width, which is consistent with the

  7. Expression profiles of two small heat shock proteins and antioxidant enzyme activity in Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to cadmium at environmentally relevant concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Liping; Ning, Xuanxuan; Chen, Leilei; Zhang, Linbao; Zhao, Jianmin; Liu, Xiaoli; Wu, Huifeng

    2014-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins encompass a widespread but diverse class of proteins, which play key roles in protecting organisms from various stressors. In the present study, the full-length cDNAs of two small heat shock proteins (MgsHSP22 and MgsHSP24.1) were cloned from Mytilus galloprovincialis, which encoded peptides of 181 and 247 amino acids, respectively. Both MgsHSP22 and MgsHSP24.1 were detected in all tissues examined by real-time PCR, with the highest expression being observed in muscle and gonad tissues. The real-time PCR results revealed that Cd significantly inhibited MgsHSP22 expression at 24 h and MgsHSP24.1 at 24 and 48 h under 5 μg/L Cd 2+ exposure. MgsHSP24.1 expression was also significantly inhibited after 50 μg/L Cd2+ exposure for 48 h. With regard to antioxidant enzymes, increased GPx and CAT activity were detected under Cd2+ stress (5 and 50 μg/L), while no significant difference in SOD activity was observed throughout the experiment. Overall, both MgsHsps and antioxidant enzymes revealed their potential as Cd stress biomarkers in M. galloprovincialis.

  8. SeptiFast real-time PCR for detection of bloodborne pathogens in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markota, Andrej; Seme, Katja; Golle, Andrej; Poljak, Mario; Sinkovič, Andreja

    2014-09-01

    Several studies have been performed investigating the role of a real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay LightCycler SeptiFast with inconsistent results. In prospective evaluation of adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock SeptiFast assay and blood culture results were compared regarding concordance, the impact of SeptiFast assay on antimicrobial therapy adjustment, time to results and the role of SeptiFast assay as a marker of disease severity. 63 blood sample sets were collected from 57 patients. 51 (80.9%) results were concordant negative and 7 (11.1%) concordant posi- tive. In one (1.6%) sample set blood culture was positive and SeptiFast assay negative, in three (4.8%) sample sets with negative blood cultures pathogens were detected by SeptiFast assay and in one (1.6%)patient an additional pathogen was detected by SeptiFast assay. If blood culture is considered as "gold standard", 1 (1.6%) SeptiFast false negative and 4 (6.3%) false positive results were identified (sensitivity 87.5%, specificity 92.6%, negative predictive value 97.8%). Antibiotic treatment was adjusted according to SeptiFast assay in 4 (6.3%) cases. Time to final results was significantly shorter with SeptiFast assay (32 +/- 23 h vs. 97 +/- 28 h, p sepsis and septic shock but it cannot replace the blood culture.

  9. Effects of two fluid resuscitations on the bacterial translocation and inflammatory response of small intestine in rats with hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xin-yue; REN Cong-cai; ZHOU Qiang; PANG Qing-feng; WU Chang-yi; ZENG Yin-ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of two fluid resuscitations on the bacterial translocation and the inflammatory factors of small intestine in rats with hemorrhagic shock. Methods: Fifty SD healthy male rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=10 per group):Group A (Sham group), Group B (Ringer's solution for 1 h), Group C (Ringer's solution for 24 h), Group D (hydroxyethyl starch for 1 h) and Group E ((hydroxyethyl starch for 24 h). A model of rats with hemorrhagic shock was established. The bacterial translocation in liver, content of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and changes of myeloperoxidase enzyme (MPO) activities in small intestine were pathologically investigated after these two fluid resuscitations, respectively. Results: The bacterial translocation and the expression of TNF-α in the small intestine were detected at 1 h and 24 h after fluid resuscitation. There were significant increase in the number of translocated bacteria, TNF-α and MPO activities in Group C compared with Group B, significant decrease in Group E compared with Group D and in Group B compared with Group D. The number of translocated bacteria and TNF-α expression significantly decreased in Group E as compared with Group C.Conclusions: The bacterial translocation and the expression of TNF-α in the small intestine exist 24 h after fluid resuscitation. 6% hydroxyethyl starch can improve the intestinal mucosa barrier function better than the Ringer's solution.

  10. Condensate Accretion in Shock Tube's Expansion Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezonlin, Ephrem-Denis; DeSilva, Upul P.; Hunte, F.; Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1997-01-01

    It has been shown that turbulence and temperature influence the droplet sizes in expansion fan induced condensation by studying the Rayleigh scattering from one port in our shock tube's test section. We have modified our set-up so as to allow, using two ports, the real time measurement of the influence of turbulence and temperature on the rate at which these droplets grow. To do this, we looked at the Rayleigh scattering from two different ports for ten Reynolds numbers at five different temperatures. We modeled the time of flight of droplets, using the equations of one-dimensional gas dynamics and the measured shock wave speed in shock tube's driven section.

  11. Time-Space Evolution of Seismic Strain Release in the Area Shocked by the August 24-October 30 Central Italy Seismic Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barani, Simone; Mascandola, Claudia; Serpelloni, Enrico; Ferretti, Gabriele; Massa, Marco; Spallarossa, Daniele

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we analyze the space-time evolution of the seismic strain release in the area shocked by the still ongoing Italian Central Apennines seismic crisis started on August 24, 2016 and culminated with the October 30 main shock of M w 6.5. Specifically, we examine the variation in time and space of the seismic strain release rate with the aim of identifying the presence of peculiar seismicity patterns, such as seismic gaps, according to the seismic cycle theory. To this end, seismic strain rates are checked for consistency with strain rates from GPS measurements to possibly adjust them for missing events due to limited seismic catalog extension or incompleteness at large magnitudes. Our results has revealed that the seismic crisis followed a long-term quiescence of about 310 years, characterized by the absence of M6.5+ earthquakes, and marked by an almost steady release of seismic deformation. Such temporal gap started after the occurrence of two nearby strong events in 1703 (Valnerina and L'Aquila earthquakes with magnitudes of 6.9 and 6.7, respectively) and terminated with the beginning of the current Central Apennines seismic crisis.

  12. Impact of pickup ions on the shock front nonstationarity and energy dissipation of the heliospheric termination shock: Two-dimensional full particle simulations and comparison with Voyager 2 observations

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Zhongwei; Richardson, John D; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The transition between the supersonic solar wind and the subsonic heliosheath, the termination shock (TS), was observed by Voyager 2 (V2) on 2007 August 31-September 1 at a distance of 84 AU from the Sun. The data reveal multiple crossings of a complex, quasi-perpendicular supercritical shock. These experimental data are the starting point for a more sophisticated analysis that includes computer modeling of a shock in the presence of pickup ions (PUIs). here, we present two-dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the TS including PUIs self-consistently. We also report the ion velocity distribution across the TS using the Faraday cup data from V2. A relatively complete plasma and magnetic field data set from V2 gives us the opportunity to do a full comparison between the experimental data and PIC simulation results. Our results show that: (1) The nonstationarity of the shock front is mainly caused by the ripples along the shock front and these ripples from even if the percentage of PUIs is high...

  13. Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interaction in Forced Shock Oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piotr Doerffer; Oskar Szulc; Franco Magagnato

    2003-01-01

    The flow in transonic diffusers as well as in supersonic air intakes becomes often unsteady due to shock wave boundary layer interaction. The oscillations may be induced by natural separation unsteadiness or may be forced by boundary conditions. Significant improvement of CFD tools, increase of computer resources as well as development of experimental methods have again.drawn the attention of researchers to this topic.To investigate the problem forced oscillations of transonic turbulent flow in asymmetric two-dimensional Laval nozzle were considered. A viscous, perfect gas flow, was numerically simulated using the Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes solver SPARC, employing a two-equation, eddy viscosity, turbulence closure in the URANS approach.For time-dependent and stationary flow simulations, Mach numbers upstream of the shock between 1.2 and 1.4 were considered. Comparison of computed and experimental data for steady states generally gave acceptable agreement. In the case of forced oscillations, a harmonic pressure variation was prescribed at the exit plane resulting in shock wave motion. Excitation frequencies between 0 Hz and 1024 Hz were investigated at the same pressure amplitude.The main result of the work carried out is the relation between the amplitude of the shock wave motion and the excitation frequency in the investigated range. Increasing excitation frequency resulted in decreasing amplitude of the shock movement. At high frequencies a natural mode of shock oscillation (of small amplitude) was observed which is not sensitive to forced excitement.

  14. Real-time characterization of the neuronal response to osmotic shock by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomariz, Maria; Garcia, Isabel; Soto-Sánchez, Cristina; Martínez-Navarrete, Gema; Fernández, Eduardo; Fimia, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy has numerous applications in biology for visualizing living cells and 3D tissues. This technique allows for the direct visualization of biological structures avoiding invasive and phototoxic procedures such as fixation and dying processing. In this study we have characterized the morphometry changes of neurons subject to osmolarity changes. For this purpose, we have measured the variations of the amplitude and the oscillation frequency of the plasmatic membrane, as well as the volume changes of the cells before the osmotic shock. There was a relation between the neural culture ageing and its behavioral changes. "Long-term" cultures that had not previously been studied were used to analyze the behavioral changes in aged cells.

  15. Impactful times memories of 60 years of shock wave research at Sandia National Laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Asay, James R; Lawrence, R Jeffery; Sweeney, Mary Ann

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a history of shock compression science, including development of experimental, material modeling, and hydrodynamics code technologies over the past six decades at Sandia National Laboratories. The book is organized into a discussion of major accomplishments by decade with over 900 references, followed by a unique collection of 45 personal recollections detailing the trials, tribulations, and successes of building a world-class organization in the field. It explains some of the challenges researchers faced and the gratification they experienced when a discovery was made. Several visionary researchers made pioneering advances that integrated these three technologies into a cohesive capability to solve complex scientific and engineering problems. What approaches worked, which ones did not, and the applications of the research are described. Notable applications include the turret explosion aboard the USS Iowa and the Shoemaker-Levy comet impact on Jupiter. The personal anecdotes and recollec...

  16. Laboratory-Scale Simulation and Real-Time Tracking of a Microbial Contamination Event and Subsequent Shock-Chlorination in Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Besmer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid contamination of drinking water in distribution and storage systems can occur due to pressure drop, backflow, cross-connections, accidents, and bio-terrorism. Small volumes of a concentrated contaminant (e.g., wastewater can contaminate large volumes of water in a very short time with potentially severe negative health impacts. The technical limitations of conventional, cultivation-based microbial detection methods neither allow for timely detection of such contaminations, nor for the real-time monitoring of subsequent emergency remediation measures (e.g., shock-chlorination. Here we applied a newly developed continuous, ultra high-frequency flow cytometry approach to track a rapid pollution event and subsequent disinfection of drinking water in an 80-min laboratory scale simulation. We quantified total (TCC and intact (ICC cell concentrations as well as flow cytometric fingerprints in parallel in real-time with two different staining methods. The ingress of wastewater was detectable almost immediately (i.e., after 0.6% volume change, significantly changing TCC, ICC, and the flow cytometric fingerprint. Shock chlorination was rapid and detected in real time, causing membrane damage in the vast majority of bacteria (i.e., drop of ICC from more than 380 cells μl-1 to less than 30 cells μl-1 within 4 min. Both of these effects as well as the final wash-in of fresh tap water followed calculated predictions well. Detailed and highly quantitative tracking of microbial dynamics at very short time scales and for different characteristics (e.g., concentration, membrane integrity is feasible. This opens up multiple possibilities for targeted investigation of a myriad of bacterial short-term dynamics (e.g., disinfection, growth, detachment, operational changes both in laboratory-scale research and full-scale system investigations in practice.

  17. The CLO3403/CLO3404 two-component system of Clostridium botulinum E1 Beluga is important for cold shock response and growth at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascher, Gerald; Derman, Yagmur; Kirk, David G; Palonen, Eveliina; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    In order to survive a temperature downshift, bacteria have to sense the changing environment and adjust their metabolism and structure. Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) play a central role in sensing and responding to many different environmental stimuli. Although the nonproteolytic (group II) Clostridium botulinum represents a major hazard in chilled foods, the cold adaption mechanisms of group II C. botulinum organisms are not known. Here, we show that the CLO3403/CLO3404 TCS of C. botulinum E1 Beluga is involved in the cold shock response and growth at 12°C. Cold shock induced the expression of the genes encoding the histidine kinase (clo3403) and the response regulator (clo3404) by more than 100-fold after 5 h relative to their expression in a nonshocked culture at the corresponding time point. The involvement of CLO3403/CLO3404 in growth at low temperature was demonstrated by impaired growth of the insertional clo3403 and clo3404 knockout mutants at 12°C compared to the growth of the wild-type culture. Additionally, the inactivation of clo3403 had a negative effect on motility. The growth efficiency at 12°C of the TCS mutants and the motility of the kinase mutants were restored by introducing a plasmid harboring the operon of the CLO3403/CLO3404 TCS. The results suggest that the CLO3403/CLO3404 TCS is important for the cold tolerance of C. botulinum E1 Beluga.

  18. Numerical study of shock induced ignition and combustion of CH{sub 4}-O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} mixtures in a two dimensional ram accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.; Taki, S. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mech. Eng.

    2000-11-01

    The numerical simulation for the starting process of the ram accelerator in Hiroshima University (HURAMAC) has being made for almost the same conditions as the experiments, where CH{sub 4}-O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} gas mixtures are used. The finite difference method is used for solving the Navier-Stokes equations including chemical reactions in the two-dimensional Cartesian coordinates. At first a test simulation is carried for the case of a cold shot with the same condition of our experiment. The structure of shock waves and the formation of expansion waves are clearly demonstrated. The simulation of a starting process of a hot shot is done for the similar conditions to one of the experiments. Numerical results show that the ignition source is formed just in front of the igniter although another high temperature region appears in the rear area of projectile. The normal shock wave is produced in front of the igniter, then it propagates forwards depending on the combustion heat release. Thermally choking mode is gradually established when the flame propagates whole cross section of the tube with the sabot ejected away from the projectile. The calculated pressure history is compared with the measured one at the middle point of the ignition tube. Very good agreement is found both in the time scale and the pressure amplitude. (orig.)

  19. Disposable self-support paper-based multi-anode microbial fuel cell (PMMFC) integrated with power management system (PMS) as the real time "shock" biosensor for wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiheng; Liu, Yucheng; Williams, Isaiah; Li, Yan; Qian, Fengyu; Zhang, Hui; Cai, Dingyi; Wang, Lei; Li, Baikun

    2016-11-15

    A paper-based multi-anode microbial fuel cell (PMMFC) integrated with power management system (PMS) was developed as a disposable self-support real-time "shock" biosensor for wastewater. PMMFCs were examined at three types of shocks (chromium, hypochlorite and acetate) in a batch-mode chamber, and exhibited various responses to shock types and concentrations. The power output of PMMFC sensor was four times as the carbon cloth (CC)-based MFCs, indicating the advantage of paper-based anode for bacterial adhesion. The power output was more sensitive than the voltage output under shocks, and thus preventing the false signals. The simulation of power harvest using PMS indicated that PMMFC could accomplish more frequent data transmission than single-anode MFCs (PSMFC) and CC anode MFCs (CCMMFC), making the self-support wastewater monitor and data transmission possible. Compared with traditional MFC sensors, PMMFCs integrated with PMS exhibit the distinct advantages of tight paper-packed structure, short acclimation period, high power output, and high sensitivity to a wide range of shocks, posing a great potential as "disposable self-support shock sensor" for real time in situ monitoring of wastewater quality.

  20. Treatment of Viscosity in the Shock Waves Observed After Two Consecutive Coronal Mass Ejection Activities CME08/03/2012 and CME15/03/2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, Huseyin

    2016-11-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) is one of the most the powerful activities of the Sun. There is a possibility to produce shocks in the interplanetary medium after CMEs. Shock waves can be observed when the solar wind changes its velocity from being supersonic nature to being subsonic nature. The investigations of such activities have a central place in space weather purposes, since; the interaction of shocks with viscosity is one of the most important problems in the supersonic and compressible gas flow regime (Blazek in Computational fluid dynamics: principles and applications. Elsevier, Amsterdam 2001). The main aim of present work is to achieve a search for the viscosity effects in the shocks occurred after two consecutive coronal mass ejection activities in 2012 (i.e. CME08/03/2012 and CME15/03/2012).

  1. Dynamics and microinstabilities at perpendicular collisionless shock: A comparison of large-scale two-dimensional full particle simulations with different ion to electron mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Umeda, Takayuki; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale two-dimensional (2D) full particle-in-cell simulations are carried out for studying the relationship between the dynamics of a perpendicular shock and microinstabilities generated at the shock foot. The structure and dynamics of collisionless shocks are generally determined by Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, while microinstabilities at the shock foot are controlled by the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity and the ratio of the plasma-to-cyclotron frequency. With a fixed Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity is given as a function of the ion-to-electron mass ratio. The present 2D full PIC simulations with a relatively low Alfven Mach number (M_A ~ 6) show that the modified two-stream instability is dominant with higher ion-to-electron mass ratios. It is also confirmed that waves propagating downstream are more enhanced at the shock foot near the shock ramp as the mass ratio becomes higher. T...

  2. Holographic and time-resolving ability of pulse-pair two-dimensional velocity interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, David J., E-mail: erskine1@llnl.gov; Smith, R. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Bolme, C. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ali, S. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Previous velocity interferometers used at research laboratories for shock physics experiments measured target motion at a point or many points on a line on the target. Recently, a two-dimensional (2d) version (2d-velocity interferometer system for any reflector) has been demonstrated using a pair of ultrashort (3 ps) pulses for illumination, separated by 268 ps. We have discovered new abilities for this instrument, by treating the complex output image as a hologram. For data taken in an out of focus configuration, we can Fourier process to bring narrow features such as cracks into sharp focus, which are otherwise completely blurred. This solves a practical problem when using high numerical aperture optics having narrow depth of field to observe moving surface features such as cracks. Furthermore, theory predicts that the target appearance (position and reflectivity) at two separate moments in time are recorded by the main and conjugate images of the same hologram, and are partially separable during analysis for narrow features. Hence, for the cracks we bring into refocus, we can make a two-frame movie with a subnanosecond frame period. Longer and shorter frame periods are possible with different interferometer delays. Since the megapixel optical detectors we use have superior spatial resolution over electronic beam based framing cameras, this technology could be of great use in studying microscopic three-dimensional-behavior of targets at ultrafast times scales. Demonstrations on shocked silicon are shown.

  3. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on frozen shoulder patients’ pain and functions

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study was conducted to examine the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on frozen shoulder patients’ pain and functions. [Subjects] In the present study, 30 frozen shoulder patients were divided into two groups: an extracorporeal shock wave therapy group of 15 patients and a conservative physical therapy group of 15 patients. [Methods] Two times per week for six weeks, the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group underwent extracorporeal shock wave therapy, and th...

  4. Comparison of CME/shock propagation models with heliospheric imaging and in situ observations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xinhua; Inhester, Bernd; Feng, Xueshang; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Lu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the arrival time for fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated shocks is highly desirable in space weather studies. In this paper, we use two shock propagation models, i.e. Data Guided Shock Time Of Arrival (DGSTOA) and Data Guided Shock Propagation Model (DGSPM), to predict the kinematical evolution of interplanetary shocks associated with fast CMEs. DGSTOA is based on the similarity theory of shock waves in the solar wind reference frame, and DGSPM on the non-similarity theory in the stationary reference frame. The inputs are the kinematics of the CME front at the maximum speed moment obtained from the geometric triangulation method applied to STEREO imaging observations together with the Harmonic Mean approximation. The outputs provide the subsequent propagation of the associated shock. We apply these models to the CMEs on 2012 January 19, January 23, and March 7. We find that the shock models predict reasonably well the shock's propagation after the impulsive acceleration. ...

  5. Injection to rapid diffusive shock acceleration at perpendicular shocks in partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional hybrid simulation of a collisionless perpendicular shock in a partially ionized plasma for the first time. In this simulation, the shock velocity and the upstream ionization fraction are Vsh ~ 1333 km/s and fi ~ 0.5, that are typical values for isolated young supernova remnants in the interstellar medium. We confirm previous two-dimensional simulation results that downstream hydrogen atoms leak into the upstream region, they are accelerated by the pickup process in the upstream region, and large magnetic field fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the magnetic field fluctuations have three-dimensional structures and the leaking hydrogen atoms are injected to the diffusive shock acceleration at the perpendicular shock after the pickup process. The observed diffusive shock acceleration can be interpreted as the shock drift acceleration with scattering. Particles are accelerated to v ~ 100 Vsh ~ 0.3c within ~ 100 gyroperio...

  6. Analysis in natural time domain of geoelectric time series monitored prior two strong earthquakes occurred in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Rojas, A.; Flores-Marquez, L. E.

    2009-12-01

    The short-time prediction of seismic phenomena is currently an important problem in the scientific community. In particular, the electromagnetic processes associated with seismic events take in great interest since the VAN method was implemented. The most important features of this methodology are the seismic electrical signals (SES) observed prior to strong earthquakes. SES has been observed in the electromagnetic series linked to EQs in Greece, Japan and Mexico. By mean of the so-called natural time domain, introduced by Varotsos et al. (2001), they could characterize signals of dichotomic nature observed in different systems, like SES and ionic current fluctuations in membrane channels. In this work we analyze SES observed in geoelectric time series monitored in Guerrero, México. Our analysis concern with two strong earthquakes occurred, on October 24, 1993 (M=6.6) and September 14, 1995 (M=7.3). The time series of the first one displayed a seismic electric signal six days before the main shock and for the second case the time series displayed dichotomous-like fluctuations some months before the EQ. In this work we present the first results of the analysis in natural time domain for the two cases which seems to be agreeing with the results reported by Varotsos. P. Varotsos, N. Sarlis, and E. Skordas, Practica of the Athens Academy 76, 388 (2001).

  7. Shock-induced chemical reactions in titanium-silicon powder mixtures of different morphologies: Time-resolved pressure measurements and materials analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadhani, N. N.; Graham, R. A.; Royal, T.; Dunbar, E.; Anderson, M. U.; Holman, G. T.

    1997-08-01

    The response of porous titanium (Ti) and silicon (Si) powder mixtures with small, medium, and coarse particle morphologies is studied under high-pressure shock loading, employing postshock materials analysis as well as nanosecond, time-resolved pressure measurements. The objective of the work was to provide an experimental basis for development of models describing shock-induced solid-state chemistry. The time-resolved measurements of stress pulses obtained with piezoelectric polymer (poly-vinyl-di-flouride) pressure gauges provided extraordinary sensitivity for determination of rate-dependent shock processes. Both techniques showed clear evidence for shock-induced chemical reactions in medium-morphology powders, while fine and coarse powders showed no evidence for reaction. It was observed that the medium-morphology mixtures experience simultaneous plastic deformation of both Ti and Si particles. Fine morphology powders show particle agglomeration, while coarse Si powders undergo extensive fracture and entrapment within the plastically deformed Ti; such processes decrease the propensity for initiation of shock-induced reactions. The change of deformation mode between fracture and plastic deformation in Si powders of different morphologies is a particularly critical observation. Such a behavior reveals the overriding influence of the shock-induced, viscoplastic deformation and fracture response, which controls the mechanochemical nature of shock-induced solid-state chemistry. The present work in conjunction with our prior studies, demonstrates that the initiation of chemical reactions in shock compression of powders is controlled by solid-state mechanochemical processes, and cannot be qualitatively or quantitatively described by thermochemical models.

  8. Recoverable stress induced two-way shape memory effect on NiTi surface using laser-produced shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyitliyev, Dovletgeldi; Li, Peizhen; Kholikov, Khomidkhodza; Grant, Byron; Thomas, Zachary; Alal, Orhan; Karaca, Haluk E.; Er, Ali O.

    2017-02-01

    The surfaces of Ni50Ti50 shape memory alloys (SMAs) were patterned by laser scribing. This method is more simplistic and efficient than traditional indentation techniques, and has also shown to be an effective method in patterning these materials. Different laser energy densities ranging from 5 mJ/pulse to 56 mJ/pulse were used to observe recovery on SMA surface. The temperature dependent heat profiles of the NiTi surfaces after laser scribing at 56 mJ/pulse show the partially-recovered indents, which indicate a "shape memory effect (SME)" Experimental data is in good agreement with theoretical simulation of laser induced shock wave propagation inside NiTi SMAs. Stress wave closely followed the rise time of the laser pulse to its peak values and initial decay. Further investigations are underway to improve the SME such that the indents are recovered to a greater extent.

  9. Cardiogenic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock - cardiogenic ... electrical system of the heart (heart block) Cardiogenic shock occurs when the heart is unable to pump ... orthostatic hypotension) Weak (thready) pulse To diagnose cardiogenic shock, a catheter (tube) may be placed in the ...

  10. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  11. When Shock Waves Collide

    CERN Document Server

    Hartigan, P; Frank, A; Hansen, E; Yirak, K; Liao, A S; Graham, P; Wilde, B; Blue, B; Martinez, D; Rosen, P; Farley, D; Paguio, R

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than an oblique one does. In this paper we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and ...

  12. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  13. Magnetic field evolution in relativistic unmagnetized collisionless shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Keshet, Uri; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Waxman, Eli

    2008-01-01

    We study relativistic unmagnetized collisionless shocks using unprecedentedly large particle-in-cell simulations of two-dimensional pair plasma. High energy particles accelerated by the shock are found to drive magnetic field evolution on a time scale >10^4 plasma times. Progressively stronger magnetic fields are generated on larger scales in a growing region around the shock. Shock-generated magnetic fields and accelerated particles carry >1% and >10% of the downstream energy flux respectively. Our results suggest limits on the magnetization of relativistic astrophysical flows.

  14. Rapid enhancement of low-energy (shocks based on two Van Allen Probes case studies: Implications for source regions and heating mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chao; Li, Wen; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Zong, Qiugang; Ma, Qianli; Bortnik, Jacob; Thorne, Richard M.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.; Kletzing, Craig A.; Wygant, John R.; Nicolls, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between interplanetary (IP) shocks and the Earth's magnetosphere manifest many important space physics phenomena including low-energy ion flux enhancements and particle acceleration. In order to investigate the mechanisms driving shock-induced enhancement of low-energy ion flux, we have examined two IP shock events that occurred when the Van Allen Probes were located near the equator while ionospheric and ground observations were available around the spacecraft footprints. We have found that, associated with the shock arrival, electromagnetic fields intensified, and low-energy ion fluxes, including H+, He+, and O+, were enhanced dramatically in both the parallel and perpendicular directions. During the 2 October 2013 shock event, both parallel and perpendicular flux enhancements lasted more than 20 min with larger fluxes observed in the perpendicular direction. In contrast, for the 15 March 2013 shock event, the low-energy perpendicular ion fluxes increased only in the first 5 min during an impulse of electric field, while the parallel flux enhancement lasted more than 30 min. In addition, ionospheric outflows were observed after shock arrivals. From a simple particle motion calculation, we found that the rapid response of low-energy ions is due to drifts of plasmaspheric population by the enhanced electric field. However, the fast acceleration in the perpendicular direction cannot solely be explained by E × B drift but betatron acceleration also plays a role. Adiabatic acceleration may also explain the fast response of the enhanced parallel ion fluxes, while ion outflows may contribute to the enhanced parallel fluxes that last longer than the perpendicular fluxes.

  15. Radiation from a D-dimensional collision of shock waves: Two dimensional reduction and Carter-Penrose diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Coelho, Flávio S

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the causal structure of the two dimensional (2D) reduced background used in the perturbative treatment of a head-on collision of two $D$-dimensional Aichelburg-Sexl gravitational shock waves. After defining all causal boundaries, namely the future light-cone of the collision and the past light-cone of a future observer, we obtain characteristic coordinates using two independent methods. The first is a geometrical construction of the null rays which define the various light cones, using a parametric representation. The second is a transformation of the 2D reduced wave operator for the problem into a hyperbolic form. The characteristic coordinates are then compactified allowing us to represent all causal light rays in a conformal Carter-Penrose diagram. Our construction holds to all orders in perturbation theory. In particular, we can easily identify the singularities of the source functions and of the Green's functions appearing in the perturbative expansion, at each order, which is crucial for a su...

  16. Effects of Fin Leading Edge Sweep on Shock-Shock Interaction at Mach 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of fin leading edge sweep on peak heating rates due to shock-shock interaction have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. The shock interaction was produced by the intersection of a planar incident shock (16.8 deg shock angle relative to the freestream, generated by a 9 deg wedge) with the bow shock formed around a O.5-inch diameter cylindrical leading edge fin. Heating distributions along the leading edge stagnation line have been obtained using densely spaced thin film resistive-type sensors. Schlieren images were obtained to illustrate the very complex shock-shock interactions. The fin leading edge sweep angle was varied from 15-degrees swept back to 45-degrees swept forward for a freestream unit Reynolds number of 2 x 10(exp 6)/ft. Two models were utilized during the study, one with 0.025-inch spacing between gage centers, and the other 0.015-inch spacing. Gage spatial resolution on the order of 0.015-in appeared to accurately capture the narrow spike in heating. Peak heating due to shock interaction was maximized when the fin was swept forward 15 deg and 25 deg, both promoting augmentations about 7 times the baseline value. The schlieren images for these cases revealed Type 4 and Type 3 interactions, respectively.

  17. Comparing transesophageal Doppler corrected systolic flow time versus central venous pressure as a guide for fluid resuscitation in septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Hamimy

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Transesophageal aortic Doppler is a simple, non-invasive tool of guiding fluid therapy in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. FTC change was a better predictor of fluid responsiveness than CVP in septic shock. There was higher significant difference in SV after resuscitation when using FTC as guidance.

  18. Two-Dimensional MHD Numerical Simulations of Magnetic Reconnection Triggered by A Supernova Shock in Interstellar Medium, Generation of X-Ray Gas in Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Tanuma, S; Kudoh, T; Shibata, K; Tanuma, Syuniti; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Kudoh, Takahiro; Shibata, Kazunari

    2001-01-01

    We examine the magnetic reconnection triggered by a supernova (or a point explosion) in interstellar medium, by performing two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations with high spatial resolution. We found that the magnetic reconnection starts long after a supernova shock (fast-mode MHD shock) passes a current sheet. The current sheet evolves as follows: (i) Tearing-mode instability is excited by the supernova shock, and the current sheet becomes thin in its nonlinear stage. (ii) The current-sheet thinning is saturated when the current-sheet thickness becomes comparable to that of Sweet-Parker current sheet. After that, Sweet-Parker type reconnection starts, and the current-sheet length increases. (iii) ``Secondary tearing-mode instability'' occurs in the thin Sweet-Parker current sheet. (iv) As a result, further current-sheet thinning occurs and anomalous resistivity sets in, because gas density decreases in the current sheet. Petschek type reconnection starts and heats interste...

  19. Shock Wave Loading on a Two-Dimensional Generic Truck/Shelter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    66 3"SlUHTT:24-42-1S 5TATM:I 24 8 2 4 a I S TX’ M TEST:2D TRC 2ŕ SMST: 24-02-15 STATION:2 II *24 8 8 li TEST:2D T•J 3M ~SHOT: 24.-42-I S STA•m:$3 24e...STATI•: 7 I S2 4 3 IS TIME. am EST:D TRUCK SWOT : 24-42-2 STATIN: ,a 24 a a i TEST:2 TRUCK SHOT: 24-2-22 STATION:9 90 S 2 4 6 S ’i TM. EC Figure B-14

  20. A Shock Mitigation of Pedestrian-Vehicle Impact Using Active Hood Lift System: Deploying Time Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hoon Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the deploying time (or response time of an active hood lift system (AHLS of a passenger vehicle activated by gunpowder actuator. In this work, this is accomplished by changing principal design parameters of the latch part mechanism of the hood system. After briefly introducing the working principle of the AHLS operated by the gunpowder actuator, the governing equations of the AHLS are formulated for each different deploying motion. Subsequently, using the governing equations, the response time for deploying the hold lift system is determined by changing several geometric distances such as the distance from the rotational center of the pop-up guide to the point of the latch in the axial and vertical directions. Then, a comparison is made of the total response time to completely deploy the hood lift system with the existing conventional AHLS and proposed AHLS. In addition, the workable driving speed of the proposed AHLS is compared with the conventional one by changing the powder volume of the actuator.

  1. A new time integration scheme for shock propagation in saturated soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a time integration scheme capable to simulate blast loading causing high frequency wave propagation in porous media using coarse meshes. The scheme is based on the partition of unity method. The discontinuity is imposed on the velocity field, while the displacement field is kept

  2. Waiting Time Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Knoester, Jasper

    We review recent work on the waiting time dynamics of coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. This dynamics can reveal chemical and physical processes that take place on the femto- and picosecond time scale, which is faster than the time scale that may be probed by, for example,

  3. A time-resolved single-pass technique for measuring optical absorption coefficients of window materials under 100 GPa shock pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Jiabo

    2008-12-01

    An experimental method was developed to perform time-resolved, single-pass optical absorption measurements and to determine absorption coefficients of window materials under strong shock compression up to approximately 200 GPa. Experimental details are described of (i) a configuration to generate an in situ dynamic, bright, optical source and (ii) a sample assembly with a lithium fluoride plate to essentially eliminate heat transfer from the hot radiator into the specimen and to maintain a constant optical source within the duration of the experiment. Examples of measurements of optical absorption coefficients of several initially transparent single crystal materials at high shock pressures are presented.

  4. Testing the External Shock Model of Gamma-Ray Bursts using the Late-Time Simultaneous Optical and X-ray Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Yuji; Sakamoto, Takanori; Huang, Kuiyun; Zheng, Weikang; Sato, Goro; Aoki, Tsutomu; Deng, Jinsong; Ioka, Kunihito; Ip, WingHuen; Kawabata, Koji S; Lee, YiHsi; Liping, Xin; Mito, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Ohsugi, Takashi; Qiu, Yulei; Soyano, Takao; Tarusawa, Kenichi; Tashiro, Makoto; Uemura, Makoto; Wei, Jianyan; Yamashita, Takuya

    2007-01-01

    We study the ``normal'' decay phase of the X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which follows the shallow decay phase, using the events simultaneously observed in the R-band. The classical external shock model, in which neither the delayed energy injection nor time-dependency of shock micro-physics is considered, shows that the decay indices of the X-ray and R-band light curves, $\\alpha_{\\rm X}$ and $\\alpha_{\\rm O}$, obey a certain relation, and that in particular, $\\alpha_{\\rm O}-\\alpha_{\\rm X}$ should be larger than -1/4. For our selected 14 samples, we have found that 7 events violate the limit taking into account 1$\\sigma$ error, so that a fraction of events are outliers of the classical external shock model at the ``normal'' decay phase.

  5. Energy deposition of quasi-two temperature relativistic electrons in fast-shock ignition scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Seyed Abolfazl; Farahbod, Amir Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Previous calculations from Solodov et al. (2008) indicate that classical stopping and scattering dominate electrons energy deposition and transport when the electrons reach the dense plasma in FSI inertial confinement fusion concept [1]. Our calculations show that, by using quasi- two temperature electrons energy distribution function [2] in comparison with exponential [3] or monoenergetic distribution function and also increasing fast electrons energy to about 7 MeV, the ratio of beam blooming to straggling definitely decreases. Our analytical analysis shows that for fuel mass more than 1 mg and for fast ignitor wavelength λif > 0.53 μ m, straggling and beam blooming increases. Meanwhile, by reducing fast ignitor wavelength from 0.53 to 0.35 micron, and for fuel mass about 2 mg, electron penetration into the dense fuel slightly increases. Therefore, reduction of scattering (blooming and straggling) of electrons and enhancement of electron penetration into the dense fuel, can be obtained in relativistic regime with high energy fast electrons of the order of 5 Mev and more. Such derivations can be used in theoretical studies of the ignition conditions and PIC simulations of the electron transport in fast ignition scenario.

  6. Time-course analysis of the Shewanella amazonensis SB2B proteome in response to sodium chloride shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parnell, John J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Rompato, Giovanni; Nicora, Carrie D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Williamson, Ashley; Pfrender, Michael E.

    2011-06-29

    Organisms in the genus Shewanella have become models for response to environmental stress. One of the most important environmental stresses is change in osmolarity. In this study, we experimentally determine the response mechanisms of Shewanella amazonensis SB2B during osmotic stress. Osmotic stress in SB2B was induced through exposure to NaCl, and the time-course proteomics response was measured using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Protein trends were qualitatively compared to gene expression trends and to phenotypic characterization. Osmotic stress affects motility, and has also been associated with a change in the membrane fatty acid composition (due to induction of branched chain amino acid degradation pathways); however, we show this is not the case for SB2B. Although proteins and genes involved with branched chain amino acid degradation are induced, fatty acid degradation pathways are not induced and no change in the fatty acid profile occurs in SB2B as a result of osmotic shock. The most extensive response of SB2B over the time course of acclimation to high salt involves an orchestrated sequence of events comprising increased expression of signal transduction associated with motility and restricted cell division and DNA replication. After SB2B has switched to increased branched chain amino acid degradation, motility, and cellular replication proteins return to pre-perturbed levels.

  7. Comparing different models of aftershock rate decay: the role of catalog incompleteness in the first times after main shock

    CERN Document Server

    Lolli, B; Gasperini, Paolo; Lolli, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the efficiency of various models in describing the time decay of aftershock rate of 47 simple sequences occurred in California (37) from 1933 to 2004 and in Italy (10) from 1976 to 2004. We compared the models by the corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc) and the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC), both based on the log-likelihood function but also including a penalty term that takes into account the number of independent observations and of free parameters of each model. We compared the performance of different models by varying the starting time Ts and the minimum magnitude threshold Mmin for each sequence. We found that Omori-type models including parameter c are preferable to those not including it, only for short Ts and low Mmin while the latters generally perform better than the formers for Ts longer than a few hours and Mmin larger than the main shock magnitude Mm minus 3 units. This clearly indicates that a value of parameter c different from zero does not represent a general pro...

  8. Late-time spectroscopy of SN 2002hh: A continued visible light echo with no shock interaction yet

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Jennifer E; Mauerhan, Jon C

    2015-01-01

    Supernova (SN) 2002hh was unusual among core-collapse SNe because it was highly reddened, and displayed a bright infrared (IR) excess due to radiatively heated dust in its circumstellar medium (CSM). Estimates for the mass of dust responsible for the IR echo suggested the presence of a massive shell within 0.26 pc of the star. For a velocity of 5000 - 10000 km/s, this material should be hit by the SN blast wave at late times, starting at roughly 12 years post-explosion. We have obtained deep late-time spectra with the MMT Blue Channel spectrograph to search for any spectral signatures of ongoing shock interaction. Interaction with a strength comparable to SN 1987A's collision with the equatorial ring would be detected in our data. However, in the spectra reported here, we do not detect clear signs of strong CSM interaction, contrary to expectations based on the reported radii of the dust shell. We do, however, detect emission associated with the old SN, and we find that the broad lines in the spectrum indicat...

  9. Late-time spectroscopy of SN 2002hh: a continued visible light echo with no shock interaction yet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J. E.; Smith, Nathan; Mauerhan, Jon C.

    2015-08-01

    Supernova (SN) 2002hh was unusual among core-collapse SNe because it was highly reddened, and displayed a bright infrared (IR) excess due to radiatively heated dust in its circumstellar medium (CSM). Estimates for the mass of dust responsible for the IR echo suggested the presence of a massive shell within 0.26 pc of the star. For a velocity of 5000-10 000 km s-1, this material should be hit by the SN blast wave at late times, starting at roughly 12 years post-explosion. We have obtained deep late-time spectra with the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) Blue Channel spectrograph to search for any spectral signatures of ongoing shock interaction. Interaction with a strength comparable to SN 1987A's collision with the equatorial ring would be detected in our data. However, in the spectra reported here, we do not detect clear signs of strong CSM interaction, contrary to expectations based on the reported radii of the dust shell. We do, however, detect emission associated with the old SN, and we find that the broad lines in the spectrum indicate a continuation of an ongoing reflected light echo, which appears similar to the spectrum at peak luminosity for this Type II-P event.

  10. Combination of two oxidant stressors suppresses the oxidative stress and enhances the heat shock protein 27 response in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brerro-Saby, Christelle; Delliaux, Stephane; Steinberg, Jean Guillaume; Boussuges, Alain; Gole, Yoann; Jammes, Yves

    2010-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the combination of 2 oxidant stressors (hyperoxia and fatiguing exercise) might reduce or suppress the oxidative stress. We concomitantly measured the plasma concentration of heat shock proteins (Hsp) that protect the cells against the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species. Healthy humans breathed pure oxygen under normobaric condition for 50-minute periods during which they stayed at rest or executed maximal static handgrip sustained until exhaustion. They also repeated handgrip bouts in normoxic condition. We performed venous blood measurements of 2 markers of the oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and reduced ascorbic acid) and Hsp27. Under normoxic condition, the handgrip elicited an oxidative stress and a modest increase in plasma Hsp27 level (+7.1 +/- 5.4 ng/mL). Under hyperoxic condition, (1) at rest, compared with the same time schedule in normoxic condition, we measured an oxidative stress (increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and decreased reduced ascorbic acid levels) and the plasma Hsp27 level increased (maximal variation, +12.5 +/- 6.0 ng/mL); and (2) after the handgrip, the oxidative stress rapidly disappeared. The combination of both hyperoxia and handgrip bout doubled the Hsp27 response (maximal variation, +24.8 +/- 9.2 ng/mL). Thus, the combination of 2 hits eliciting an oxidative stress seems to induce an adaptive Hsp27 response that might counterbalance an excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fingerprinting the K/T impact site and determining the time of impact by U-Pb dating of single shocked zircons from distal ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, T. E.; Kamo, S. L.; Bohor, B. F.

    1993-01-01

    U-Pb isotopic dating of single 1 - 3 micrograms zircons from K/T distal ejecta from a site in the Raton Basin, Colorado provides a powerful new tool with which to determine both the time of the impact event and the age of the basement at the impact site. Data for the least shocked zircons are slightly displaced from the 544 +/- 5 Ma primary age for a component of the target site, while those for highly shocked and granular grains are strongly displaced towards the time of impact at 65.5 +/- 3.0 Ma. Such shocked and granular zircons have never been reported from any source, including explosive volcanic rocks. Zircon is refractory and has one of the highest thermal blocking temperatures; hence, it can record both shock features and primary and secondary ages without modification by post-crystallization processes. Unlike shocked quartz, which can come from almost anywhere on the Earth's crust, shocked zircons can be shown to come from a specific site because basement ages vary on the scale of meters to kilometers. With U-Pb zircon dating, it is now possible to correlate ejecta layers derived from the same target site, test the single versus multiple impact hypothesis, and identify the target source of impact ejecta. The ages obtained in this study indicate that the Manson impact site, Iowa, which has basement rocks that are mid-Proterozoic in age, cannot be the source of K/T distal ejecta. The K/T distal ejecta probably originated from a single impact site because most grains have the same primary age.

  12. Thomson scattering measurement of a shock in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, T.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Moritaka, T. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sakawa, Y.; Takabe, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikane-yama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Tomita, K.; Nakayama, K.; Inoue, K.; Uchino, K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Ide, T.; Tsubouchi, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishio, K.; Ide, H.; Kuwada, M. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikane-yama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    We report the first direct measurement of temporally and spatially resolved plasma temperatures at a shock as well as its spatial structure and propagation in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas. Two shocks are formed in counter-streaming collisionless plasmas early in time, and they propagate opposite directions. This indicates the existence of counter-streaming collisionless flows to keep exciting the shocks, even though the collisional effects increase later in time. The shock images are observed with optical diagnostics, and the upstream and downstream plasma parameters of one of the shocks are measured using Thomson scattering technique.

  13. Comparison of time optimal control for two level quantum systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Cong; Jie Wen; Xubo Zou

    2014-01-01

    The time optimal problem for a two level quantum sys-tem is studied. We compare two different control strategies of bang-bang control and the geometric control, respectively, es-pecial y in the case of minimizing the time of steering the state from North Pole to South Pole on the Bloch sphere with bounded control. The time performances are compared for different param-eters by the individual numerical simulation experiments, and the experimental results are analyzed. The results show that the ge-ometric control spends less time than the bang-bang control does.

  14. PENETRATION OF A SHOCK WAVE IN A FLAME FRONT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan PANTAZOPOL

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the interactions between a fully supersonic flame front, situated in a supersonic two-dimensional flow of an ideal homogeneous combustible gas mixture, and an incident shock wawe, which is penetrating in the space of the hot burnt gases. A possible configuration, which was named ,,simple penetration” is examined. For the anlysis of the interference phenomena, shock polar and shock-combustion polar are used. At the same time, the paper shows the possibility to produce similar but more complicated configurations, which may contain expansion fans and reflected shock waves.

  15. A Fully Implicit Time Accurate Method for Hypersonic Combustion: Application to Shock-induced Combustion Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungster, Shaye; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    1994-01-01

    A new fully implicit, time accurate algorithm suitable for chemically reacting, viscous flows in the transonic-to-hypersonic regime is described. The method is based on a class of Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) schemes and uses successive Gauss-Siedel relaxation sweeps. The inversion of large matrices is avoided by partitioning the system into reacting and nonreacting parts, but still maintaining a fully coupled interaction. As a result, the matrices that have to be inverted are of the same size as those obtained with the commonly used point implicit methods. In this paper we illustrate the applicability of the new algorithm to hypervelocity unsteady combustion applications. We present a series of numerical simulations of the periodic combustion instabilities observed in ballistic-range experiments of blunt projectiles flying at subdetonative speeds through hydrogen-air mixtures. The computed frequencies of oscillation are in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  16. Shock priming enhances the efficacy of SSRIs in the foot shock-induced ultrasonic vocalization test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassai, Ferenc; Gyertyán, István

    2012-01-10

    Data on the effect of acutely administered serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in animal anxiety models have been inconsistent. In some of the models these compounds showed anxiolytic properties, while in others they were ineffective or even anxiogenic. In the foot shock-induced ultrasonic vocalization (USV) test in the adult rat, SSRIs were reported to be effective, however, they were only tested with protocols using multiple shocking design. In the present study, anxiolytic effects of various SSRI compounds (sertraline, fluoxetine, paroxetine, escitalopram) were tested in three distinct USV test protocols in comparison with alprazolam and 8-OH-DPAT. In the single shocking protocol, animals were exposed to one shocking session after the drug treatment. In the multiple shocking protocol, rats went through a foot shock priming session before each drug test. On priming days animals received foot shocks without drug treatment. On the test day (the day after), rats received drug treatment and then were shocked again. In the context conditioning protocol animals were exposed to foot shocks on two consecutive days before the drug test. On the third, test day, after drug treatment animals were replaced to the shocking chamber, but this time shocks were not delivered. SSRIs were ineffective using the single shocking protocol. In the context conditioned protocol, all SSRIs showed linear dose-response relationship with ED50 values of 8.5, 2.2, 0.77 and 0.93 mg/kg i.p. for fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine and escitalopram, respectively. Using the multiple shocking protocol, SSRIs were only partially effective with maximum inhibitions ranging between 44% and 62%. In contrast to SSRIs, the benzodiazepine anxiolytics, alprazolam showed anxiolytic activity with linear dose-response relationship in all of the test protocols, with ED50 values varying from 1.3 to 4.0 mg/kg i.p. The serotonin 5HT1A receptor antagonist 8-OH-DPAT also showed linear dose-response relationship in all

  17. Electromagnetic Structure and Electron Acceleration in Shock–Shock Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru; Mazelle, Christian X.

    2017-09-01

    A shock–shock interaction is investigated by using a one-dimensional full particle-in-cell simulation. The simulation reproduces the collision of two symmetrical high Mach number quasi-perpendicular shocks. The basic structure of the shocks and ion dynamics is similar to that obtained by previous hybrid simulations. The new aspects obtained here are as follows. Electrons are already strongly accelerated before the two shocks collide through multiple reflection. The reflected electrons self-generate waves upstream between the two shocks before they collide. The waves far upstream are generated through the right-hand resonant instability with the anomalous Doppler effect. The waves generated near the shock are due to firehose instability and have much larger amplitudes than those due to the resonant instability. The high-energy electrons are efficiently scattered by the waves so that some of them gain large pitch angles. Those electrons can be easily reflected at the shock of the other side. The accelerated electrons form a power-law energy spectrum. Due to the accelerated electrons, the pressure of upstream electrons increases with time. This appears to cause the deceleration of the approaching shock speed. The accelerated electrons having sufficiently large Larmor radii are further accelerated through the similar mechanism working for ions when the two shocks are colliding.

  18. Localized shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Daniel A; Susskind, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    We study products of precursors of spatially local operators, $W_{x_{n}}(t_{n}) ... W_{x_1}(t_1)$, where $W_x(t) = e^{-iHt} W_x e^{iHt}$. Using chaotic spin-chain numerics and gauge/gravity duality, we show that a single precursor fills a spatial region that grows linearly in $t$. In a lattice system, products of such operators can be represented using tensor networks. In gauge/gravity duality, they are related to Einstein-Rosen bridges supported by localized shock waves. We find a geometrical correspondence between these two descriptions, generalizing earlier work in the spatially homogeneous case.

  19. Time dependent two phase flows in Magnetohydrodynamics: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Time dependent two phase flows in Magnetohydrodynamics: A Greens function approach. BK Jha, HM Jibril ...

  20. Entanglement Entropy for time dependent two dimensional holographic superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Mazhari, N S; Myrzakulov, Kairat; Myrzakulov, R

    2016-01-01

    We studied entanglement entropy for a time dependent two dimensional holographic superconductor. We showed that the conserved charge of the system plays the role of the critical parameter to have condensation.

  1. 时间间隔服从二项分布的冲击模型的特征量的分布%The Distribution of Characteristics of Shock Model of Time Interval Obeying the Binomial Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马明; 陆琬; 吉佩玉

    2015-01-01

    This study did a research on a type of the random shock model. In the case of time interval of random shock model obeying the binomial distribution, this study researched the three indicators:the arrival time of shock, the total number of shocking time at any time, and if the shock of time reached the frequency and found the shock arrival time, the number of shocking time, and the probability distribution of the chance of shocking at any given time.%对一类随机冲击模型进行了研究,在随机冲击模型冲击到达的时间间隔服从二项分布的情况下,对冲击到达时刻、到任一时刻为止共冲击次数、时刻是否有冲击到达的概率这3个指标做了研究,得到了冲击到达时刻、冲击次数和任一时刻是否有冲击的概率分布。

  2. Plasma ion stratification by weak planar shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Andrei N.; Keenan, Brett D.; Taitano, William T.; Chacón, Luis

    2017-09-01

    We derive fluid equations for describing steady-state planar shocks of a moderate strength ( 0 shock Mach number) propagating through an unmagnetized quasineutral collisional plasma comprising two separate ion species. In addition to the standard fluid shock quantities, such as the total mass density, mass-flow velocity, and electron and average ion temperatures, the equations describe shock stratification in terms of variations in the relative concentrations and temperatures of the two ion species along the shock propagation direction. We have solved these equations analytically for weak shocks ( 0 shocks, and they have been used to verify kinetic simulations of shocks in multi-ion plasmas.

  3. Two-fractal overlap time series: Earthquakes and market crashes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bikas K Chakrabarti; Arnab Chatterjee; Pratip Bhattacharyya

    2008-08-01

    We find prominent similarities in the features of the time series for the (model earthquakes or) overlap of two Cantor sets when one set moves with uniform relative velocity over the other and time series of stock prices. An anticipation method for some of the crashes have been proposed here, based on these observations.

  4. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forward-forward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  5. Similarity solution of the shock wave propagation in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller M.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the possibility of calculation of propagation of a shock wave generated during the bubble collapse in water including the dissipation effect. The used semi-empirical model is based on an assumption of similarity between the shock pressure time profiles in different shock wave positions. This assumption leads to a system of two ordinary differential equations for pressure jump and energy at the shock front. The NIST data are used for the compilation of the equation of state, which is applied to the calculation of the shock wave energy dissipation. The initial conditions for the system of equations are obtained from the modified method of characteristics in the combination with the differential equations of cavitation bubble dynamics, which considers viscous compressible liquid with the influence of surface tension. The initial energy of the shock wave is estimated from the energy between the energies of the bubble growth to the first and second maximum bubble radii.

  6. Hypovolemic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thready Tests that may be done include: Blood chemistry, including kidney function tests and those tests looking ... severe shock. Severe hypovolemic shock may lead to death, even with immediate medical attention. Older adults are ...

  7. Shock propagation and attenuation in high-power excimer lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzwarth, Achim; Berger, Peter; Huegel, Helmut

    1993-05-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations on the propagation, reflection, and attenuation of shock waves as they occur in excimer lasers have been performed. The numerical simulations have been carried out using a two-dimensional, unsteady finite difference scheme. The experimental setup is a piston driven shock tube with a rectangular cross section working in air at atmospheric pressure. The shocks were detected interferometrically as well as by means of pressure transducers. This shock tube allows us to investigate basic phenomena of shock diffraction which can be used to confirm the computational results in the range of weak shock waves. In particular, the influence of the shape of the wall contour on the reflection of shock waves has been investigated theoretically. The decay time of pressure and density perturbations differs for various wall configurations in such a way that short electrodes accelerate the attenuation as well as does a strong area increase in the vicinity of them. After each laser pulse there is a shock travelling into the laser channel. Experiments have been carried out on the reflection of this shock at a specially formed bend that is able to focus the shock into a muffling element.

  8. When Shock Waves Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  9. Projective Synchronization Between Two Nonidentical Variable Time Delayed Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Cun-Fang; WANG Ying-Hai

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for the projective synchronization between two different chaotic systems with variable time delays. Using active control approach, the suitable controller is constructed to make the states of two different diverse time delayed systems asymptotically synchronize up to the desired scaling factor. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, the sufficient condition for the projective synchronization is calculated theoretically. Numerical simulations of the projective synchronization between Maekey-Glass system and Ikeda system with variable time delays are shown to validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Causality in noncommutative two-sheeted space-times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Nicolas; Eckstein, Michał

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the causal structure of two-sheeted space-times using the tools of Lorentzian spectral triples. We show that the noncommutative geometry of these spaces allows for causal relations between the two sheets. The computation is given in detail when the sheet is a 2- or 4-dimensional globally hyperbolic spin manifold. The conclusions are then generalised to a point-dependent distance between the two sheets resulting from the fluctuations of the Dirac operator.

  11. Causality in noncommutative two-sheeted space-times

    CERN Document Server

    Franco, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the causal structure of two-sheeted space-times using the tools of Lorentzian spectral triples. We show that the noncommutative geometry of these spaces allows for causal relations between the two sheets. The computation is given in details when the sheet is a 2- or 4-dimensional globally hyperbolic spin manifold. The conclusions are then generalised to a point-dependent distance between the two sheets resulting from the fluctuations of the Dirac operator.

  12. A Numerical Scheme Based on an Immersed Boundary Method for Compressible Turbulent Flows with Shocks: Application to Two-Dimensional Flows around Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Takahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational code adopting immersed boundary methods for compressible gas-particle multiphase turbulent flows is developed and validated through two-dimensional numerical experiments. The turbulent flow region is modeled by a second-order pseudo skew-symmetric form with minimum dissipation, while the monotone upstream-centered scheme for conservation laws (MUSCL scheme is employed in the shock region. The present scheme is applied to the flow around a two-dimensional cylinder under various freestream Mach numbers. Compared with the original MUSCL scheme, the minimum dissipation enabled by the pseudo skew-symmetric form significantly improves the resolution of the vortex generated in the wake while retaining the shock capturing ability. In addition, the resulting aerodynamic force is significantly improved. Also, the present scheme is successfully applied to moving two-cylinder problems.

  13. Evaluation of a Two-Length Scale Turbulence Model with Experiments on Shock-Driven Turbulent Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; Gore, Rob; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-11-01

    A new second moment turbulence model which uses separate transport and decay length scales is used to model the shock-driven instability. The ability of the model to capture the evolution of turbulence statistics and mixing is discussed. Evaluation is based on comparison to the Georgia Tech shock tube experiments. In the experiments a membraneless light-over-heavy interface is created. There is a long-wavelength perturbation which exists due to inclination of the entire shock tube. By limiting calculations to one dimension, there is not a geometric description of the incline, and the ability of the transport length scale alone to capture the effect of the long-wavelength perturbation is tested.

  14. A numerical study of fundamental shock noise mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis - Cornell Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Kristine R.

    1995-01-01

    The results of this thesis demonstrate that direct numerical simulation can predict sound generation in unsteady aerodynamic flows containing shock waves. Shock waves can be significant sources of sound in high speed jet flows, on helicopter blades, and in supersonic combustion inlets. Direct computation of sound permits the prediction of noise levels in the preliminary design stage and can be used as a tool to focus experimental studies, thereby reducing cost and increasing the probability of a successfully quiet product in less time. This thesis reveals and investigates two mechanisms fundamental to sound generation by shocked flows: shock motion and shock deformation. Shock motion is modeled by the interaction of a sound wave with a shock. During the interaction, the shock wave begins to move and the sound pressure is amplified as the wave passes through the shock. The numerical approach presented in this thesis is validated by the comparison of results obtained in a quasi-one dimensional simulation with linear theory. Analysis of the perturbation energy demonstrated for the first time that acoustic energy is generated by the interaction. Shock deformation is investigated by the numerical simulation of a ring vortex interacting with a shock. This interaction models the passage of turbulent structures through the shock wave. The simulation demonstrates that both acoustic waves and contact surfaces are generated downstream during the interaction. Analysis demonstrates that the acoustic wave spreads cylindrically, that the sound intensity is highly directional, and that the sound pressure level increases significantly with increasing shock strength. The effect of shock strength on sound pressure level is consistent with experimental observations of shock noise, indicating that the interaction of a ring vortex with a shock wave correctly models a dominant mechanism of shock noise generation.

  15. Pump and probe measurements of shock-compressed states

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, K G; Hironaka, Y; Kondo, K

    2002-01-01

    A pump and probe technique is used for time-resolved measurements of the microstructure of condensed matter under laser shock compression. Two types of experiment (picosecond x-ray diffraction and nanosecond Raman spectroscopy) are performed. The picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction results for laser-shocked Si(111) give the time evolution of the strain profiles in 60 ps intervals. Nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for laser-shocked poly-tetrafluoroethylene shows transient bond scission of the polymer chain.

  16. Two way time transfer results at NRL and USNO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galysh, Ivan J.; Landis, G. Paul

    1993-06-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed a two way time transfer modem system for the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). Two modems in conjunction with a pair of Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) and a communication satellite can achieve sub nanosecond time transfer. This performance is demonstrated by the results of testing at and between NRL and USNO. The modems use Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) methods to separate their signals through a single path in the satellite. Each modem transmitted a different Pseudo Random Noise (PRN) code and received the others PRN code. High precision time transfer is possible with two way methods because of reciprocity of many of the terms of the path and hardware delay between the two modems. The hardware description was given in a previous paper.

  17. Two way time transfer results at NRL and USNO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galysh, Ivan J.; Landis, G. Paul

    1993-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed a two way time transfer modem system for the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). Two modems in conjunction with a pair of Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) and a communication satellite can achieve sub nanosecond time transfer. This performance is demonstrated by the results of testing at and between NRL and USNO. The modems use Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) methods to separate their signals through a single path in the satellite. Each modem transmitted a different Pseudo Random Noise (PRN) code and received the others PRN code. High precision time transfer is possible with two way methods because of reciprocity of many of the terms of the path and hardware delay between the two modems. The hardware description was given in a previous paper.

  18. Shock-acceleration of a pair of gas inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Nunez, Jose Alonso; Reese, Daniel; Oakley, Jason; Rothamer, David; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    A shock wave moving through the interstellar medium distorts density inhomogeneities through the deposition of baroclinic vorticity. This process is modeled experimentally in a shock tube for a two-bubble interaction. A planar shock wave in nitrogen traverses two soap-film bubbles filled with argon. The two bubbles share an axis that is orthogonal to the shock wave and are separated from one another by a distance of approximately one bubble diameter. Atomization of the soap-film by the shock wave results in dispersal of droplets that are imaged using Mie scattering with a laser sheet through the bubble axis. Initial condition images of the bubbles in free-fall (no holder) are taken using a high-speed camera and then two post-shock images are obtained with two laser pulses and two cameras. The first post-shock image is of the early time compression stage when the sphere has become ellipsoidal, and the second image shows the emergence of vortex rings which have evolved due to vorticity depostion by the shock wave. Bubble morphology is characterized with length scale measurements.

  19. 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sadot, Oren; Igra, Ozer

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings collect the papers presented at the 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW30), which was held in Tel-Aviv Israel from July 19 to July 24, 2015. The Symposium was organized by Ortra Ltd. The ISSW30 focused on the state of knowledge of the following areas: Nozzle Flow, Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Shocks, Supersonic Jets, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Reacting Flows, Detonation, Combustion, Ignition, Shock Wave Reflection and Interaction, Shock Wave Interaction with Obstacles, Shock Wave Interaction with Porous Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Granular Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Dusty Media, Plasma, Magnetohyrdrodynamics, Re-entry to Earth Atmosphere, Shock Waves in Rarefied Gases, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter (Solids and Liquids), Shock Waves in Dense Gases, Shock Wave Focusing, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock Boundary Layer Interaction, Multiphase Flow, Blast Waves, Facilities, Flow Visualization, and Numerical Methods. The two volumes serve as a reference ...

  20. [Shock in obstetrics. Institutional experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Ahued Ahued, R; García-Benítez, C Q; Bolaños Ancona, R; Callejos, T; Juárez García, L

    1997-04-01

    Shock is one of the most difficult problems an obstetrician can face. Hemorrhage is the main reason of shock. A descriptive and retrospective research was conducted at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, from January 1992 to May 1996, including all patients admitted to the intensive care unit with diagnosis of shock. There were found 90 cases with diagnosis of shock, 82 were hipovolemic, and 8 cases had the septic kind of shock. The average of age was 32.2 years, with a gestational age between 6.2 to 41.4 weeks . There were 71 healthy patients, hypertension was associated to pregnancy in 9 cases, infertility in two, myomatosis in 2, and diabetes in 2 more patients. Other 5 cases reported different pathologies. The most frequent cause for hipovolemic shock resulted to be placenta acreta (40 cases), followed by uterine tone alterations in 37 patients, ectopic pregnancy in 7, uterine rupture or perforation in 4, and vaginal or cervical lacerations in 2. The estimated blood loss varied from 2200 cc to 6500 cc, and the minimal arterial pressure registered during shock was between 40/20 mmHg to 90/60 mmHg. Medical initial assistance consisted in volume reposition with crystalloids, globular packages, and plasma expansors in 73 patients (81.1%). The rest of the patients received in addition coloids, platelets and cryoprecipitates. A total of 76 patients required surgical intervention consisting in total abdominal hysterectomy. In 5 cases the previous surgical procedure was done and ligation of hypogastric vessels was needed. Salpingectomy was performed in 5 patients, and rupture or perforation repair in 3. The average surgery time was 2 hours and 33 minutes. The observed complications were 7 cases with abscess of the cupula, consumption coagulopathy in 2, 1 vesical quirurgical injury, 1 intestinal occlusion, and 11 vesico-vaginal fistula. The average days of hospitalization resulted to be 5. The most frequent kind of shock seen by obstetricians is the hipovolemic type

  1. Properties of the cosmological filament between two clusters: A possible detection of a large-scale accretion shock by Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, H.; Fujita, Y.; Akahori, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Hayashida, K.; Hoshino, A.; Mernier, F.; Yoshikawa, K.; Sato, K.; Kaastra, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    We report on the results of a Suzaku observation of the plasma in the filament located between the two massive clusters of galaxies, Abell 399 and Abell 401. Abell 399 (z = 0.0724) and Abell 401 (z = 0.0737) are expected to be in the initial phase of a cluster merger. In the region between the two clusters, we find a clear enhancement in the temperature of the filament plasma from 4 keV (expected value of a typical cluster temperature profile) to kT 6.5 keV. Our analysis also shows that filament plasma is present out to a radial distance of 15' (1.3 Mpc) from a line connecting the two clusters. The temperature profile is characterized by an almost flat radial shape with kT 6-7 keV within 10' or 0.8 Mpc. Across r = 8' from the axis, the temperature of the filament plasma shows a drop from 6.3 keV to 5.1 keV, indicating the presence of a shock front. The Mach number based on the temperature drop is estimated to be ℳ 1.3. We also successfully determined the abundance profile up to 15' (1.3 Mpc), showing an almost constant value (Z = 0.3 solar) at the cluster outskirts. We estimated the Compton y parameter to be 14.5 ± 1.3 × 10-6, which is in agreement with the Planck results (14-17 × 10-6 on the filament). The line-of-sight depth of the filament is l 1.1 Mpc, which indicates that the geometry of filament is likely a pancake shape rather than cylindrical. The total mass of the filamentary structure is 7.7 × 1013M⊙. We discuss a possible interpretation of the drop of X-ray emission at the rim of the filament, which was pushed out by the merging activity and formed by the accretion flow induced by the gravitational force of the filament.

  2. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  3. Explosion of red-supergiant stars: Influence of the atmospheric structure on shock breakout and early-time supernova radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc; John Hillier, D.; Audit, Edouard

    2017-09-01

    Early-time observations of Type II supernovae (SNe) 2013cu and 2013fs have revealed an interaction of ejecta with material near the star surface. Unlike Type IIn SN 2010jl, which interacts with a dense wind for 1 yr, the interaction ebbs after 2-3 d, suggesting a dense and compact circumstellar envelope. Here, we use multi-group radiation hydrodynamics and non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium radiative transfer to explore the properties of red-supergiant (RSG) star explosions embedded in a variety of dense envelopes. We consider the cases of an extended static atmosphere or a steady-state wind, adopting a range of mass loss rates. The shock breakout signal, luminosity and color evolution up to 10 d, and ejecta dynamics are strongly influenced by the properties of this nearby environment. This compromises the use of early-time observations to constrain R⋆. For dense circumstellar envelopes, the time-integrated luminosity over the first 10-15 d can be boosted by a factor of a few. The presence of narrow lines for 2-3 d in 2013fs and 2013cu require a cocoon of material of 0.01 M⊙ out to 5-10 R⋆. Spectral lines evolve from electron scattering to Doppler broadened with a growing blueshift of their emission peaks. Recent studies propose a super-wind phase with a mass loss rate from 0.001 up to 1 M⊙ yr-1 in the last months or years of the life of a RSG, although there is no observational constraint that this external material is a steady-state outflow. Alternatively, observations may be explained by the explosion of a RSG star inside its complex atmosphere. Indeed, spatially resolved observations reveal that RSG stars have extended atmospheres, with the presence of downflows and upflows out to several R⋆, even in a standard RSG such as Betelgeuse. Mass loading in the region intermediate between star and wind can accommodate the 0.01 M⊙ needed to explain the observations of 2013fs. Signatures of interaction in early-time spectra of RSG star explosions may

  4. Advection equation analysed by two-timing method

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, V A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study and classify the multiplicity of distinguished limits and asymptotic solutions for the advection equation with a general oscillating velocity field with the systematic use of the two-timing method. Our results are: (i) the dimensionless advection equation contains two independent small parameters, which represent the ratio of two characteristic time-scales and the spatial amplitudes of oscillations; the scaling of the variables and parameters contains Strouhal number; (ii) an infinite sequence of distinguished limits has been identified; this sequence corresponds to the successive degenerations of a drift velocity; (iii) we have derived the averaged and oscillatory equations for the first four distinguished limits; derivations are performed up to the forth orders in small parameters; (v) we have shown, that each distinguish limit solution generates an infinite number of parametric solutions; these solutions differ from each other by the slow time-scale and the amplitude of pr...

  5. A Comparison of Two Methods of Assessing Representation-Mediated Food Aversions Based on Shock or Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    In experiments that measured food consumption, Holland (1981; "Learning and Motivation," 12, 1-18) found that food aversions were formed when an exteroceptive associate of food was paired with illness, but not when such an associate was paired with shock. By contrast, measuring the ability of food to reinforce instrumental responding,…

  6. Immersed Boundary-Lattice Boltzmann Method Using Two Relaxation Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Hayashi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM using a two-relaxation time model (TRT is proposed. The collision operator in the lattice Boltzmann equation is modeled using two relaxation times. One of them is used to set the fluid viscosity and the other is for numerical stability and accuracy. A direct-forcing method is utilized for treatment of immersed boundary. A multi-direct forcing method is also implemented to precisely satisfy the boundary conditions at the immersed boundary. Circular Couette flows between a stationary cylinder and a rotating cylinder are simulated for validation of the proposed method. The method is also validated through simulations of circular and spherical falling particles. Effects of the functional forms of the direct-forcing term and the smoothed-delta function, which interpolates the fluid velocity to the immersed boundary and distributes the forcing term to fixed Eulerian grid points, are also examined. As a result, the following conclusions are obtained: (1 the proposed method does not cause non-physical velocity distribution in circular Couette flows even at high relaxation times, whereas the single-relaxation time (SRT model causes a large non-physical velocity distortion at a high relaxation time, (2 the multi-direct forcing reduces the errors in the velocity profile of a circular Couette flow at a high relaxation time, (3 the two-point delta function is better than the four-point delta function at low relaxation times, but worse at high relaxation times, (4 the functional form of the direct-forcing term does not affect predictions, and (5 circular and spherical particles falling in liquids are well predicted by using the proposed method both for two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases.

  7. Virulence of two Streptococcus pyogenes strains (types M1 and M3) associated with toxic-shock-like syndrome depends on an intact mry-like gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Perez-Casal, J F; Dillon, H F; Husmann, L K; Graham, B.; Scott, J R

    1993-01-01

    The major virulence factor of Streptococcus pyogenes, the M protein, is positively regulated at the transcriptional level by mry in the M type 6 strain studied. We show here that in two S. pyogenes strains isolated from cases of toxic-shock-like syndrome, a type M1 strain and a type M3 strain, an mry-like gene is also required for resistance to phagocytosis.

  8. [Historical vision of shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosne Pasqualini, C

    1998-01-01

    The concept of shock and its close relationship with that of stress dates back to the experiments of Hans Selye initiated in 1936 at McGill University in Montreal, with whom I collaborated between 1939 and 1942. It was demonstrated that the General Adaptation Syndrome begins with an Alarm Reaction, which consists of a Stage of Shock and one of Counter-Shock, followed by a Stage of Adaptation and finally a Stage of Exhaustion. My Ph.D. thesis concluded that shock was due to an adrenal insufficiency postulating that active metabolic processes drain the body of certain essential compounds the lack of which causes shock. My interest in the role of the glucose metabolism in shock led me to work with Bernardo Houssay in 1942 at the Institute of Physiology of the University of Buenos Aires and in 1944 with C.N.H. Long at Yale University. There I developed a method for the induction of hemorrhagic shock in the guinea pig with 94% lethality; curiously, the administration of 200 mg of ascorbic acid prevented death. Upon my return to Buenos Aires, these results were confirmed and moreover, it was demonstrated that the administration of cortisone led to 40% survival of the animals while desoxycorticosterone had no effect. At the time, no explanation was available but to-day, half a century later, this Symposium should be able to explain the mechanisms leading to death by hemorrhagic shock.

  9. [Shock waves in orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, G

    1997-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock waves have revolutionized urological stone treatment. Nowadays shock waves are widely used in orthopedics, too. This article reviews the applications of extracorporeal shock waves on bone and adjacent soft tissue. The osteoneogenetic effect of extracorporeal shock waves has been proven and can be used to treat pseudarthrosis with a success rate of around 75%. Shock waves have a positive effect in tennis and golfer's elbow, calcaneal spur, and the complex called "periarthritis humero-scapularis." The mechanism for this is not yet known, and results from large prospective and randomized studies are still lacking. However, the treatment has been performed many thousands of times. In patients in whom conservative treatment has failed surgery used to be the only choice, but its success rate barely exceeds that of shock wave therapy and surgery can still be done if shock wave therapy fails. Extracorporeal shock waves will have an impact on orthopedics comparable to its effect in urology. Scientific evaluations, professional certifications, quality assurance and reimbursement issues present great challenges.

  10. Early Pubertal Timing and Girls' Problem Behavior: Integrating Two Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stattin, Hakan; Kerr, Margaret; Skoog, Therese

    2011-01-01

    Girls' early pubertal timing has been linked in many studies to behavioral problems such as delinquency and substance use. The theoretical explanations for these links have often involved the girls' peer relationships, but contexts have also been considered important in some explanations. By integrating two theoretical models, the…

  11. Hamiltonian Noether theorem for gauge systems and two time physics

    CERN Document Server

    Villanueva, V M; Ruiz, L; Silvas, J

    2005-01-01

    The Noether theorem for Hamiltonian constrained systems is revisited. In particular, our review presents a novel method to show that the gauge transformations are generated by the conserved quantities associated with the first class constraints. We apply our results to the relativistic point particle, to the Friedberg et al. model and, with special emphasis, to two time physics.

  12. Two Hybrid Methods for Solving Two-Dimensional Linear Time-Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Jacobs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computationally efficient hybridization of the Laplace transform with two spatial discretization techniques is investigated for numerical solutions of time-fractional linear partial differential equations in two space variables. The Chebyshev collocation method is compared with the standard finite difference spatial discretization and the absolute error is obtained for several test problems. Accurate numerical solutions are achieved in the Chebyshev collocation method subject to both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The solution obtained by these hybrid methods allows for the evaluation at any point in time without the need for time-marching to a particular point in time.

  13. First passage time statistics for two-channel diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Godec, Aljaz

    2016-01-01

    We present rigorous results for the mean first passage time and first passage time statistics for two-channel Markov additive diffusion in a 3-dimensional spherical domain. Inspired by biophysical examples we assume that the particle can only recognise the target in one of the modes, which is shown to effect a non-trivial first passage behaviour. We also address the scenario of intermittent immobilisation. In both cases we prove that despite the perfectly non-recurrent motion of two-channel Markov additive diffusion in 3 dimensions the first passage statistics at long times do not display Poisson-like behaviour if none of the phases has a vanishing diffusion coefficient. This stands in stark contrast to the standard (one-channel) Markov diffusion counterpart. We also discuss the relevance of our results in the context of cellular signalling.

  14. A shock tube and laser absorption study of ignition delay times and OH reaction rates of ketones: 2-Butanone and 3-buten-2-one

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2014-03-01

    Ketones are potential biofuel candidates and are also formed as intermediate products during the oxidation of large hydrocarbons or oxygenated fuels, such as alcohols and esters. This paper presents shock tube ignition delay times and OH reaction rates of 2-butanone (C2H5COCH3) and 3-buten-2-one (C2H3COCH3). Ignition delay measurements were carried out over temperatures of 1100-1400K, pressures of 3-6.5atm, and at equivalence ratios (F{cyrillic}) of 0.5 and 1. Ignition delay times were monitored using two different techniques: pressure time history and OH absorption near 306nm. The reaction rates of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with these two ketones were measured over the temperature range of 950-1400K near 1.5atm. The OH profiles were monitored by the narrow-line-width ring-dye laser absorption of the well-characterized R1(5) line in the OH A-X (0, 0) band near 306.69nm. We found that the ignition delay times of 2-butanone and 3-buten-2-one mixtures scale with pressure as P-0.42 and P-0.52, respectively. The ignition delay times of 3-buten-2-one were longer than that of 2-butanone for stoichiometric mixtures, however, for lean mixtures (F{cyrillic}=0.5), 2-butanone had longer ignition delay times. The chemical kinetic mechanism of Serinyel et al. [1] over-predicted the ignition delay times of 2-butanone at all tested conditions, however, the discrepancies were smaller at higher pressures. The mechanism was updated with recent rate measurements to decrease discrepancy with the experimental data. A detailed chemistry for the oxidation of 3-buten-2-one was developed using rate estimation method and reasonable agreements were obtained with the measured ignition delay data. The measured reaction rate of 2-butanone with OH agreed well with the literature data, while we present the first high-temperature measurements for the reaction of OH with 3-buten-2-one. The following Arrhenius expressions are suggested over the temperature range of 950-1450K: kC2H5COCH3+OH=6.78×1013exp

  15. Nitro Stretch Probing of a Single Molecular Layer to Monitor Shock Compression with Picosecond Time-Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christopher; Lagutchev, Alexei; Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2011-06-01

    To obtain maximum possible temporal resolution, laser-driven shock compression of a molecular monolayer was studied using vibrational spectroscopy. The stretching transitions of nitro groups bound to aromatic rings was monitored using a nonlinear coherent infrared spectroscopy termed sum-frequency generation, which produced high-quality signals from this very thin layer. To overcome the shock opacity problem, a novel polymer overcoat method allowed us to make the observation window (witness plate) a few micrometers thick. The high signal-to-noise ratios (>100:1) obtained via this spectroscopy allowed us to study detailed behavior of the shocked molecules. To help interpret these vibrational spectra, additional spectra were obtained under conditions of static pressures up to 10 GPa and static temperatures up to 1000 C. Consequently, this experiment represents a significant step in resolving molecular dynamics during shock compression and unloading with both high spatial and temporal resolution. Supported by the Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliance Program from the Carnegie-DOE Alliance Center under grant number DOE CIW 4-3253-13 and the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research under award number FAA9550-09-1-0163.

  16. Collisionless shock waves mediated by Weibel Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Neda; Ruan, Panpan; Zhang, Xi; Khudik, Vladimir; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-11-01

    Relativistic collisionless shocks are common events in astrophysical environments. They are thought to be responsible for generating ultra-high energy particles via the Fermi acceleration mechanism. It has been conjectured that the formation of collisionless shocks is mediated by the Weibel instability that takes place when two initially cold, unmagnetized plasma shells counter-propagate into each other with relativistic drift velocities. Using a PIC code, VLPL, which is modified to suppress numerical Cherenkov instabilities, we study the shock formation and evolution for asymmetric colliding shells with different densities in their own proper reference frame. Plasma instabilities in the region between the shock and the precursor are also investigated using a moving-window simulation that advances the computational domain at the shock's speed. This method helps both to save computation time and avoid severe numerical Cherenkov instabilities, and it allows us to study the shock evolution in a longer time period. Project is supported by US DOE grants DE-FG02-04ER41321 and DE-FG02-07ER54945.

  17. Carrier shock and frequency conversion of a few-cycle pulse laser propagating in a non-resonant two-level atom medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖健; 王中阳; 徐至展

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the spectral behaviour of few-cycle soliton pulses in a non-resonant two-level atom medium by solving the full Maxwell-Bloch equations. It is demonstrated further that the carrier effects play an important role in the propagation of the few-cycle pulse laser. When the frequency detuning is not very large, both the population distribution and the refractive index of the medium follow the oscillatory carrier field instantaneously; in this case,carrier-wave compression or carrier shock occurs, and a supercontinuum broader than that in the resonant medium may be generated. When the frequency detuning is large, the carrier shock is weak and the spectrum is not continuous, only showing an odd harmonic radiation.

  18. Two-time-scale population evolution on a singular landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Jiao, Shuyun; Jiang, Pengyao; Ao, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Under the effect of strong genetic drift, it is highly probable to observe gene fixation or gene loss in a population, shown by singular peaks on a potential landscape. The genetic drift-induced noise gives rise to two-time-scale diffusion dynamics on the bipeaked landscape. We find that the logarithmically divergent (singular) peaks do not necessarily imply infinite escape times or biological fixations by iterating the Wright-Fisher model and approximating the average escape time. Our analytical results under weak mutation and weak selection extend Kramers's escape time formula to models with B (Beta) function-like equilibrium distributions and overcome constraints in previous methods. The constructed landscape provides a coherent description for the bistable system, supports the quantitative analysis of bipeaked dynamics, and generates mathematical insights for understanding the boundary behaviors of the diffusion model.

  19. Planar shock wave sliding over a water layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, V.; Jourdan, G.; Marty, A.; Allou, A.; Parisse, J.-D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we conduct experiments to study the interaction between a horizontal free water layer and a planar shock wave that is sliding over it. Experiments are performed at atmospheric pressure in a shock tube with a square cross section (200× 200 mm^2) for depths of 10, 20, and 30 mm; a 1500-mm-long water layer; and two incident planar shock waves having Mach numbers of 1.11 and 1.43. We record the pressure histories and high-speed visualizations to study the flow patterns, surface waves, and spray layers behind the shock wave. We observe two different flow patterns with ripples formed at the air-water interface for the weaker shock wave and the dispersion of a droplet mist for the stronger shock wave. From the pressure signals, we extract the delay time between the arrival of the compression wave into water and the shock wave in air at the same location. We show that the delay time evolves with the distance traveled over the water layer, the depth of the water layer, and the Mach number of the shock wave.

  20. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Marcowith, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O C; Lembege, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebul\\ae, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in-situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasize is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in a...

  1. Evidence for two time scales in long SNS junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, F; Aprili, M; Reulet, B

    2009-10-23

    We use microwave excitation to elucidate the dynamics of long superconductor-normal metal-superconductor Josephson junctions. By varying the excitation frequency in the range 10 MHz-40 GHz, we observe that the critical and retrapping currents, deduced from the dc voltage versus dc current characteristics of the junction, are set by two different time scales. The critical current increases when the ac frequency is larger than the inverse diffusion time in the normal metal, whereas the retrapping current is strongly modified when the excitation frequency is above the electron-phonon rate in the normal metal. Therefore the critical and retrapping currents are associated with elastic and inelastic scattering, respectively.

  2. Two-Component Multi-Parameter Time-Frequency Electromagnetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuangZhou; DongWeibin; HeTiezhi

    2003-01-01

    The two-component multi-parameter time-frequency electromagnetic method, used for the development of oilfields,makes use of both the traditional individual conductivity parameters of oil-producing layers and the dispersion information of the conductivity, i.e., the induced polarization parameter. The frequency-domain dispersion data is used to delineate the contacts between oil and water and the time domain dBz/dt component is used to estimate the depths to the un-known reservoirs so as to offer significant data in many aspects for oil exploration and detection.

  3. Coping with shocks in rural Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debebe, Z.Y.; Mebratie, A.; Sparrow, R.; Abebaw, D.; Dekker, M.; Alemu, G.; Bedi, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Based on household survey data and event history interviews undertaken in a highly shock prone country, this paper investigates which shocks trigger which coping responses and why? We find clear differences in terms of coping strategies across shock types. The two relatively covariate shocks, that

  4. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Cano, X. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, CU, Coyoacan 04510 DF (Mexico); Kajdic, P. [IRAP-University of Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Morelia (Mexico); Russell, C. T. [ESS and IGPP, University of California, Los Angeles, 603 Charles Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jian, L. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD and University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [SSL, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  5. Prediction of Sound Waves Propagating Through a Nozzle Without/With a Shock Wave Using the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    The benchmark problems in Category 1 (Internal Propagation) of the third Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Work-shop sponsored by NASA Glenn Research Center are solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. The first problem addresses the propagation of sound waves through a nearly choked transonic nozzle. The second one concerns shock-sound interaction in a supersonic nozzle. A quasi one-dimension CE/SE Euler solver for a nonuniform mesh is developed and employed to solve both problems. Numerical solutions are compared with the analytical solution for both problems. It is demonstrated that the CE/SE method is capable of solving aeroacoustic problems with/without shock waves in a simple way. Furthermore, the simple nonreflecting boundary condition used in the CE/SE method which is not based on the characteristic theory works very well.

  6. Two-dimensional random arrays for real time volumetric imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Richard E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Smith, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays are necessary for a variety of ultrasonic imaging techniques, including elevation focusing, 2-D phase aberration correction, and real time volumetric imaging. In order to reduce system cost and complexity, sparse 2-D arrays have been considered with element geometries...... real time volumetric imaging system, which employs a wide transmit beam and receive mode parallel processing to increase image frame rate. Depth-of-field comparisons were made from simulated on-axis and off-axis beamplots at ranges from 30 to 160 mm for both coaxial and offset transmit and receive...... selected ad hoc, by algorithm, or by random process. Two random sparse array geometries and a sparse array with a Mills cross receive pattern were simulated and compared to a fully sampled aperture with the same overall dimensions. The sparse arrays were designed to the constraints of the Duke University...

  7. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  8. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  9. Study of a tissue protecting system for clinical applications of underwater shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2005-04-01

    Applications of underwater shock waves have been extended to various clinical therapies during the past two decades. Besides the successful contribution of extracorporeal shock waves, tissue damage especially to the vasculature has been reported. These side effects are believed to be due to the shock wave-tissue interaction and cavitation. In the present research in order to minimize shock wave induced damage a shock wave attenuating system was designed and studied. The attenuating system consisted of thin gas packed layers immersed in water, which could attenuate more than 90% of shock waves overpressure. Silver azide micro-pellets (10 mg) were ignited by irradiation of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to generate shock waves. Pressure histories were measured with fiber optic probe and PVDF needle hydrophones. The strength of incident shock waves was changed by adjusting the distance between the pellets and the layers. The whole sequences of the shock wave attenuation due to the interaction of shock waves with the dissipating layers were quantitatively visualized by double exposure holographic interferometry and time resolved high speed photography. The attenuated shock had overpressure less than threshold damage of brain tissue evaluated from histological examination of the rat brain treated by shock waves.

  10. A novel particle Time Of Flight (pTOF) diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D3He and DT implosions at the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Zylstra, A B; Sinenian, N; Rosenbergh, M J; Frenje, J A; Waugh, C J; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Rygg, J R; Kline, J; Doeppner, T; Park, H S; Landen, O; Lepape, S; Meezan, N; Kilkenny, J; Glebov, V Y; Sangster, T; Stoeckl, C; Olson, R

    2012-05-02

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, fielded alongside a Wedge Range-Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer, will provide an absolute timing for the shock-burn weighted {rho}R measurements that will validate the modeling of implosion dynamics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In the first phase of the project, pTOF has recorded accurate bang times in cryogenic DT, DT-Exploding Pusher and D{sup 3}He implosions using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than {+-}70 ps. In the second phase of the project, a deflecting magnet will be incorporated into the pTOF design for simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D{sup 3}He-filled surrogate implosions using D{sup 3}He protons and DD-neutrons, respectively.

  11. Two Multivehicle Routing Problems with Unit-Time Windows

    CERN Document Server

    Frederickson, Greg N

    2011-01-01

    Two multivehicle routing problems are considered in the framework that a visit to a location must take place during a specific time window in order to be counted and all time windows are the same length. In the first problem, the goal is to visit as many locations as possible using a fixed number of vehicles. In the second, the goal is to visit all locations using the smallest number of vehicles possible. For the first problem, we present an approximation algorithm whose output path collects a reward within a constant factor of optimal for any fixed number of vehicles. For the second problem, our algorithm finds a 6-approximation to the problem on a tree metric, whenever a single vehicle could visit all locations during their time windows.

  12. Time-course of sFlt-1 and VEGF-A release in neutropenic patients with sepsis and septic shock: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Souza Carmino A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Septic shock is the most feared complication of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia. So far, there are no robust biomarkers that can stratify patients to the risk of sepsis complications. The VEGF-A axis is involved in the control of microvascular permeability and has been involved in the pathogenesis of conditions associated with endothelial barrier disruption such as sepsis. sFlt-1 is a soluble variant of the VEGF-A receptor VEGFR-1 that acts as a decoy receptor down-regulating the effects of VEGF-A. In animal models of sepsis, sFlt-1 was capable to block the barrier-breaking negative effects of VEGF-A and to significantly decrease mortality. In non-neutropenic patients, sFlt-1 has been shown to be a promising biomarker for sepsis severity. Methods We prospectively evaluated concentrations of sFlt-1 and VEGF-A at different time-points during febrile neutropenia, and evaluated the association of these levels with sepsis severity and septic shock development. Results Neutropenic patients that evolved with septic shock (n = 10 presented higher levels of sFlt-1 and VEGF-A measured 48 hours after fever onset than patients with non-complicated sepsis (n = 31 and levels of these biomarkers correlated with sepsis severity scores. Estimation of the diagnostic accuracy of sFlt-1 levels for the discrimination of patients that evolved to septic shock yielded promising results in our study population. Discussion Our data suggest that sFlt-1 and VEGF-A could be useful biomarkers for sepsis severity in patients with febrile neutropenia. In addition, the kinetics of sFlt-1 release in patients that evolve to septic shock suggest that the sFlt-1 could be a salvage compensatory mechanism in patients with septic shock, but that the magnitude of the sFlt-1 release observed in human sepsis is not sufficient to reproduce the beneficial anti-VEGF-A effects observed in animal models of sepsis.

  13. Overestimation of the second time interval replaces time-shrinking when the difference between two adjacent time intervals increases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka eNakajima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When the onsets of three successive sound bursts mark two adjacent time intervals, the second time interval can be underestimated when it is physically longer than the first time interval by up to 100 ms. This illusion, time-shrinking, is very stable when the first time interval is 200 ms or shorter (Nakajima et al., 2004, Perception, 33. Time-shrinking had been considered a kind of perceptual assimilation to make the first and the second time interval more similar to each other. Here we investigated whether the underestimation of the second time interval was replaced by an overestimation if the physical difference between the neighboring time intervals was too large for the assimilation to take place; this was a typical situation in which a perceptual contrast could be expected. Three experiments to measure the overestimation/underestimation of the second time interval by the method of adjustment were conducted. The first time interval was varied from 40 to 280 ms, and such overestimations indeed took place when the first time interval was 80-280 ms. The overestimations were robust when the second time interval was longer than the first time interval by 240 ms or more, and the magnitude of the overestimation was larger than 100 ms in some conditions. Thus, a perceptual contrast to replace time-shrinking was established. An additional experiment indicated that this contrast did not affect the perception of the first time interval substantially: The contrast in the present conditions seemed unilateral.

  14. A monolingual mind can have two time lines: Exploring space-time mappings in Mandarin monolinguals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenxing; Sun, Ying

    2016-06-01

    Can a mind accommodate two time lines? Miles, Tan, Noble, Lumsden and Macrae (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 18, 598-604, 2011) shows that Mandarin-English bilinguals have both a horizontal space-time mapping consistent with linguistic conventions within English and a vertical representation of time commensurate with Mandarin. However, the present study, via two experiments, demonstrates that Mandarin monolinguals possess two mental time lines, i.e., one horizontal and one vertical line. This study concludes that a Mandarin speaker has two mental time lines not because he/she has acquired L2 English, but because there are both horizontal and vertical expressions in Mandarin spatiotemporal metaphors. Specifically, this study highlights the fact that a horizontal time line does exist in a Mandarin speaker's cognition, even if he/she is a Mandarin monolingual instead of a ME bilingual. Taken together, the evidence in hand is far from sufficient to support Miles et al.'s (2011) conclusion that ME bilinguals' horizontal concept of time is manipulated by English. Implications for theoretical issues concerning the language-thought relationship in general and the effect of bilingualism on cognition in particular are discussed.

  15. A single-pulse shock tube coupled with high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for high-temperature gas-phase kinetics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, P.; Shu, B.; Aghsaee, M.; Herzler, J.; Welz, O.; Fikri, M.; Schulz, C.

    2016-10-01

    Shock tubes are frequently used to investigate the kinetics of chemical reactions in the gas phase at high temperatures. Conventionally, two complementary arrangements are used where either time-resolved intermediate species measurements are conducted after the initiation of the reaction or where the product composition is determined after rapid initiation and quenching of the reaction through gas-dynamic processes. This paper presents a facility that combines both approaches to determine comprehensive information. A single-pulse shock tube is combined with high-sensitivity gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for product composition and concentration measurement as well as high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometry for time-dependent intermediate concentration determination with 10 μs time resolution. Both methods can be applied simultaneously. The arrangement is validated with investigations of the well-documented thermal unimolecular decomposition of cyclohexene towards ethylene and 1,3-butadiene at temperatures between 1000 and 1500 K and pressures ranging from 0.8 to 2.4 bars. The comparison shows that the experimental results for both detections are in very good agreement with each other and with literature data.

  16. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    CERN Document Server

    Dasadia, Sarthak; Sarazin, Craig; Morandi, Andrea; Markevitch, Maxim; Wik, Daniel; Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele; Govoni, Federica; Vacca, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Deep (103 ks) \\chandra\\ observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of $M$ = 3.0 $\\pm$ 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell~665 the second cluster where a strong merger shock of $M \\approx$ 3 has been detected, after the Bullet cluster. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 $\\pm$ 0.7) $\\times$ 10$^3$ km sec$^{-1}$. The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front, with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the re-acceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  17. Reentry Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorine; Houston

    1998-01-01

    Dear Xiao Lan, You remember the pain of culture and reentry shock; humor me please; let mereview the facts for the sake of the students you are sending here in greater numbers.Culture shock is the emotional pain that people experience when they visit a newcountry and find customs, experiences, smells, and non-verbal communication stylesto be different from their own country.

  18. A shock tube with a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer for investigations of complex reaction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürrstein, Steffen H.; Aghsaee, Mohammad; Jerig, Ludger; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof

    2011-08-01

    A conventional membrane-type stainless steel shock tube has been coupled to a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HRR-TOF-MS) to be used to study complex reaction systems such as the formation of pollutants in combustion processes or formation of nanoparticles from metal containing organic compounds. Opposed to other TOF-MS shock tubes, our instrument is equipped with a modular sampling unit that allows to sample with or without a skimmer. The skimmer unit can be mounted or removed in less than 10 min. Thus, it is possible to adjust the sampling procedure, namely, the mass flux into the ionization chamber of the HRR-TOF-MS, to the experimental situation imposed by species-specific ionization cross sections and vapor pressures. The whole sampling section was optimized with respect to a minimal distance between the nozzle tip inside the shock tube and the ion source inside the TOF-MS. The design of the apparatus is presented and the influence of the skimmer on the measured spectra is demonstrated by comparing data from both operation modes for conditions typical for chemical kinetics experiments. The well-studied thermal decomposition of acetylene has been used as a test system to validate the new setup against kinetics mechanisms reported in literature.

  19. A shock tube with a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer for investigations of complex reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürrstein, Steffen H; Aghsaee, Mohammad; Jerig, Ludger; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof

    2011-08-01

    A conventional membrane-type stainless steel shock tube has been coupled to a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HRR-TOF-MS) to be used to study complex reaction systems such as the formation of pollutants in combustion processes or formation of nanoparticles from metal containing organic compounds. Opposed to other TOF-MS shock tubes, our instrument is equipped with a modular sampling unit that allows to sample with or without a skimmer. The skimmer unit can be mounted or removed in less than 10 min. Thus, it is possible to adjust the sampling procedure, namely, the mass flux into the ionization chamber of the HRR-TOF-MS, to the experimental situation imposed by species-specific ionization cross sections and vapor pressures. The whole sampling section was optimized with respect to a minimal distance between the nozzle tip inside the shock tube and the ion source inside the TOF-MS. The design of the apparatus is presented and the influence of the skimmer on the measured spectra is demonstrated by comparing data from both operation modes for conditions typical for chemical kinetics experiments. The well-studied thermal decomposition of acetylene has been used as a test system to validate the new setup against kinetics mechanisms reported in literature.

  20. Precision Timing of Two Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi; Chakrabarty; Steinberger

    1999-11-01

    We report on long-term X-ray timing of two anomalous X-ray pulsars, 1RXS J170849.0-400910 and 1E 2259+586, using the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. In monthly observations made over 1.4 and 2.6 yr for the two pulsars, respectively, we have obtained phase-coherent timing solutions which imply that these objects have been rotating with great stability throughout the course of our observations. For 1RXS J170849.0-400910, we find a rotation frequency of 0.0909169331(5) Hz and frequency derivative -15.687&parl0;4&parr0;x10-14 Hz s-1 for epoch MJD 51215.931. For 1E 2259+586, we find a rotation frequency of 0.1432880613(2) Hz and frequency derivative -1.0026&parl0;7&parr0;x10-14 Hz s-1 for epoch MJD 51195.583. The rms phase residuals from these simple models are only approximately 0.01 cycles for both sources. We show that the frequency derivative for 1E 2259+586 is inconsistent with that inferred from incoherent frequency observations made over the last 20 yr. Our observations are consistent with the magnetar hypothesis and make binary accretion scenarios appear unlikely.

  1. [Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome or Kawasaki disease? Two case studies of children with group A streptococcal pneumonia empyema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosland, A; Arlaud, K; Rousset-Rouvière, C; Fouilloux, V; Paut, O; Dubus, J-C; Bosdure, E

    2011-12-01

    We report 2 cases of children with group A streptococcus pyogenes pleuropneumonia, in one child associated with Kawasaki disease and in the other with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. These 2 features, with theoretically well-defined clinical and biological criteria, are difficult to differentiate in clinical practice, however, likely due to their pathophysiological links. In case of clinical doubt, an echocardiography needs to be performed to search for coronary involvement and treatment including intravenous immunoglobulins, and an antibiotic with an anti-toxin effect such as clindamycin has to be started early.

  2. Effects of laser polarizations on shock generation and shock ion acceleration in overdense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Kang, Teyoun; Jung, Moon Youn; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-09-01

    The effects of laser-pulse polarization on the generation of an electrostatic shock in an overdense plasma were investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. We found, from one-dimensional simulations, that total and average energies of reflected ions from a circular polarization- (CP) driven shock front are a few times higher than those from a linear polarization- (LP) driven one for a given pulse energy. Moreover, it was discovered that the pulse transmittance is the single dominant factor for determining the CP-shock formation, while the LP shock is affected by the plasma scale length as well as the transmittance. In two-dimensional simulations, it is observed that the transverse instability, such as Weibel-like instability, can be suppressed more efficiently by CP pulses.

  3. Two special classes of space-times admitting a non-null valence two Killing spinor

    CERN Document Server

    Bergh, Norbert Van den

    2009-01-01

    Non-conformally flat space-times admitting a non-null Killing spinor of valence two are investigated in the Geroch-Held-Penrose formalism. Contrary to popular belief these space-times are not all explicitly known. It is shown that the standard construction hinges on the tacit assumption that certain integrability conditions hold, implying two algebraic relations, KS1 and KS2, for the spin coefficients and the components of the Ricci spinor. An exhaustive list of (conformal classes of) space-times, in which either KS1 or KS2 are violated, is presented. The resulting space-times are each other's Sachs transforms, in general admit no Killing vectors and are characterized by a single arbitrary function.

  4. No discrimination shock avoidance with sequential presentation of stimuli but shore crabs still reduce shock exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Barry; Elwood, Robert W

    2016-07-15

    Insights into the potential for pain may be obtained from examination of behavioural responses to noxious stimuli. In particular, prolonged responses coupled with long-term motivational change and avoidance learning cannot be explained by nociceptive reflex but are consistent with the idea of pain. Here, we placed shore crabs alternately in two halves of a test area divided by an opaque partition. Each area had a dark shelter and in one repeated small electric shocks were delivered in an experimental but not in a control group. Crabs showed no specific avoidance of the shock shelter either during these trials or in a subsequent test in which both were offered simultaneously; however they often emerged from the shock shelter during a trial and thus avoided further shock. More crabs emerged in later trials and took less time to emerge than in early trials. Thus, despite the lack of discrimination learning between the two shelters they used other tactics to markedly reduce the amount of shock received. We note that a previous experiment using simultaneous presentation of two shelters demonstrated rapid discrimination and avoidance learning but the paradigm of sequential presentation appears to prevent this. Nevertheless, the data show clearly that the shock is aversive and tactics, other than discrimination learning, are used to avoid it. Thus, the behaviour is only partially consistent with the idea of pain.

  5. Time-Distance Helioseismology of Two Realistic Sunspot Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    DeGrave, K; Rempel, M

    2014-01-01

    Linear time-distance helioseismic inversions are carried out using several filtering schemes to determine vector flow velocities within two $\\sim100^2\\,{\\rm Mm^2}\\times 20\\,{\\rm Mm}$ realistic magnetohydrodynamic sunspot simulations of 25~hr. One simulation domain contains a model of a full sunspot (i.e. one with both an umbra and penumbra), while the other contains a pore (i.e. a spot without a penumbra). The goal is to test current helioseismic methods using these state-of-the-art simulations of magnetic structures. We find that horizontal flow correlations between inversion and simulation flow maps are reasonably high ($\\sim0.5$--0.8) in the upper 3~Mm at distances exceeding 25--30~Mm from spot center, but are substantially lower at smaller distances and larger depths. Inversions of forward-modeled travel times consistently outperform those of our measured travel times in terms of horizontal flow correlations, suggesting that our inability to recover flow structure near these active regions is largely due ...

  6. Standing Rankine-Hugoniot Shocks in Black Hole Accretion Discs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Wei-Min; LU Ju-Fu

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study the problem of standing shocks in viscous disc-like accretion flows around black holes. For the first time we parametrize such a flow with two physical constants, namely the specific angular momentum accreted by the black hole j and the energy quantity K. By providing the global dependence of shock formation in the j - K parameter space, we show that a significant parameter region can ensure solutions with Rankine-Hugoniot shocks; and that the possibilities of shock formation are the largest for inviscid flows, decreasing with increasing viscosity, and ceasing to exist for a strong enough viscosity. Our results support the view that the standing shock is an essential ingredient in black hole accretion discs and is a general phenomenon in astrophysics, and that there should be a continuous change from the properties of inviscid flows to those of viscous ones.

  7. Role of Magnetosonic Solitons in Perpendicular Collisionless Shock Reformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Ohsawa, Yukiharu; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-03-01

    The nature of the magnetic structure arising from ion specular reflection in shock compression studies is examined by means of 1D particle-in-cell simulations. Propagation speed, field profiles, and supporting currents for this magnetic structure are shown to be consistent with a magnetosonic soliton. Coincidentally, this structure and its evolution are typical of foot structures observed in perpendicular shock reformation. To reconcile these two observations, we propose, for the first time, that shock reformation can be explained as the result of the formation, growth, and subsequent transition to a supercritical shock of a magnetosonic soliton. This argument is further supported by the remarkable agreement found between the period of the soliton evolution cycle and classical reformation results. This new result suggests that the unique properties of solitons can be used to shed new light on the long-standing issue of shock nonstationarity and its role on particle acceleration.

  8. PBX炸药细观结构冲击点火的二维数值模拟%Two-dimensional Mesoscale Simulation of Shock Ignition in PBX Explosives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘群; 陈朗; 伍俊英; 王晨

    2011-01-01

    为了研究冲击加载下非均质炸药的点火机理,对PBX炸药细观结构在冲击加载下的响应过程进行了二维数值模拟.首先对炸药颗粒的压制过程进行数值模拟,获得PBX炸药的细观结构模型.然后对炸药冲击点火进行数值模拟计算,考虑了热力耦合作用和炸药自热反应,分析了炸药颗粒尺寸、密度和黏结剂对炸药冲击点火的影响.结果表明,冲击作用下PBX炸药点火点出现在炸药颗粒与黏结剂界面处;炸药颗粒尺寸较小时,PBX炸药点火的临界压力较大;随着PBX炸药密度的增加,临界点火压力逐渐增大;黏结剂能够衰减冲击波对炸药颗粒的压缩作用,黏结剂增多,PBX炸药的临界点火压力提高.%To investigate the mechanism of shock ignition in heterogeneous explosives, two-dimensional mesoscale simulation of PBX explosives under shock loading was conducted. Through simulation of explosive particles press-ing,the mesoscale structure of PBX was obtained. Then the shock ignition of PBX explosives was calculated,and the coupled thermo-mechanics and self-heating reaction were considered, and the influence of explosive density, particle size and binder content on shock ignition were analyzed. The results show that hot spots focus on the interface be-tween explosive particles and binder. The critical pressure to ignite explosives in small particle size is higher than that in large particle size. The critical pressure to ignite explosives in low density is higher than that of explosives in high density. In addition,binders play an important role in attenuating shock intensity on explosive particles,and PBX ex-plosives in more binder content are more insensitive than those in less binder content.

  9. Fast, multiphase volume adaptation to hyperosmotic shock by Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuta Pilizota

    Full Text Available All living cells employ an array of different mechanisms to help them survive changes in extra cellular osmotic pressure. The difference in the concentration of chemicals in a bacterium's cytoplasm and the external environment generates an osmotic pressure that inflates the cell. It is thought that the bacterium Escherichia coli use a number of interconnected systems to adapt to changes in external pressure, allowing them to maintain turgor and live in surroundings that range more than two-hundred-fold in external osmolality. Here, we use fluorescence imaging to make the first measurements of cell volume changes over time during hyperosmotic shock and subsequent adaptation on a single cell level in vivo with a time resolution on the order of seconds. We directly observe two previously unseen phases of the cytoplasmic water efflux upon hyperosmotic shock. Furthermore, we monitor cell volume changes during the post-shock recovery and observe a two-phase response that depends on the shock magnitude. The initial phase of recovery is fast, on the order of 15-20 min and shows little cell-to-cell variation. For large sucrose shocks, a secondary phase that lasts several hours adds to the recovery. We find that cells are able to recover fully from shocks as high as 1 Osmol/kg using existing systems, but that for larger shocks, protein synthesis is required for full recovery.

  10. Lorentz violation, two-time physics, and strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Juan M., E-mail: jromero@correo.cua.uam.mx [Departamento de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Mexico, D.F 01120 (Mexico); Sanchez-Santos, Oscar, E-mail: oscarsanbuzz@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico 04510 DF (Mexico); Vergara, Jose David, E-mail: vergara@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico 04510 DF (Mexico)

    2011-10-24

    The aim of this paper is to study the generalization of the relativistic particle recently proposed by Kostelecky. An alternative action for this system is presented, and it is shown that this action can be interpreted as a particle in curved space. Furthermore, the following results are established for the model: (i) there exists a limit where the system has more local symmetries than the usual relativistic particle; (ii) in this limit when Lorentz symmetry is restored, a direct relationship with the two-time physics is determined; (iii) if also Poincare symmetry is recovered, the action of a relativistic bosonic string is obtained. -- Highlights: → We study the generalization of the relativistic particle proposed by Kostelecky. → An alternative action for this system is presented. → There is a limit where the model has more symmetries than the relativistic particle. → When Lorentz symmetry is restored, a relationship with two-time physics is determined. → If Poincare symmetry is recovered, the action of a relativistic string is obtained.

  11. Two-Agent Single-Machine Scheduling of Jobs with Time-Dependent Processing Times and Ready Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Yee Kung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Scheduling involving jobs with time-dependent processing times has recently attracted much research attention. However, multiagent scheduling with simultaneous considerations of jobs with time-dependent processing times and ready times is relatively unexplored. Inspired by this observation, we study a two-agent single-machine scheduling problem in which the jobs have both time-dependent processing times and ready times. We consider the model in which the actual processing time of a job of the first agent is a decreasing function of its scheduled position while the actual processing time of a job of the second agent is an increasing function of its scheduled position. In addition, each job has a different ready time. The objective is to minimize the total completion time of the jobs of the first agent with the restriction that no tardy job is allowed for the second agent. We propose a branch-and-bound and several genetic algorithms to obtain optimal and near-optimal solutions for the problem, respectively. We also conduct extensive computational results to test the proposed algorithms and examine the impacts of different problem parameters on their performance.

  12. Artificial spacecraft in hybrid simulations of the quasi-parallel Earth's bow shock: analysis of time series versus spatial profiles and a separation strategy for Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Giacalone

    Full Text Available We construct artificial "software" spacecraft consisting of magnetometers and 3D thermal and energetic ion detectors. Four such spacecraft are "flown" through a 1D simulation of a quasi-parallel shock. We analyze the resulting time series from the spacecraft, and then use the more complete simulational information to evaluate our interpretations based on the limited times series information. The separation strategy used, with two closely spaced spacecraft pairs separated by a large distance, was helpful in the interpretation, since a variety of important processes operate over several different scale lengths. This work highlights the ability to draw inferences about spatially and temporally varying phenomena based on multiple-spacecraft time series data, and suggests that many spacecraft configurations which bear little resemblance to the classic Cluster tetrahedron may be necessary when multiple scale lengths are present.

  13. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Bret, Antoine; Bykov, Andrei;

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active...... galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space....... It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments...

  14. Ectopic pregnancy after two times tubal ligation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Keypour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tubal sterilization is the permanent and effective contraception method. This can be performed at any time, but at least half are performed in conjunction with cesarean or vaginal delivery and are termed puerperal. The most complication after tubal ligation is ectopic pregnancy. Ectopic pregnancy is the leading cause of maternal death in first trimester.Case presentation: We present a 33 years old woman gravida5, para4, all normal vaginal delivery, presented with complaints of delayed menstrual period, pelvic pain and spotting. She underwent tubal ligation for two times. For the first time she had puerperal Pomeroy tubal sterilization after third child delivery. Intra uterine pregnancy occurred three years later. One day after vaginal delivery of fourth child, she underwent post partum tubal ligation with the Parkland method. Tubal pregnancy occurred nine months later. Physical examination identified acute abdomen. Pelvic ultrasound showed no gestational sac in uterine cavity. The sac with fetal pole was in right adnexa. Beta-HCG was 2840mIU/ml. She underwent laparotomy. Surgical management included salpingectomy with cornual resection in both sides. The surgery identified Ectopic pregnancy.Conclusion: Any symptoms of pregnancy in a woman after tubal ligation must be investigated; an ectopic pregnancy should be excluded. Ectopic pregnancy must be considered, in any woman with lower abdominal pain, missed period and vaginal bleed-ing. Conception after tubal sterilization can be explained by fistula formation and re-canalization of fallopian tube.

  15. Shock wave science and technology reference library

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This book is the second of several volumes on solids in the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library. These volumes are primarily concerned with high-pressure shock waves in solid media, including detonation and high-velocity impact and penetration events. Of the four extensive chapters in this volume, the first two describe the reactive behavior of condensed phase explosives, - Condensed-Phase Explosives: Shock Initiation and Detonation Phenomena (SA Sheffield and R Engelke) - First Principles Molecular Simulations of Energetic Materials at High-Pressures (F Zhang, S Alavi, and TK Woo), and the remaining two discuss the inert, mechanical response of solid materials. - Combined Compression and Shear Plane Waves (ZP Tang and JB Aidun), and - Dynamic Fragmentation of Solids (D Grady). All chapters are each self-contained, and can be read independently of each other. They offer a timely reference, for beginners as well as professional scientists and engineers, on the foundations of detonation phenomen...

  16. Kelvin-Helmholtz turbulence associated with collisionless shocks in laser produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramitsu, Y; Sakawa, Y; Dono, S; Gregory, C D; Pikuz, S A; Loupias, B; Koenig, M; Waugh, J N; Woolsey, N; Morita, T; Moritaka, T; Sano, T; Matsumoto, Y; Mizuta, A; Ohnishi, N; Takabe, H

    2012-05-11

    We report the experimental results of a turbulent electric field driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability associated with laser produced collisionless shock waves. By irradiating an aluminum double plane target with a high-power laser, counterstreaming plasma flows are generated. As the consequence of the two plasma interactions, two shock waves and the contact surface are excited. The shock electric field and transverse modulation of the contact surface are observed by proton radiography. Performing hydrodynamic simulations, we reproduce the time evolutions of the reverse shocks and the transverse modulation driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  17. Waiting time dynamics in two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Thomas L C; Knoester, Jasper

    2009-09-15

    We review recent work on the waiting time dynamics of coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. This dynamics can reveal chemical and physical processes that take place on the femto- and picosecond time scale, which is faster than the time scale that may be probed by, for example, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A large number of chemically relevant processes take place on this time scale. Such processes range from forming and breaking hydrogen bonds and proton transfer to solvent exchange and vibrational population transfer. In typical 2DIR spectra, multiple processes contribute to the waiting time dynamics and the spectra are often congested. This makes the spectra challenging to interpret, and the aid of theoretical models and simulations is often needed. To be useful, such models need to account for all dynamical processes in the sample simultaneously. The numerical integration of the Schrodinger equation (NISE) method has proven to allow for a very general treatment of the dynamical processes. It accounts for both the motional narrowing resulting from solvent-induced frequency fluctuations and population transfer between coupled vibrations. At the same time, frequency shifts arising from chemical-exchange reactions and changes of the transition dipoles because of either non-Condon effects or molecular reorientation are included in the treatment. This method therefore allows for the disentanglement of all of these processes. The NISE method has thus far been successfully applied to study chemical-exchange processes. It was demonstrated that 2DIR is not only sensitive to reaction kinetics but also to the more detailed reaction dynamics. NISE has also been applied to the study of population transfer within the amide I band (CO stretch) and between the amide I and amide II bands (CN stretch and NH bend) in polypeptides. From the amide I studies, it was found that the population transfer can be used to enhance cross-peaks that act as

  18. Earth's Magnetosphere Impinged by Interplanetary Shocks of Different Orientations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-Cheng; HU You-Qiu; WANG Chi

    2005-01-01

    @@ Using a recently developed PPMLR-MHD code, we carry out a global numerical simulation of the interaction between interplanetary shocks and Earth's magnetosphere. The initial magnetosphere is in a quasi-steady state,embedded in a uniform solar wind and a spiral interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). An interplanetary (IP)shock interacts in turn with the bow shock, the magnetosheath, the magnetopause, and the magnetosphere, and changes the magnetosphere in shape and structure, and the distribution of the electric current and potential in the ionosphere as well. A preliminary comparison is made between two IP shocks of the same solar wind dynamic pressure and a vanishing IMF Bz on the downstream side, but with different propagation directions, one parallel and the other oblique to the Sun-Earth line. The numerical results show that both shocks cause a compression of the magnetosphere, an enhancement of magnetic field strength and field-aligned current in the magnetosphere, and an increase of the dawn-dusk electric potential drops across the polar ionosphere. Moreover, the magnetosphereionosphere system approaches a similar quasi-steady state after the interaction, for the downstream states are very close for the two shocks. However, the evolution processes of the system are remarkably different during the interaction with the two shocks of different orientations. The shock with the normal oblique to the Sun-Earth line results in a much longer evolution time for the system. This demonstrates that the shock orientation plays an important role in determining the associated geophysical effects and interpreting multisatellite observations of IP shock-magnetosphere interaction events.

  19. Coarse-grained model for N2-N relaxation in hypersonic shock conditions using two-dimensional bins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong; Li, Zheng; Levin, Deborah A.

    2016-11-01

    A high fidelity internal energy relaxation model for N2-N suitable for use in direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) modeling of chemically reacting flows is proposed. A novel two-dimensional binning approach with variable bin energy resolutions in the rotational and vibrational modes is developed for treating the internal mode of N2. Both bin-to-bin and state-specific relaxation cross sections are obtained using the molecular dynamics/quasi-classical trajectory (MD/QCT) method with two potential energy surfaces as well as the state-specific database of Jaffe et al. The 99 bin model is used in homogeneous DSMC relaxation simulations and is found to be able to recover the state-specific master equation results of Panesi et al. when the Jaffe state-specific cross sections are used. Rotational relaxation energy profiles and relaxation times obtained using the ReaxFF and Jaffe potential energy surfaces (PESs) are in general agreement but there are larger differences between the vibrational relaxation times. These differences become smaller as the translational temperature increases because the difference in the PES energy barrier becomes less important.

  20. Development of a two-dimensional binning model for N2-N relaxation in hypersonic shock conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong; Li, Zheng; Levin, Deborah A.

    2016-08-01

    A high fidelity internal energy relaxation model for N2-N suitable for use in direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) modeling of chemically reacting flows is proposed. A novel two-dimensional binning approach with variable bin energy resolutions in the rotational and vibrational modes is developed for treating the internal mode of N2. Both bin-to-bin and state-specific relaxation cross sections are obtained using the molecular dynamics/quasi-classical trajectory (MD/QCT) method with two potential energy surfaces as well as the state-specific database of Jaffe et al. The MD/QCT simulations of inelastic energy exchange between N2 and N show that there is a strong forward-preferential scattering behavior at high collision velocities. The 99 bin model is used in homogeneous DSMC relaxation simulations and is found to be able to recover the state-specific master equation results of Panesi et al. when the Jaffe state-specific cross sections are used. Rotational relaxation energy profiles and relaxation times obtained using the ReaxFF and Jaffe potential energy surfaces (PESs) are in general agreement but there are larger differences between the vibrational relaxation times. These differences become smaller as the translational temperature increases because the difference in the PES energy barrier becomes less important.

  1. The shock-vortex interaction patterns affected by vortex flow regime and vortex models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Barik, Hrushikesh; Chang, Se-Myong

    2009-08-01

    We have used a third-order essentially non-oscillatory method to obtain numerical shadowgraphs for investigation of shock-vortex interaction patterns. To search different interaction patterns, we have tested two vortex models (the composite vortex model and the Taylor vortex model) and as many as 47 parametric data sets. By shock-vortex interaction, the impinging shock is deformed to a S-shape with leading and lagging parts of the shock. The vortex flow is locally accelerated by the leading shock and locally decelerated by the lagging shock, having a severely elongated vortex core with two vertices. When the leading shock escapes the vortex, implosion effect creates a high pressure in the vertex area where the flow had been most expanded. This compressed region spreads in time with two frontal waves, an induced expansion wave and an induced compression wave. They are subsonic waves when the shock-vortex interaction is weak but become supersonic waves for strong interactions. Under a intermediate interaction, however, an induced shock wave is first developed where flow speed is supersonic but is dissipated where the incoming flow is subsonic. We have identified three different interaction patterns that depend on the vortex flow regime characterized by the shock-vortex interaction.

  2. Distributed Space Time Coding for Wireless Two-way Relaying

    CERN Document Server

    Muralidharan, Vijayvaradharaj T

    2012-01-01

    We consider the wireless two-way relay channel, in which two-way data transfer takes place between the end nodes with the help of a relay. For the Denoise-And-Forward (DNF) protocol, it was shown by Koike-Akino et. al. that adaptively changing the network coding map used at the relay greatly reduces the impact of Multiple Access interference at the relay. The harmful effect of the deep channel fade conditions can be effectively mitigated by proper choice of these network coding maps at the relay. Alternatively, in this paper we propose a Distributed Space Time Coding (DSTC) scheme, which effectively removes most of the deep fade channel conditions at the transmitting nodes itself without any CSIT and without any need to adaptively change the network coding map used at the relay. It is shown that the deep fades occur when the channel fade coefficient vector falls in a finite number of vector subspaces of $\\mathbb{C}^2$, which are referred to as the singular fade subspaces. DSTC design criterion referred to as ...

  3. Two types of softening detected in X-ray afterglows of Swift bursts: internal and external shock origins?

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Y -P; Fan, J H; Lu, R -J

    2008-01-01

    The softening process observed in the steep decay phase of early X-ray afterglows of Swift bursts has remained a puzzle since its discovery. The softening process can also be observed in the later phase of the bursts and its cause has also been unknown. Recently, it was suggested that, influenced by the curvature effect, emission from high latitudes would shift the Band function spectrum from higher energy band to lower band, and this would give rise to the observed softening process accompanied by a steep decay of the flux density. The curvature effect scenario predicts that the terminating time of the softening process would be correlated with the duration of the process. In this paper, based on the data from the UNLV GRB group web-site, we found an obvious correlation between the two quantities. In addition, we found that the softening process can be divided into two classes: the early type softening ($t_{s,max}\\leq "4000"s$) and the late type softening ($t_{s,max} > "4000"s$). The two types of softening s...

  4. Computations of Axisymmetric Flows in Hypersonic Shock Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Wilson, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    A time-accurate two-dimensional fluid code is used to compute test times in shock tubes operated at supersonic speeds. Unlike previous studies, this investigation resolves the finer temporal details of the shock-tube flow by making use of modern supercomputers and state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamic solution techniques. The code, besides solving the time-dependent fluid equations, also accounts for the finite rate chemistry in the hypersonic environment. The flowfield solutions are used to estimate relevant shock-tube parameters for laminar flow, such as test times, and to predict density and velocity profiles. Boundary-layer parameters such as bar-delta(sub u), bar-delta(sup *), and bar-tau(sub w), and test time parameters such as bar-tau and particle time of flight t(sub f), are computed and compared with those evaluated by using Mirels' correlations. This article then discusses in detail the effects of flow nonuniformities on particle time-of-flight behind the normal shock and, consequently, on the interpretation of shock-tube data. This article concludes that for accurate interpretation of shock-tube data, a detailed analysis of flowfield parameters, using a computer code such as used in this study, must be performed.

  5. A deteriorating two-system with two repair modes and sojourn times phase-type distributed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoro-Cazorla, Delia [Departamento de Estadistica e I.O., Escuela Politecnica de Linares, Universidad de Jaen, 23700 Linares, Jaen (Spain); Perez-Ocon, Rafael [Departamento de Estadistica e I.O., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain)]. E-mail: rperezo@ugr.es

    2006-01-01

    We study a two-unit cold standby system in steady-state. The online unit goes through a finite number of stages of successive degradation preceding the failure. The units are reparable, there is a repairman and two types of maintenance are considered, preventive and corrective. The preventive repair aims to improve the degradation of a unit being operative. The corrective repair is necessary when the unit fails. We will assume that the preventive repair will be interrupted in favour of a corrective repair in order to increase the availability of the system. The random operational and repair times follow phase-type distributions. For this system, the stationary probability vector, the replacement times, and the involved costs are calculated. An optimisation problem is illustrated by a numerical example. In this, the optimal degradation stage for the preventive repair of the online unit is determined by taking into account the system availability and the incurred costs.

  6. Ionization Front and Shock Wave Structures in Microwave Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M.; Miyamoto, H.; Okuno, Y.; Ohnishi, N.

    A two-dimensional finite-difference time domain code was coupled with compressible fluid calculation and a simple ionization model to reproduce microwave propagation and shock formation in atmospheric microwave discharge. Plasma filaments are driven toward the microwave source at the atmospheric pressure, and the distance between filaments is one-quarter of themicrowave wavelength as predicted in previous works. The strong shock wave is generated due to the high electron density and the large energy absorption. On the other hand, the plasma becomes diffusive at the lower pressure so that the shock wave weakens as a result of smaller energy absorption.

  7. Shock wave reflection phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-dor, Gabi

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive state-of-the-knowledge description of the shock wave reflection phenomena from a phenomenological point of view. The first part is a thorough introduction to oblique shock wave reflections, presenting the two major well-known reflection wave configurations, namely, regular (RR) and Mach (MR) reflections, the corresponding two- and three-shock theories, their analytical and graphical solution and the proposed transition boundaries between these two reflection-wave configurations. The second, third and fourth parts describe the reflection phenomena in steady, pseudo-steady and unsteady flows, respectively. Here, the possible specific types of reflection wave configurations are described, criteria for their formation and termination are presented and their governing equations are solved analytically and graphically and compared with experimental results. The resolution of the well-known von Neumann paradox and a detailed description of two new reflection-wave configurations - t...

  8. Are gauge shocks really shocks?

    CERN Document Server

    Alcubierre, M

    2005-01-01

    The existence of gauge pathologies associated with the Bona-Masso family of generalized harmonic slicing conditions is proven for the case of simple 1+1 relativity. It is shown that these gauge pathologies are true shocks in the sense that the characteristic lines associated with the propagation of the gauge cross, which implies that the name ``gauge shock'' usually given to such pathologies is indeed correct. These gauge shocks are associated with places where the spatial hypersurfaces that determine the foliation of spacetime become non-smooth.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Dual-Pulse Shock Test Machine for Simulating Underwater Explosion Shock Loads on Warship Equipments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-yi; WANG Gong-xian; WANG Yu

    2009-01-01

    In order to qualify shock resistance performance of shipboard equipments and simulate real underwater explosion environment, a novel dual-puise shock test machine is proposed. The new machine will increase testing capability and meet special shock testing requirement. Two key parts of the machine, the velocity generator and the shock pulse regulator, play an important role in producing the positive acceleration pulse and the succeeding negative acceleration pulse, respectively. The generated dual-pulse shock for test articles is in conformity with an anti-shock test specification. Based on the impact theory, a nonlinear dynamic model of the hydraulically-actuated test machine is established with thorough analysis on its mechanism that involves conversion of gas potential energy and dissipation of kinetic energy. Simulation results have demonstrated that the proposed machine is able to produce a double-pulse acceleration shock in the time domain or a desired shock response spectrum in the frequency domain, which sets up a base for the construction of the machine.

  10. Fundamentals of collisionless shocks for astrophysical application, 2. Relativistic shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, A M

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress on collisionless relativistic shocks. Kinetic instability theory is briefed including its predictions and limitations. The main focus is on numerical experiments in (i) pair and (ii) electron-nucleon plasmas. The main results are: (i) confirmation of shock evolution in non-magnetised relativistic plasma in 3D due to either the lepton-Weibel instability or the ion-Weibel instability; (ii) sensitive dependence on upstream magnetisation ; (iii) the sensitive dependence of particle dynamics on the upstream magnetic inclination angle $\\thetabn$, where particles of $\\thetabn>34^\\circ$ cannot escape upstream, leading to the distinction between `sub-luminal' and `super-luminal' shocks; (iv) particles in ultra-relativistic shocks can hardly overturn the shock and escape to upstream; they may oscillate around the shock ramp for a long time, so to speak `surfing it' and thereby becoming accelerated by a kind of SDA; (v) these particles form a power law tail on the downstream distribution; their...

  11. Shock wave diffraction and reflection around a dusty square cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王柏懿; 王超; 戚隆溪

    2001-01-01

    The diffraction and reflection of planar shock wave around a dusty square cavity is investigated nuerically, which is embedded in the flat bottom surface of a two-dimensional channel, and the induced gas-particle twophase flow. The wave patterns at different times are obtained for three different values of the particle diameter. The computational results show that the existence of particles affects appreciably the shock wave diffraction and cavity flow.

  12. Internal shock model for Microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, C R; Spruit, H C; Kaiser, Christian R.; Sunyaev, Rashid; Spruit, Henk C.

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for the radio outbursts of microquasars based on the assumption of quasi-continuous jet ejection. The jets are `lit up' by shock fronts traveling along the jets during outbursts. The observed comparatively flat decay light curves combined with gradually steepening spectral slopes are explained by a superposition of the radiation of the aging relativistic particle population left behind by the shocks. This scenario is the low energy, time-resolved equivalent to the internal shock model for GRBs. We show that this model predicts energy contents of the radiating plasma similar to the plasmon model. At the same time, the jet model relaxes the severe requirements on the central source in terms of the rate at which this energy must be supplied to the jet. Observations of `mini-bursts' with flat spectral slopes and of infrared emission far from the source centre suggest two different states of jet ejections: (i) A `mini-burst' mode with relatively stable jet production and weak radio emission with...

  13. High order finite volume methods on wavelet-adapted grids with local time-stepping on multicore architectures for the simulation of shock-bubble interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazialhosseini, Babak; Rossinelli, Diego; Bergdorf, Michael; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We present a space-time adaptive solver for single- and multi-phase compressible flows that couples average interpolating wavelets with high-order finite volume schemes. The solver introduces the concept of wavelet blocks, handles large jumps in resolution and employs local time-stepping for efficient time integration. We demonstrate that the inherently sequential wavelet-based adaptivity can be implemented efficiently in multicore computer architectures using task-based parallelism and introducing the concept of wavelet blocks. We validate our computational method on a number of benchmark problems and we present simulations of shock-bubble interaction at different Mach numbers, demonstrating the accuracy and computational performance of the method.

  14. Differences between left and right ventricular anatomy determine the types of reentrant circuits induced by an external electric shock. A rabbit heart simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Blanca; Eason, James C; Trayanova, Natalia

    2006-01-01

    Despite the fact that elucidating the mechanisms of cardiac vulnerability to electric shocks is crucial to understanding why defibrillation shocks fail, important aspects of cardiac vulnerability remain unknown. This research utilizes a novel anatomically based bidomain finite-element model of the rabbit ventricles to investigate the effect of shock polarity reversal on the reentrant activity induced by an external defibrillation-strength shock in the paced ventricles. The specific goal of the study is to examine how differences between left and right ventricular chamber anatomy result in differences in the types of reentrant circuits established by the shock. Truncated exponential monophasic shocks of duration 8 ms were delivered via two external electrodes at various timings. Vulnerability grids were constructed for shocks of reversed polarity (referred to as RV- or LV- when either the RV or the LV electrode is a cathode). Our results demonstrate that reversing electrode polarity from RV- to LV- changes the dominant type of post-shock reentry: it is figure-of-eight for RV- and quatrefoil for LV- shocks. Differences in secondary types of post-shock arrhythmia also occur following shock polarity reversal. These effects of polarity reversal are primarily due to the fact that the LV wall is thicker than the RV, resulting in a post-shock excitable gap that is predominantly within the LV wall for RV- shocks and in the septum for LV- shocks.

  15. Isotopic niche partitioning between two apex predators over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, M; Cardona, L; Franco-Trecu, V; Crespo, E A; Vales, D; Borella, F; Zenteno, L; Gonzáles, E M; Inchausti, P

    2017-03-22

    1.Stable isotope analyses have become an important tool in reconstructing diets, analyzing resource use patterns, elucidating trophic relations among predators and understanding the structure of food webs. 2.Here, we use stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in bone collagen to reconstruct and compare the isotopic niches of adult South American fur seals (Arctocephalus australis; n = 86) and sea lions (Otaria flavescens; n = 49) -two otariid species with marked morphological differences- in the Río de la Plata estuary (Argentina - Uruguay) and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean during the second half of the 20(th) century and the beginning of the 21(st) century. Samples from the middle Holocene (n = 7 fur seals and n = 5 sea lions) are also included in order to provide a reference point for characterizing resource partitioning before major anthropogenic modifications of the environment. 3.We found that the South American fur seals and South American sea lions had distinct isotopic niches during the middle Holocene. Isotopic niche segregation was similar at the beginning of the second half of the 20(th) century, but has diminished over time. 4.The progressive convergence of the isotopic niches of these two otariids during the second half of the 20(th) century and the beginning of the 21(st) century is most likely due to the increased reliance of South American fur seals on demersal prey. 5.This recent dietary change of South American fur seals can be explained by at least two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms: (i) the decrease in the abundance of sympatric South American sea lions as a consequence of small colony size and high pup mortality resulting from commercial sealing; and (ii) the decrease in the average size of demersal fishes due to intense fishing of the larger class sizes, which may have increased their accessibility to those eared seals with a smaller mouth gape, i.e., South American fur seals of both sexes and female South American sea lions. This article

  16. Time-resolved two-photon photoemission from metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Weinelt, M

    2002-01-01

    The Rydberg-like series of image-potential states is a prototype system for loosely bound electrons at a metal surface. The electronic structure and the femtosecond dynamics of these states is studied by high-resolution energy-and time-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. The electron trapped in the image potential moves virtually freely laterally to the surface where it is subject to inelastic and quasielastic scattering processes which cause decay of population and phase relaxation. The influence of surface corrugation on these processes has been investigated for adsorbates on Cu(001) and stepped Cu(117) and Cu(119) surfaces which are vicinal to Cu(001). The dynamics depend on both the distance of the electron in front of the surface and the parallel momentum. For CO molecules on Cu(001) inelastic scattering into bulk states and adsorbate-induced resonances determine the decay rate. For small numbers of Cu adatoms on Cu(001) and the vicinal surfaces the decay rate of image-potential states is sig...

  17. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  18. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Burgess, D.; Fujimoto, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (MA ) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ˜0.3 τc , where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and MA and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same MA , a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming.

  19. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Bret, Antoine; Bykov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space...... the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights...... in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics....

  20. A Two-moment Radiation Hydrodynamics Module in Athena Using a Time-explicit Godunov Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, M. Aaron; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a module for the Athena code that solves the gray equations of radiation hydrodynamics (RHD), based on the first two moments of the radiative transfer equation. We use a combination of explicit Godunov methods to advance the gas and radiation variables including the non-stiff source terms, and a local implicit method to integrate the stiff source terms. We adopt the M 1 closure relation and include all leading source terms to {O}(β τ). We employ the reduced speed of light approximation (RSLA) with subcycling of the radiation variables in order to reduce computational costs. Our code is dimensionally unsplit in one, two, and three space dimensions and is parallelized using MPI. The streaming and diffusion limits are well described by the M 1 closure model, and our implementation shows excellent behavior for a problem with a concentrated radiation source containing both regimes simultaneously. Our operator-split method is ideally suited for problems with a slowly varying radiation field and dynamical gas flows, in which the effect of the RSLA is minimal. We present an analysis of the dispersion relation of RHD linear waves highlighting the conditions of applicability for the RSLA. To demonstrate the accuracy of our method, we utilize a suite of radiation and RHD tests covering a broad range of regimes, including RHD waves, shocks, and equilibria, which show second-order convergence in most cases. As an application, we investigate radiation-driven ejection of a dusty, optically thick shell in the ISM. Finally, we compare the timing of our method with other well-known iterative schemes for the RHD equations. Our code implementation, Hyperion, is suitable for a wide variety of astrophysical applications and will be made freely available on the Web.

  1. Shock dynamics in layered periodic media

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Solutions of constant-coeffcient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coeffcients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by a computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

  2. Interaction of Shock Waves in Cement Mortar Plate Investigated by the Digital Speckle Correlation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xu-Dong; LIU Kai-Xin; ZHANG Guang-Sheng; WEN Shang-Gang; TAN Fu-Li

    2008-01-01

    @@ Interaction of shock waves in cement mortar plate is studied by digital speckle correlation method and digital high-speed photography technique. When the plates were destroyed by two detonators exploding at the same time, variation of shock wave field is obtained. Experimental results show that the interaction of shock waves will result in a nonlinear huge increase of local normal strain, leading to large deformation and serious destruction. However, the occurrence of this strongly nonlinear phenomenon sensitively depends on the interval between detonators, and it will only appear when the interval is smaller than the diameter of the region where shock waves exist.

  3. Real time propagation of the exact two component time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goings, Joshua J.; Kasper, Joseph M.; Egidi, Franco; Sun, Shichao; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-09-01

    We report the development of a real time propagation method for solving the time-dependent relativistic exact two-component density functional theory equations (RT-X2C-TDDFT). The method is fundamentally non-perturbative and may be employed to study nonlinear responses for heavy elements which require a relativistic Hamiltonian. We apply the method to several group 12 atoms as well as heavy-element hydrides, comparing with the extensive theoretical and experimental studies on this system, which demonstrates the correctness of our approach. Because the exact two-component Hamiltonian contains spin-orbit operators, the method is able to describe the non-zero transition moment of otherwise spin-forbidden processes in non-relativistic theory. Furthermore, the two-component approach is more cost effective than the full four-component approach, with similar accuracy. The RT-X2C-TDDFT will be useful in future studies of systems containing heavy elements interacting with strong external fields.

  4. Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    times only for high concentrations (of order 1% fuel or greater). The requirements of engine (IC, HCCI , CI and SI) modelers also present a different...Paper 03F-61 Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data D. F. Davidson and R. K. Hanson Mechanical Engineering ... Engineering Department Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305 Abstract Chemical kinetic modelers make extensive use of shock tube ignition data

  5. Asymptotic Expansions of Backward Equations for Two-time-scale Markov Chains in Continuous Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G Yin; Dung Tien Nguyen

    2009-01-01

    This work develops asymptotic expansions for solutions of systems of backward equations of timeinhomogeneons Markov chains in continuous time. Owing to the rapid progress in technology and the increasing complexity in modeling, the underlying Markov chains often have large state spaces, which make the computational tasks infeasible. To reduce the complexity, two-time-scale formulations are used. By introducing a small parameter ε> 0 and using suitable decomposition and aggregation procedures, it is formulated as a singular perturbation problem. Both Markov chains having recurrent states only and Markov chains including also transient states are treated. Under certain weak irreducibility and smoothness conditions of the generators, the desired asymptotic expansions are constructed. Then error bounds are obtained.

  6. Real-time cell analysis and heat shock protein gene expression in the TcA Tribolium castaneum cell line in response to environmental stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Reina, Andrés; Rodríguez-García, María Juliana; Ramis, Guillermo; Galián, José

    2015-12-17

    The rust red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst, 1797) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is a pest of stored grain and one of the most studied insect model species. Some of the previous studies involved heat response studies in terms of survival and heat shock protein expression, which are regulated to protect other proteins against environmental stress conditions. In the present study, we characterize the impedance profile with the xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analyzer and study the effect of increased temperature in cell growth and viability in the cell line BCIRL-TcA-CLG1 (TcA) of T. castaneum. This novel system measures cells behavior in real time and is applied for the first time to insect cells. Additionally, cells are exposed to heat shock, increased salinity, acidic pH and UV-A light with the aim of measuring the expression levels of Hsp27, Hsp68a and Hsp83 genes. Results show a high thermotolerance of TcA in terms of cell growth and viability. This result is likely related to gene expression results in which a significant up-regulation of all studied Hsp genes is observed after one hour of exposure to 40 ºC and UV light. All three genes show similar expression patterns, but Hsp27 seems to be the most affected. The results of this study validate the RTCA method and reveal the utility of insect cell lines, real-time analysis and gene expression studies to better understand the physiological response of insect cells, with potential applications in different fields of biology such as conservation biology and pest management. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. [Neurogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Rafael; Pasquier, Mathieu; Clerc, David; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2014-08-13

    The neurogenic shock is a common complication of spinal cord injury, especially when localized at the cervical level. Characterized by a vasoplegia (hypotension) and bradycardia, the neurogenic shock is secondary to the damage of the sympathetic nervous system. The clinical presentation often includes tetraplegia, with or without respiratory failure. Early treatment aims to minimize the occurrence of secondary spinal cord lesions resulting from systemic ischemic injuries. Medical management consists in a standardized ABCDE approach, in order to stabilize vital functions and immobilize the spine. The hospital care includes performing imaging, further measures of neuro-resuscitation, and coordinated surgical assessment and treatment of any other injury.

  8. Two questions from the time of king Bodin's rule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Tibor

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we try to give reliable answer upon two major questions: did Bodin, king of Dioclea, capture Dyrrachion in 1085, as it is related in the Chronicle of the Priest of Dioclea, and when did he try to capture Dubrovnik (Ragusa. The capture of Dyrrachion is not mentioned at Ane Comnene's Alexias. Byzantine princess wrote that citizens of Dyrrachion surrender the town to her father, the Emperor Alexios, after the death of the Norman ruler Robert Guiscard in 1085. On the other hand, the Priest of Dioclea says that Bodin, after the death of Robert Guiscard captured Dyrrachion which he gave back to the Byzantines after he signed the peace treaty with the Emperor. Both statements are not clear enough, but detailed analysis of both writings shows that Bodin took northern part of the theme of Dyrrachion and most probably tried to negotiate surrender of town itself, but he failed. Bodin's military activities against the Byzantine possessions in the theme of Dyrrachion could be placed between 1085 and 1090 when he was captured, being forced to sign peace treaty. The charter of antipope Clement III issued in 1089 to the archbishop of Antibaris, contain list of bishops which served in Dioclea, and only one of them - the bishop of Dulcigno (Ulcinj, had been earlier under the archbishop of Dyrrachion. In other words, Bodin took a very small part of the theme of Dyrrachion and southern borders of Dioclea were approximately the same as in the time of his father Michael. The description of the siege of Dubrovnik is well preserved in Chronicle of the Priest of Dioclea as well by several other authors from Dubrovnik. The authors from Dubrovnik, which composed their Chronicles much later (from XIV to XVII century, made mistake in the chronology, assuming that the siege took place in 1104. Having at their disposal an old note, that Bodin's tower, which stood on the shores just opposite the wooden bridge which lead from Dubrovnik to the land, was captured on

  9. Generalized dualities in one-time physics as holographic predictions from two-time physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Ignacio J.; Bars, Itzhak

    2014-03-01

    In the conventional formalism of physics, with one time, systems with different Hamiltonians or Lagrangians have different physical interpretations and are considered to be independent systems unrelated to each other. However, in this paper we construct explicitly canonical maps in one-time (1T) phase space (including timelike components, specifically the Hamiltonian) to show that it is appropriate to regard various 1T physics systems, with different Lagrangians or Hamiltonians, as being duals of each other. This concept is similar in spirit to dualities discovered in more complicated examples in field theory or string theory. Our approach makes it evident that such generalized dualities are widespread. This suggests that, as a general phenomenon, there are hidden relations and hidden symmetries that conventional 1T physics does not capture, implying the existence of a more unified formulation of physics that naturally supplies the hidden information. In fact, we show that two-time (2T) physics in (d +2) dimensions is the generator of these dualities in 1T physics in d dimensions by providing a holographic perspective that unifies all the dual 1T systems into one. The unifying ingredient is a gauge symmetry in phase space. Via such dualities it is then possible to gain new insights toward new physical predictions not suspected before, and suggest new methods of computation that yield results not obtained before. As an illustration, we will provide concrete examples of 1T systems in classical mechanics that are solved analytically for the first time via our dualities. These dualities in classical mechanics have counterparts in quantum mechanics and field theory, and in some simpler cases they have already been constructed in field theory. We comment on the impact of our approach on the meaning of space-time and on the development of new computational methods based on dualities.

  10. Comparison of CME/Shock Propagation Models with Heliospheric Imaging and In Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinhua; Liu, Ying D.; Inhester, Bernd; Feng, Xueshang; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Lu, Lei

    2016-10-01

    The prediction of the arrival time for fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated shocks is highly desirable in space weather studies. In this paper, we use two shock propagation models, i.e., Data Guided Shock Time Of Arrival (DGSTOA) and Data Guided Shock Propagation Model (DGSPM), to predict the kinematical evolution of interplanetary shocks associated with fast CMEs. DGSTOA is based on the similarity theory of shock waves in the solar wind reference frame, and DGSPM is based on the non-similarity theory in the stationary reference frame. The inputs are the kinematics of the CME front at the maximum speed moment obtained from the geometric triangulation method applied to STEREO imaging observations together with the Harmonic Mean approximation. The outputs provide the subsequent propagation of the associated shock. We apply these models to the CMEs on 2012 January 19, January 23, and March 7. We find that the shock models predict reasonably well the shock’s propagation after the impulsive acceleration. The shock’s arrival time and local propagation speed at Earth predicted by these models are consistent with in situ measurements of WIND. We also employ the Drag-Based Model (DBM) as a comparison, and find that it predicts a steeper deceleration than the shock models after the rapid deceleration phase. The predictions of DBM at 1 au agree with the following ICME or sheath structure, not the preceding shock. These results demonstrate the applicability of the shock models used here for future arrival time prediction of interplanetary shocks associated with fast CMEs.

  11. [High resolution laser transient spectroscopic technology under two-stage light gas-gun loading condition and stability study of shocked benzene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bei-Jing; Liu, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Wen-Peng; Zhang, Ning-Chao; Feng, Li-Peng; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Xue, Xue-Dong

    2013-10-01

    The present paper reports the high resolution transient Raman laser testing technology under two-stage light gas-gun loading experiment, and its application to studying the Raman spectroscopy of shocked benzene. In the experiments, the frequency shift of C-C stretching vibration (992 cm(-1)) and C-H stretching vibration peak (3 061 cm(-1)) in the low pressure section (less than 8 GPa) varies linearly with the pressure, and the results agree well with reported data in the literature. The structural changes in liquid benzene about 13 GPa were clarified firstly by the Raman spectral technique; the experimental results show that at a pressure of 9.7 GPa, the structural change of liquid benzene has taken place, not reported in the literature about 13 GPa. But the composition in the production is not clear. The measurement system provides an effective means to study the microstructure changes of transparent and translucent material under dynamic loading experiment.

  12. Turbulence generation by a shock wave interacting with a random density inhomogeneity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete Ruiz de Lira, C.

    2010-12-01

    When a planar shock wave interacts with a random pattern of pre-shock density non-uniformities, it generates an anisotropic turbulent velocity/vorticity field. This turbulence plays an important role in the early stages of the mixing process in a compressed fluid. This situation emerges naturally in a shock interaction with weakly inhomogeneous deuterium-wicked foam targets in inertial confinement fusion and with density clumps/clouds in astrophysics. We present an exact small-amplitude linear theory describing such an interaction. It is based on the exact theory of time and space evolution of the perturbed quantities behind a corrugated shock front for a single-mode pre-shock non-uniformity. Appropriate mode averaging in two dimensions results in closed analytical expressions for the turbulent kinetic energy, degree of anisotropy of velocity and vorticity fields in the shocked fluid, shock amplification of the density non-uniformity and sonic energy flux radiated downstream. These explicit formulae are further simplified in the important asymptotic limits of weak/strong shocks and highly compressible fluids. A comparison with the related problem of a shock interacting with a pre-shock isotropic vorticity field is also presented.

  13. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  14. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  15. Management of refractory cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyentovich, Alex; Barghash, Maya H; Hochman, Judith S

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock is a life-threatening condition that occurs in response to reduced cardiac output in the presence of adequate intravascular volume and results in tissue hypoxia. Cardiogenic shock has several underlying aetiologies, with the most common being acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Refractory cardiogenic shock presents as persistent tissue hypoperfusion despite administration of adequate doses of two vasoactive medications and treatment of the underlying aetiology. Investigators of the SHOCK trial reported a long-term mortality benefit of emergency revascularization for shock complicating AMI. Since the publication of the SHOCK trial and subsequent guideline recommendations, the increase in community-based use of percutaneous coronary intervention for this condition has resulted in a significant decline in mortality. Despite these successes in the past 15 years, mortality still remains exceptionally high, particularly in patients with refractory cardiogenic shock. In this Review, we discuss the aetiology and pathophysiology of cardiogenic shock and summarize the data on the available therapeutics and their limitations. Although new mechanical circulatory support devices have been shown to improve haemodynamic variables in patients with shock complicating AMI, they did not improve clinical outcomes and are associated with high costs and complications.

  16. Standing Shocks in Viscous Accretion Flows around Black Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Wei-Min; LU Ju-Fu

    2005-01-01

    @@ We study the problem of standing shocks in viscous accretion flows around black holes.We parameterize such a flow with two physical constants, namely the specific angular momentum accreted by the black hole j and the energy quantity K.By providing the global dependence of shock formation in the j - K parameter space, we show that a significant parameter region can ensure solutions with shocks of different types, namely Rankine-Hugoniot shocks, isothermal shocks, and more realistically, mixed shocks.

  17. Relativistic Radiation Mediated Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Budnik, Ran; Sagiv, Amir; Waxman, Eli

    2010-01-01

    The structure of relativistic radiation mediated shocks (RRMS) propagating into a cold electron-proton plasma is calculated and analyzed. A qualitative discussion of the physics of relativistic and non relativistic shocks, including order of magnitude estimates for the relevant temperature and length scales, is presented. Detailed numerical solutions are derived for shock Lorentz factors $\\Gamma_u$ in the range $6\\le\\Gamma_u\\le30$, using a novel iteration technique solving the hydrodynamics and radiation transport equations (the protons, electrons and positrons are argued to be coupled by collective plasma processes and are treated as a fluid). The shock transition (deceleration) region, where the Lorentz factor $ \\Gamma $ drops from $ \\Gamma_u $ to $ \\sim 1 $, is characterized by high plasma temperatures $ T\\sim \\Gamma m_ec^2 $ and highly anisotropic radiation, with characteristic shock-frame energy of upstream and downstream going photons of a few~$\\times\\, m_ec^2$ and $\\sim \\Gamma^2 m_ec^2$, respectively.P...

  18. 33 CFR 159.105 - Shock test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shock test. 159.105 Section 159... MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.105 Shock test. The device, with liquid... shocks that are ten times the force of gravity (10g) and have a duration of 20-25 milliseconds...

  19. Magnetic Fields inside Extremely Fast Shock Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of my research on magnetic fields in extremely fast shock waves has been to predict the properties of shock waves that move almost with the speed of light. These shocks are created in the tenuous interstellar medium by catastrophic events such as the explosion of stars many times heavier

  20. Magnetic Fields inside Extremely Fast Shock Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of my research on magnetic fields in extremely fast shock waves has been to predict the properties of shock waves that move almost with the speed of light. These shocks are created in the tenuous interstellar medium by catastrophic events such as the explosion of stars many times heavier

  1. Tear strength of five elastomeric impression materials at two setting times and two tearing rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O; Litaker, Mark

    2008-01-01

    PROBLEM/AIMS: Thin sections of impression materials are susceptible to tearing in gingival crevices and interproximal spaces. This study measures the tear strength of six fast and regular set impression materials after different setting times and at different tearing rates. Tear strength specimens were prepared of four addition silicone materials: Aquasil (Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany), Imprint 3 (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), Stand Out (Kerr, Orange, CA, USA), Virtual (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein); one polyether material: Impregum (3M ESPE); and a new hybrid material: Senn (GC, Aichi, Japan) using a split mold. Specimens were divided into four groups (N = 5). Groups 1 and 2 were immediately removed from the mold and loaded in tension until failure using an Instron testing device (Instron Corp., Canton, MA, USA). Groups 3 and 4 were tested 24 hours after fabrication. Groups 1 and 3 were tested at 1 mm/minute, and groups 2 and 4 were tested at 500 mm/minute. A two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test revealed differences among material brands (alpha = 0.05) in all experimental groups. The polyether and hybrid material were in the lowest statistically significant ranking group for all experimental groups. A three-factor ANOVA determined that a 500 mm/minute tearing rate and a 24-hour set time produced higher tear strengths and that fast set materials produced greater tear strength than regular set materials. Most addition silicone materials provide higher tear strengths than polyether and hybrid materials. Materials display higher tear strengths after longer set times and at faster tearing rates. Impressions should be removed from the mouth with the fastest possible speed. Addition silicone materials should be used in impressions requiring replication of gingival crevices or interproximal spaces to prevent tearing of thin sheets of material. Impressions should be removed from the mouth and separated from the model with the fastest possible

  2. On the Nonlinear Dynamics of a Tunable Shock Micro-switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Saber; Javaheri, Hamid; Ghanati, Parisa

    2016-12-01

    A tunable shock micro-switch based on piezoelectric excitation is proposed in this study. This model includes a clamped-clamped micro-beam sandwiched with two piezoelectric layers throughout the entire length. Actuation of the piezoelectric layers via a DC voltage leads to an initial axial force in the micro-beam and directly affects on its overall bending stiffness; accordingly enables two-side tuning of both the trigger time and threshold shock. The governing motion equation, in the presence of an electrostatic actuation and a shock wave, is derived using Hamilton's principle. We employ the finite element method based on the Galerkin technique to obtain the temporal and phase responses subjected to three different shock waves including half sine, triangular and rectangular forms. Subsequently, we investigate the effect of the piezoelectric excitations on the threshold shock amplitude and trigger time.

  3. Two Novel Special Relativistic Effects Space Dilatation and Time Contraction

    CERN Document Server

    Field, J H

    2000-01-01

    The conventional discussion of the observed distortions of space and time in Special Relativity (the Lorentz-Fitzgerald Contraction and Time Dilatation) is extended by considering observations, from a stationary frame, of : (i) objects moving with constant velocity and uniformly illuminated during a short time $\\tau_L$ (their `Luminous Proper Time') in their rest frame; these may be called `Transient Luminous Objects' and (ii) a moving, extended, array of synchronised `equivalent clocks' in a common inertial frame. Application of the Lorentz Transformation to (i) shows that such objects, observed from the stationary frame with coarse time resolution in a direction perpendicular to their direction of motion are seen to be at rest but {\\it longer} in the direction of the relative velocity $\\vec{v}$ by a factor $1/\\sqrt{1-(v/c)^2}$ (Space Dilatation) and to (ii) that the moving equivalent clock at any fixed position in the rest frame of the stationary observer is seen to be running {\\it faster} than a similar cl...

  4. Cavitation inception following shock wave passage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohl, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    Cavitation bubble nucleation following the passage of an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter pulse is investigated experimentally and numerically. In the experiments two configurations are considered: Free passage of the shock wave, and reflection of the shock wave from a rigid reflector. The nuc

  5. Coping with shocks in rural Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z.Y. Debebe (Zelalem); A.D. Mebratie (Anagaw); R.A. Sparrow (Robert); D. Abebaw Ejigie (Degnet); M. Dekker (Marleen); G. Alemu (Getnet ); A.S. Bedi (Arjun Singh)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBased on household survey data and event history interviews undertaken in a highly shock prone country, this paper investigates which shocks trigger which coping responses and why? We find clear differences in terms of coping strategies across shock types. The two relatively covariate

  6. Cavitation inception following shock wave passage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohl, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    Cavitation bubble nucleation following the passage of an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter pulse is investigated experimentally and numerically. In the experiments two configurations are considered: Free passage of the shock wave, and reflection of the shock wave from a rigid reflector. The nuc

  7. Real-time optical diagnosis of the rat brain exposed to a laser-induced shock wave: observation of spreading depolarization, vasoconstriction and hypoxemia-oligemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunichi Sato

    Full Text Available Despite many efforts, the pathophysiology and mechanism of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI have not yet been elucidated, partially due to the difficulty of real-time diagnosis and extremely complex factors determining the outcome. In this study, we topically applied a laser-induced shock wave (LISW to the rat brain through the skull, for which real-time measurements of optical diffuse reflectance and electroencephalogram (EEG were performed. Even under conditions showing no clear changes in systemic physiological parameters, the brain showed a drastic light scattering change accompanied by EEG suppression, which indicated the occurrence of spreading depression, long-lasting hypoxemia and signal change indicating mitochondrial energy impairment. Under the standard LISW conditions examined, hemorrhage and contusion were not apparent in the cortex. To investigate events associated with spreading depression, measurement of direct current (DC potential, light scattering imaging and stereomicroscopic observation of blood vessels were also conducted for the brain. After LISW application, we observed a distinct negative shift in the DC potential, which temporally coincided with the transit of a light scattering wave, showing the occurrence of spreading depolarization and concomitant change in light scattering. Blood vessels in the brain surface initially showed vasodilatation for 3-4 min, which was followed by long-lasting vasoconstriction, corresponding to hypoxemia. Computer simulation based on the inverse Monte Carlo method showed that hemoglobin oxygen saturation declined to as low as ∼35% in the long-term hypoxemic phase. Overall, we found that topical application of a shock wave to the brain caused spreading depolarization/depression and prolonged severe hypoxemia-oligemia, which might lead to pathological conditions in the brain. Although further study is needed, our findings suggest that spreading depolarization/depression is one of

  8. Two-point functions on deformed space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Trampetic, Josip

    2014-01-01

    We present a review of one-loop photon (\\Pi) and neutrino (\\Sigma) two-point functions in a covariant and deformed U(1) gauge-theory on d-dimensional noncommutative spaces, determined by a constant antisymmetric tensor \\theta, and by a parameter-space (\\kappa_f,\\kappa_g), respectively. For the general fermion-photon S_f(\\kappa_f) and photon self-interaction S_g(\\kappa_g) the closed form results reveal two-point functions with all kind of pathological terms: the UV divergence, the quadratic UV/IR mixing terms as well as a logarithmic IR divergent term of the type ln(\\mu^2(\\theta p)^2). In addition, the photon-loop produces new tensor structures satisfying transversality condition by themselves. We show that the photon two-point function in four-dimensional Euclidean spacetime can be reduced to two finite terms by imposing a specific full rank of \\theta and setting deformation parameters (\\kappa_f,\\kappa_g)=(0,3). In this case the neutrino two-point function vanishes. Thus for a specific point (0,3) in the para...

  9. Marketers and Educationalists--Two Communities Divided by Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In this conceptual discussion paper the author seeks to suggest that marketing as a technology of the market has contributed to the foreshortening of educational horizons within which we act or observe but can only hold for declining durations. To satisfy this demand for more in time, marketing has contributed to the commoditisation of…

  10. Marketers and Educationalists--Two Communities Divided by Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In this conceptual discussion paper the author seeks to suggest that marketing as a technology of the market has contributed to the foreshortening of educational horizons within which we act or observe but can only hold for declining durations. To satisfy this demand for more in time, marketing has contributed to the commoditisation of…

  11. Analysis of the temporal properties of price shock sequences in crude oil markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ying; Zhuang, Xin-tian; Liu, Zhi-ying; Huang, Wei-qiang

    2014-01-01

    As one of the fundamental energy sources and important chemical raw materials, crude oil is crucially important to every country. Especially, the price shock of crude oil will bring about hidden dangers in energy security and economic security. Therefore, investigating the dynamics of frequent price shocks of crude oil markets seems to be crucial and necessary. In order to make the conclusions more reliable and valid, we use two different representations of the price shocks (inter-event times and series of counts) to study the temporal properties of price shock sequences in crude oil markets, such as coefficient of variation, Allan Factor, Fano Factors, Rescaled Range analysis and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We find evidence that the time dynamics of the price shock sequences can be considered as a fractal process with a high degree of time-clusterization of the events. It could give us some useful information to better understand the nature and dynamics of crude oil markets.

  12. Particle Acceleration at Shocks: Insights from Supernova Remnant Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. W. Jones

    2011-12-01

    I review some basic properties of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in the context of young supernova remnants (SNRs). I also point out some key differences with cosmological, cluster-related shocks. DSA seems to be very efficient in strong, young SNR shocks. Provided the magnetic fields exceed some hundreds of Gauss (possibly amplified by CR related dynamics), these shocks can accelerate cosmic ray hadrons to PeV energies in the time available to them. Electron energies, limited by radiative losses, are likely limited to the TeV range. Injection of fresh particles at these shocks is poorly understood, but hadrons are much more easily injected than the more highly magnetized electrons. That seems supported by observational data, as well. So, while CR protons in young SNRs may play very major roles in the SNR evolution, the CR electron populations have minimal such impact, despite their observational importance.

  13. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrne, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eakins, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  14. Characterization of two heat shock proteins (Hsp70/Hsc70) from grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella): evidence for their differential gene expression, protein synthesis and secretion in LPS-challenged peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anying; Zhou, Xiaofei; Wang, Xinyan; Zhou, Hong

    2011-06-01

    Two cDNAs, encoding the stress-inducible 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) and the constitutively expressed 70-kDa heat shock cognate protein (Hsc70), were isolated from grass carp. The Hsp70 and Hsc70 cDNAs were 2250 bp and 2449 bp in length and contained 1932 bp and 1953 bp open reading frames, respectively. Tissue distribution results showed that Hsp70/Hsc70 was highly expressed in gill, kidney, head kidney and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Using grass carp PBLs as a cell model, effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the mRNA and protein levels of Hsp70/Hsc70 were examined. In this case, LPS increased the mRNA expression of Hsp70 in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on Hsc70 mRNA expression. In agreement with this, LPS elevated the intracellular Hsp70 markedly, but not the Hsc70 protein levels in parallel experiments. Furthermore, Hsp70 protein was also detected in culture medium. Moreover, inhibition of LPS on Hsp70 release in a time-dependent manner was observed, indicating that there may be a dynamic balance between Hsp70 stores and Hsp70 release in grass carp PBLs following exposure to LPS. Taken together, these results not only shed new insights into the different regulations of LPS on Hsp70/Hsc70 gene expression, protein synthesis and release, but also provide a basis for further study on the functional role of Hsp70 in fish immune response.

  15. High-power laser experiments to study collisionless shock generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Morita, T.; Kato, T.; Tanji, H.; Ide, T.; Nishio, K.; Kuwada, M.; Tsubouchi, T.; Ide, H.; Norimatsu, T.; Gregory, C.; Woolsey, N.; Schaar, K.; Murphy, C.; Gregori, G.; Diziere, A.; Pelka, A.; Koenig, M.; Wang, S.; Dong, Q.; Li, Y.; Park, H.-S.; Ross, S.; Kugland, N.; Ryutov, D.; Remington, B.; Spitkovsky, A.; Froula, D.; Takabe, H.

    2013-11-01

    A collisionless Weibel-instability mediated shock in a self-generated magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation [Kato and Takabe, Astophys. J. Lett. 681, L93 (2008)]. It is predicted that the generation of the Weibel shock requires to use NIF-class high-power laser system. Collisionless electrostatic shocks are produced in counter-streaming plasmas using Gekko XII laser system [Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011)]. A NIF facility time proposal is approved to study the formation of the collisionless Weibel shock. OMEGA and OMEGA EP experiments have been started to study the plasma conditions of counter-streaming plasmas required for the NIF experiment using Thomson scattering and to develop proton radiography diagnostics.

  16. High-power laser experiments to study collisionless shock generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakawa Y.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A collisionless Weibel-instability mediated shock in a self-generated magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation [Kato and Takabe, Astophys. J. Lett. 681, L93 (2008]. It is predicted that the generation of the Weibel shock requires to use NIF-class high-power laser system. Collisionless electrostatic shocks are produced in counter-streaming plasmas using Gekko XII laser system [Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011]. A NIF facility time proposal is approved to study the formation of the collisionless Weibel shock. OMEGA and OMEGA EP experiments have been started to study the plasma conditions of counter-streaming plasmas required for the NIF experiment using Thomson scattering and to develop proton radiography diagnostics.

  17. Shock ignition: an alternative scheme for HiPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.; Lafon, M.; Galera, S.; Weber, S.

    2009-01-01

    Two main paths are now under investigation that aim at thermonuclear ignition of hydrogen isotopes using lasers: central hot spot self-ignition and externally driven fast ignition of preassembled fuel. A third, intermediate, scheme is shock ignition, which combines the simplicity of self-ignition capsules to the hydrodynamic robustness of the fast ignition fuel assembly. This study addresses the potential of shock ignition for the HiPER project and provides a preliminary assessment of possible detrimental effects. Monodimensional simulations are performed to study the robustness of the ignition scheme in terms of shock launching time and laser power. Bidimensional simulations address the sensitivity of shock ignition to irradiation nonuniformity and to low mode asymmetries of the fuel assembly.

  18. Two-time quantum transport and quantum diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, P

    2009-05-01

    Based on the nonequilibrium Green's function technique, a unified theory is developed that covers quantum transport and quantum diffusion in bulk semiconductors on the same footing. This approach, which is applicable to transport via extended and localized states, extends previous semiphenomenological studies and puts them on a firm microscopic basis. The approach is sufficiently general and applies not only to well-studied quantum-transport problems, but also to models, in which the Hamiltonian does not commute with the dipole operator. It is shown that even for the unified treatment of quantum transport and quantum diffusion in homogeneous systems, all quasimomenta of the carrier distribution function are present and fulfill their specific function. Particular emphasis is put on the double-time nature of quantum kinetics. To demonstrate the existence of robust macroscopic transport effects that have a true double-time character, a phononless steady-state current is identified that appears only beyond the generalized Kadanoff-Baym ansatz.

  19. Simulations of Converging Shock Collisions for Shock Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Joshua; Dodd, Evan; Loomis, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Shock ignition (SI) has been proposed as an alternative to achieving high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. A central hot spot below the ignition threshold is created by an initial compression pulse, and a second laser pulse drives a strong converging shock into the fuel. The collision between the rebounding shock from the compression pulse and the converging shock results in amplification of the converging shock and increases the hot spot pressure above the ignition threshold. We investigate shock collision in SI drive schemes for cylindrical targets with a polystyrene foam interior using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations with the RAGE code. The configuration is similar to previous targets fielded on the Omega laser. The CH interior results in a lower convergence ratio and the cylindrical geometry facilitates visualization of the shock transit using an axial X-ray backlighter, both of which are important for comparison to potential experimental measurements. One-dimensional simulations are used to determine shock timing, and the effects of low mode asymmetries in 2D computations are also quantified. LA-UR-16-24773.

  20. Magnetic field amplification by collisionless shocks in partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study shock structures of collisionless shocks in partially ionized plasmas by means of two-dimensional hybrid simulations, where the shock is a perpendicular shock with shock velocity Vsh ~ 40 Va ~ 1333 km/s and the upstream ionization fraction is 0.5. We find that large density fluctuations and large magnetic fields fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the velocity distribution of downstream hydrogen atoms has three components. Observed shock structures suggest that diffusive shock acceleration can operate at perpendicular shocks propagating into partially ionized plasmas in real three-dimensional systems.

  1. Etiology of Shock in the Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Jensen, Helene Kildegaard; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The knowledge of the etiology and associated mortality of undifferentiated shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. We aimed to describe the etiology based proportions and incidence rates (IR) of shock, as well as the associated mortality in the ED. METHODS: Population......-based cohort study at an University Hospital ED in Denmark from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. Patients aged ≥18 years living in the ED-catchment area (N = 225,000) with a first time ED presentation with shock (n = 1,646) defined as hypotension (systolic blood pressure ≤100 mmHg)) and ≥1 organ failures...... were included. Discharge diagnoses defined the etiology and were grouped as; distributive septic shock (SS), distributive non-septic shock (NS)), cardiogenic shock (CS), hypovolemic shock (HS), obstructive shock (OS) and other conditions (OC). Outcomes were etiology-based characteristics, annual IR per...

  2. Saving Lives and Money Two Wheels at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    riders had less than five months experience on the accident motorcycle.  Motorcyclist had less than two seconds to maneuver to avoid accident ...other states as a waiver to the state motorcycle road test. C. OTHER STUDIES Other studies related to motorcycle accidents look at the cost for...killed or injured in motorcycle accidents in 2008 were riding sport bikes. Some leaders see the combination of young service members and motorcycles

  3. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... that at resonance a stationary state arise consisting of multiple oscillating shock waves. Off resonance driving leads to a nearly linear oscillating ground state but superimposed by bursts of a fast oscillating shock wave. Based on a travelling wave ansatz for the fluid velocity potential with an added 2'nd order...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  4. Power Transmission Through Timing Belt In Two Wheeler Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurumurthy Veerapathiran

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect of noise and friction on performance of the chain drive system for motor bikes. Experiment shows that chain transmission in chain drive system leads to poor overall performance, due to its noise and chain gets loose due to aging and sprockets wear due to chain friction etc., the proposed system consists of drive and driven pulley with timing belt transmission. Compared to conventional method, proposed method give improved tension in pulleys and belt by the additional arrangement called belt tensioner. This gives good overall performance of the system, and reduces noise, vibration and gives high transmission speed.

  5. Cosmology with a shock wave

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    We construct the simplest solution of the Einstein equations that incorporates a shock-wave into a standard Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric whose equation of state accounts for the Hubble constant and the microwave background radiation temperature. This produces a new solution of the Einstein equations from which we are able to derive estimates for the shock position at present time. We show that the distance from the shock-wave to the center of the explosion at present time is comparable t...

  6. 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings present the results of the 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW29) which was held in Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A., from July 14 to July 19, 2013. It was organized by the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory, which is part of the College of Engineering of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The ISSW29 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reactive Flows, Detonation and Combustion,  Facilities, Flow Visualization, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Industrial Applications, Magnetohydrodynamics, Medical and Biological Applications, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Plasmas, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter, Shock Waves in Multiphase Flow, as well as Shock Waves in Rarefield Flow. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 29 and individuals interes...

  7. Culture Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋文玲

    2004-01-01

    Specialists say that it is not easy to get used to life in a new culture.“Culture shock”is the term these specialists use when talking about the feelings that people have in a new environment.There are three stages of culture shock,say the specialists.In the first stage,the newcomers like their new environment,Then when the fresh experience

  8. Time domain responses of hydraulic bushing with two flow passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tan; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    Hydraulic bushings are commonly employed in vehicle suspension and body sub-frame systems to control motion, vibration, and structure-borne noise. Since literature on this topic is sparse, a controlled bushing prototype which accommodates a combination of long and short flow passages and flow restriction elements is first designed, constructed and instrumented. Step-up and step-down responses of several typical fluid-filled bushing configurations are measured along with steady harmonic time histories of transmitted force and internal pressures. To analyze the experimental results and gain physical insights into the hydraulic bushing system, lumped system models of bushings with different design features are developed, and analytical expressions of transmitted force and internal pressure responses are derived by using the convolution method. Parametric studies are also conducted to examine the effect of hydraulic element parameters. System parameters are successfully estimated for both harmonic and step responses using theory and measurements, and the dynamic force measurements are analyzed using analytical predictions. Finally, some nonlinearities of the system are also observed, and the fluid resistance of flow passage is found to be the most nonlinear element.

  9. Culture shock and travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L; Leggat, P A

    1998-06-01

    compounds. This readjustment back to their own culture after a period of time abroad has been termed "reverse culture shock, a condition which has been studied in both corporate managers and Peace Corps volunteers. With culture shock and many other processes of psychological adjustment, people tend to suffer alone, thinking that they are the only ones not coping well with their new circumstance. The objective of this paper was to bring the phenomenon of culture shock to the awareness of travel health advisors, who can in turn advise travelers, especially longer term travelers, about having realistic expectations of their travel and life in new cultures.

  10. Simulation Study of Shock Reaction on Porous Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ai-Guo; ZHANG Guang-Cai; PAN Xiao-Fei; ZHU Jian-Shi

    2009-01-01

    Direct modeling of porous materials under shock is a complex issue.We investigate such a system via the newly developed material-point method.The effects of shock strength and porosity size are the main concerns.For the same porosity, the effects of mean-void-size are checked.It is found that local turbulence mixing and volume dissipation are two important mechanisms for transformation of kinetic energy to heat.When the porosity is very small, the shocked portion may arrive at a dynamical steady state; the voids in the downstream portion reflect back rarefactive waves and result in slight oscillations of mean density and pressure; for the same value of porosity, a larger mean-void-size makes a higher mean temperature.When the porosity becomes large, hydrodynamic quantities vary with time during the whole shock-loading procedure: after the initial stage, the mean density and pressure decrease, but the temperature increases with a higher rate.The distributions of local density, pressure, temperature and particle-velocity are generally non-Gaussian and vary with time.The changing rates depend on the porosity value, mean-void-size and shock strength.The stronger the loaded shock, the stronger the porosity effects.This work provides a supplement to experiments for the very quick procedures and reveals more fundamental mechanisms in energy and momentum transportation.

  11. Two cases in which myocardial injury could be only evaluated by nuclear medicine studies on electric shock patients whose electrocardiogram and myocardial enzyme levels were normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino, Mari; Yoshioka, Koichiro; Morita, Seiji; Yamagiwa, Takeshi; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Akieda, Kazuki; Iizuka, Shinichi; Kanda, Shigetaka; Ikari, Yuji; Nasu, Seiji; Hatakeyama, Kenji; Kodama, Itsuo; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Tanabe, Teruhisa

    2009-03-01

    Heart injury due to electric shock is currently diagnosed based on electrocardiogram (ECG) changes or elevated levels of myocardial enzymes or both. However, the rate at which ECG detects abnormalities is very low; thus, the estimated rate of the diagnosis of myocardial damage due to electric shock is lower than the actual rate. The method of nuclear medicine study of the heart is superior with regard to evaluating transient ischemia, such as angina pectoris, in patients whose ECG and myocardial enzyme levels are normal. Therefore, we attempted to diagnose transient myocardial damage in electric shock patients by using nuclear medicine study of the heart.

  12. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF. Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB, 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL.

  13. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William J; Fackler, Cameron J; Berger, Elliott H; Shaw, Peter B; Stergar, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF). Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB), 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL.

  14. Shock-vortex interactions in a soap film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, C. Y.; Wu, W. J.; Chen, H.

    2008-08-01

    This work experimentally visualizes the interaction of a quasi-one-dimensional moving shock wave with a two-dimensional vortex in a soap film for the first time. A vertical soap film shock tube was used to generate a quasi-one-dimensional moving shock wave and a NACA-0012 airfoil intruded into the soap film was towed to shed the starting vortex. The interesting interaction phenomena were then visualized using a traditional high-speed flash photography. The concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) used was 0.5 CMC (critical micelle concentration) to keep the surfactant molecules behave as two-dimensional gases. A sequence of pictures shows that the shock is distorted non-symmetrically as it passes through the spiral vortex flow field and the vortex structure is compressed in the direction normal to the shock. These flow features observed in soap films are qualitatively similar to their counterparts in gases. In addition, the visualization of the interactions of a quasi-one-dimensional moving shock wave with a K árm án vortex street are presented.

  15. Electron acceleration in a nonrelativistic shock with very high Alfv\\'en Mach number

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Y; Hoshino, M

    2013-01-01

    Electron acceleration associated with various plasma kinetic instabilities in a nonrelativistic, very-high-Alfv\\'en Mach-number ($M_A \\sim 45$) shock is revealed by means of a two-dimensional fully kinetic PIC simulation. Electromagnetic (ion Weibel) and electrostatic (ion-acoustic and Buneman) instabilities are strongly activated at the same time in different regions of the two-dimensional shock structure. Relativistic electrons are quickly produced predominantly by the shock surfing mechanism with the Buneman instability at the leading edge of the foot. The energy spectrum has a high-energy tail exceeding the upstream ion kinetic energy accompanying the main thermal population. This gives a favorable condition for the ion acoustic instability at the shock front, which in turn results in additional energization. The large-amplitude ion Weibel instability generates current sheets in the foot, implying another dissipation mechanism via magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional shock structure in the very-hi...

  16. [Definition of shock types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, H A; Baumann, G; Gänsslen, A; Janssens, U; Knoefel, W; Koch, T; Marx, G; Müller-Werdan, U; Pape, H C; Prange, W; Roesner, D; Standl, T; Teske, W; Werner, G; Zander, R

    2001-11-01

    Definitions of shock types. Hypovolaemic shock is a state of insufficient perfusion of vital organs with consecutive imbalance of oxygen supply and demand due to an intravascular volume deficiency with critically impaired cardiac preload. Subtypes are haemorrhagic shock, hypovolaemic shock in the narrow sense, traumatic-haemorrhagic shock and traumatic-hypovolaemic shock. Cardiac shock is caused by a primary critical cardiac pump failure with consecutive inadequate oxygen supply of the organism. Anaphylactic shock is an acute failure of blood volume distribution (distributive shock) and caused by IgE-dependent, type-I-allergic, classical hypersensibility, or a physically, chemically, or osmotically induced IgE-independent anaphylactoid hypersensibility. The septic shock is a sepsis-induced distribution failure of the circulating blood volume in the sense of a distributive shock. The neurogenic shock is a distributive shock induced by generalized and extensive vasodilatation with consecutive hypovolaemia due to an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of vascular smooth muscles.

  17. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan, Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics, 2455 Hayward Dr., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Bingham, D.; Goh, J. [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada); Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10{sup 14} W cm{sup −2} to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code.

  18. The Efficacy of Medical Expulsive Therapy (MET) in Improving Stone-free Rate and Stone Expulsion Time, After Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL) for Upper Urinary Stones: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarikos, Andreas; Grivas, Nikolaos; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Mourmouris, Panagiotis; Rountos, Thomas; Fiamegos, Alexandros; Stavrou, Sotirios; Venetis, Chris

    2015-12-01

    In this meta-analysis, we included randomized studies on medical expulsive therapy implemented following shock wave lithotripsy for renal and ureteral stones. Pooled results demonstrated the efficacy of α-blockers, nifedipine, Rowatinex, and Uriston in increasing stone clearance. In addition, the time to stone elimination, the intensity of pain, the formation of steinstrasse, and the need for auxiliary procedures were reduced mainly with α-blockers. Expulsion rate was not correlated with the type of α-blocker, the diameter, and the location of stone. Our results show that medical expulsive therapy for residual fragments after shock wave lithotripsy should be implemented in clinical practice.

  19. 延长美罗培南给药时间治疗脓毒性休克疗效观察%Clinical efficacy of extending infusion time of meropenem in the treatment of septic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭云辉; 冯丽; 陈熙; 徐圣君; 黄晓芳

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical efficacy of extending infusion time of meropenem in the treatment of septic shock. Methods One hundred and forty-three hospitalized patients with septic shock in Inten-sive Care Unit from Jan. 2012 to Mar. 2014 were enrolled. Before treatment, the patients were randomly divided into two groups. Extended time group (n=71) was treated with 1 g meropenem, q8h, intravenous infusion, and each infu-sion pump was within 3 h. Conventional treatment group (n=72) was treated with 1 g meropenem, q8h intravenous infusion, and each infusion pump was within 30 min. The mechanical ventilation time, time of antibiotic use, length of ICU stay, APACHEⅡ score, serum procalcitonin level, adverse reactions and 28 d mortality in the two groups were observed. Results Time of antibiotic use [(8.4 ± 2.3) d vs (12.1 ± 2.2) d], length of ICU stay [(9.5 ± 2.2) d vs (12.4±2.1) d], 28 d mortality (11.27%vs 16.67%), APACHEⅡscore and serum procalcitonin level reduction in the extended time group were significantly better than those in the conventional treatment group (P0.05). Conclusion Extending infusion time of meropenem is superior to conventional treatment and should be recommended as empirical therapy against septic shock.%目的:探讨延长美罗培南给药时间法治疗脓毒性休克的疗效。方法选择2012年1月至2014年3月被诊断为脓毒性休克的ICU住院患者143例,治疗前按随机数字法分为延长时间组71例,常规给药组72例,延长时间组患者采用美罗培南1 g,静脉滴注,q8h,每次以输液泵控制输注时间为3 h;常规给药组患者采用美罗培南1 g,静脉滴注,q8h,每次以输液泵控制输注时间为30 min。其他治疗方法相同。观察两组患者的机械通气时间、抗生素使用天数、ICU住院时间、降钙素原(PCT)水平、APACHEⅡ评分、不良反应及28 d病死率。结果延长时间组抗生素使用天数[(8.4±2.3) d vs (12.1±2.2) d

  20. Particle-in-cell simulations of particle energization from low Mach number fast mode shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Jaehong; Blackman, Eric G; Ren, Chuang; Siller, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Astrophysical shocks are often studied in the high Mach number limit but weakly compressive fast shocks can occur in magnetic reconnection outflows and are considered to be a site of particle energization in solar flares. Here we study the microphysics of such perpendicular, low Mach number collisionless shocks using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with a reduced ion/electron mass ratio and employ a moving wall boundary method for initial generation of the shock. This moving wall method allows for more control of the shock speed, smaller simulation box sizes, and longer simulation times than the commonly used fixed wall, reflection method of shock formation. Our results, which are independent of the shock formation method, reveal the prevalence shock drift acceleration (SDA) of both electron and ions in a purely perpendicular shock with Alfv\\'en Mach number $M_A=6.8$ and ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure $\\beta=8$. We determine the respective minimum energies required for electrons and ...

  1. Time-resolved in situ detection of CO in a shock tube using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a quantum-cascade laser near 4.6 µm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Wang, Shengkai; Sur, Ritobrata; Chao, Xing; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-10-06

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using a mid-infrared DFB quantum-cascade laser is reported for sensitive time-resolved (10 μs) in situ CO measurements in a shock tube. Off-axis alignment and fast scanning of the laser wavelength were used to minimize coupling noise in a low-finesse cavity. An absorption gain factor of 91 was demonstrated, which enabled sub-ppm detection sensitivity for gas temperatures of 1000-2100K in a 15 cm diameter shock tube. This substantial improvement in detection sensitivity compared to conventional single-pass absorption measurements, shows great potential for the study of reaction pathways of high-temperature combustion kinetics mechanisms in shock tubes.

  2. Development of a shock noise prediction code for high-speed helicopters - The subsonically moving shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadghighi, H.; Holz, R.; Farassat, F.; Lee, Yung-Jang

    1991-01-01

    A previously defined airfoil subsonic shock-noise prediction formula whose result depends on a mapping of the time-dependent shock surface to a time-independent computational domain is presently coded and incorporated in the NASA-Langley rotor-noise prediction code, WOPWOP. The structure and algorithms used in the shock-noise prediction code are presented; special care has been taken to reduce computation time while maintaining accuracy. Numerical examples of shock-noise prediction are presented for hover and forward flight. It is confirmed that shock noise is an important component of the quadrupole source.

  3. REAL-TIME SIGNAL PROCESSING FOR FLYING HEIGHT MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL IN HARD DRIVES SUBJECT TO SHOCK AND VIBRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Amei

    2008-01-01

    Merged with duplicate record 10026.1/829 on 10.04.2017 by CS (TIS) Three readback signal detection methods are investigated for real-time flying height or head disk spacing variation measurement under vibration conditions. This is carried out by theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental study. The first method (amplitude detection) provides a simple way to study the head disk spacing change. The second method ( PW50 parameter estimation) can be used effective...

  4. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Pullin, D. I.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R = √μ0/p0 I/(2π) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field then

  5. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  6. Collisionless shock formation, spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations and streaming instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, A; Fiuza, F; Ruyer, C; Gremillet, L; Narayan, R; Silva, L O

    2013-01-01

    Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysics and in the lab. Recent numerical simulations and experiments have shown how they can arise from the encounter of two collisionless plasma shells. When the shells interpenetrate, the overlapping region turns unstable, triggering the shock formation. As a first step towards a microscopic understanding of the process, we analyze here in detail the initial instability phase. On the one hand, 2D relativistic PIC simulations are performed where two symmetric initially cold pair plasmas collide. On the other hand, the instabilities at work are analyzed, as well as the field at saturation and the seed field which gets amplified. For mildly relativistic motions and onward, Weibel modes govern the linear phase. We derive an expression for the duration of the linear phase in good agreement with the simulations. This saturation time constitutes indeed a lower-bound for the shock formation time.

  7. Collisionless shock formation, spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations, and streaming instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Stockem, A.; Fiuza, F.; Silva, L. O. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Ruyer, C.; Gremillet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF F-91297 Arpajon (France); Narayan, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysics and in the lab. Recent numerical simulations and experiments have shown how they can arise from the encounter of two collisionless plasma shells. When the shells interpenetrate, the overlapping region turns unstable, triggering the shock formation. As a first step towards a microscopic understanding of the process, we analyze here in detail the initial instability phase. On the one hand, 2D relativistic Particle-In-Cell simulations are performed where two symmetric initially cold pair plasmas collide. On the other hand, the instabilities at work are analyzed, as well as the field at saturation and the seed field which gets amplified. For mildly relativistic motions and onward, Weibel modes govern the linear phase. We derive an expression for the duration of the linear phase in good agreement with the simulations. This saturation time constitutes indeed a lower-bound for the shock formation time.

  8. Shock absorption in lumbar disc prosthesis: a preliminary mechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeHuec, J C; Kiaer, T; Friesem, T; Mathews, H; Liu, M; Eisermann, L

    2003-08-01

    Lumbar disc prostheses have been used in treating symptomatic degenerative disc diseases. A few prostheses of the ball-socket design are currently available for clinical use, the joint mechanism being materialized either with a hard polymer core or a metal-to-metal couple. Other prostheses of "shock absorber" design were not available at the time of the study. The objective of this work was to establish whether there was a difference in the shock absorption capacity between a device having an ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene center core and a device having a metal-on-metal bearing. Vibration and shock loading were applied to two lumbar total disc prostheses: PRODISC, manufactured by Spine Solutions, and MAVERICK Total Disc Replacement, manufactured by Medtronic Sofamor Danek. The shock absorption capacity of the device was evaluated by comparing the input and the output force measurements. The disc prosthesis was mounted onto a test apparatus. Each side of the device was equipped with a force sensor. The input shock load and the output resulting forces were simultaneously measured and recorded. The loading force pattern included 1). a static preload of 350 N plus an oscillating vibration of 100 N with frequency sweeping from 0 to 100 Hz and 2). a sudden shock load of 250 N applied over a 0.1-second interval. Both input and output signal data were processed and were transformed into their frequency spectrums. The vibration and shock transmissibility of the device, defined as the ratio of the output spectrum over the input spectrum, were calculated in sweeping the frequency from 0 to 100 Hz. The phase deviation was calculated to characterize the shock absorber effects. For both tested devices under vibration and shock loading, the phase angle displacement between the input and the output signals was 10 degrees. Under oscillating vibration loading, both tested devices had a transmission ratio higher than 99.8%. Over the frequency interval 1-100 Hz, the

  9. Shock compression of nitrobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozu, Naoshi; Arai, Mitsuru; Tamura, Masamitsu; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Yoshida, Masatake; Kondo, Ken-Ichi

    1999-06-01

    The Hugoniot (4 - 30 GPa) and the isotherm (1 - 7 GPa) of nitrobenzene have been investigated by shock and static compression experiments. Nitrobenzene has the most basic structure of nitro aromatic compounds, which are widely used as energetic materials, but nitrobenzene has been considered not to explode in spite of the fact its calculated heat of detonation is similar to TNT, about 1 kcal/g. Explosive plane-wave generators and diamond anvil cell were used for shock and static compression, respectively. The obtained Hugoniot consists of two linear lines, and the kink exists around 10 GPa. The upper line agrees well with the Hugoniot of detonation products calculated by KHT code, so it is expected that nitrobenzene detonates in that area. Nitrobenzene solidifies under 1 GPa of static compression, and the isotherm of solid nitrobenzene was obtained by X-ray diffraction technique. Comparing the Hugoniot and the isotherm, nitrobenzene is in liquid phase under experimented shock condition. From the expected phase diagram, shocked nitrobenzene seems to remain metastable liquid in solid phase region on that diagram.

  10. Formulation of an RP-1 Pyrolysis Surrogate from Shock Tube Measurements of Fuel and Ethylene Time Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NO. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQRC 10 E. Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB...times of ram accelerator CH4/O2/diluent mixtures. Journal of Propulsion and Power, 15(1):82–91, 1999. E. L. Petersen, D. F. Davidson, M. Rohrig, and...Arai. Overall rate constant of pyrolysis of n-alkanes at a low conversion level. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, 40(9):2027–2036, 2001

  11. Generation of Focused Shock Waves in Water for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeš, Petr; Šunka, Pavel; Hoffer, Petr; Stelmashuk, Vitaliy; Beneš, Jiří; Poučková, Pavla; Zadinová, Marie; Zeman, Jan

    The physical characteristics of focused two-successive (tandem) shock waves (FTSW) in water and their biological effects are presented. FTSW were ­generated by underwater multichannel electrical discharges in a highly conductive saline solution using two porous ceramic-coated cylindrical electrodes of different diameter and surface area. The primary cylindrical pressure wave generated at each composite electrode was focused by a metallic parabolic reflector to a common focal point to form two strong shock waves with a variable time delay between the waves. The pressure field and interaction between the first and the second shock waves at the focus were investigated using schlieren photography and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) shock gauge sensors. The largest interaction was obtained for a time delay of 8-15 μs between the waves, producing an amplitude of the negative pressure phase of the second shock wave down to -80 MPa and a large number of cavitations at the focus. The biological effects of FTSW were demonstrated in vitro on damage to B16 melanoma cells, in vivo on targeted lesions in the thigh muscles of rabbits and on the growth delay of sarcoma tumors in Lewis rats treated in vivo by FTSW, compared to untreated controls.

  12. A yeast two-hybrid screen reveals a strong interaction between the Legionella chaperonin Hsp60 and the host cell small heat shock protein Hsp10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2015-06-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular bacterium that replicates inside a membrane-bound vacuole called Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV), where it plentifully liberates its HtpB chaperonin. From LCV, HtpB reaches the host cell cytoplasm, where it interacts with SAMDC, a cytoplasmic protein required for synthesis of host polyamines that are important for intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. Additionally, cytoplasmic expression of HtpB in S. cerevisiae induces pseudohyphal growth, and in mammalian cells recruits mitochondria to LCV, and modifies actin microfilaments organization. This led us to hypothesize here that HtpB recruits a protein(s) from eukaryotic cells that is involved in the emergence of the aforementioned phenotypes. To identify this protein, a commercially available HeLa cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid system. Approximately 5×10(6) yeast clones carrying HeLa cDNA library plasmid were screened. Twenty-one positive clones were identified. DNA sequence analysis revealed that all of these positive clones encoded the mammalian small heat shock protein Hsp10. Based on the fact that chaperonions are required to interact with co-chaperonins to function properly in protein folding, we believe that HtpB recruits the host cell Hsp10 to appropriately interact with SAMDC and to induce the multifunction phenotypes deemed important in L. pneumophila pathogenesis.

  13. Viscous solution of the triple shock reflection problem

    CERN Document Server

    Lau-Chapdelaine, S She-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The reflection of a triple-shock configuration was studied numerically in two dimensions using the Navier-Stokes equations. The flow field was initialized using three shock theory, and the reflection of the triple point on a plane of symmetry was studied. The conditions simulated a stoichiometric methane-oxygen detonation cell at low pressure on time scales preceding ignition, when the gas was assumed to be thermodynamically inert. Viscosity was found to play an important role on some shock reflection mechanisms believed to accelerate reaction rates in detonations where time scales are small. A small wall jet was present in the double Mach reflection and increased in size with Reynolds number, eventually forming a small vortex. Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were absent and there was no Mach stem bifurcation at Reynolds numbers corresponding to and exceeding the induction length. Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities are unlikely to be a source of rapid reactions in detonations at time scales commensurate with the i...

  14. Shock breakout theory

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, Eli

    2016-01-01

    The earliest supernova (SN) emission is produced when the optical depth of the plasma lying ahead of the shock, which ejects the envelope, drops below c/v, where v is the shock velocity. This "breakout" may occur when the shock reaches the edge of the star, producing a bright X-ray/UV flash on time scales of seconds to a fraction of an hour, followed by UV/optical "cooling" emission from the expanding cooling envelope on a day time-scale. If the optical depth of circumstellar material (CSM) ejected from the progenitor star prior to the explosion is larger than c/v, the breakout will take place at larger radii, within the CSM, extending its duration to days time scale. The properties of the early, breakout and cooling, emission carry unique signatures of the structure of the progenitor star (e.g. its radius and surface composition) and of its mass-loss history. The recent progress of wide-field transient surveys enable SN detections on a day time scale, and are being used to set unique constraints on the proge...

  15. Detection and quantitation of two cucurbit criniviruses in mixed infection by real-time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamian, Peter E; Seblani, Rewa; Sobh, Hana; Abou-Jawdah, Yusuf

    2013-11-01

    Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus (CCYV) and Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV) are whitefly-transmitted criniviruses infecting cucurbit crops inducing similar symptoms. Single and multiplex RT-PCR protocols were developed and evaluated on cucurbit samples collected from commercial greenhouses. Primers and probes were designed from the highly conserved heat shock protein 70 homolog (Hsp70h) gene. Conventional RT-PCR and multiplex RT-PCR assays showed high specificity and suitability for routine screening. TaqMan-based quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) protocols were also developed for the detection and quantitation of both viruses occurring in single or mixed infection. The assays proved to be highly specific with no cross amplification. RT-qPCR assays showed a 100-1000 times improved sensitivity over conventional RT-PCR. Virus titers in mixed infections were compared to singly infected plants by RT-qPCR. CYSDV and CCYV titers decreased in double infected plants. This paper reports highly specific conventional RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR assays for detection, quantitation and differentiation between two closely related cucurbit-infecting criniviruses.

  16. Numerical modelling of closed-cell aluminium foams under shock loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, M. A.; Islam, M. A.; Hazell, P. J.; Escobedo, J. P.; Saadatfar, M.; Brown, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    The present research numerically investigates shock propagation through closed-cell aluminium foam via flyer-plate impact. The mechanics of foam deformation was elucidated using the finite element (FE) software ABAQUS/explicit. X-ray computed micro-tomography was performed to render a full 3D foam geometry mesh for understanding detailed macrostructural response due to shock propagation. Elastic wave propagation and pore collapse mechanism with time were studied. The free surface velocity of the foam was measured at two different flyer-plate impact velocities to observe the profile of the shock wave with time. Good correlations were observed between experimental data and FE predictions for both test conditions.

  17. Nonthermal radiation from relativistic electrons accelerated at spherically expanding shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons accelerated at spherically expanding shocks with low Mach numbers and the ensuing spectral signatures imprinted in radio synchrotron emission. Time-dependent simulations of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of electrons in the test-particle limit have been performed for spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for typical shocks in the intracluster medium. The electron and radiation spectra at the shock location can be described properly by the test-particle DSA predictions with the instantaneous shock parameters. However, the volume integrated spectra of both electrons and radiation deviate significantly from the test-particle power-laws, because the shock compression ratio and the flux of injected electrons at the shock gradually decrease as the shock slows down in time. So one needs to be cautious about interpreting observed radio spectra of evolving shocks by simple DSA models in the test-particle regime.

  18. Limits of Declustering Methods for Disentangling Exogenous from Endogenous Events in Time Series with Foreshocks, Main shocks and Aftershocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sornette, D

    2009-01-01

    Many time series in natural and social sciences can be seen as resulting from an interplay between exogenous influences and an endogenous organization. We use a simple (ETAS) model of events occurring sequentially, in which future events are influenced (partially triggered) by past events to ask the question of how well can one disentangle the exogenous events from the endogenous ones. We apply both model-dependant and model-independent stochastic declustering methods to reconstruct the tree of ancestry and estimate key parameters. In contrast with previously reported positive results, we have to conclude that declustered catalogs are rather unreliable for the synthetic catalogs that we have investigated, which contains of the order of thousands of events, typical of realistic applications. The estimated rates of exogenous events suffer from large errors. The key branching ratio $n$, quantifying the fraction of events that have been triggered by previous events, is also badly estimated in general from declust...

  19. An Analysis of Shock-Compression in Mo-Si Powder Mixtures Using Recovery and Time-Resolved Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    1999-06-01

    The densification and reaction characteristics in the Mo-Si system were investigated utilizing recovery experiments as well as time resolved measurements with in-situ stress gages. The starting sample in all cases consisted of statically pressed Mo + 2 Si powder mixtures ( ~55% TMD). The recovery experiments were performed using the Sandia Momma Bear and Momma Bear A fixtures with baratol and composition B explosives respectively. The instrumented experiments were performed in a capsule design similar to that of the Momma Bear, but modified to incorporate poly-vinyl di-flouride (PVDF) stress gages at the front and rear surfaces of the powder. These experiments were performed using a single stage gas gun in the velocity range of 500 m/s to 1 km/s. The instrumented experiments allow the crush strength, densification history, and reaction threshold to be mapped at increasing pressure to correlate with reaction observed in the recovery experiments.

  20. SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy)

    2012-05-10

    The theory of diffusive shock acceleration is extended to the case of superdiffusive transport, i.e., when the mean square deviation grows proportionally to t{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} > 1. Superdiffusion can be described by a statistical process called Levy random walk, in which the propagator is not a Gaussian but it exhibits power-law tails. By using the propagator appropriate for Levy random walk, it is found that the indices of energy spectra of particles are harder than those obtained where a normal diffusion is envisaged, with the spectral index decreasing with the increase of {alpha}. A new scaling for the acceleration time is also found, allowing substantially shorter times than in the case of normal diffusion. Within this framework we can explain a number of observations of flat spectra in various astrophysical and heliospheric contexts, for instance, for the Crab Nebula and the termination shock of the solar wind.

  1. The Volatility of Long-term Bond Returns: Persistent Interest Shocks and Time-varying Risk Premiums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osterrieder, Daniela; Schotman, Peter C.

    We develop a model that can match two stylized facts of the term-structure. The first stylized fact is the predictability of excess returns on long-term bonds. Modeling this requires sufficient volatility and persistence in the price of risk. The second stylized fact is that long-term yields...... are dominated by a level factor, which requires persistence in the spot interest rate. We find that a fractionally integrated process for the short rate plus a fractionally integrated specification for the price of risk leads to an analytically tractable almost affine term structure model that can explain...... the stylized facts. In a decomposition of long-term bond returns we find that the expectations component from the level factor is more volatile than the returns themselves. It therefore takes a volatile risk premium that is negatively correlated with innovations in the level factor to explain the volatility...

  2. VNAP2: a computer program for computation of two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible, turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, M.C.

    1981-08-01

    VNAP2 is a computer program for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing-length model, a one-equation model, or the Jones-Launder two-equation model. The geometry may be a single- or a dual-flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference-plane-characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free-jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet-powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free-jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  3. A Study of Uranus' Bow Shock Motions Using Langmuir Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, S.; Cairns, I. H.; Smith, C. W.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    During the Voyager 2 flyby of Uranus, strong electron plasma oscillations (Langmuir waves) were detected by the plasma wave instrument in the 1.78-kHz channel on January 23-24, 1986, prior to the inbound bow shock crossing. Langmuir waves are excited by energetic electrons streaming away from the bow shock. The goal of this work is to estimate the location and motion of Uranus' bow shock using Langmuir wave data, together with the spacecraft positions and the measured interplanetary magnetic field. The following three remote sensing analyses were performed: the basic remote sensing method, the lag time method, and the trace-back method. Because the interplanetary magnetic field was highly variable, the first analysis encountered difficulties in obtaining a realistic estimation of Uranus' bow shock motion. In the lag time method developed here, time lags due to the solar wind's finite convection speed are taken into account when calculating the shock's standoff distance. In the new trace-back method, limits on the standoff distance are obtained as a function of time by reconstructing electron paths. Most of the results produced by the latter two analyses are consistent with predictions based on the standard theoretical model and the measured solar wind plasma parameters. Differences between our calculations and the theoretical model are discussed.

  4. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 1. Invited Papers, Submarine Shock Testing, Shock Analysis, Shock Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-06-01

    P. White, Jr., Rochester Applied Science Associates, Inc., Rochester, New York MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF A TYPICAL FLOATING SHOCK PLATFORM SUBJECTED TO...our offer. standardization projects as well as in the This asrect of cuantitive railroad technology various technical societies. This multi...Analysis of a Gravity phenomena which my education had kept care- Dam," using gelatin models . The stimulation fully hidden from me until that time. It’s

  5. The pertinence of expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) to the efficacy of cryopreservation in HELAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peitao; Shu, Zhiquan; He, Liqun; Cui, Xiangdong; Wang, Yuzhen; Gao, Dayong

    2005-01-01

    HELAs (Hela cells, passed cells of human cervical carcinoma) were heat or cold treated (named heat or cold shock) and then resumed normal culture for 2, 4 or 8 hours respectively. The expressions of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and 90 (HSP90) of the HELAs were measured by Northern and Western blotting. HELAs after 4-hour culture were exposed to or cryopreserved with different concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO, 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% respectively, V/V). Meanwhile, the HELAs after different culture time (2, 4 and 6 hours of culture) were cryopreserved with 5% Me2SO. After exposure or cryopreservation, the number of live HELAs was counted and the survival rate was calculated. The results showed that heat shock increased the expression of HSP70 and HSP90 of HELAs, while cold shock decreased the expression of the two proteins. When the concentrations of Me2SO were 10%, 15% and 20%, the survival rates of HELAs after exposure to Me2SO or cryopreservation were much lower than those when the concentrations were small. The survival rates of the heat shocked HELAs were significantly higher than those of the cold shocked and control HELAs. After cryopreservation with 5% Me2SO, the survival rate of heat shocked HELAs group with 2 hours culture time was the lowest among all the groups of HELAs with different cultural time. From the results of this study, we conclude that the expressions of HSP70 and HSP90 in HELAs increased significantly after heat shock, while cold shock decreased the expressions of these two proteins. The over-expressions of HSPs in the heat shocked HELAs could protect the cells from both injury caused by potential toxicity of high concentrations of Me2SO and cryoinjury caused by the freeze-thawing/cryopreservation procedure.

  6. Generation and evolution of interplanetary slow shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Wu

    Full Text Available It is well known that most MHD shocks observed within 1 AU are MHD fast shocks. Only a very limited number of MHD slow shocks are observed within 1 AU. In order to understand why there are only a few MHD slow shocks observed within 1 AU, we use a one-dimensional, time-dependent MHD code with an adaptive grid to study the generation and evolution of interplanetary slow shocks (ISS in the solar wind. Results show that a negative, nearly square-wave perturbation will generate a pair of slow shocks (a forward and a reverse slow shock. In addition, the forward and the reverse slow shocks can pass through each other without destroying their characteristics, but the propagating speeds for both shocks are decreased. A positive, square-wave perturbation will generate both slow and fast shocks. When a forward slow shock (FSS propagates behind a forward fast shock (FFS, the former experiences a decreasing Mach number. In addition, the FSS always disappears within a distance of 150R (where R is one solar radius from the Sun when there is a forward fast shock (with Mach number ≥1.7 propagating in front of the FSS. In all tests that we have performed, we have not discovered that the FSS (or reverse slow shock evolves into a FFS (or reverse fast shock. Thus, we do not confirm the FSS-FFS evolution as suggested by Whang (1987.

  7. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcowith, A.; Bret, A.; Bykov, A.; Dieckman, M. E.; O'C Drury, L.; Lembège, B.; Lemoine, M.; Morlino, G.; Murphy, G.; Pelletier, G.; Plotnikov, I.; Reville, B.; Riquelme, M.; Sironi, L.; Stockem Novo, A.

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  8. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcowith, A; Bret, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O'C; Lembège, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  9. Shock compression of polyurethane foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahl D.B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Several shock studies have been made on polyurethane materials, both fully dense and distended in the form of foams. However, there is a lack of shock data between the densities of 0.321 and 1.264g/cm3 (fully dense. We present here data obtained from two different types of shock experiments at densities of 0.35, 0.5, 0.68, 0.78, and 0.9g/cm3 in order to fill in the density deficiencies and make it easier to develop an unreacted equation of state (EOS for polyurethane as a function of density. A thermodynamically consistent EOS was developed, based on the Helmholtz free energy, and was used to predict the shock properties of polyurethane materials at densities from 1.264 to 0.348g/cm3. These estimates are compared to the available data. The data match quite close to the predictions and provide a basis for calculating polyurethane foam shock processes. Chemical reaction has been observed at relatively high pressure (21.7 GPa in fully dense polyurethane in an earlier study, and the equation of state presented here is representative of the unreacted polyurethane foam. Lowering the density is expected to drop the shock pressure for chemical reaction, yet there is not enough data to address the low density shock reaction thresholds in this study.

  10. An LMI Approach to H∞ Performance Analysis of Continous-Time System with Two Additive Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrastawa Ridwan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the problem of H∞ performance analysis for continous–time systems with two additive time-varying delays in the state. Our objective is focused on stability analysis of a continuous system with two time-varying delays with an H∞ disturbance attenuation level γ. By exploiting Lyapunov-Krasovski functional and introducing free weighting matrix variables, LMI stability condition have been derived.

  11. Can a mind have two time lines? Exploring space-time mapping in Mandarin and English speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Lynden K; Tan, Lucy; Noble, Grant D; Lumsden, Joanne; Macrae, C Neil

    2011-06-01

    Spatial representations of time are a ubiquitous feature of human cognition. Nevertheless, interesting sociolinguistic variations exist with respect to where in space people locate temporal constructs. For instance, while in English time metaphorically flows horizontally, in Mandarin an additional vertical dimension is employed. Noting that the bilingual mind can flexibly accommodate multiple representations, the present work explored whether Mandarin-English bilinguals possess two mental time lines. Across two experiments, we demonstrated that Mandarin-English bilinguals do indeed employ both horizontal and vertical representations of time. Importantly, subtle variations to cultural context were seen to shape how these time lines were deployed.

  12. Do sector-specific shocks explain aggregate fluctuations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busato, Francesco; Girardi, Alessandro; Argentiero, Amedeo

    a disaggregate analysismay shed light on the mechanisms behind the propagation of shocks across sectors and over time.(iv) Finally, our analysis suggests that an appropriate real business model for the United Stateseconomy requires at least two sectors, representing, for example, durable and non-durable goods...

  13. Diffusive Acceleration of Ions at Interplanetary Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Summerlin, Errol J.

    2005-01-01

    Heliospheric shocks are excellent systems for testing theories of particle acceleration in their environs. These generally fall into two classes: (1) interplanetary shocks that are linear in their ion acceleration characteristics, with the non-thermal ions serving as test particles, and (2) non-linear systems such as the Earth's bow shock and the solar wind termination shock, where the accelerated ions strongly influence the magnetohydrodynamic structure of the shock. This paper explores the modelling of diffusive acceleration at a particular interplanetary shock, with an emphasis on explaining in situ measurements of ion distribution functions. The observational data for this event was acquired on day 292 of 1991 by the Ulysses mission. The modeling is performed using a well-known kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, which has yielded good agreement with observations at several heliospheric shocks, as have other theoretical techniques, namely hybrid plasma simulations, and numerical solution of the diffusion-conv...

  14. Numerical study of shock waves propagating through right angled multiple elbows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kage, Kazuyuki; Shiroyama, Mihoko; Ishimatsu, Katsuya

    2005-09-01

    The details of the shock propagated through the right angled multiple elbows (mainly double elbow and fourfold elbow) are investigated by the numerical study. Computations were carried out by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations by using the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme. Computations were performed for six types of elbow (two types of double elbow and four types of fourfold elbow) and two incident shock Mach numbers (Ms=1.5, 2.3). The effects of the direction and number of the bends in the stabilizing, merging and attenuating processes of the shock are numerically explored by various diagrams such as pressure contours, pressure distributions on the walls and time histories of the pressure contours, and the strength of the shock front at the location of about 20 times the length for each type of elbows was displayed.

  15. Numerical Study of Shock Waves Propagating through Right Angled Multiple Elbows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuyuki KAGE; Mihoko SHIROYAMA; Katsuya ISHIMATSU

    2005-01-01

    The details of the shock propagated through the right angled multiple elbows (mainly double elbow and fourfold elbow) are investigated by the numerical study. Computations were carried out by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations by using the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme. Computations were performed for six types of elbow (two types of double elbow and four types of fourfold elbow) and two incident shock Mach numbers (Ms=1.5, 2.3). The effects of the direction and number of the bends in the stabilizing, merging and attenuating processes of the shock are numerically explored by various diagrams such as pressure contours, pressure distributions on the walls and time histories of the pressure contours, and the strength of the shock front at the location of about 20 times the length for each type of elbows was displayed.

  16. Comparison of two different running models for the shock wave lithotripsy machine in Taipei City Hospital: self-support versus outsourcing cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Yi; Chen, Shiou-Sheng; Chen, Li-Kuei

    2009-10-01

    To compare two different running models including self-support and outsourcing cooperation for the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) machine in Taipei City Hospital, we made a retrospective study. Self-support means that the hospital has to buy an SWL machine and get all the payment from SWL. In outsourcing cooperation, the cooperative company provides an SWL machine and shares the payment with the hospital. Between January 2002 and December 2006, we used self-support for the SWL machine, and from January 2007 to December 2008, we used outsourcing cooperation. We used the method of full costing to calculate the cost of SWL, and the break-even point was the lowest number of treatment sessions of SWL to make balance of payments every month. Quality parameters including stone-free rate, retreatment rate, additional procedures and complication rate were evaluated. When outsourcing cooperation was used, there were significantly more treatment sessions of SWL every month than when utilizing self-support (36.3 +/- 5.1 vs. 48.1 +/- 8.4, P = 0.03). The cost of SWL for every treatment session was significantly higher using self-support than with outsourcing cooperation (25027.5 +/- 1789.8 NT$ vs. 21367.4 +/- 201.0 NT$). The break-even point was 28.3 (treatment sessions) for self-support, and 28.4 for outsourcing cooperation, when the hospital got 40% of the payment, which would decrease if the percentage increased. No significant differences were noticed for stone-free rate, retreatment rate, additional procedures and complication rate of SWL between the two running models. Besides, outsourcing cooperation had lower cost (every treatment session), but a greater number of treatment sessions of SWL every month than self-support.

  17. Self-excited shock oscillation in transonic diffuser flows. 1st report. Source of disturbance inducing shock unsteady motion and shock oscillation mechanisms; Sen'onsoku diffuser nagare ni okeru shogekih ano jido shindo. 1. shogekiha wo yurasu jouran no hasseigen to shindo kiko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handa, T.; Miyazato, Y.; Masuda, M.; Matsuo, K. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2000-05-25

    Mechanism of self-excited shock oscillation in two-dimensional transonic diffuser flow is investigated experimentally. The diffuser used in this work is composed of the fiat top wall and the curved bottom wall. Time-sequence of shock location is recorded by the high speed CCD camera combined with schlieren system, together with simultaneous measurements of static pressure fluctuations along the top wall. The pressure fluctuations at many locations on the side wall are also measured simultaneously. As a result, it is found that disturbances which induce shock oscillation are propagating upstream from downstream portion of the shock wave where the boundary layer behaves unsteadily and the most violently. Furthermore, vortices generated by the shock oscillation are observed to be convected downstream. The shock oscillation is explained to be sustained by the upstream-propagating disturbances and the downstream-convected vortices. (author)

  18. Constitutive nitric oxide synthase inhibition combined with histamine and serotonin receptor blockade improves the initial ovalbumin-induced arterial hypotension but decreases the survival time in brown norway rats anaphylactic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellou, Abdelouahab; Lambert, Henri; Gillois, Pierre; Montémont, Chantal; Gerard, Philippe; Vauthier, Eliane; Sainte-Laudy, Jean; Longrois, Dan; Guéant, Jean Louis; Mallié, Jean Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Anaphylactic shock accidents after allergen exposure are frequent. After immunization with ovalbumin (OVA), a common dietary constituent, we evaluated the efficacy of pretreatment with histamine-receptor or serotonin-receptor blockers administered alone or in combination with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME) on OVA-induced anaphylactic shock in Brown Norway rats. Animals were allocated to the following groups (n = 6 each): control (0.9% saline); diphenydramine (15 mg kg(-1)); cimetidine (20 mg kg(-1)); diphenydramine + cimetidine; dihydroergotamine (50 microg kg(-1)); diphenydramine + cimetidine + dihydroergotamine; L-NAME (100 mg/kg) alone or associated with diphenydramine, cimetidine, diphenydramine + cimetidine, dihydroergotamine, or diphenydramine + cimetidine + dihydroergotamine. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), heart rate (HR), and survival time were monitored for 60 min following treatment. The shock was initiated with i.v. OVA. The MABP drop after i.v. OVA was worsened by diphenydramine and was modestly attenuated by cimetidine, dihydroergotamine, or both together. L-NAME potentiated slightly the effects of cimetidine and dihydroergotamine by lessening the initial MABP decrease, but this transient effect was not sufficient to prevent the final collapse or to improve survival time. Decreased vasodilatory (prostaglandins E2), increased vasoconstrictory (thromboxane B2) prostaglandins, and unchanged leukotriene C4 concentrations were contributory to the overall hemodynamic changes. Thus, the combined blockade of vasodilator mediators (histamine, serotonin, and nitric oxide) slowed the MABP drop in anaphylactic shock, but did not improve survival. More studies are needed to understand these discordant effects.

  19. The shock tube as a device for testing transonic airfoils at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A performance analysis of gas-driven shock tubes shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers in the range of 100 million can be generated behind the primary shock in a large shock tube. A study of flow over simple airfoils has been carried out at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photos and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those observed for the airfoils in wind tunnels can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with either properly-contoured test section walls or a properly-designed slotted-wall test section. The study indicates that the shock tube is a useful facility for studying two-dimensional high Reynolds number transonic airfoil flows.

  20. Particle Acceleration at a Flare Termination Shock: Effect of Large-scale Magnetic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Fan

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the acceleration of charged particles (both electrons and protons) at collisionless shocks predicted to exist in the vicinity of solar flares. The existence of standing termination shocks has been examined by flare models and numerical simulations e.g., Shibata,Forbes. We study electron energization by numerically integrating the equations of motion of a large number of test-particle electrons in the time-dependent two-dimensional electric and magnetic fields generated from hybrid simulations (kinetic ions and fluid electron) using parameters typical of the solar flare plasma environment. The shock is produced by injecting plasma flow toward a rigid piston. Large-scale magnetic fluctuations -- known to exist in plasmas and known to have important effects on the nonthermal electron acceleration at shocks -- are also included in our simulations. For the parameters characteristic of the flaring region, our calculations suggest that the termination shock formed in the reconnection outflow region (a...

  1. Risk factors for shock in children with dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Pothapregada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate and analyze the clinical and laboratory parameters that were predictive of the development of shock in children with dengue fever. Subjects and Methods: Retrospective study carried out from August 2012 to July 2014 at a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry. Results: Two hundred and fifty-four children were admitted with dengue fever and among them dengue fever without shock was present in 159 children (62.5% and dengue fever with shock was present in 95 cases (37.4%. Various clinical and laboratory parameters were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression between the two groups and a P value of 20% with concomitant platelet count 6 years, hepatomegaly, pain in the abdomen, and oliguria were the most common risk factors associated with shock in children with dengue fever. There were six deaths (2.4% and out of them four presented with impaired consciousness (66.6% at the time of admission. Conclusion: Age >6 years, hepatomegaly, abdomen pain, and oliguria were the most common risk factors for shock in children with dengue fever. Impaired consciousness at admission was the most ominous sign for mortality in dengue fever. Hence, these features should be identified early, monitored closely, and managed timely.

  2. Risk factors for shock in children with dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothapregada, Sriram; Kamalakannan, Banupriya; Thulasingham, Mahalakshmy

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate and analyze the clinical and laboratory parameters that were predictive of the development of shock in children with dengue fever. Retrospective study carried out from August 2012 to July 2014 at a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry. Two hundred and fifty-four children were admitted with dengue fever and among them dengue fever without shock was present in 159 children (62.5%) and dengue fever with shock was present in 95 cases (37.4%). Various clinical and laboratory parameters were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression between the two groups and a P value of 20% with concomitant platelet count 6 years, hepatomegaly, pain in the abdomen, and oliguria were the most common risk factors associated with shock in children with dengue fever. There were six deaths (2.4%) and out of them four presented with impaired consciousness (66.6%) at the time of admission. Age >6 years, hepatomegaly, abdomen pain, and oliguria were the most common risk factors for shock in children with dengue fever. Impaired consciousness at admission was the most ominous sign for mortality in dengue fever. Hence, these features should be identified early, monitored closely, and managed timely.

  3. Bow shock data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipf, Edward C.; Erdman, Peeter W.

    1994-08-01

    The University of Pittsburgh Space Physics Group in collaboration with the Army Research Office (ARO) modeling team has completed a systematic organization of the shock and plume spectral data and the electron temperature and density measurements obtained during the BowShock I and II rocket flights which have been submitted to the AEDC Data Center, has verified the presence of CO Cameron band emission during the Antares engine burn and for an extended period of time in the post-burn plume, and have adapted 3-D radiation entrapment codes developed by the University of Pittsburgh to study aurora and other atmospheric phenomena that involve significant spatial effects to investigate the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) envelope surrounding the re-entry that create an extensive plasma cloud by photoionization.

  4. On physical interpretation of two dimensional time-correlations regarding time delay velocities and eddy shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorczak, N. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Manz, P. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut feur Plasmaphysik, Association Euratom-IPP, 85748Garching (Germany); Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Time delay estimation (TDE) techniques are frequently used to estimate the flow velocity from fluctuating measurements. Tilted structures carried by the flow lead to misinterpretation of the time delays in terms of velocity direction and amplitude. It affects TDE measurements from probes, and is also intrinsically important for beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging measurements. Local eddy shapes estimated from 2D fluctuating field are necessary to gain a more accurate flow estimate from TDE, as illustrated by Langmuir probe array measurements. A least square regression approach is proposed to estimate both flow field and shaping parameters. The technique is applied to a test case built from numerical simulation of interchange fluctuations. The local eddy shape does not only provide corrections for the velocity field but also quantitative information about the statistical interaction mechanisms between local eddies and E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. The technique is then tested on gaz puff imaging data collected at the edge of EAST tokamak plasmas. It is shown that poloidal asymmetries of the fluctuation fields-velocity and eddy shape-are consistent at least qualitatively with a ballooning type of turbulence immersed in a radially sheared equilibrium flow.

  5. INTERFERENCE OF COUNTERPROPAGATING SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study. We examined the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves. The necessity of counterpropagating shock waves studying occurs at designing of high Mach number modern internal compression air intakes, Ramjets with subsonic and supersonic combustion, in asymmetrical supersonic nozzles and in some other cases. In a sense, this problem is a generalization of the case of an oblique shock reflection from the wall or from the plane of symmetry. With the renewed vigor, the interest to this problem emerged at the end of the 90s. This was due to the start of the programs for flight study at hypersonic speeds. The first experiments performed with air intakes, which realized the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves have shown that the change in flow velocity is accompanied by abrupt alteration of shock-wave structure, the occurrence of nonstationary and oscillatory phenomena. With an increase of flow velocity these phenomena undesirable for aircraft structure became more marked. The reason is that there are two fundamentally different modes of interaction of counterpropagating shock waves: a four-wave regular and a five-wave irregular. The transition from one mode to another can be nonstationary abrupt or gradual, it can also be accompanied by hysteresis. Main results. Criteria for the transition from regular reflection of counterpropagating shock waves to irregular are described: the criterion of von Neumann and the stationary Mach configuration criterion. We described areas in which the transition from one reflection type to another is possible only in abrupt way, as well as areas of possible gradual transition. Intensity dependences of the reflected shock waves from the intensity of interacting counterpropagating shocks were given. Qualitative pictures of shock-wave structures arising from the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves were shown. Calculation results of the intensity of outgoing gas

  6. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papin P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. In the current work, high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to accelerate the material. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. Two constitutive strength (plasticity models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS models, were calibrated using common quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data. However, simulations with the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured experimental wave profiles. The experimental results indicate that, even if fractured by the initial shock loading, the Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading. Additional “arrested” drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  7. Shock Wave Emissions of a Sonoluminescing Bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Holzfuss, J; Billó, M; Holzfuss, Joachim; Ruggeberg, Matthias; Billo, Andreas

    1998-01-01

    A single bubble in water is excited by a standing ultrasound wave. At high intensity the bubble starts to emit light. Together with the emitted light pulse, a shock wave is generated in the liquid at collapse time. The time-dependent velocity of the outward-travelling shock is measured with an imaging technique. The pressure in the shock and in the bubble is shown to have a lower limit of 5500 bars. Visualization of the shock and the bubble at different phases of the acoustic cycle reveals previously unobserved dynamics during stable and unstable sonoluminescence.

  8. Dynamical Properties of Internal Shocks Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Pe'er, Asaf; Casella, Piergiorgio

    2016-01-01

    Internal shocks between propagating plasma shells, originally ejected at different times with different velocities are believed to play a major role in dissipating the kinetic energy, thereby explaining the observed lightcurve and spectra in a large range of transient objects. Even if initially the colliding plasmas are cold, following the first collision the plasma shells are substantially heated, implying that in a scenario of multiple collisions, most collisions take place between plasmas of non-zero temperatures. Here, we calculate the dynamical properties of plasmas resulting from collision between arbitrarily hot plasma shells, moving at arbitrary speeds. We provide simple analytical expressions valid for both the ultra-relativistic and Newtonian velocities, for both hot and cold plasmas. We derive the minimum criteria required for the formation of the two-shock wave system, and show that in the relativistic limit, the minimum Lorentz factor is proportional to the square root of the ratio of the initial...

  9. Investigation of shock-induced and shock-assisted chemical reactions in molybdenum-silicon powder mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersall, Kevin Stewart

    1999-10-01

    In this research, chemical reactions occurring in molybdenum and silicon powder mixtures under "shock-induced" (those occurring during the high-pressure shock state) and "shock-assisted" (those occurring subsequent to the shock event, but due to bulk temperature increases) conditions were investigated. Differences in the densities and yield strengths of the two constituents, in addition to the large heat of reaction associated with molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) formation can lead to shock-induced as well as shock-assisted reactions, which make this an ideal system to delineate the kinetics and mechanisms of reactions occurring in shock-compressed powder mixtures. Shock recovery experiments performed on Mo + 2 Si powder mixtures employing cylindrical implosion geometry showed thermally initiated reactions. A mixed phase eutectic type microstructure of MoSi2 and Mo 5Si3, resulting from reaction occurring due to melting of both reactants, was observed in axial regions of the cylindrical compacts. In regions surrounding the mach stem, melting of only silicon and reaction occurring via dissolution and re-precipitation forming MoSi2 spherules surrounding molybdenum particles in a melted and solidified silicon matrix was observed. The planar pressure shock recovery geometry showed a single phase MoSi2, microstructure formed due to a solid-state pressure-induced reaction process. The time-resolved instrumented experiments were performed using a single stage gas gun in the velocity range of 500 m/s to 1 km/s, and employed poly-vinyl di-flouride (PVDF) stress gauges placed at the front and rear surfaces of the powder to determine the crush strength, densification history, and reaction initiation threshold conditions. Time-resolved experiments performed on ˜58% dense Mo + 2 Si powder mixtures at input stresses less than 4 GPa, showed characteristics of powder densification and dispersed propagated wave stress profiles with rise time >˜40 nanoseconds. At input stress between

  10. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  11. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  12. Optimal monetary policy and oil price shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormilitsina, Anna

    larger drop in wages, and a rise in hours compared to those actually observed. The central finding of this Chapter is that the optimal policy is associated with a smaller drop in GDP and other macroeconomic variables. The latter results therefore confirm the claim of Bernanke, Gertler and Watson that monetary policy was to a large extent responsible for the recessions that followed the oil price shocks. However, under the optimal policy, interest rates are tightened even more than what is predicted by the empirical model. This result contrasts sharply with the claim of Bernanke, Gertler, and Watson that the Federal Reserve exacerbated recessions by the excessive tightening of interest rates in response to the oil price increases. In contrast to related studies that focus on output stabilization, I find that eliminating the negative response of GDP to an oil price shock is not desirable. In the second chapter of this dissertation, I compare two approaches to modeling energy sector. Because the share of energy in GDP is small, models of energy have been criticized for their inability to explain sizeable effects of energy price increases on the economic activity. I find that if the price of energy is an exogenous AR(1) process, then the two modeling approaches produce the responses of GDP similar in size to responses observed in most empirical studies, but fail to produce the timing and the shape of the response. DSGE framework can solve the timing and the shape of impulse responses problem, however, fails to replicate the size of the impulse responses. Thus, in DSGE frameworks, amplifying mechanisms for the effect of the energy price shock and estimation based calibration of model parameters are needed to produce the size of the GDP response to the energy price shock.

  13. Stationary one-dimensional dispersive shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V

    2011-01-01

    We address shock waves generated upon the interaction of tilted plane waves with negative refractive index defect in defocusing media with linear gain and two-photon absorption. We found that in contrast to conservative media where one-dimensional dispersive shock waves usually exist only as nonstationary objects expanding away from defect or generating beam, the competition between gain and two-photon absorption in dissipative medium results in the formation of localized stationary dispersive shock waves, whose transverse extent may considerably exceed that of the refractive index defect. One-dimensional dispersive shock waves are stable if the defect strength does not exceed certain critical value.

  14. Effect of Shock Compression Method on the Defect Substructure in Monocrystalline Copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, B Y; Meyers, M A; Lassila, D H; Schneider, M S; Kad, B K; Huang, C X; Xu, Y B; Kalantar, D H; Remington, B A

    2005-02-17

    Monocrystalline copper samples with orientations of [001] and [221] were shocked at pressures ranging from 20 GPa to 60 GPa using two techniques: direct drive lasers and explosively driven flyer plates. The pulse duration for these techniques differed substantially: 2 ns for the laser experiments and 1.1-1.4 {micro}s for the flyer-plate experiments. The residual microstructures were dependent on orientation, pressure, and shocking method. The much shorter pulse duration in laser shock yielded recovery microstructures with no or limited dislocation motion. For the flyer-plate experiments, the longer pulse duration allow shock-generated defects to reorganize into lower energy configurations. Calculations show that the post shock cooling occurs in a time scale of 0.2 s for laser shock and 1000 s for plate-impact shock, propitiating recovery and recrystallization conditions for the latter. At the higher pressure level extensive recrystallization was observed in the plate-impact samples, while it was absent in laser shock. An effect that is proposed to contribute significantly to the formation of recrystallized regions is the existence of micro-shearbands, which increase the local temperature.

  15. Two-time correlation and occupation time for the Brownian bridge and tied-down renewal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude

    2017-07-01

    Tied-down renewal processes are generalisations of the Brownian bridge, where an event (or a zero crossing) occurs both at the origin of time and at the final observation time t. We give an analytical derivation of the two-time correlation function for such processes in the Laplace space of all temporal variables. This yields the exact asymptotic expression of the correlation in the Porod regime of short separations between the two times and in the persistence regime of large separations. We also investigate other quantities, such as the backward and forward recurrence times, as well as the occupation time of the process. The latter has a broad distribution which is determined exactly. Physical implications of these results for the Poland Scheraga and related models are given. These results also give exact answers to questions posed in the past in the context of stochastically evolving surfaces.

  16. Some effects of punishment shock intensity upon discriminative responding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, R W

    1971-01-01

    Three pigeons received visual discrimination training under both multiple variable-ratio extinction and variable-interval extinction schedules. All birds developed nearly perfect discrimination. When punishment for every tenth response during food reinforcement was presented, responding decreased as shock intensity increased. At the same time, responding during extinction, which was not punished, increased at intermediate punishment intensities, but returned to low levels under severe punishment. A second procedure, in which punishment and no-punishment sessions alternated unsystematically, was employed with two of the birds. The results under this procedure essentially replicated the data obtained as punishment shock intensity increased gradually.

  17. Note: An improved driver section for a diaphragmless shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randazzo, J B; Tranter, R S

    2015-01-01

    Improvements to equipment lifetime and measurement reproducibility have been made by modifying the actuating mechanism of a diaphragmless shock tube that is used for high temperature gas kinetic studies. The modifications have two major benefits while retaining the simplicity of the original apparatus. First, the reproducibility of shock wave generation has been greatly improved and is demonstrated with 50 nearly identical experiments on the dissociation of cyclohexene at T2 = 1765 ± 13 K and P2 = 120 ± 1 Torr, demonstrating the capability for signal averaging over many experiments. Second, the lifetime of the bellows which forms the heart of the actuator is considerably improved, significantly increasing the time between replacements.

  18. Shock finding on a moving-mesh - II. Hydrodynamic shocks in the Illustris universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Kevin; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Pfrommer, Christoph; Nelson, Dylan; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodynamical shocks are a manifestation of the non-linearity of the Euler equations and play a fundamental role in cosmological gas dynamics. In this work, we identify and analyse shocks in the Illustris simulation, and contrast the results with those of non-radiative runs. We show that simulations with more comprehensive physical models of galaxy formation pose new challenges for shock finding algorithms due to radiative cooling and star-forming processes, prompting us to develop a number of methodology improvements. We find in Illustris a total shock surface area which is about 1.4 times larger at the present epoch compared to non-radiative runs, and an energy dissipation rate at shocks which is higher by a factor of around 7. Remarkably, shocks with Mach numbers above and below mathcal {M}≈ 10 contribute about equally to the total dissipation across cosmic time. This is in sharp contrast to non-radiative simulations, and we demonstrate that a large part of the difference arises due to strong black hole radio-mode feedback in Illustris. We also provide an overview of the large diversity of shock morphologies, which includes complex networks of halo-internal shocks, shocks on to cosmic sheets, feedback shocks due to black holes and galactic winds, as well as ubiquitous accretion shocks. In high-redshift systems more massive than 1012 M⊙, we discover the existence of a double accretion shock pattern in haloes. They are created when gas streams along filaments without being shocked at the outer accretion shock, but then forms a second, roughly spherical accretion shock further inside.

  19. Kinetics of shock-induced polymorphic phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, D.B.

    1976-01-01

    Shock-loading induces polymorphic phase transitions in some solids if the pressure exceeds that at which phase transition occurs under quasi-static compression. Volume changes in shock-induced transitions must occur very rapidly to produce the structured shock waves observed, so transition rates are large under these dynamic conditions. By contrast, the same transition might require minutes or hours under quasi-static loading. If shock-induced transition is so rapid that kinetic effects can be ignored, a steady two-wave structure is propagated. The first wave, of amplitude equal to the transition pressure, shocks the material to the phase boundary but produces no transition; the second, slower wave produces the transformed phase. When kinetic effects are important, this two-wave structure does not form immediately but by an evolutionary process which produces transients in the amplitudes and rise times of the stress waves. By measuring these transient effects, some facts about the kinetics of phase transitions have been inferred. Comprehensive studies on phase-transition kinetics in antimony, iron, and potassium chloride are described, with emphasis on a thermodynamic description of the intermediate states during transition. Complicating effects such as shear strength and wave perturbations due to free surfaces are discussed.

  20. Simulations of 2-shock Convergence Scan Shots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J. L.; MacLaren, S. A.; Ma, T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kyrala, G. A.; Pino, J.; Dewald, E.; Khan, S.; Sayre, D.; Ralph, J.; Turnbull, D.

    2016-10-01

    The 2-shock campaign is a joint Los Alamos/Livermore project to investigate the role of shock timing, asymmetry, and shock convergence on the performance of ignition relevant capsules. This campaign uses a simple two step pulse that makes it easier to correlate the effect of changing the laser pulse on the performance of the capsule. The 680 micron outer radius capsule has a CH +1 at% Si ablator approximately 175 microns thick surrounding a DD or HT gas region with fill densities between 0.0085 and 0.00094 g/cc. The capsules are indirectly driven inside a gold hohlraum that is 9.2 mm long by 5.75 mm in diameter. Some capsules had about 3 microns of CD on the inner surface. The CD inner surface capsules utilized HT fuel so that the DT yield arises from mixing of CD shell material into the tritium of the gas region. Our simulated results compare well to the experimental yield, ion temperature, burn width, x-ray size, convergence ratio, and radius versus time data. Work performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. A statistical study of the performance of the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry version 2 numerical model in predicting solar shock arrival times at Earth during different phases of solar cycle 23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. P. McKenna-Lawlor

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the Hakamada Akasofu-Fry, version 2 (HAFv.2 numerical model, which provides predictions of solar shock arrival times at Earth, was subjected to a statistical study to investigate those solar/interplanetary circumstances under which the model performed well/poorly during key phases (rise/maximum/decay of solar cycle 23. In addition to analyzing elements of the overall data set (584 selected events associated with particular cycle phases, subsets were formed such that those events making up a particular sub-set showed common characteristics. The statistical significance of the results obtained using the various sets/subsets was generally very low and these results were not significant as compared with the hit by chance rate (50%. This implies a low level of confidence in the predictions of the model with no compelling result encouraging its use. However, the data suggested that the success rates of HAFv.2 were higher when the background solar wind speed at the time of shock initiation was relatively fast. Thus, in scenarios where the background solar wind speed is elevated and the calculated success rate significantly exceeds the rate by chance, the forecasts could provide potential value to the customer. With the composite statistics available for solar cycle 23, the calculated success rate at high solar wind speed, although clearly above 50%, was indicative rather than conclusive. The RMS error estimated for shock arrival times for every cycle phase and for the composite sample was in each case significantly better than would be expected for a random data set. Also, the parameter "Probability of Detection, yes" (PODy which presents the Proportion of Yes observations that were correctly forecast (i.e. the ratio between the shocks correctly predicted and all the shocks observed, yielded values for the rise/maximum/decay phases of the cycle and using the composite sample of 0.85, 0.64, 0.79 and 0.77, respectively. The statistical

  2. Expansion of a shock plasma in the accelerating field of a parallel-plate capacitor in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkin, N. D.; Pomel'nikov, R. A.; Telegin, A. M.

    2014-05-01

    We have solved the problem of expansion of a multicomponent shock plasma (initiated by an impact of a fast microprojectile against a solid target) to vacuum in the electric field of a parallel-plate capacitor. The results of calculations can be used in the development of a dust impact mass spectrometer for studying the elemental composition of micrometeorites.

  3. Hemodynamic management of septic shock: is it time for "individualized goal-directed hemodynamic therapy" and for specifically targeting the microcirculation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugel, Bernd; Trepte, Constantin J; Heckel, Kai; Wagner, Julia Y; Reuter, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    Septic shock is a life-threatening condition in both critically ill medical patients and surgical patients during the perioperative phase. In septic shock, specific alterations in global cardiovascular dynamics (i.e., the macrocirculation) and in the microcirculatory blood flow (i.e., the microcirculation) have been described. However, the presence and degree of microcirculatory failure are in part independent from systemic macrohemodynamic variables. Macrocirculatory and microcirculatory failure can independently induce organ dysfunction. We review current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for the assessment and optimization of both the macrocirculation and the microcirculation in septic shock. There are various technologies for the determination of macrocirculatory hemodynamic variables. We discuss the data on early goal-directed therapy for the resuscitation of the macrocirculation. In addition, we describe the concept of "individualized goal-directed hemodynamic therapy." Technologies to assess the local microcirculation are also available. However, adequate resuscitation goals for the optimization of the microcirculation still need to be defined. At present, we are not ready to specifically monitor and target the microcirculation in clinical routine outside studies. In the future, concepts for an integrative approach for individualized hemodynamic management of the macrocirculation and in parallel the microcirculation might constitute a huge opportunity to define additional resuscitation end points in septic shock.

  4. Generation and Evolution of High-Mach-Number Laser-Driven Magnetized Collisionless Shocks in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Fox, W.; Haberberger, D.; Fiksel, G.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Barnak, D. H.; Hu, S. X.; Germaschewski, K.

    2017-07-01

    We present the first laboratory generation of high-Mach-number magnetized collisionless shocks created through the interaction of an expanding laser-driven plasma with a magnetized ambient plasma. Time-resolved, two-dimensional imaging of plasma density and magnetic fields shows the formation and evolution of a supercritical shock propagating at magnetosonic Mach number Mms≈12 . Particle-in-cell simulations constrained by experimental data further detail the shock formation and separate dynamics of the multi-ion-species ambient plasma. The results show that the shocks form on time scales as fast as one gyroperiod, aided by the efficient coupling of energy, and the generation of a magnetic barrier between the piston and ambient ions. The development of this experimental platform complements present remote sensing and spacecraft observations, and opens the way for controlled laboratory investigations of high-Mach number collisionless shocks, including the mechanisms and efficiency of particle acceleration.

  5. Effect of Thermal Shock Process in Accelerated Environment Spectrum on the Fatigue Life of 7B04-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Tengfei; LIU Daoxin; ZHANG Xiaohua; YU Shouming

    2016-01-01

    The effect of thermal shock, in an accelerated-corrosion environment spectrum, on the fatigue and corrosion behavior of 7B04-T6 aluminum alloy, was determined. The environment spectrum consists of two modules, namely: salt-spray corrosion and thermal shock. The effect of thermal shock on the mechanical properties was determined via tensile tests; SEM, DCS, and XRD were used to determine the effect of thermal shock on the corrosion products. In addition, the corrosion resistance of the products was ascertained through electrochemical testing. The results show that the mechanical properties and fatigue life of the aluminum alloy will decline with prolonged thermal shock time. The thermal shock process may result in denser surface corrosion products than those formed on the no thermal shock specimens, and transformation of some Al (OH)3 into AlOOH. AlOOH may have resulted in improved corrosion resistance and hence a lower decrease in the fatigue life after corrosion, compared with that of the no thermal shock specimen. Repeated corrosion/thermal shock may have delayed further decease in the fatigue life. Therefore, selection of an appropriate equivalent thermal shock temperature and time was essential for designing the environmental spectrum.

  6. Transient shocks beyond the heliopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, R. L.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-09-01

    The heliopause is a rich, dynamic surface affected by the time-dependent solar wind. Stream interactions due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), corotating interaction regions (CIRs), and other transient phenomena are known to merge producing global merged interaction regions (GMIRs). Numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) show that GMIRs, as well other time-dependent structures in the solar wind, may produce compression/rarefaction waves and shocks in the LISM behind the heliopause. These shocks may initiate wave activity observed by the Voyager spacecraft. The magnetometer onboard Voyager 1 indeed observed a few structures that may be interpreted as shocks. We present numerical simulations of such shocks in the year of 2000, when both Voyager spacecraft were in the supersonic solar wind region, and in 2012, when Voyager 1 observed traveling shocks. In the former case, Voyager observations themselves provide time- dependent boundary conditions in the solar wind. In the latter case, we use OMNI data at 1 AU to analyze the plasma and magnetic field behavior after Voyager 1 crossed the heliospheric boundary. Numerical results are compared with spacecraft observations.

  7. Results from laboratory tests of the two-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik; Gerling, Mark D; Le Galloudec, Nathalie Joelle

    2014-09-01

    A series of laboratory experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of two dimensional time-encoded imaging. A prototype two-dimensional time encoded imaging system was designed and constructed. Results from imaging measurements of single and multiple point sources as well as extended source distributions are presented. Time encoded imaging has proven to be a simple method for achieving high resolution two-dimensional imaging with potential to be used in future arms control and treaty verification applications.

  8. The Post-Shock Chemical Lifetimes of Outflow Tracers and a Possible New Mechanism to Produce Water Ice Mantles

    CERN Document Server

    Bergin, E A; Neufeld, D A; Bergin, Edwin A.; Melnick, Gary J.; Neufeld, David A.

    1998-01-01

    We have used a coupled time-dependent chemical and dynamical model to investigate the lifetime of the chemical legacy left in the wake of C-type shocks. We concentrate this study on the chemistry of H2O and O2, two molecules which are predicted to have abundances that are significantly affected in shock-heated gas. Two models are presented: (1) a three-stage model of pre-shock, shocked, and post-shock gas; and (2) a Monte-Carlo cloud simulation where we explore the effects of stochastic shock activity on molecular gas over a cloud lifetime. In agreement with previous studies, we find that shock velocities in excess of 10 km s^-1 are required to convert all of the oxygen not locked in CO into H2O before the gas has an opportunity to cool. For pure gas-phase models the lifetime of the high water abundances, or ``H2O legacy'', in the post-shock gas is 4 - 7 x 10^5 years. Through the Monte Carlo cloud simulation we demonstrate that the time-average abundance of H2O is a sensitive function of the frequency of shoc...

  9. Entropy Generation Across Earth's Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, George K.; McCarthy, Michael; Fu, Suiyan; Lee E. s; Cao, Jinbin; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Canu, Patrick; Dandouras, Iannis S.; Reme, Henri; Fazakerley, Andrew; Lin, Naiguo; Wilber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Earth's bow shock is a transition layer that causes an irreversible change in the state of plasma that is stationary in time. Theories predict entropy increases across the bow shock but entropy has never been directly measured. Cluster and Double Star plasma experiments measure 3D plasma distributions upstream and downstream of the bow shock that allow calculation of Boltzmann's entropy function H and his famous H-theorem, dH/dt O. We present the first direct measurements of entropy density changes across Earth's bow shock. We will show that this entropy generation may be part of the processes that produce the non-thermal plasma distributions is consistent with a kinetic entropy flux model derived from the collisionless Boltzmann equation, giving strong support that solar wind's total entropy across the bow shock remains unchanged. As far as we know, our results are not explained by any existing shock models and should be of interests to theorists.

  10. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF A SODA LIME GLASS THERMAL SHOCK RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert FANTOZZI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Comparatively to the as received soda lime glass samples, the strength distribution after thermal shocks showed the appearance of a second branch in the Weibull curves. This branch is observed for temperature differences (ΔT equal or higher than the critical temperature difference (ΔTc for both water and motor oil cooling baths. The dispersion is more spread out in these two baths in comparison with the olive oil bath probably because of more pronounced slow crack growth effect. The Weibull modulus varies according to the used cooling bath and the considered temperature difference. In the case of thermal shock caused by air blast cooling at T = 20°C, a bimodal distribution is observed for only the critical state. The initial cracking time, obtained by acoustic emission, corresponds to the unstable propagation of the most critical defect. The number of cracks induced by thermal shock is proportional to the number of acoustic events.

  11. Shock experiments in metals and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, G.T. III.

    1990-01-01

    Shock recovery and spallation experiments, in which material structure/property effects are systematically varied and characterized quantitatively, offer two important experimental techniques to probe the physical mechanisms controlling shock processes and dynamic fracture. This paper highlights the current state of knowledge and principal challenges of the structure/property effects of shock-wave deformation on metals and ceramics. Recent shock-recovery and spallation experimental results on post-mortem material properties and fracture behavior in metals and ceramics are reviewed. Finally, the influence of shock-wave deformation on several intermetallics and a recent experiment examining the Bauschinger effect in Al-4% Cu during shock loading are presented. 65 refs., 6 figs.

  12. A miniature high repetition rate shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, R S; Lynch, P T

    2013-09-01

    A miniature high repetition rate shock tube with excellent reproducibility has been constructed to facilitate high temperature, high pressure, gas phase experiments at facilities such as synchrotron light sources where space is limited and many experiments need to be averaged to obtain adequate signal levels. The shock tube is designed to generate reaction conditions of T > 600 K, P shock waves with predictable characteristics are created, repeatably. Two synchrotron-based experiments using this apparatus are also briefly described here, demonstrating the potential of the shock tube for research at synchrotron light sources.

  13. Entropy Production and Admissibility of Shocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tai-Ping Liu; Tommaso Ruggeri

    2003-01-01

    In shock wave theory there are two considerations in selecting the physically relevant shock waves.There is the admissibility criterion for the well-posedness of hyperbolic conservation laws. Another consideration concerns the entropy production across the shocks. The latter is natural from the physical point of view, but is not sufficient in its straightforward formulation, if the system is not genuinely nonlinear. In this paper we propose the principles of increasing entropy production and that of the superposition of shocks. These principles are shown to be equivalent to the admissibility criterion.

  14. Treatment Outcomes of Corticosteroid Injection and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy as Two Primary Therapeutic Methods for Acute Plantar Fasciitis: A Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Karimi Mobarakeh, Mahmoud; Hassanzadeh, Zabihallah; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Asadi, Kamran; Ettehad, Hossein; Hashemi-Motlagh, Keyvan; Saheb-Ekhtiari, Khashayar; Fallah-Alipour, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of corticosteroid injection (CSI) and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) as primary treatment of acute plantar fasciitis has been debated. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of CSI and ESWT in patients with acute ( .05). Both ESWT and CSI can be used as the primary and/or initial treatment option for treating patients with acute plantar fasciitis; however, the CSI technique had better therapeutic outcomes.

  15. Green governance - one solution for two problems? : climate change and economic shocks ; risk perceptions and coping strategies in China, India and Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This collection of papers is based on an international workshop held in the summer of 2009 at the University of Duisburg-Essen. It brings together different perceptions regarding China, India and Bangladesh as they face the risks and crises of climate change and economic shocks like the recent global financial crisis. The papers reflect assumptions concerning the concept of Risk Society and discuss the extent to which Sustainable Development and the rather new concepts of Green Governance, Gr...

  16. Cosmic-ray acceleration during the impact of shocks on dense clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung

    1993-01-01

    In order to elucidate the properties of diffusive shock acceleration in nonuniform environments, an extensive set of simulations of the dynamical interactions between plane nonradiative shocks and dense gas clouds was carried out initially in static equilibrium with their environments. These time-dependent calculations are based on the two-fluid model for diffusive cosmic ray transport, and include the dynamically active energetic proton component of the cosmic rays as well as passive electron and magnetic field components. Except when the incident shock is itself already dominated by cosmic ray pressure, it is found that the presence of the cloud adds little to the net acceleration efficiency of the original shock and can, in fact, reduce slightly the net amount of energy transferred to cosmic rays after a given time. It is found that, in 2D cloud simulations, the always-weak bow shock and the shock inside the cloud are less important to acceleration during the interaction than the tail shock.

  17. Shock-driven Accretion in Circumplanetary Disks: Observables and Satellite Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Stone, James M

    2016-01-01

    Circumplanetary disks (CPDs) control the growth of planets, supply material for satellites to form, and provide observational signatures of young forming planets. We have carried out two dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with radiative cooling to study CPDs, and suggested a new mechanism to drive the disk accretion. Two spiral shocks are present in CPDs, excited by the central star. We find that spiral shocks can at least contribute to, if not dominate the angular momentum transport and energy dissipation in CPDs. Meanwhile, dissipation and heating by spiral shocks have a positive feedback on shock-driven accretion itself. As the disk is heated up by spiral shocks, the shocks become more open, leading to more efficient angular momentum transport. This shock driven accretion is, on the other hand, unsteady on a timescale of months/years due to production and destruction of vortices in disks. After being averaged over time, a quasi-steady accretion is reached from the planet's Hill radius all the way to th...

  18. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a flat interface subjected to a rippled shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liyong; Liu, Jinhong; Liao, Shenfei; Zheng, Xianxu; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability of a nominally flat interface (N2/SF6 ) subjected to a rippled shock, as the counterpart of a corrugated interface interacting with a planar shock, is studied experimentally in a vertical shock tube using both schlieren photography and fog visualization diagnostics. The nonplanar incident shock wave is produced by a planar shock diffracting around a rigid cylinder, and the flat interface is created by a membraneless technique. Three different distances η (the ratio of spacing from cylinder to interface over cylinder diameter) are considered. Schlieren images indicate that the nonplanar incident shock can be divided into three different segments separated by two triple points. Fog visualization pictures show the formation of overall "Λ " shaped interface structures and a N2 cavity at the center and two interface steps at both sides. With the increase of the dimensionless time, the dimensionless interface amplitude increases as well as the penetration depth of the cavity, and both curves exhibit reasonable collapse for different η numbers. Through equating the preinterface perturbation of the rippled shock with a preshock perturbation of a corrugated interface, the growth rate of this instability is found to be noticeably smaller than that of the standard RM instability.

  19. Properties of post-shock solar wind deduced from geomagnetic indices responses after sudden impulses

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shock plays a key role in causing the global dynamic changes of the geospace environment. For the perspective of Solar-Terrestrial relationship, it will be of great importance to estimate the properties of post-shock solar wind simply and accurately. Motivated by this, we performed a statistical analysis of IP shocks during 1998-2008, focusing on the significantly different responses of two well-used geomagnetic indices (SYMH and AL) to the passive of two types of IP shocks. For the IP shocks with northward IMF (91 cases), the SYMH index keeps on the high level after the sudden impulses (SI) for a long time. Meanwhile, the change of AL index is relative small, with an mean value of only -29 nT. However, for the IP shocks with southward IMF (92 cases), the SYMH index suddenly decreases at a certain rate after SI, and the change of AL index is much significant, of -316 nT. Furthermore, the change rate of SYMH index after SI is found to be linearly correlated with the post-shock reconnection ...

  20. Material ejection from shock-loaded free surfaces of aluminum and lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asay, J.R.

    1976-10-01

    A discussion is presented regarding interferometer experiments conducted on free surfaces which are impulsively loaded with high amplitude shock waves. It is shown that material ejection from shocked surfaces can significantly degrade interferometer experiments. In particular, loss of both light intensity and contrast of interferometer signals can result from various scattering and absorption processes occurring in a cloud of ejected material. An experimental technique is presented which allows determination of the mass and velocity of material ejected from free surfaces during shock loading. The technique has been applied to a study of mass ejection occurring naturally from shocked surfaces of two aluminium alloys and from lead. These results show that the total ejected mass ranges from a few ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ in the aluminum alloys studied to a few mg/cm/sup 2/ in lead, for shock pressures ranging from about 10 to 50 GPa (100 to 500 kbar). Surface defects, such as pits and scratches, are thought to strongly influence mass ejection in aluminum; whereas in lead, localized shock-induced melting and vaporization are thought to be the dominant mechanisms at the higher shock pressures. Experimental results are also presented for aluminum surfaces which contain artificial defects in the form of wedge-shaped cavities. These results show that the maximum ejecta velocities of approximately two to four times the free surface velocity which are observed in these experiments can be correlated with predictions of steady jetting theory.

  1. Simulations and experiments of ejecta generation in twice-shocked metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkhanis, Varad; Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Buttler, William; Hammerberg, James; Cherne, Frank; Andrews, Malcolm

    2016-11-01

    Using continuum hydrodynamics embedded in the FLASH code, we model ejecta generation in recent target experiments, where a metallic surface was loaded by two successive shock waves. The experimental data were obtained from a two-shockwave, high-explosive tool at Los Alamos National Laboratory, capable of generating ejecta from a shocked tin surface in to a vacuum. In both simulations and experiment, linear growth is observed following the first shock event, while the second shock strikes a finite-amplitude interface leading to nonlinear growth. The timing of the second incident shock was varied systematically in our simulations to realize a finite-amplitude re-initialization of the RM instability driving the ejecta. We find the shape of the interface at the event of second shock is critical in determining the amount of ejecta, and thus must be used as an initial condition to evaluate subsequent ejected mass using a source model. In particular, the agreement between simulations, experiments and the mass model is improved when shape effects associated with the interface at second shock are incorporated. This work was supported in part by the (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA2-5396.

  2. Effects of tandem and colliding shock waves on the initiation of triaminotrinitrobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, Craig M.; Urtiew, Paul A.; Tao, William C.

    1995-09-01

    The shock initiation of the insensitive high-explosive LX-17, which contains 92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene and 7.5% Kel-F binder, was studied under simulated accident conditions in which two shock waves interact producing locally high pressures and temperatures. Two experimental geometries were studied using embedded manganin pressure gauges to measure the increases in pressure due to exothermic reaction at various locations as functions of time. These pressure histories were compared to ignition and growth reactive flow model calculations to determine whether a second shock compression of reacting LX-17 caused unusually rapid reaction rates and thus more extreme hazards. One experiment used a tandem flyer plate of aluminum and steel separated by a gap to shock the LX-17 charge, allow it to rarify, and then reshock the damaged charge to even higher pressures. These experiments revealed no significant enhancement of the LX-17 reaction rates under this shock, rarefaction, and reshock loading. The second experiment used a grooved flyer plate to produce a subcritical shock wave in LX-17, which then diverged and collided, producing a Mach stem interaction at the charge axis. The threshold conditions under which the Mach stem grew to detonation were measured. The standard LX-17 ignition and growth model yielded excellent agreement with the pressure gauge records in the Mach stem interaction region. The formation of Mach stem interactions by nearly simultaneous multiple high-velocity impacts was identified as a serious shock initiation hazard for heterogeneous solid explosives.

  3. THEORY AND EXPERIMENT ON THE VISCOUS HEATING OF FLUID DAMPER UNDER SHOCK ENVIRONMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Deying; ZHANG Zhiyi; WANG Gongxian; HUA Hongxing; WANG Yu

    2008-01-01

    A specially designed fluid damper used as negative shock pulse generator in the shock resistance test system to dissipate the shock input energy in transient time duration is presented. The theoretical modeling based on the three-dimensional equation of heat transfer through a fluid element is created to predict the viscous heating in the fluid damper under shock conditions. A comprehensive experimental program that investigates the problem of viscous heating in the fluid damper under different shock conditions is conducted on the shock test machine to validate the analytical expression. Temperature histories for the fluid within the damper at two locations, the annular-orifice and the-end-of stroke of the damper, are recorded. The experimental results show that the theoretical model can offer a very dependable prediction for the temperature histories in the damper for increasing input velocity. The theoretical model and experimental data both clearly indicate that the viscous heating in the damper is directly related to the maximum shock velocity input and the pressure between the two sides of the piston head.

  4. The influence of incident shock Mach number on radial incident shock wave focusing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to investigate radial incident shock focusing on a test section where the planar incident shock wave was divided into two identical ones. A conventional shock tube was used to generate the planar shock. Incident shock Mach number of 1.51, 1.84 and 2.18 were tested. CCD camera was used to obtain the schlieren photos of the flow field. Third-order, three step strong-stability-preserving (SSP Runge-Kutta method, third-order weighed essential non-oscillation (WENO scheme and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR algorithm were adopted to simulate the complicated flow fields characterized by shock wave interaction. Good agreement between experimental and numerical results was observed. Complex shock wave configurations and interactions (such as shock reflection, shock-vortex interaction and shock focusing were observed in both the experiments and numerical results. Some new features were observed and discussed. The differences of structure of flow field and the variation trends of pressure were compared and analyzed under the condition of different Mach numbers while shock wave focusing.

  5. Shock machine for the mechanical behaviour of hip prostheses: a description of performance capabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Uribe, Juliana; Forest, Bernard; 10.1002/ls.167

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the behaviour of a shock machine designed for testing hip prostheses. A microseparation between head and cup occurs inducing a shock of several times the body weight, leading to fracture of ceramic femoral components. Femoral heads and cups of diameter 32 mm manufactured from alumina were tested in dry and wet conditions. Implants were subjected to shocks with a load profile of 9 kN load at 2 Hz and various microseparations. Position is monitored and force is measured with two acquisition systems. The working range and the device capabilities were investigated. Only cups tested in dry conditions failed. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed intergranular and transgranular fractures. Two wear stripes were observed on the heads. Three-dimensional roughness of wear stripes was measured. Since experimental results are in good agreement with retrieved femoral heads, the shocks machine reproduces the in vivo degradations.

  6. [Toxic shock syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyll, T; Bílková, M; Revinová, A; Müller, M; Čurdová, M; Zlámal, M; Holub, M

    2015-10-01

    The authors present an up-to-date review of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) - a life-threatening condition where toxins of the Gram-positive bacteria Staphyloccocus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes play a key role in the pathogenesis. The authors provide insight into the epidemiology and pathogenesis of the disease and point out the relevant patient history data and clinical signs and symptoms that may indicate progression of TSS. Last but not least, the state of the art diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to early and full blown TSS are summarized. Case reports are presented to illustrate two different etiological forms of this relatively rare nosological entity.

  7. Effects of dry aging of bone-in and boneless strip loins using two aging processes for two aging times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeer, S L; Hunt, M C; Bratcher, C L; Crozier-Dodson, B A; Johnson, D E; Stika, J F

    2009-12-01

    This experiment investigated the combined effects of two dry-aging methods (unpackaged and in a bag), two loin-cut styles (bone-in shell loins and boneless strip loins), and two aging times (21 and 28days) on the physical, chemical, sensory, and microbial properties of dry-aged beef. Sections from shell and strip loin were assigned randomly to be aged unpackaged or aged packaged in a bag with high moisture permeability. Weight losses increased with aging time. Shell loins lost more (Pdry aging in a bag had less (P0.05) in any of the sensory traits between shell and strip loins or dry aging using a traditional method or in a bag. Dry aging in a bag creates positive effects on yields, no negative effects on product quality, and adds flexibility and control of the aging environment.

  8. Numerical simulation of converging shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Seokjune; Abe, Kanji

    We can achieve the high pressure and high temperature state of gas if the shock wave converges stably. In order to check the stability of the converging shock wave, we introduce two kinds of perturbed initial conditions. The Euler equations of conservation form are integrated by using explicit Non-Muscl TVD finite difference scheme.

  9. Fast radiation mediated shocks and supernova shock breakouts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Boaz; Waxman, Eli

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple analytic model for the structure of non-relativistic and relativistic radiation mediated shocks. At shock velocities \\beta_s\\equiv v_s/c\\gtrsim 0.1, the shock transition region is far from thermal equilibrium, since the transition crossing time is too short for the production of a black-body photon density (by Bremsstrahlung emission). In this region, electrons and photons (and positrons) are in Compton (pair) equilibrium at temperatures T_s significantly exceeding the far downstream temperature, T_s\\gg T_d\\approx 2(\\varepsilon n_u \\hbar^3c^3)^{1/4}. T_s\\gtrsim 10 keV is reached at shock velocities \\beta_s\\approx 0.2. At higher velocities, \\beta_s\\gtrsim0.6, the plasma is dominated in the transition region by e^\\pm pairs and 60 keV\\lesssim T_s \\lesssim 200 keV. We argue that the spectrum emitted during the breaking out of supernova shocks from the stellar envelopes (or the surrounding winds) of Blue Super Giants and Wolf-Rayet stars, which reach \\beta_s>0.1 for reasonable stellar parameter...

  10. Imaginary time propagation code for large-scale two-dimensional eigenvalue problems in magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We present a code for solving the single-particle, time-independent Schr\\"odinger equation in two dimensions. Our program utilizes the imaginary time propagation (ITP) algorithm, and it includes the most recent developments in the ITP method: the arbitrary order operator factorization and the exact inclusion of a (possibly very strong) magnetic field. Our program is able to solve thousands of eigenstates of a two-dimensional quantum system in reasonable time with commonly available hardware. ...

  11. Accuracy of early rapid ultrasound in shock (RUSH examination performed by emergency physician for diagnosis of shock etiology in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Ghane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rapid Ultrasound in Shock (RUSH is a recently reported emergency ultrasound protocol designed to help clinicians better recognize distinctive shock etiologies in a short time. We tried to evaluate the accuracy of early RUSH protocol performed by emergency physicians to predict the shock type in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: Our prospective study was approved by the ethics committee of trauma research center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Science, Iran. We enrolled 52 patients with shock state in the emergency department from April 2013 to October 2013. We performed early bed-side sonographic examination for participants based on RUSH protocol. Patients received all needed standard therapeutic and diagnostic interventions without delay and were followed to document their final diagnosis. Agreement (Kappa index of initial impression provided by RUSH with final diagnosis, and also sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV of RUSH for diagnosis of each shock type were calculated. Results: Fifty-two patients were enrolled in our study. Kappa index was 0.7 (P value = 0.000, reflecting acceptable general agreement between initial impression and final diagnosis. For hypovolemic and obstructive shocks, the protocol had sensitivity of 100% but had lower PPV. For shocks with distributive or mixed etiology, RUSH showed PPV of 100% but had low sensitivity. For cardiogenic shocks, all reliability indices were above 90%. Conclusion: We highlight the role of RUSH examination in the hands of an emergency physician in making a rapid diagnosis of shock etiology, especially in ruling out obstructive, cardiogenic, and hypovolemic types.

  12. Improved shock-detection pin arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    Shockwave speeds are often measured by comparing arrival times at the tips of electrical shorting pins in a hexagonal array over two elevations (called up and down). In the conventional arrangement, the center pin is solely responsible for measuring the curvature of the wavefront. Without this datum the shock speed cannot be precisely determined. In some experiments this pin fail frequently enough to be a problem. We report a simple rearrangement between up and down designated pins which eliminates the critical reliance on a single.

  13. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION AT COSMOLOGICAL SHOCK WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyesung [Department of Earth Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dongsu, E-mail: kang@uju.es.pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-10

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large-scale structure of the universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfvenic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and acceleration efficiency. In our DSA model, the CR acceleration efficiency is determined mainly by the sonic Mach number M{sub s} , while the MFA factor depends on the Alfvenic Mach number and the degree of shock modification by CRs. We show that at strong CR modified shocks, if scattering centers drift with an effective Alfven speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum is steepened and the acceleration efficiency is reduced significantly, compared to the cases without such effects. As a result, the postshock CR pressure saturates roughly at {approx}20% of the shock ram pressure for strong shocks with M{sub s} {approx}> 10. In the test-particle regime (M{sub s} {approx}< 3), it is expected that the magnetic field is not amplified and the Alfvenic drift effects are insignificant, although relevant plasma physical processes at low Mach number shocks remain largely uncertain.

  14. Two-time Green's functions and spectral density method in nonextensive quantum statistical mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Cavallo, A.; Cosenza, F.; De Cesare, L.

    2007-01-01

    We extend the formalism of the thermodynamic two-time Green's functions to nonextensive quantum statistical mechanics. Working in the optimal Lagrangian multipliers representation, the $q$-spectral properties and the methods for a direct calculation of the two-time $q$% -Green's functions and the related $q$-spectral density ($q$ measures the nonextensivity degree) for two generic operators are presented in strict analogy with the extensive ($q=1$) counterpart. Some emphasis is devoted to the...

  15. Fermi acceleration at fast shock in a solar flare and impulsive loop-top hard X-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuneta, S; Tsuneta, Saku; Naito, Tsuguya

    1998-01-01

    We propose that non-thermal electrons are efficiently accelerated by first-order Fermi process at the fast shock, as a natural consequence of the new magnetohydrodynamic picture of the flaring region revealed with Yohkoh. An oblique fast shock is naturally formed below the reconnection site, and boosts the acceleration to significantly decrease the injection energy. The slow shocks attached to the reconnection X-point heat the plasma up to 10--20 MK, exceeding the injection energy. The combination of the oblique shock configuration and the pre-heating by the slow shock allows bulk electron acceleration from the thermal pool. The accelerated electrons are trapped between the two slow shocks due to the magnetic mirror downstream of the fast shock, thus explaining the impulsive loop-top hard X-ray source discovered with Yohkoh. Acceleration time scale is ~ 0.3--0.6 s, which is consistent with the time scale of impulsive bursts. When these electrons stream away from the region enclosed by the fast shock and the s...

  16. Sub-photospheric, radiation mediated shocks in GRBs: Multiple shock emission and the Band spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Keren, Shai

    2014-01-01

    We compute the time integrated, thermal emission produced by a series of radiation mediated shocks that emerge from the photosphere of a GRB outflow. We show that for a sufficiently broad distribution of shock strengths, the overall shape of the time integrated spectral energy distribution below the peak is a power law, $\

  17. Whistler Waves Associated with Weak Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Kajdic, P.; Jian,, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of 98 weak interplanetary shocks measured by the dual STEREO spacecraft over approximately 3 years during the past solar minimum. We study the occurrence of whistler waves associated with these shocks, which on average are high beta shocks (0.2 whistler waves can extend up to 100,000 km in the upstream region but in most cases (88%) are contained in a distance within 30,000 km from the shock. This corresponds to a larger region with upstream whistlers associated with IP shocks than previously reported in the literature. The maximum amplitudes of the waves are observed next to the shock interface, and they decrease as the distance to the shock increases. In most cases the wave propagation direction becomes more aligned with the magnetic field as the distance to the shock increases. These two facts suggest that most of the waves in the upstream region are Landau damping as they move away from the shock. From the analysis we also conclude that it is likely that the generation mechanism of the upstream whistler waves is taking place at the shock interface. In the downstream region, the waves are irregularly polarized, and the fluctuations are very compressive; that is, the compressive component of the wave clearly dominates over the transverse one. The majority of waves in the downstream region (95%) propagate at oblique angles with respect to the ambient magnetic field (>60 deg.). The wave propagation with respect to the shock-normal direction has no preferred direction and varies similarly to the upstream case. It is possible that downstream fluctuations are generated by ion relaxation as suggested in previous hybrid simulation shocks.

  18. Phase-step calibration technique based on a two-run-times-two-frame phase-shift method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xianghong

    2006-12-10

    A novel phase-step calibration technique is presented on the basis of a two-run-times-two-frame phase-shift method. First the symmetry factor M is defined to describe the distribution property of the distorted phase due to phase-shifter miscalibration; then the phase-step calibration technique, in which two sets of two interferograms with a straight fringe pattern are recorded and the phase step is obtained by calculating M of the wrapped phase map, is developed. With this technique, a good mirror is required, but no uniform illumination is needed and no complex mathematical operation is involved. This technique can be carried out in situ and is applicable to any phase shifter, whether linear or nonlinear.

  19. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana; Pasternak Janko; Milovanović Stanislav; Ivanov Dejan; Milić Saša

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella pre...

  20. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.