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Sample records for twist helicopter rotor

  1. Integral Twist Actuation of Helicopter Rotor Blades for Vibration Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, SangJoon; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2001-01-01

    Active integral twist control for vibration reduction of helicopter rotors during forward flight is investigated. The twist deformation is obtained using embedded anisotropic piezocomposite actuators. An analytical framework is developed to examine integrally-twisted blades and their aeroelastic response during different flight conditions: frequency domain analysis for hover, and time domain analysis for forward flight. Both stem from the same three-dimensional electroelastic beam formulation with geometrical-exactness, and axe coupled with a finite-state dynamic inflow aerodynamics model. A prototype Active Twist Rotor blade was designed with this framework using Active Fiber Composites as the actuator. The ATR prototype blade was successfully tested under non-rotating conditions. Hover testing was conducted to evaluate structural integrity and dynamic response. In both conditions, a very good correlation was obtained against the analysis. Finally, a four-bladed ATR system is built and tested to demonstrate its concept in forward flight. This experiment was conducted at NASA Langley Tansonic Dynamics Tunnel and represents the first-of-a-kind Mach-scaled fully-active-twist rotor system to undergo forward flight test. In parallel, the impact upon the fixed- and rotating-system loads is estimated by the analysis. While discrepancies are found in the amplitude of the loads under actuation, the predicted trend of load variation with respect to its control phase correlates well. It was also shown, both experimentally and numerically, that the ATR blade design has the potential for hub vibratory load reduction of up to 90% using individual blade control actuation. Using the numerical framework, system identification is performed to estimate the harmonic transfer functions. The linear time-periodic system can be represented by a linear time-invariant system under the three modes of blade actuation: collective, longitudinal cyclic, and lateral cyclic. A vibration

  2. Design optimization for active twist rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Ji Won

    This dissertation introduces the process of optimizing active twist rotor blades in the presence of embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. Optimum design of active twist blades is a complex task, since it involves a rich design space with tightly coupled design variables. The study presents the development of an optimization framework for active helicopter rotor blade cross-sectional design. This optimization framework allows for exploring a rich and highly nonlinear design space in order to optimize the active twist rotor blades. Different analytical components are combined in the framework: cross-sectional analysis (UM/VABS), an automated mesh generator, a beam solver (DYMORE), a three-dimensional local strain recovery module, and a gradient based optimizer within MATLAB. Through the mathematical optimization problem, the static twist actuation performance of a blade is maximized while satisfying a series of blade constraints. These constraints are associated with locations of the center of gravity and elastic axis, blade mass per unit span, fundamental rotating blade frequencies, and the blade strength based on local three-dimensional strain fields under worst loading conditions. Through pre-processing, limitations of the proposed process have been studied. When limitations were detected, resolution strategies were proposed. These include mesh overlapping, element distortion, trailing edge tab modeling, electrode modeling and foam implementation of the mesh generator, and the initial point sensibility of the current optimization scheme. Examples demonstrate the effectiveness of this process. Optimization studies were performed on the NASA/Army/MIT ATR blade case. Even though that design was built and shown significant impact in vibration reduction, the proposed optimization process showed that the design could be improved significantly. The second example, based on a model scale of the AH-64D Apache blade, emphasized the capability of this framework to

  3. Aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotor blades with time-variable, non-linear structural twist and multiple structural redundancy: Mathematical derivation and program user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The differential equations of motion for the lateral and torsional deformations of a nonlinearly twisted rotor blade in steady flight conditions together with those additional aeroelastic features germane to composite bearingless rotors are derived. The differential equations are formulated in terms of uncoupled (zero pitch and twist) vibratory modes with exact coupling effects due to finite, time variable blade pitch and, to second order, twist. Also presented are derivations of the fully coupled inertia and aerodynamic load distributions, automatic pitch change coupling effects, structural redundancy characteristics of the composite bearingless rotor flexbeam - torque tube system in bending and torsion, and a description of the linearized equations appropriate for eigensolution analyses. Three appendixes are included presenting material appropriate to the digital computer program implementation of the analysis, program G400.

  4. Blade tip vortex measurements on actively twisted rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauknecht, André; Ewers, Benjamin; Schneider, Oliver; Raffel, Markus

    2017-05-01

    Active rotor control concepts, such as active twist actuation, have the potential to effectively reduce the noise and vibrations of helicopter rotors. The present study focuses on the experimental investigation of active twist for the reduction of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) effects on a model rotor. Results of a large-scale smart-twisting active rotor test under hover conditions are described. This test investigated the effects of individual blade twist control on the blade tip vortices. The rotor blades were actuated with peak torsion amplitudes of up to 2° and harmonic frequencies of 1-5/rev with different phase angles. Time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry was carried out to study the effects of active twist on the strength and trajectories of the tip vortices between ψ _ {v}= 3.6° and 45.7° of vortex age. The analysis of the vortex trajectories revealed that the 1/rev active twist actuation mainly caused a vertical deflection of the blade tip and the corresponding vortex trajectories of up to 1.3% of the rotor radius R above and -1%R below the unactuated condition. An actuation with frequencies of 2 and 3/rev significantly affected the shapes of the vortex trajectories and caused negative vertical displacements of the vortices relative to the unactuated case of up to 2%R within the first 35° of wake age. The 2 and 3/rev actuation also had the most significant effects on the vortex strength and altered the initial peak swirl velocity by up to -34 and +31% relative to the unactuated value. The present aerodynamic investigation reveals a high control authority of the active twist actuation on the strength and trajectories of the trailing blade tip vortices. The magnitude of the evoked changes indicates that the active twist actuation constitutes an effective measure for the mitigation of BVI-induced noise on helicopters.

  5. Pneumatic boot for helicopter rotor deicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, B. J.; Evanich, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    Pneumatic deicer boots for helicopter rotor blades were tested. The tests were conducted in the 6 by 9 ft icing research tunnel on a stationary section of a UH-IH helicopter main rotor blade. The boots were effective in removing ice and in reducing aerodynamic drag due to ice.

  6. Smart helicopter rotors optimization and piezoelectric vibration control

    CERN Document Server

    Ganguli, Ranjan; Viswamurthy, Sathyamangalam Ramanarayanan

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the properties of piezoelectric materials to minimize vibration in rotor-blade actuators, this book demonstrates the potential of smart helicopter rotors to achieve the smoothness of ride associated with jet-engined, fixed-wing aircraft. Vibration control is effected using the concepts of trailing-edge flaps and active-twist. The authors’ optimization-based approach shows the advantage of multiple trailing-edge flaps and algorithms for full-authority control of dual trailing-edge-flap actuators are presented. Hysteresis nonlinearity in piezoelectric stack actuators is highlighted and compensated by use of another algorithm. The idea of response surfaces provides for optimal placement of trailing-edge flaps. The concept of active twist involves the employment of piezoelectrically induced shear actuation in rotating beams. Shear is then demonstrated for a thin-walled aerofoil-section rotor blade under feedback-control vibration minimization. Active twist is shown to be significant in reducing vibra...

  7. Helicopter Rotor Blade Monitoring using Autonomous Wireless Sensor Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Ramirez, Andrea; Loendersloot, Richard; Tinga, Tiedo; Basu, B.

    2013-01-01

    The advancement on Wireless Sensor Networks for vibration monitoring presents important possibilities for helicopter rotor health and usage monitoring. While main rotor blades account for the main source of lift for helicopters, rotor induced vibration establishes an important source for

  8. Valve-aided twisted Savonius rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaya Rajkumar, M.; Saha, U.K.

    2006-05-15

    Accessories, such as end plates, deflecting plates, shielding and guide vanes, may increase the power of a Savonius rotor, but make the system structurally complex. In such cases, the rotor can develop a relatively large torque at small rotational speeds and is cheap to build, however it harnesses only a small fraction of the incident wind energy. Another proposition for increasing specific output is to place non-return valves inside the concave side of the blades. Such methods have been studied experimentally with a twisted-blade Thus improving a Savonius rotor's energy capture. This new concept has been named as the 'Valve-Aided Twisted Savonius'rotor. Tests were conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel to evaluate performance. This mechanism is found to be independent of flow direction, and shows potential for large machines. [Author].

  9. Helicopter Rotor Blade Monitoring using Autonomous Wireless Sensor Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Ramirez, Andrea; Loendersloot, Richard; Tinga, Tiedo; Basu, B.

    2013-01-01

    The advancement on Wireless Sensor Networks for vibration monitoring presents important possibilities for helicopter rotor health and usage monitoring. While main rotor blades account for the main source of lift for helicopters, rotor induced vibration establishes an important source for understandi

  10. Identification of helicopter rotor dynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molusis, J. A.; Bar-Shalom, Y.; Warmbrodt, W.

    1983-01-01

    A recursive, extended Kalman-filter approach is applied to the identifiction of rotor damping levels of representative helicopter dynamic systems. The general formulation of the approach is presented in the context of a typically posed stochastic estimation problem, and the method is analytically applied to determining the damping levels of a coupled rotor-body system. The identified damping covergence characteristics are studied for sensitivity to both constant-coefficient and periodic-coefficient measurement models, process-noise covariance levels, and specified initial estimates of the rotor-system damping. A second application of the method to identifying the plant model for a highly damped, isolated flapping blade with a constant-coefficient state model (hover) and a periodic-coefficient state model (forward flight) is also investigated. The parameter-identification capability is evaluated for the effect of periodicity on the plant model coefficients and the influence of different measurement noise levels.

  11. A VORTEX MODEL OF A HELICOPTER ROTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin BUTOESCU

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A vortex model of a helicopter rotor is presented. Each blade of the rotor has three degrees of freedom: flapping, lagging and feathering. The motions after each degree of freedom are also known for all blades. The blade is modelled as a thin vortex surface. The wakes are free fluid surfaces. A system of five equations are obtained: the first one is the integral equation of the lifting surface (rotor, the next three describe the wakes motion, and the last one relates the vortex strength on the wakes and the variation of vorticity on the rotor. A numerical solution of this system is presented. To avoid the singularities that can occur due to the complexity of vortex system, a desingularized model of the vortex core was adopted. A Mathcad worksheet containing the method has been written.The original contribution of the work. The calculation method of the motion of the wakes free vortex system, the development of the vortex cores in time and a new method to approximate the aerodynamic influence of remoted wake regions.

  12. On the performance analysis of Savonius rotor with twisted blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, U.K.; Rajkumar, M. Jaya [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati-781 039 (India)

    2006-09-15

    The present investigation is aimed at exploring the feasibility of twisted bladed Savonius rotor for power generation. The twisted blade in a three-bladed rotor system has been tested in a low speed wind tunnel, and its performance has been compared with conventional semicircular blades (with twist angle of 0{sup o}). Performance analysis has been made on the basis of starting characteristics, static torque and rotational speed. Experimental evidence shows the potential of the twisted bladed rotor in terms of smooth running, higher efficiency and self-starting capability as compared to that of the conventional bladed rotor. Further experiments have been conducted in the same setup to optimize the twist angle. (author)

  13. Loads and Performance Data from a Wind-Tunnel Test of Generic Model Helicopter Rotor Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2005-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to acquire data for use in assessing the ability of current and future comprehensive analyses to predict helicopter rotating-system and fixed-system vibratory loads. The investigation was conducted with a generic model helicopter rotor system using blades with rectangular planform, no built-in twist, uniform radial distribution of mass and stiffnesses, and a NACA 0012 airfoil section. Rotor performance data, as well as mean and vibratory components of blade bending and torsion moments, fixed-system forces and moments, and pitch link loads were obtained at advance ratios up to 0.35 for various combinations of rotor shaft angle-of-attack and collective pitch. The data are presented without analysis.

  14. A Computational Tool for Helicopter Rotor Noise Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project proposes to develop a computational tool for helicopter rotor noise prediction based on hybrid Cartesian grid/gridless approach. The uniqueness of...

  15. Aeromechanical Evaluation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joon W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Hoffman, Frauke; van der Wall, Berend G.; Kim, Do-Hyung; Jung, Sung N.; You, Young H.; Tanabe, Yasutada; Bailly, Joelle; Lienard, Caroline; Delrieux, Yves

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor (STAR) was made to assess potential benefits of the current active twist rotor concept for performance improvement, vibration reduction, and noise alleviation. The STAR rotor is a 40% Mach-scaled, Bo105 rotor with an articulated flap-lag hinge at 3.5%R and no pre-cone. The 0-5 per rev active twist harmonic inputs were applied for various flight conditions including hover, descent, moderate to high speed level flights, and slowed rotor high advance ratio. For the analysis, the STAR partners used multiple codes including CAMRAD II, S4, HOST, rFlow3D, elsA, and their associated software. At the high thrust level in hover, the 0 per rev active twist with 80% amplitude increased figure of merit (FM) by 0.01-0.02 relative to the baseline. In descent, the largest BVI noise reduction was on the order of 2 to 5 dB at the 3 per rev active twist. In the high speed case (mu = 0.35), the 2 per rev actuation was found to be the most effective in achieving a power reduction as well as a vibration reduction. At the 2 per rev active twist, total power was reduced by 0.65% at the 60 deg active twist phase, and vibration was reduced by 47.6% at the 45 deg active twist phase. The use of the 2 per rev active twist appears effective for vibration reduction. In the high advance ratio case (mu = 0.70), the 0 per rev actuation appeared to have negligible impact on performance improvement. In summary, computational simulations successfully demonstrated that the current active twist concept provided a significant reduction of the maximum BVI noise in descent, a significant reduction of the vibration in the high speed case, a small improvement on rotor performance in hover, and a negligible impact on rotor performance in forward flight.

  16. Extension-twist coupling optimization in composite rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, Serkan

    2005-07-01

    For optimal rotor performance in a tiltrotor aircraft the difference in the inflow and the rotor speeds between the hover and cruise flight modes suggests different blade twist and chord distributions. The blade twist rates in current tiltrotor applications are defined based upon a compromise between the figure of merit in hover and propeller efficiency in airplane mode. However, when each operation mode is considered separately the optimum blade distributions are found to be considerably different. Passive blade twist control, which uses the inherent variation in centrifugal forces on a rotor blade to achieve optimum blade twist distributions in each flight mode through the use of extension-twist coupled composite rotor blades, has been considered for performance improvement of tiltrotor aircraft over the last two decades. The challenge for this concept is to achieve the desired twisting deformations in the rotor blade without altering the aeroelastic characteristics of the vehicle. A concept referred to as the sliding mass concept is proposed in this work in order to increase the twist change with rotor speed for a closed-cell composite rotor blade cross-section to practical levels for performance improvement in a tiltrotor aircraft. The concept is based on load path changes for the centrifugal forces by utilizing non-structural masses readily available on a conventional blade, such as the leading edge balancing mass. A multilevel optimization technique based on the simulated annealing method is applied to improve the performance of the XV15 tiltrotor aircraft. A cross-sectional analysis tool, VABS together with a multibody dynamics code, DYMORE are integrated into the optimization process. The optimization results revealed significant improvements in the power requirement in hover while preserving cruise efficiency. It is also shown that about 21% of the improvement is provided through the sliding mass concept pointing to the additional flexibility the concept

  17. Performance of twist-coupled blades on variable speed rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.; Laino, D.J.

    1999-12-07

    The load mitigation and energy capture characteristics of twist-coupled HAWT blades that are mounted on a variable speed rotor are investigated in this paper. These blades are designed to twist toward feather as they bend with pretwist set to achieve a desirable twist distribution at rated power. For this investigation, the ADAMS-WT software has been modified to include blade models with bending-twist coupling. Using twist-coupled and uncoupled models, the ADAMS software is exercised for steady wind environments to generate C{sub p} curves at a number of operating speeds to compare the efficiencies of the two models. The ADAMS software is also used to generate the response of a twist-coupled variable speed rotor to a spectrum of stochastic wind time series. This spectrum contains time series with two mean wind speeds at two turbulence levels. Power control is achieved by imposing a reactive torque on the low speed shaft proportional to the RPM squared with the coefficient specified so that the rotor operates at peak efficiency in the linear aerodynamic range, and by limiting the maximum RPM to take advantage of the stall controlled nature of the rotor. Fatigue calculations are done for the generated load histories using a range of material exponents that represent materials from welded steel to aluminum to composites, and results are compared with the damage computed for the rotor without twist-coupling. Results indicate that significant reductions in damage are achieved across the spectrum of applied wind loading without any degradation in power production.

  18. Dynamic Analysis of a Helicopter Rotor by Dymore Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Vedat; Kırca, Mesut

    The dynamic behavior of hingeless and bearingless blades of a light commercial helicopter which has been under design process at ITU (İstanbul Technical University, Rotorcraft Research and Development Centre) is investigated. Since the helicopter rotor consists of several parts connected to each other by joints and hinges; rotors in general can be considered as an assembly of the rigid and elastic parts. Dynamics of rotor system in rotation is complicated due to coupling of elastic forces (bending, torsion and tension), inertial forces, control and aerodynamic forces on the rotor blades. In this study, the dynamic behavior of the rotor for a real helicopter design project is analyzed by using DYMORE. Blades are modeled as elastic beams, hub as a rigid body, torque tubes as rigid bodies, control links as rigid bodies plus springs and several joints. Geometric and material cross-sectional properties of blades (Stiffness-Matrix and Mass-Matrix) are calculated by using VABS programs on a CATIA model. Natural frequencies and natural modes of the rotating (and non-rotating) blades are obtained by using DYMORE. Fan-Plots which show the variation of the natural frequencies for different modes (Lead-Lag, Flapping, Feathering, etc.) vs. rotor RPM are presented.

  19. Aeromechanical Analysis of a Smart Helicopter Rotor in Forward Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Serafini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a smart system integrated into a helicopter blade aimed at giving an anhedral shape to the blade tip region to alleviate the blade-vortex interaction phenomenon that may cause reduced helicopter performance in terms of noise and vibrations. The blade tip morphing is obtained through the joint action of a magneto-rheological fluid (MRF device, a shape-memory alloy ribbons- based (SMA device and a set of concentrated masses properly distributed spanwise. The presence of this smart actuator (particularly the concentrated masses inside the blades modifies the aeromechanical behaviour of the rotor and may be detrimental in terms of hub vibratory loads, pitch control effectiveness and aeroelastic stability. Following a previous literature work concerning with the effectiveness of the smart actuated rotor in hovering conditions, the present paper focuses on the aeromechanical effects due to the inclusion of the smart device in a four-bladed helicopter rotor in forward flight where blade morphing is not needed. Aim of this work is to investigate on the compatibility of the smart system with the required aeromechanical performance of the rotor, highlighting the feasibility of its application on helicopters.

  20. A new approach to helicopter rotor blade research instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, V. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A rotor-blade-mounted telemetry instrumentation system developed and used in flight tests by the NASA/Langley Research Center is described. The system uses high-speed digital techniques to acquire research data from miniature pressure transducers on advanced rotor airfoils which are flight tested using an AH-1G helicopter. The system employs microelectronic PCM multiplexer-digitizer stations located remotely on the blade and in a hub-mounted metal canister. The electronics contained in the canister digitizes up to 16 sensors, formats this data with serial PCM data from the remote stations, and transmits the data from the canister which is above the plane of the rotor. Data is transmitted over an RF link to the ground for real-time monitoring and to the helicopter fuselage for tape recording.

  1. Lift capability prediction for helicopter rotor blade-numerical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Cîrciu, Ionicǎ; Luculescu, Doru

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to describe the key physical features for modelling the unsteady aerodynamic effects found on helicopter rotor blade operating under nominally attached flow conditions away from stall. The unsteady effects were considered as phase differences between the forcing function and the aerodynamic response, being functions of the reduced frequency, the Mach number and the mode forcing. For a helicopter rotor, the reduced frequency at any blade element can't be exactly calculated but a first order approximation for the reduced frequency gives useful information about the degree of unsteadiness. The sources of unsteady effects were decomposed into perturbations to the local angle of attack and velocity field. The numerical calculus and graphics were made in FLUENT and MAPLE soft environments. This mathematical model is applicable for aerodynamic design of wind turbine rotor blades, hybrid energy systems optimization and aeroelastic analysis.

  2. Helicopter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Holten, T.

    2004-01-01

    The invention relates to a helicopter provided with a rotor with at least one rotor blade (5), wherein drive means are provided for actively moving the or each rotor blade up and down during rotation of the rotor, in particular about a flapping hinge (8) thereof, so that moments, applied by the roto

  3. Optimal Aerodynamic Design of Conventional and Coaxial Helicopter Rotors in Hover and Forward Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanetti, Eli B.

    This dissertation investigates the optimal aerodynamic performance and design of conventional and coaxial helicopters in hover and forward flight using conventional and higher harmonic blade pitch control. First, we describe a method for determining the blade geometry, azimuthal blade pitch inputs, optimal shaft angle (rotor angle of attack), and division of propulsive and lifting forces among the components that minimize the total power for a given forward flight condition. The optimal design problem is cast as a variational statement that is discretized using a vortex lattice wake to model inviscid forces, combined with two-dimensional drag polars to model profile losses. The resulting nonlinear constrained optimization problem is solved via Newton iteration. We investigate the optimal design of a compound vehicle in forward flight comprised of a coaxial rotor system, a propeller, and optionally, a fixed wing. We show that higher harmonic control substantially reduces required power, and that both rotor and propeller efficiencies play an important role in determining the optimal shaft angle, which in turn affects the optimal design of each component. Second, we present a variational approach for determining the optimal (minimum power) torque-balanced coaxial hovering rotor using Blade Element Momentum Theory including swirl. We show that the optimal hovering coaxial rotor generates only a small percentage of its total thrust on the portion of the lower rotor operating in the upper rotor's contracted wake, resulting in an optimal design with very different upper and lower rotor twist and chord distributions. We also show that the swirl component of induced velocity has a relatively small effect on rotor performance at the disk loadings typical of helicopter rotors. Third, we describe a more refined model of the wake of a hovering conventional or coaxial rotor. We approximate the rotor or coaxial rotors as actuator disks (though not necessarily uniformly loaded

  4. Flap motion of helicopter rotors with novel, dynamic stall model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nonlinear flapping equation for large inflow angles and flap angles is established by analyzing the aerodynamics of helicopter blade elements. In order to obtain a generalized flap equation, the Snel stall model was first applied to determine the lift coefficient of the helicopter rotor. A simulation experiment for specific airfoils was then conducted to verify the effectiveness of the Snel stall model as it applies to helicopters. Results show that the model requires no extraneous parameters compared to the traditional stall model and is highly accurate and practically applicable. Based on the model, the relationship between the flapping angle and the angle of attack was analyzed, as well as the advance ratio under the dynamic stall state.

  5. Sweep-twist adaptive rotor blade : final project report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2010-02-01

    Knight & Carver was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to develop a Sweep Twist Adaptive Rotor (STAR) blade that reduced operating loads, thereby allowing a larger, more productive rotor. The blade design used outer blade sweep to create twist coupling without angled fiber. Knight & Carver successfully designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated STAR prototype blades. Through laboratory and field tests, Knight & Carver showed the STAR blade met the engineering design criteria and economic goals for the program. A STAR prototype was successfully tested in Tehachapi during 2008 and a large data set was collected to support engineering and commercial development of the technology. This report documents the methodology used to develop the STAR blade design and reviews the approach used for laboratory and field testing. The effort demonstrated that STAR technology can provide significantly greater energy capture without higher operating loads on the turbine.

  6. Quad-Rotor Helicopter Autonomous Navigation Based on Vanishing Point Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quad-rotor helicopter is becoming popular increasingly as they can well implement many flight missions in more challenging environments, with lower risk of damaging itself and its surroundings. They are employed in many applications, from military operations to civilian tasks. Quad-rotor helicopter autonomous navigation based on the vanishing point fast estimation (VPFE algorithm using clustering principle is implemented in this paper. For images collected by the camera of quad-rotor helicopter, the system executes the process of preprocessing of image, deleting noise interference, edge extracting using Canny operator, and extracting straight lines by randomized hough transformation (RHT method. Then system obtains the position of vanishing point and regards it as destination point and finally controls the autonomous navigation of the quad-rotor helicopter by continuous modification according to the calculated navigation error. The experimental results show that the quad-rotor helicopter can implement the destination navigation well in the indoor environment.

  7. Modelling and Daisy Chaining Control Allocation of a Multirotor Helicopter with a Single Tilting Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Porter

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and implementation of a single tilting rotor multirotor helicopter. A single tilting rotor multirotor helicopter is proposed that allows for decoupled lateral acceleration and attitude states. A dynamics model of the proposed multirotor helicopter is established to enable control system development. A control system architecture and daisy chaining-based control allocation scheme is developed and implemented. The control architecture facilitates the control of decoupled lateral accelerations and attitudes. Further, a computational and experimental analysis is undertaken and offers evidence that the proposed multirotor helicopter and control system architecture enables the multirotor helicopter to achieve lateral accelerations without requiring attitude actuation.

  8. Helicopter rotor loads using matched asymptotic expansions: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, G. A.; Vaidyanathan, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Computer programs were developed to implement the computational scheme arising from Van Holten's asymptotic method for calculating airloads on a helicopter rotor blade in forward flight, and a similar technique which is based on a discretized version of the method. The basic outlines of the two programs are presented, followed by separate descriptions of the input requirements and output format. Two examples illustrating job entry with appropriate input data and corresponding output are included. Appendices contain a sample table of lift coefficient data for the NACA 0012 air foil and listings of the two programs.

  9. Contributions to the dynamics of helicopters with active rotor controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpica, Carlos A.

    This dissertation presents an aeromechanical closed loop stability and response analysis of a hingeless rotor helicopter with a Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) system for vibration reduction. The analysis includes the rigid body dynamics of the helicopter and blade flexibility. The gain matrix is assumed to be fixed and computed off-line. The discrete elements of the HHC control loop are rigorously modeled, including the presence of two different time scales in the loop. By also formulating the coupled rotor-fuselage dynamics in discrete form, the entire coupled helicopter-HHC system could be rigorously modeled as a discrete system. The effect of the periodicity of the equations of motion is rigorously taken into account by converting the system into an equivalent system with constant coefficients and identical stability properties using a time lifting technique. The most important conclusion of the present study is that the discrete elements in the HHC loop must be modeled in any HHC analysis. Not doing so is unconservative. For the helicopter configuration and HHC structure used in this study, an approximate continuous modeling of the HHC system indicates that the closed loop, coupled helicopter-HHC system remains stable for optimal feedback control configurations which the more rigorous discrete analysis shows can result in closed loop instabilities. The HHC gains must be reduced to account for the loss of gain margin brought about by the discrete elements. Other conclusions of the study are: (i) the HHC is effective in quickly reducing vibrations, at least at its design condition, although the time constants associated with the closed loop transient response indicate closed loop bandwidth to be 1 rad/sec on average, thus overlapping with FCS or pilot bandwidths, and raising the issue of potential interactions; (ii) a linearized model of helicopter dynamics is adequate for HHC design, as long as the periodicity of the system is correctly taken into account, i

  10. Efficient sensitivity analysis and optimization of a helicopter rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joon W.; Chopra, Inderjit

    1989-01-01

    Aeroelastic optimization of a system essentially consists of the determination of the optimum values of design variables which minimize the objective function and satisfy certain aeroelastic and geometric constraints. The process of aeroelastic optimization analysis is illustrated. To carry out aeroelastic optimization effectively, one needs a reliable analysis procedure to determine steady response and stability of a rotor system in forward flight. The rotor dynamic analysis used in the present study developed inhouse at the University of Maryland is based on finite elements in space and time. The analysis consists of two major phases: vehicle trim and rotor steady response (coupled trim analysis), and aeroelastic stability of the blade. For a reduction of helicopter vibration, the optimization process requires the sensitivity derivatives of the objective function and aeroelastic stability constraints. For this, the derivatives of steady response, hub loads and blade stability roots are calculated using a direct analytical approach. An automated optimization procedure is developed by coupling the rotor dynamic analysis, design sensitivity analysis and constrained optimization code CONMIN.

  11. Numerical Analysis of Helicopter Rotor Hovering in Close Proximity to the Ground with a Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoga, Noriaki; Iboshi, Naohiro; Horimoto, Mitsumasa; Saito, Shigeru; Tanabe, Yasutada

    In rescue operations and emergency medical services, helicopters are frequently required to operate near the ground with obstacles such as buildings and sidewalls of highway. In this paper, numerical analysis of helicopter rotor hovering in close proximity to the ground with an obstacle is done by solving unsteady 3D compressible Euler equations with an overlapped grid system. The obstacle is simulated by a wall vertically set up on the ground. The parameters for numerical analysis are the rotor height and distance from the rotor-hub-center to the wall. The effects of combinations of these parameters on the flowfields around the rotor, inflow distributions on the rotor disc and behaviors of blade flapping motion are discussed. It is also clarified the cause that the helicopter rotor hovering in close proximity to the ground with a wall does not have the enough ground effect depending on the combinations of these parameters.

  12. Advances in transitional flow modeling applications to helicopter rotors

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Chunhua

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive description of numerical methods and validation processes for predicting transitional flows based on the Langtry–Menter local correlation-based transition model, integrated with both one-equation Spalart–Allmaras (S–A) and two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence models. A comparative study is presented to combine the respective merits of the two coupling methods in the context of predicting the boundary-layer transition phenomenon from fundamental benchmark flows to realistic helicopter rotors. The book will of interest to industrial practitioners working in aerodynamic design and the analysis of fixed-wing or rotary wing aircraft, while also offering advanced reading material for graduate students in the research areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), turbulence modeling and related fields.

  13. Direct CFD Predictions of Low Frequency Sounds Generated by Helicopter Main Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Conner, Dave; Watts, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    This proposed paper will highlight the application of a CSD/CFD methodology currently inuse by the US Army Aerfolightdynamics Directorate (AFDD) to assess the feasibility and fidelity of directly predicting low frequency sounds of helicopter rotors.

  14. Extracting radar micro-Doppler signatures of helicopter rotating rotor blades using K-band radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rachel; Liu, Baokun

    2014-06-01

    Helicopter identification has been an attractive topic. In this paper, we applied radar micro-Doppler signatures to identify helicopter. For identifying the type of a helicopter, besides its shape and size, the number of blades, the length of the blade, and the rotation rate of the rotor are important features, which can be estimated from radar micro-Doppler signatures of the helicopter's rotating rotor blades. In our study, K-band CW/FMCW radars are used for collecting returned signals from helicopters. By analyzing radar micro-Doppler signatures, we can estimate the number of blades, the length of the blade, the angular rotation rate of the rotating blade, and other necessary parameters for identifying the type of a helicopter.

  15. Mach number scaling of helicopter rotor blade/vortex interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Kenneth P.; Harris, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    A parametric study of model helicopter rotor blade slap due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) was conducted in a 5 by 7.5-foot anechoic wind tunnel using model helicopter rotors with two, three, and four blades. The results were compared with a previously developed Mach number scaling theory. Three- and four-bladed rotor configurations were found to show very good agreement with the Mach number to the sixth power law for all conditions tested. A reduction of conditions for which BVI blade slap is detected was observed for three-bladed rotors when compared to the two-bladed baseline. The advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotor exhibited an angular dependence not present for the two-bladed configuration. The upper limits for the advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotors increased with increasing rotational speed.

  16. Time domain System Identification of Longitudinal Dynamics of Single Rotor Model Helicopter using SIDPAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbab Nighat Khizer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a time-domain approach for identification of longitudinal dynamics of single rotor model helicopter. A frequency sweep excitation input signal is applied for hover flying mode widely used for space state linearized model. A fully automated programmed flight test method provides high quality flight data for system identification using the computer controlled flight simulator X-plane©. The flight test data were recorded, analyzed and reduced using the SIDPAC (System Identification Programs for Air Craft toolbox for MATLAB, resulting in an aerodynamic model of single rotor helicopter. Finally, the identified model of single rotor helicopter is validated on Raptor 30-class model helicopter at hover showing the reliability of proposed approach

  17. Helicopter Rotor Load Prediction Using a Geometrically Exact Beam with Multicomponent Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Hyun-Ku; Viswamurthy, S.R.; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    rotor-blade/control-system model was loosely coupled with various inflow and wake models in order to simulate both hover and forward-flight conditions. The resulting rotor blade response and pitch link loads are in good agreement with those predicted byCAMRADII. The present analysis features both model......In this paper, an accurate structural dynamic analysis was developed for a helicopter rotor system including rotor control components, which was coupled to various aerodynamic and wake models in order to predict an aeroelastic response and the loads acting on the rotor. Its blade analysis was based...... on an intrinsic formulation of moving beams implemented in the time domain. The rotor control system was modeled as a combination of rigid and elastic components. A multicomponent analysis was then developed by coupling the beam finite element model with the rotor control system model to obtain a complete rotor-blade/control...

  18. Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Flow Around Forward Flight Helicopter with Coaxial Rotors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Heyong; YE Zhengyin

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional unsteady Euler equations are numerically solved to simulate the unsteady flows around forward flight helicopter with coaxial rotors based on unstructured dynamic overset grids. The performances of the two coaxial rotors both become worse because of the aerodynamic interaction between them, and the influence of the top rotor on the bottom rotor is greater than that of the bottom rotor on the top rotor. The downwash velocity at the bottom rotor plane is much larger than that at the top rotor plane, and the downwash velocity at the top rotor plane is a little larger than that at an individual rotor plane. The downwash velocity and thrust coefficient both become larger when the collective angle of blades is added. When the spacing between the two coaxial rotors increases, the thrust coefficient of the top rotor increases, but the total thrust coefficient reduces a little,because the decrease of the bottom rotor thrust coefficient is larger than the increase of the top rotor thrust coefficient.

  19. Dynamic surface measurements on a model helicopter rotor during blade slap at high angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, J. E., Jr.; Harris, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The modern helicopter offers a unique operational capability to both the public and private sectors. However, the use of the helicopter may become severely limited due to the radiated noise generated by the rotor system. A description is presented of some of the experimental results obtained with a model helicopter rotor in an anechoic wind tunnel with regard to blade stall as a source mechanism of blade slap. Attention is given to dynamic rotor blade surface phenomena and the resulting far field impulsive noise from the model helicopter rotor at high angles of attack and low tip speed. The results of the investigation strongly implicates the boundary layer as playing an important role in blade slap due to blade/vortex interaction (BVI) in a highly loaded rotor. Intermittent stall cannot be ruled out as a possible source mechanism for blade slap. This implies that blade surface characteristics, airfoil shape and local Reynolds number may now be used as tools to reduce the resultant far-field sound pressure levels in helicopters.

  20. Prediction and measurement of low-frequency harmonic noise of a hovering model helicopter rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarawal, H. R.; Schmitz, F. H.; Boxwell, D. A.

    Far-field acoustic data for a model helicopter rotor have been gathered in a large open-jet, acoustically treated wind tunnel with the rotor operating in hover and out of ground-effect. The four-bladed Boeing 360 model rotor with advanced airfoils, planform, and tip shape was run over a range of conditions typical of today's modern helicopter main rotor. Near in-plane acoustic measurements were compared with two independent implementations of classical linear theory. Measured steady thrust and torque were used together with a free-wake analysis (to predict the thrust and drag distributions along the rotor radius) as input to this first-principles theoretical approach. Good agreement between theory and experiment was shown for both amplitude and phase for measurements made in those positions that minimized distortion of the radiated acoustic signature at low-frequencies.

  1. The Effects of Ambient Conditions on Helicopter Rotor Source Noise Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Frederic H.; Greenwood, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A new physics-based method called Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustic Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) is used to demonstrate the change in rotor harmonic noise of a helicopter operating at different ambient conditions. FRAME is based upon a non-dimensional representation of the governing acoustic and performance equations of a single rotor helicopter. Measured external noise is used together with parameter identification techniques to develop a model of helicopter external noise that is a hybrid between theory and experiment. The FRAME method is used to evaluate the main rotor harmonic noise of a Bell 206B3 helicopter operating at different altitudes. The variation with altitude of Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise, known to be a strong function of the helicopter s advance ratio, is dependent upon which definition of airspeed is flown by the pilot. If normal flight procedures are followed and indicated airspeed (IAS) is held constant, the true airspeed (TAS) of the helicopter increases with altitude. This causes an increase in advance ratio and a decrease in the speed of sound which results in large changes to BVI noise levels. Results also show that thickness noise on this helicopter becomes more intense at high altitudes where advancing tip Mach number increases because the speed of sound is decreasing and advance ratio increasing for the same indicated airspeed. These results suggest that existing measurement-based empirically derived helicopter rotor noise source models may give incorrect noise estimates when they are used at conditions where data were not measured and may need to be corrected for mission land-use planning purposes.

  2. A comparison of model helicopter rotor Primary and Secondary blade/vortex interaction blade slap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, J. E., Jr.; Leighton, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the relative importance of blade/vortex interactions which occur on the retreating side of a model helicopter rotor disk is described. Some of the salient characteristics of this phenomenon are presented and discussed. It is shown that the resulting Secondary blade slap may be of equal or greater intensity than the advancing side (Primary) blade slap. Instrumented model helicopter rotor data is presented which reveals the nature of the retreating blade/vortex interaction. The importance of Secondary blade slap as it applies to predictive techniques or approaches is discussed. When Secondary blade slap occurs it acts to enlarge the window of operating conditions for which blade slap exists.

  3. Tests of Full-Scale Helicopter Rotors at High Advancing Tip Mach Numbers and Advance Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, James C.; McCloud, John L., III; Stroub, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    As a continuation of the studies of reference 1, three full-scale helicopter rotors have been tested in the Ames Research Center 40- by SO-foot wind tunnel. All three of them were two-bladed, teetering rotors. One of the rotors incorporated the NACA 0012 airfoil section over the entire length of the blade. This rotor was tested at advance ratios up to 1.05. Both of the other rotors were tapered in thickness and incorporated leading-edge camber over the outer 20 percent of the blade radius. The larger of these rotors was tested at advancing tip Mach numbers up to 1.02. Data were obtained for a wide range of lift and propulsive force, and are presented without discussion.

  4. Panel/full-span free-wake coupled method for unsteady aerodynamics of helicopter rotor blade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Jianfeng; Wang Haowen

    2013-01-01

    A full-span free-wake method is coupled with an unsteady panel method to accurately predict the unsteady aerodynamics of helicopter rotor blades in hover and forward flight.The unsteady potential-based panel method is used to consider aerodynamics of finite thickness multi-bladed rotors,and the full-span free-wake method is applied to simulating dynamics of rotor wake.These methods are tightly coupled through trailing-edge Kutta condition and by converting doublet-wake panels to full-span vortex filaments.A velocity-field integration technique is also adopted to overcome singularity problem during the interaction between the rotor wake and blades.Helicopter rotors including Caradonna-Tung,UH-60A,and AH-1G rotors,are simulated in hover and forward flight to validate the accuracy of this approach.The predicted aerodynamic loads of rotor blades agree well with available measured data and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results,and the unsteady dynamics of rotor wake is also well simulated.Compared to CFD,the present method obtains accurate results more efficiently and is suitable to rotorcraft aeroelastic analysis.

  5. Power harvesting using piezoelectric materials: applications in helicopter rotors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de P.H.

    2013-01-01

    The blades of helicopters are heavily loaded and are critical components. Failure of any one blade will lead to loss of the aircraft. Currently, the technical lifespan of helicopter blades is calculated using a worst-case operation scenario. The consequence is that a blade that may be suitable for,

  6. Wireless sensor network for helicopter rotor blade vibration monitoring: Requirements definition and technological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Ramirez, Andrea; Das, Kallol; Loendersloot, Richard; Tinga, Tiedo; Havinga, Paul; Basu, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    The main rotor accounts for the largest vibration source for a helicopter fuselage and its components. However, accurate blade monitoring has been limited due to the practical restrictions on instrumenting rotating blades. The use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) for real time vibration monitoring

  7. Neutron radiography and other NDE tests of main rotor helicopter blades

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, FC

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available leading to aircraft structural failures, are addressed by various NDE techniques. In a combined investigation by means of visual inspection, X-ray radiography and shearography on helicopter main rotor blades, neutron radiography (NRad) at SAFARI-1 research...

  8. CALCULATION OF HELICOPTER ROTOR FLAPPING ANGLES AND COMPARISON WITH MEASURED DATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Helicopter rotor flapping angles from hover to low-speed forward flight are calculated and compared with the measured data in this paper. The analytical method is based on a second order lifting-line/full-span free wake model as well as a fully coupled rotor trim model. It is shown that, in order to accurately predict the lateral flapping angle at low advance ratio, it is necessary to use free wake analysis to account for the highly non-uniform inflow induced by the distorted wake geometry at rotor disc plane.

  9. A rotor-mounted digital instrumentation system for helicopter blade flight research measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, V. H., Jr.; Haywood, W. S., Jr.; Williams, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    A rotor mounted flight instrumentation system developed for helicopter rotor blade research is described. The system utilizes high speed digital techniques to acquire research data from miniature pressure transducers on advanced rotor airfoils which are flight tested on an AH-1G helicopter. The system employs microelectronic pulse code modulation (PCM) multiplexer digitizer stations located remotely on the blade and in a hub mounted metal canister. As many as 25 sensors can be remotely digitized by a 2.5 mm thick electronics package mounted on the blade near the tip to reduce blade wiring. The electronics contained in the canister digitizes up to 16 sensors, formats these data with serial PCM data from the remote stations, and transmits the data from the canister which is above the plane of the rotor. Data are transmitted over an RF link to the ground for real time monitoring and to the helicopter fuselage for tape recording. The complete system is powered by batteries located in the canister and requires no slip rings on the rotor shaft.

  10. Vibratory Loads Data from a Wind-Tunnel Test of Structurally Tailored Model Helicopter Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Hamouda, M-Nabil H.; Idol, Robert F.; Mirick, Paul H.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to investigate the use of a Bell Helicopter Textron (BHT) rotor structural tailoring concept, known as rotor nodalization, in conjunction with advanced blade aerodynamics as well as to evaluate rotor blade aerodynamic design methodologies. A 1/5-size, four-bladed bearingless hub, three sets of Mach-scaled model rotor blades were tested in forward flight from transition up to an advance ratio of 0.35. The data presented pertain only to the evaluation of the structural tailoring concept and consist of fixed-system and rotating system vibratory loads. These data will be useful for evaluating the effects of tailoring blade structural properties on fixed-system vibratory loads, as well as validating analyses used in the design of advanced rotor systems.

  11. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A HELICAL SAVONIUS ROTOR WITHOUT SHAFT AT 45° TWIST ANGLE USING CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachu Deb

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Helical Savonius rotor exhibits better performance characteristics at all the rotor angles compared to conventional Savonius rotor. However studies related to the performance measurement and flow physics of such rotor are very scarce. Keeping this in view, in this paper, a three dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis using commercial Fluent 6.2 software was done to predict the performance of a two-bucket helical Savonius rotor without shaft and with end plates in a complete cycle of rotation. A two-bucket helical Savonius rotor having height of 60 cm and diameter of 17 cm with 45° bucket twist angle was designed using Gambit. The buckets were connected at the top and bottom circular end plates, which are 1.1 times the rotor diameter. The k-ε turbulence model with second order upwind discretization scheme was adopted with standard wall condition. Power coefficients (Cp and torque coefficients (Ct at different tip speed ratios were evaluated at different rotor angles. From the investigation, it was observed that power coefficient increased with increase of tip speed ratio up to an optimum limit, but then decreased even further tip speed ratio was increased. Further investigation was done on the variations of Cp & Ct in a complete cycle of rotation from 0° to 360° in a step of 45° rotor corresponding to the optimum tip speed ratio. The value of Cp at all the rotor angles is positive. Moreover, velocity magnitude contours were analyzed for each rotor angle and it could be concluded that high aerodynamic torque and power can be expected when the rotor is positioned at 45º & 90º with respect to incoming flow.

  12. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A HELICAL SAVONIUS ROTOR WITHOUT SHAFT AT 45° TWIST ANGLE USING CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachu Deb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Helical Savonius rotor exhibits better performance characteristics at all the rotor angles compared to conventional Savonius rotor. However studies related to the performance measurement and flow physics of such rotor are very scarce. Keeping this in view, in this paper, a three dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis using commercial Fluent 6.2 software was done to predict the performance of a two-bucket helical Savonius rotor without shaft and with end plates in a complete cycle of rotation. A two-bucket helical Savonius rotor having height of 60 cm and diameter of 17 cm with 45° bucket twist angle was designed using Gambit. The buckets were connected at the top and bottom circular end plates, which are 1.1 times the rotor diameter. The k- ε turbulence model with second order upwind discretization scheme was adopted with standard wall condition. Power coefficients (Cp and torque coefficients (Ct at different tip speed ratios were evaluated at different rotor angles. From the investigation, it was observed that power coefficient increased with increase of tip speed ratio up to an optimum limit, but then decreased even further tip speed ratio was increased. Further investigation was done on the variations of Cp & Ct in a complete cycle of rotation from 0° to 360° in a step of 45° rotor corresponding to the optimum tip speed ratio. The value of Cp at all the rotor angles is positive. Moreover, velocity magnitude contours were analyzed for each rotor angle and it could be concluded that high aerodynamic torque and power can be expected when the rotor is positioned at 45º & 90º with respect to incoming flow.

  13. Controllability Analysis for Multirotor Helicopter Rotor Degradation and Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guang-Xun; Quan, Quan; Yang, Binxian; Cai, Kai-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    This paper considers the controllability analysis problem for a class of multirotor systems subject to rotor failure/wear. It is shown that classical controllability theories of linear systems are not sufficient to test the controllability of the considered multirotors. Owing to this, an easy-to-use measurement index is introduced to assess the available control authority. Based on it, a new necessary and sufficient condition for the controllability of multirotors is derived. Furthermore, a controllability test procedure is approached. The proposed controllability test method is applied to a class of hexacopters with different rotor configurations and different rotor efficiency parameters to show its effectiveness. The analysis results show that hexacopters with different rotor configurations have different fault-tolerant capabilities. It is therefore necessary to test the controllability of the multirotors before any fault-tolerant control strategies are employed.

  14. Numerical simulation of aerodynamic interaction for a tilt rotor aircraft in helicopter mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Liang; Zhang Ying; Yang Shuo; Zhu Xinglin; Dong Jun

    2016-01-01

    A rotor CFD solver is developed for simulating the aerodynamic interaction phe-nomenon among rotor, wing and fuselage of a tilt rotor aircraft in its helicopter mode. The unsteady Navier–Stokes equations are discretized in inertial frame and embedded grid system is adopted for describing the relative motion among blades and nacelle/wing/fuselage. A combination of multi-layer embedded grid and‘‘extended hole fringe”technique is complemented in original grid system to tackle grid assembly difficulties arising from the narrow space among different aerody-namic components, and to improve the interpolation precision by decreasing the cell volume dis-crepancy among different grid blocks. An overall donor cell searching and automatic hole cutting technique is used for grid assembly, and the solution processes are speeded up by introduc-tion of OpenMP parallel method. Based on this solver, flow fields and aerodynamics of a tilt rotor aircraft in hover are simulated with several rotor collective angles, and the corresponding states of an isolated rotor and rotor/wing/fuselage model are also computed to obtain reference solution. Aerodynamic interference influences among the rotor and wing/fuselage/nacelle are analyzed, and some meaningful conclusions are drawn.

  15. Design and performance prediction of swashplateless helicopter rotors with trailing edge flaps and tabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Jaye

    This work studies the design of trailing edge controls for swashplateless helicopter primary control, and examines the impact of those controls on the performance of the rotor. The objective is to develop a comprehensive aeroelastic analysis for swashplateless rotors in steady level flight. The two key issues to be solved for this swashplateless control concept are actuation of the trailing edge controls and evaluating the performance of the swashplateless rotor compared to conventionally controlled helicopters. Solving the first requires simultaneous minimization of trailing flap control angles and hinge moments to reduce actuation power. The second issue requires not only the accurate assessment of swashplateless rotor power, but also similar or improved performance compared to conventional rotors. The analysis consists of two major parts, the structural model and the aerodynamic model. The inertial contributions of the trailing edge flap and tab are derived and added to the system equations in the structural model. Two different aerodynamic models are used in the analysis, a quasi-steady thin airfoil theory that includes arbitrary hinge positions for the flap and the tab, and an unsteady lifting line model with airfoil table lookup based on wind tunnel test data and computational fluid dynamics simulation. The design aspect of the problem is investigated through parametric studies of the trailing edge flap and tab for a Kaman-type conceptual rotor and a UH-60A swashplateless variant. The UH-60A model is not changed except for the addition of a trailing edge flap to the rotor blade, and the reduction of pitch link stiffness to imitate a soft root spring. Study of the uncoupled blade response identifies torsional stiffness and flap hinge stiffness as important design features of the swashplateless rotor. Important trailing edge flap and tab design features including index angle, aerodynamic overhang, chord and length are identified through examination of coupled

  16. ANALYTICAL APPROACH TO AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE HELICOPTER ROTOR WITH ANHEDRAL TIP SHAPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    A new analytical approach, based on a lifting surface model and a full-span free wake analysis using the curved vortex element on the circular arc, is established for evaluating the aerodynamic characteristics of the helicopter rotor with an anhedral blade-tip and is emphasized to be applicable to various blade-tip configurations, such as the tapered, swept, anhedral and combined shapes. Sample calculations on the rotor aerodynamic characteristics for different anhedral tips in both hover and forward flight are performed. The results on the induced velocity, blade section lift distribution, tip vortex path and rotor performance are presented so that the effect of the anhedral tip on the rotor aerodynamic characteristics is fully analyzed.

  17. Calculation of rotor impedance for use in design analysis of helicopter airframe vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, Kip P.

    1990-01-01

    Excessive vibration is one of the most prevalent technical obstacles encountered in the development of new rotorcraft. The inability to predict these vibrations is primarily due to deficiencies in analysis and simulation tools. The Langley Rotorcraft Structural Dynamics Program was instituted in 1984 to meet long term industry needs in the area of rotorcraft vibration prediction. As a part of the Langley program, this research endeavors to develop an efficient means of coupling the rotor to the airframe for preliminary design analysis of helicopter airframe vibrations. The main effort was to modify the existing computer program for modeling the dynamic and aerodynamic behavior of rotorcraft called DYSCO (DYnamic System COupler) to calculate the rotor impedance. DYSCO was recently developed for the U.S. Army and has proven to be adaptable for the inclusion of new solution methods. The solution procedure developed to use DYSCO for the calculation of rotor impedance is presented. Verification of the procedure by comparison with a known solution for a simple wind turbine model is about 75 percent completed, and initial results are encouraging. After the wind turbine impedance is confirmed, the verification effort will continue by comparison to solutions of a more sophisticated rotorcraft model. Future work includes determination of the sensitivity of the rotorcraft airframe vibrations to helicopter flight conditions and rotor modeling assumptions. When completed, this research will ascertain the feasibility and efficiency of the impedance matching method of rotor-airframe coupling for use in the analysis of airframe vibrations during the preliminary rotorcraft design process.

  18. Identification of Flap Motion Parameters for Vibration Reduction in Helicopter Rotors with Multiple Active Trailing Edge Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğbreve;ur Dalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An active control method utilizing the multiple trailing edge flap configuration for rotorcraft vibration suppression and blade loads control is presented. A comprehensive model for rotor blade with active trailing edge flaps is used to calculate the vibration characteristics, natural frequencies and mode shapes of any complex composite helicopter rotor blade. A computer program is developed to calculate the system response, rotor blade root forces and moments under aerodynamic forcing conditions. Rotor blade system response is calculated using the proposed solution method and the developed program depending on any structural and aerodynamic properties of rotor blades, structural properties of trailing edge flaps and properties of trailing edge flap actuator inputs. Rotor blade loads are determined first on a nominal rotor blade without multiple active trailing edge flaps and then the effects of the active flap motions on the existing rotor blade loads are investigated. Multiple active trailing edge flaps are controlled by using open loop controllers to identify the effects of the actuator signal output properties such as frequency, amplitude and phase on the system response. Effects of using multiple trailing edge flaps on controlling rotor blade vibrations are investigated and some design criteria are determined for the design of trailing edge flap controller that will provide actuator signal outputs to minimize the rotor blade root loads. It is calculated that using the developed active trailing edge rotor blade model, helicopter rotor blade vibrations can be reduced up to 36% of the nominal rotor blade vibrations.

  19. Optimal Aerodynamic Design of Conventional and Coaxial Helicopter Rotors in Hover and Forward Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-28

    explore compound vehicle performance and optimal design [7, 16, 22, 23, 24]. Other authors, including Orchard and New- man [6], Ormiston [5], and...forward flight. Orchard and Newman [6] investigated fundamental design features of compound helicopters using a wing, a single rotor, and a propul- sor...to θ. It is difficult to compute the Jacobian of R(θ) analytically. Instead, we use automatic differentiated code generated by the compiler Tapenade

  20. Stress analysis of advanced attack helicopter composite main rotor blade root end lug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Stress analysis of the Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) composite main rotor blade root end lug is described. The stress concentration factor determined from a finite element analysis is compared to an empirical value used in the lug design. The analysis and test data indicate that the stress concentration is primarily a function of configuration and independent of the range of material properties typical of Kevlar-49/epoxy and glass epoxy.

  1. Power harvesting using piezomaterial in a helicopter rotor blade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de P.H.; Boer, de A.; Loendersloot, R.; Hoogt, van der P.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Current power harvesting research has focused on bending beams and determining power output under a given excitation. For the European CleanSky – Green Rotor Craft project a tool is being developed which optimizes the piezoelectric material and placement thereof for power harvesting. It focuses on b

  2. General model and control of an n rotor helicopter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidea, Adriana-Gabriela; Brogaard, Rune Yding; Andersen, Nils Axel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a dynamic, nonlinear mathematical model ofa multirotor that would be valid for different numbers of rotors. Furthermore, a set of SingleInput Single Output (SISO) controllers were implemented for attitude control. Both model andcontrollers were tested exper...

  3. Helicopter rotor loads using a matched asymptotic expansion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, G. A.; Vaidyanathan, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical basis and computational feasibility of the Van Holten method, and its performance and range of validity by comparison with experiment and other approximate methods was examined. It is found that within the restrictions of incompressible, potential flow and the assumption of small disturbances, the method does lead to a valid description of the flow. However, the method begins to break down under conditions favoring nonlinear effects such as wake distortion and blade/rotor interaction.

  4. Visualization and Quantification of Rotor Tip Vortices in Helicopter Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, David L.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Holst, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an automated approach for effective extraction, visualization, and quantification of vortex core radii from the Navier-Stokes simulations of a UH-60A rotor in forward flight. We adopt a scaled Q-criterion to determine vortex regions and then perform vortex core profiling in these regions to calculate vortex core radii. This method provides an efficient way of visualizing and quantifying the blade tip vortices. Moreover, the vortices radii are displayed graphically in a plane.

  5. General model and control of an n rotor helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidea, A. G.; Yding Brogaard, R.; Andersen, N. A.; Ravn, O.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a dynamic, nonlinear mathematical model of a multirotor that would be valid for different numbers of rotors. Furthermore, a set of Single Input Single Output (SISO) controllers were implemented for attitude control. Both model and controllers were tested experimentally on a quadcopter. Using the combined model and controllers, simple system simulation and control is possible, by replacing the physical values for the individual systems.

  6. General model and control of an n rotor helicopter

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a dynamic, nonlinear mathematical model ofa multirotor that would be valid for different numbers of rotors. Furthermore, a set of SingleInput Single Output (SISO) controllers were implemented for attitude control. Both model andcontrollers were tested experimentally on a quadcopter. Using the combined model andcontrollers, simple system simulation and control is possible, by replacing the physical valuesfor the individual systems.

  7. Multicyclic control of a helicopter rotor considering the influence of vibration, loads, and control motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T. J.; Mccloud, J. L., III

    1980-01-01

    Weighted multiple linear regression is used to establish a transfer function matrix relationship between higher harmonic control inputs and transducer vibration outputs for a controllable twist rotor. Data used in the regression were taken from the test of a KAMAN controllable twist rotor conducted in the Ames Research Center's 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel in June 1977. Optimal controls to minimize fixed system vibrational levels are calculated using linear quadratic regulatory theory with a control deflection penalty included in the performance criteria. Control sensitivity to changes in control travel, forward speed, and lift and propulsive forces is examined. It is found that the linear transfer matrix is a strong function of forward speed and a weak function of lift and propulsive force. An open-loop strategy is proposed for systems with limited control travel.

  8. Nonlinear coupled rotor-fuselage helicopter vibration studies with higher harmonic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.; Papavassiliou, I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters by means of active control methodologies. The nonlinear equations of a coupled rotor/flexible-fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra, thus relegating this tedious task to the computer. In the solution procedure the trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by using a harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter in all the rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. Using this solution procedure, the influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. In addition, it is shown that the conventional single frequency HHC is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. A new scheme called MHHC, having multiple higher harmonic pitch inputs, was used to accomplish this task of simultaneously reducing both the vibratory hub loads and fuselage vibratory response. In addition, the uniqueness of this MHHC scheme is explained in detail.

  9. Unsteady Velocity Measurements Taken Behind a Model Helicopter Rotor Hub in Forward Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Drag caused by separated flow behind the hub of a helicopter has an adverse effect on aerodynamic performance of the aircraft. To determine the effect of separated flow on a configuration used extensively for helicopter aerodynamic investigations, an experiment was conducted using a laser velocimeter to measure velocities in the wake of a model helicopter hub operating at Mach-scaled conditions in forward flight. Velocity measurements were taken using a laser velocimeter with components in the vertical and downstream directions. Measurements were taken at 13 stations downstream from the rotor hub. At each station, measurements were taken in both a horizontal and vertical row of locations. These measurements were analyzed for harmonic content based on the rotor period of revolution. After accounting for these periodic velocities, the remaining unsteady velocities were treated as turbulence. Turbulence intensity distributions are presented. Average turbulent intensities ranged from approximately 2 percent of free stream to over 15 percent of free stream at specific locations and azimuths. The maximum average value of turbulence was located near the rear-facing region of the fuselage.

  10. An experimental investigation of the chopping of helicopter main rotor tip vortices by the tail rotor. Part 2: High speed photographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Charles M.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of a free vortex and a rotor was recorded photographically using oil smoke and stroboscopic illumination. The incident vortex is normal to the plane of the rotor and crosses the rotor plane. This idealized aerodynamic experiment most nearly corresponds to helicopter flight conditions in which a tip vortex from the main rotor is incident upon the tail rotor while hovering. The high speed photographs reveal important features not observed using conventional photography where the image is the time average of varying instantaneous images. Most prominent is the strong interaction between the rotor tip vortex system and the incident vortex, resulting in the roll-up of the incident vortex around the (stronger) tip vortices and the resulting rapid destabilization of the deformed incident vortex. The viscous interaction is clearly shown also. Other forms of instabilities or wave-like behavior may be apparent from further analysis of the photographs.

  11. Direct CFD Predictions of Low Frequency Sounds Generated by a Helicopter Main Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark A.; Conner, Dave A.; Conner, Dave A.; Watts, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The use of CFD to directly predict helicopter main rotor noise is shown to be quite promising as an alternative mean for low frequency source noise evaluation. Results using existing state-of-the-art grid structures and finite-difference schemes demonstrated that small perturbation pressures, associated with acoustics radiation, can be extracted with some degree of fidelity. Accuracy of the predictions are demonstrated via comparing to predictions from conventional acoustic analogy-based models, and with measurements obtained from wind tunnel and flight tests for the MD-902 helicopter at several operating conditions. Findings show that the direct CFD approach is quite successfully in yielding low frequency results due to thickness and steady loading noise mechanisms. Mid-to-high frequency contents, due to blade-vortex interactions, are not predicted due to CFD modeling and grid constraints.

  12. Multivariable Super Twisting Based Robust Trajectory Tracking Control for Small Unmanned Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a highly robust trajectory tracking controller for small unmanned helicopter with model uncertainties and external disturbances. First, a simplified dynamic model is developed, where the model uncertainties and external disturbances are treated as compounded disturbances. Then the system is divided into three interconnected subsystems: altitude subsystem, yaw subsystem, and horizontal subsystem. Second, a disturbance observer based controller (DOBC is designed based upon backstepping and multivariable super twisting control algorithm to obtain robust trajectory tracking property. A sliding mode observer works as an estimator of the compounded disturbances. In order to lessen calculative burden, a first-order exact differentiator is employed to estimate the time derivative of the virtual control. Moreover, proof of the stability of the closed-loop system based on Lyapunov method is given. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed flight control scheme.

  13. Statistical Modeling for the Effect of Rotor Speed, Yarn Twist and Linear Density on Production and Quality Characteristics of Rotor Spun Yarn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Ahmed Arain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a statistical model for the effect of RS (Rotor Speed, YT (Yarn Twist and YLD (Yarn Linear Density on production and quality characteristics of rotor spun yarn. Cotton yarns of 30, 35 and 40 tex were produced on rotor spinning machine at different rotor speeds (i.e. 70000, 80000, 90000 and 100000 rpm and with different twist levels (i.e. 450, 500, 550, 600 and 700 tpm. Yarn production (g/hr and quality characteristics were determined for all the experiments. Based on the results, models were developed using response surface regression on MINITAB�16 statistical tool. The developed models not only characterize the intricate relationships among the factors but may also be used to predict the yarn production and quality characteristics at any level of factors within the range of experimental values.

  14. Quantification of helicopter rotor downwash effects on electro-optical defensive aids suites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffer, Dirk P.; Eisele, Christian; Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars; Möller, Sebastian; Togna, Fabio; Velluet, Marie-Thérèse

    2015-10-01

    The performance of electro-optical platform protection systems can be degraded significantly by the propagation environment around the platform. This includes aero-optical effects and zones of severe turbulence generated by engine exhausts. For helicopters rotor tip vortices and engine exhaust gases that are pressed down by the rotor airflow form the so called downwash phenomena. The downwash is a source for perturbations. A wide range of spatial and temporal fluctuations in the refractive index of air can occur. The perturbations from the turbulent flow cause detrimental effects on energy delivery, angle of arrival fluctuations, jam-code transmission, tracking accuracy and imaging performance in general. Therefore the effects may especially have a severe impact on the performance of laser-based protection systems like directed infrared countermeasures (DIRCM). The chain from passive missile detection and warning to obtaining an optical break-lock by the use of an active laser system will be influenced. To anticipate the installed performance of an electro-optical defensive aids suite (DAS) for helicopter platforms it is necessary to develop models for the prediction of the perturbations. Modelled results have to be validated against experimental findings. However, the data available in open literature on the effects of rotor downwash from helicopters on optical propagation is very limited. To collect necessary data and to obtain a first impression about the magnitude of occurring effects the European defence agency group (EDA) on "airborne platform effects on lasers and warning sensors (ALWS)" decided to design and perform a field trial on the premises of the Italian Air Force Flight Test Center in Pratica di Mare, Italy. ALWS is a technical arrangement under the Europa MoU among France, Germany, Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

  15. The Acoustic Results of a United Technologies Scale Model Helicopter Rotor Tested at DNW

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    Annual Forum of the Amer- Germany (Refs. 3,4). It was this ’ benchmark ’ test ican Helicopter Society, Washington, DC May 1990 which led to the...The au- 2. Schmitz, F.H., Boxwell , DA., Lewy, S., and Da- thors would like to offer sincere thanks to their friends han, C., "A Note on the Generel...W.R., Schultz, K.J., Schmitz, F.H., ing for their contributions made in acquiring the data and Boxwell ,D.A.,"Model Rotor High Speed Im- presented in

  16. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF AERODYNAMIC INTERACTION EFFECT OF ROTOR WAKE ON FUSELAGE OF HELICOPTER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The interaction effect of rotor wake on fuselage of helicopter was investigated with experimental method. The results from experiment have proved that for the drag of fuselage the effect of rotor airflow is closely in connection with both the flight speed and the collective pitch of blades, while for the thrust and pitch moment of fuselage the collective pitch angle of blades plays more important role. A simple and effective computing method about aerodynamic interaction can be derived from the measured data. In order to implement the experiment, a fuselage model, a special sensor, the measurement and data acquisition and processing system were designed and manufactured according to the special requirements of this research project, thereby a good base was built up for carrying out experiments successfully with high quality.

  17. Novel controller design demonstration for vibration alleviation of helicopter rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulker, Fatma Demet; Nitzsche, Fred

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents an advanced controller design methodology for vibration alleviation of helicopter rotor sys- tems. Particularly, vibration alleviation in a forward ight regime where the rotor blades experience periodically varying aerodynamic loading was investigated. Controller synthesis was carried out under the time-periodic H2 and H∞ framework and the synthesis problem was solved based on both periodic Riccati and Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI) formulations. The closed-loop stability was analyzed using Floquet-Lyapunov theory, and the controller's performance was validated by closed-loop high-delity aeroelastic simulations. To validate the con- troller's performance an actively controlled trailing edge ap strategy was implemented. Computational cost was compared for both formulations.

  18. Implementation and verification of a comprehensive helicopter coupled rotor - Fuselage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. R.; Banerjee, D.; Shamie, J.; Straub, F.; Dinyavari, M. A. H.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical basis and the application of a Rotor/Airframe Comprehensive Aeroelastic Program (RACAP) are described in detail. The rationale behind each analytical choice is outlined and the modular procedure is described. The program is verified by application to the AH-1G helicopter. The applicability of various airload prediction models is examined, and both the steady and vibratory responses of the blade are compared with flight test data. Reasonable correlation is found between measured and calculated blade response, with excellent correlation for vibration amplitudes at various locations on the fuselage such as engine, pilot seat, and gunner. Within the analytical model, comparisons are drawn between an isolated blade analysis and a coupled rotor/fuselage model. The deficiency of the former in the context of the AH-1G is highlighted.

  19. Generic icing effects on forward flight performance of a model helicopter rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Korkan, Kenneth D.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental program using a commercially available model helicopter has been conducted in the TAMU 7 ft x 10 ft Subsonic Wind Tunnel to investigate main rotor performance degradation due to generic ice adhesion. Base and iced performance data were gathered as functions of fuselage incidence, blade collective pitch, main rotor rotational velocity, and freestream velocity. The experimental values have shown that, in general, the presence of generic ice introduces decrements in performance caused by leading edge separation regions and increased surface roughness. In addition to the expected changes in aerodynamic forces caused by variations in test Reynolds number, forward flight data seemed to be influenced by changes in freestream and rotational velocity. The dependence of the data upon such velocity variations was apparently enhanced by increases in blade chord.

  20. Generic icing effects on forward flight performance of a model helicopter rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Korkan, Kenneth D.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental program using a commercially available model helicopter has been conducted in the TAMU 7 ft x 10 ft Subsonic Wind Tunnel to investigate main rotor performance degradation due to generic ice adhesion. Base and iced performance data were gathered as functions of fuselage incidence, blade collective pitch, main rotor rotational velocity, and freestream velocity. The experimental values have shown that, in general, the presence of generic ice introduces decrements in performance caused by leading edge separation regions and increased surface roughness. In addition to the expected changes in aerodynamic forces caused by variations in test Reynolds number, forward flight data seemed to be influenced by changes in freestream and rotational velocity. The dependence of the data upon such velocity variations was apparently enhanced by increases in blade chord.

  1. Solid State Adaptive Rotor Using Postbuckled Precompressed, Bending-Twist Coupled Piezoelectric Actuator Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald M. Barrett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is centered on a new actuation mechanism which is integrated on a solid state rotor. This paper outlines the application of such a system via a Post-Buckled Precompression (PBP technique at the end of a twist-active piezoelectric rotor blade actuator. The basic performance of the system is handily modeled by using laminated plate theory techniques. A dual cantilevered spring system was used to increasingly null the passive stiffness of the root actuator along the feathering axis of the rotor blade. As the precompression levels were increased, it was shown that corresponding blade pitch levels also increased. The PBP cantilever spring system was designed so as to provide a high level of stabilizing pitch-flap coupling and inherent resistance to rotor propeller moments. Experimental testing showed pitch deflections increasing from just 8° peak-to-peak deflections at 650 V/mm field strength to more than 26° at the same field strength with design precompression levels. Dynamic testing showed the corner frequency of the linear system coming down from 63 Hz (3.8/rev to 53 Hz (3.2/rev. Thrust coefficients manipulation levels were shown to increase from 0.01 to 0.028 with increasing precompression levels. The paper concludes with an overall assessment of the actuator design.

  2. Vibrations of a Helicopter Rotor Blade Using Finite Element- Unconstrained Variational Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    agree well with the available data of Boyce , DiPrima and Handelman [11]. The torsional vibration frequency has only one eigen- value solution and, if CA...Equations of Motiqn for Combined Flapwise Bending, Chordwise Bending and Torsion of Twisted Rotor Blades,” NACA Report No. 1346, 1956. 11. W. E. Boyce ...R. C. DiPrima and G. H. - Handelman , “Vibrations of Rotating Beams of Constant Section,” Proceedings of the Second U.S. National Congress of Applied

  3. Fiber Migration and Distribution of Twist at Different Radial Positions of Rotor Yarn-by Hi-Scope Video Microscope System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shan-yuan; CHEUNG H.W.; LO M.T.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes systematic measurement of fiber migration and distribution pattern of twist at different radial positions of rotor spun yarn mixed tracer fiber by Hi- Scope Video Microscope System. The positions of tracer fibers were measured in three dimensions accurately, and the migration index and the twist distribution at different radial positions of rotor yarn were calculated and analyzed. This research result serves structural mechanics of rotor spun yarn.

  4. Steady and Periodic Pressure Measurements on a Generic Helicopter Fuselage Model in the Presence of a Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of a generic helicopter fuselage model with an independently mounted rotor has been conducted to obtain steady and periodic pressure data on the helicopter body. The model was tested at four advance ratios and three thrust coefficients. The periodic unsteady pressure coefficients are marked by four peaks associated with the passage of the four rotor blades. Blade passage effects are largest on the nose and tail boom of the model. The magnitude of the pulse increases with rotor thrust coefficient. Tabular listings of the unsteady pressure data are included to permit independent analysis. A CD-rom containing the steady and unsteady pressure data presented in the report is available from the authors.

  5. Helicopter Rotor Sailing by Non-Smooth Dynamics Co-Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fancello Matteo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of a co-simulation approach for the simulation of frictional contact in general-purpose multibody dynamics to a rotorcraft dynamics problem. The proposed approach is based on the co-simulation of a main problem, which is described and solved as a set of differential algebraic equations, with a subproblem that is characterized by nonsmooth dynamics events and solved using a timestepping technique. The implementation and validation of the formulation is presented. The method is applied to the analysis of the droop and anti-flap contacts of helicopter rotor blades. Simulations focusing on the problem of blade sailing are conducted to understand the behavior and assess the validity of the method. For this purpose, the results obtained using a contact model based on Hertzian reaction forces at the interface are compared with those of the proposed approach.

  6. Initial Aerodynamic and Acoustic Study of an Active Twist Rotor Using a Loosely Coupled CFD/CSD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David D. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary aerodynamic and performance predictions for an active twist rotor for a HART-II type of configuration are performed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, OVERFLOW2, and a computational structural dynamics (CSD) code, CAMRAD -II. These codes are loosely coupled to compute a consistent set of aerodynamics and elastic blade motions. Resultant aerodynamic and blade motion data are then used in the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkins solver, PSU-WOPWOP, to compute noise on an observer plane under the rotor. Active twist of the rotor blade is achieved in CAMRAD-II by application of a periodic torsional moment couple (of equal and opposite sign) at the blade root and tip at a specified frequency and amplitude. To provide confidence in these particular active twist predictions for which no measured data is available, the rotor system geometry and computational set up examined here are identical to that used in a previous successful Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) computational study. For a single frequency equal to three times the blade passage frequency (3P), active twist is applied across a range of control phase angles at two different amplitudes. Predicted results indicate that there are control phase angles where the maximum mid-frequency noise level and the 4P non -rotating hub vibrations can be reduced, potentially, both at the same time. However, these calculated reductions are predicted to come with a performance penalty in the form of a reduction in rotor lift-to-drag ratio due to an increase in rotor profile power.

  7. Helicopter model rotor-blade vortex interaction impulsive noise: Scalability and parametric variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic data taken in the anechoic Deutsch-Niederlaendischer Windkanal (DNW) have documented the blade vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise radiated from a 1/7-scale model main rotor of the AH-1 series helicopter. Averaged model scale data were compared with averaged full scale, inflight acoustic data under similar nondimensional test conditions. At low advance ratios (mu = 0.164 to 0.194), the data scale remarkable well in level and waveform shape, and also duplicate the directivity pattern of BVI impulsive noise. At moderate advance ratios (mu = 0.224 to 0.270), the scaling deteriorates, suggesting that the model scale rotor is not adequately simulating the full scale BVI noise; presently, no proved explanation of this discrepancy exists. Carefully performed parametric variations over a complete matrix of testing conditions have shown that all of the four governing nondimensional parameters - tip Mach number at hover, advance ratio, local inflow ratio, and thrust coefficient - are highly sensitive to BVI noise radiation.

  8. Preparation of helicopter rotor counterbalance component by means of permanent-mold casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhao-jing; ZUO Feng; REN Shan-zhi; LI Feng-zhen

    2007-01-01

    Copper alloy was adopted to prepare helicopter rotor counterbalance component by means of permanent-mold casting. Process parameters were determined on the basis of theory calculation and computer numerical simulation. Through controlling mould temperature, pouring temperature and speed, the defects, such as gas cavity, shrinkage porosity, cold shut, can be effectively avoided. The results show that the best process parameters for smelting are as follows: pouring temperature is 1 100 ℃, pouring time is 14 s and opened mould time is 6 min. Mixture of 90% charcoal powder and 10% fluorite were selected as covering agent and 0.01% phosphorus copper acts as oxidizer. The density of rotor counterbalance component after casting in permanent-mold is 99.91% of its theory density. Mechanical properties are as follows: σb=315 MPa, σ0.2=143 MPa, δ=25%, HB=950. The mass deviation is between -5 g and +5 g, the curved surface distortion is less than 0.20 mm, and the largest tolerance of sectional thickness can be controlled between -0.10 mm and +0.10 mm.

  9. DISCUSSION AND PRACTICAL ASPECTS ON CONTROL ALLOCATION FOR A MULTI-ROTOR HELICOPTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. J. Ducard

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents practical methods to improve the flight performance of an unmanned multi-rotor helicopter by using an efficient control allocation strategy. The flying vehicle considered is an hexacopter. It is indeed particularly suited for long missions and for carrying a significant payload such as all the sensors needed in the context of cartography, photogrammetry, inspection, surveillance and transportation. Moreover, a stable flight is often required for precise data recording during the mission. Therefore, a high performance flight control system is required to operate the UAV. However, the flight performance of a multi-rotor vehicle is tightly dependent on the control allocation strategy that is used to map the virtual control vector v = [T, L, M, N ]T composed of the thrust and the torques in roll, pitch and yaw, respectively, to the propellers' speed. This paper shows that a control allocation strategy based on the classical approach of pseudo-inverse matrix only exploits a limited range of the vehicle capabilities to generate thrust and moments. Thus, in this paper, a novel approach is presented, which is based on a weighted pseudo-inverse matrix method capable of exploiting a much larger domain in v. The proposed control allocation algorithm is designed with explicit laws for fast operation and low computational load, suitable for a small microcontroller with limited floating-point operation capability.

  10. Development of a resonant trailing-edge flap actuation system for helicopter rotor vibration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-S.; Wang, K. W.; Smith, E. C.

    2007-12-01

    A resonant trailing-edge flap actuation system for helicopter rotors is developed and evaluated experimentally. The concept involves deflecting each individual trailing-edge flap using a compact resonant piezoelectric actuation system. Each resonant actuation system yields high authority, while operating at a single frequency. By tailoring the natural frequencies of the actuation system (including the piezoelectric actuator and the related mechanical and electrical elements) to the required operating frequencies, one can increase the output authority. The robustness of the device can be enhanced by increasing the high authority bandwidth through electric circuitry design. Such a resonant actuation system (RAS) is analyzed for a full-scale piezoelectric induced-shear tube actuator, and bench-top testing is conducted to validate the concept. An adaptive feed-forward controller is developed to realize the electric network dynamics and adapt to phase variation. The control strategy is then implemented via a digital signal processor (DSP) system. Analysis is also performed to examine the rotor system dynamics in forward flight with piezoelectric resonant actuators, using a perturbation method to evaluate the system's time-varying characteristics. Numerical simulations reveal that the resonant actuator concept can be applied to forward flights as well as to hover conditions.

  11. Least square based sliding mode control for a quad-rotor helicopter and energy saving by chattering reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumantri, Bambang; Uchiyama, Naoki; Sano, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new control structure for a quad-rotor helicopter that employs the least squares method is introduced. This proposed algorithm solves the overdetermined problem of the control input for the translational motion of a quad-rotor helicopter. The algorithm allows all six degrees of freedom to be considered to calculate the control input. The sliding mode controller is applied to achieve robust tracking and stabilization. A saturation function is designed around a boundary layer to reduce the chattering phenomenon that is a common problem in sliding mode control. In order to improve the tracking performance, an integral sliding surface is designed. An energy saving effect because of chattering reduction is also evaluated. First, the dynamics of the quad-rotor helicopter is derived by the Newton-Euler formulation for a rigid body. Second, a constant plus proportional reaching law is introduced to increase the reaching rate of the sliding mode controller. Global stability of the proposed control strategy is guaranteed based on the Lyapunov's stability theory. Finally, the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed control system are demonstrated experimentally under wind gusts, and are compared with a regular sliding mode controller, a proportional-differential controller, and a proportional-integral-differential controller.

  12. Crack of a helicopter main rotor actuator attachment: failure analysis and lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Allegrucci

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A Light Utility Helicopter (LUH, in the course of a training flight, leaving the ground during the taxi to take off, went into an uncontrolled rolling to the right; consequently the helicopter gradually laid down on the right side. The impact with the runway destroyed the rotating blades up to the hubs rotor. The accident investigation focused on main rotor oscillatory plate servo actuators . These components, directly linked to the cloche movements, regulate main rotor blades plane tilt and pitch. Following the preliminary examination, only front servo actuator attachment was found to be broken in two parts. In detail, the present paper deals with the fracture analysis results. The servo actuator attachment material is a 2014 Aluminum alloy extrudate, undergone to T651 heat treatment. Fracture surfaces were examined by optical and electronic microscopy in order to determine the main morphological features and consequently to trace the origin of failure mechanism and causes. The accordance with the specification requirements about alloy composition was verified by quantitative elementary analysis through inductive coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP; furthermore, semi-quantitative elementary analysis was locally verified by Energy dispersion spectroscopy X ray (EDS_RX. Finally, the hydrogen content of the material was evaluated by the total hydrogen analysis. Microstructural and technological alloy characteristics were verified as well by using metallographic microscopy and hardness testing of the material.Macroscopic fracture surfaces evidences were characterized by the lack of any significant plastic deformations and by the presence of symmetry compared to the servo actuator axis. Microscopic fracture features of both the investigated surfaces were not coherent to the hypothesis of an impact of the main rotor to the soil. Further achieved evidences, such as grain boundary fracture propagation, the presence of corrosion products, were all in

  13. Coupled rotor/fuselage dynamic analysis of the AH-1G helicopter and correlation with flight vibrations data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, J. C.; Cronkhite, J. D.; Dompka, R. V.; Perry, K. S.; Rogers, J. P.; Sadler, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Under a research program designated Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS (DAMVIBS), existing analytical methods are used for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM), which has been developed, extensively documented, and correlated with ground vibration test. One procedure that was used for predicting coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations using the advanced Rotorcraft Flight Simulation Program C81 and NASTRAN is summarized. Detailed descriptions of the analytical formulation of rotor dynamics equations, fuselage dynamic equations, coupling between the rotor and fuselage, and solutions to the total system of equations in C81 are included. Analytical predictions of hub shears for main rotor harmonics 2p, 4p, and 6p generated by C81 are used in conjunction with 2p OLS measured control loads and a 2p lateral tail rotor gearbox force, representing downwash impingement on the vertical fin, to excite the NASTRAN model. NASTRAN is then used to correlate with measured OLS flight test vibrations. Blade load comparisons predicted by C81 showed good agreement. In general, the fuselage vibration correlations show good agreement between anslysis and test in vibration response through 15 to 20 Hz.

  14. Optimal deployment schedule of an active twist rotor for performance enhancement and vibration reduction in high-speed flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young H. YOU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The best active twist schedules exploiting various waveform types are sought taking advantage of the global search algorithm for the reduction of hub vibration and/or power required of a rotor in high-speed conditions. The active twist schedules include two non-harmonic inputs formed based on segmented step functions as well as the simple harmonic waveform input. An advanced Particle Swarm assisted Genetic Algorithm (PSGA is employed for the optimizer. A rotorcraft Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD code CAMRAD II is used to perform the rotor aeromechanics analysis. A Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD code is coupled with CSD for verification and some physical insights. The PSGA optimization results are verified against the parameter sweep study performed using the harmonic actuation. The optimum twist schedules according to the performance and/or vibration reduction strategy are obtained and their optimization gains are compared between the actuation cases. A two-phase non-harmonic actuation schedule demonstrates the best outcome in decreasing the power required while a four-phase non-harmonic schedule results in the best vibration reduction as well as the simultaneous reductions in the power required and vibration. The mechanism of reduction to the performance gains is identified illustrating the section airloads, angle-of-attack distribution, and elastic twist deformation predicted by the present approaches.

  15. Experimental investigation of helicopter vibration reduction using rotor blade aeroelastic tailoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1991-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation has been conducted to parametrically investigate the effect of blade nonstructural mass on helicopter fixed- and rotating-system vibratory loads. The data were obtained using Mach- and aeroelastically-scaled model rotor blades which allowed for the addition of concentrated nonstructural masses at multiple points along the blade radius. Testing was conducted for advance ratios ranging from 0.10 to 0.35 for ten blade mass configurations. Three thrust levels were obtained at representative full-scale shaft angles for each configuration. Results indicate that proper placement of blade nonstructural mass can provide reductions in fixed-system vibratory loads, but that correct mass placement and the loads reduction realized are dependent upon flight condition. The data base obtained with this investigation provides a comprehensive set of fixed-system shears and moments, blade moment, and blade flap and lag response. The data set is well suited for use in the correlation and development of advanced rotorcraft analyses.

  16. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an active control surface located on the blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using individual blade control (IBC), which is implemented by an individually controlled aerodynamic surface located on each blade, is presented. For this exploratory study, a simple offset-hinged spring restrained model of the blade is used with fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics for each blade. Deterministic controllers based on local and global system models are implemented to reduce 4/rev hub loads using both an actively controlled aerodynamic surface on each blade as well as conventional IBC, where the complete blade undergoes cyclic pitch change. The effectiveness of the two approaches for simultaneous reduction of the 4/rev hub shears and hub moments is compared. Conventional IBC requires considerably more power to achieve approximately the same level of vibration reduction as that obtained by implementing IBC using an active control surface located on the outboard segment of the blade. The effect of blade torsional flexibility on the vibration reduction effectiveness of the actively controlled surface was also considered and it was found that this parameter has a very substantial influence.

  17. Integration of dynamic, aerodynamic and structural optimization of helicopter rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, David A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to study the integration of structural, dynamic, and aerodynamic considerations in the design-optimization process for helicopter rotorblades. This is to be done in three phases. Task 1 is to bring on-line computer codes that could perform the finite-element frequency analyses of rotor blades. The major features of this program are summarized. The second task was to bring on-line an optimization code for the work. Several were tried and it was decided to use CONMIN. Explicit volume constraints on the thicknesses and lumped masses used in the optimization were added. The specific aeroelastic constraint that the center of mass must be forward of the quarter chord in order to prevent flutter was applied. The bending-torsion coupling due to cg-ea offset within the blade cross section was included. Also included were some very simple stress constraints. The first three constraints are completed, and the fourth constraint is being completed.

  18. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an active control surface located on the blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using individual blade control (IBC), which is implemented by an individually controlled aerodynamic surface located on each blade, is presented. For this exploratory study, a simple offset-hinged spring restrained model of the blade is used with fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics for each blade. Deterministic controllers based on local and global system models are implemented to reduce 4/rev hub loads using both an actively controlled aerodynamic surface on each blade as well as conventional IBC, where the complete blade undergoes cyclic pitch change. The effectiveness of the two approaches for simultaneous reduction of the 4/rev hub shears and hub moments is compared. Conventional IBC requires considerably more power to achieve approximately the same level of vibration reduction as that obtained by implementing IBC using an active control surface located on the outboard segment of the blade. The effect of blade torsional flexibility on the vibration reduction effectiveness of the actively controlled surface was also considered and it was found that this parameter has a very substantial influence.

  19. Helicopter rotor blade frequency evolution with damage growth and signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Niranjan; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2005-05-01

    Structural damage in materials evolves over time due to growth of fatigue cracks in homogenous materials and a complicated process of matrix cracking, delamination, fiber breakage and fiber matrix debonding in composite materials. In this study, a finite element model of the helicopter rotor blade is used to analyze the effect of damage growth on the modal frequencies in a qualitative manner. Phenomenological models of material degradation for homogenous and composite materials are used. Results show that damage can be detected by monitoring changes in lower as well as higher mode flap (out-of-plane bending), lag (in-plane bending) and torsion rotating frequencies, especially for composite materials where the onset of the last stage of damage of fiber breakage is most critical. Curve fits are also proposed for mathematical modeling of the relationship between rotating frequencies and cycles. Finally, since operational data are noisy and also contaminated with outliers, denoising algorithms based on recursive median filters and radial basis function neural networks and wavelets are studied and compared with a moving average filter using simulated data for improved health-monitoring application. A novel recursive median filter is designed using integer programming through genetic algorithm and is found to have comparable performance to neural networks with much less complexity and is better than wavelet denoising for outlier removal. This filter is proposed as a tool for denoising time series of damage indicators.

  20. Multiaxial fatigue of in-service aluminium longerons for helicopter rotor-blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shanyavskiy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue cracking of longerons manufactured from Al-alloy AVT-1 for helicopter in-service rotor-blades was considered and crack growth period and equivalent of tensile stress for different blade sections were estimated. Complicated case of in-service blades multiaxial cyclically bending-rotating and tension can be considered based on introduced earlier master curve constructed for aluminum alloys in the simple case of uniaxial tension with stress R-ratio near to zero. Calculated equivalent tensile stress was compared for different blade sections and it was shown that in-service blades experienced not principle difference in this value in the crack growth direction by the investigated sections. It is not above the designed equivalent stress level. Crack growth period estimation in longerons based on fatigue striation spacing or meso-beach-marks measurements has shown that monitoring system introduced designer in longerons can be effectively used for in-time crack detecting independently on the failed section when can appeared because of various type of material faults or in-service damages

  1. Development and application of an analysis of axisymmetric body effects on helicopter rotor aerodynamics using modified slender body theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, G.; Johnson, W.

    1984-01-01

    A computationally efficient body analysis designed to couple with a comprehensive helicopter analysis is developed in order to calculate the body-induced aerodynamic effects on rotor performance and loads. A modified slender body theory is used as the body model. With the objective of demonstrating the accuracy, efficiency, and application of the method, the analysis at this stage is restricted to axisymmetric bodies at zero angle of attack. By comparing with results from an exact analysis for simple body shapes, it is found that the modified slender body theory provides an accurate potential flow solution for moderately thick bodies, with only a 10%-20% increase in computational effort over that of an isolated rotor analysis. The computational ease of this method provides a means for routine assessment of body-induced effects on a rotor. Results are given for several configurations that typify those being used in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and in the rotor-body aerodynamic interference tests being conducted at Ames. A rotor-hybrid airship configuration is also analyzed.

  2. RESEARCH OF THE HIGH HARMONICS INDIVIDUAL BLADE CONTROL EFFECT ON VIBRATIONS CAUSED BY THE HELICOPTER MAIN ROTOR THRUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents numerical results analysis of main rotor vibration due to helicopter main rotor thrust pulsation.The calculation method, the object of research and numerical research results with the aim to reduce the amplitude of the vibrations transmitted to the hub from the helicopters main rotor by the individual blade control in azimuth by the installation angle of blades cyclic changes are set out in the article. The individual blades control law for a five-blade main rotor based on the blade frequencies is made. It allows reducing the vibration from thrust. Research takes into account the main rotor including and excluding the blade flapping motion. The minimal vibrations regime is identified.Numerical study of variable loads caused by unsteady flow around the main rotor blades at high relative speeds of flight, which transmitted to the rotor hub, is made. The scheme of a thin lifting surface and the rotor vortex theory are used for simulation of the aerodynamic loads on blades. Non - uniform loads caused by the thrust, decomposed on the blade harmonic and its overtones. The largest values of deviation from the mean amplitude thrust are received. The analysis of variable loads with a traditional control system is made. Algorithms of higher harmonics individual blade control capable of reducing the thrust pulsation under the average value of thrust are developed.Numerical research shows that individual blade control of high harmonics reduces variable loads. The necessary change in the blade installation is about ± 0,2 degree that corresponds to the maximum displacement of the additional con- trol stick is about 1 mm.To receive the overall picture is necessary to consider all six components of forces and moments. Control law with own constants will obtained for each of them. It is supposed, that each of six individual blade control laws have an impact on other components. Thus, the problem reduces to the optimization issue. The

  3. Optimizing tuning masses for helicopter rotor blade vibration reduction including computed airloads and comparison with test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Walsh, Joanne L.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimization procedure is developed for locating tuning masses on a rotor blade so that vibratory loads are minimized and hub-shear harmonics are reduced without adding a large mass penalty. The airloads are computed by means of a helicopter analysis for the cases of three vs six tuning masses, with attention given to the prediction of changes in airloads. Frequencies, airloads, and hub loads are computed with the CAMRAD/JA helicopter analysis code and the Conmin general-purpose optimization program. The hub shear is found to be significantly reduced in both cases with the added mass, and the reduction of hub shear is demonstrated under three flight conditions. Comparisons with wind-tunnel data demonstrate that the correlation of mass location is good and the relationship between mass location and flight speed is predicted well by the model.

  4. Prototype of a tilt rotor helicopter: A helicopter comprising a multi-rotor system with individual collective and cyclic pitch control.

    OpenAIRE

    Napsholm, Svein Rivli

    2013-01-01

    The use of drones and remote operated aircrafts has become a useful tool for the oil and mining industry, when searching for new production areas. The remote controlled aircrafts can perform some of the tasks during these operations such as deploy sensors, gather geographical data and perform area inspections. The smaller and cheaper aircrafts are a cost and time effective solution compared to using bigger helicopters and air planes. In this master thesis, it is proposed a new type of remote ...

  5. THE ANALYSIS OF THIN WALLED COMPOSITE LAMINATED HELICOPTER ROTOR WITH HIERARCHICAL WARPING FUNCTIONS AND FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸德超; 邓忠民; 王荇卫

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper, a series of hierarchical warping functions is developed to analyze the static and dynamic problems of thin walled composite laminated helicopter rotors composed of several layers with single closed cell. This ethod is the development and extension of the traditional constrained warping theory of thin walled metallic beams, which had been proved very successful since 1940s. The warping distribution along the perimeter of each layer is expanded into a series of successively corrective warping functions with the traditional warping function caused by free torsion or free bending as the first term, and is assumed to be piecewise linear along the thickness direction of layers. The governing equations are derived based upon the variational principle of minimum potential energy for static analysis and Rayleigh Quotient for free vibration analysis. Then the hierarchical finite element method is introduced to form a numerical algorithm. Both static and natural vibration problems of sample box beams are analyzed with the present method to show the main mechanical behavior of the thin walled composite laminated helicopter rotor.

  6. 旋翼结冰对直升机飞行动力学特性的影响%Effect of Rotor Icing on Helicopter Flight Dynamic Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国知; 曹义华

    2011-01-01

    基于旋翼冰风洞试验数据,考虑桨叶表面附着冰脱落及桨叶表面局部温度对结冰的影响,提出了旋翼结冰的工程模型,建立了直升机旋翼结冰后的飞行动力学模型,以UH-60A为样机,研究了直升机旋翼结冰后的平衡特性,分析了结冰对直升机稳定性的影响.根据有人驾驶垂直/短距起落飞机军用品质规范(MIL-F-83300)与军用旋翼飞行器驾驶品质要求(ADS-33E-PRF),分析了结冰时间、环境温度、液态水含量以及平均水滴直径对旋翼结冰后的直升机开环状态下的操纵特性、姿态敏捷性、轴间耦合特性以及垂直轴操纵功效的影响.计算结果的对比分析显示,旋翼结冰模型合理,直升机飞行动力学模型计算精度高,能够用来研究直升机旋翼结冰后的飞行动力学问题.%Based on the rotor icing tunnel data, and considering the effect of rotor blade ice shedding and local temperature variation on the rotor blade icing, an engineering rotor icing model is advanced. Then a flight dynamics modal is built of a single rotor helicopter due to icing. The trim characteristics and stability of a UH-60A helicopter in icing conditions at the hover and in the forward flight are studied in detail. Using the military specification flying qualities of piloted V/STOL aircraft (MIL-F-83300) and the handling qualities requirements for military helicopters (ADS-33E-PRF), the effect of icing on the controllability, attitude quickness, interaxis coupling, and vertical axis control power of the helicopter open-loop system are analyzed in terms of icing time, atmospheric temperature, liquid water content, and median volumetric diameter. Calculation results indicate that the rotor icing model and the iced helicopter dynamics model are feasible and effective, and that they can be used to investigate issues in helicopter dynamics in rotor icing conditions.

  7. A Coupled Helicopter Rotor/Fuselage Dynamics Model Using Finite Element Multi-body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Qi-you

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage model for vibration reduction studies, the equation of coupled rotor-fuselage is set up based on the theory of multi-body dynamics, and the dynamic analysis model is established with the software MSC.ADMAS and MSC.NASTRAN. The frequencies and vibration acceleration responses of the system are calculated with the model of coupled rotor-fuselage, and the results are compared with those of uncoupled modeling method. Analysis results showed that compared with uncoupled model, the dynamic characteristic obtained by the model of coupled rotor-fuselage are some different. The intrinsic frequency of rotor is increased with the increase of rotational velocities. The results also show that the flying speed has obvious influence on the vibration acceleration responses of the fuselage. The vibration acceleration response in the vertical direction is much higher at the low speed and high speed flight conditions.

  8. A New Optimal Control Algorithm for Quad-rotor Helicopter with State Constraints via Sliding-mode Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a strategy of a new optimal sliding-mode control for flight control system with state constraints so that the system guarantees the optimal performance index. Besides, the strategy ensures strong robustness to the internal parametric uncertainty and the external disturbances. In order to have fast transient response speed as well as good tracking accuracy, the integral of the time multiplied by the absolute displacement tracking error is introduced as the performance index. By analyzing the state constraints which are specifically the velocity tracking error constraint and the acceleration tracking error constraint, and the performance index, the parameters of sliding-mode surface and control law are obtained. Finally, the authors conduct the semi physical simulation on Qball-X4 quad-rotor helicopter, showing the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  9. A 3D imaging system for the non-intrusive in-flight measurement of the deformation of an aircraft propeller and a helicopter rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasicki, Bolesław; Boden, Fritz; Ludwikowski, Krzysztof

    2017-02-01

    The non-intrusive in-flight deformation measurement and the resulting local pitch of an aircraft propeller or helicopter rotor blade is a demanding task. The idea of an imaging system integrated and rotating with the air-craft propeller has already been presented at the 30th International Congress on High-Speed Imaging and Photonics (ICHSIP30) in 2012. Since then this system has been designed, constructed and tested in the laboratory as well as in-flight on the Cobra VUT100 of Evektor Aerotechnik, Kunovice (CZ). The major aim of the EU FP7 project AIM2 ("Advanced In-flight Measurement techniques 2" - contract No. 266107) was to ascertain the feasibility of this technique under extreme conditions - vibration and large centrifugal forces - to real flight testing. Based on the gained experience a new rotating system for the application on helicopter rotors has recently been constructed and tested on the whirl tower of Airbus Helicopters, Donauwoerth (D). In this paper the principle of the applied Image Pattern Correlation Technique (IPCT), a specialized type of Digital Image Correlation (DIC), is outlined and the construction of both rotating 3D image acquisition systems dedicated to the in-flight deformation measurement of the aircraft propeller and helicopter rotor are described. Furthermore, the results of the ground and in-flight tests of these systems will be shown and discussed. The obtained results will be helpful for manufacturers in the design of their future aircrafts.

  10. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an actively controlled partial span trailing edge flap located on the blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes an analytical study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap located on the blade. The vibration reduction produced by the actively controlled flap (ACF) is compared with that obtained using individual blade control (IBC), in which the entire blade is oscillated in pitch. For both cases a deterministic feedback controller is implemented to reduce the 4/rev hub loads. For all cases considered, the ACF produced vibration reduction comparable with that obtained using IBC, but consumed only 10-30% of the power required to implement IBC. A careful parametric study is conducted to determine the influence of blade torsional stiffness, spanwise location of the control flap, and hinge moment correction on the vibration reduction characteristics of the ACF. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach to vibration reduction. It should be emphasized than the ACF, used together with a conventional swashplate, is completely decoupled from the primary flight control system and thus it has no influence on the airworthiness of the helicopter. This attribute is potentially a significant advantage when compared to IBC.

  11. Prediction and simulator verification of state-space rotor modelling on helicopter manoeuvring flight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, R.; Gennaretti, M.; Pavel, M.D.; Stroosma, O.; Miletovic, I.

    2015-01-01

    Among the many fundamental components of a flight simulator, the mathematical representation of the vehicle dynamics stands out for complexity and importance. This is especially true for helicopters, for which the complex dynamics involved prevents simple models to be sufficiently accurate without t

  12. Hummingbird wing efficacy depends on aspect ratio and compares with helicopter rotors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, J.W.; Quicazan Rubio, E.M.; Heijst, van G.J.F.; Altshuler, D.L.; Lentink, D.

    2014-01-01

    Hummingbirds are the only birds that can sustain hovering. This unique flight behaviour comes, however, at high energetic cost. Based on helicopter and aeroplane design theory, we expect that hummingbird wing aspect ratio (AR), which ranges from about 3.0 to 4.5, determines aerodynamic efficacy. Pre

  13. Higher harmonic control analysis for vibration reduction of helicopter rotor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh Q.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced higher harmonic control (HHC) analysis has been developed and applied to investigate its effect on vibration reduction levels, blade and control system fatigue loads, rotor performance, and power requirements of servo-actuators. The analysis is based on a finite element method in space and time. A nonlinear time domain unsteady aerodynamic model, based on the indicial response formulation, is used to calculate the airloads. The rotor induced inflow is computed using a free wake model. The vehicle trim controls and blade steady responses are solved as one coupled solution using a modified Newton method. A linear frequency-domain quasi-steady transfer matrix is used to relate the harmonics of the vibratory hub loads to the harmonics of the HHC inputs. Optimal HHC is calculated from the minimization of the vibratory hub loads expressed in term of a quadratic performance index. Predicted vibratory hub shears are correlated with wind tunnel data. The fixed-gain HHC controller suppresses completely the vibratory hub shears for most of steady or quasi-steady flight conditions. HHC actuator amplitudes and power increase significantly at high forward speeds (above 100 knots). Due to the applied HHC, the blade torsional stresses and control loads are increased substantially. For flight conditions where the blades are stalled considerably, the HHC input-output model is quite nonlinear. For such cases, the adaptive-gain controller is effective in suppressing vibratory hub loads, even though HHC may actually increase stall areas on the rotor disk. The fixed-gain controller performs poorly for such flight conditions. Comparison study of different rotor systems indicates that a soft-inplane hingeless rotor requires less actuator power at high speeds (above 130 knots) than an articulated rotor, and a stiff-inplane hingeless rotor generally requires more actuator power than an articulated or a soft-inplane hingeless rotor. Parametric studies for a hingeless rotor

  14. Design and preliminary tests of a blade tip air mass injection system for vortex modification and possible noise reduction on a full-scale helicopter rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, R. J.; Hosier, R. N.; Balcerak, J. C.; Johnson, H. K.

    1975-01-01

    Full-scale tests were conducted on the Langley helicopter rotor test facility as part of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of a turbulent blade tip air mass injection system in alleviating the impulsive noise (blade slap) caused by blade-vortex interaction. Although blade-slap conditions could not be induced during these tests, qualitative results from flow visualization studies using smoke showed that the differential velocity between the jet velocity and the rotor tip speed was a primary parameter controlling the vortex modification.

  15. Prediction of BVI Noise for an Active Twist Rotor Using a Loosely Coupled CFD/CSD Method and Comparison to Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.; Boyd, David Douglas, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical predictions of the acoustic characteristics of an Active Twist Rotor (ATR), using two methods to compute the rotor blade aerodynamics and elastic blade motion are compared to experimental data from a wind tunnel test in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) in 2000. The first method, a loosely coupled iterative method, utilizes the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code OVERFLOW 2 and the Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) code CAMRAD II. The second method utilizes the CAMRAD II free-wake model only. The harmonic active-twist control to the main rotor blade system is identified with three parameters - harmonic actuation frequency, actuation amplitude, and control phase angle. The resulting aerodynamics and blade motion data from the two methods are then used in the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP to predict acoustic pressure on a spherical array of equally spaced observers surrounding the rotor. This spherical distribution of pressure is used to compute the sound power level representing baseline and actuated conditions. Sound power levels for three categories of noise are defined as - blade-vortex interaction sound power level (BVIPWL), low frequency sound power level (LFPWL), and overall sound power level, OAPWL. Comparisons with measured data indicate the CFD/CSD analysis successfully captures the trends in sound power levels and the effects of active-twist control at advance ratios of 0.14 and 0.17. The free-wake model predictions show inconsistent sound power levels relative to the trends in the experimental and CFD data. This paper presents the first ever comparison between CFD/CSD acoustic predictions for an active-twist rotor and experimental measurements.

  16. Artificial Icing Test CH-47C Helicopter with Fiberglass Rotor Blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    fiberglass rotor blades and the intake and exhaust ports for the prototype de-ice system generator . The following general aircraft information is...shut off valve was provided in the tubing run to the generator set fuel inlet. 22 0~0 zgI ogoo j 000 LiJ 2I Photo 3. De-ice System Generator Installation

  17. Some issues on modeling atmospheric turbulence experienced by helicopter rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Mark; Gaonkar, G. H.; Prasad, J. V. R.; Schrage, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The atmospheric turbulence velocities seen by nonrotating aircraft components and rotating blades can be substantially different. The differences are due to the spatial motion of the rotor blades, which move fore and aft through the gust waves. Body-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the actual atmospheric turbulence experienced by a point fixed on a nonrotating aircraft component such as the aircraft's center of gravity or the rotor hub, while blade-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the atmospheric turbulence experienced by an element of the rotating rotor blade. An example is presented, which, though overly simplified, shows important differences between blade- and body-fixed rotorcraft atmospheric turbulence models. All of the information necessary to develop the dynamic equations describing the atmospheric turbulence velocity field experienced by an aircraft is contained in the atmospheric turbulence velocity correlation matrix. It is for this reason that a generalized formulation of the correlation matrix describing atmospheric turbulence that a rotating blade encounters is developed. From this correlation matrix, earlier treated cases restricted to a rotor flying straight and level directly into the mean wind can be recovered as special cases.

  18. A comparative study and application of continuously variable transmission to a single main rotor heavy lift helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameer, Sameer

    Rotorcraft transmission design is limited by empirical weight trends that are proportional to the power/torque raised to the two-thirds coupled with the relative inexperience industry has with the employment of variable speed transmission to heavy lift helicopters of the order of 100,000 lbs gross weight and 30,000 installed horsepower. The advanced rotorcraft transmission program objectives are to reduce transmission weight by at least 25%, reduce sound pressure levels by at least 10 dB, have a 5000 hr mean time between removal, and also incorporate the use of split torque technology in rotorcraft drivetrains of the future. The major obstacle that challenges rotorcraft drivetrain design is the selection, design, and optimization of a variable speed transmission in the goal of achieving a 50% reduction in rotor speed and its ability to handle high torque with light weight gears, as opposed to using a two-speed transmission which has inherent structural problems and is highly unreliable due to the embodiment of the traction type transmission, complex clutch and brake system. This thesis selects a nontraction pericyclic continuously variable transmission (P-CVT) as the best approach for a single main rotor heavy lift helicopter. The objective is to target and overcome the above mentioned obstacle for drivetrain design. Overcoming this obstacle provides advancement in the state of the art of drivetrain design over existing planetary and split torque transmissions currently used in helicopters. The goal of the optimization process was to decrease weight, decrease noise, increase efficiency, and increase safety and reliability. The objective function utilized the minimization of the weight and the major constraint is the tooth bending stress of the facegears. The most important parameters of the optimization process are weight, maintainability, and reliability which are cross-functionally related to each other, and these parameters are related to the torques and

  19. 78 FR 27867 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters Inc. Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ..., leading to vibration, loss of tail rotor pitch control, and subsequent loss of tail rotor and helicopter... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters Inc. Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking...

  20. High-speed helicopter rotor noise - Shock waves as a potent source of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farassat, F.; Lee, Yung-Jang; Tadghighi, H.; Holz, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the problem of high speed rotor noise prediction. In particular, we propose that from the point of view of the acoustic analogy, shocks around rotating blades are sources of sound. We show that, although for a wing at uniform steady rectilinear motion with shocks the volume quadrupole and shock sources cancel in the far field to the order of 1/r, this cannot happen for rotating blades. In this case, some cancellation between volume quadrupoles and shock sources occurs, yet the remaining shock noise contribution is still potent. A formula for shock noise prediction is presented based on mapping the deformable shock surface to a time independent region. The resulting equation is similar to Formulation 1A of Langley. Shock noise prediction for a hovering model rotor for which experimental noise data exist is presented. The comparison of measured and predicted acoustic data shows good agreement.

  1. Manufacturing Process Development for Dust and Rain Erosion Resistant Coated Metallic Clads for Helicopter Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Command. The program is being conducted at Solar Turbines International Research Laboratories with Mr. A. R. Stetson, Manager of Materials Technology, as...had to be fabricated. The titanium specimens were fabricated using the same coating/creep forming tecnique developed to produce the large scale Bell...and David P. Huey and A.R. Stetson of Solar, from Sikorsky Aircraft: John Longobardi, Program Manager , Peter Ogle, Rotor System Section Head and John

  2. Stabilization and control of quad-rotor helicopter using a smartphone device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Alok; Lee, Dah-Jye; Moore, Jason; Chang, Yung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, autonomous, micro-unmanned aerial vehicles (micro-UAVs), or more specifically hovering micro- UAVs, have proven suitable for many promising applications such as unknown environment exploration and search and rescue operations. The early versions of UAVs had no on-board control capabilities, and were difficult for manual control from a ground station. Many UAVs now are equipped with on-board control systems that reduce the amount of control required from the ground-station operator. However, the limitations on payload, power consumption and control without human interference remain the biggest challenges. This paper proposes to use a smartphone as the sole computational device to stabilize and control a quad-rotor. The goal is to use the readily available sensors in a smartphone such as the GPS, the accelerometer, the rate-gyros, and the camera to support vision-related tasks such as flight stabilization, estimation of the height above ground, target tracking, obstacle detection, and surveillance. We use a quad-rotor platform that has been built in the Robotic Vision Lab at Brigham Young University for our development and experiments. An Android smartphone is connected through the USB port to an external hardware that has a microprocessor and circuitries to generate pulse-width modulation signals to control the brushless servomotors on the quad-rotor. The high-resolution camera on the smartphone is used to detect and track features to maintain a desired altitude level. The vision algorithms implemented include template matching, Harris feature detector, RANSAC similarity-constrained homography, and color segmentation. Other sensors are used to control yaw, pitch, and roll of the quad-rotor. This smartphone-based system is able to stabilize and control micro-UAVs and is ideal for micro-UAVs that have size, weight, and power limitations.

  3. Rotor damping analysis based on helicopter dynamic requirement with rotor/fuselage coupling%基于耦合动力学要求的旋翼阻尼器特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭俊贤; 向锦武; 覃海鹰

    2011-01-01

    旋翼阻尼特性是直升机动力学问题的要素之一,根据全机动力学设计要求,进行地面共振和旋翼/动力/传动扭振系统稳定性分析,并据此提出旋翼系统阻尼特性参数设计要求.分析了粘弹性阻尼器和液压阻尼器的特点,研究了阻尼器刚度和阻尼对全机耦合动力学的影响;通过比较不同孔径节流孔的阻尼特性,确定了阻尼器设计方案.计算分析结果以及阻尼器样件的性能试验和机上试验验证结果表明:阻尼特性能够满足地面共振和旋翼/动力/传动扭振系统稳定性要求,并可实现其用于桨叶折叠的功能要求.%The rotor damping is one of the key points for a helicopter dynamic design. An introduction to the theoretical and practical study of one of the helicopter dynamic problems, which describesd the development of the rotor damping based on the helicopter dynamic with rotor/fuselage coupling that contains the stability analysis of ground resonance and the stability of rotor/power/transmission coherent was given. Based on the dynamic requirement of rotor/frame, damping analysis of the elasto-damper and the fluid-damper, which considered the effect of the stiffness and the damping was presented. The parametric sensitivity of the damper stiffness and damping was estimated. With constraints from engine control and ground resonance, the different effect was given with various available designs. Calculating and testing results performed demonstrating that, as solution to the dynamic problem, the damping with suitable orifice design for a variable liquid damper is reasonable for the helicopter dynamic problem solution and rotor blade folding.

  4. 直升机旋翼系统弹性轴承刚度特性试验方法研究%RESEARCH OF STIFFNESS CHARACTERISTICS TEST METHOD FOR HELICOPTER ROTOR SYSTEM SPHERICAL THRUST BEARING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓东; 王卫卫; 蒋玮光

    2012-01-01

    直升机旋翼系统是直升机的核心部件,弹性轴承将桨叶与桨毂相连,提供桨叶的挥舞、摆振和变距自由度,刚度特性是其主要的力学性能.通过采用松紧螺套驱动半圆形夹具转动来测试弹性轴承压缩、扭转和弯曲刚度特性,结果表明该试验方法新颖独特,具有一定的通用性,能准确判定弹性轴承是否合格,可为不同机型的弹性轴承提供装机前试验的方法.%Rotor system is the core component of the helicopter, flexible blade with the spherical thrust bearing connected to provide the wielding, shimmy and pitch degrees of freedom, the stiffness characteristics is one of the main mechanical properties. Test the spherical thrust bearing compression, torsion and bending stiffness characteristics by twisting the screw to drive the semicircular fixture. These results indicated that the test method is distinctive and general. It can accurately determine whether the spherical thrust bearing is qualified and provide a test before installing for different type of spherical thrust bearings.

  5. Multiaxial fatigue of in-service aluminium longerons for helicopter rotor-blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shanyavskiy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue cracking of longerons manufactured from Al-alloy AVT-1 for helicopter in-service rotorblades was considered and crack growth period and equivalent of tensile stress for different blade sections were estimated. Complicated case of in-service blades multiaxial cyclically bending-rotating and tension can be considered based on introduced earlier master curve constructed for aluminum alloys in the simple case of uniaxial tension with stress R-ratio near to zero. Calculated equivalent tensile stress was compared for different blade sections and it was shown that in-service blades experienced not principle difference in this value in the crack growth direction by the investigated sections. It is not above the designed equivalent stress level. Crack growth period estimation in longerons based on fatigue striation spacing or meso-beach-marks measurements has shown that monitoring system introduced designer in longerons can be effectively used for in-time crack detecting independently on the failed section when can appeared because of various type of material faults or in-service damages.

  6. An experimental investigation of the effect of rotor tip shape on helicopter blade-slap noise. [in the langley v/stol wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoad, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of tip-shape modification on blade-vortex interaction-induced helicopter blade-slap noise was investigated. The general rotor model system (GRMS) with a 3.148 m (10.33 ft) diameter, four-bladed fully articulated rotor was installed in the Langley V/STOL wind tunnel. The tunnel was operated in the open-throat configuration with treatment to improve the semi-anechoic characteristics of the test chamber. Based on previous investigation, four promising tips (ogee, sub-wing, 60 deg swept-tapered, and end-plate) were used along with a standard square tip as a baseline configuration. Aerodynamic and acoustical data concerning the relative applicability of the various tip configurations for blade-slap noise reduction are presented without analysis or discussion.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a twisted airfoil shaped two-bladed H-Darrieus rotor made from fibreglass reinforced plastic (FRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Gupta, Sukanta Roy, Agnimitra Biswas

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available H-Darrieus rotor is a lift type device having two to three blades designed as airfoils. The blades are attached vertically to the central shaft through support arms. The support to vertical axis helps the rotor maintain its shape. In this paper, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD analysis of an airfoil shaped two-bladed H-Darrieus rotor using Fluent 6.2 software was performed. Based on the CFD results, a comparative study between experimental and computational works was carried out. The H-Darrieus rotor was 20cm in height, 5cm in chord and twisted with an angle of 30° at the trailing end. The blade material of rotor was Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP. The experiments were earlier conducted in a subsonic wind tunnel for various height-to-diameter (H/D ratios. A two dimensional computational modeling was done with the help of Gambit tool using unstructured grid. Realistic boundary conditions were provided for the model to have synchronization with the experimental conditions. Two dimensional steady-state segregated solver with absolute velocity formulation and cell based grid was considered, and a standard k-epsilon viscous model with standard wall functions was chosen. A first order upwind discretization scheme was adopted for pressure velocity coupling of the flow. The inlet velocities and rotor rotational speeds were taken from the experimental results. From the computational analysis, power coefficient (Cp and torque coefficient (Ct values at ten different H/D ratios namely 0.85, 1.0, 1.10, 1.33, 1.54, 1.72, 1.80, 1.92, 2.10 and 2.20 were calculated in order to predict the performances of the twisted H-rotor. The variations of Cp and Ct with tip speed ratios were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. The standard deviations of computational Cp and Ct from experimental Cp and Ct were obtained. From the computational analysis, the highest values of Cp and Ct were obtained at H/D ratios of 1.0 and 1.54 respectively. The

  8. 直升机旋翼结冰后的飞行品质%Effects of Rotor Icing on Flying Qualities of Helicopter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国知; 曹义华

    2011-01-01

    研究了旋翼结冰后直升机飞行品质分析模型的建立方法,该方法通过引入结冰参数,计算结冰后桨叶翼型升阻力系教增量,建立旋翼结冰模型.并以系数增量形式计入结冰对旋翼力、力矩和旋翼挥舞模型的影响,建立结冰后飞行动力学模型.基于线性小扰动理论,进一步建立结冰后直升机飞行品质分析模型.根据军用旋翼飞行器驾驶品质要求(ADS-33E-PRF),研究了旋翼结冰对直升机开环状态下飞行品质的影响.按照品质规范要求,主要分析了结冰时间、环境温度、液态水含量和平均水滴直径的变化对直升机姿态敏捷性、轴间耦合特性、垂直轴操纵功效和横向突风扰动的影响.计算结果的对比分析显示,直升机旋翼结冰后的飞行品质模型合理,可以用来进行工程应用上的定性分析.%A method for establishing the helicopter flying qualities analysis model due to rotor icing is studied. By introducing several icing parameters, the increment of blade airfoil lift/drag coefficient due to rotor icing is calculated, and the rotor icing model is established. Then considering the rotor icing effects on rotor force and torque and rotor flapping model with the forms of coefficient increment, the iced flight dynamic model is developed. Based on the linear perturbation theory, the helicopter flying quality analysis model is established. Based on the handing quality requirements for military helicopters (ADS-33E-PRF), the effects of icing on the open-loop flying qualities of helicopter are analyzed. According to those requirements, the attitude quickness, interaxis coupling, vertical axis control power, and disturbance of the lateral gust are mainly analyzed with the variation of icing time, atmospheric temperature,liquid water content, and median volumetric diameter. Calculation results indicate that the flying qualities analysis model due to rotor icing is effective, and they can be used as an

  9. Variable Speed Rotor System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Variable speed rotors will give helicopters several advantages: higher top speed, greater fuel efficiency, momentary emergency over-power, resonance detuning...

  10. 78 FR 65180 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc., Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... condition, vibration, loss of tail rotor pitch control, and loss of directional control of the helicopter...-047-AD; Amendment 39-17606; AD 2013-19-24] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc., Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We...

  11. Taper Measurement for Helicopter Rotor Based on Spot Imaging Method%基于光斑成像的直升机旋翼共锥度测量方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆军; 邓超; 蔡成涛; 姜迈

    2011-01-01

    Helicopter rotor dynamic balancing of rotor taper is an important parameter measurement. It directly affects the performance of helicopter mobility, security and so many key indicators. Rotor rotating at high speed for a state system of measuring the characteristics of taper values, a taper measurement for helicopter rotor based on spot imaging method has been introduced, while a more detailed description of the system, basic structure, basic principle and system error analysis has been introduced. It is a non-contact measurement. It can measure the blade pitch angle beside measuring the rotor taper, and can be realized on a total of helicopter rotor taper high precision measurements. The method has high practical value.%直升机旋翼共锥度值是直升机旋翼动平衡试验中测试的一项重要指标,它关系到直升机的安全和各方面性能,针对在旋翼高速旋转的动态下进行旋翼共锥度测量的特点,设计了一种基于光斑成像的直升机旋翼共锥度测量方法,给出了系统基本构成和测量原理,并进行了系统误差分析;该方法是一种非接触式的测量方法,在测量旋翼锥度差的同时,还可以测出桨叶的桨距角,可实现对直升机旋翼共锥度较高精度的测量;该方法具有较高的实际应用价值.

  12. Boeing-SMART Rotor Wind Tunnel Test Data Report for DARPA Helicopter Quieting Program (HQP), Phase 1B

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    band-pass filter.) • Fluctuations in some of the rotor performance channels were observed. Analyses revealed a strong contribution from a subharmonic ...harmonics. Nevertheless to correct for the problem, a band-pass filter was developed to remove the 6.135-per-rev subharmonic in the rotor performance

  13. A comparison with theory of peak to peak sound level for a model helicopter rotor generating blade slap at low tip speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, R. R.; Hubbard, J. E., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Mini-tuft and smoke flow visualization techniques have been developed for the investigation of model helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction noise at low tip speeds. These techniques allow the parameters required for calculation of the blade vortex interaction noise using the Widnall/Wolf model to be determined. The measured acoustics are compared with the predicted acoustics for each test condition. Under the conditions tested it is determined that the dominating acoustic pulse results from the interaction of the blade with a vortex 1-1/4 revolutions old at an interaction angle of less than 8 deg. The Widnall/Wolf model predicts the peak sound pressure level within 3 dB for blade vortex separation distances greater than 1 semichord, but it generally over predicts the peak S.P.L. by over 10 dB for blade vortex separation distances of less than 1/4 semichord.

  14. The Production of Rotor-spun Pure Cotton Low-twist Knitting Yarn%转杯纺纯棉低捻针织纱的生产

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张占全

    2013-01-01

    The selection and assortment of cotton is the first step for producing high-quality, high-grade pure cotton low-twist knitting yarn. During cotton assorting, it is important to pay close attention to the internal quotas of the cotton. The article discussed the process and technology for each step of the yarn production from blowing, carding to drawing and rotor-spinning.%  生产优质、高档全棉低捻针织转杯纺纱,棉花的选配是第一关,选配棉花时要重点关注棉花的内在指标。文章还对清棉工序、梳棉工序、并条工序、转杯纺工序的工艺技术进行了探讨。

  15. Aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotors with blade appended pendulum vibration absorbers. Mathematical derivations and program user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical development is presented for the expanded capabilities of the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) G400 Rotor Aeroelastic Analysis. This expanded analysis, G400PA, simulates the dynamics of teetered rotors, blade pendulum vibration absorbers and the higher harmonic excitations resulting from prescribed vibratory hub motions and higher harmonic blade pitch control. Formulations are also presented for calculating the rotor impedance matrix appropriate to these higher harmonic blade excitations. This impedance matrix and the associated vibratory hub loads are intended as the rotor blade characteristics elements for use in the Simplified Coupled Rotor/Fuselage Vibration Analysis (SIMVIB). Sections are included presenting updates to the development of the original G400 theory, and material appropriate to the user of the G400PA computer program. This material includes: (1) a general descriptionof the tructuring of the G400PA FORTRAN coding, (2) a detaild description of the required input data and other useful information for successfully running the program, and (3) a detailed description of the output results.

  16. Fault Simulation and Diagnosis of Helicopter Rotor Dynamic Balance Based on Dynamic Model%基于动力学模型的旋翼动平衡故障仿真及诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高军龙; 胡国才; 吴靖

    2016-01-01

    Rotor mass unbanlance leads to dynamic unbalance of rotor-system, thus it causes helicopter vibration. Accord-ing to the faults of rotor dynamic unbalance, the dynamics model of helicopter was constructed to simulate and analyze mass unbalance of blade,and the relation was found out between the mass unbalance and adjusting weight . And then a methodology of rotor adjustment was presented based on the combination of BP neural network and genetic algorithm, and a model was established between the inputs and weights that included the flapping angles of 4 blades and the accelerations and phases of body roll and pitch. The model would predict the adjustment weights throught learning and training, so as to reduce the vibration of the helicopter, and solve the problem of rotor unbalance.%旋翼桨叶质量不平衡造成旋翼动不平衡,从而引起直升机振动.针对旋翼动不平衡故障,建立直升机动力学模型,对桨叶质量不平衡进行故障仿真及分析,建立质量不平衡故障与调整配重的对应关系;进而提出一种BP神经网络和遗传算法结合的旋翼调整方法,建立输入参数与桨叶配重之间的模型,将四片桨叶的挥舞角和机体横滚、俯仰2个方向的加速度值及相位作为网络输入,通过学习训练,根据输入数据预测调整配重,从而减小直升机振动,解决旋翼动不平衡问题.

  17. Wind Tunnel Testing of a 120th Scale Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Model in Airplane and Helicopter Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.; Willink, Gina C.; Russell, Carl R.; Amy, Alexander R.; Pete, Ashley E.

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012 and October 2013, NASA and the U.S. Army jointly conducted a wind tunnel test program examining two notional large tilt rotor designs: NASA's Large Civil Tilt Rotor and the Army's High Efficiency Tilt Rotor. The approximately 6%-scale airframe models (unpowered) were tested without rotors in the U.S. Army 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Measurements of all six forces and moments acting on the airframe were taken using the wind tunnel scale system. In addition to force and moment measurements, flow visualization using tufts, infrared thermography and oil flow were used to identify flow trajectories, boundary layer transition and areas of flow separation. The purpose of this test was to collect data for the validation of computational fluid dynamics tools, for the development of flight dynamics simulation models, and to validate performance predictions made during conceptual design. This paper focuses on the results for the Large Civil Tilt Rotor model in an airplane mode configuration up to 200 knots of wind tunnel speed. Results are presented with the full airframe model with various wing tip and nacelle configurations, and for a wing-only case also with various wing tip and nacelle configurations. Key results show that the addition of a wing extension outboard of the nacelles produces a significant increase in the lift-to-drag ratio, and interestingly decreases the drag compared to the case where the wing extension is not present. The drag decrease is likely due to complex aerodynamic interactions between the nacelle and wing extension that results in a significant drag benefit.

  18. An analytically linearized helicopter model with improved modeling accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Patrick T.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An analytically linearized model for helicopter flight response including rotor blade dynamics and dynamic inflow, that was recently developed, was studied with the objective of increasing the understanding, the ease of use, and the accuracy of the model. The mathematical model is described along with a description of the UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter and flight test used to validate the model. To aid in utilization of the model for sensitivity analysis, a new, faster, and more efficient implementation of the model was developed. It is shown that several errors in the mathematical modeling of the system caused a reduction in accuracy. These errors in rotor force resolution, trim force and moment calculation, and rotor inertia terms were corrected along with improvements to the programming style and documentation. Use of a trim input file to drive the model is examined. Trim file errors in blade twist, control input phase angle, coning and lag angles, main and tail rotor pitch, and uniform induced velocity, were corrected. Finally, through direct comparison of the original and corrected model responses to flight test data, the effect of the corrections on overall model output is shown.

  19. Autonomous Hovering Flight of a Small Helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Akihiro; Tokutake, Hiroshi; Sunada, Shigeru

    During the 20th century, aircraft were only used for transportation. If aircraft can be made small and lightweight, however, they can become tools to assist in everyday life. We developed a small, lightweight co-axial helicopter with a rotor diameter of about 30cm. The mechanisms for varying cyclic pitch of the upper and lower rotors, which are used in the coaxial helicopter for entertainment, are adopted in our develop helicopter. Our developed helicopter is equipped with a flight control system for the attitude and position, which is composed of a micro computer and some sensors. And the helicopter can make autonomous hovering flight just measuring the height and the distances from the walls. The weight of the helicopter is no more than 200g and this helicopter is the lightest helicopter for an autonomous hovering flight among the helicopters where all control systems are onboard, as far as the authors know.

  20. 78 FR 23692 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... in excessive vibration of the helicopter and loss of control of the helicopter. (c) Comments Due Date... Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM... AS350B, BA, B1, B2, B3, and D, and Model AS355E, F, F1, F2, and N helicopters with certain tail rotor...

  1. A Survey of Theoretical and Experimental Coaxial Rotor Aerodynamic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Colin P.

    1997-01-01

    The recent appearance of the Kamov Ka-50 helicopter and the application of coaxial rotors to unmanned aerial vehicles have renewed international interest in the coaxial rotor configuration. This report addresses the aerodynamic issues peculiar to coaxial rotors by surveying American, Russian, Japanese, British, and German research. (Herein, 'coaxial rotors' refers to helicopter, not propeller, rotors. The intermeshing rotor system was not investigated.) Issues addressed are separation distance, load sharing between rotors, wake structure, solidity effects, swirl recovery, and the effects of having no tail rotor. A general summary of the coaxial rotor configuration explores the configuration's advantages and applications.

  2. 粒子群优化在直升机旋翼动平衡调整中的应用%Helicopter rotor tuning based on neural network and particle swarm optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红梅; 吕琛; 欧阳平超; 王少萍

    2011-01-01

    传统的直升机旋翼调整方法没有考虑调整参数与振动信号之间的非线性关系,针对这一缺点,提出将广义回归神经网络(GRNN,General Regression Neural Network)和粒子群算法相结合的旋翼调整方法,采用GRNN网络建立旋翼动平衡调整模型,以桨叶的调整参数作为神经网络的输入,以旋翼转轴和机身的三向的加速度测量值作为网络输出,建立调整参数与直升机振动信号间的模型.以直升机振动作为目标函数,采用粒子群优化算法对桨叶的调整参数进行寻优,获得当直升机振动最小时的桨叶的调整量.飞行实验结果表明,此方法可通过飞行测试获得的新数据对神经网络进行更新,使系统在使用过程中不断完善,并可在较少的飞行调整下完成旋翼的动平衡调整.%Considering the drawbacks of traditional rotor adjustment method without calculating possible nonlinear between rotor adjustments and fuselage vibration signals of the helicopter, a new rotor adjustment method based on the general regression neural network (GRNN) and the particle swarm optimization (PSO) was presented. GRNN network was employed to model the relationship of the rotor adjustment parameters and the fuselage vibrations, whose input parameters are rotor adjustment parameters and whose outputs are acceleration measurements along the three axes of rotor shaft and the fuselage. With the helicopter vibration as an objective function, the PSO was used to make a global optimization to find the suitable rotor adjustments corresponding to the minimum vibrations. Flight test results indicate that the neural networks are easily updated if new data becomes available thus allowing the system to evolve and mature in the course of its use.

  3. Feedback Control of Rotor Overspeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    Feedback system for automatically governing helicopter rotor speed promises to lessen pilot's workload, enhance maneuverability, and protect airframe. With suitable modifications, concept applied to control speed of electrical generators, automotive engines and other machinery.

  4. 电控旋翼直升机飞行动力学建模与配平特性研究%Flight dynamics modeling and trim characteristics of helicopters with electrically controlled rotor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆洋; 王超; 赵鑫

    2013-01-01

    首先基于Peters He广义动态尾迹理论,建立了电控旋翼动态尾迹入流模型,进一步结合电控旋翼襟翼操纵与桨叶变距之间的关系、桨叶挥舞运动方程和带襟翼翼型非定常气动力模型建立了适用于飞行力学分析的电控旋翼气动力模型.在此基础上,结合机身、尾桨、尾面的气动力模型,建立了完整的电控旋翼直升机飞行动力学分析模型.以Z-11直升机为基准改造为电控旋翼直升机作为算例,计算了前飞状态下电控旋翼直升机的诱导速度分布和桨盘迎角分布,对比了电控旋翼与常规旋翼的气动特性差异;在此基础上,进一步分析了电控旋翼直升机的配平特性随前飞速度的变化规律以及与常规直升机的差异.%Firstly,a dynamic inflow model for electrically controlled rotor (ECR) is developed based on the "Peters-He" generalized dynamic wake theory,and an accurate aerodynamics model of ECR,which is suited for the analysis of ECR helicopter flight dynamics,is built combined with the relationship between flap deflection and blade pitch,the blade flapping equation and the unsteady aerodynamic model of airfoil with trailing-edge flap.Then,on this basis,an ECR helicopter flight dynamics model is established combined with the aerodynamics models of airframe,tail rotor,horizontal and vertical tail.Taking Z-11 helicopter as a numerical example,the distributions of ECR induced velocity and angles of attack variations with advance speed are calculated and compared with the baseline rotor.Furthermore,the trim characteristics of the ECR helicopter is investigated.

  5. An Overview of Rotor Blades Optimum Design for Helicopter Vibration Reduction%直升机减振的旋翼桨叶优化设计研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向锦武; 郭俊贤; 张晓谷

    2001-01-01

    Helicopter vibration level has been a problem for many helicopter configurations. Due to the great practical importance of the problem a considerable amount of research has been aimed at various aspects of vibration reduction and control. This paper presents the results of a survey of rotor blades optimum design of reducing vibration by modifying blade properties so as to reduce vibratory hub shears and moments, and thereby reduce the vibration level experienced in the fuselage. Important categories relative to this optimum design problems are considered: the integration of various disciplines and the optimum design objectives; structural and aerodynamic analysis model of the rotor blades for optimum design; numerical optimization and sensitivity analysis technology; and the further development on this subject. This paper is intended to put this design method in a proper perspective from the viewpoint of high performance helicopter design.%围绕降低直升机振动水平的旋翼桨叶减振优化设计,对国内外这方面研究进展情况作了综述;着重讨论了降低旋翼激振力减振优化设计分析中的几个主要问题,包括桨叶减振优化设计途径与目标,桨叶优化设计中的分析模型,优化设计方法及灵敏度分析技术,以及桨叶优化减振设计研究的最新发展方向和需进一步研究的问题等.

  6. Analysis of Aerodynamic and Vibration Characteristics of a Micro Quad-rotor Helicopter with Low Reynolds Number%低雷诺数下微型四旋翼飞行器气动和振动特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐书浩; 刘素娟; 张文明; 肖心想

    2013-01-01

    基于有限元方法研究低雷诺数下微型四旋翼飞行器的气动特性和振动特性。建立微型四旋翼飞行器悬飞时的三维流场物理模型,给出边界条件,采用有限体积法对多个边界条件进行数值计算和分析,研究微型四旋翼飞行器在悬飞过程中的流场分布,揭示微型四旋翼飞行器的气动特性变化规律;此外,将气动载荷加载到结构分析模块,研究机身应力分布情况和流固耦合特性,得到机身最大应力所在位置及其振动特性。%Aerodynamic and vibration characteristics of a micro quad-rotor helicopter were studied based on finite element method. A three dimensional physical model of the flow field was established. By adding boundary conditions, the flow field was analyzed numerically using the finite volume method and its aerodynamic characteristics were obtained. Then the aerodynamic force was loaded to the helicopter structure to get the stress distribution and find out where the maximum stress occurs. Finally, the first six vibration modes and their vibration characteristics were obtained after the modal analysis of the micro quad-rotor helicopter.

  7. Helicopter controllability

    OpenAIRE

    Carico, Dean

    1989-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The concept of helicopter controllability is explained. A background study reviews helicopter development in the U.S. General helicopter configurations, linearized equations of motion, stability, and piloting requirements are discussed. Helicopter flight controls, handling qualities, and associated specification are reviewed. Analytical, simulation and flight test methods for evaluating helicopter automatic flight control systems ar...

  8. Dynamic Stability Analysis for Helicopter Rotor/Fuselage Coupled Nonlinear Systems%直升机旋翼/机体耦合非线性系统的动稳定性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡国才; 向锦武; 张晓谷

    2003-01-01

    为了准确反映直升机旋翼/机体耦合系统的动稳定性,建立了旋翼/机体耦合非线性动力学微分方程,在时域内求解微分方程得到各片桨叶的挥舞、摆振及机体的响应用以对系统进行数值模拟;为了获得系统稳定性的定量值,用快速傅立叶变换(FFT)确定模态频率,用基于傅立叶级数的移动矩形窗方法得到模态阻尼.地面共振分析表明,时域分析与特征值分析结果具有良好的相关性,并与试验值吻合,从而验证了该方法的有效性.大总距时,用时域分析得到的模态阻尼与试验值吻合得更好,该方法可用于具有非线性减摆器的直升机旋翼/机体耦合系统的动稳定性分析.%In order to accurately predict the dynamic instabilities of a helicopter rotor/fuselage coupled system, nonlinear differential equations are derived and integrated in the time domain to yield responses of rotor blade flapping, lead-lag and fuselage motions to simulate the behavior of the system numerically. To obtain quantitative instabilities, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is conducted to estimate the modal frequencies, and Fourier series based moving-block analysis is employed in the predictions of the modal damping in terms of the response time history. Study on the helicopter ground resonance exhibits excellent correlation among the time-domain (TD) analytical results, eigenvalues and wind tunnel test data, thus validating the methodology of the paper. With a large collective pitch set, the predictions of regressive lag modal damping from TD analysis correlate with the experimental data better than from eigen analysis. TD analysis can be applied in the dynamic stability analysis of helicopter rotor/fuselage coupled systems incorporated with nonlinear blade lag dampers.

  9. Generalized Helicopter Rotor Performance Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    as a roughness factor that naturally occurs on blades that are used on production aircraft. A value of .002 is normally used. The value is not added...4 1XI .UCCW 11NP g * (N (N4 13144 1N %1m- bTX MO H0 cnx) ’---Z ýoE-aO (N (N 11 -M t1E-4(N0 HCAHZ w~ N c . 0 Iý 0H’.- 121WA~w = = 0 =% .. ’ ým *Lt N I

  10. Study of Helicopter Roll Control Effectiveness Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    variety of helicopter configurations and control system types , and a wide range of flight tasks and maneuvers. The basis of the experimental design...represent a wide range of basic helicopter rotor hub and airframe designs and flight control system types . It was intended to generally limit

  11. Helicopter vibration reduction using robust control

    OpenAIRE

    Mannchen, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation presents a control law for helicopters to reduce vibration and to increase damping using individual blade control. H-infinity control synthesis is used to develop a robust controller usable in different operating conditions with different helicopter flight speeds. The control design is applied in simulation to the four-blade BO 105 helicopter rotor, which is equipped with an individual blade control system, where the pitch rod links are replaced by hydraulic actuators, allow...

  12. Performance and Vibratory Loads Data From a Wind-Tunnel Test of a Model Helicopter Main-Rotor Blade With a Paddle-Type Tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Noonan, Kevin W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to obtain data to permit evaluation of paddle-type tip technology for possible use in future U.S. advanced rotor designs. Data was obtained for both a baseline main-rotor blade and a main-rotor blade with a paddle-type tip. The baseline and paddle-type tip blades were compared with regard to rotor performance, oscillatory pitch-link loads, and 4-per-rev vertical fixed-system loads. Data was obtained in hover and forward flight over a nominal range of advance ratios from 0.15 to 0.425. Results indicate that the paddle-type tip offers no performance improvements in either hover or forward flight. Pitch-link oscillatory loads for the paddle-type tip are higher than for the baseline blade, whereas 4-per-rev vertical fixed-system loads are generally lower.

  13. Rotor/body aerodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzina, M. D.; Smith, C. A.; Shinoda, P.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in which independent, steady state aerodynamic forces and moments were measured on a 2.24 m diam. two bladed helicopter rotor and on several different bodies. The mutual interaction effects for variations in velocity, thrust, tip-path-plane angle of attack, body angle of attack, rotor/body position, and body geometry were determined. The results show that the body longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of a rotor and hub, and that the hub interference may be a major part of such interaction. The effects of the body on the rotor performance are presented.

  14. 78 FR 65195 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc. (MDHI) Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... other helicopters of the same type designs and that air safety and the public interest require adopting... rotor blade (MRB) retention bolts (bolts) installed. This AD requires a daily check of the position of... (ASB SB900-116). ASB SB900-116 specifies a repetitive check of the blade retention bolts, part number...

  15. Development of an advanced high-speed rotor - Final results from the Advanced Flight Research Rotor program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Mark; Haslim, Leonard

    1988-01-01

    The final results of the Advanced Flight Research Rotor (AFRR) study, a NASA sponsored research program, are summarized. First, the results of the initial phase of the AFRR program, consisting of the definition of a conventional rotor with planform and prescribed twist distributions, are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of the calculated performance benefit is then explained, and a detailed analysis of the prescribed twist distribution is presented. Recommendations are made on the practical means of approximating the prescribed twist on the actual rotor.

  16. Natural vibration of pre-twisted shear deformable beam systems subject to multiple kinds of initial stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, A. Y. T.; Fan, J.

    2010-05-01

    Free vibration and buckling of pre-twisted beams exhibit interesting coupling phenomena between compression, moments and torque and have been the subject of extensive research due to their importance as models of wind turbines and helicopter rotor blades. The paper investigates the influence of multiple kinds of initial stresses due to compression, shears, moments and torque on the natural vibration of pre-twisted straight beam based on the Timoshenko theory. The derivation begins with the three-dimensional Green strain tensor. The nonlinear part of the strain tensor is expressed as a product of displacement gradient to derive the strain energy due to initial stresses. The Frenet formulae in differential geometry are employed to treat the pre-twist. The strain energy due to elasticity and the linear kinetic energy are obtained in classical sense. From the variational principle, the governing equations and the associated natural boundary conditions are derived. It is noted that the first mode increases together with the pre-twisted angle but the second decreases seeming to close the first two modes together for natural frequencies and compressions. The gaps close monotonically as the angle of twist increases for natural frequencies and buckling compressions. However, unlike natural frequencies and compressions, the closeness is not monotonic for buckling shears, moments and torques.

  17. Flying control of small-type helicopter by detecting its in-air natural features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthaka Premachandra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Control of a small type helicopter is an interesting research area in unmanned aerial vehicle development. This study aims to detect a more typical helicopter unequipped with markers as a means by which to resolve the various issues of the prior studies. Accordingly, we propose a method of detecting the helicopter location and pose through using an infrastructure camera to recognize its in-air natural features such as ellipse traced by the rotation of the helicopter's propellers. A single-rotor system helicopter was used as the controlled airframe in our experiments. Here, helicopter location is measured by detecting the main rotor ellipse center and pose is measured following relationship between the main rotor ellipse and the tail rotor ellipse. Following these detection results we confirmed the hovering control possibility of the helicopter through experiments.

  18. 基于机体振动的直升机桨毂阻尼故障诊断%DIAGNOSIS OF DAMPING FAULTS IN HELICOPTER ROTOR HUB BASED ON FUSELAGE VIBRATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高亚东; 张曾锠

    2006-01-01

    研究了仅用机体振动信号诊断旋翼减摆器阻尼失效、轴向铰卡涩和水平铰卡涩3种桨毂阻尼故障的可行性.在旋翼试验台上分别设置上述3种阻尼故障,测取机体振动响应,利用快速傅立叶变换分析其频谱特征.分析表明,3种阻尼故障引起的机体振动谱图互不相同.采用概率神经网络实现了3种阻尼故障的正确分类.研究表明,仅用机体振动响应实现旋翼阻尼故障诊断是可行的.%Damping faults in a helicopter rotor hub are diagnosed by using vibration signals from the fuselage. Faults include the defective lag damper and raspings in its flap and feathering hinges. Experiments on the diagnosis of three faults are carried out on a rotor test rig with the chosen fault each time. Fuselage vibration signals from specified locations are measured and analyzed by the fast Fourier transform in the frequency domain. It is demonstrated that fuselage vibration frequency spectra induced by three faults are different fromeach other. The probabilistic neural network (PNN) is adopted to detect three faults. Results show that it is feasible to diagnose three faults only using fuselage vibration data.

  19. A New Framework For Helicopter Vibration Suppression; Time-Periodic System Identification and Controller Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulker, Fatma Demet

    In forward flight, helicopter rotor blades function within a highly complex aerodynamic environment that includes both near-blade and far-blade aerodynamic phenomena. These aerodynamic phenomena cause fluctuating aerodynamic loads on the rotor blades. These loads when coupled with the dynamic characteristics and elastic motion of the blade create excessive amount of vibration. These vibrations degrade helicopter performance, passenger comfort and contributes to high cost maintenance problems. In an effort to suppress helicopter vibration, recent studies have developed active control strategies using active pitch links, flaps, twist actuation and higher harmonic control of the swash plate. In active helicopter vibration control, designing a controller in a computationally efficient way requires accurate reduced-order models of complex helicopter aeroelasticity. In previous studies, controllers were designed using aeroelastic models that were obtained by coupling independently reduced aerodynamic and structural dynamic models. Unfortunately, these controllers could not satisfy stability and performance criteria when implemented in high-fidelity computer simulations or real-time experiments. In this thesis, we present a novel approach that provides accurate time-periodic reduced-order models and time-periodic H2 and H infinity controllers that satisfy the stability and performance criteria. Computational efficiency and the necessity of using the approach were validated by implementing an actively controlled flap strategy. In this proposed approach, the reduced-order models were directly identified from high-fidelity coupled aeroelastic analysis by using the time-periodic subspace identification method. Time-periodic H2 and Hinfinity controllers that update the control actuation at every time step were designed. The control synthesis problem was solved using Linear Matrix Inequality and periodic Riccati Equation based formulations, for which an in-house periodic

  20. Twisted light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Research at the Mathematical Optics Group uses "twisted" light to study new quatum-based information security systems. In order to understand the structure of "twisted" light, it is useful to start with an ordinary light beam with zero twist, namely...

  1. 基于DSP的微型直升机主动旋翼控制系统硬件设计%Hardware Design of Mini-helicopter Rotor Active Control System Based on DSP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宏; 罗华; 杨淑凤

    2012-01-01

    针对共轴双桨直升机主动旋翼控制的工作原理及其硬件设计方案进行了介绍.该系统主要由三轴加速度计ADXL345和三轴陀螺L3G4200D及TMS320F28335 DSP组成捷联惯导系统.并在捷联惯导姿态控制中增加了旋翼受力反馈环路,提高了惯导对外界扰动的响应速度.通过实验验证,该系统对于提高悬停稳定性和高度控制响应速度具有较好的效果.%The sculls coaxial helicopter active control of the working principle and hardware design solutions were introduced.The system consists of three-axis accelerometer ADXL345 three-axis gyro and L3G4200D and TMS320F28335 DSP components.And attitude control in strap down inertial navigation system(SINS) was added to rotor force feedback loop to improve the response to external disturbances.Experiments show that the system with good results to the hover stability and response speed of height control.

  2. The Use of Commercial Remote Sensing Predicting Helicopter Brownout Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    landing. 4 Figure 2. Soil caught in rotor downwash, start of brownout (from Brownout California soil resource lab) . A second issue ...Sensing in Predicting Helicopter Brownout Conditions. September 2006 (Top Secret). Tan, Kim H., First Edition, Enviromental Soil Science Marcel

  3. The Diver with a Rotor

    CERN Document Server

    Bharadwaj, Sudarsh; Dullin, Holger R; Leung, Karen; Tong, William

    2015-01-01

    We present and analyse a simple model for the twisting somersault. The model is a rigid body with a rotor attached which can be switched on and off. This makes it simple enough to devise explicit analytical formulas whilst still maintaining sufficient complexity to preserve the shape-changing dynamics essential for twisting somersaults in springboard and platform diving. With `rotor on' and with `rotor off' the corresponding Euler-type equations can be solved, and the essential quantities characterising the dynamics, such as the periods and rotation numbers, can be computed in terms of complete elliptic integrals. Thus we arrive at explicit formulas for how to achieve a dive with m somersaults and n twists in a given total time. This can be thought of as a special case of a geometric phase formula due to Cabrera 2007.

  4. Performance tests on helical Savonius rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamoji, M.A.; Kedare, S.B. [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India); Prabhu, S.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India)

    2009-03-15

    Conventional Savonius rotors have high coefficient of static torque at certain rotor angles and a negative coefficient of static torque from 135 to 165 and from 315 to 345 in one cycle of 360 . In order to decrease this variation in static torque from 0 to 360 , a helical Savonius rotor with a twist of 90 is proposed. In this study, tests on helical Savonius rotors are conducted in an open jet wind tunnel. Coefficient of static torque, coefficient of torque and coefficient of power for each helical Savonius rotor are measured. The performance of helical rotor with shaft between the end plates and helical rotor without shaft between the end plates at different overlap ratios namely 0.0, 0.1 and 0.16 is compared. Helical Savonius rotor without shaft is also compared with the performance of the conventional Savonius rotor. The results indicate that all the helical Savonius rotors have positive coefficient of static torque at all the rotor angles. The helical rotors with shaft have lower coefficient of power than the helical rotors without shaft. Helical rotor without shaft at an overlap ratio of 0.0 and an aspect ratio of 0.88 is found to have almost the same coefficient of power when compared with the conventional Savonius rotor. Correlation for coefficient of torque and power is developed for helical Savonius rotor for a range of Reynolds numbers studied. (author)

  5. 78 FR 52410 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ..., separation of tail rotor parts, severe vibration, and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter. DATES... Deutschland GmbH Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY..., MBB-BK 117 B-1, MBB-BK-117 B-2, and MBB-BK 117 C-1 helicopters to require inspections for corrosion...

  6. 77 FR 52265 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... rotor parts, severe vibration, and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter. You may obtain further... vibration, and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter. (c) Compliance You are responsible for... Deutschland GmbH Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ] ACTION: Notice of...

  7. 77 FR 54796 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... 26, 2010, which specifies installing two siliconed glass wool sleeves over both forward main rotor... the continued airworthiness of these helicopters. ] Costs of Compliance We estimate that this AD will.... Required parts cost $212, for a total cost of $297 for each helicopter. Based upon these costs, we...

  8. 直升机旋翼/机身动力反共振隔振器的优化设计%Optimization design for dynamic anti-resonance isolators of helicopters' rotor/fuselage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李园园; 陈国平; 王轲

    2016-01-01

    为提高直升机旋翼/机身反共振隔振器的隔振效率,对直升机主减隔振系统进行了优化设计。通过灵敏度分析,确定了以前后柔性梁的厚度和配重的密度作为优化设计变量,接着采用遗传算法对隔振效率和配重动能进行优化,考虑到仿真模型直接调用优化算法的计算效率较低问题,建立了基于响应面方法的优化近似模型。结果表明:优化后模型的某一阶反共振频率与激励频率一致,配重振动加大,力传递率下降,隔振效率大幅度提高。优化设计提高了动力反共振隔振器的隔振性能,可以为直升机隔振器的设计提供一定的指导。%To improve the isolation efficiency of helicopter rotor /fuselage anti-resonance isolator,optimization for the isolation system was conducted.The thickness of the front and rear flexible beams and their counterweight density were taken as the design variables through sensitivity analysis,and then the isolation efficiency and counterweight kinetic energy were optimized using genetic algorithms.Considering the lower computational efficiency problem due to simulation models directly calling the optimization algorithm,a surrogate model was established with the response surface method.The results showed that after optimization,a certain order anti-resonance frequency is consistent with the excitation frequency, counterweight vibration increases,force transmission rate decreases and vibration isolation efficiency is greatly improved;optimization design improves the dynamic isolators'anti-resonance isolation performance and can provide a guidance for the design of helicopter vibration isolators.

  9. 76 FR 35334 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. Model 205A, 205A-1, 205B, 212, 412, 412CF...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... directive (AD) for the specified Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. (BHT) model helicopters with tail rotor (T R.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This amendment adopts a new AD for the specified BHT model helicopters with an... blade, and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter. We have reviewed the following BHT Alert...

  10. Abrasion Resistance Comparison between Rotor and Ring Spun Yarn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jian-ping; YU Chong-wen

    2002-01-01

    On the base of literature review and the analysis of yarn properties, yarn structure and some other facts, the abrasion resistance of both rotor spun yarn and ring spun yarns are discussed. The results show that with the same raw material and twist, the rotor spun yarn has lower abrasion resistance than that of ring spun yarn, because of the higher twist employed, the abrasion resistance of rotor spun yarn is higher than that of ring spun yarn.

  11. Rotor dynamic considerations for large wind power generator systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiston, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Successful large, reliable, low maintenance wind turbines must be designed with full consideration for minimizing dynamic response to aerodynamic, inertial, and gravitational forces. Much of existing helicopter rotor technology is applicable to this problem. Compared with helicopter rotors, large wind turbines are likely to be relatively less flexible with higher dimensionless natural frequencies. For very large wind turbines, low power output per unit weight and stresses due to gravitational forces are limiting factors. The need to reduce rotor complexity to a minimum favors the use of cantilevered (hingeless) rotor configurations where stresses are relieved by elastic deformations.

  12. Dynamic Gust Load Analysis for Rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic load of helicopter rotors due to gust directly affects the structural stress and flight performance for helicopters. Based on a large deflection beam theory, an aeroelastic model for isolated helicopter rotors in the time domain is constructed. The dynamic response and structural load for a rotor under the impulse gust and slope-shape gust are calculated, respectively. First, a nonlinear Euler beam model with 36 degrees-of-freedoms per element is applied to depict the structural dynamics for an isolated rotor. The generalized dynamic wake model and Leishman-Beddoes dynamic stall model are applied to calculate the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic forces on rotors. Then, we transformed the differential aeroelastic governing equation to an algebraic one. Hence, the widely used Newton-Raphson iteration algorithm is employed to simulate the dynamic gust load. An isolated helicopter rotor with four blades is studied to validate the structural model and the aeroelastic model. The modal frequencies based on the Euler beam model agree well with published ones by CAMRAD. The flap deflection due to impulse gust with the speed of 2m/s increases twice to the one without gust. In this numerical example, results indicate that the bending moment at the blade root is alleviated due to elastic effect.

  13. Analysis of potential helicopter vibration reduction concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, A. J.; Davis, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    Several recent helicopter vibration reduction research programs are described. Results of studies of blade design parameters in rotor vibratory response and of an advanced blade design for reduced vibration are examined. An optimization approach to develop a general automated procedure for rotor blade design is described, and analytical results for an articulated rotor operating at a steady 160 kt flight condition are reported. The use of a self-adaptive controller to implement higher harmonic control in closed-loop fashion is addressed, and a computer simulation used to evaluate and compare the performance of alternative algorithms included in the generic active controller is discussed. Results are presented for steady level flight conditions, short-duration maneuvers, blade stresses and rotor performance, blade-appended aeroelastic devices, vibratory airloads, wake-induced blade airloads, and airloads from blade motions, the interaction of rotor and fuselage, and the interaction of rotor and empennage.

  14. Nine Years of Cooperation: The US-German Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on Helicopter Aeromechanics 2003-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    major source of structural loads of the rotor blades and the pitch links, as well a major source of vibrations and fatigue. Objectives: The...Extreme operation conditions on rotor blades limit the helicopter in many respects, like maximum speed, efficiency, noise emissions, and loading ...individuals contributed to the modern helicopter handling quality requirements with theoretical analysis, piloted simulations, and flight tests. The

  15. 76 FR 76068 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... rotor blade erosion protective shell which could lead to an unbalanced main rotor, high vibrations, damage to the tail boom or tail rotor, and loss of control of the helicopter. DATES: Comments must be... AD from American Eurocopter Corporation, 2701 N. Forum Drive, Grand Prairie, TX 75052, telephone (972...

  16. 旋翼/机翼转换式高速直升机RD15方案设计%RESEARCH ON SCHEME OF HIGH-SPEED ROTOR/WING TRANSITION HELICOPTER RD15

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王焕瑾; 高正

    2004-01-01

    首先对目前各种类型的高速直升机方案和提高前飞速度的新技术进行了综合比较和分析,在此基础上提出了一种旋翼/机翼转换式高速方案.然后,设计了高速直升机RD15的总体方案和直升机/飞机模式的转换过程.在该方案中,升力系统由盘翼和可收缩的桨叶组成;悬停和低速前飞时的控制采用单片桨叶控制技术;尾部采用矢量推力的涵道螺桨,不仅在悬停时提供方向控制,而且在飞机模式时提供高速前飞的推力和多种控制.最后,对此方案旋翼系统的气动特性和关键技术--直升机/飞机模式转换过程中盘翼的仰角、桨叶的长度、转速以及桨距等参数的变化进行了理论和试验研究,并建立了盘翼/旋翼系统的气动计算模型.计算和试验表明,该方案在直升机/飞机模式相互转化过程中升力、功率和操纵的改变能够实现平滑连续地过渡并保证操稳性.%To analyze the existing schemes of high-speed rotorcrafts and some new technologies, a new conceptual sketch of the high-speed rotor/wing transition helicopter RD15 is proposed. The overall layout of the RD15 is given out and the transition process from the helicopter mode to the airplane mode is designed. The lift system consists of a circular disk-wing with four retractable blades. The technology of individual blade control is adopted for flight control in hover and low speed flight. The tail is a vectored thrust duct propeller. It can provide the anti-torque in hover, and offer the multi-directional controls and propulsion drive for the airplane mode flight. The aerodynamic characteristics and key technologies in the transition process for this layout, including the nose up angle of disk-wing, the length of the blade, rotation speed, pitch angle and other parameters, are theoretically analyzed and experimentally tested. Calculation and experiments show that the shift process of the lift, the power and controls are

  17. Calculation of the rotor-fuselage interaction using the resolution of Euler equations; Calcul de l'interaction rotor-fuselage par resolution des equations d'Euler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettschart, N.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents the recent developments made at ONERA for the prediction of helicopter rotor-fuselage aerodynamic interactions. An actuator disk model has been implemented in the FLU3M code. Applications on isolated rotors as well as complete helicopter are performed using the Euler option of the code. The numerical results are compared with theoretical and experimental results. (author)

  18. Calculation of the rotor-fuselage interaction using the resolution of Euler equations; Calcul de l'interaction rotor-fuselage par resolution des equations d'Euler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettschart, N.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents the recent developments made at ONERA for the prediction of helicopter rotor-fuselage aerodynamic interactions. An actuator disk model has been implemented in the FLU3M code. Applications on isolated rotors as well as complete helicopter are performed using the Euler option of the code. The numerical results are compared with theoretical and experimental results. (author)

  19. Development of helicopter attitude axes controlled hover flight without pilot assistance and vehicle crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Miguel

    In this work, we show how to computerize a helicopter to fly attitude axes controlled hover flight without the assistance of a pilot and without ever crashing. We start by developing a helicopter research test bed system including all hardware, software, and means for testing and training the helicopter to fly by computer. We select a Remote Controlled helicopter with a 5 ft. diameter rotor and 2.2 hp engine. We equip the helicopter with a payload of sensors, computers, navigation and telemetry equipment, and batteries. We develop a differential GPS system with cm accuracy and a ground computerized navigation system for six degrees of freedom (6-DoF) free flight while tracking navigation commands. We design feedback control loops with yet-to-be-determined gains for the five control "knobs" available to a flying radio-controlled (RC) miniature helicopter: engine throttle, main rotor collective pitch, longitudinal cyclic pitch, lateral cyclic pitch, and tail rotor collective pitch. We develop helicopter flight equations using fundamental dynamics, helicopter momentum theory and blade element theory. The helicopter flight equations include helicopter rotor equations of motions, helicopter rotor forces and moments, helicopter trim equations, helicopter stability derivatives, and a coupled fuselage-rotor helicopter 6-DoF model. The helicopter simulation also includes helicopter engine control equations, a helicopter aerodynamic model, and finally helicopter stability and control equations. The derivation of a set of non-linear equations of motion for the main rotor is a contribution of this thesis work. We design and build two special test stands for training and testing the helicopter to fly attitude axes controlled hover flight, starting with one axis at a time and progressing to multiple axes. The first test stand is built for teaching and testing controlled flight of elevation and yaw (i.e., directional control). The second test stand is built for teaching and

  20. Computational Study of Flow Interactions in Coaxial Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Lee, Henry C.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Although the first idea of coaxial rotors appeared more than 150 years ago, most helicopters have used single main-rotor/tail-rotor combination. Since reactive moments of coaxial rotors are canceled by contra-rotation, no tail rotor is required to counter the torque generated by the main rotor. Unlike the single main rotor design that distributes power to both main and tail rotors, all of the power for coaxial rotors is used for vertical thrust. Thus, no power is wasted for anti-torque or directional control. The saved power helps coaxial rotors reach a higher hover ceiling than single rotor helicopters. Another advantage of coaxial rotors is that the overall rotor diameter can be reduced for a given vehicle gross weight because each rotor provides a maximum contribution to vertical thrust to overcome vehicle weight. However, increased mechanical complexity of the hub has been one of the challenges for manufacturing coaxial rotorcraft. Only the Kamov Design Bureau of Russia had been notably successful in production of coaxial helicopters until Sikorsky built X2, an experimental compound helicopter. Recent developments in unmanned aircraft systems and high-speed rotorcraft have renewed interest in the coaxial configuration. Multi-rotors are frequently used for small electric unmanned rotorcraft partly due to mechanical simplicity. The use of multiple motors provides redundancy as well as cost-efficiency. The multi-rotor concept has rarely been used until recently because of its inherent stability and control problems. However, advances in inexpensive electronic flight control systems have opened the floodgates for small drones using multirotors. Coaxial rotors have started to appear in some multi-rotor configurations. Small coaxial rotors have often been designed using a hundred year old approach that is "sketch, build, fly, and iterate." In that approach, there is no systematic way to explore trade-offs or determine logical next steps. It is neither possible to

  1. Optimum design configuration of Savonius rotor through wind tunnel experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, U.K.; Thotla, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781 039 (India); Maity, D. [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781 039 (India)

    2008-08-15

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to assess the aerodynamic performance of single-, two- and three-stage Savonius rotor systems. Both semicircular and twisted blades have been used in either case. A family of rotor systems has been manufactured with identical stage aspect ratio keeping the identical projected area of each rotor. Experiments were carried out to optimize the different parameters like number of stages, number of blades (two and three) and geometry of the blade (semicircular and twisted). A further attempt was made to investigate the performance of two-stage rotor system by inserting valves on the concave side of blade. (author)

  2. Performance and Vibration Analyses of Lift-Offset Helicopters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-In Go

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A validation study on the performance and vibration analyses of the XH-59A compound helicopter is conducted to establish techniques for the comprehensive analysis of lift-offset compound helicopters. This study considers the XH-59A lift-offset compound helicopter using a rigid coaxial rotor system as a verification model. CAMRAD II (Comprehensive Analytical Method of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics II, a comprehensive analysis code, is used as a tool for the performance, vibration, and loads analyses. A general free wake model, which is a more sophisticated wake model than other wake models, is used to obtain good results for the comprehensive analysis. Performance analyses of the XH-59A helicopter with and without auxiliary propulsion are conducted in various flight conditions. In addition, vibration analyses of the XH-59A compound helicopter configuration are conducted in the forward flight condition. The present comprehensive analysis results are in good agreement with the flight test and previous analyses. Therefore, techniques for the comprehensive analysis of lift-offset compound helicopters are appropriately established. Furthermore, the rotor lifts are calculated for the XH-59A lift-offset compound helicopter in the forward flight condition to investigate the airloads characteristics of the ABC™ (Advancing Blade Concept rotor.

  3. Twisting Somersault

    CERN Document Server

    Dullin, Holger R

    2015-01-01

    A complete description of twisting somersaults is given using a reduction to a time-dependent Euler equation for non-rigid body dynamics. The central idea is that after reduction the twisting motion is apparent in a body frame, while the somersaulting (rotation about the fixed angular momentum vector in space) is recovered by a combination of dynamic and geometric phase. In the simplest "kick-model" the number of somersaults $m$ and the number of twists $n$ are obtained through a rational rotation number $W = m/n$ of a (rigid) Euler top. This rotation number is obtained by a slight modification of Montgomery's formula [9] for how much the rigid body has rotated. Using the full model with shape changes that take a realistic time we then derive the master twisting-somersault formula: An exact formula that relates the airborne time of the diver, the time spent in various stages of the dive, the numbers $m$ and $n$, the energy in the stages, and the angular momentum by extending a geometric phase formula due to C...

  4. Oliver Twist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickens, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Oliver Twist is one of Dickens's most popular novels, with many famous film, television and musical adaptations. It is a classic story of good against evil, packed with humour and pathos, drama and suspense, in which the orphaned Oliver is brought up in a harsh workhouse, and then taken in and

  5. Oliver Twist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickens, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Oliver Twist is one of Dickens's most popular novels, with many famous film, television and musical adaptations. It is a classic story of good against evil, packed with humour and pathos, drama and suspense, in which the orphaned Oliver is brought up in a harsh workhouse, and then taken in and explo

  6. Selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes in a concise manner three selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems. The three topics are as follows: (1) the active control of helicopter air-resonance using an LQG/LTR approach; (2) simulation of higher harmonic control (HHC) applied to a four bladed hingeless helicopter rotor in forward flight; and (3) vibration suppression in forward flight on a hingeless helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap, which is mounted on the blade. Only a few selected illustrative results are presented. The results obtained clearly indicate that the partial span, actively controlled flap has considerable potential for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors.

  7. Development and evaluation of a generic active helicopter vibration controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized generic active controller is developed, which alleviates helicopter vibration by closed-loop implementation of higher harmonic control (HHC). In the system, the higher harmonic blade pitch is input through a standard helicopter swashplate; for a four-blade helicopter rotor the 4/rev vibration in the rotorcraft is minimized by inducing cyclic pitch motions at 3, 4, and 5/rev in the rotating system. The controller employs the deterministic, cautious, and dual control approaches and two linear system models (local and global), as well as several methods of limiting control. Based on model testing, performed at moderate to high values of forward velocity and rotor thrust, reductions in the rotor test apparatus vibration from 75 to 95 percent are predicted, with HHC pitch amplitudes of less than one degree. Good performance is also noted for short-duration maneuvers.

  8. A Computational Study of BVI Noise Reduction Using Active Twist Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    The results of a computational study examining the effects of active-twist control on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise using the Apache Active Twist Rotor are presented. The primary goal of this activity is to reduce BVI noise during a low-speed descent flight condition using active-twist control. Rotor aeroelastic behavior was modeled using the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics code and the rotor noise was predicted using the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP. The accuracy of the analysis was validated through comparisons with experimental acoustic data for the first generation Active Twist Rotor at an advance ratio of mu=0.14. The application of active-twist to the main rotor blade system consisted of harmonic actuation frequencies ranging from 2P to 5P, control phase angles from 0' to 360 , and tip-twist amplitudes ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 . The acoustic analysis was conducted for a single low-speed flight condition of advance ratio =0.14 and shaft angle-of-attack, c^=+6 , with BVI noise levels predicted on a flat plane of observers located 1.1 rotor diameters beneath the rotor. The results indicated reductions of up to 11dB in BVI noise using 1.25 tip-twist amplitude with negligible effects on 4P vertical hub shear.

  9. Twisted baskets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Keith; Pratumyot, Yaowalak; Polen, Shane; Hardin, Alex M; Dalkilic, Erdin; Dastan, Arif; Badjić, Jovica D

    2015-02-23

    A preparative procedure for obtaining a pair of twisted molecular baskets, each comprising a chiral framework with either right ((P)-1syn) or left ((M)-1syn) sense of twist and six ester groups at the rim has been developed and optimized. The racemic (P/M)-1syn can be obtained in three synthetic steps from accessible starting materials. The resolution of (P/M)-1syn is accomplished by its transesterification with (1R,2S,5R)-(-)-menthol in the presence of a Ti(IV) catalyst to give diastereomeric 8(P) and 8(M). It was found that dendritic-like cavitands 8(P) and 8(M), in CD2Cl2, undergo self-inclusion ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) with a menthol moiety occupying the cavity of each host. Importantly, the degree of inclusion of the menthol group was ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) found to be greater in the case of 8(P) than 8(M). Accordingly, it is suggested that different folding characteristic of 8(P) and 8(M) ought to affect the physicochemical characteristics of the hosts to permit their effective separation by column chromatography. The absolute configuration of 8(P)/8(M), encompassing right- and left-handed "cups", was determined with the exciton chirality method and also verified in silico (DFT: B3LYP/TZVP). Finally, the twisted baskets are strongly fluorescent due to three naphthalene chromophores, having a high fluorescence quantum yield within the rigid framework of 8(P)/8(M).

  10. IMPACT OF AN UNDERSLUNG LOAD ON A HELICOPTER CONTROLLABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed at finding the causes of controllability variations of a helicopter while transporting sling load.The maximum angular acceleration taken by the helicopter at similar controller displacement at different flight speeds was taken as a quantity characteristic of controllability efficiency to study the load impact on the helicopter cont- rollability.This article offers research results obtained with the use of the НеliСargо software. This software has proven to be a great tool for integrated research of the impact of an underslung load on the parameters of a helicopter controllability, and allows carrying out an analysis of the impact of an underslung load on the parameters of controllability under its dyna- mic behavior.The performed computational experiments have shown that the helicopter maximum angular acceleration with an underslung load significantly rises, as compared to a helicopter without cargo or a helicopter carrying the same load inside the cargo compartment. The data obtained during computational experiments corresponds to the results of analytical computations, and is in line with the literature based on the experience of helicopter flight operations.The cause of the variation in the helicopter controllability parameters during transportation of an underslung load has been found, that is - the underslung load considerably increases the main rotor thrust, due to sling load, as compared to a helicopter without cargo. When compared to a helicopter carrying a load inside the cargo compartment, this increased efficiency is mainly attributed to the fact that a helicopter with an underslung load has lower rotational inertia, since the load is not inside the cargo compartment, but outside.The obtained results can be used to improve flight manuals and flight personnel training publications, which could play a significant part in ensuring flight safety and security, and increasing the operational efficiency of

  11. Nonlinear Feedforward Control for Wind Disturbance Rejection on Autonomous Helicopter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Morten; la Cour-Harbo, Anders; A. Danapalasingam, Kumeresan

    2010-01-01

    for the purpose. The model is inverted for the calculation of rotor collective and cyclic pitch angles given the wind disturbance. The control strategy is then applied on a small helicopter in a controlled wind environment and flight tests demonstrates the effectiveness and advantage of the feedforward controller.......This paper presents the design and verification of a model based nonlinear feedforward controller for wind disturbance rejection on autonomous helicopters. The feedforward control is based on a helicopter model that is derived using a number of carefully chosen simplifications to make it suitable...

  12. Study of the helicopter blade running elevation measurement system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Helicopter blade running elevation measurement is an important measure target in helicopter blade dynamic balance experimentation. The elevation influences the helicopter's security and other performance capabilities. In testing, however, it has been difficult to measure the elevation when the rotor reaches high speeds. To get a simple, fast and highly accurate measurement system, photo electricity technology was applied to measuring the blade running elevation. Discussed is the measurement principle of blade running elevation, the design of the measurement system and analysis of the measurement precision.

  13. 77 FR 75073 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... this proposed AD, contact American Eurocopter Corporation, 2701 N. Forum Drive, Grand Prairie, Texas... erosion protective shell, which could lead to an unbalanced main rotor, high vibration, damage to the tail boom or tail rotor, and loss of control of the helicopter. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA...

  14. Transverse vibration of the blade for unmanned micro helicopter using rayleigh-ritz method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jungang Lü; Jiadao Wang; Darong Chen

    2003-01-01

    A rotor manipulation mechanism for micro unmanned helicopter utilizing the inertia and the elasticity of the rotor is introduced. The lagging motion equation of the rotor blades is established, and then the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the blade for the helicopter are studied by using beam characteristic orthogonal polynomials by the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The variation of natural frequencies with the speed of rotation and the mode shapes at different rotational speeds are plotted. The using of orthogonal polynomials for the bending shapes enables the computation of higher natural frequencies of any order to be accomplished without facing any difficulties.

  15. 77 FR 58973 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... helicopter nose to drop and hit the ground while the rotor blades are spinning. DATES: We must receive... designs. Related Service Information We reviewed Eurocopter ASB No. 32.00.18, Revision 2, dated July 12... the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for...

  16. 78 FR 63853 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... likely to exist or develop on other helicopters of these same type designs. Related Service Information... necessary to modify the log card of the tail rotor blade assembly due to some of the pitch horn part numbers... air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds...

  17. 78 FR 58256 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... proposed actions are intended to prevent vibration due to a failed bearing, failure of the tail rotor, and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter. DATES: We must receive comments on this proposed AD by November..., contact American Eurocopter Corporation, 2701 N. Forum Drive, Grand Prairie, TX 75052; telephone (972) 641...

  18. Applications of Fluorogens with Rotor Structures in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kok-Haw; Liu, Bin

    2017-05-29

    Solar cells are devices that convert light energy into electricity. To drive greater adoption of solar cell technologies, higher cell efficiencies and reductions in manufacturing cost are necessary. Fluorogens containing rotor structures may be helpful in addressing some of these challenges due to their unique twisted structures and photophysics. In this review, we discuss the applications of rotor-containing molecules as dyes for luminescent down-shifting layers and luminescent solar concentrators, where their aggregation-induced emission properties and large Stokes shifts are highly desirable. We also discuss the applications of molecules containing rotors in third-generation solar cell technologies, namely dye-sensitized solar cells and organic photovoltaics, where the twisted 3-dimensional rotor structures are used primarily for aggregation control. Finally, we discuss perspectives on the future role of molecules containing rotor structures in solar cell technologies.

  19. Applications of Fluorogens with Rotor Structures in Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Haw Ong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Solar cells are devices that convert light energy into electricity. To drive greater adoption of solar cell technologies, higher cell efficiencies and reductions in manufacturing cost are necessary. Fluorogens containing rotor structures may be helpful in addressing some of these challenges due to their unique twisted structures and photophysics. In this review, we discuss the applications of rotor-containing molecules as dyes for luminescent down-shifting layers and luminescent solar concentrators, where their aggregation-induced emission properties and large Stokes shifts are highly desirable. We also discuss the applications of molecules containing rotors in third-generation solar cell technologies, namely dye-sensitized solar cells and organic photovoltaics, where the twisted 3-dimensional rotor structures are used primarily for aggregation control. Finally, we discuss perspectives on the future role of molecules containing rotor structures in solar cell technologies.

  20. Molecular Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-31

    Molecular Dipolar Rotors on Insulating Surfaces," Salamanca , Spain. Trends in Nanotechnology Conference. September 5-9, 2003 [86] Laura I. Clarke, Mary Beth...Horansky at the Trends in Nanotechnology Conference, Salamanca , Spain (September 5-9, 2003). [145] Michl, J. “Unusual Molecules: Artificial Surface...temperature and frequency for difluorophenylene rotor crystal. Figure JP6. Monte Carlo results for the local potential asymmetry at

  1. Response studies of rotors and rotor blades with application to aeroelastic tailoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Various tools for the aeroelastic stability and response analysis of rotor blades in hover and forward flight were developed and incorporated in a comprehensive package capable of performing aeroelastic tailoring of rotor blades in forward flight. The results indicate that substantial vibration reductions, of order 15-40%, in the vibratory hub shears can be achieved by relatively small modifications of the initial design. Furthermore the optimized blade can be up to 20% lighter than the original design. Accomplishments are reported for the following tasks: (1) finite element modeling of rotary-wing aeroelastic problems in hover and forward flight; (2) development of numerical methods for calculating the aeroelastic response and stability of rotor blades in forward fight; (3) formulation of the helicopter air resonance problem in hover with active controls; and (4) optimum design of rotor blades for vibration reduction in forward flight.

  2. Development of an aeroelastic methodology for surface morphing rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James R.

    Helicopter performance capabilities are limited by maximum lift characteristics and vibratory loading. In high speed forward flight, dynamic stall and transonic flow greatly increase the amplitude of vibratory loads. Experiments and computational simulations alike have indicated that a variety of active rotor control devices are capable of reducing vibratory loads. For example, periodic blade twist and flap excitation have been optimized to reduce vibratory loads in various rotors. Airfoil geometry can also be modified in order to increase lift coefficient, delay stall, or weaken transonic effects. To explore the potential benefits of active controls, computational methods are being developed for aeroelastic rotor evaluation, including coupling between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural dynamics (CSD) solvers. In many contemporary CFD/CSD coupling methods it is assumed that the airfoil is rigid to reduce the interface by single dimension. Some methods retain the conventional one-dimensional beam model while prescribing an airfoil shape to simulate active chord deformation. However, to simulate the actual response of a compliant airfoil it is necessary to include deformations that originate not only from control devices (such as piezoelectric actuators), but also inertial forces, elastic stresses, and aerodynamic pressures. An accurate representation of the physics requires an interaction with a more complete representation of loads and geometry. A CFD/CSD coupling methodology capable of communicating three-dimensional structural deformations and a distribution of aerodynamic forces over the wetted blade surface has not yet been developed. In this research an interface is created within the Fully Unstructured Navier-Stokes (FUN3D) solver that communicates aerodynamic forces on the blade surface to University of Michigan's Nonlinear Active Beam Solver (UM/NLABS -- referred to as NLABS in this thesis). Interface routines are developed for

  3. Investigation of rotor control system loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Tao; Tan Jianfeng; Wang Haowen

    2013-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the aeroelasticity analysis of rotor blade and rotor control systems. A new multi-body dynamics model is established to predict both rotor pitch link loads and swashplate servo loads. Two helicopter rotors of UH-60A and SA349/2, both operating in two critical flight conditions, high-speed flight and high-thrust flight, are studied. The analysis shows good agreements with the flight test data and the calculation results using CAMRAD II. The mechanisms of rotor control loads are then analyzed in details based on the present predictions and the flight test data. In high-speed conditions, the pitch link loads are dominated by the integral of blade pitching moments, which are generated by cyclic pitch control. In high-thrust conditions, the positive pitching loads in the advancing side are caused by high collective pitch angle, and dynamic stall in the retreating side excites high-frequency responses. The swashplate servo loads are predominated by the rotor pitch link loads, and the inertia of the swashplate has significant effects on high-frequency harmonics of the servo loads.

  4. Active control for performance enhancement of electrically controlled rotor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yang; Wang Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrically controlled rotor (ECR) system has the potential to enhance the rotor perfor-mance by applying higher harmonic flap inputs. In order to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement using closed-loop control method, firstly, an ECR rotor perfor-mance analysis model based on helicopter flight dynamic model is established, which can reflect the performance characteristics of ECR helicopter at high advance ratio. Based on the simulation platform, an active control method named adaptive T-matrix algorithm is adopted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this closed-loop control method. For the sample ECR helicopter, about 3%rotor power reduction is obtained with the optimum 2/rev flap inputs at the advance ratio of 0.34. And through analyzing the distributions of attack of angle and drag in rotor disk, the underlying physical essence of ECR power reduction is cleared. Furthermore, the influence of the key control parameters, including convergence factor and weighting matrix, on the effectiveness of closed-loop control for ECR performance enhancement is explored. Some useful results are summarized, which can be used to direct the future active control law design of ECR performance enhancement.

  5. Final assessment of vibro-acoustic source strength descriptors of helicopter gearboxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlrich, Mogens; Rasmussen, Ulrik Møller

    1996-01-01

    Two novel measurement techniques have been developed for quantifying the vibro-aqcoustic source strength of lightweight helicopter gearboxes. The accuracy, robustness and implementation of these methods have been examined by a comprehensive investigation, including theoretical studies of simple...... multi-modal beam systems and extensive experiments with more realistic small scale models and with large, detailed 3/4-scale test structures of a medium-size helicopter. In addition, partial verification tests have been conducted with the Eurocopter BK 117 helicopter and its main rotor gearbox....... The results of this work are essential as input for any prediction code of the internal noise in a helicopter cabin, because the prediction requires knowledge of the major sources, that is, the rotors, engines and gearboxes....

  6. A laboratory study of the subjective response to helicopter blade-slap noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, K. P.

    1978-01-01

    The test stimuli recorded during a recent field study consisted of 16 sounds, each presented at 4 peak noise levels. Two helicopters and a fixed-wing aircraft were used. The impulsive characteristics of one helicopter were varied by operating at different rotor speeds, whereas the other helicopter, the noise of which was dominated by the tail rotor, displayed little variation in blade-slap noise. Thirty-two subjects made noisiness judgments on a continuous, 11 point, numerical scale. Preliminary results indicate that proposed impulsiveness corrections provide no significant improvement in the noisiness predictive ability of Effective Perceived Noise Levels (EPNL). For equal EPNL, the two categories of helicopter stimuli, one of which was far more impulsive than the other, showed no difference in judged noisiness. Examination of the physical characteristics of the sounds presented in the laboratory highlighted the difficulty of reproducing acoustical signals with high-crest factors.

  7. Helicopter air resonance modeling and suppression using active control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M. D.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1991-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. Using this mathematical model, a nominal configuration is selected with an air resonance instability throughout most of its flight envelope. A multivariable compensator is then designed using two swashplate inputs and a single-body roll rate measurement. The controller design is based on the linear quadratic Gaussian technique and the loop transfer recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout a wide range of helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  8. The cost of applying current helicopter external noise reduction methods while maintaining realistic vehicle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical methods were developed and/or adopted for calculating helicopter component noise, and these methods were incorporated into a unified total vehicle noise calculation model. Analytical methods were also developed for calculating the effects of noise reduction methodology on helicopter design, performance, and cost. These methods were used to calculate changes in noise, design, performance, and cost due to the incorporation of engine and main rotor noise reduction methods. All noise reduction techniques were evaluated in the context of an established mission performance criterion which included consideration of hovering ceiling, forward flight range/speed/payload, and rotor stall margin. The results indicate that small, but meaningful, reductions in helicopter noise can be obtained by treating the turbine engine exhaust duct. Furthermore, these reductions do not result in excessive life cycle cost penalties. Currently available main rotor noise reduction methodology, however, is shown to be inadequate and excessively costly.

  9. Applications of numerical optimization methods to helicopter design problems - A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, H.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of applications of mathematical programming methods is used to improve the design of helicopters and their components. Applications of multivariable search techniques in the finite dimensional space are considered. Five categories of helicopter design problems are considered: (1) conceptual and preliminary design, (2) rotor-system design, (3) airframe structures design, (4) control system design, and (5) flight trajectory planning. Key technical progress in numerical optimization methods relevant to rotorcraft applications are summarized.

  10. Applications of numerical optimization methods to helicopter design problems: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, H.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of applications of mathematical programming methods is used to improve the design of helicopters and their components. Applications of multivariable search techniques in the finite dimensional space are considered. Five categories of helicopter design problems are considered: (1) conceptual and preliminary design, (2) rotor-system design, (3) airframe structures design, (4) control system design, and (5) flight trajectory planning. Key technical progress in numerical optimization methods relevant to rotorcraft applications are summarized.

  11. Concepts for the design of a completely active helicopter isolation system using output vector feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, G.

    1977-01-01

    The theory of output vector feedback (a few measured quantities) is used to derive completely active oscillation isolation functions for helicopters. These feedback controller concepts are tested with various versions of the BO 105 helicopter and their performance is demonstrated. A compensation of the vibrational excitations from the rotor and harmonics of the number of blades are considered. There is also a fast and automatic trim function for maneuvers.

  12. Swashplateless Helicopter Experimental Investigation: Primary Control with Trailing Edge Flaps Actuated with Piezobenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Peter

    V/cm (limited by depoling). An undocumented phenomenon is found called bender relaxation where the benders lose over half of their initial DC stroke over time. While the bender stiffness is shown not to change with electric field, the DC stroke is significantly less than AC stroke. A two-bladed Mach-scale rotor is constructed with each blade containing 2 flaps each actuated by a single piezobender. Each flap is 26.5% chord and 14% span for a total of 28% span centered at 75% of the blade radius. Flap motion of greater than 10 degrees half peak-peak is obtained for all 4 flaps at 900 RPM on the hoverstand. So, the flaps show promise for the Mach-scale rotor speed of 2400 RPM. A PID loop is implemented for closed loop control of flap amplitude and mean position. On the hoverstand at 900 RPM, the swashplateless concept is demonstrated. The linear springs used to lower the torsional frequency are shown to have minimum friction during rotation. 1/rev blade pitching of +/-1 degree is achieved at a torsional frequency of 1.5/rev for each blade. At resonance, the blade pitching for each blade is greater than +/-4 degrees. Primary control is demonstrated by measuring hub forces and moments. At resonance state, the flaps in conjunction with the blade pitching provide +/-15 lbs of normal force at a mean lift of 15 lbs yielding +/-100% lift authority. Significant hub forces and moments are produced as well. For a production swashplateless helicopter, it may be prudent to eliminate the pitch links by reducing the blade structural stiffness. A novel wire sensor system network is proposed in order to measure blade elastic flap bending, lead-lag bending and torsion. The theory for measuring blade twist is rigorously derived. A blade is constructed with the wire sensor network and validated on the benchtop for blade elastic bending and twist. This work is a step forward in achieving a swashplateless rotor system. Not only would this reduce drag in high speed forward flight, but it would lead to

  13. Comparison of broadband noise mechanisms, analyses, and experiments on helicopters, propellers, and wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S.-T.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data on broadband noise from airfoils are compared, together with analytical methods, in order to identify the mechanisms of noise emission. Rotor noise is categorized into discrete frequency, impulsive, and broadband components, the last having a continuous spectrum originating from a random source. The results of computer simulations of different rotor blade types which produce broadband noise were compared with experimental data and among themselves in terms of predictions of the spectra obtained. Consideration was given to the overall sound pressure level, unsteady turbulence forces, rotational forces, inflow turbulence, self-generated turbulence, and turbulence in the flow. Data are presented for a helicopter rotor and light aircraft propeller. The most significant source was found to be inflow turbulence induced lift fluctuations in helicopter rotors and boundary layer trailing edge noise on large wind energy conversion systems

  14. Some thoughts on the implementation of pilot night vision devices for helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    Night vision enhancement devices greatly expand the range and quality of services by extending night operational capabilities. Evolving military tactical concepts for helicopters survivability and battlefield effectiveness necessitate nap-of-the-earth (NOE) flying under both day and night conditions. From a pilot workload standpoint, flying a helicopter NOE in day VFR conditions with minimum clearance between rotors and obstacles is quite demanding. Doing the same job at night is several times more difficult. There are two general categories of night vision devices in operation in helicopter aviation: the Night Vision Goggles (NVG) and forward looking infrared (FLIR) system. The capabilities and limitations of those two devices are discussed.

  15. Generalised twisted partition functions

    CERN Document Server

    Petkova, V B

    2001-01-01

    We consider the set of partition functions that result from the insertion of twist operators compatible with conformal invariance in a given 2D Conformal Field Theory (CFT). A consistency equation, which gives a classification of twists, is written and solved in particular cases. This generalises old results on twisted torus boundary conditions, gives a physical interpretation of Ocneanu's algebraic construction, and might offer a new route to the study of properties of CFT.

  16. Wire harness twisting aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, E. J.; Commadore, C. C.; Ingles, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Long wire bundles twist into uniform spiral harnesses with help of simple apparatus. Wires pass through spacers and through hand-held tool with hole for each wire. Ends are attached to low speed bench motor. As motor turns, operator moves hand tool away forming smooth twists in wires between motor and tool. Technique produces harnesses that generate less radio-frequency interference than do irregularly twisted cables.

  17. Identification and stochastic control of helicopter dynamic modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molusis, J. A.; Bar-Shalom, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A general treatment of parameter identification and stochastic control for use on helicopter dynamic systems is presented. Rotor dynamic models, including specific applications to rotor blade flapping and the helicopter ground resonance problem are emphasized. Dynamic systems which are governed by periodic coefficients as well as constant coefficient models are addressed. The dynamic systems are modeled by linear state variable equations which are used in the identification and stochastic control formulation. The pure identification problem as well as the stochastic control problem which includes combined identification and control for dynamic systems is addressed. The stochastic control problem includes the effect of parameter uncertainty on the solution and the concept of learning and how this is affected by the control's duel effect. The identification formulation requires algorithms suitable for on line use and thus recursive identification algorithms are considered. The applications presented use the recursive extended kalman filter for parameter identification which has excellent convergence for systems without process noise.

  18. Twisted network programming essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Fettig, Abe

    2005-01-01

    Twisted Network Programming Essentials from O'Reilly is a task-oriented look at this new open source, Python-based technology. The book begins with recommendations for various plug-ins and add-ons to enhance the basic package as installed. It then details Twisted's collection simple network protocols, and helper utilities. The book also includes projects that let you try out the Twisted framework for yourself. For example, you'll find examples of using Twisted to build web services applications using the REST architecture, using XML-RPC, and using SOAP. Written for developers who want to s

  19. Aeromechanics and Aeroacoustics Predictions of the Boeing-SMART Rotor Using Coupled-CFD/CSD Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Jeremy; Sim, Ben W.; Sankar, Lakshmi; Brentner, Ken

    2010-01-01

    This paper will highlight helicopter aeromechanics and aeroacoustics prediction capabilities developed by Georgia Institute of Technology, the Pennsylvania State University, and Northern Arizona University under the Helicopter Quieting Program (HQP) sponsored by the Tactical Technology Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). First initiated in 2004, the goal of the HQP was to develop high fidelity, state-of-the-art computational tools for designing advanced helicopter rotors with reduced acoustic perceptibility and enhanced performance. A critical step towards achieving this objective is the development of rotorcraft prediction codes capable of assessing a wide range of helicopter configurations and operations for future rotorcraft designs. This includes novel next-generation rotor systems that incorporate innovative passive and/or active elements to meet future challenging military performance and survivability goals.

  20. Detection of Forward Flight Limitations of Unmanned Helicopters

    OpenAIRE

    Voigt, Andreas; Dauer, Johann; Krenik, Alex; Dittrich, Jörg Steffen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a method is proposed to determine the flight envelope limitations for steady forward flight with the purpose of performing a flight envelope expansion. First, the rotary wing system is analyzed. In this paper, an intermeshing rotor configuration, a SwissDrones Dragon 50, is used to demonstrate the approach. Next, relevant limitations of the forward flight are reviewed and analyzed with the help of the Helicopter Overall Simulation Tool (HOST). From this analysis, relevant measu...

  1. Classification Trees and the Analysis of Helicopter Vibration Data

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Harold J.

    1997-01-01

    Health and Usage Monitoring Systems are receiving a great deal of interest, in an attempt to increase the safety and operational readiness of helicopters, and to minimize maintenance costs. These systems monitor (and can record) various flight parameters, pilot conversations, engine exhaust debris, metallic chip detector levels in the lubrication system, rotor track and balance, as well as vibration levels at selected locations throughout the airframe and the power drive system. Vibration lev...

  2. Helicopter human factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  3. Selected Problems Of Transmission Wear Of The Mi-24 Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gębura Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis of mutual, destructive impact of the worn upper bearing of the WR-24 transmission on the Mi-24 helicopter's gearbox was stated. The Mi-24 is the only helicopter operated in Poland, in which the gearbox is mounted outside the main transmission – in the centre of the transmission shaft, between the main gearbox and the tail rotor. Damage to the gears in the gearbox of power generators is equivalent to termination of the tail rotor's drive. Such a termination immediately causes rotation of the body in the direction opposite to the direction of rotation of the main rotor. It is associated with the loss of lift and steering. It may lead to a disaster. Such an incident occurred in January 2011 in Afghanistan – both authors participated in its investigation. The authors, taking into account very good, almost legendary combat properties of the Mi-24, and their research of the specifics of wear and tear of the transmission elements, they think that, first, funds for development and implementation of the drive unit monitoring system should be made available specially for this helicopter. For this purpose, the authors propose to use the FAM-C method. It is characterised with significant ergonomics. Thank to this, multiple kinematic pairs can be observed simultaneously, and, therefore, the relationships between them as well.

  4. Osvrt na projektovanje glavnog rotora helikoptera / Review of the design of the helicopter rotor / Oбзор проектирования главного ротора вертолета

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalibor P. Petrović

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available U radu je prikazano projektovanje glavnog rotora helikoptera uz pomoć patentne dokumentacije, kao veoma korisnog alata za dolaženje do konkretnih ideja i konstrukcija, kako bi se na najekonomičniji način pronašlo kvalitetno rešenje za određeni tehnički problem koji je prisutan u postupku konstruisanja. Veliki broj tehničkih informacija prvo se pojavljuje u patentnim dokumentima, a oko dve trećine ovih informacija ne može se naći ni na kojem drugom mestu. Prikazana je struktura patentnih dokumenata sa težištem na delovima koji se odnose na tehničke informacije sa detaljnim objašnjenjem mogućnosti primene patentne dokumentacije u toku projektovanja glavnog rotora helikoptera. Na konkretnom primeru projektovanja rotora helikoptera prikazan je postupak i načini pretraživanja patentne dokumentacije. Korišćena je Espacenet baza patentne dokumentacije, kao najobuhvatnija i najčešće korišćena baza koja sadrži preko osamdeset miliona različitih patentnih dokumenata o pronalascima i tehničkim unapređenjima iz celog sveta. Težišni deo rada odnosi se na prikaz postupka pretraživanja patentne dokumentacije radi dolaženja do rešenja tehničkog problema konstrukcije glavnog rotora helikoptera, koji se odnosi na obezbeđivanje potrebnog zabacivanja i bržeg odziva promene smeštajnog ugla (koraka lopatice krutog rotora helikoptera. / This article - paper presents the design of the main rotor of the helicopter supported by the patent documents, as a very useful tool (instrument to reach the specific ideas and design in order to find the most economical way for the quality solution for a certain technical problem present in the process of design (construction. A large amount of technical information first appears in patent documents and about two thirds of this information cannot be found on any other site. The structure of patent documents is presented with an emphasis on the elements that relate to technical information with

  5. Overregularity in Oliver Twist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔祥曼

    2015-01-01

    Oliver Twist is one of the earliest works of Charles Dickens. In this novel, the author uses many writing skills which impress the readers a lot. This paper gives a brief description of overregularity in Oliver Twist at the phonological and syntactical levels.

  6. Boeing Smart Rotor Full-scale Wind Tunnel Test Data Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Hagerty, Brandon; Salazar, Denise

    2016-01-01

    A full-scale helicopter smart material actuated rotor technology (SMART) rotor test was conducted in the USAF National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames. The SMART rotor system is a five-bladed MD 902 bearingless rotor with active trailing-edge flaps. The flaps are actuated using piezoelectric actuators. Rotor performance, structural loads, and acoustic data were obtained over a wide range of rotor shaft angles of attack, thrust, and airspeeds. The primary test objective was to acquire unique validation data for the high-performance computing analyses developed under the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Helicopter Quieting Program (HQP). Other research objectives included quantifying the ability of the on-blade flaps to achieve vibration reduction, rotor smoothing, and performance improvements. This data set of rotor performance and structural loads can be used for analytical and experimental comparison studies with other full-scale rotor systems and for analytical validation of computer simulation models. The purpose of this final data report is to document a comprehensive, highquality data set that includes only data points where the flap was actively controlled and each of the five flaps behaved in a similar manner.

  7. Methods for Expanding Rotary Wing Aircraft Health and Usage Monitoring Systems to the Rotating Frame through Real-time Rotor Blade Kinematics Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Charles Jefferson

    Since the advent of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) in the early 1990's, there has been a steady decrease in the number of component failure related helicopter accidents. Additionally, measurable cost benefits due to improved maintenance practices based on HUMS data has led to a desire to expand HUMS from its traditional area of helicopter drive train monitoring. One of the areas of greatest interest for this expansion of HUMS is monitoring of the helicopter rotor head loads. Studies of rotor head load and blade motions have primarily focused on wind tunnel testing with technology which would not be applicable for production helicopter HUMS deployment, or measuring bending along the blade, rather than where it is attached to the rotor head and the location through which all the helicopter loads pass. This dissertation details research into finding methods for real time methods of estimating rotor blade motion which could be applied across helicopter fleets as an expansion of current HUMS technology. First, there is a brief exploration of supporting technologies which will be crucial in enabling the expansion of HUMS from the fuselage of helicopters to the rotor head: wireless data transmission and energy harvesting. A brief overview of the commercially available low power wireless technology selected for this research is presented. The development of a relatively high-powered energy harvester specific to the motion of helicopter rotor blades is presented and two different prototypes of the device are shown. Following the overview of supporting technologies, two novel methods of monitoring rotor blade motion in real time are developed. The first method employs linear displacement sensors embedded in the elastomer layers of a high-capacity laminate bearing of the type commonly used in fully articulated rotors throughout the helicopter industry. The configuration of these displacement sensors allows modeling of the sensing system as a robotic parallel

  8. The Effects of Ambient Conditions on Helicopter Harmonic Noise Radiation: Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of ambient atmospheric conditions, air temperature and density, on rotor harmonic noise radiation are characterized using theoretical models and experimental measurements of helicopter noise collected at three different test sites at elevations ranging from sea level to 7000 ft above sea level. Significant changes in the thickness, loading, and blade-vortex interaction noise levels and radiation directions are observed across the different test sites for an AS350 helicopter flying at the same indicated airspeed and gross weight. However, the radiated noise is shown to scale with ambient pressure when the flight condition of the helicopter is defined in nondimensional terms. Although the effective tip Mach number is identified as the primary governing parameter for thickness noise, the nondimensional weight coefficient also impacts lower harmonic loading noise levels, which contribute strongly to low frequency harmonic noise radiation both in and out of the plane of the horizon. Strategies for maintaining the same nondimensional rotor operating condition under different ambient conditions are developed using an analytical model of single main rotor helicopter trim and confirmed using a CAMRAD II model of the AS350 helicopter. The ability of the Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustics Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) technique to generalize noise measurements made under one set of ambient conditions to make accurate noise predictions under other ambient conditions is also validated.

  9. Comparison of induced velocity models for helicopter flight mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.E.; Houston, S.S.

    2002-07-01

    Modeling of rotor-induced velocity receives continued attention in the literature as the rotorcraft community addresses limitations in the fidelity of simulations of helicopter stability, control, and handling qualities. A comparison is presented of results obtained using a rigid-blade rotor-fuselage model configured with two induced velocity models: a conventional, first-order, finite state, dynamic inflow model and a wake model that solves a vorticity transport equation on a computational mesh enclosing the rotorcraft. Differences between the two models are quantified by comparing predictions of trimmed rotor blade flap, lag and feather angles, airframe pitch and roll attitudes, cross-coupling derivatives, response to control inputs, and airframe vibration. Results are presented in the context of measurements taken on a Puma aircraft in steady flight from hover to high speed. More accurate predictions of the cross-coupling derivatives, response to control, and airframe vibration obtained using the vorticity transport model suggest that incorporation of real flowfield effects is important to extending the bandwidth of applicability of helicopter simulation models. Unexpectedly small differences in some of the trim predictions obtained using the two wake models suggest that an overall improvement in simulation fidelity may not be achieved without equivalent attention to the rotor dynamic model. (Author)

  10. Wind tunnel testing of a full scale helicopter blade section with an upstream active Gurney flap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loendersloot, R.; Freire Gomez, J.; Booker, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed on an aerofoil section comparable to that of a full scale helicopter blade section with an upstream active Gurney flap in the framework of the European project CleanSky ITD Green RotorCraft. A modified NACA0012 profile was used, with 23 Kulite pressure transducers em

  11. Model helicopter performance degradation with simulated ice shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Korkan, Kenneth D.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental program using a commercially available model helicopter has been conducted in the Texas A&M University Subsonic Wind Tunnel to investigate main rotor performance degradation due to generic ice. The simulated ice, including both primary and secondary formations, was scaled by chord from previously documented artificial ice accretions. Base and iced performance data were gathered as functions of fuselage incidence, blade collective pitch, main rotor rotational velocity, and freestream velocity. It was observed that the presence of simulated ice tends to decrease the lift to equivalent drag ratio, as well as thrust coefficient for the range of velocity ratios tested. Also, increases in torque coefficient due to the generic ice formations were observed. Evaluation of the data has indicated that the addition of roughness due to secondary ice formations is crucial for proper evaluation of the degradation in main rotor performance.

  12. Model helicopter performance degradation with simulated ice shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Korkan, Kenneth D.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental program using a commercially available model helicopter has been conducted in the Texas A&M University Subsonic Wind Tunnel to investigate main rotor performance degradation due to generic ice. The simulated ice, including both primary and secondary formations, was scaled by chord from previously documented artificial ice accretions. Base and iced performance data were gathered as functions of fuselage incidence, blade collective pitch, main rotor rotational velocity, and freestream velocity. It was observed that the presence of simulated ice tends to decrease the lift to equivalent drag ratio, as well as thrust coefficient for the range of velocity ratios tested. Also, increases in torque coefficient due to the generic ice formations were observed. Evaluation of the data has indicated that the addition of roughness due to secondary ice formations is crucial for proper evaluation of the degradation in main rotor performance.

  13. Helicopter stability during aggressive maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ranjith

    The dissertation investigates helicopter trim and stability during level bank-angle and diving bank-angle turns. The level turn is moderate in that sufficient power is available to maintain level maneuver, and the diving turn is severe where the power deficit is overcome by the kinetic energy of descent. The investigation basically represents design conditions where the peak loading goes well beyond the steady thrust limit and the rotor experiences appreciable stall. The major objectives are: (1) to assess the sensitivity of the trim and stability predictions to the approximations in modeling stall, (2) to correlate the trim predictions with the UH-60A flight test data, and (3) to demonstrate the feasibility of routinely using the exact fast-Floquet periodic eigenvector method for mode identification in the stability analysis. The UH-60A modeling and analysis are performed using the comprehensive code RCAS (Army's Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System). The trim and damping predictions are based on quasisteady stall, ONERA-Edlin (Equations Differentielles Lineaires) and Leishman-Beddoes dynamic stall models. From the correlation with the test data, the strengths and weaknesses of the trim predictions are presented.

  14. Twisted equivariant matter

    CERN Document Server

    Freed, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    We show how general principles of symmetry in quantum mechanics lead to twisted notions of a group representation. This framework generalizes both the classical 3-fold way of real/complex/quaternionic representations as well as a corresponding 10-fold way which has appeared in condensed matter and nuclear physics. We establish a foundation for discussing continuous families of quantum systems. Having done so, topological phases of quantum systems can be defined as deformation classes of continuous families of gapped Hamiltonians. For free particles there is an additional algebraic structure on the deformation classes leading naturally to notions of twisted equivariant K-theory. In systems with a lattice of translational symmetries we show that there is a canonical twisting of the equivariant K-theory of the Brillouin torus. We give precise mathematical definitions of two invariants of the topological phases which have played an important role in the study of topological insulators. Twisted equivariant K-theor...

  15. Twisted analytic torsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MATHAI; Varghese

    2010-01-01

    We review the Reidemeister, Ray-Singer’s analytic torsion and the Cheeger-Mller theorem. We describe the analytic torsion of the de Rham complex twisted by a flux form introduced by the current authors and recall its properties. We define a new twisted analytic torsion for the complex of invariant differential forms on the total space of a principal circle bundle twisted by an invariant flux form. We show that when the dimension is even, such a torsion is invariant under certain deformation of the metric and the flux form. Under T-duality which exchanges the topology of the bundle and the flux form and the radius of the circular fiber with its inverse, the twisted torsion of invariant forms are inverse to each other for any dimension.

  16. Twisted Analytic Torsion

    CERN Document Server

    Mathai, Varghese

    2009-01-01

    We review the Reidemeister and Ray-Singer's analytic torsions and the Cheeger-M"uller theorem. We describe the analytic torsion of the de Rham complex twisted by a flux form introduced by the current authors and recall its properties. We define a new twisted analytic torsion for the complex of invariant differential forms on the total space of a principal circle bundle twisted by an invariant flux form. We show that when the dimension is even, such a torsion is invariant under certain deformation of the metric and the flux form. Under T-duality which exchanges the topology of the bundle and the flux form and the radius of the circular fiber with its inverse, the twisted torsions are inverse to each other for any dimensions.

  17. The Second Generation High Speed Rotor Head Mounted Instrumentation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John; Reynolds, R. S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center has been investigating the air pressure flow of a rotor blade on a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter in-flight. This paper will address the changes and improvements due to additional restrictions and requirements for the instrumentation system. The second generation instrumentation system was substantially larger and this allowed greatly improved accessibility to the components for ease of maintenance as well as improved gain and offset adjustment capabilities and better filtering.

  18. The Effect of Non-Harmonic Active Twist Actuation on BVI Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2011-01-01

    The results of a computational study examining the effects of non-harmonic active-twist control on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise for the Apache Active Twist Rotor are presented. Rotor aeroelastic behavior was modeled using the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics code and the rotor noise was predicted using the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP. The application of non-harmonic active-twist inputs to the main rotor blade system comprised three parameters: azimuthal location to start actuation, azimuthal duration of actuation, and magnitude of actuation. The acoustic analysis was conducted for a single low-speed flight condition of advance ratio mu=0.14 and shaft angle-of-attack, a(sub s)=+6deg. BVI noise levels were predicted on a flat plane of observers located 1.1 rotor diameters beneath the rotor. The results indicate significant reductions of up to 10dB in BVI noise using a starting azimuthal location for actuation of 90?, an azimuthal duration of actuation of 90deg, and an actuation magnitude of +1.5 ft-lb.

  19. Twisted radio waves and twisted thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Laszlo B; Nevels, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    We present and analyze a gedanken experiment and show that the assumption that an antenna operating at a single frequency can transmit more than two independent information channels to the far field violates the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Transmission of a large number of channels, each associated with an angular momenta 'twisted wave' mode, to the far field in free space is therefore not possible.

  20. Design studies for twist-coupled wind turbine blades.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, Ulyses (Wichita State University, Wichita, KS); Locke, James (Wichita State University, Wichita, KS)

    2004-06-01

    This study presents results obtained for four hybrid designs of the Northern Power Systems (NPS) 9.2-meter prototype version of the ERS-100 wind turbine rotor blade. The ERS-100 wind turbine rotor blade was designed and developed by TPI composites. The baseline design uses e-glass unidirectional fibers in combination with {+-}45-degree and random mat layers for the skin and spar cap. This project involves developing structural finite element models of the baseline design and carbon hybrid designs with and without twist-bend coupling. All designs were evaluated for a unit load condition and two extreme wind conditions. The unit load condition was used to evaluate the static deflection, twist and twist-coupling parameter. Maximum deflections and strains were determined for the extreme wind conditions. Linear and nonlinear buckling loads were determined for a tip load condition. The results indicate that carbon fibers can be used to produce twist-coupled designs with comparable deflections, strains and buckling loads to the e-glass baseline.

  1. Aeromechanical stability analysis of a multirotor vehicle with application to hybrid heavy lift helicopter dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    The Hybrid Heavy Lift Helicopter (HHLH) is a potential candidate vehicle aimed at providing heavy lift capability at low cost. This vehicle consists of a buoyant envelope attached to a supporting structure. Four rotor systems are also attached to the supporting structure. Nonlinear equations of motion capable of modeling the dynamics of this multi-rotor/support frame/vehicle system have been developed and used to study the fundamental aeromechanical stability characteristics of this class of vehicles. The mechanism of coupling between the blades, supporting structure and rigid body modes is identified and the effect of buoyancy ratio (buoyant lift/total weight) on the vehicle dynamics is studied. It is shown that dynamics effects have a major role in the design of such vehicles. The analytical model developed is also useful for studying the aeromechanical stability of single rotor and tandem rotor coupled rotor/fuselage systems.

  2. Aeromechanical stability analysis of a multirotor vehicle with application to hybrid heavy lift helicopter dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    The Hybrid Heavy Lift Helicopter (HHLH) is a potential candidate vehicle aimed at providing heavy lift capability at low cost. This vehicle consists of a buoyant envelope attached to a supporting structure. Four rotor systems are also attached to the supporting structure. Nonlinear equations of motion capable of modeling the dynamics of this multi-rotor/support frame/vehicle system have been developed and used to study the fundamental aeromechanical stability characteristics of this class of vehicles. The mechanism of coupling between the blades, supporting structure and rigid body modes is identified and the effect of buoyancy ratio (buoyant lift/total weight) on the vehicle dynamics is studied. It is shown that dynamics effects have a major role in the design of such vehicles. The analytical model developed is also useful for studying the aeromechanical stability of single rotor and tandem rotor coupled rotor/fuselage systems.

  3. Structural characterization of rotor blades through photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Giovanni; Serafini, Jacopo; Enei, Claudio; Mattioni, Luca; Ficuciello, Corrado; Vezzari, Valerio

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the use of photogrammetry for the experimental identification of structural and inertial properties of helicopter rotor blades4. The identification procedure is based upon theoretical/numerical algorithms for the evaluation of mass and flexural stiffness distributions which are an extension of those proposed in the past by Larsen, whereas the torsional properties (stiffness and shear center position) are determined through the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The identification algorithms require the knowledge of the blade displacement field produced by known steady loads. These data are experimentally obtained through photogrammetric detection technique, which allows the identification of 3D coordinates of labeled points (markers) on the structure through the correlation of 2D digital photos. Indeed, the displacement field is simply evaluated by comparing the markers positions on the loaded configuration with those on the reference one. The proposed identification procedure, numerically and experimentally validated in the past by the authors, has been here applied to the structural characterization of two main rotor blades, designed for ultra-light helicopters. Strain gauges measurements have been used to assess the accuracy of the identified properties through natural frequencies comparison as well as to evaluate the blades damping characteristics.

  4. A Hybrid Flight Control for a Simulated Raptor-30 V2 Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbab Nighat Khizer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a hybrid flight control system for a single rotor simulated Raptor-30 V2 helicopter. Hybrid intelligent control system, combination of the conventional and intelligent control methodologies, is applied to small model helicopter. The proposed hybrid control used PID as a traditional control and fuzzy as an intelligent control so as to take the maximum advantage of advanced control theory. The helicopter?s model used; comes from X-Plane flight simulator and their hybrid flight control system was simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK in a simulation platform. X-Plane is also used to visualize the performance of this proposed autopilot design. Through a series of numerous experiments, the operation of hybrid control system was investigated. Results verified that the proposed hybrid control has an excellent performance at hovering flight mode.

  5. Open Rotor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zante, Dale E.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    The ERA project executed a comprehensive test program for Open Rotor aerodynamic and acoustic performance. System studies used the data to estimate the fuel burn savings and acoustic margin for an aircraft system with open rotor propulsion. The acoustic measurements were used to produce an auralization that compares the legacy blades to the current generation of open rotor designs.

  6. Twisted derivations of Hopf algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, Alexei

    2012-01-01

    In the paper we introduce the notion of twisted derivation of a bialgebra. Twisted derivations appear as infinitesimal symmetries of the category of representations. More precisely they are infinitesimal versions of twisted automorphisms of bialgebras. Twisted derivations naturally form a Lie algebra (the tangent algebra of the group of twisted automorphisms). Moreover this Lie algebra fits into a crossed module (tangent to the crossed module of twisted automorphisms). Here we calculate this crossed module for universal enveloping algebras and for the Sweedler's Hopf algebra.

  7. Coupled rotor-flexible fuselage vibration reduction using open loop higher harmonic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computer facility. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselae vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control is required.

  8. Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, D.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2009-08-01

    This report describes the adaptation of a wind turbine performance code for use in the development of a general use design code and optimization method for stall-regulated horizontal-axis hydrokinetic turbine rotors. This rotor optimization code couples a modern genetic algorithm and blade-element momentum performance code in a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for rapid and intuitive design of optimal stall-regulated rotors. This optimization method calculates the optimal chord, twist, and hydrofoil distributions which maximize the hydrodynamic efficiency and ensure that the rotor produces an ideal power curve and avoids cavitation. Optimizing a rotor for maximum efficiency does not necessarily create a turbine with the lowest cost of energy, but maximizing the efficiency is an excellent criterion to use as a first pass in the design process. To test the capabilities of this optimization method, two conceptual rotors were designed which successfully met the design objectives.

  9. GARTEUR Helicopter Cooperative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Pahlke, Klausdieter

    2010-01-01

    This paper starts with an overview about the general structure of the Group for Aeronautical Research and Technology in EURope (GARTEUR). The focus is on the activities related to rotorcraft which are managed in the GARTEUR Helicopter Group of Responsables (HC GoR). The research activities are carried out in so-called Action Groups. Out of the 5 Action Groups which ended within the last four years results generated in the Helicopter Action Groups HC(AG14) “Methods for Refinement of Structural...

  10. Influence of pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s performance loss due to roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangler, J.L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of blade geometric parameters such as pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s sensitivity to leading edge roughness. The approach began with an evaluation of available test data of performance degradation due to roughness effects for several rotors. In addition to airfoil geometry, this evaluation suggested that a rotor`s sensitivity to roughness was also influenced by the blade geometric parameters. Parametric studies were conducted using the PROP computer code with wind-tunnel airfoil characteristics for smooth and rough surface conditions to quantify the performance loss due to roughness for tapered and twisted blades relative to a constant-chord, non-twisted blade at several blade pitch angles. The results indicate that a constant-chord, non-twisted blade pitched toward stall will have the greatest losses due to roughness. The use of twist, taper, and positive blade pitch angles all help reduce the angle-of-attack distribution along the blade for a given wind speed and the associated performance degradation due to roughness. (au)

  11. Influence of pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s performance loss due to roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangler, J.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of blade geometric parameters such as pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s sensitivity to leading edge roughness. The approach began with an evaluation of available test data of performance degradation due to roughness effects for several rotors. In addition to airfoil geometry, this evaluation suggested that a rotor`s sensitivity to roughness was also influenced by the blade geometric parameters. Parametric studies were conducted using the PROP computer code with wind-tunnel airfoil characteristics for smooth and rough surface conditions to quantify the performance loss due to roughness for tapered and twisted blades relative to a constant-chord, non-twisted blade at several blade pitch angles. The results indicate that a constant-chord, non-twisted blade pitched toward stall will have the greatest losses due to roughness. The use of twist, taper, and positive blade pitch angles all help reduce the angle-of-attack distribution along the blade for a given wind speed and the associated performance degradation due to roughness. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Noise, vibration and changes in wakefulness during helicopter flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landström, U; Löfstedt, P

    1987-02-01

    The investigation was carried out in cooperation with the helicopter school AF 1 in Boden. Measurements were made in two different types of helicopter, Hkp 3 and Hkp 6. Three different parameters were recorded during the flights: noise, vibrations, and wakefulness. Noise and vibration exposures were mainly correlated to the main rotor energy and frequency. Both types of exposure were dominated by lower frequencies, below 10 Hz. Analyses of wakefulness during long-distance flights, about 4 h, and short-distance flights, less than 2 h, were based on EEG and EKG recordings. As expected the level of wakefulness was influenced by the stress upon the pilots. Take-offs and landings, as well as unexpected events during the flight, were correlated to an increased level of wakefulness. In some cases flying was correlated to a gradual increase of weariness. The correlation between weariness, types of flying, and the external environmental factors of noise and vibration, is also discussed.

  13. Fluid mechanics mechanisms in the stall process of helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Recent experimental results from airfoils in the Mach number, Reynolds number, or reduced frequency ranges typical of helicopter rotor blades have identified the most influential flow mechanisms in the dynamic stall process. The importance of secondary shed vortices, downstream wake action, and the flow in the separated region is generally acknowledged but poorly understood. By means of surface pressure cross-correlations and flow field measurements in static stall, several new hypotheses have been generated. It is proposed that vortex shedding may be caused by acoustic disturbances propagating forward in the lower (pressure) surface boundary layer, that wake closure is a misnomer, and that the shed vortex leaves a trail of vorticity that forms a turbulent free shear layer. The known dynamic stall flow mechanisms are reviewed and the potential importance of recently proposed and hypothetical flow phenomena with respect to helicopter blade aeroelastic response are assessed.

  14. SpaceTwist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yiu, Man Lung; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Xuegang, Huang

    2008-01-01

    -based matching generally fall short in offering practical query accuracy guarantees. Our proposed framework, called SpaceTwist, rectifies these shortcomings for k nearest neighbor (kNN) queries. Starting with a location different from the user's actual location, nearest neighbors are retrieved incrementally...

  15. Reweighting twisted boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bussone, Andrea; Hansen, Martin; Pica, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Imposing twisted boundary conditions on the fermionic fields is a procedure extensively used when evaluating, for example, form factors on the lattice. Twisting is usually performed for one flavour and only in the valence, and this causes a breaking of unitarity. In this work we explore the possibility of restoring unitarity through the reweighting method. We first study some properties of the approach at tree level and then we stochastically evaluate ratios of fermionic determinants for different boundary conditions in order to include them in the gauge averages, avoiding in this way the expensive generation of new configurations for each choice of the twisting angle, $\\theta$. As expected the effect of reweighting is negligible in the case of large volumes but it is important when the volumes are small and the twisting angles are large. In particular we find a measurable effect for the plaquette and the pion correlation function in the case of $\\theta=\\pi/2$ in a volume $16\\times 8^3$, and we observe a syst...

  16. The twisted Mellin transform

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zuoqin

    2007-01-01

    The "twisted Mellin transform" is a slightly modified version of the usual classical Mellin transform on $L^2(\\mathbb R)$. In this short note we investigate some of its basic properties. From the point of views of combinatorics one of its most important interesting properties is that it intertwines the differential operator, $df/dx$, with its finite difference analogue, $\

  17. Vibration Characteristics of OH-58A Helicopter Main Rotor Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    spectral density function -accelerometer I (ring gearconsistency between accelerometers as the...3119 lb-in.). (table IV). A Power Spectral Density N The one-sided power spectral density function from refer- ence 14 is The power spectral density function (eq...power spectral density function for the The power spectral density, a function of the frequency spiral bevel harmonics were added together and divided

  18. Design of a simple active controller to suppress helicopter air resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M. D.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1988-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. Using this mathematical model, a nominal configuration is selected that experiences an air resonance instability throughout most of its flight envelope. A simple multivariable compensator using conventional swashplate inputs and a single body roll rate measurement is then designed. The controller design is based on a linear estimator in conjunction with optimal feedback gains, and the design is done in the frequency domain using the Loop Transfer Recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout wide range helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  19. 76 FR 67628 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. (Bell) Model 204B, 205A, 205A-1, 205B...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ...-hour intervals and corrosion protection and sealing of the yoke, P/N 204-011-102, of the main rotor hub... holes on yokes installed on Model 212 helicopters. That AD was intended to detect corrosion pitting and...-02, Bell has introduced a replacement stainless steel yoke, P/N 212-011-102. Bell issued...

  20. Model Predictive Control for a Small Scale Unmanned Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfu Du

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Kinematical and dynamical equations of a small scale unmanned helicoper are presented in the paper. Based on these equations a model predictive control (MPC method is proposed for controlling the helicopter. This novel method allows the direct accounting for the existing time delays which are used to model the dynamics of actuators and aerodynamics of the main rotor. Also the limits of the actuators are taken into the considerations during the controller design. The proposed control algorithm was verified in real flight experiments where good perfomance was shown in postion control mode.

  1. Validation of Comprehensive Helicopter Aeroelastic Analysis with Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrinivas R. Bhat

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The experimental data for a Cbladed soft-inplane hingeless main rotor is used to validate a comprehensive aeroelastic analysis. A finite element model has been developed for the rotorblade which predicts rotating frequencies quite well, across a range of rotation speeds. The helicopter is trimmed and the predicted trim-control angles are found to be In the range ofmeasured values for a variety of flight speeds. Power predictions over a range of forward speeds also compare well. Finally, the aeroelastlc analysis is used to study the Importance ofaerodynamic models on the vibration predict~onU. nsteady aerodynamics and free-wake models have been investigated.

  2. A subjective field study of helicopter blade-slap noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of impulsiveness on the noisiness of helicopters are examined by varying the main rotor speed while maintaining a constant airspeed. This resulted in other characteristics of the noise being held relatively constant. Other controlled variables included altitude, side line distance, descent operations, and level flyovers. A description is provided of the concept, experimental design and procedures along with results based on partial analyses of acoustic and subjective response data. No significant improvement in the noisiness predictive ability of EPNL was provided by either proposed or an A-weighted crest factor correction for impulsiveness.

  3. Hyperspectral and photogrammetric helicopter-based measurements over western Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, M.; Mote, T. L.; Smith, L. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Lampkin, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss the setup and results of an experiment aimed at collecting helicopter-based hyperspectral and photogrammetry measurements over the western Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) for studying the evolution of surface albedo and surface hydrological features. Data were collected during three days at the end of July 2015 concurrently with in-situ hydrological measurements of runoff and discharge of a supraglacial stream (Rio Behar) and along the K-transect up to an elevation of ~ 1500 m a.s.l. Hyperspectral measurements of incoming and outgoing radiation collected at a radiometric resolution of 10 nm were acquired in conjunction with geo-located images by means of a digital camera mounted on the same platform. Gyroscopes and 3-D accelerometers were also used to estimate the relative orientation of the sensors collecting the incoming and outgoing solar radiation. To our knowledge, despite their importance, it is the first time that such measurements have been collected over the Greenland ice sheet from an airborne platform. The sensors were installed inside a pod that was specifically modified for our purpose. The impact of the helicopter on the recorded incoming radiation was characterized by collecting measurements in the absence and presence of the helicopter when the rotors were either off or on. Moreover, the effect of the relative position of the helicopter with respect to the sun's position was also quantified by ad-hoc maneuvers during take off and landing with the helicopter spinning around the main rotor axis. The geo-referenced images collected by our instrument provide an unprecedented ground spatial resolution of ~ 6 cm, hence allowing us to study the spatial distribution of surface hydrological features, such as cryoconite holes, small order streams and cracks developing into larger moulins. Such images were also used to evaluate the application of RGB data to estimate streams and lakes surface area and depths. Our helicopter-based hyperspectral and

  4. Effect of Ply Twist Factor on Hairiness and Unevenness of Two Plied Cotton Yarns Made of Different Spinning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamija, Sudershan; Chowdhury, Amal; Chattopadhyay, Rabisankar

    2016-06-01

    Hairiness and unevenness of cotton plied yarns made of singles spun on Murata Vortex Spinning (MVS) and other spinning systems viz. ring, compact and rotor in relation to ply twist factor have been evaluated. It has been observed that both the type of singles and ply twist has remarkable influence on these parameters. Plied yarn hairiness for ring and compact yarns is less than their respective single counterparts. However, for vortex and rotor yarns, it is found to be higher and decreases with ply twist to be at the same level or even less that of their parent single yarns at high ply twist factor. There is always an increase of short hairs (1, 2 mm) after plying as compared to their respective singles at low ply twist factors, the effect being more prominent for vortex and rotor yarns. The improvement in yarn evenness after plying has also been found to be higher for these yarns but insensitive to ply twist. Further, the percentage decrease in imperfections after plying is observed to be the highest for MVS yarns in majority of the cases.

  5. An Empirical Study of Overlapping Rotor Interference for a Small Unmanned Aircraft Propulsion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantas Brazinskas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of research into full-sized helicopter overlapping propulsion systems involves co-axial setups (fully overlapped. Partially overlapping rotor setups (tandem, multirotor have received less attention, and empirical data produced over the years is limited. The increase in demand for compact small unmanned aircraft has exposed the need for empirical investigations of overlapping propulsion systems at a small scale (Reynolds Number < 250,000. Rotor-to-rotor interference at the static state in various overlapping propulsion system configurations was empirically measured using off the shelf T-Motor 16 inch × 5.4 inch rotors. A purpose-built test rig was manufactured allowing various overlapping rotor configurations to be tested. First, single rotor data was gathered, then performance measurements were taken at different thrust and tip speeds on a range of overlap configurations. The studies were conducted in a system torque balance mode. Overlapping rotor performance was compared to an isolated dual rotor propulsion system revealing interference factors which were compared to the momentum theory. Tests revealed that in the co-axial torque-balanced propulsion system the upper rotor outperforms the lower rotor at axial separation ratios between 0.05 and 0.85. Additionally, in the same region, thrust sharing between the two rotors changed by 21%; the upper rotor produced more thrust than the lower rotor at all times. Peak performance was recorded as a 22% efficiency loss when the axial separation ratio was greater than 0.25. The performance of a co-axial torque-balanced system reached a 27% efficiency loss when the axial separation ratio was equal to 0.05. The co-axial system swirl recovery effect was recorded to have a 4% efficiency gain in the axial separation ratio region between 0.05 and 0.85. The smallest efficiency loss (3% was recorded when the rotor separation ratio was between 0.95 and 1 (axial separation ratio was kept at 0

  6. Twisted aspirin crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Rohl, Andrew L; Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2013-03-06

    Banded spherulites of aspirin have been crystallized from the melt in the presence of salicylic acid either generated from aspirin decomposition or added deliberately (2.6-35.9 mol %). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and optical polarimetry show that the spherulites are composed of helicoidal crystallites twisted along the growth directions. Mueller matrix imaging reveals radial oscillations in not only linear birefringence, but also circular birefringence, whose origin is explained through slight (∼1.3°) but systematic splaying of individual lamellae in the film. Strain associated with the replacement of aspirin molecules by salicylic acid molecules in the crystal structure is computed to be large enough to work as the driving force for the twisting of crystallites.

  7. Twisted quantum doubles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daijiro Fukuda

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Using diagrammatic pictures of tensor contractions, we consider a Hopf algebra (Aop⊗ℛλA** twisted by an element ℛλ∈A*⊗Aop corresponding to a Hopf algebra morphism λ:A→A. We show that this Hopf algebra is quasitriangular with the universal R-matrix coming from ℛλ when λ2=idA, generalizing the quantum double construction which corresponds to the case λ=idA.

  8. Twist planet drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A planetary gear system includes a sun gear coupled to an annular ring gear through a plurality of twist-planet gears, a speeder gear, and a ground structure having an internal ring gear. Each planet gear includes a solid gear having a first half portion in the form of a spur gear which includes vertical gear teeth and a second half portion in the form of a spur gear which includes helical gear teeth that are offset from the vertical gear teeth and which contact helical gear teeth on the speeder gear and helical gear teeth on the outer ring gear. One half of the twist planet gears are preloaded downward, while the other half are preloaded upwards, each one alternating with the other so that each one twists in a motion opposite to its neighbor when rotated until each planet gear seats against the sun gear, the outer ring gear, the speeder gear, and the inner ring gear. The resulting configuration is an improved stiff anti-backlash gear system.

  9. Helicopter collision avoidance and brown-out recovery with HELLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Christian; Schwartz, Ingo; Kielhorn, Peter

    2008-10-01

    EADS Germany is the world market leader in commercial and military Helicopter Laser Radar (HELLAS) Obstacle Warning Systems. The HELLAS-Warning System has been introduced into the market in 2000, is in service at German Federal Police and Royal Thai Air Force. HELLAS was also successfully evaluated by the Foreign Comparative Test Program (FCT) of the U.S. Army and other governmental agencies. Currently the successor system for military applications, HELLAS-Awareness, is in qualification phase. It will have extended sensor performance, enhanced real-time data processing capabilities and advanced human machine interface (HMI) features. Flight tests on NH90 helicopter have been successfully performed. Helicopter series integration is scheduled to begin from 2009. We will give an outline of the new sensor unit concerning detection technology and helicopter integration aspects. The system provides a widespread field of view with additional dynamic line of sight steering and a large detection range in combination with a high frame rate. We will show the HMI representations. This HELLAS system is the basis for a 3 dimensional see-and-remember-system for brown-out recovery. When landing in sandy or dusty areas the downwash of the helicopter rotor causes clouds of visually-restrictive material that can completely obstruct the pilot's outside reference, resulting in a complete loss of situational awareness and spatial orientation of the pilot which can end up in total loss of aircraft control and dangerous accidents. The brown-out recovery system presented here creates an augmented enhanced synthetic vision of the landing area with the surrounding which is based on HELLAS range image data as well as altimeter and inertial reference information.

  10. Reduction of Helicopter BVI Noise, Vibration, and Power Consumption Through Individual Blade Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Blaas, Achim; Teves, Dietrich; Kube, Roland; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted with a full-scale BO 105 helicopter rotor to evaluate the potential of open-loop individual blade control (IBC) to improve rotor performance, to reduce blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise, and to alleviate helicopter vibrations. The wind tunnel test was an international collaborative effort between NASA/U.S. Army AFDD, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, Eurocopter Deutschland, and the German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR) and was conducted under the auspices of the U.S./German MOU on Rotorcraft Aeromechanics. In this test the normal blade pitch links of the rotor were replaced by servo-actuators so that the pitch of each blade could be controlled independently of the other blades. The specially designed servoactuators and IBC control system were designed and manufactured by ZF Luftfahrttechnik, GmbH. The wind tunnel test was conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. An extensive amount of measurement information was acquired for each IBC data point. These data include rotor performance, static and dynamic hub forces and moments, rotor loads, control loads, inboard and outboard blade pitch motion, and BVI noise data. The data indicated very significant (80 percent) simultaneous reductions in both BVI noise and hub vibrations could be obtained using multi-harmonic input at the critical descent (terminal approach) condition. The data also showed that performance improvements of up to 7 percent could be obtained using 2P input at high-speed forward flight conditions.

  11. Reduction of Helicopter BVI Noise, Vibration, and Power Consumption Through Individual Blade Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Blaas, Achim; Teves, Dietrich; Kube, Roland; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted with a full-scale BO 105 helicopter rotor to evaluate the potential of open-loop individual blade control (IBC) to improve rotor performance, to reduce blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise, and to alleviate helicopter vibrations. The wind tunnel test was an international collaborative effort between NASA/U.S. Army AFDD, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, Eurocopter Deutschland, and the German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR) and was conducted under the auspices of the U.S./German MOU on Rotorcraft Aeromechanics. In this test the normal blade pitch links of the rotor were replaced by servo-actuators so that the pitch of each blade could be controlled independently of the other blades. The specially designed servoactuators and IBC control system were designed and manufactured by ZF Luftfahrttechnik, GmbH. The wind tunnel test was conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. An extensive amount of measurement information was acquired for each IBC data point. These data include rotor performance, static and dynamic hub forces and moments, rotor loads, control loads, inboard and outboard blade pitch motion, and BVI noise data. The data indicated very significant (80 percent) simultaneous reductions in both BVI noise and hub vibrations could be obtained using multi-harmonic input at the critical descent (terminal approach) condition. The data also showed that performance improvements of up to 7 percent could be obtained using 2P input at high-speed forward flight conditions.

  12. Aerodynamic design of the Cal Poly Da Vinci Human-Powered Helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larwood, Scott; Saiki, Neal

    1990-01-01

    This paper will discuss the methodology used in designing the rotor and drive propellers for the third generation Cal Poly Da Vinci Human-Powered Helicopter. The rotor was designed using a lifting surface, uniform inflow hover analysis code and the propeller was designed using a minimum induced-loss method. Construction, geometry, and operating considerations are discussed as they impact the designs. Optimization of the design performance is also explained. The propellers were tested in a wind tunnel and results are compared with theoretical data. Successful flight tests of the Da Vinci III are discussed.

  13. Design and Evaluation of a Low-Noise Helicopter Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Natsuki; Tsujiuchi, Tomoka; Murashige, Atsushi; Nishimura, Hiroki; Aoki, Makoto; Tsuchihashi, Akihiko; Yamakawa, Eiichi; Aoyama, Takashi; Saito, Shigeru

    A low-noise helicopter blade, AT1, was designed with the concept of reducing noise without the drop of rotor performance. In the concept, High-Speed Impulsive (HSI) noise is reduced by applying a thin airfoil in the tip region and a dog-tooth like extension in the leading-edge of the tip region. Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise is reduced by applying the extension and a strong taper near the tip end. The stall angle of the blade is increased by the effect of the vortex generated from the leading-edge extension. As a result, the drop of rotor performance caused by the thin airfoil and the reduction of rotor rotational speed is recovered. The low-noise characteristics and the performance of AT1 were evaluated by a model rotor test conducted at Deutsch Niederländischer Windkanal (DNW). It is shown that AT1 reduces HSI noise and BVI noise and has good performance in forward flight conditions. However, the improvement of performance in high-lift conditions still remains as a future problem.

  14. Experimental study of flight noise on AS350B2 helicopter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huaming; ZHANG Qiang; HU Zhangwei; BAO Jinsong

    2005-01-01

    A joint flight experiment is conducted by China Aviation Establishment and German Aerospace Center on an Aerospatiale AS350B2 helicopter to investigate rotorcraft flight acoustics at Pingfang airport, Harbing City, China. This paper briefly introduces the methodologies and facilities used in the flight tests. The flight exposure noise levels for ten test flight conditions are showed in the paper and harmonic spectrum and wavelet analysis methods are used for the noise test data processing, which are measured in the flight test in taking off, climbing, forward and descent flight conditions. Results show that the flight noise levels are relatively higher in the climbing and descending flight conditions. The flight noise comes mainly from the tail rotor for the climbing and from the main rotor due to the blade vortex interaction (BVI) for the descending flight conditions. The highest noise level occurs in the forward rotating blade side when the helicopter flys at moderate speed with about 6° descending slide angle.

  15. Passive suppression of helicopter ground resonance using nonlinear energy sinks attached on the helicopter blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeot, B.; Bellizzi, S.; Cochelin, B.

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the passive control of a rotor instability named helicopter Ground Resonance (GR). The passive device consists of a set of essential cubic nonlinear absorbers named Nonlinear Energy Sinks (NES) each of them positioned on a blade. A dynamic model reproducing helicopter GR instability is presented and transformed to a time-invariant nonlinear system using a multi-blade coordinate transformation based on Fourier transform mapping the dynamic state variables into a non-rotating reference frame. Combining complexification, slow/fast partition of the dynamics and averaging procedure, a reduced model is obtained which allowed us to use the so-called geometric singular perturbation analysis to characterize the steady state response regimes. As in the case of a NES attached to the fuselage, it is shown that under suitable conditions, GR instability can be completely suppressed, partially suppressed through periodic response or strongly modulated response. Relevant analytical results are compared, for validation purposes, to direct integration of the reference and reduced models.

  16. The Effects of Crosswind Flight on Rotor Harmonic Noise Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop recommendations for procedures for helicopter source noise characterization, the effects of crosswinds on main rotor harmonic noise radiation are assessed using a model of the Bell 430 helicopter. Crosswinds are found to have a significant effect on Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise radiation when the helicopter is trimmed with the fuselage oriented along the inertial flight path. However, the magnitude of BVI noise remains unchanged when the pilot orients the fuselage along the aerodynamic velocity vector, crabbing for zero aerodynamic sideslip. The effects of wind gradients on BVI noise are also investigated and found to be smaller in the crosswind direction than in the headwind direction. The effects of crosswinds on lower harmonic noise sources at higher flight speeds are also assessed. In all cases, the directivity of radiated noise is somewhat changed by the crosswind. The model predictions agree well with flight test data for the Bell 430 helicopter captured under various wind conditions. The results of this investigation would suggest that flight paths for future acoustic flight testing are best aligned across the prevailing wind direction to minimize the effects of winds on noise measurements when wind cannot otherwise be avoided.

  17. The Gravitational Field of a Twisted Skyrmion

    CERN Document Server

    Hadi, Miftachul; Husein, Andri

    2015-01-01

    We study nonlinear sigma model, especially Skyrme model without twist and Skyrme model with twist: twisted Skyrme model. Twist term, $mkz$, is indicated in vortex solution. We are interested to construct a space-time containing a string with Lagrangian plus a twist. To add gravity, we replace $\\eta^{\\mu\

  18. Properties of twisted ferromagnetic filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belovs, Mihails; Cebers, Andrejs [University of Latvia, Zellu 8, LV-1002 (Latvia)], E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.lv

    2009-02-01

    The full set of equations for twisted ferromagnetic filaments is derived. The linear stability analysis of twisted ferromagnetic filament is carried out. Two different types of the buckling instability are found - monotonous and oscillatory. The first in the limit of large twist leads to the shape of filament reminding pearls on the string, the second to spontaneous rotation of the filament, which may constitute the working of chiral microengine.

  19. The Acoustic Signal of a Helicopter can be Used to Track it With Seismic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Eva P. S.; Lokmer, Ivan; Bean, Christopher J.; Akerlie, Eggert

    2016-04-01

    We apply traditional frequency domain methods usually applied to volcanic tremor on seismic recordings of a helicopter. On a volcano the source can be repeating, closely spaced earthquakes whereas for a helicopter the source are repeating pressure pulses from the rotor blades that are converted through acoustic-to-seismic coupling. In both cases the seismic signal is referred to as tremor. As frequency gliding is in this case merely caused by the Doppler effect, not a change in the source, we can use its shape to deduce properties of the helicopter. We show in this analysis that the amount of rotor blades, rotor revolutions per minute (RPM), flight direction, height and location can be deduced. The signal was recorded by a seven station broadband array with an aperture of 1.6 km. Our spacing is close enough to record the signal at all stations and far enough to observe traveltime differences. We perform a detailed spectral and location analysis of the signal, and compare our results with the known information on the helicopter's speed, location, height, the frequency of the blades rotation and the amount of blades. This analysis is based on the characteristic shape of the curve i.e. speed of the gliding, minimum and maximum fundamental frequency, amplitudes at the inflection points at different stations and traveltimes deduced from the inflection points at different stations. The helicopter GPS track gives us a robust way of testing the method. This observation has an educative value, because the same principles can be applied to signals in different disciplines.

  20. Preliminary Design of a Tip-Jet-Driven Heavy Lift Helicopter Incorporating Circulation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    helicopter size, and soon become limiting factors (Reference 1). 2 .i1 * ~ ~ ~ Fgr 1. XH-17qI¶ ,=---.- I~~~~Fgr ___.________________I 44 Figur 1. X-1...have not been practical in the past because of the limitations imposed by available engines and materials. For example, the afterburners at the blade...successive runs. An option was a-’ailable to optimize the main rotor automatically using iterative procedures. The funcions of the individual

  1. Piloted simulator investigation of helicopter control systems effects on handling qualities during instrument flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, R. D.; Chen, R. T. N.; Gerdes, R. M.; Alderete, T. S.; Gee, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    An exploratory piloted simulation was conducted to investigate the effects of the characteristics of helicopter flight control systems on instrument flight handling qualities. This joint FAA/NASA study was motivated by the need to improve instrument flight capability. A near-term objective is to assist in updating the airworthiness criteria for helicopter instrument flight. The experiment consisted of variations of single-rotor helicopter types and levels of stability and control augmentation systems (SCAS). These configurations were evaluated during an omnirange approach task under visual and instrument flight conditions. The levels of SCAS design included a simple rate damping system, collective decoupling plus rate damping, and an attitude command system with collective decoupling. A limited evaluation of stick force versus airspeed stability was accomplished. Some problems were experienced with control system mechanization which had a detrimental effect on longitudinal stability. Pilot ratings, pilot commentary, and performance data related to the task are presented.

  2. Application of the ABC helicopter to the emergency medical service role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, L. S.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is called to the use of helicopters in transporting the sick and injured to medical facilities. It is noted that the helicopter's speed of response and delivery increases patient survival rates and may reduce the cost of medical care and its burden on society. Among the vehicle characteristics desired for this use are a cruising speed of 200 knots, a single engine hover capability at 10,000 ft, and an absence of a tail rotor. Three designs for helicopters incorporating such new technologies as digital/optical control systems, all composite air-frames, and third-generation airfoils are presented. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to show the effect of design speed, mission radius, and single engine hover capability on vehicle weight, fuel consumption, operating costs, and productivity.

  3. Investigation of Maximum Blade Loading Capability of Lift-Offset Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Maximum blade loading capability of a coaxial, lift-offset rotor is investigated using a rotorcraft configuration designed in the context of short-haul, medium-size civil and military missions. The aircraft was sized for a 6600-lb payload and a range of 300 nm. The rotor planform and twist were optimized for hover and cruise performance. For the present rotor performance calculations, the collective pitch angle is progressively increased up to and through stall with the shaft angle set to zero. The effects of lift offset on rotor lift, power, controls, and blade airloads and structural loads are examined. The maximum lift capability of the coaxial rotor increases as lift offset increases and extends well beyond the McHugh lift boundary as the lift potential of the advancing blades are fully realized. A parametric study is conducted to examine the differences between the present coaxial rotor and the McHugh rotor in terms of maximum lift capabilities and to identify important design parameters that define the maximum lift capability of the rotor. The effects of lift offset on rotor blade airloads and structural loads are also investigated. Flap bending moment increases substantially as lift offset increases to carry the hub roll moment even at low collective values. The magnitude of flap bending moment is dictated by the lift-offset value (hub roll moment) but is less sensitive to collective and speed.

  4. Twisted mass lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindler, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2007-07-15

    I review the theoretical foundations, properties as well as the simulation results obtained so far of a variant of the Wilson lattice QCD formulation: Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. Emphasis is put on the discretization errors and on the effects of these discretization errors on the phase structure for Wilson-like fermions in the chiral limit. The possibility to use in lattice simulations different lattice actions for sea and valence quarks to ease the renormalization patterns of phenomenologically relevant local operators, is also discussed. (orig.)

  5. A study of the effects of Rotating Frame Turbulence (RFT) on helicopter flight mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrage, D. P.; Prasad, J. V. B.; Gaonkar, G. H.

    1989-01-01

    The turbulence actually experienced by a helicopter blade-element significantly differs from the space-fixed free atmospheric turbulence. The turbulence in the rotor disk requires a rotationally sampled description in a rotating frame of reference. It is referred to as the rotating frame turbulence or RFT which exhibits a striking phenomenon. The RFT spectral density versus frequency shows high peak values at 1P,2P, or 3P, frequencies. The energy increase at these peaks is balanced by an energy decrease primarily at the lower-than-1P frequency range. Particularly for low altitude flight regimes of pure helicopters, such as the nap-of-the-earth maneuvers, the conventional space-fixed description of turbulence is not a good approximation, since the turbulence scale length can have values comparable to the rotor radius. Accordingly the flight mechanics characteristics with RFT description are compared with those based on the conventional space-fixed turbulence description. The results demonstrate that the RFT qualitatively and quantitatively affects the prediction of helicopter flight mechanics characteristics in turbulence. Such comparisons should play an important role in the new development of handling qualities specifications for helicopters.

  6. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel efficiency, there is renewed interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems that are both efficient and quiet. The major contributor to the overall noise of an open rotor system is the propulsor noise, which is produced as a result of the interaction of the airstream with the counter-rotating blades. As such, robust aeroacoustic prediction methods are an essential ingredient in any approach to designing low-noise open rotor systems. To that end, an effort has been underway at NASA to assess current open rotor noise prediction tools and develop new capabilities. Under this effort, high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations of a benchmark open rotor blade set were carried out and used to make noise predictions via existing NASA open rotor noise prediction codes. The results have been compared with the aerodynamic and acoustic data that were acquired for this benchmark open rotor blade set. The emphasis of this paper is on providing a summary of recent results from a NASA Glenn effort to validate an in-house open noise prediction code called LINPROP which is based on a high-blade-count asymptotic approximation to the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Equation. The results suggest that while predicting the absolute levels may be difficult, the noise trends are reasonably well predicted by this approach.

  7. Control Law Design for Twin Rotor MIMO System with Nonlinear Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of complex air vehicles is a challenging task due to high nonlinear behavior and significant coupling effect between rotors. Twin rotor multi-input multioutput system (TRMS is a laboratory setup designed for control experiments, which resembles a helicopter with unstable, nonlinear, and coupled dynamics. This paper focuses on the design and analysis of sliding mode control (SMC and backstepping controller for pitch and yaw angle control of main and tail rotor of the TRMS under parametric uncertainty. The proposed control strategy with SMC and backstepping achieves all mentioned limitations of TRMS. Result analysis of SMC and backstepping control schemes elucidates that backstepping provides efficient behavior with the parametric uncertainty for twin rotor system. Chattering and oscillating behaviors of SMC are removed with the backstepping control scheme considering the pitch and yaw angle for TRMS.

  8. A coupling VWM/CFD/CSD method for rotor airload prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjie Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A coupling fluid-structure method with a combination of viscous wake model (VWM, computational fluid dynamics (CFD and comprehensive structural dynamics (CSD modules is developed in this paper for rotor unsteady airload prediction. The hybrid VWM/CFD solver is employed to model the nonlinear aerodynamic phenomena and complicated rotor wake dynamics; the moderate deflection beam theory is implemented to predict the blade structural deformation; the loose coupling strategy based on the ‘delt method’ is used to couple the fluid and structure solvers. Several cases of Helishape 7A rotor are performed first to investigate the effect of elastic deformation on airloads. Then, two challenging forward flight conditions of UH-60A helicopter rotor are investigated, and the simulated results of wake geometry, chordwise pressure distribution and sectional normal force show excellent agreement with available test data; a comparison with traditional CFD/CSD method is also presented to illustrate the efficiency of the developed method.

  9. Helicopter Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  10. Helicopter Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  11. World helicopter market study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, B.; Pearson, R. W.; Greenwood, S. W.; Kaplan, L.

    1978-01-01

    The extent of the threat to the US helicopter industry posed by a determined effort by foreign manufacturers, European companies in particular, to supply their own domestic markets and also to penetrate export markets, including the USA is assessed. Available data on US and world markets for civil and military uses are collated and presented in both graphic and tabular form showing the past history of production and markets and, where forecasts are available, anticipated future trends. The data are discussed on an item-by-item basis and inferences are drawn in as much depth as appears justified.

  12. Optimal flight of a helicopter in engine failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhemi, Ali Abdelmajid

    This thesis studies optimal category-A helicopter flight operations in the event of one engine failure. Both Continued Takeoff (CTO) and Rejected Takeoff (RTO) operations are studied. A two-dimensional point mass model has been used to study CTO and RTO from an elevated heliport. In this model, the main rotor and tail rotor dynamics are modeled to better predict the power required during flight. A first order dynamic of the One Engine Inoperative (OEI) contingency power is considered. Flights after engine failure are formulated as nonlinear optimal control problems. For studying optimal strategies, the performance index is selected in a way that reflects the main parameters to be optimized. Problems are formulated to minimize heliport size, subject to helicopter equations. In addition to the equations of motion, state and control constraints, FAA regulations are enforced. FAA regulations are enforced during CTO, while safety considerations are enforced during RTO. These optimal control problems are solved numerically using a direct approach. States, controls, and helicopter constant parameters are parameterized, and a collocation method is employed. The cost function and path constraints are enforced as algebraic equations at the nodes, while the differential constraints are enforced by integrating the equations of motion in between nodes using Simpson's one third rule. The problem is then fed to a nonlinear programming routine to solve for all parameters. Extensive optimization of CTO and RTO problems are conducted, and results are computed, plotted, and interpreted physically. A balanced weight concept is concluded. The balanced weight concept is similar to the balanced field-length concept in field takeoff.

  13. Twisting formula of epsilon factors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAZZAD ALI BISWAS

    2017-09-01

    For characters of a non-Archimedean local field we have explicit formula for epsilon factors. But in general, we do not have any generalized twisting formula of epsilon factors. In this paper, we give a generalized twisting formula of epsilon factorsvia local Jacobi sums.

  14. Twisted supergravity and its quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Costello, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Twisted supergravity is supergravity in a background where the bosonic ghost field takes a non-zero value. This is the supergravity counterpart of the familiar concept of twisting supersymmetric field theories. In this paper, we give conjectural descriptions of type IIA and IIB supergravity in $10$ dimensions. Our conjectural descriptions are in terms of the closed-string field theories associated to certain topological string theories, and we conjecture that these topological string theories are twists of the physical string theories. For type IIB, the results of arXiv:1505.6703 show that our candidate twisted supergravity theory admits a unique quantization in perturbation theory. This is despite the fact that the theories, like the original physical theories, are non-renormalizable. Although we do not prove our conjectures, we amass considerable evidence. We find that our candidates for the twisted supergravity theories contain the residual supersymmetry one would expect. We also prove (using heavily a res...

  15. Porphyrin and bodipy molecular rotors as microviscometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Joseph Daniel, III

    Viscosity, a fluid's internal resistance to flow and resist molecular diffusion, is a fundamental property of fluid media. Determining the bulk viscosity of a fluid has been easy to relatively simple to accomplish for many years, yet in the recent decade there has been a focus on techniques to measure a fluid's microviscosity. Microviscosity differs from bulk viscosity such that microviscosity is the friction experienced by a single particle interacting with its micron-sized local environment. Macroscopic methods to evaluate the viscosity are well established, but methods to determine viscosity on the microscale level remains unclear. This work determines the viability of three molecular rotors designed as probes for microviscosity in organic media, ionic liquids, and in the cellular microenvironment. Understanding microviscosity is important because it one of the main properties of any fluid and thus has an effect on any diffusion related processes. A variety of mass and signal transport phenomena as well as intermolecular interactions are often governed by viscosity. Molecular rotors are a subclass of intramolecular charge transfer fluorophores which form a lower energy twisted state. This results in a charge separated species which is highly sensitive to its surrounding microenviroment's viscosity as high viscosity limits its ability to form this twisted state. Once excited, there are deactivation routes which the excited fluorophore can undergo: radiative and non-radiative. Both were studied in this work. In the case of a radiative decay, as seen in porphyrin dimer, the energy is released in the form of a photon and is seen as a shifted band in the emission structure. The conformation of the porphyrin dimer was found to be influenced differently by ionic liquids as compared to molecular solvents, indicating the microheterogenous nature of ionic liquids play a role in the conformation. For non-radiative decays, BODIPY dyads and triads were investigated. The

  16. Large Rotor Test Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This test apparatus, when combined with the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, produces a thorough, full-scale test capability. The Large Rotor Test Apparatus...

  17. Reducing rotor weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheney, M.C. [PS Enterprises, Inc., Glastonbury, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The cost of energy for renewables has gained greater significance in recent years due to the drop in price in some competing energy sources, particularly natural gas. In pursuit of lower manufacturing costs for wind turbine systems, work was conducted to explore an innovative rotor designed to reduce weight and cost over conventional rotor systems. Trade-off studies were conducted to measure the influence of number of blades, stiffness, and manufacturing method on COE. The study showed that increasing number of blades at constant solidity significantly reduced rotor weight and that manufacturing the blades using pultrusion technology produced the lowest cost per pound. Under contracts with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Energy Commission, a 400 kW (33m diameter) turbine was designed employing this technology. The project included tests of an 80 kW (15.5m diameter) dynamically scaled rotor which demonstrated the viability of the design.

  18. Twisted bialgebroids versus bialgebroids from a Drinfeld twist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Andrzej; Pachoł, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Bialgebroids (respectively Hopf algebroids) are bialgebras (Hopf algebras) over noncommutative rings. Drinfeld twist techniques are particularly useful in the (deformation) quantization of Lie algebras as well as the underlying module algebras (=quantum spaces). A smash product construction combines both of them into the new algebra which, in fact, does not depend on the twist. However, we can turn it into a bialgebroid in a twist-dependent way. Alternatively, one can use Drinfeld twist techniques in a category of bialgebroids. We show that both the techniques indicated in the title—the twisting of a bialgebroid or constructing a bialgebroid from the twisted bialgebra—give rise to the same result in the case of a normalized cocycle twist. This can be useful for the better description of a quantum deformed phase space. We argue that within this bialgebroid framework one can justify the use of deformed coordinates (i.e. spacetime noncommutativity), which are frequently postulated in order to explain quantum gravity effects.

  19. Refinement and evaluation of helicopter real-time self-adaptive active vibration controller algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    A Real-Time Self-Adaptive (RTSA) active vibration controller was used as the framework in developing a computer program for a generic controller that can be used to alleviate helicopter vibration. Based upon on-line identification of system parameters, the generic controller minimizes vibration in the fuselage by closed-loop implementation of higher harmonic control in the main rotor system. The new generic controller incorporates a set of improved algorithms that gives the capability to readily define many different configurations by selecting one of three different controller types (deterministic, cautious, and dual), one of two linear system models (local and global), and one or more of several methods of applying limits on control inputs (external and/or internal limits on higher harmonic pitch amplitude and rate). A helicopter rotor simulation analysis was used to evaluate the algorithms associated with the alternative controller types as applied to the four-bladed H-34 rotor mounted on the NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus (RTA) which represents the fuselage. After proper tuning all three controllers provide more effective vibration reduction and converge more quickly and smoothly with smaller control inputs than the initial RTSA controller (deterministic with external pitch-rate limiting). It is demonstrated that internal limiting of the control inputs a significantly improves the overall performance of the deterministic controller.

  20. Modeling, Control and Coordination of Helicopter Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Beibei; Chen, Chang; Fua, Cheng-Heng; Lee, Tong Heng

    2012-01-01

    Modeling, Control and Coordination of Helicopter Systems provides a comprehensive treatment of helicopter systems, ranging from related nonlinear flight dynamic modeling and stability analysis to advanced control design for single helicopter systems, and also covers issues related to the coordination and formation control of multiple helicopter systems to achieve high performance tasks. Ensuring stability in helicopter flight is a challenging problem for nonlinear control design and development. This book is a valuable reference on modeling, control and coordination of helicopter systems,providing readers with practical solutions for the problems that still plague helicopter system design and implementation. Readers will gain a complete picture of helicopters at the systems level, as well as a better understanding of the technical intricacies involved. This book also: Presents a complete picture of modeling, control and coordination for helicopter systems Provides a modeling platform for a general class of ro...

  1. 76 FR 67051 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. Model 204B, 205A, 205A-1, 205B, 210, 212...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    .... (BHT) Model helicopters with certain tail rotor blades (blades). The superseded AD requires, before... 2010-26-52), which was sent to all known owners and operators of BHT Model 204B, 205A, 205A-1, 205B.... Relevant Service Information We have reviewed the following revised BHT Alert Service Bulletins (ASBs), all...

  2. Initial design of a stall-controlled wind turbine rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, T.A. [Inst. for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway)

    1997-08-01

    A model intended for initial design of stall-controlled wind turbine rotors is described. The user specifies relative radial position of an arbitrary number of airfoil sections, referring to a data file containing lift-and drag curves. The data file is on the same format as used in the commercial blade-element code BLADES-/2/, where lift- and drag coefficients are interpolated from tables as function of Reynolds number, relative thickness and angle of attack. The user can set constraints on a selection of the following: Maximum power; Maximum thrust in operation; Maximum root bending moment in operation; Extreme root bending moment, parked rotor; Tip speed; Upper and lower bounds on optimisation variables. The optimisation variables can be selected from: Blade radius; Rotational speed; Chord and twist at an arbitrary number of radial positions. The user can chose linear chord distribution and a hyperbola-like twist distribution to ensure smooth planform and twist, or cubic spline interpolation for one or both. The aerodynamic model is based on classical strip theory with Prandtl tip loss correction, supplemented by empirical data for high induction factors. (EG)

  3. Active Flap Control of the SMART Rotor for Vibration Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Steven R.; Anand, R. Vaidyanathan; Straub, Friedrich K.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Active control methodologies were applied to a full-scale active flap rotor obtained during a joint Boeing/ DARPA/NASA/Army test in the Air Force National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex 40- by 80-foot anechoic wind tunnel. The active flap rotor is a full-scale MD 900 helicopter main rotor with each of its five blades modified to include an on-blade piezoelectric actuator-driven flap with a span of 18% of radius, 25% of chord, and located at 83% radius. Vibration control demonstrated the potential of active flaps for effective control of vibratory loads, especially normal force loads. Active control of normal force vibratory loads using active flaps and a continuous-time higher harmonic control algorithm was very effective, reducing harmonic (1-5P) normal force vibratory loads by 95% in both cruise and approach conditions. Control of vibratory roll and pitch moments was also demonstrated, although moment control was less effective than normal force control. Finally, active control was used to precisely control blade flap position for correlation with pretest predictions of rotor aeroacoustics. Flap displacements were commanded to follow specific harmonic profiles of 2 deg or more in amplitude, and the flap deflection errors obtained were less than 0.2 deg r.m.s.

  4. Adaptation of the Neural Network Recognition System of the Helicopter on Its Acoustic Radiation to the Flight Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Hohlov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns the adaptation of a neural tract that recognizes a helicopter from the aerodynamic and ground objects by its acoustic radiation to the helicopter flight speed. It uses non-centered informative signs-indications of estimating signal spectra, which correspond to the local extremes (maximums and minimums of the power spectrum of input signal and have the greatest information when differentiating the helicopter signals from those of tracked vehicles. The article gives justification to the principle of the neural network (NN adaptation and adaptation block structure, which solves problems of blade passage frequency estimation when capturing the object and track it when tracking a target, as well as forming a signal to control the resonant filter parameters of the selection block of informative signs. To create the discriminatory characteristics of the discriminator are used autoregressive statistical characteristics of the quadrature components of signal, obtained through the discrete Hilbert Converter (DGC that perforMathematical modeling of the tracking meter using the helicopter signals obtained in real conditions is performed. The article gives estimates of the tracking parameter when using a tracking meter with DGC by sequential records of realized acoustic noise of the helicopter. It also shows a block-diagram of the adaptive NN. The scientific novelty of the work is that providing the invariance of used informative sign, the counts of local extremes of power spectral density (PSD to changes in the helicopter flight speed is reached due to adding the NN structure and adaptation block, which is implemented as a meter to track the apparent passage frequency of the helicopter rotor blades using its relationship with a function of the autoregressive acoustic signal of the helicopter.Specialized literature proposes solutions based on the use of training classifiers with different parametric methods of spectral representations

  5. Vertebral pain in helicopter pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, R.; Delahaye, R. P.; Metges, P. J.; VICENS

    1980-01-01

    Pathological forms of spinal pain engendered by piloting helicopters were clinically studied. Lumbalgia and pathology of the dorsal and cervical spine are discussed along with their clinical and radiological signs and origins.

  6. Identification, control and visually-guided behavior for a model helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saripalli, Srikanth

    Research on unmanned aerial vehicles is motivated by applications where human intervention is impossible, risky or expensive e.g. hazardous material recovery, traffic monitoring, disaster relief support, military operations etc. Due to its vertical take-off, landing and hover capabilities, a helicopter is an attractive platform for such applications. There are significant challenges to building an autonomous robotic helicopter - these span the areas of system identification, low-level control, state estimation, and planning. Towards the goal of fully-autonomous helicopters this thesis makes the following contributions. A continuous-discrete extended Kalman filter has been developed that combines inertial data with GPS and compass data to provide estimates of the 6DOF state of the helicopter. Using this filter a model for the helicopter has been identified based on frequency response techniques. The model has been validated in flight tests on a small helicopter testbed (1.6 m rotor diameter) at speeds upto 5 m/s. Based on evidence from this model a decoupled low-level controller has been developed which is embedded in a control architecture suitable for visually-guided navigation. As a novel application, we show how such a controller can be used to perform trajectory following on the helicopter where the desired trajectories are typical spacecraft landing trajectories, and the only controls available are thrusters. This in effect, produces a low-cost testbed for testing spacecraft landing and hazard avoidance on a planetary surface. Finally, we develop and extensively experimentally characterize algorithms for vision-based autonomous landing, object tracking, and sensor deployment.

  7. Dynamics of a split torque helicopter transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Timothy L.

    1994-06-01

    Split torque designs, proposed as alternatives to traditional planetary designs for helicopter main rotor transmissions, can save weight and be more reliable than traditional designs. This report presents the results of an analytical study of the system dynamics and performance of a split torque gearbox that uses a balance beam mechanism for load sharing. The Lagrange method was applied to develop a system of equations of motion. The mathematical model includes time-varying gear mesh stiffness, friction, and manufacturing errors. Cornell's method for calculating the stiffness of spur gear teeth was extended and applied to helical gears. The phenomenon of sidebands spaced at shaft frequencies about gear mesh fundamental frequencies was simulated by modeling total composite gear errors as sinusoid functions. Although the gearbox has symmetric geometry, the loads and motions of the two power paths differ. Friction must be considered to properly evaluate the balance beam mechanism. For the design studied, the balance beam is not an effective device for load sharing unless the coefficient of friction is less than 0.003. The complete system stiffness as represented by the stiffness matrix used in this analysis must be considered to precisely determine the optimal tooth indexing position.

  8. The evolution of helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R.; Wen, C. Y.; Lorente, S.; Bejan, A.

    2016-07-01

    Here, we show that during their half-century history, helicopters have been evolving into geometrically similar architectures with surprisingly sharp correlations between dimensions, performance, and body size. For example, proportionalities emerge between body size, engine size, and the fuel load. Furthermore, the engine efficiency increases with the engine size, and the propeller radius is roughly the same as the length scale of the whole body. These trends are in accord with the constructal law, which accounts for the engine efficiency trend and the proportionality between "motor" size and body size in animals and vehicles. These body-size effects are qualitatively the same as those uncovered earlier for the evolution of aircraft. The present study adds to this theoretical body of research the evolutionary design of all technologies [A. Bejan, The Physics of Life: The Evolution of Everything (St. Martin's Press, New York, 2016)].

  9. EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE OF HORIZONTAL AXIS WIND TURBINE BLADES BASED ON OPTIMAL ROTOR THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Tenguria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is a very popular renewable energy resource. In order to increase the use of wind energy, it is important to develop wind turbine rotor with high rotations rates and power coefficient. In this paper, a method for the determination of the aerodynamic performance characteristics using NACA airfoils is given for three bladed horizontal axis wind turbine. Blade geometry is obtained from the best approximation of the calculated theoretical optimum chord and twist distribution of the rotating blade. Optimal rotor theory is used, which is simple enough and accurate enough for rotor design. In this work, eight different airfoils are used to investigate the changes in performance of the blade. Rotor diameter taken is 82 m which is the diameter of VESTAS V82-1.65MW. The airfoils taken are same from root to tip in every blade. The design lift coefficient taken is 1.1. A computer program is generated to automate the complete procedure.

  10. EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE OF HORIZONTAL AXIS WIND TURBINE BLADES BASED ON OPTIMAL ROTOR THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Tenguria

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is a very popular renewable energy resource. In order to increase the use of wind energy, it is important to develop wind turbine rotor with high rotations rates and power coefficient. In this paper, a method for the determination of the aerodynamic performance characteristics using NACA airfoils is given for three bladed horizontal axis wind turbine. Blade geometry is obtained from the best approximation of the calculated theoretical optimum chord and twist distribution of the rotating blade. Optimal rotor theory is used, which is simple enough and accurate enough for rotor design. In this work, eight different airfoils are used to investigate the changes in performance of the blade. Rotor diameter taken is 82 m which is the diameter of VESTAS V82-1.65MW. The airfoils taken are same from root to tip in every blade. The design lift coefficient taken is 1.1. A computer program is generated to automate the complete procedure.

  11. Photogrammetric detection technique for rotor blades structural characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enei, C.; Bernardini, G.; Serafini, J.; Mattioni, L.; Ficuciello, C.; Vezzari, V.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an innovative use of photogrammetric detection techniques to experimentally estimate structural/inertial properties of helicopter rotor blades. The identification algorithms for the evaluation of mass and flexural stiffness distributions are an extension of the ones proposed by Larsen, whereas the procedure for torsional properties determination (stiffness and shear center position) is based on the Euler-Prandtl beam theory. These algorithms rely on measurements performed through photogrammetric detection, which requires the collection of digital photos allowing the identification of 3D coordinates of labeled points (markers) on the structure through the correlation of 2D pictures. The displacements are evaluated by comparing the positions of markers in loaded and reference configuration. Being the applied loads known, the structural characteristics can be directly obtained from the measured displacements. The accuracy of the proposed identification algorithms has been firstly verified by comparison with numerical and experimental data, and then applied to the structural characterization of two main rotor blades, designed for ultra-light helicopter applications.

  12. Semantic Deviation in Oliver Twist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康艺凡

    2016-01-01

    Dickens, with his adeptness with language, applies semantic deviation skillfully in his realistic novel Oliver Twist. However, most studies and comments home and abroad on it mainly focus on such aspects as humanity, society, and characters. Therefore, this thesis will take a stylistic approach to Oliver Twist from the perspective of semantic deviation, which is achieved by the use of irony, hyperbole, and pun and analyze how the application of the technique makes the novel attractive.

  13. Null twisted geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Speziale, Simone

    2013-01-01

    We define and investigate a quantisation of null hypersurfaces in the context of loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph. The main tool we use is the parametrisation of the theory in terms of twistors, which has already proved useful in discussing the interpretation of spin networks as the quantization of twisted geometries. The classical formalism can be extended in a natural way to null hypersurfaces, with the Euclidean polyhedra replaced by null polyhedra with space-like faces, and SU(2) by the little group ISO(2). The main difference is that the simplicity constraints present in the formalims are all first class, and the symplectic reduction selects only the helicity subgroup of the little group. As a consequence, information on the shapes of the polyhedra is lost, and the result is a much simpler, abelian geometric picture. It can be described by an Euclidean singular structure on the 2-dimensional space-like surface defined by a foliation of space-time by null hypersurfaces. This geometric structure is na...

  14. Rotor balancing apparatus and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Frank (Inventor); Lyman, Joseph (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Rotor balancing apparatus and a system comprising balance probes for measuring unbalance at the ends of a magnetically suspended rotor are disclosed. Each balance probe comprises a photocell which is located in relationship to the magnetically suspended rotor such that unbalance of the rotor changes the amount of light recorded by each photocell. The signal from each photocell is electrically amplified and displayed by a suitable device, such as an oscilloscope.

  15. Non-contact measurement of helicopter device position in wind tunnels with the use of optical videogrammetry method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruliuk, K. A.; Kulesh, V. P.

    2016-10-01

    An optical videogrammetry method using one digital camera for non-contact measurements of geometric shape parameters, position and motion of models and structural elements of aircraft in experimental aerodynamics was developed. The tests with the use of this method for measurement of six components (three linear and three angular ones) of real position of helicopter device in wind tunnel flow were conducted. The distance between camera and test object was 15 meters. It was shown in practice that, in the conditions of aerodynamic experiment instrumental measurement error (standard deviation) for angular and linear displacements of helicopter device does not exceed 0,02° and 0.3 mm, respectively. Analysis of the results shows that at the minimum rotor thrust deviations are systematic and generally are within ± 0.2 degrees. Deviations of angle values grow with the increase of rotor thrust.

  16. Lightweight rotor design by optimal spar cap offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, A.; Sartori, L.; Lunghini, M. S.; Clozza, L.; Bortolotti, P.; Bottasso, C. L.

    2016-09-01

    Bend-twist coupling behavior is induced in a blade by displacing the suction side spar cap towards the leading edge, and the pressure side one in the opposite direction. Additional couplings are introduced by rotating the spar cap fibers. The structural configuration of the blade is optimized using an automated design environment. The resulting blade shows significant benefits in terms of mass and loads when compared to the baseline uncoupled one. Finally, the lightweight design concept is used to increase the rotor size, resulting in a larger energy yield for the same hub loads.

  17. Investigating Flight with a Toy Helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Flight fascinates people of all ages. Recent advances in battery technology have extended the capabilities of model airplanes and toy helicopters. For those who have never outgrown a childhood enthusiasm for the wonders of flight, it is possible to buy inexpensive, remotely controlled planes and helicopters. A toy helicopter offers an opportunity…

  18. Civil helicopter flight research. [for CH-53 helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, W. J.; Schoultz, M. B.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a description of the NASA CH-53 Civil Helicopter Research Aircraft and discusses preliminary results of the aircraft flight research performed to evaluate factors and requirements for future helicopter transport operations. The CH-53 equipped with a 16-seat airline-type cabin and instrumented for flight research studies in noise, vibration, handling qualities, passenger acceptance, fuel utilization, terminal area maneuvers, and gust response. Predicted fuel usage for typical short-haul missions is compared with actual fuel use. Pilot ratings for an IFR handling quality task for three levels of stability augmentation are presented, and the effects of internal noise, vibration, and motion on passenger acceptance are discussed. Future planned CH-53 flight research within the Civil Helicopter Technology Program is discussed.

  19. Influence of vane sweep on rotor-stator interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envia, Edmane; Kerschen, Edward J.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of vane sweep in rotor-stator interaction noise is investigated. In an analytical approach, the interaction of a convected gust representing the rotor viscous wake, with a cascade of cascade of finite span swept airfoils, representing the stator, is analyzed. The analysis is based on the solution of the exact linearized equations of motion. High frequency convected gusts for which noise generation is concentrated near the leading edge of airfoils is considered. In a preliminary study, the problem of an isolated finite span swept airfoil interacting with a convected gust is analyzed. Results indicate that sweep can substantially reduce the farfield noise levels for a single airfoil. Using the single airfoil model, an approximate solution to the problem of noise radiation from a cascade of finite span swept airfoils interacting with a convected gust is derived. A parametric study of noise generated by gust cascade interaction is carried out to assess the effectiveness of vane sweep in reducing rotor-stator interaction noise. The results show that sweep is beneficial in reducing noise levels. Rotor wake twist or circumferential lean substantially influences the effectiveness of vane sweep. The orientation of vane sweep must be chosen to enhance the natural phase lag caused by wake lean, in which case rather small sweep angles substantially reduce the noise levels.

  20. Study of Rotor Spun Basofil/Cotton Blended Yarn Quality Characteristics during Optimisation of Processing Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mwasiagi J.I.; WANG Xin-hou; Tuigong D.R.; Wang J.

    2005-01-01

    Yarn quality characteristics are affected by processing parameters. A 36 tex rotor spun yarn of 50/50 Basofil/cotton (B/C) blended yarn was spun, and the spinning process optimised for rotor speed, opening roller speed and twist factor. Selected yarn characteristics were studied during the optimization process. During the optimizations process yarn elongation and hairiness reduced with increase in rotor speed. Tenacity increased with increase of rotor speed. The increase in TF caused tenacity and CV of count to increase up to a peak and then started to decrease with further increase of TF. While TF caused an increase in yarn hairiness, elongation decreased to a minimum level and then started to increase with further increase of TF. CV of count and hairiness increased with increase in opening roller speed, but tenacity and elongation decreased with increase in opening roller speed. The optimization process yielded the optimum levels for rotor speed, opening roller speed and twist factor (TF) as 45,000 rpm, 6,500 rpm and 450respectively. As per uster Standards the optimum yarn showed good results for CV of count, CV of tenacity and thin places/km.

  1. Design of the Active Elevon Rotor for Low Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Mark V.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Helicopter fuselages vibrate more than desired, and traditional solutions have limited effectiveness and can impose an appreciable weight penalty. Alternative methods of combating high vibration, including Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) via harmonic swashplate motion and Individual Blade Control (IBC) via active pitch links, have been studied for several decades. HHC via an on-blade control surface was tested in 1977 on a full scale rotor using a secondary active swashplate and a mechanical control system. Recent smart material advances have prompted new research into the use of on-blade control concepts. Recent analytical studies have indicated that the use of on-blade control surfaces produces vibration reduction comparable to swashplate-based HHC but for less power. Furthermore, smart materials (such as piezoceramics) have been shown to provide sufficient control authority for preliminary rotor experiments. These experiments were initially performed at small scale for reduced tip speeds. More recent experiments have been conducted at or near full tip speeds, and a full-scale active rotor is under development by Boeing with Eurocopter et al. pursuing a similarly advanced full-scale implementation. The US Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate has undertaken a new research program called the Active Elevon Rotor (AER) Focus Demo. This program includes the design, fabrication, and wind. tunnel testing of a four-bladed, 12.96 ft diameter rotor with one or two on-blade elevons per blade. The rotor, which will be Mach scaled, will use 2-5/rev elevon motion for closed-loop control and :will be tested in late 2001. The primary goal of the AER Focus Demo is the reduction of vibratory hub loads by 80% and the reduction of vibratory blade structural loads. A secondary goal is the reduction of rotor power. The third priority is the measurement and possible reduction of Blade Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. The present study is focused on elevon effectiveness, that is, the elevon

  2. The NASA/industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) program : Bell Helicopter Textron accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronkhite, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate vibration prediction for helicopter airframes is needed to 'fly from the drawing board' without costly development testing to solve vibration problems. The principal analytical tool for vibration prediction within the U.S. helicopter industry is the NASTRAN finite element analysis. Under the NASA DAMVIBS research program, Bell conducted NASTRAN modeling, ground vibration testing, and correlations of both metallic (AH-1G) and composite (ACAP) airframes. The objectives of the program were to assess NASTRAN airframe vibration correlations, to investigate contributors to poor agreement, and to improve modeling techniques. In the past, there has been low confidence in higher frequency vibration prediction for helicopters that have multibladed rotors (three or more blades) with predominant excitation frequencies typically above 15 Hz. Bell's findings under the DAMVIBS program, discussed in this paper, included the following: (1) accuracy of finite element models (FEM) for composite and metallic airframes generally were found to be comparable; (2) more detail is needed in the FEM to improve higher frequency prediction; (3) secondary structure not normally included in the FEM can provide significant stiffening; (4) damping can significantly affect phase response at higher frequencies; and (5) future work is needed in the areas of determination of rotor-induced vibratory loads and optimization.

  3. 直升机气动噪声研究进展%Progress in aero-acoustic technology of helicopter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈平剑; 仲唯贵; 段广战

    2015-01-01

    The status and progress in helicopter aero-acoustic technology is presented,inclu-ding test technology,analysis method and rotor noise control technology.The advanced test technologies such as unsteady pressure measurement,flow field visualization and noise source lo-calization,have been implemented in the acoustic wind tunnel test of rotor noise,which is the es-sential instrument for helicopter aero-acoustic research.Flight test of helicopter aero-acoustic measurements has become a necessary technique in the programs of helicopter noise certification and helicopter noise reduction investigation.With the development of helicopter aero-acoustic noise analysis method,many software tools for rotor noise prediction have been developed and applied in the helicopter design and noise reduction research,based on the solutions of the FW-H equation and Kirchhoff equation.Low noise blade tip is the primary and effective method for heli-copter noise control,and is used widely in helicopter design.Moreover,new technologies such as noise abatement operation and active rotor noise control have been validated by flight test,but have not been used in helicopter design get.Initiated by the demands to design environmentally compatible helicopter,both societies of industry and academia will devote more effort in helicop-ter aero-acoustic technology research.%对直升机气动噪声的研究进展进行了综述,内容包括试验技术、理论分析方法和噪声抑制技术。声学风洞试验是直升机气动噪声研究的基本手段,其中非定常载荷测试、流场显示和声源定位等先进测试技术已实现应用;飞行试验在直升机噪声适航标准完善和噪声控制技术研究等方面已成为必不可少的研究和验证手段。直升机气动噪声的理论体系不断完善,包括声类比法、Kirchhoff/CFD 混合法等旋翼气动噪声分析方法都已形成分析程序,成为直升机研发的有效工具。直升机气动噪声

  4. Rotor Vibration Reduction Using Multi-Element Multi-Path Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Keye

    Multi-Element Multi-Path (MEMP) structural design is a new concept for rotor vibration reduction. This thesis explores the possibility of applying MEMP design to helicopter rotor blades. A conceptual design is developed to investigate the MEMP blade's vibration reduction performance. In the design, the rotor blade is characterized by two centrifugally loaded beams which are connected to each other through linear and torsional springs. A computer program is built to simulate the behavior of such structures. Detailed parametric studies are conducted. The main challenges in this thesis involve the blade hub load vibration analysis, the blade thickness constraint and the blade parameter selection. The results show substantial vibration reduction for the MEMP design but the large relative deflection between the two beams, conceptualized as an internal spar and airfoil shell, remains a problem for further study.

  5. Control of a Quadrotor Equipped with a Fixed-wing by Tilting Some of Four Rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Nakamura

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract—Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs are beingexpected to be used for the vegetational observation and theinformation collection of disaster sites. Especially, rotorcraftstypified by helicopters are attractive, because they are able tohover and achieve vertical take-off and landing (VTOL.However, rotorcrafts have a disadvantage that it cannot have along-distance flight, because they fly by the thrust of upwarddirection. Aircrafts with tilt rotors are developed in order toovercome such disadvantages. Such aircrafts can be hovering andtake a VTOL and also a long-distance flight by changing theangle of the rotor. In this research, it is aimed at proposing aVTOL-type UAV with a fixed-wing and four tiltable rotors andcontrolling it.

  6. [Back ache in helicopter pilots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, S; Jovelić, S; Manojlović, J

    1992-01-01

    Due to low back pain (LBP) and harmful effects of flying, questionnaires were sent to 71 helicopter pilots of the experimental group, 22 mechanics helicopter flyers and to the control group of 28 air-traffic controllers. The prevalence of LBP was the highest in helicopter pilots, then in helicomechanics and air-traffic controllers (53%, 50% and 36%). Effects of exposure to vibration, body posture and working load have not contributed significantly to the occurrence of LBP. LBP has not lead to an important difference in the strength of the back musculature, body mass index and spondylosis, that is, scoliosis. The necessity of further study of LBP and maintaining of specific preventive measures are indicated.

  7. Dynamics Control Approaches to Improve Vibratory Environment of the Helicopter Aircrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Viresh Kanchana

    Although helicopter has become a versatile mode of aerial transportation, high vibration levels leads to poor ride quality for its passengers and aircrew. Undesired vibration transmitted through the helicopter seats have been known to cause fatigue and discomfort to the aircrew in the short-term as well as neck strain and back pain injuries due to long-term exposure. This research study investigated the use of novel active as well as passive methodologies integrated in helicopter seats to mitigate the aircrew exposure to high vibration levels. Due to significantly less certification effort required to modify the helicopter seat structure, application of novel technologies to the seat is more practical compared to flight critical components such as the main rotor to reduce aircrew vibration. In particular, this research effort developed a novel adaptive seat mount approach based on active vibration control technology. This novel design that incorporated two stacked piezoelectric actuators as active struts increases the bending stiffness to avoid the low frequency resonance while generating forces to counteract higher harmonic vibration peaks. A real-time controller implemented using a feed-forward algorithm based on adaptive notches counteracted the forced vibration peaks while a robust feedback control algorithm suppressed the resonance modes. The effectiveness of the adaptive seat mount system was demonstrated through extensive closed-loop control tests on a full-scale helicopter seat using representative helicopter floor vibration profiles. Test results concluded that the proposed adaptive seat mount approach based on active control technology is a viable solution for the helicopter seat vibration control application. In addition, a unique flight test using a Bell-412 helicopter demonstrated that the aircrew is exposed to high levels of vibration during flight and that the whole body vibration spectrum varied substantially depending on operating conditions as

  8. The helicopter - some ergonomic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovesey, E J

    1975-09-01

    Helicopter pilots are some of the hardest working human operators, because of the machine's inherant instability and control problems. This article covers some aspects where ergonomists might help to improve the overall system. After considering basic differences between helicopters and fixed wing aircraft, the author examines controls, where there are prospects of using miniature hand levers; cockpit vision and displays with particular reference to night and instrument flying; seating and vibration where the effects of protective clothing and harnesses are considered; and cabin noise from the engine, transmission and intercom systems. Finally, he assesses pilot activity using cine film techniques for different types of flight.

  9. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-02

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of 'polarization twist', which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms.

  10. Overview: Applications of numerical optimization methods to helicopter design problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, H.

    1984-01-01

    There are a number of helicopter design problems that are well suited to applications of numerical design optimization techniques. Adequate implementation of this technology will provide high pay-offs. There are a number of numerical optimization programs available, and there are many excellent response/performance analysis programs developed or being developed. But integration of these programs in a form that is usable in the design phase should be recognized as important. It is also necessary to attract the attention of engineers engaged in the development of analysis capabilities and to make them aware that analysis capabilities are much more powerful if integrated into design oriented codes. Frequently, the shortcoming of analysis capabilities are revealed by coupling them with an optimization code. Most of the published work has addressed problems in preliminary system design, rotor system/blade design or airframe design. Very few published results were found in acoustics, aerodynamics and control system design. Currently major efforts are focused on vibration reduction, and aerodynamics/acoustics applications appear to be growing fast. The development of a computer program system to integrate the multiple disciplines required in helicopter design with numerical optimization technique is needed. Activities in Britain, Germany and Poland are identified, but no published results from France, Italy, the USSR or Japan were found.

  11. 77 FR 30232 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... Textron (BHT) Model 412, 412EP, and 412CF helicopters. This proposed AD is prompted by a reported failure... delay. We may change this proposal in light of the comments we receive. Discussion BHT has received a... develop on other products of the same type design. Related Service Information We reviewed BHT ASB 412-11...

  12. 77 FR 68055 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Bell Helicopter Textron (BHT) Model 412, 412EP... 39 to include an AD that would apply to certain serial-numbered BHT Model 412, 412EP, and 412CF... AD and the Service Information The BHT ASBs require compliance within 100 hours of flight time for...

  13. 78 FR 9793 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ..., Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Rotorcraft Directorate, Rotorcraft Certification Office, 2601 Meacham Blvd., Fort... helicopters, are susceptible to the same type of cracking because they are of similar design and manufacture... first. This AD does not require you to report a cracked fitting to the Rotorcraft Certification...

  14. 78 FR 1730 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ...: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. (BHTI) Model... (connector) can deteriorate, causing a short in the connector that may lead to a fire in the starter... short in the connector that may lead to a fire in the starter/generator, smoke in the cockpit...

  15. Aeroelastic response and stability of tiltrotors with elastically-coupled composite rotor blades. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1993-01-01

    There is a potential for improving the performance and aeroelastic stability of tiltrotors through the use of elastically-coupled composite rotor blades. To study the characteristics of tiltrotors with these types of rotor blades it is necessary to formulate a new analysis which has the capabilities of modeling both a tiltrotor configuration and an anisotropic rotor blade. Background for these formulations is established in two preliminary investigations. In the first, the influence of several system design parameters on tiltrotor aeroelastic stability is examined for the high-speed axial flight mode using a newly-developed rigid-blade analysis with an elastic wing finite element model. The second preliminary investigation addresses the accuracy of using a one-dimensional beam analysis to predict frequencies of elastically-coupled highly-twisted rotor blades. Important aspects of the new aeroelastic formulations are the inclusion of a large steady pylon angle which controls tilt of the rotor system with respect to the airflow, the inclusion of elastic pitch-lag coupling terms related to rotor precone, the inclusion of hub-related degrees of freedom which enable modeling of a gimballed rotor system and engine drive-train dynamics, and additional elastic coupling terms which enable modeling of the anisotropic features for both the rotor blades and the tiltrotor wing. Accuracy of the new tiltrotor analysis is demonstrated by a comparison of the results produced for a baseline case with analytical and experimental results reported in the open literature. Two investigations of elastically tailored blades on a baseline tiltrotor are then conducted. One investigation shows that elastic bending-twist coupling of the rotor blade is a very effective means for increasing the flutter velocity of a tiltrotor, and the magnitude of coupling required does not have an adverse effect on performance or blade loads. The second investigation shows that passive blade twist control via

  16. Rotor for a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a rotor for a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor, said rotor comprising a rotor body having a longitudinal centre axis, and at least one pivotally mounted blade being adapted to pivot around a pivot axis under rotation of the rotor body around the longitudinal centre axis....... Moreover, the present invention relates to a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor applying such a rotor....

  17. Drinfel'd basis of twisted Yangians

    CERN Document Server

    Belliard, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantization of a Lie bi-ideal structure for twisted half-loop algebras of finite dimensional simple complex Lie algebras. We obtain Drinfel'd basis formalism and algebra closure relations of twisted Yangians for all symmetric pairs of simple Lie algebras and for simple twisted even half-loop Lie algebras. We also give an explicit form of twisted Yangians in Drinfel'd basis for the sl3 Lie algebra.

  18. Helicopter vibration reduction using structural optimization with aeroelastic/multidisciplinary constraints - A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of the state-of-the-art in the field of structural optimization when applied to vibration reduction of helicopters in forward flight with aeroelastic and multidisciplinary constraints. It emphasizes the application of the modern approach where the optimization is formulated as a mathematical programming problem, the objective function consists of the vibration levels at the hub, and behavior constraints are imposed on the blade frequencies and aeroelastic stability margins, as well as on a number of additional ingredients that can have a significant effect on the overall performance and flight mechanics of the helicopter. It is shown that the integrated multidisciplinary optimization of rotorcraft offers the potential for substantial improvements, which can be achieved by careful preliminary design and analysis without requiring additional hardware such as rotor vibration absorbers of isolation systems.

  19. A simple active controller to suppress helicopter air resonance in hover and forward flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Takahashi, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. This model is used to illustrate the effect of unsteady aerodynamics, forward flight, and torsional flexibility on air resonance. Next, a nominal configuration, which experiences air resonance in forward flight, is selected. A simple multivariable compensator using conventional swashplate inputs and a single body roll rate measurement is then designed. The controller design is based on a linear estimator in conjunction with optimal feedback gains, and the design is done in the frequency domain using the loop-transfer recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout wide range helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  20. Smart actuation for helicopter rotorblades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, A.R.A.; Loendersloot, R.; Boer, de A.; Akkerman, R.; Berselli, G.; Vertechy, R.; Vassura, G.

    2012-01-01

    Successful rotorcrafts were only achieved when the differences between hovering flight conditions and a stable forward flight were understood. During hovering, the air speed on all helicopter blades is linearly distributed along each blade and is the same for each. However, during forward flight, th

  1. Helicopter Toy and Lift Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-01-01

    A $1 plastic helicopter toy (called a Wacky Whirler) can be used to demonstrate lift. Students can make basic measurements of the toy, use reasonable assumptions and, with the lift formula, estimate the lift, and verify that it is sufficient to overcome the toy's weight. (Contains 1 figure.)

  2. Helicopter Toy and Lift Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-01-01

    A $1 plastic helicopter toy (called a Wacky Whirler) can be used to demonstrate lift. Students can make basic measurements of the toy, use reasonable assumptions and, with the lift formula, estimate the lift, and verify that it is sufficient to overcome the toy's weight. (Contains 1 figure.)

  3. Smart actuation for helicopter rotorblades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, Alexandre; Loendersloot, Richard; de Boer, Andries; Akkerman, Remko; Berselli, G.; Vertechy, R.; Vassura, G.

    2012-01-01

    Successful rotorcrafts were only achieved when the differences between hovering flight conditions and a stable forward flight were understood. During hovering, the air speed on all helicopter blades is linearly distributed along each blade and is the same for each. However, during forward flight,

  4. Properly twisted groups and their algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Bales, John W

    2011-01-01

    A twist property is developed which imparts certain properties on the twisted group algebra. These include an involution * satisfying (xy)*=y*x* and an inner product satisfying = and =. Examples of twisted group algebras having this property are the Cayley-Dickson algebras and Clifford algebras.

  5. Lessons from Rotor 37

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.D.Denton

    1997-01-01

    NASA rotor 37 was used as a blind test case for turbomachinery CFD by the Turbomachinery Committee of the IGTI.The rotor is a transonic compressor with a tip speed of 454 m/s(1500ft/s)and a relatively high pressure ratio of 2.1.It was tested in isolation with a circumferentially uniform inlet flow so that the flow through it should be steady apart from and effects of passage to passage geometry variation and mechanical vibration.As such it represents the simplest possible type of test for three-dimensional turbomachinery flow solvers.Howerver,the rotor still presents a real challenge to 3D viscous flow solvers because the shock wave-boudary layer interaction is strong and the effects of viscosity are dominant in determining the flow deviation and hence the pressure ration.Eleven blind solutions were submittewd and in addition a non-blind solution was used to prepare for the exercies.This paper reviews the flow in the test case and the comparisons of the CFD solutions with the test data.Lessons for both the Flow physics in transonic fans and for the application of CFD to such machines are pointed out.

  6. "Oliver Twist": A Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashion, Carol; Fischer, Diana

    This teacher's guide for public television's 3-part adaptation of Charles Dickens's "Oliver Twist" provides information that will help enrich students' viewing of the series, whether or not they read the novel. The guide includes a wide range of discussion and activity ideas; there is also a series Web site and a list of Web resources.…

  7. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P St J; Beravat, R; Wong, G K L

    2017-02-28

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic 'space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of 'numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. St. J.; Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic `space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of `numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  9. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic ‘space’, cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of ‘numerical experiments’ based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069771

  10. Military display market segment: helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    2004-09-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of one of its segments: helicopter displays. Parameters requiring special consideration, to include luminance ranges, contrast ratio, viewing angles, and chromaticity coordinates, are examined. Performance requirements for rotary-wing displays relative to several premier applications are summarized. Display sizes having aggregate defense applications of 5,000 units or greater and having DoD applications across 10 or more platforms, are tabulated. The issue of size commonality is addressed where distribution of active area sizes across helicopter platforms, individually, in groups of two through nine, and ten or greater, is illustrated. Rotary-wing displays are also analyzed by technology, where total quantities of such displays are broken out into CRT, LCD, AMLCD, EM, LED, Incandescent, Plasma and TFEL percentages. Custom, versus Rugged commercial, versus commercial off-the-shelf designs are contrasted. High and low information content designs are identified. Displays for several high-profile military helicopter programs are discussed, to include both technical specifications and program history. The military display market study is summarized with breakouts for the helicopter market segment. Our defense-wide study as of March 2004 has documented 1,015,494 direct view and virtual image displays distributed across 1,181 display sizes and 503 weapon systems. Helicopter displays account for 67,472 displays (just 6.6% of DoD total) and comprise 83 sizes (7.0% of total DoD) in 76 platforms (15.1% of total DoD). Some 47.6% of these rotary-wing applications involve low information content displays comprising just a few characters in one color; however, as per fixed-wing aircraft, the predominant instantiation involves higher information content units capable of showing changeable graphics, color and video.

  11. Analiza niskofrekventnog spektra vibracija na elementima strukture helikoptera 'Gazela' / Analysis of low frequency vibrations on the structural connection elements of the Gazelle helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav M. Jovanović

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available U radu je prikazan postupak i metodologija ispitivanja vibracija na helikopteru 'gazela' radi definisanja efikasnosti prigušenja vibracija na vezi struktura - sedište pilota. Posebna pažnja posvećena je teorijskim osnovama vibracija na helikopteru, određivanju radnih frekvencija, definisanju režima rada i profila leta helikoptera u toku ispitivanja. Na kraju rada prikazani su rezultati merenja vibracija u frekventnom domenu. / In this paper the procedure and methodology of vibration testing on a Gazelle helicopter are presented with the aim to define efficiency of vibration damping at the structure-pilot seat connection. A particular attention is paid to the theoretical basis of helicopter vibrations, definition of working frequency, regime and profile of flight during the test. The results of the vibration measurement are shown in the frequency domain. Introduction Nowadays, possibility of defining loads and vibrations is one of the most important requests in the design and modification of processes on helicopters. The loads occuring on the main rotor during flight are the basic source of vibrations on the helicopter. Possibilities to satisfy international standards in the area of structural and human vibrations are based on continuous and adequate measurement and analysis of the vibration levels on all elements of helicopters. This paper shows the procedures of vibration measuring and analyzing in order to define efficiency of vibration damping using a modern acquisition system NetdB 12 and its software dBFA Suite. Theoretical analysis of vibration sources on the helicopter main rotor The helicopter rotor operates in a complex aerodynamic flow field. The aerodynamic loads on the rotor blade vary considerably as it moves around the rotor disc, and in steady flight these loads are periodic. A particular attention is paid to a theoretical basis of vibration sources on a helicopter. A complex aerodynamic field in the plane of the helicopter

  12. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A homopolar motor (10) has a field rotor (15) mounted on a frame (11) for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor (17) mounted for rotation on said frame (11) within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor (15). The two rotors (15, 17) are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism (19), so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed.

  13. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, J.S.

    1998-12-01

    A homopolar motor has a field rotor mounted on a frame for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor mounted for rotation on said frame within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor. The two rotors are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism, so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed. 7 figs.

  14. CFD study of a twisted blade H-Darrieus wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Gupta, Rituraj Gautam, Siddhartha Sankar Deka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a two-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD study of the performance of a H-Darrieus turbine with three twisted blade had been carried out. The chord length of each blade is 5cm and the blade height is considered to be same for all the rotors. A two dimensional (2D model of the turbine was designed in CATIA V5R19 software and a k-epsilon turbulence closure was adopted with the unstructured mesh generated around the rotor modeled in GAMBIT 2.3.16. The inlet velocities and the rotational speeds are taken from the experimental results and the CFD analysis was carried out in CFD Code-FLUENT 6.3.26. From the CFD analysis, power coefficient (Cp and torque coefficient (Ct at three different H/D ratios of 1.13, 1.31 and 1.55 respectively were calculated and compared with available experimental results. The computational analysis showed that the highest values of Cp (0.525 and Ct (0.95 were obtained at H/D ratios of 1.31 and 1.13 respectively. The deviation of computational Cp from experimental Cp was within ±3.08 % and that of computational Ct from experimental Ct was within ±1.106 %. A study of the flow behaviour around the rotor was also carried out using the pressure contours and velocity vectors plots. A maximum pressure drop is obtained for H/D ratio of 1.31 and a vortex reattachment near rear blade of rotor with H/D ratio of 1.31 was observed from the pressure contours and velocity vectors plots. The vortex attachment to the blade of the rotor enhances the lift coefficient of the rotor which helps in improving the power coefficient of the rotor. The comparison between the computational results and previous experimental work is pretty encouraging.

  15. Formulation and validation of high-order linearized models of helicopter flight mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Frederick D.; Celi, Roberto; Tischler, Mark B.

    1990-01-01

    A high-order linearized model of helicopter flight dynamics is extracted from a nonlinear time domain simulation. The model has 29 states that describe the fuselage rigid body degrees of freedom, the flap and lag dynamics in a nonrotating coordinate system, the inflow dynamics, the delayed entry of the horizontal tail into the main rotor wake, and, approximately, the blade torsion dynamics. The nonlinear simulation is obtained by extensively modifying the GENHEL computer program. The results indicate that the agreement between the linearized and the nonlinear model is good for small perturbations, and deteriorates for large amplitude maneuvers.

  16. Type-2 fuzzy logic control of a 2-DOF helicopter (TRMS system)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeghlache, Samir; Kara, Kamel; Saigaa, Djamel

    2014-09-01

    The helicopter dynamic includes nonlinearities, parametric uncertainties and is subject to unknown external disturbances. Such complicated dynamics involve designing sophisticated control algorithms that can deal with these difficulties. In this paper, a type 2 fuzzy logic PID controller is proposed for TRMS (twin rotor mimo system) control problem. Using triangular membership functions and based on a human operator experience, two controllers are designed to control the position of the yaw and the pitch angles of the TRMS. Simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  17. Investigation of difficult component effects on FEM vibration prediction for the AH-1G helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dompka, Robert V.

    1988-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations program, a series of ground vibration tests and NASTRAN finite element model correlations were conducted on the Bell AH-1G helicopter gunship to investigate the effects of difficult components on the vibration response of the airframe. Secondary structure and damping were found to have significant effects on the frequency response of the airframe above 15 Hz. The nonlinear effects of thrust stiffening and elastomeric mounts on the low-frequency pylon modes below the main rotor were also significant.

  18. A study of coupled rotor-fuselage vibration with higher harmonic control using a symbolic computing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1990-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computing facility. The details of the derivation using the MACSYMA program are described. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control (HHC) capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselage vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control (MHHC) is required. The fundamental aspects of this scheme and its uniqueness are described in detail, providing new insight on vibration reduction in helicopters using HHC.

  19. Blade Displacement Measurement Technique Applied to a Full-Scale Rotor Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrego, Anita I.; Olson, Lawrence E.; Romander, Ethan A.; Barrows, Danny A.; Burner, Alpheus W.

    2012-01-01

    Blade displacement measurements using multi-camera photogrammetry were acquired during the full-scale wind tunnel test of the UH-60A Airloads rotor, conducted in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The objectives were to measure the blade displacement and deformation of the four rotor blades as they rotated through the entire rotor azimuth. These measurements are expected to provide a unique dataset to aid in the development and validation of rotorcraft prediction techniques. They are used to resolve the blade shape and position, including pitch, flap, lag and elastic deformation. Photogrammetric data encompass advance ratios from 0.15 to slowed rotor simulations of 1.0, thrust coefficient to rotor solidity ratios from 0.01 to 0.13, and rotor shaft angles from -10.0 to 8.0 degrees. An overview of the blade displacement measurement methodology and system development, descriptions of image processing, uncertainty considerations, preliminary results covering static and moderate advance ratio test conditions and future considerations are presented. Comparisons of experimental and computational results for a moderate advance ratio forward flight condition show good trend agreements, but also indicate significant mean discrepancies in lag and elastic twist. Blade displacement pitch measurements agree well with both the wind tunnel commanded and measured values.

  20. Optimized chord and twist angle distributions of wind turbine blade considering Reynolds number effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L.; Tang, X. [Univ. of Central Lancashire. Engineering and Physical Sciences, Preston (United Kingdom); Liu, X. [Univ. of Cumbria. Sustainable Engineering, Workington (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a wind turbine depends very much on its blade geometric design, typically based on the blade element momentum (BEM) theory, which divides the blade into several blade elements. In current blade design practices based on Schmitz rotor design theory, the blade geometric parameters including chord and twist angle distributions are determined based on airfoil aerodynamic data at a specific Reynolds number. However, rotating wind turbine blade elements operate at different Reynolds numbers due to variable wind speed and different blade span locations. Therefore, the blade design through Schmitz rotor theory at a specific Reynolds number does not necessarily provide the best power performance under operational conditions. This paper aims to provide an optimal blade design strategy for horizontal-axis wind turbines operating at different Reynolds numbers. A fixed-pitch variable-speed (FPVS) wind turbine with S809 airfoil is chosen as a case study and a Matlab program which considers Reynolds number effects is developed to determine the optimized chord and twist angle distributions of the blade. The performance of the optimized blade is compared with that of the preliminary blade which is designed based on Schmitz rotor design theory at a specific Reynolds number. The results demonstrate that the proposed blade design optimization strategy can improve the power performance of the wind turbine. This approach can be further developed for any practice of horizontal axis wind turbine blade design. (Author)

  1. 78 FR 34958 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. (Bell), Model Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... 412CF helicopter or on a Model 412 or 412EP helicopter with a (BHT-412-SI-62) slope landing kit, P/N 412... installed on a Model 412 or 412EP helicopter with a (BHT-412-SI-62) slope landing kit, P/N 412-704-012-101...

  2. 78 FR 23688 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Inc. Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Inc. (BHT) Model 206A, 206B, and 206L helicopters. This proposed AD...-2012-19), to correct an unsafe condition for certain serial numbered BHT Model 206A, 206B, and 206L... Information BHT has issued Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) No. 206-11-127 for Model 206A and 206B helicopters and...

  3. 78 FR 54751 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Inc. Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Inc. (BHT) Model 206A... 14 CFR part 39 to include an AD that would apply to BHT Model 206A and 206B helicopters, all serial... assembly) part number (P/N) 206-375-017-101 installed and BHT Model 206L helicopters, S/N 45001 through...

  4. High-order state space simulation models of helicopter flight mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Frederick D.; Celi, Roberto; Tischler, Mark B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the formulation and validation of a high-order linearized mathematical model of helicopter flight mechanics, which includes rotor flap and lag degrees of freedom as well as inflow dynamics. The model is extracted numerically from an existing nonlinear, blade element, real-time simulation model. Extensive modifications in the formulation and solution process of the nonlinear model, required for a theoetically rigorous linearization, are described in detail. The validation results show that the linearized model successfully captures the coupled rotor-fuselage dynamics in the frequency band most critical for the design of advanced flight control systems. Additional results quantify the extent to which the order of the model can be reduced without loss of fidelity.

  5. A real-time blade element helicopter simulation for handling qualities analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Val, Ronald W.

    1989-01-01

    A simulation model which utilizes parallel processing platforms is described in terms of its contributions to improved real-time helicopter simulation. The FLIGHTLAB parallel processing environment is explained, and the relative advantages of the blade element and rotor map models for rigid and elastic articulated blades are discussed. A UH-60 simulation is conducted by means of a rigid model with 14 degrees of freedom, as well as an elastic model with 26 degrees of freedom, to compare trim conditions, longitudinal static margins, and longitudinal and lateral frequency responses. The FLIGHTLAB system is shown to facilitate restructuring for parallel processing as well as the systematic comparison of a variety of models. The system can facilitate the comparison of rigid and elastic blade element rotor models at NASA-Ames and other research facilities.

  6. Comparison of composite rotor blade models: A coupled-beam analysis and an MSC/NASTRAN finite-element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Robert V.; Nixon, Mark W.; Rehfield, Lawrence W.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology was developed for the structural analysis of composite rotor blades. This coupled-beam analysis is relatively simple to use compared with alternative analysis techniques. The beam analysis was developed for thin-wall single-cell rotor structures and includes the effects of elastic coupling. This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of the new composite-beam analysis method through comparison of its results with those of an established baseline analysis technique. The baseline analysis is an MSC/NASTRAN finite-element model built up from anisotropic shell elements. Deformations are compared for three linear static load cases of centrifugal force at design rotor speed, applied torque, and lift for an ideal rotor in hover. A D-spar designed to twist under axial loading is the subject of the analysis. Results indicate the coupled-beam analysis is well within engineering accuracy.

  7. Renormalization constants for 2-twist operators in twisted mass QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Korzec, T; Panagopoulos, H; Stylianou, F

    2010-01-01

    Perturbative and non-perturbative results on the renormalization constants of the fermion field and the twist-2 fermion bilinears are presented with emphasis on the non-perturbative evaluation of the one-derivative twist-2 vector and axial vector operators. Non-perturbative results are obtained using the twisted mass Wilson fermion formulation employing two degenerate dynamical quarks and the tree-level Symanzik improved gluon action. The simulations have been performed for pion masses in the range of about 450-260 MeV and at three values of the lattice spacing $a$ corresponding to $\\beta=3.9, 4.05, 4.20$. Subtraction of ${\\cal O}(a^2)$ terms is carried out by performing the perturbative evaluation of these operators at 1-loop and up to ${\\cal O}(a^2)$. The renormalization conditions are defined in the RI$'$-MOM scheme, for both perturbative and non-perturbative results. The renormalization factors, obtained for different values of the renormalization scale, are evolved perturbatively to a reference scale set...

  8. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar [Nonlinear Multifunctional Composites - Analysis and Design Lab (NMCAD Lab) Department of Aerospace Engineering Indian Institute of Science Bangalore - 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2015-03-10

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load.

  9. Molecular Rotors as Switches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang L. Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of a functional molecular unit acting as a state variable provides an attractive alternative for the next generations of nanoscale electronics. It may help overcome the limits of conventional MOSFETd due to their potential scalability, low-cost, low variability, and highly integratable characteristics as well as the capability to exploit bottom-up self-assembly processes. This bottom-up construction and the operation of nanoscale machines/devices, in which the molecular motion can be controlled to perform functions, have been studied for their functionalities. Being triggered by external stimuli such as light, electricity or chemical reagents, these devices have shown various functions including those of diodes, rectifiers, memories, resonant tunnel junctions and single settable molecular switches that can be electronically configured for logic gates. Molecule-specific electronic switching has also been reported for several of these device structures, including nanopores containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene monolayers, and planar junctions incorporating rotaxane and catenane monolayers for the construction and operation of complex molecular machines. A specific electrically driven surface mounted molecular rotor is described in detail in this review. The rotor is comprised of a monolayer of redox-active ligated copper compounds sandwiched between a gold electrode and a highly-doped P+ Si. This electrically driven sandwich-type monolayer molecular rotor device showed an on/off ratio of approximately 104, a read window of about 2.5 V, and a retention time of greater than 104 s. The rotation speed of this type of molecular rotor has been reported to be in the picosecond timescale, which provides a potential of high switching speed applications. Current-voltage spectroscopy (I-V revealed a temperature-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR associated with the device. The analysis of the device

  10. The twist box domain is required for Twist1-induced prostate cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajula, Rajendra P; Chettiar, Sivarajan T; Williams, Russell D; Thiyagarajan, Saravanan; Kato, Yoshinori; Aziz, Khaled; Wang, Ruoqi; Gandhi, Nishant; Wild, Aaron T; Vesuna, Farhad; Ma, Jinfang; Salih, Tarek; Cades, Jessica; Fertig, Elana; Biswal, Shyam; Burns, Timothy F; Chung, Christine H; Rudin, Charles M; Herman, Joseph M; Hales, Russell K; Raman, Venu; An, Steven S; Tran, Phuoc T

    2013-11-01

    Twist1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, plays a key role during development and is a master regulator of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) that promotes cancer metastasis. Structure-function relationships of Twist1 to cancer-related phenotypes are underappreciated, so we studied the requirement of the conserved Twist box domain for metastatic phenotypes in prostate cancer. Evidence suggests that Twist1 is overexpressed in clinical specimens and correlated with aggressive/metastatic disease. Therefore, we examined a transactivation mutant, Twist1-F191G, in prostate cancer cells using in vitro assays, which mimic various stages of metastasis. Twist1 overexpression led to elevated cytoskeletal stiffness and cell traction forces at the migratory edge of cells based on biophysical single-cell measurements. Twist1 conferred additional cellular properties associated with cancer cell metastasis including increased migration, invasion, anoikis resistance, and anchorage-independent growth. The Twist box mutant was defective for these Twist1 phenotypes in vitro. Importantly, we observed a high frequency of Twist1-induced metastatic lung tumors and extrathoracic metastases in vivo using the experimental lung metastasis assay. The Twist box was required for prostate cancer cells to colonize metastatic lung lesions and extrathoracic metastases. Comparative genomic profiling revealed transcriptional programs directed by the Twist box that were associated with cancer progression, such as Hoxa9. Mechanistically, Twist1 bound to the Hoxa9 promoter and positively regulated Hoxa9 expression in prostate cancer cells. Finally, Hoxa9 was important for Twist1-induced cellular phenotypes associated with metastasis. These data suggest that the Twist box domain is required for Twist1 transcriptional programs and prostate cancer metastasis. Targeting the Twist box domain of Twist1 may effectively limit prostate cancer metastatic potential. ©2013 AACR.

  11. Design of fault tolerant control system for individual blade control helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Sergio

    This dissertation presents the development of a fault tolerant control scheme for helicopters fitted with individually controlled blades. This novel approach attempts to improve fault tolerant capabilities of helicopter control system by increasing control redundancy using additional actuators for individual blade input and software re-mixing to obtain nominal or close to nominal conditions under failure. An advanced interactive simulation environment has been developed including modeling of sensor failure, swashplate actuator failure, individual blade actuator failure, and blade delamination to support the design, testing, and evaluation of the control laws. This simulation environment is based on the blade element theory for the calculation of forces and moments generated by the main rotor. This discretized model allows for individual blade analysis, which in turn allows measuring the consequences of a stuck blade, or loss of the surface area of the blade itself, with respect to the dynamics of the whole helicopter. The control laws are based on non-linear dynamic inversion and artificial neural network augmentation, which is a mix of linear and nonlinear methods that compensates for model inaccuracies due to linearization or failure. A stability analysis based on the Lyapunov function approach has shown that bounded tracking error is guaranteed, and under specific circumstances, global stability is guaranteed as well. An analysis over the degrees of freedom of the mechanical system and its impact over the helicopter handling qualities is also performed to measure the degree of redundancy achieved with the addition of individual blade actuators as compared to a classic swashplate helicopter configuration. Mathematical analysis and numerical simulation, using reconfiguration of the individual blade control under failure have shown that this control architecture can potentially improve the survivability of the aircraft and reduce pilot workload under failure

  12. Missile Captive Carry Monitoring and Helicopter Identification Using a Capacitive Microelectromechanical Systems Accelerometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Mauss, Fredrick J.; Amaya, Ivan A.; Skorpik, James R.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Marotta, Steve

    2012-03-27

    Military missiles are exposed to many sources of mechanical vibration that can affect system reliability, safety, and mission effectiveness. The U. S. Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) has been developing missile health monitoring systems to assess and improve reliability, reduce life cycle costs, and increase system readiness. One of the most significant exposures to vibration occurs when the missile is being carried by a helicopter or other aviation platform, which is a condition known as captive carry. Recording the duration of captive carry exposure during the missile’s service life can enable the implementation of predictive maintenance and resource management programs. Since the vibration imparted by each class of helicopter varies in frequency and amplitude, tracking the vibration exposure from each helicopter separately can help quantify the severity and harmonic content of the exposure. Under the direction of AMRDEC staff, engineers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a Captive Carry Health Monitor (CCHM) for the Hellfire II missile. The CCHM is an embedded usage monitoring device installed on the outer skin of the Hellfire II missile to record the cumulative hours the host missile has been in captive carry mode. To classify the vibration by class of helicopter, the CCHM analyzes the amplitude and frequency content of the vibration with the Goertzel algorithm to detect the presence of distinctive rotor harmonics. Cumulative usage data are accessible in theater from an external display; monthly usage histograms are accessible through an internal download connector. This paper provides an overview of the CCHM electrical and package design, describes field testing and data analysis techniques used to monitor captive carry identify and the class of helicopter, and discusses the potential application of missile health and usage data for real-time reliability analysis and fleet management.

  13. "Twisted" black holes are unphysical

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Finnian; Schuster, Sebastian; Visser, Matt

    2016-01-01

    So-called "twisted" black holes have recently been proposed by Zhang (1609.09721 [gr-qc]), and further considered by Chen and Jing (1610.00886 [gr-qc]), and more recently by Ong (1610.05757 [gr-qc]). While these spacetimes are certainly Ricci-flat, and so mathematically satisfy the vacuum Einstein equations, they are also merely minor variants on Taub--NUT spacetimes. Consequently they exhibit several unphysical features that make them quite unreasonable as realistic astrophysical objects. Specifically, these "twisted" black holes are not (globally) asymptotically flat. Furthermore, they contain closed timelike curves that are not hidden behind any event horizon --- the most obvious of these closed timelike curves are small azimuthal circles around the rotation axis, but the effect is more general. The entire region outside the horizon is infested with closed timelike curves.

  14. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of ‘polarization twist’, which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  15. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of ‘polarization twist’, which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms.

  16. Lytic spondylolisthesis in helicopter pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froom, P; Froom, J; Van Dyk, D; Caine, Y; Ribak, J; Margaliot, S; Floman, Y

    1984-06-01

    Trauma to the back from the force of chronic stress is thought to be an etiologic factor in isthmic spondylolisthesis (SLL). The relationship of first degree spondylolisthesis to low back pain (LBP) is controversial. We compare the prevalence of SLL in helicopter pilots who are subject to strong vibrational forces, with other airforce personnel. Helicopter pilots had more than a four times higher prevalence of SLL (4.5%) than did cadets (1.0%) and transport pilots (0.9%). Low back pain was more frequent in pilots with SLL than in those without this lesion but in no case was the pain disabling or the defect progressive. We conclude that SLL may be induced by vibrational forces and although SLL is associated with LBP, the pain was little clinical significance.

  17. Full-scale S-76 rotor performance and loads at low speeds in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Vol. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Patrick M.

    1996-01-01

    A full-scale helicopter rotor test was conducted in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel with a four-bladed S-76 rotor system. Rotor performance and loads data were obtained over a wide range of rotor shaft angles-of-attack and thrust conditions at tunnel speeds ranging from 0 to 100 kt. The primary objectives of this test were (1) to acquire forward flight rotor performance and loads data for comparison with analytical results; (2) to acquire S-76 forward flight rotor performance data in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel to compare with existing full-scale 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test data that were acquired in 1977; (3) to evaluate the acoustic capability of the 80- by 120- Foot Wind Tunnel for acquiring blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise in the low speed range and compare BVI noise with in-flight test data; and (4) to evaluate the capability of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel test section as a hover facility. The secondary objectives were (1) to evaluate rotor inflow and wake effects (variations in tunnel speed, shaft angle, and thrust condition) on wind tunnel test section wall and floor pressures; (2) to establish the criteria for the definition of flow breakdown (condition where wall corrections are no longer valid) for this size rotor and wind tunnel cross-sectional area; and (3) to evaluate the wide-field shadowgraph technique for visualizing full-scale rotor wakes. This data base of rotor performance and loads can be used for analytical and experimental comparison studies for full-scale, four-bladed, fully articulated rotor systems. Rotor performance and structural loads data are presented in this report.

  18. Twisted Chern-Simons supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellani, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Innovazione Tecnologica, Univ. del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria (Italy); INFN Gruppo collegato di Alessandria (Italy)

    2014-09-11

    We present a noncommutative version of D = 5 Chern-Simons supergravity, where noncommutativity is encoded in a *-product associated to an abelian Drinfeld twist. The theory is invariant under diffeomorphisms, and under the *-gauge supergroup SU(2,2 vertical stroke 4), including Lorentz and N = 4 local supersymmetries. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Counting Polyominoes on Twisted Cylinders

    OpenAIRE

    Barequet, Gill; Moffie, Micha; Ribó, Ares; Rote, Günter

    2005-01-01

    International audience; We improve the lower bounds on Klarner's constant, which describes the exponential growth rate of the number of polyominoes (connected subsets of grid squares) with a given number of squares. We achieve this by analyzing polyominoes on a different surface, a so-called $\\textit{twisted cylinder}$ by the transfer matrix method. A bijective representation of the "states'' of partial solutions is crucial for allowing a compact representation of the successive iteration vec...

  20. New twist on artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Carter S.; Li, Na; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Aliev, Ali E.; Di, Jiangtao; Baughman, Ray H.

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight artificial muscle fibers that can match the large tensile stroke of natural muscles have been elusive. In particular, low stroke, limited cycle life, and inefficient energy conversion have combined with high cost and hysteretic performance to restrict practical use. In recent years, a new class of artificial muscles, based on highly twisted fibers, has emerged that can deliver more than 2,000 J/kg of specific work during muscle contraction, compared with just 40 J/kg for natural muscle. Thermally actuated muscles made from ordinary polymer fibers can deliver long-life, hysteresis-free tensile strokes of more than 30% and torsional actuation capable of spinning a paddle at speeds of more than 100,000 rpm. In this perspective, we explore the mechanisms and potential applications of present twisted fiber muscles and the future opportunities and challenges for developing twisted muscles having improved cycle rates, efficiencies, and functionality. We also demonstrate artificial muscle sewing threads and textiles and coiled structures that exhibit nearly unlimited actuation strokes. In addition to robotics and prosthetics, future applications include smart textiles that change breathability in response to temperature and moisture and window shutters that automatically open and close to conserve energy. PMID:27671626

  1. Single-shot temperature- and pressure-sensitive paint measurements on an unsteady helicopter blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disotell, Kevin J.; Peng, Di; Juliano, Thomas J.; Gregory, James W.; Crafton, Jim W.; Komerath, Narayanan M.

    2014-02-01

    Unsteady pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) measurements were acquired on an articulated model helicopter rotor of 0.26 m diameter in edgewise flow to simulate forward flight conditions. The rotor was operated at advance ratios (free stream velocity normalized by hover tip speed) of 0.15 and 0.30 at a cycle-averaged tip chord Reynolds number of 1.1 × 105, with collective and longitudinal cyclic pitch inputs of 10° and 2.5°, respectively. A single-shot data acquisition technique allowed a camera to record the paint luminescence after a single pulse of high-energy laser excitation, yielding sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to avoid image averaging. Platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) in a porous polymer/ceramic binder served as the PSP. To address errors caused by image blurring and temperature sensitivity, a previously reported motion deblurring algorithm was implemented and the temperature correction was made using temperature-sensitive paint measurements on a second rotor blade. Instantaneous, unsteady surface pressure maps at a rotation rate of 82 Hz captured different aerodynamic responses between the two sides of the rotor disk and were compared to the nominally steady hover case. Cycle-to-cycle variations in tip unsteadiness on the retreating blade were also observed, causing oblique pressure features which may be linked to three-dimensional stall.

  2. When is the helicopter faster? A comparison of helicopter and ground ambulance transport times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Marco A; Hendey, Gregory W; Bivins, Herbert G

    2005-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 7,854 ground ambulance and 1,075 helicopter transports was conducted. The 911-hospital arrival intervals for three transport methods were compared: ground, helicopter dispatched simultaneously with ground unit, and helicopter dispatched nonsimultaneously after ground unit response. Compared with ground transports, simultaneously dispatched helicopter transports had significantly shorter 911-hospital arrival intervals at all distances greater than 10 miles from the hospital. Nonsimultaneously dispatched helicopter transport was significantly faster than ground at distances greater than 45 miles, and simultaneous helicopter dispatch was faster than nonsimultaneous at virtually all distances. Ground transport was significantly faster than either air transport modality at distances less than 10 miles from the hospital. Ground ambulance transport provided the shortest 911-hospital arrival interval at distances less than 10 miles from the hospital. At distances greater than 10 miles, simultaneously dispatched air transport was faster. Nonsimultaneous dispatched helicopter transport was faster than ground if greater than 45 miles from the hospital.

  3. Effects of a trailing edge flap on the aerodynamics and acoustics of rotor blade-vortex interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, B. D.; Tadghighi, H.; Hassan, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of a trailing edge flap on a helicopter rotor has been numerically simulated to determine if such a device can mitigate the acoustics of blade vortex interactions (BVI). The numerical procedure employs CAMRAD/JA, a lifting-line helicopter rotor trim code, in conjunction with RFS2, an unsteady transonic full-potential flow solver, and WOPWOP, an acoustic model based on Farassat's formulation 1A. The codes were modified to simulate trailing edge flap effects. The CAMRAD/JA code was used to compute the far wake inflow effects and the vortex wake trajectories and strengths which are utilized by RFS2 to predict the blade surface pressure variations. These pressures were then analyzed using WOPWOP to determine the high frequency acoustic response at several fixed observer locations below the rotor disk. Comparisons were made with different flap deflection amplitudes and rates to assess flap effects on BVI. Numerical experiments were carried out using a one-seventh scale AH-1G rotor system for flight conditions simulating BVI encountered during low speed descending flight with and without flaps. Predicted blade surface pressures and acoustic sound pressure levels obtained have shown good agreement with the baseline no-flap test data obtained in the DNW wind tunnel. Numerical results indicate that the use of flaps is beneficial in reducing BVI noise.

  4. High performance electrochemical and electrothermal artificial muscles from twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Ah; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-04-01

    High performance torsional and tensile artificial muscles are described, which utilize thermally- or electrochemically-induced volume changes of twist-spun, guest-filled, carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns. These yarns were prepared by incorporating twist in carbon nanotube sheets drawn from spinnable CNT forests. Inserting high twist into the CNT yarn results in yarn coiling, which can dramatically amplify tensile stroke and work capabilities compared with that for the non-coiled twisted yarn. When electrochemically driven in a liquid electrolyte, these artificial muscles can generate a torsional rotation per muscle length that is over 1000 times higher than for previously reported torsional muscles. All-solid-state torsional electrochemical yarn muscles have provided a large torsional muscle stroke (53° per mm of yarn length) and a tensile stroke of up to 1.3% when lifting loads that are ~25 times heavier than can be lifted by the same diameter human skeletal muscle. Over a million torsional and tensile actuation cycles have been demonstrated for thermally powered CNT hybrid yarns muscles filled with paraffin wax, wherein a muscle spins a rotor at an average 11,500 revolutions/minute or delivers 3% tensile contraction at 1200 cycles/minute. At lower actuation rates, these thermally powered muscles provide tensile strokes of over 10%.

  5. Noncommutative principal bundles through twist deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Aschieri, Paolo; Pagani, Chiara; Schenkel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We construct noncommutative principal bundles deforming principal bundles with a Drinfeld twist (2-cocycle). If the twist is associated with the structure group then we have a deformation of the fibers. If the twist is associated with the automorphism group of the principal bundle, then we obtain noncommutative deformations of the base space as well. Combining the two twist deformations we obtain noncommutative principal bundles with both noncommutative fibers and base space. More in general, the natural isomorphisms proving the equivalence of a closed monoidal category of modules and its twist related one are used to obtain new Hopf-Galois extensions as twists of Hopf-Galois extensions. A sheaf approach is also considered, and examples presented.

  6. 14 CFR 27.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor speed. 27.1509 Section 27.1509... Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be established... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1509 - Rotor speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor speed. 29.1509 Section 29.1509....1509 Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  8. Initial results of a model rotor higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel experiment on BVI impulsive noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Lehmann, G.; van der Wall, B.

    1989-09-01

    Initial acoustic results are presented from a higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel pilot experiment on helicopter rotor blade-vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise reduction, making use of the DFVLR 40-percent-scaled BO-105 research rotor in the DNW 6m by 8m closed test section. Considerable noise reduction (of several decibels) has been measured for particular HHC control settings, however, at the cost of increased vibration levels and vice versa. The apparently adverse results for noise and vibration reduction by HHC are explained. At optimum pitch control settings for BVI noise reduction, rotor simulation results demonstrate that blade loading at the outer tip region is decreased, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are increased, resulting altogether in reduced BVI noise generation. At optimum pitch control settings for vibration reduction adverse effects on blade loading, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are found.

  9. The Twist Limit for Bipolar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Gary, Allen

    2008-01-01

    We present new evidence that further supports the standard idea that active regions are emerged magnetic-flux-rope omega loops. When the axial magnetic twist of a cylindrical flux rope exceeds a critical amount, the flux rope becomes unstable to kinking, and the excess axial twist is converted into writhe twist by the kinking. This suggests that, if active regions are emerged omega loops, then (1) no active region should have magnetic twist much above the limit set by kinking, (2) active regions having twist near the limit should often arise from kinked omega loops, and (3) since active regions having large delta sunspots are outstandingly twisted, these arise from kinked omega loops and should have twist near the limit for kinking. From each of 36 vector magnetograms of bipolar active regions, we have measured (1) the total flux of the vertical field above 100 G, (2) the area covered by this flux, and (3) the net electric current that arches over the polarity inversion line. These three quantities yield an estimate of the axial magnetic twist in a simple model cylindrical flux rope that corresponds to the top of the active region s hypothetical omega loop prior to emergence. In all 36 cases, the estimated twist is below the critical limit for kinking. The 11 most twisted active regions (1) have estimated twist within a factor of approx.3 of the limit, and (2) include all of our 6 active regions having large delta sunspots. Thus, our observed twist limit for bipolar active regions is in good accord with active regions being emerged omega loops.

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF CRACKED ROTOR BY WAVELET TRANSFORM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹剑; 陈进; 蒲亚鹏

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic equation of cracked rotor in rotational frame was modelled, the numerical simulation solutions of the cracked rotor and the uncracked rotor were obtained. By the wavelet transform, the time-frequency properties of the cracked rotor and the uncracked rotor were discussed, the difference of the time-frequency properties between the cracked rotor and the uncracked rotor was compared. A new detection algorithm using wavelet transform to identify crack was proposed. The experiments verify the availability and validity of the wavelet transform in identification of crack.

  11. Plan, execute, and discuss vibration measurements and correlations to evaluate a NASTRAN finite element model of the AH-64 helicopter airframe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferg, D.; Foote, L.; Korkosz, G.; Straub, F.; Toossi, M.; Weisenburger, R.

    1990-01-01

    A ground vibration test was performed on the AH-64 (Apache) helicopter to determine the frequency response of the airframe. The structure was excited at both the main and tail rotor hubs, separately, and response measurements were taken at 102 locations throughout the fuselage structure. Frequency responses were compared and correlated with results from a NASTRAN finite element model of AH-64. In addition, natural frequencies and mode shapes were estimated from the frequency response data and were correlated with analytical results.

  12. Rotor blade assembly having internal loading features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloway, Daniel David

    2017-05-16

    Rotor blade assemblies and wind turbines are provided. A rotor blade assembly includes a rotor blade having exterior surfaces defining a pressure side, a suction side, a leading edge and a trailing edge each extending between a tip and a root, the rotor blade defining a span and a chord, the exterior surfaces defining an interior of the rotor blade. The rotor blade assembly further includes a loading assembly, the loading assembly including a weight disposed within the interior and movable generally along the span of the rotor blade, the weight connected to a rotor blade component such that movement of the weight towards the tip causes application of a force to the rotor blade component by the weight. Centrifugal force due to rotation of the rotor blade biases the weight towards the tip.

  13. Rotor Wake Vortex Definition: Initial Evaluation of 3-C PIV Results of the Hart-II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; vanderWall, Berend; Richard, Hughes; Raffel, Markus; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Lim, Joon W.; Yu, Yung H.; Tung, Chee

    2002-01-01

    An initial evaluation is made of extensive three-component (3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements within the wake across a rotor disk plane. The model is a 40 percent scale BO-105 helicopter main rotor in forward flight simulation. This study is part of the HART II test program conducted in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). Included are wake vortex field measurements over the advancing and retreating sides of the rotor operating at a typical descent landing condition important for impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Also included are advancing side results for rotor angle variations from climb to steep descent. Using detailed PIV vector maps of the vortex fields, methods of extracting key vortex parameters are examined and a new method was developed and evaluated. An objective processing method, involving a center-of-vorticity criterion and a vorticity 'disk' integration, was used to determine vortex core size, strength, core velocity distribution characteristics, and unsteadiness. These parameters are mapped over the rotor disk and offer unique physical insight for these parameters of importance for rotor noise and vibration prediction.

  14. DVCS amplitude with kinematical twist-3 terms

    CERN Document Server

    Radyushkin, A V

    2000-01-01

    We compute the amplitude of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) using the calculus of QCD string operators in coordinate representation. To restore the electromagnetic gauge invariance (transversality) of the twist-2 amplitude we include the operators of twist-3 which appear as total derivatives of twist-2 operators. Our results are equivalent to a Wandzura-Wilczek approximation for twist-3 skewed parton distributions. We find that this approximation gives a finite result for the amplitude of a longitudinally polarized virtual photon, while the amplitude for transverse polarization is divergent, i.e., factorization breaks down in this term.

  15. Helicopter Noise And Noise Abatement Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borivoj Galović

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The helicopter generated noise at and around the airports islower than the noise generated by aeroplanes, since their numberof operations, i. e. the number of takeoffs and landings ismuch lower than the takeoffs and landings of the aeroplanes.Out of some hundred operations a day, helicopters participatewith approximately 15%, but the very impact of noise is by nomeans negligible, since the number of helicopter flights aboveurban areas is constantly increasing.This paper attempts to analyse this phenomenon and thetype of helicopter generated noise, its negative impacts, to explainthe flight procedures and the operative procedures duringtakeoff, landing and overflight of helicopters in operations inthe vicinity and outside airports, as well as the methods of measuringand determining the limit of noise [eve~ and the resultingproblems.

  16. Design study of a feedback control system for the Multicyclic Flap System rotor (MFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrich, R.; Perley, R.; Howes, H.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of automatically providing higher harmonic control to a deflectable control flap at the tip of a helicopter rotor blade through feedback of selected independent parameter was investigated. Control parameters were selected for input to the feedback system. A preliminary circuit was designed to condition the selected parameters, weigh limiting factors, and provide a proper output signal to the multi-cyclic control actuators. Results indicate that feedback control for the higher harmonic is feasible; however, design for a flight system requires an extension of the present analysis which was done for one flight condition - 120 kts, 11,500 lbs gross weight and level flight.

  17. Twisted conjugacy in braid groups

    CERN Document Server

    González-Meneses, Juan

    2011-01-01

    In this note we solve the twisted conjugacy problem for braid groups, i.e. we propose an algorithm which, given two braids $u,v\\in B_n$ and an automorphism $\\phi \\in Aut (B_n)$, decides whether $v=(\\phi (x))^{-1}ux$ for some $x\\in B_n$. As a corollary, we deduce that each group of the form $B_n \\rtimes H$, a semidirect product of the braid group $B_n$ by a torsion-free hyperbolic group $H$, has solvable conjugacy problem.

  18. Review and analysis of the DNW/Model 360 rotor acoustic data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, R. A.; Boxwell, D. A.; Spencer, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive model rotor aeroacoustic data base was collected in a large anechoic wind tunnel in 1986. Twenty-six microphones were positioned around the azimuth to collect acoustic data for approximately 150 different test conditions. A dynamically scaled, blade-pressure-instrumented model of the forward rotor of the BH360 helicopter simultaneously provided blade pressures for correlation with the acoustic data. High-speed impulsive noise, blade-vortex interaction noise, low-frequency noise, and broadband noise were all captured in this extensive data base. Trends are presentes for each noise source, with important parametric variations. The purpose of this paper is to introduce this data base and illustrate its potential for predictive code validation.

  19. Proximal Blade Twist Feedback Control for Heliogyro Solar Sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah Mitchell

    A heliogyro spacecraft is a specific type of solar sail that generates thrust from the reflection of solar photons. It consists of multiple long (200 to 600 meters), thin blades, similar to a helicopter. The heliogyro's blades remain in tension by spinning around the central hub of the spacecraft. The individual blades are pitched collectively or cyclically to produce the desired maneuver profile. The propellant-free heliogyro is a long-duration sustainable spacecraft whose maneuverability allows it to attain previously inaccessible orbits for traditional spacecraft. The blades are constructed from thin Mylar sheets, approximately 2.5 ?m thick, which have very little inherent damping making it necessary to include some other way of attenuating blade vibration caused by maneuvering. The most common approach is to incorporate damping through the root pitch actuator. However, due to the small root pitch control torques required, on the order of 2 ?Nm, compared to the large friction torques associated with a root pitch actuator, it is challenging to design a root control system that takes friction into account and can still add damping to the blade. The purpose of this research is to address the limitations of current control designs for a heliogyro spacecraft and to develop a physically realizable root pitch controller that effectively damps the torsional structural modes of a single heliogyro blade. Classical control theory in conjunction with impedance control techniques are used to design a position-source root pitch controller to dominate friction with high gains, wrapped with an outer loop that adds damping to the blade by sensing differential twist outboard of the blade root. First, modal parameter characterization experiments were performed on a small-scale heliogyro blade in a high vacuum chamber to determine a damping constant to be used in the membrane ladder finite element model of the blade. The experimental damping ratio of the lowest frequency torsional

  20. Design of composite flywheel rotor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue BAI; Qingjia GAO; Haiwen LI; Yihui WU; Ming XUAN

    2008-01-01

    A design method for a flywheel rotor com-posed of a composite rim and a metal hub is proposed by studying the connection between the rotor and the driving machine. The influence of some factors such as the rotor material, configuration, connection, and frac-ture techniques on energy density is analyzed. The results show that the ratio of the inner radius to outer radius of the rim is the key factor, and is determined by the rim material. Optimizing the hub can further efficiently improve energy density. The composite flywheel rotor is produced and its rotation stress has been tested at the speed of 20 krpm. The emulation results are consistent with testing results, which proves that the introduced design method is useful.

  1. On Cup Anemometer Rotor Aerodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago Pindado; Sergio Avila-Sanchez; Javier Pérez

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups’ front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer’s performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a lin...

  2. Development of swashplateless helicopter blade pitch control system using the limited angle direct-drive motor (LADDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It can be greatly beneficial to remove the swashplate of conventional helicopter, because the swashplate is usually complicated, aerodynamically resistive, and obstacle of more complex pitch control for improving performance. The present technologies for helicopter vibration reduction are usually narrow in effective range or requiring additional actuators and signal transfer links, and more effective technology is desired. Helicopter blade pitch control system, which is removed of swashplate and integrated high-frequency pitch control function for active vibration reduction, is likely the suitable solution at current technical level. Several potential implementation schemes are discussed, such as blades being directly or indirectly driven by actuators mounted in rotating frame and application of different types of actuators, especially implementation schemes of electro-mechanical actuator with or without gear reducer. It is found that swashplateless blade pitch control system based on specially designed limited angle direct-drive motor (LADDM is a more practical implementation scheme. An experimental prototype of the finally selected implementation scheme has been designed, fabricated and tested on rotor tower. The test results show considerable feasibility of the swashplateless helicopter blade pitch control system using the LADDM.

  3. Development of swashplateless helicopter blade pitch control system using the limited angle direct-drive motor (LADDM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian; Wang Haowen; Wu Chao

    2015-01-01

    It can be greatly beneficial to remove the swashplate of conventional helicopter, because the swashplate is usually complicated, aerodynamically resistive, and obstacle of more complex pitch control for improving performance. The present technologies for helicopter vibration reduc-tion are usually narrow in effective range or requiring additional actuators and signal transfer links, and more effective technology is desired. Helicopter blade pitch control system, which is removed of swashplate and integrated high-frequency pitch control function for active vibration reduction, is likely the suitable solution at current technical level. Several potential implementation schemes are discussed, such as blades being directly or indirectly driven by actuators mounted in rotating frame and application of different types of actuators, especially implementation schemes of electro-mechanical actuator with or without gear reducer. It is found that swashplateless blade pitch control system based on specially designed limited angle direct-drive motor (LADDM) is a more practical implementation scheme. An experimental prototype of the finally selected implementation scheme has been designed, fabricated and tested on rotor tower. The test results show considerable feasibility of the swashplateless helicopter blade pitch control system using the LADDM.

  4. Twisting the N=2 string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketov, Sergei V.; Lechtenfeld, Olaf; Parkes, Andrew J.

    1995-03-01

    The most general homogeneous monodromy conditions in N=2 string theory are classified in terms of the conjugacy classes of the global symmetry group U(1,1)⊗openZ2. For classes which generate a discrete subgroup Γ, the corresponding target space backgrounds openC1,1/Γ include half spaces, complex orbifolds, and tori. We propose a generalization of the intercept formula to matrix-valued twists, but find massless physical states only for Γ=open1 (untwisted) and Γ=openZ2 (in the manner of Mathur and Mukhi), as well as for Γ being a parabolic element of U(1,1). In particular, the 16 openZ2-twisted sectors of the N=2 string are investigated, and the corresponding ground states are identified via bosonization and BRST cohomology. We find enough room for an extended multiplet of ``spacetime'' supersymmetry, with the number of supersymmetries being dependent on global ``spacetime'' topology. However, world-sheet locality for the chiral vertex operators does not permit interactions among all massless ``spacetime'' fermions.

  5. Symmetry fractionalization and twist defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Nicolas; Lindner, Netanel H.; Fidkowski, Lukasz

    2016-03-01

    Topological order in two-dimensions can be described in terms of deconfined quasiparticle excitations—anyons—and their braiding statistics. However, it has recently been realized that this data does not completely describe the situation in the presence of an unbroken global symmetry. In this case, there can be multiple distinct quantum phases with the same anyons and statistics, but with different patterns of symmetry fractionalization—termed symmetry enriched topological order. When the global symmetry group G, which we take to be discrete, does not change topological superselection sectors—i.e. does not change one type of anyon into a different type of anyon—one can imagine a local version of the action of G around each anyon. This leads to projective representations and a group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, with the second cohomology group {H}2(G,{{ A }}{{abelian}}) being the relevant group. In this paper, we treat the general case of a symmetry group G possibly permuting anyon types. We show that despite the lack of a local action of G, one can still make sense of a so-called twisted group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, and show how this data is encoded in the associativity of fusion rules of the extrinsic ‘twist’ defects of the symmetry. Furthermore, building on work of Hermele (2014 Phys. Rev. B 90 184418), we construct a wide class of exactly-solvable models which exhibit this twisted symmetry fractionalization, and connect them to our formal framework.

  6. Multiple Twisted -Euler Numbers and Polynomials Associated with -Adic -Integrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Lee-Chae

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available By using -adic -integrals on , we define multiple twisted -Euler numbers and polynomials. We also find Witt's type formula for multiple twisted -Euler numbers and discuss some characterizations of multiple twisted -Euler Zeta functions. In particular, we construct multiple twisted Barnes' type -Euler polynomials and multiple twisted Barnes' type -Euler Zeta functions. Finally, we define multiple twisted Dirichlet's type -Euler numbers and polynomials, and give Witt's type formula for them.

  7. Large N reduction on a twisted torus

    CERN Document Server

    González-Arroyo, A; Neuberger, H

    2005-01-01

    We consider SU(N) lattice gauge theory at infinite N defined on a torus with a CP invariant twist. Massless fermions are incorporated in an elegant way, while keeping them quenched. We present some numerical results which suggest that twisting can make numerical simulations of planar QCD more efficient.

  8. Stress effects in twisted highly birefringent fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, Tomasz R.

    1994-03-01

    Hydrostatic pressure and uniaxial longitudinal strain effects in twisted highly birefringent optical fibers have been investigated from the point of the Marcuse mode-coupling theory. The problem is analyzed in terms of local normal modes of the ideal fiber and in the limit of weak twist, where large linear birefringence dominates over twist effect, and therefore twist coupling between local modes is not effective. The authors present the results of birefringence measurements in highly birefringent bow-tie fibers influenced simultaneously by hydrostatic pressure up to 100 MPa and twisting the result for highly birefringent elliptical-core fibers influenced by uniaxial longitudinal strain up to 4000 (mu) (epsilon) and twisting effect. The birefringence measurement method is based on twist-induced effects and has been successfully applied in a stress environment. The experiment was conducted with a specially designed stress generating device that makes it possible to simultaneously generate various mechanical perturbations such as hydrostatic and radial pressure, axial strain and twist, allowing study of their influence on mode propagation in optical fibers. A comparison with theoretical results as well as with pervious experimental data on stress influence on the beat length parameter in highly birefringent fibers is also provided.

  9. Decay constants from twisted mass QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulos, P; Michael, C; Simula, S; Urbach, C

    2008-01-01

    We present results for chiral extrapolations of the mass and decay constants of the rho meson. The data sets used are the nf=2 unquenched gauge configurations generated with twisted mass fermions by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration. We describe a calculation of three decay constants in charmonium and explain why they are required.

  10. Twisting theory for weak Hopf algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ju-zhen; ZHANG Yan; WANG Shuan-hong

    2008-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to study the twisting theory of weak Hopf algebras and give an equivalence between the (braided) monoidal categories of weak Hopf bimodules over the original and the twisted weak Hopf algebra to generalize the result from Oeckl (2000).

  11. N=4 Twisted Superspace from Dirac-Kahler Twist and Off-shell SUSY Invariant Actions in Four Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, J; Miyake, A; Kato, Junji; Kawamoto, Noboru; Miyake, Akiko

    2005-01-01

    We propose N=4 twisted superspace formalism in four dimensions by introducing Dirac-Kahler twist. In addition to the BRST charge as a scalar counter part of twisted supercharge we find vector and tensor twisted supercharges. By introducing twisted chiral superfield we explicitly construct off-shell twisted N=4 SUSY invariant action. We can propose variety of supergauge invariant actions by introducing twisted vector superfield. We may, however, need to find further constraints to identify twisted N=4 super Yang-Mills action. We propose a superconnection formalism of twisted superspace where constraints play a crucial role. It turns out that N=4 superalgebra of Dirac-Kahler twist can be decomposed into N=2 sectors. We can then construct twisted N=2 super Yang-Mills actions by the superconnection formalism of twisted superspace in two and four dimensions.

  12. Hidden Beauty in Twisted Viking Neck Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    Many hoards found in Ireland, Scotland, Orkney Islands, and Scandinavia demonstrate the vikings ability to fabricate beautiful arm and neck rings of twisted silver and gold rods. Characteristic for such rings is the uniform appearance of the twisted pattern along the length of the arm ring, as well as from one arm ring to another, also when found at distant geographical locations. How can the appearance of the twisted wires be so perfectly repetitive? We demonstrate that the answer is that the vikings utilized a self-forming motif: The pattern arises from a twisting of the wires to a maximally rotated configuration. That is why the twist patterns in these arm and neck rings are beautiful, repetitive, and universal.

  13. Optimal Design and Acoustic Assessment of Low-Vibration Rotor Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bernardini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimal procedure for the design of rotor blade that generates low vibratory hub loads in nonaxial flow conditions is presented and applied to a helicopter rotor in forward flight, a condition where vibrations and noise become severe. Blade shape and structural properties are the design parameters to be identified within a binary genetic optimization algorithm under aeroelastic stability constraint. The process exploits an aeroelastic solver that is based on a nonlinear, beam-like model, suited for the analysis of arbitrary curved-elastic-axis blades, with the introduction of a surrogate wake inflow model for the analysis of sectional aerodynamic loads. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to identify low vibratory hub loads rotor blades as well as to assess the robustness of solution at off-design operating conditions. Further, the aeroacoustic assessment of the rotor configurations determined is carried out in order to examine the impact of low-vibration blade design on the emitted noise field.

  14. Rotor-Router Aggregation on the Comb

    OpenAIRE

    Huss, Wilfried; Sava, Ecaterina

    2011-01-01

    We prove a shape theorem for rotor-router aggregation on the comb, for a specific initial rotor configuration and clockwise rotor sequence for all vertices. Furthermore, as an application of rotor-router walks, we describe the harmonic measure of the rotor-router aggregate and related shapes, which is useful in the study of other growth models on the comb. We also identify the shape for which the harmonic measure is uniform. This gives the first known example where the rotor-router cluster ha...

  15. Lead-Lag Control for Helicopter Vibration and Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Farhan

    1995-01-01

    As a helicopter transitions from hover to forward flight, the main rotor blades experience an asymmetry in flow field around the azimuth, with the blade section tangential velocities increasing on the advancing side and decreasing on the retreating side. To compensate for the reduced dynamic pressure on the retreating side, the blade pitch angles over this part of the rotor disk are increased. Eventually, a high enough forward speed is attained to produce compressibility effects on the advancing side of the rotor disk and stall on the retreating side. The onset of these two phenomena drastically increases the rotor vibratory loads and power requirements, thereby effectively establishing a limit on the maximum achievable forward speed. The alleviation of compressibility and stall (and the associated decrease in vibratory loads and power) would potentially result in an increased maximum forward speed. In the past, several methods have been examined and implemented to reduce the vibratory hub loads. Some of these methods are aimed specifically at alleviating vibration at very high flight speeds and increasing the maximum flight speed, while others focus on vibration reduction within the conventional flight envelope. Among the later are several types passive as well as active schemes. Passive schemes include a variety of vibration absorbers such as mechanical springs, pendulums, and bifilar absorbers. These mechanism are easy to design and maintain, but incur significant weight and drag penalties. Among the popular active control schemes in consideration are Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) and Individual Blade Control (IBC). HHC uses a conventional swash plate to generate a multi-cyclic pitch input to the blade. This requires actuators capable of sufficiently high power and bandwidth, increasing the cost and weight of the aircraft. IBC places actuators in the rotating reference frame, requiring the use of slip rings capable of transferring enough power to the actuators

  16. Twisted spacetime in Einstein gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    We find a vacuum stationary twisted solution in four-dimensional Einstein gravity. Its frame dragging angular velocities are antisymmetric with respect to the equatorial plane. It possesses a symmetry of joint inversion of time and parity with respect to the equatorial plane. Its Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) mass and angular momentum are zero. It is curved but regular all over the manifold. Its Komar mass and Komar angular momentum are also zero. Its infinite red-shift surface coincides with its event horizon, since the event horizon does not rotate. Furthermore we extend this solution to the massive case, and find some similar properties. This solution is a stationary axisymmetric solution, but not Kerr. It explicitly proves that pure Einstein gravity permits different rotational mode other than Kerr. Our results demonstrate that the Einstein theory may have much more rich structures than what we ever imagine.

  17. Numerical analysis on noise of rotor with unconventional blade tips based on CFD/Kirchhoff method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bo; Zhao Qijun; Xu Guohua; Ye Liang; Wang Junyi

    2013-01-01

    A solver is developed aiming at efficiently predicting rotor noise in hover and forward flight.In this solver,the nonlinear near-field solutions are calculated by a hybrid approach which includes the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations based on a moving-embedded grid system and adaptive grid methodology.A combination of the third-order upwind scheme and flux-difference splitting scheme,instead of the second-order center-difference scheme which may cause larger wake dissipation,has been employed in the present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method.The sound pressure data in the near field can be calculated directly by solving the Navier-Stokes equations,and the sound propagation can be predicted by the Kirchhoffmethod.A harmonic expansion approach is presented for rotor far-field noise prediction,which gives an analytical expression for the integral function in the Kirchhoff formula.As a result,the interpolation process is simplified and the efficiency and accuracy of the interpolation are improved.Then,the high-speed impulsive (HIS) noise of a helicopter rotor at different tip Mach numbers and on different observers is calculated and analyzed in hover and forward flight,which shows a highly directional characteristic of the rotor HIS noise with a maximum value in the rotor plane,and the HSI noise weakens rapidly with the increasing of the directivity angle.In order to investigate the effects of the rotor blade-tip shape on its aeroacoustic characteristics,four kinds of blade tips are designed and their noise characteristics have been simulated.At last,a new unconventional CLOR-Ⅱ blade tip has been designed,and the noise characteristics of the presented CLOR-Ⅱ model rotor have been simulated and measured compared to the reference rotors with a rectangular or swept-back platform blade tip.The results demonstrate that the unconventional CLOR-Ⅱblade tip can significantly reduce the HSI noise of a rotor.

  18. A comprehensive vibration analysis of a coupled rotor/fuselage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo

    A comprehensive vibration analysis of a coupled rotor/fuselage system for a two-bladed teetering rotor using finite element methods in space and time is developed which incorporates consistent rotor/fuselage structural, aerodynamic, and inertial couplings and a modern free wake model. A coordinate system is developed to take into account a teetering rotor's unique characteristics, such as teetering motion and undersling. Coupled nonlinear periodic blade and fuselage equations are transformed to the modal space in the fixed frame and solved simultaneously. The elastic line and detailed 3-D NASTRAN finite element models of the AH-1G helicopter airframe from the DAMVIBS program are integrated into the elastic rotor finite element model. Analytical predictions of rotor control angles, blade loads, hub forces, and vibration are compared with AH-1G Operation Load Survey flight test data. The blade loads predicted by present analysis show generally fair agreement with the flight test data, especially blade chord bending moment estimation shows good agreement. Calculated 2/rev vertical vibration levels at pilot seat show good correlation with the flight test data both in magnitude and phase, but 4/rev vibration levels show fair correlation only in magnitude. Lateral vibration results show more disagreement than vertical vibration results. Pylon flexibility effect is essential in the two-bladed teetering rotor vibration analysis. The pylon flexibility increases the first lag frequency by about 14%, and decreases 2/rev longitudinal and lateral hub forces by more than half. Rotor/fuselage coupling reduces 2/rev vertical and lateral vibration levels by 60% to 70% and has a small effect on 4/rev vibration levels. Modeling of difficult components (secondary structures, doors/panels, etc) is essential in predicting airframe natural frequencies. Refined aerodynamics such as free wake and unsteady aerodynamics have an important role in the prediction of vibration. For example, free

  19. Twisting cracks in Bouligand structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksangpanya, Nobphadon; Yaraghi, Nicholas A; Kisailus, David; Zavattieri, Pablo

    2017-06-10

    The Bouligand structure, which is found in many biological materials, is a hierarchical architecture that features uniaxial fiber layers assembled periodically into a helicoidal pattern. Many studies have highlighted the high damage-resistant performance of natural and biomimetic Bouligand structures. One particular species that utilizes the Bouligand structure to achieve outstanding mechanical performance is the smashing Mantis Shrimp, Odontodactylus Scyllarus (or stomatopod). The mantis shrimp generates high speed, high acceleration blows using its raptorial appendage to defeat highly armored preys. The load-bearing part of this appendage, the dactyl club, contains an interior region [16] that consists of a Bouligand structure. This region is capable of developing a significant amount of nested twisting microcracks without exhibiting catastrophic failure. The development and propagation of these microcracks are a source of energy dissipation and stress relaxation that ultimately contributes to the remarkable damage tolerance properties of the dactyl club. We develop a theoretical model to provide additional insights into the local stress intensity factors at the crack front of twisting cracks formed within the Bouligand structure. Our results reveal that changes in the local fracture mode at the crack front leads to a reduction of the local strain energy release rate, hence, increasing the necessary applied energy release rate to propagate the crack, which is quantified by the local toughening factor. Ancillary 3D simulations of the asymptotic crack front field were carried out using a J-integral to validate the theoretical values of the energy release rate and the local stress intensity factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. DYNAMICS OF STRONGLY TWISTED RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parfrey, Kyle [Astronomy Department, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hui, Lam, E-mail: parfrey@astro.princeton.edu [Physics Department and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Magnetar magnetospheres are believed to be strongly twisted due to shearing of the stellar crust by internal magnetic stresses. We present time-dependent axisymmetric simulations showing in detail the evolution of relativistic force-free magnetospheres subjected to slow twisting through large angles. When the twist amplitude is small, the magnetosphere moves quasi-statically through a sequence of equilibria of increasing free energy. At some twist amplitude the magnetosphere becomes tearing-mode unstable to forming a resistive current sheet, initiating large-scale magnetic reconnection in which a significant fraction of the magnetic free energy can be dissipated. This ''critical'' twist angle is insensitive to the resistive length scale. Rapid shearing temporarily stabilizes the magnetosphere beyond the critical angle, allowing the magnetosphere of a rapidly differentially rotating star to store and dissipate more free energy. In addition to these effects, shearing the surface of a rotating star increases the spindown torque applied to the star. If shearing is much slower than rotation, the resulting spikes in spindown rate can occur on timescales anywhere from the long twisting timescale to the stellar spin period or shorter, depending both on the stellar shear distribution and the existing distribution of magnetospheric twists. A model in which energy is stored in the magnetosphere and released by a magnetospheric instability therefore predicts large changes in the measured spindown rate before soft gamma repeater giant flares.

  1. Application of the Baseline Rotonet system to the prediction of helicopter tone noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, R. A.; Weir, D. S.; Tracy, M. B.

    1986-07-01

    The capabilities of the baseline Rotonet system designed to predict helicopter noise are analyzed. The modules of the system utilized for main and tail rotor geometry and blade section aerodynamic characteristics, for analyses, and for source-to-observer geometry, and atmospheric and ground effects calculations are described; a diagram of the system is provided. The Rotonet system produces axial force, tone noise, and sound pressure level information and a one third octave spectrum related to rotor tone noise and broadband noise sources. Main rotor noise predictions are compared with flight data. It is observed that both sets of data reveal increase loading on the advancing side and decrease loading on the retreating side. The tone noise and sound pressure levels for the first and second harmonics correlate well with the flight data; however, there is only fair agreement for the third harmonics of the sound pressure level. Analysis of the spectra display lower noise levels for higher altitudes and lower speeds. It is noted that the baseline Rotonet system is applicable for predicting performance and noise signatures for the lower harmonics. A phase II Rotonet system for evaluating higher harmonics is being developed.

  2. Rotor/Wing Interactions in Hover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry A.; Derby, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Hover predictions of tiltrotor aircraft are hampered by the lack of accurate and computationally efficient models for rotor/wing interactional aerodynamics. This paper summarizes the development of an approximate, potential flow solution for the rotor-on-rotor and wing-on-rotor interactions. This analysis is based on actuator disk and vortex theory and the method of images. The analysis is applicable for out-of-ground-effect predictions. The analysis is particularly suited for aircraft preliminary design studies. Flow field predictions from this simple analytical model are validated against experimental data from previous studies. The paper concludes with an analytical assessment of the influence of rotor-on-rotor and wing-on-rotor interactions. This assessment examines the effect of rotor-to-wing offset distance, wing sweep, wing span, and flaperon incidence angle on tiltrotor inflow and performance.

  3. Novel Properties of Twisted-Photon Absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasev, Andrei; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2014-01-01

    We discuss novel features of twisted-photon absorption both by atoms and by micro-particles. First, we extend the treatment of atomic photoexcitation by twisted photons to include atomic recoil, derive generalized quantum selection rules and consider phenomena of forbidden atomic transitions. Second, we analyze the radiation pressure from twisted-photon beams on micro- and nano-sized particles and observe that for particular conditions the pressure is negative in a small area near the beam axis. A central part of the beam therefore acts as a "tractor beam".

  4. Twisted spectral geometry for the standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinetti, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    In noncommutative geometry, the spectral triple of a manifold does not generate bosonic fields, for fluctuations of the Dirac operator vanish. A Connes-Moscovici twist forces the commutative algebra to be multiplied by matrices. Keeping the space of spinors untouched, twisted-fluctuations then yield perturbations of the spin connection. Applied to the spectral triple of the Standard Model, a similar twist yields the scalar field needed to stabilize the vacuum and to make the computation of the Higgs mass compatible with its experimental value.

  5. Progress in helicopter infrared signature suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jingzhou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to their low-attitude and relatively low-speed fight profiles, helicopters are subjected to serious threats from radio, infrared (IR, visual, and aural detection and tracking. Among these threats, infrared detection and tracking are regarded as more crucial for the survivability of helicopters. In order to meet the requirements of infrared stealth, several different types of infrared suppressor (IRS for helicopters have been developed. This paper reviews contemporary developments in this discipline, with particular emphasis on infrared signature suppression, advances in mixer-ejectors and prediction for helicopters. In addition, several remaining challenges, such as advanced IRS, emissivity optimization technique, helicopter infrared characterization, etc., are proposed, as an initial guide and stimulation for future research. In the future, the comprehensive infrared suppression in the 3–5 μm and 8–14 μm bands will doubtfully become the emphasis of helicopter stealth. Multidisciplinary optimization of a complete infrared suppression system deserves further investigation.

  6. Helicopter response to atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, J.; Prasad, J. V. R.; Schrage, D. P.; Gaonkar, G. H.

    1992-01-01

    A new time-domain method for simulating cyclostationary turbulence as seen by a translating and rotating blade element has recently been developed for the case of one-dimensional spectral distribution. This paper extends the simulation method to the cases of two- and three-dimensional spectral distributions and presents validation results for the two-dimensional case. The statistics of an isolated rigid blade flapping response to turbulence are computed using a two-dimensional spectral representation of the von Karman turbulence model, and the results are compared with those obtained using the conventional space-fixed turbulence analysis. The new turbulence simulation method is used for predicting the Black Hawk helicopter response to atmospheric turbulence.

  7. Aeroelastic effects in multirotor vehicles. Part 2: Methods of solution and results illustrating coupled rotor/body aeromechanical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1987-01-01

    This report is a sequel to the earlier report titled, Aeroelastic Effects in Multi-Rotor Vehicles with Application to Hybrid Heavy Lift System, Part 1: Formulation of Equations of Motion (NASA CR-3822). The trim and stability equations are presented for a twin rotor system with a buoyant envelope and an underslung load attached to a flexible supporting structure. These equations are specialized for the case of hovering flight. A stability analysis, for such a vehicle with 31 degrees of freedom, yields a total of 62 eigenvalues. A careful parametric study is performed to identify the various blade and vehicle modes, as well as the coupling between various modes. Finally, it is shown that the coupled rotor/vehicle stability analysis provides information on both the aeroelastic stability as well as complete vehicle dynamic stability. Also presented are the results of an analytical study aimed at predicting the aeromechanical stability of a single rotor helicopter in ground resonance. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results, thereby validating the analytical model for the dynamics of the coupled rotor/support system.

  8. On cup anemometer rotor aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup.

  9. Transonic Axial Splittered Rotor Tandem Stator Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    compressor rotor was designed incorporating a splitter vane between the principal blades . Historical experiments conducted by Dr. Arthur J...conventional rotor design . The stage is composed of the rotor and stator. The flow of the air passing through the rotor is turned, and the flow is required...derived results achieved the best blade geometry for design continuation. The best circumferential and axial placement for the splitter blade was

  10. Twist1 Is Essential for Tooth Morphogenesis and Odontoblast Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Tian; Huang, Yanyu; Wang, Suzhen; Zhang, Hua; Dechow, Paul C; Wang, Xiaofang; Qin, Chunlin; Shi, Bing; D'Souza, Rena N; Lu, Yongbo

    2015-12-04

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix-containing transcription factor that is expressed in the dental mesenchyme during the early stages of tooth development. To better delineate its roles in tooth development, we generated Twist1 conditional knockout embryos (Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl)) by breeding Twist1 floxed mice (Twist1(fl/fl)) with Twist2-Cre recombinase knockin mice (Twist2(Cre) (/+)). The Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) embryos formed smaller tooth germs and abnormal cusps during early tooth morphogenesis. Molecular and histological analyses showed that the developing molars of the Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) embryos had reduced cell proliferation and expression of fibroblast growth factors 3, 4, 9, and 10 and FGF receptors 1 and 2 in the dental epithelium and mesenchyme. In addition, 3-week-old renal capsular transplants of embryonic day 18.5 Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) molars showed malformed crowns and cusps with defective crown dentin and enamel. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the implanted mutant molars had defects in odontoblast differentiation and delayed ameloblast differentiation. Furthermore, in vitro ChIP assays demonstrated that Twist1 was able to bind to a specific region of the Fgf10 promoter. In conclusion, our findings suggest that Twist1 plays crucial roles in regulating tooth development and that it may exert its functions through the FGF signaling pathway. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Design and Analysis of Delta Wing Tilt Rotor UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Ravikanth

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A tilt rotor is an aircraft of a special kind, which possesses the characteristics of a helicopter and a fixed-wing airplane. However, there are a great number of important technical problems waiting for settlements. Of them, the flight control system might be a critical one. A tiltrotor aircraft comprising a pair of contra-rotating co-axial tiltable rotors on the longitudinal center line of the aircraft. The rotors may be tiltable sequentially and independently. They may be moveable between a lift position and a flight position in front of or behind the fuselage.In this paper we present a project aimed for the designing of a small scale Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV with Tiltrotor configuration (that uses two rotating rotors. he current paper describes the adopted design methodology, the mathematical and computational models created to represent the UAV, the physical components that constitute the UAV, and the results obtained so far. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV, also known as a remotely piloted aircraft (RPA or unmanned aircraft, is a machine which functions either by the remote control of a navigator or pilot or autonomously. A UAV is defined as a powered, aerial vehicle that does not carry a human operator, uses aerodynamic forces to provide vehicle lift, can fly autonomously or be piloted remotely, can be expendable or recoverable, and can carry payload.India‘s requirement of these unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV has become prior need for fighting in the northeast, against threat of terrorism, tension along the Pakistan border and its emerging role as a regional naval power and subsequent need for surveillance. The military wants to acquire at least 1,500 unmanned systems in the next 3-4 years, ranging from man-portable drones to high-altitude, long-endurance (HALE vehicles.Indian military is using Israeli-built UAVs such as the Heron, Searcher Mk II and Harop from Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI. Till date India has mostly deployed

  12. Topological hypermultiplet on N=2 twisted superspace in four dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, J; Kato, Junji; Miyake, Akiko

    2005-01-01

    We propose a N=2 twisted superspace formalism with a central charge in four dimensions by introducing a Dirac-K\\"ahler twist. Using this formalism, we construct a twisted hypermultiplet action and find an explicit form of fermionic scalar, vector and tensor transformations. We construct a off-shell Donaldson-Witten theory coupled to the twisted hypermultiplet. We show that this action possesses N=4 twisted supersymmetry at on-shell level. It turns out that four-dimensional Dirac-K\\"ahler twist is equivalent to the Marcus's twist.

  13. Transmission properties of cryogenic twisted pair filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Woon; Rehman, Mushtaq; Chong, Yonuk [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Sangwan [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    We fabricated a cryogenic low pass filter that consists of twisted pairs of manganin wires wrapped in copper tape and measured its transmission characteristics at frequencies up to 18 GHz. The dependence of the microwave transmission characteristics on the filter length was studied, which showed that a filter of length 1.0 m had a 70-dB attenuation at 1 GHz. We also studied the dependence of common- and differential-mode transmission on the number of twists per unit length and found that the number of twists per unit length affects differential-mode transmission but not common-mode transmission. Because the shielded twisted pair filter is more compact than a conventional copper powder filter, it can solve the space and thermal load issues when many cables are required for precision electronic transport experiments at low temperatures.

  14. Mutations in the human TWIST gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, K W; Zackai, E H; Stolle, C A

    2000-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a relatively common craniosynostosis disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. Mutations in the TWIST gene have been identified in patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. The TWIST gene product is a transcription factor with DNA binding and helix-loop-helix domains. Numerous missense and nonsense mutations cluster in the functional domains, without any apparent mutational hot spot. Two novel point mutations and one novel polymorphism are included in this review. Large deletions including the TWIST gene have been identified in some patients with learning disabilities or mental retardation, which are not typically part of the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Comprehensive studies in patients with the clinical diagnosis of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome have demonstrated a TWIST gene abnormality in about 80%, up to 37% of which may be large deletions [Johnson et al., 1998]. The gene deletions and numerous nonsense mutations are suggestive of haploinsufficiency as the disease-causing mechanism. No genotype phenotype correlation was apparent.

  15. Observation of subluminal twisted light in vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Mand, Harjaspreet; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's theory of relativity establishes the speed of light in vacuum, c, as a fundamental constant. However, the speed of light pulses can be altered significantly in dispersive materials. While significant control can be exerted over the speed of light in such media, no experimental demonstration of altered light speeds has hitherto been achieved in vacuum for ``twisted'' optical beams. We show that ``twisted'' light pulses exhibit subluminal velocities in vacuum, being slowed by 0.1\\% relative to c. This work does not challenge relativity theory, but experimentally supports a body of theoretical work on the counterintuitive vacuum group velocities of twisted pulses. These results are particularly important given recent interest in applications of twisted light to quantum information, communication and quantum key distribution.

  16. Twisted Vector Bundles on Pointed Nodal Curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ivan Kausz

    2005-05-01

    Motivated by the quest for a good compactification of the moduli space of -bundles on a nodal curve we establish a striking relationship between Abramovich’s and Vistoli’s twisted bundles and Gieseker vector bundles.

  17. Gerbes and twisted orbifold quantum cohomology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we construct an orbifold quantum cohomology twisted by a flat gerbe. Then we compute these invariants in the case of a smooth manifold and a discrete torsion on a global quotient orbifold.

  18. Deformed and twisted black holes with NUTs

    CERN Document Server

    Krtous, Pavel; Frolov, Valeri P; Kolar, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We construct a new class of vacuum black hole solutions whose geometry is deformed and twisted by the presence of NUT charges. The solutions are obtained by `unspinning' the general Kerr-NUT-(A)dS spacetimes, effectively switching off some of their rotation parameters. The resulting geometry has a structure of warped space with the Kerr-like Lorentzian part warped to a Euclidean metric of deformed and/or twisted sphere, with the deformation and twist characterized by the `Euclidean NUT' parameters. In the absence of NUTs, the solution reduces to a well known Kerr-(A)dS black hole with several rotations switched off. New geometries inherit the original symmetry of the Kerr-NUT-(A)dS family, namely, they possess the full Killing tower of hidden and explicit symmetries. As expected, for vanishing NUT, twist, and deformation parameters, the symmetry is further enlarged.

  19. Gerbes and twisted orbifold quantum cohomology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN JianZhong; RUAN YongBin; YIN XiaoQin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we construct an orbifold quantum cohomology twisted by a flat gerbe.Then we compute these invariants in the case of a smooth manifold and a discrete torsion on a global quotient orbifold.

  20. Deformed and twisted black holes with NUTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krtouš, Pavel; Kubizňák, David; Frolov, Valeri P.; Kolář, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    We construct a new class of vacuum black hole solutions whose geometry is deformed and twisted by the presence of NUT charges. The solutions are obtained by ‘unspinning’ the general Kerr-NUT-(A)dS spacetimes, effectively switching off some of their rotation parameters. The resulting geometry has a structure of warped space with the Kerr-like Lorentzian part warped to a Euclidean metric of a deformed and/or twisted sphere, with the deformation and twist characterized by the ‘Euclidean NUT’ parameters. In the absence of NUTs, the solution reduces to a well known Kerr-(A)dS black hole with several rotations switched off. New geometries inherit the original symmetry of the Kerr-NUT-(A)dS family, namely, they possess the full Killing tower of hidden and explicit symmetries. As expected, for vanishing NUT, twist, and deformation parameters, the symmetry is further enlarged.

  1. Study on the Rotor Spinning Processing of Spun Silk/CashmereBlended Yarn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nibikora Ildephonse; WANG Jun; XI Qiong; LIANG Jin-ru

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies roto spinning blended yarn producedof spun silk and cashmere. Nine samples were spun, from threedifferent opening rollers and different navels.According to theUster test results of yarn quality prioerties, optimum selection isdane by using analysis method of combining fuzzy decision-makingand fuzzy pattern classification.Expermental plan is designedbased on universal rotated experitmental design, and the method ofconfined optimization is used to optimize the speed of openingtaller, the speed of rotor and twist factor, according to the resultsof yarn quality test by Uster.

  2. Genomic pathways modulated by Twist in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Vesuna, Farhad; Bergman, Yehudit; Raman, Venu

    2017-01-01

    Background The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TWIST1 (Twist) is involved in embryonic cell lineage determination and mesodermal differentiation. There is evidence to indicate that Twist expression plays a role in breast tumor formation and metastasis, but the role of Twist in dysregulating pathways that drive the metastatic cascade is unclear. Moreover, many of the genes and pathways dysregulated by Twist in cell lines and mouse models have not been validated against data obtaine...

  3. DDalphaAMG for Twisted Mass Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Bacchio, Simone; Finkenrath, Jacob; Frommer, Andreas; Kahl, Karsten; Rottmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    We present the Adaptive Aggregation-based Domain Decomposition Multigrid method extended to the twisted mass fermion discretization action. We show comparisons of results as a function of tuning the parameters that enter the twisted mass version of the DDalphaAMG library (https://github.com/sbacchio/DDalphaAMG). Moreover, we linked the DDalphaAMG library to the tmLQCD software package and give details on the performance of the multigrid solver during HMC simulations at the physical point.

  4. Twisted Covariant Noncommutative Self-dual Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada-Jimenez, S; Obregón, O; Ramírez, C

    2008-01-01

    A twisted covariant formulation of noncommutative self-dual gravity is presented. The recent formulation introduced by J. Wess and coworkers for constructing twisted Yang-Mills fields is used. It is shown that the noncommutative torsion is solved at any order of the $\\theta$-expansion in terms of the tetrad and the extra fields of the theory. In the process the first order expansion in $\\theta$ for the Pleba\\'nski action is explicitly obtained.

  5. OAM mode converter in twisted fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.; Beltran-Mejia, Felipe; Cordeiro, Cristiano

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the case of an OAM mode converter based on a twisted fiber, through finite element simulations where we exploit an equivalence between geometric and material transformations. The obtained converter has potential applications in MDM. © 2014 OSA.......We analyze the case of an OAM mode converter based on a twisted fiber, through finite element simulations where we exploit an equivalence between geometric and material transformations. The obtained converter has potential applications in MDM. © 2014 OSA....

  6. On Supermultiplet Twisting and Spin-Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Hubsch, Tristan

    2012-01-01

    Twisting of off-shell supermultiplets in models with 1+1-dimensional spacetime has been discovered in 1984, and was shown to be a generic feature of off-shell representations in worldline supersymmetry two decades later. It is shown herein that in all supersymmetric models with spacetime of four or more dimensions, this type of twisting, if nontrivial, necessarily maps regular (non-ghost) supermultiplets to ghost supermultiplets.

  7. On Supermultiplet Twisting and Spin-Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Hubsch, Tristan

    2012-01-01

    Twisting of off-shell supermultiplets in models with 1+1-dimensional spacetime has been discovered in 1984, and was shown to be a generic feature of off-shell representations in worldline supersymmetry two decades later. It is shown herein that in all supersymmetric models with spacetime of four or more dimensions, this off-shell supermultiplet twisting, if non-trivial, necessarily maps regular (non-ghost) supermultiplets to ghost supermultiplets. This feature is shown to be ubiquitous in all...

  8. The gradient flow in a twisted box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Alberto [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2013-08-15

    We study the perturbative behavior of the gradient flow in a twisted box. We apply this information to define a running coupling using the energy density of the flow field. We study the step-scaling function and the size of cutoff effects in SU(2) pure gauge theory. We conclude that the twisted gradient flow running coupling scheme is a valid strategy for step-scaling purposes due to the relatively mild cutoff effects and high precision.

  9. US Helicopter Expands Service to Newark Liberty International Airport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ US Helicopter Corporation ("US Helicopter") (OTC Bulletin Board: USHP) and Continental Airlines (NYSE: CAL)announced a partnership to provide eight-minute shuttle service between Manhattan and Newark Liberty International Airport beginning Dec.18, 2006.

  10. An analytical investigation of the performance of wind-turbines with gyrocopter-like rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kentfield, J.A.C.; Brophy, D.C. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The performance was predicted of a wind-turbine, intended for electrical power generation, the rotor of which is similar in configuration to the rotor of an autogyro or gyrocopter as originated by Cierva. Hence the rotor axis of spin is tilted downwind, for maximum power production, by an angle of 40{degrees} to 50{degrees} relative to the vertical with power regulation by modulation of the tilt angle. Because the rotor of a Cierva turbine generates lift the simple, non-twisted, fixed-pitch blades {open_quotes}fly{close_quotes} and are self supporting thereby eliminating flap-wise bending moments when the blades are hinged at their roots. It was found from the analysis that it is possible to reduce tower bending moments substantially relative to a conventional horizontal axis turbine of equal power output and also, for equal maximum hub heights and blade tip altitudes, a Cierva turbine is capable, at a prescribed wind speed, of a greater power output than a conventional horizontal axis machine.

  11. Twisted Boundary Conditions in Lattice Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sachrajda, Christopher T C

    2004-01-01

    By imposing twisted boundary conditions on quark fields it is possible to access components of momenta other than integer multiples of 2pi/L on a lattice with spatial volume L^3. We use Chiral Perturbation Theory to study finite-volume effects with twisted boundary conditions for quantities without final-state interactions, such as meson masses, decay constants and semileptonic form factors, and confirm that they remain exponentially small with the volume. We show that this is also the case for "partially twisted" boundary conditions, in which (some of) the valence quarks satisfy twisted boundary conditions but the sea quarks satisfy periodic boundary conditions. This observation implies that it is not necessary to generate new gluon configurations for every choice of the twist angle, making the method much more practicable. For K->pipi decays we show that the breaking of isospin symmetry by the twisted boundary conditions implies that the amplitudes cannot be determined in general (on this point we disagree ...

  12. 78 FR 54380 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ..., AS355F1, and AS355F2 helicopters with an autopilot installed; Model AS350B3 helicopters with an autopilot or modification 073252 installed; and Model AS355N and AS355NP helicopters with an autopilot or..., AS350D, AS355E, AS355F, AS355F1, AS355F2, AS355N, and AS355NP helicopters with either an autopilot...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Rotor syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of these proteins. Without the function of either transport protein, bilirubin is less efficiently taken up by the ... Schinkel AH. Complete OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 deficiency causes human Rotor syndrome by interrupting conjugated bilirubin reuptake into ...

  14. Rotor damage detection by using piezoelectric impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y.; Tao, Y.; Mao, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    Rotor is a core component of rotary machinery. Once the rotor has the damage, it may lead to a major accident. Thus the quantitative rotor damage detection method based on piezoelectric impedance is studied in this paper. With the governing equation of piezoelectric transducer (PZT) in a cylindrical coordinate, the displacement along the radius direction is derived. The charge of PZT is calculated by the electric displacement. Then, by the use of the obtained displacement and charge, an analytic piezoelectric impedance model of the rotor is built. Given the circular boundary condition of a rotor, annular elements are used as the analyzed objects and spectral element method is used to set up the damage detection model. The Electro-Mechanical (E/M) coupled impedance expression of an undamaged rotor is deduced with the application of a low-cost impedance test circuit. A Taylor expansion method is used to obtain the approximate E/M coupled impedance expression for the damaged rotor. After obtaining the difference between the undamaged and damaged rotor impedance, a rotor damage detection method is proposed. This method can directly calculate the change of bending stiffness of the structural elements, it follows that the rotor damage can be effectively detected. Finally, a preset damage configuration is used for the numerical simulation. The result shows that the quantitative damage detection algorithm based on spectral element method and piezoelectric impedance proposed in this paper can identify the location and the severity of the damaged rotor accurately.

  15. Advances in tilt rotor noise prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, A. R.; Coffen, C. D.; Ringler, T. D.

    The two most serious tilt rotor external noise problems, hover noise and blade-vortex interaction noise, are studied. The results of flow visualization and inflow velocity measurements document a complex, recirculating highly unsteady and turbulent flow due to the rotor-wing-body interactions characteristic of tilt rotors. The wing under the rotor is found to obstruct the inflow, causing a deficit in the inflow velocities over the inboard region of the rotor. Discrete frequency harmonic thickness and loading noise mechanisms in hover are examined by first modeling tilt rotor hover aerodynamics and then applying various noise prediction methods using the WOPWOP code. The analysis indicates that the partial ground plane created by the wing below the rotor results in a primary sound source for hover.

  16. 77 FR 44434 - Airworthiness Directives; Various Restricted Category Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... State University); Firefly Aviation Helicopter Services (previously Erickson Air-Crane Co.); California... Services (previously Erickson Air-Crane Co.); California Department of Forestry; Garlick Helicopters, Inc... (previously Erickson Air-Crane Co.); California Department of Forestry; Garlick Helicopters, Inc.; Global...

  17. 78 FR 47531 - Airworthiness Directives; Various Restricted Category Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... Component Overhaul Schedule, Revision 11, dated April 30, 2010, of Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. (BHTI), BHT... Schedule, Revision 11, dated April 30, 2010, of Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., BHT-212- MM-1, Revision 13... Helicopter Textron, Inc., BHT-212-MM-1, Revision 13, dated September 16, 2010. (3) For BHTI service...

  18. 78 FR 18230 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... sides of the helicopter. This AD was prompted by a crack and failure of a cabin vibration damper blade... 2007-SW-053-AD. (a) Applicability This AD applies to Model EC130 B4 helicopters with a cabin vibration..., install a vibration damper casing assembly on both sides of the helicopter by following paragraphs...

  19. Soft tissue twisting injuries of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, T.; Shapiro, M. [Neuroimaging Inst., Melbourne, FL (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Twisting injuries occur as a result of differential motion of different tissue types in injuries with some rotational force. These injuries are well described in brain injuries but, to our knowledge, have not been described in the musculoskeletal literature. We correlated the clinical examination and MR findings of 20 patients with twisting injuries of the soft tissues around the knee. Design and patients: We prospectively followed the clinical courses of 20 patients with knee injuries who had clinical histories and MR findings to suggest twisting injuries of the subcutaneous tissues. Patients with associated internal derangement of the knee (i.e., meniscal tears, ligamentous or bone injuries) were excluded from this study. MR findings to suggest twisting injuries included linear areas of abnormal dark signal on T1-weighted sequences and abnormal bright signal on T2-weighted or short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences and/or signal to suggest hemorrhage within the subcutaneous tissues. These MR criteria were adapted from those established for indirect musculotendinous junction injuries. Results: All 20 patients presented with considerable pain that suggested internal derangement on physical examination by the referring orthopedic surgeons. All presented with injuries associated with rotational force. The patients were placed on a course of protected weight-bearing of the affected extremity for 4 weeks. All patients had pain relief by clinical examination after this period of protected weight-bearing. Twisting injuries of the soft tissues can result in considerable pain that can be confused with internal derangement of the knee on physical examination. Soft tissue twisting injuries need to be recognized on MR examinations as they may be the cause of the patient's pain despite no MR evidence of internal derangement of the knee. The demonstration of soft tissue twisting injuries in a patient with severe knee pain but no documented internal derangement on MR

  20. Helicopter industry - early beginnings to now; an outlook on the helicopter market and its major players in the rotorcraft industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spranger, L.

    2013-01-01

    The helicopter is probably the most flexible aircraft that we know today. Although its history dates back to around 1500, the first practical helicopter wasn’t manufactured until the 1940s, roughly three decades after the Wright brothers’ first powered human flight. Today, helicopters fulfil a wide

  1. A technique using a nonlinear helicopter model for determining trims and derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Downing, D. R.; Rood, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    A technique is described for determining the trims and quasi-static derivatives of a flight vehicle for use in a linear perturbation model; both the coupled and uncoupled forms of the linear perturbation model are included. Since this technique requires a nonlinear vehicle model, detailed equations with constants and nonlinear functions for the CH-47B tandem rotor helicopter are presented. Tables of trims and derivatives are included for airspeeds between -40 and 160 knots and rates of descent between + or - 10.16 m/sec (+ or - 200 ft/min). As a verification, the calculated and referenced values of comparable trims, derivatives, and linear model poles are shown to have acceptable agreement.

  2. Case Studies for the Statistical Design of Experiments Applied to Powered Rotor Wind Tunnel Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmeyer, Austin D.; Tanner, Philip E.; Martin, Preston B.; Commo, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The application of statistical Design of Experiments (DOE) to helicopter wind tunnel testing was explored during two powered rotor wind tunnel entries during the summers of 2012 and 2013. These tests were performed jointly by the U.S. Army Aviation Development Directorate Joint Research Program Office and NASA Rotary Wing Project Office, currently the Revolutionary Vertical Lift Project, at NASA Langley Research Center located in Hampton, Virginia. Both entries were conducted in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel with a small portion of the overall tests devoted to developing case studies of the DOE approach as it applies to powered rotor testing. A 16-47 times reduction in the number of data points required was estimated by comparing the DOE approach to conventional testing methods. The average error for the DOE surface response model for the OH-58F test was 0.95 percent and 4.06 percent for drag and download, respectively. The DOE surface response model of the Active Flow Control test captured the drag within 4.1 percent of measured data. The operational differences between the two testing approaches are identified, but did not prevent the safe operation of the powered rotor model throughout the DOE test matrices.

  3. HIGH CYCLE FATIGUE RELIABILITY ANALYSIS ON ROTOR HUB BASED ON APPROXIMATION TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜年朝; 周光明; 张逊; 戴勇; 倪俊; 张志清

    2013-01-01

    A high cycle fatigue reliability analysis approach to helicopter rotor hub is proposed under working load spectrum .Automatic calculation for the approach is implemented through writing the calculating programs .In the system ,the modification of geometric model of rotor hub is controlled by several parameters ,and finite element method and S-N curve method are then employed to solve the fatigue life by automatically assigned parameters .A database between assigned parameters and fatigue life is obtained via Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) on toler-ance zone of rotor hub .Different data-fitting technologies are used and compared to determine a highest-precision approximation for this database .The parameters are assumed to be independent of each other and follow normal distributions .Fatigue reliability is then computed by the Monte Carlo (MC) method and the mean-value first order second moment (M FOSM ) method .Results show that the approach has high efficiency and precision ,and is suit-able for engineering application .

  4. Rotor Wake Vortex Definition Using 3C-PIV Measurements: Corrected for Vortex Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; vanderWall, Berend; Richard, Hughues Richard; Raffel, Markus; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Lim, Joon W.; Yu, Yung H.; Tung, Chee

    2003-01-01

    Three-component (3-C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, within the wake across a rotor disk plane, are used to determine wake vortex definitions important for BVI (Blade Vortex Interaction) and broadband noise prediction. This study is part of the HART II test program conducted using a 40 percent scale BO-105 helicopter main rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). In this paper, measurements are presented of the wake vortex field over the advancing side of the rotor operating at a typical descent landing condition. The orientations of the vortex (tube) axes are found to have non-zero tilt angles with respect to the chosen PIV measurement cut planes, often on the order of 45 degrees. Methods for determining the orientation of the vortex axis and reorienting the measured PIV velocity maps (by rotation/projection) are presented. One method utilizes the vortex core axial velocity component, the other utilizes the swirl velocity components. Key vortex parameters such as vortex core size, strength, and core velocity distribution characteristics are determined from the reoriented PIV velocity maps. The results are compared with those determined from velocity maps that are not corrected for orientation. Knowledge of magnitudes and directions of the vortex axial and swirl velocity components as a function of streamwise location provide a basis for insight into the vortex evolution.

  5. Simulation of Flow around Isolated Helicopter Fuselage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garipov A.O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Low fuselage drag has always been a key target of helicopter manufacturers. Therefore, this paper focuses on CFD predictions of the drag of several components of a typical helicopter fuselage. In the first section of the paper, validation of the obtained CFD predictions is carried out using wind tunnel measurements. The measurements were carried out at the Kazan National Research Technical University n.a. A. Tupolev. The second section of the paper is devoted to the analysis of drag contributions of several components of the ANSAT helicopter prototype fuselage using the RANS approach. For this purpose, several configurations of fuselages are considered with different levels of complexity including exhausts and skids. Depending on the complexity of the considered configuration and CFD mesh both the multi-block structured HMB solver and the unstructured commercial tool Fluent are used. Finally, the effect of an actuator disk on the predicted drag is addressed.

  6. Neuro-optimal control of helicopter UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodland, David; Ghosh, Arpita; Zargarzadeh, H.; Jagannathan, S.

    2011-05-01

    Helicopter UAVs can be extensively used for military missions as well as in civil operations, ranging from multirole combat support and search and rescue, to border surveillance and forest fire monitoring. Helicopter UAVs are underactuated nonlinear mechanical systems with correspondingly challenging controller designs. This paper presents an optimal controller design for the regulation and vertical tracking of an underactuated helicopter using an adaptive critic neural network framework. The online approximator-based controller learns the infinite-horizon continuous-time Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation and then calculates the corresponding optimal control input that minimizes the HJB equation forward-in-time. In the proposed technique, optimal regulation and vertical tracking is accomplished by a single neural network (NN) with a second NN necessary for the virtual controller. Both of the NNs are tuned online using novel weight update laws. Simulation results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control design in hovering applications.

  7. Workload and operational fatigue in helicopter pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondo, G

    1978-02-01

    In light of the modern aetiopathogenic views, a brief review was made concerning possible causes of operational fatigue to which flying personnel in general are exposed in the exercise of flying activity. The author then describes and analyzes the meaning and importance of the various stressing factors that constitute the physical and psychic workload to which the helicopter pilot is subjected in performing his professional activities. Also analyzed are the influences exercised, both separately and jointly, on the genesis of flight fatigue in helicopter pilots by stressing and fatiguing effects of vibrations, noise, and psycho-emotional and psycho-sensorial factors related to the variety and danger of utilization of this modern aircraft. Such an analytical investigation enables the author to conclude that one must admit that helicopter piloting involves a psycho-physical workload certainly no less than that required by more powerful and faster aircraft.

  8. Comprehensive Modeling and Analysis of Rotorcraft Variable Speed Propulsion System With Coupled Engine/Transmission/Rotor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmidt, Hans A.; Smith, Edward C.; Bill, Robert C.; Wang, Kon-Well

    2013-01-01

    This project develops comprehensive modeling and simulation tools for analysis of variable rotor speed helicopter propulsion system dynamics. The Comprehensive Variable-Speed Rotorcraft Propulsion Modeling (CVSRPM) tool developed in this research is used to investigate coupled rotor/engine/fuel control/gearbox/shaft/clutch/flight control system dynamic interactions for several variable rotor speed mission scenarios. In this investigation, a prototypical two-speed Dual-Clutch Transmission (DCT) is proposed and designed to achieve 50 percent rotor speed variation. The comprehensive modeling tool developed in this study is utilized to analyze the two-speed shift response of both a conventional single rotor helicopter and a tiltrotor drive system. In the tiltrotor system, both a Parallel Shift Control (PSC) strategy and a Sequential Shift Control (SSC) strategy for constant and variable forward speed mission profiles are analyzed. Under the PSC strategy, selecting clutch shift-rate results in a design tradeoff between transient engine surge margins and clutch frictional power dissipation. In the case of SSC, clutch power dissipation is drastically reduced in exchange for the necessity to disengage one engine at a time which requires a multi-DCT drive system topology. In addition to comprehensive simulations, several sections are dedicated to detailed analysis of driveline subsystem components under variable speed operation. In particular an aeroelastic simulation of a stiff in-plane rotor using nonlinear quasi-steady blade element theory was conducted to investigate variable speed rotor dynamics. It was found that 2/rev and 4/rev flap and lag vibrations were significant during resonance crossings with 4/rev lagwise loads being directly transferred into drive-system torque disturbances. To capture the clutch engagement dynamics, a nonlinear stick-slip clutch torque model is developed. Also, a transient gas-turbine engine model based on first principles mean

  9. Noncommutative geometry in string and twisted Hopf algebra of diffeomorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watamura, Satoshi

    2011-09-01

    We discuss the Hopf algebra structure in string theory and present the twist quantization as a unified formulation of the world sheet quantization of the string and the symmetry of the target spacetime. Applying it to the case with a nonzero B-field background, we explain a method to decompose the twist into two successive twists. There are two different possibilities of decomposition: The first is a natural decomposition from the viewpoint of the twist quantization, leading to a new type of twisted Poincaré symmetry. The second decomposition reveals the relation of our formulation to the twisted Poincaré symmetry on the Moyal type noncommutative space.

  10. Twisted electron-acoustic waves in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman-ur-Rehman, Ali, S.; Khan, S. A.; Shahzad, K.

    2016-08-01

    In the paraxial limit, a twisted electron-acoustic (EA) wave is studied in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma, whose constituents are the dynamical cold electrons and Boltzmannian hot electrons in the background of static positive ions. The analytical and numerical solutions of the plasma kinetic equation suggest that EA waves with finite amount of orbital angular momentum exhibit a twist in its behavior. The twisted wave particle resonance is also taken into consideration that has been appeared through the effective wave number qeff accounting for Laguerre-Gaussian mode profiles attributed to helical phase structures. Consequently, the dispersion relation and the damping rate of the EA waves are significantly modified with the twisted parameter η, and for η → ∞, the results coincide with the straight propagating plane EA waves. Numerically, new features of twisted EA waves are identified by considering various regimes of wavelength and the results might be useful for transport and trapping of plasma particles in a two-electron component plasma.

  11. Calculation of flight vibration levels of the AH-1G helicopter and correlation with existing flight vibration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopher, R.; Twomey, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Langley is sponsoring a rotorcraft structural dynamics program with the objective to establish in the U.S. a superior capability to utilize finite element analysis models for calculations to support industrial design of helicopter airframe structures. In the initial phase of the program, teams from the major U.S. manufacturers of helicopter airframes will apply extant finite element analysis methods to calculate loads and vibrations of helicopter airframes, and perform correlations between analysis and measurements. The aforementioned rotorcraft structural dynamics program was given the acronym DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Method for Vibrations). Sikorsky's RDYNE Rotorcraft Dynamics Analysis used for the correlation study, the specifics of the application of RDYNE to the AH-1G, and comparisons of the predictions of the method with flight data for loads and vibrations on the AH-1G are described. RDYNE was able to predict trends of variations of loads and vibrations with airspeed, but in some instances magnitudes differed from measured results by factors of two or three to one. Sensitivities were studied of predictions to rotor inflow modeling, effects of torsional modes, number of blade bending modes, fuselage structural damping, and hub modal content.

  12. Helicopter trajectory planning using optimal control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Cheng, V. H. L.; Kim, E.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for optimal trajectory planning, useful in the nap-of-the-earth guidance of helicopters, is presented. This approach uses an adjoint-control transformation along with a one-dimensional search scheme for generating the optimal trajectories. In addition to being useful for helicopter nap-of-the-earth guidance, the trajectory planning solution is of interest in several other contexts, such as robotic vehicle guidance and terrain-following guidance for cruise missiles and aircraft. A distinguishing feature of the present research is that the terrain constraint and the threat envelopes are incorporated in the equations of motion. Second-order necessary conditions are examined.

  13. CMU's autonomous helicopter explores new territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, J.

    1998-10-01

    In the summer of 1998, several members of Carnegie Mellon University's (CMUs) Autonomous Helicopter Project team joined NASA on a multidisciplinary expedition to the Canadian Arctic's Haughton Crater. NASA was willing to travel to such a remote corner of the globe because of its similarity to an even more remote locale - Mars. Researchers are studying the 23-million-year-old meteorite impact crater in the hope of learning more about Mars's environment. While there, they also tested a number of technologies that will enable future exploration of Mars, including CMU's autonomous helicopter.

  14. Prehospital airway management on rescue helicopters in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Mang, H; Ey, K; Schüttler, J

    2009-06-01

    Adequate equipment is one prerequisite for advanced, out of hospital, airway management. There are no data on current availability of airway equipment on UK rescue helicopters. An internet search revealed all UK rescue helicopters, and a questionnaire was sent to the bases asking for available airway management items. We identified 27 helicopter bases and 26 (96%) sent the questionnaire back. Twenty-four bases (92%) had at least one supraglottic airway device; 16 (62%) helicopters had material for establishing a surgical airway (e.g. a cricothyroidotomy set); 88% of the helicopters had CO(2) detection; 25 (96%) helicopters carried automatic ventilators; among these, four (15%) had sophisticated ventilators and seven (27%) helicopters carried special face masks suitable for non-invasive ventilation. We found a wide variation in the advanced airway management equipment that was carried routinely on air ambulances. Current guidelines for airway management are not met by all UK air ambulances.

  15. On Cup Anemometer Rotor Aerodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pindado

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups’ front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer’s performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal, tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups’ center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor’s cup.

  16. Evaluation of an oil-debris monitoring device for use in helicopter transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, David G.; Blanchette, Donald M.; Biron, Gilles

    1992-08-01

    Experimental tests were performed on an OH-58A helicopter main-rotor transmission to evaluate an oil-debris monitoring device (ODMD). The tests were performed in the NASA 500-hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Five endurance tests were run as part of a U.S. Navy/NASA/Army advanced lubricants program. The tests were run at 100 percent design speed, 117-percent design torque, and 121 C (250 F) oil inlet temperature. Each test lasted between 29 and 122 hr. The oils that were used conformed to MIL-L-23699 and DOD-L-85734 specifications. One test produced a massive sun-gear fatigue failure; another test produced a small spall on one sun-gear tooth; and a third test produced a catastrophic planet-bearing cage failure. The ODMD results were compared with oil spectroscopy results. The capability of the ODMD to detect transmission component failures was not demonstrated. Two of the five tests produced large amounts of debris. For these two tests, two separate ODMD sensors failed, possibly because of prolonged exposure to relatively high oil temperatures. One test produced a small amount of debris and was not detected by the ODMD or by oil spectroscopy. In general, the ODMD results matched the oil spectroscopy results. The ODMD results were extremely sensitive to oil temperature and flow rate.

  17. RESEARCH ON SCHEME OF HIGH-SPEED ROTOR/WING TRANSITION HELICOPTER RD15

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGHuan-jin; GAOZheng

    2004-01-01

    To analyze the existing schemes of high-speed rotorcrafts and some new technologies, a new conceptual sketch of the high-speed rotor/wing transition helicopter RD15 is proposed. The overall layout of the RD15 is given out and the transition process from the helicopter mode to the airplane mode is designed. The lift system consists of a circular disk-wing with four retractable blades. The technology of individual blade control is adopted for flight control in hover and low speed flight. The tail is a vectored thrust duct propeller. It can provide the anti-torque in hover, and offer the multi-directional controls and propulsion drive for the airplane mode flight. The aerodynamic characteristics and key technologies in the transition process for this layout, including the nose up angle of disk-wing, the length of the blade, rotation speed, pitch angle and other parameters, are theoretically ana lyzed and experimentally tested. Calculation and experiments show that the shift process of the lift, the power and controls are smooth, and the designed scheme is feasible.

  18. Simultaneous State and Parameter Estimation Based Actuator Fault Detection and Diagnosis for an Unmanned Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous state and parameter estimation based actuator fault detection and diagnosis (FDD for single-rotor unmanned helicopters (UHs is investigated in this paper. A literature review of actuator FDD for UHs is given firstly. Based on actuator healthy coefficients (AHCs, which are introduced to represent actuator faults, a combined dynamic model is established with the augmented state containing both the flight state and AHCs. Then the actuator fault detection and diagnosis problem is transformed into a general nonlinear estimation one: given control inputs and the measured flight state contaminated by measurement noises, estimate both the flight state and AHCs recursively in each time-step, which is also known as the simultaneous state and parameter estimation problem. The estimated AHCs can further be used for fault tolerant control (FTC. Based on the existing widely used nonlinear estimation methods such as the unscented Kalman filter (UKF and the extended set-membership filter (ESMF, three kinds of adaptive schemes (KF-UKF, MIT-UKF and MIT-ESMF are proposed by our team to improve the actuator FDD performance. A comprehensive comparative study on these different estimation methods is given in detail to illustrate their advantages and disadvantages when applied to unmanned helicopter actuator FDD.

  19. Application of fuzzy theories to formulation of multi-objective design problems. [for helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, A. K.; Rao, S. S.; Miura, H.

    1988-01-01

    Much of the decision making in real world takes place in an environment in which the goals, the constraints, and the consequences of possible actions are not known precisely. In order to deal with imprecision quantitatively, the tools of fuzzy set theory can by used. This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of fuzzy theories in the formulation and solution of two types of helicopter design problems involving multiple objectives. The first problem deals with the determination of optimal flight parameters to accomplish a specified mission in the presence of three competing objectives. The second problem addresses the optimal design of the main rotor of a helicopter involving eight objective functions. A method of solving these multi-objective problems using nonlinear programming techniques is presented. Results obtained using fuzzy formulation are compared with those obtained using crisp optimization techniques. The outlined procedures are expected to be useful in situations where doubt arises about the exactness of permissible values, degree of credibility, and correctness of statements and judgements.

  20. A study of symbolic processing and computational aspects in helicopter dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, S.; Gaonkar, G.; Nagabhushanam, J.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1990-03-01

    Even research models of helicopter dynamics often lead to a large number of equations of motion with periodic coefficients; and Floquet theory is a widely used mathematical tool for dynamic analysis. Presently, three approaches are used in generating the equations of motion. These are (1) general-purpose symbolic processors such as REDUCE and MACSYMA, (2) a special-purpose symbolic processor, DEHIM (Dynamic Equations for Helicopter Interpretive Models), and (3) completely numerical approaches. In this paper, comparative aspects of the first two purely algebraic approaches are studied by applying REDUCE and DEHIM to the same set of problems. These problems range from a linear model with one degree of freedom to a mildly non-linear multi-bladed rotor model with several degrees of freedom. Further, computational issues in applying Floquet theory are also studied, which refer to (1) the equilibrium solution for periodic forced response together with the transition matrix for perturbations about that response and (2) a small number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the unsymmetric transition matrix. The study showed the following: (1) compared to REDUCE, DEHIM is far more portable and economical, but it is also less user-friendly, particularly during learning phases; (2) the problems of finding the periodic response and eigenvalues are well conditioned.

  1. Exotic twisted equivariant cohomology of loop spaces,twisted Bismut-Chern character and T-duality

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    We define completed periodic {\\em exotic twisted $\\mathbb{T}$-equivariant cohomology} for loop spaces of smooth manifolds. We then show that the twisted Bismut-Chern character, defined on the twisted K-theory of the smooth manifold, twisted by a gerbe with connection, takes values in the completed periodic exotic twisted $\\mathbb{T}$-equivariant cohomology of the loop space of the smooth manifold. We establish a localisation theorem for the completed periodic exotic twisted $\\mathbb{T}$-equivariant cohomology for loop spaces and apply it to establish T-duality in a background flux in type II String Theory from a loop space perspective.

  2. Unraveling cellulose microfibrils: a twisted tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Jodi A; French, Alfred D; Woods, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of cellulose microfibrils are pertinent to the paper, textile, and biofuels industries for their unique capacity to characterize dynamic behavior and atomic-level interactions with solvent molecules and cellulase enzymes. While high-resolution crystallographic data have established a solid basis for computational analysis of cellulose, previous work has demonstrated a tendency for modeled microfibrils to diverge from the linear experimental structure and adopt a twisted conformation. Here, we investigate the dependence of this twisting behavior on computational approximations and establish the theoretical basis for its occurrence. We examine the role of solvent, the effect of nonbonded force field parameters [partial charges and van der Waals (vdW) contributions], and the use of explicitly modeled oxygen lone pairs in both the solute and solvent. Findings suggest that microfibril twisting is favored by vdW interactions, and counteracted by both intrachain hydrogen bonds and solvent effects at the microfibril surface.

  3. Analysis of gun barrel rifling twist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia; Chen, Guangsong; Qian, Linfang; Liu, Taisu

    2017-05-01

    Aiming at the problem of gun barrel rifling twist, the constraint relation between rifling and projectile is investigated. The constraint model of rifling and projectile is established and the geometric relation between the twist and the motion of projectile is analyzed. Based on the constraint model, according to the rotating band that is fired, the stress and the motion law of the rotating band in bore are analyzed. The effects to rotating band (double rotating band or wide driving band) caused by different rifling (rib rifling, increasing rifling and combined rifling) are also investigated. The model is demonstrated by several examples. The results of numerical examples and the constraint mode show that the uncertainty factors will be brought in the increasing rifling and combined rifling during the projectile move in the bore. According to the amplitude and the strength of the twist acting on rotating band, the steady property of rotational motion of the projectile, the rib rifling is a better choose.

  4. Blind analysis results of the TWIST experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hillairet, A; Bueno, J F; Davydov, Y I; Depommier, P; Faszer, W; Fujiwara, M C; Gagliardi, C A; Gaponenko, A; Grossheim, A; Gill, D R; Gumplinger, P; Hasinoff, M D; Henderson, R S; Hu, J; Koetke, D D; MacDonald, R P; Marshall, G M; Mathie, E W; Mischke, R E; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Openshaw, R; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Selivanov, V; Sheffer, G; Shin, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Tacik, R; Tribble, R E

    2010-01-01

    The TRIUMF Weak Interaction Symmetry Test (TWIST) experiment was designed to test the standard model at high precision in the purely leptonic decay of polarized muons. A general four-fermion interaction model is used to describe the muon decay. TWIST measures three of the four muon decay parameters of this model, $\\rho$, $\\delta$ and $P_{\\mu}^{\\pi} \\xi$, from the shape of the momentum-angle spectrum. The results of this model independent approach are compared to the standard model predictions and used to constrain new physics. Our collaboration has finalized the blind analysis of the final experimental data taken in 2006 and 2007. This analysis mostly reached our goal of a precision of an order of magnitude improvement over the pre-TWIST measurements.

  5. Helicoids, wrinkles, and loops in twisted ribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Julien; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2013-10-25

    We investigate the instabilities of a flat elastic ribbon subject to twist under tension and develop an integrated phase diagram of the observed shapes and transitions. We find that the primary buckling mode switches from being localized longitudinally along the length of the ribbon to transverse above a triple point characterized by a crossover tension that scales with ribbon elasticity and aspect ratio. Far from threshold, the longitudinally buckled ribbon evolves continuously into a self-creased helicoid with focusing of the curvature along the triangular edges. Further twist causes an anomalous transition to loops compared with rods due to the self-rigidity induced by the creases. When the ribbon is twisted under high tension, transverse wrinkles are observed due to the development of compressive stresses with higher harmonics for greater width-to-length ratios. Our results can be used to develop functional structures using a wide range of elastic materials and length scales.

  6. Dynamical Twisted Mass Fermions with Light Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Boucaud, P; Farchioni, F; Frezzotti, R; Giménez, V; Herdoiza, G; Jansen, K; Lubicz, V; Martinelli, G; McNeile, C; Michael, C; Montvay, I; Palao, D; Papinutto, Mauro; Pickavance, J; Rossi, G C; Scorzato, L; Shindler, A; Simula, S; Urbach, C; Wenger, U; Boucaud, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of dynamical simulations with 2 flavours of degenerate Wilson twisted mass quarks at maximal twist in the range of pseudo scalar masses from 300 to 550 MeV. The simulations are performed at one value of the lattice spacing a \\lesssim 0.1 fm. In order to have O(a) improvement and aiming at small residual cutoff effects, the theory is tuned to maximal twist by requiring the vanishing of the untwisted quark mass. Precise results for the pseudo scalar decay constant and the pseudo scalar mass are confronted with chiral perturbation theory predictions and the low energy constants F, \\bar{l}_3 and \\bar{l}_4 are evaluated with small statistical errors.

  7. Matrix theory compactifications on twisted tori

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzistavrakidis, Athanasios

    2012-01-01

    We study compactifications of Matrix theory on twisted tori and non-commutative versions of them. As a first step, we review the construction of multidimensional twisted tori realized as nilmanifolds based on certain nilpotent Lie algebras. Subsequently, matrix compactifications on tori are revisited and the previously known results are supplemented with a background of a non-commutative torus with non-constant non-commutativity and an underlying non-associative structure on its phase space. Next we turn our attention to 3- and 6-dimensional twisted tori and we describe consistent backgrounds of Matrix theory on them by stating and solving the conditions which describe the corresponding compactification. Both commutative and non-commutative solutions are found in all cases. Finally, we comment on the correspondence among the obtained solutions and flux compactifications of 11-dimensional supergravity, as well as on relations among themselves, such as Seiberg-Witten maps and T-duality.

  8. On reweighting for twisted boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bussone, Andrea; Hansen, Martin; Pica, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We consider the possibility of using reweighting techniques in order to correct for the breaking of unitarity when twisted boundary conditions are imposed on valence fermions in simulations of lattice gauge theories. We start by studying the properties of reweighting factors and their variances at tree-level. That leads us to the introduction of a factorization for the fermionic reweighting determinant. In the numerical, stochastic, implementation of the method, we find that the effect of reweighting is negligible in the case of large volumes but it is sizeable when the volumes are small and the twisting angles are large. More importantly, we find that for un-improved Wilson fermions, and in small volumes, the dependence of the critical quark mass on the twisting angle is quite pronounced and results in large violations of the continuum dispersion relation.

  9. Coaxial Compound Helicopter for Confined Urban Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne; Elmore, Joshua F.; Keen, Ernest B.; Gallaher, Andrew T.; Nunez, Gerardo F.

    2016-01-01

    A rotorcraft was designed for military operations in a confined urban environment. The specifications included major increases in useful load, range, and speed relative current aircraft capabilities, with a size constraint based on the dimensions of urban streets and intersections. Analysis showed that this combination of requirements is best satisfied by a coaxial main-rotor configuration, with lift compounding to off-load the rotors at high speed, and ducted fans under the rotor disk for propulsion. The baseline design is described, and the aircraft performance is summarized for utility, attack, MEDEVAC, and cargo delivery missions. The impact on size and performance is examined for a number of excursions, including lift-offset main rotors. Technology development required to achieve this advance in capability is recommended.

  10. Inspiring and Challenging Laboratory Exercise in Multivariable Control Theory – The Four-rotor Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag A. H. Samuelsen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering students in a module on multivariable control theory are given a laboratory exercise for developing their skills in practical implementation of control systems. This is done in an effort to create a more complete module that gives the students experiences in the practical sides of implementing control systems, while still being theoretically challenging and inspiring. Presenting students with this kind of real-life challenges like sub-optimal models, limited processing time and large degree of uncertainty, is a challenging task, partly due to the need of adapting the level of complexity to the student or group of students doing the exercise in order to keep them engaged throughout the exercise, and in part due to the university's need to reduce expenses related to the administration, supervision, and execution of laboratory exercises. The possibility of adapting the complexity of the exercise to each student's skill level is important, both through the design of the exercise and through the students choosing between different models. The eager student might be tempted by the better performing, but more complex models, while the struggling student can find satisfaction in stabilising the aircraft using the less complex models. The laboratory setup presented uses low-cost components, giving low investment and maintenance costs.

  11. 3D Warping Actuation Driven Dynamic Camber Control Concept for Helicopter Rotor Blades Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In a rotorcraft, optimized camber change not only reduces vibratory hub loads and noise but also increases available thrust and improved flight control augmentation....

  12. Development of Virtual Blade Model for Modelling Helicopter Rotor Downwash in OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    13, most OpenFOAM data files are themselves dictionaries containing a set of keyword entries. Dictionaries provide the means for organising entries...14. RELEASE AUTHORITY Chief, Aerospace Division 15. SECONDARY RELEASE STATEMENT OF THIS DOCUMENT Approved for Public release OVERSEAS

  13. Development of Manufacturing Technology for Fabrication of a Composite Helicopter Main Rotor Spar by Tubular Braiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    kevlar 49® fib -r over aluminum alloy mandrels, vacuum• impregnated with liquid resin, autoclave cured, and testeo. Reproducibility of fiber angles was...P.O. Box 894, Indianapolis, Indiana 46206 1 ATTN: James E. Knott , General Manager General Electric Company, 10449 St. Charles Rock Road, St. Ann

  14. Design Framework for Vibration Monitoring Systems for Helicopter Rotor Blade Monitoring Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Ramirez, Andrea; Loendersloot, Richard; Jauregui Becker, Juan Manuel; Tinga, Tiedo; Chang, F.-K

    2013-01-01

    The pursue of methods for supporting Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has been an important driver for the technological innovation in several engineering fields such as wireless communication, sensing and power harvesting. However, despite of the innovative and scientific value of these advances,

  15. Inspiring and Challenging Laboratory Exercise in Multivariable Control Theory – The Four-rotor Helicopter

    OpenAIRE

    Dag A. H. Samuelsen; Olaf H. Graven

    2012-01-01

    Engineering students in a module on multivariable control theory are given a laboratory exercise for developing their skills in practical implementation of control systems. This is done in an effort to create a more complete module that gives the students experiences in the practical sides of implementing control systems, while still being theoretically challenging and inspiring. Presenting students with this kind of real-life challenges like sub-optimal models, limited processing time and la...

  16. Inspiring and Challenging Laboratory Exercise in Multivariable Control Theory – The Four-rotor Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag A. H. Samuelsen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering students in a module on multivariable control theory are given a laboratory exercise for developing their skills in practical implementation of control systems. This is done in an effort to create a more complete module that gives the students experiences in the practical sides of implementing control systems, while still being theoretically challenging and inspiring. Presenting students with this kind of real-life challenges like sub-optimal models, limited processing time and large degree of uncertainty, is a challenging task, partly due to the need of adapting the level of complexity to the student or group of students doing the exercise in order to keep them engaged throughout the exercise, and in part due to the university's need to reduce expenses related to the administration, supervision, and execution of laboratory exercises. The possibility of adapting the complexity of the exercise to each student's skill level is important, both through the design of the exercise and through the students choosing between different models. The eager student might be tempted by the better performing, but more complex models, while the struggling student can find satisfaction in stabilising the aircraft using the less complex models. The laboratory setup presented uses low-cost components, giving low investment and maintenance costs.

  17. Two Methods for Viscous and Inviscid Free-Wake Analysis of Helicopter Rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    states that the circulation r = jCv" dx (2.7) over a material contour C (i.e.. a contour which is made up of material particles) remains constant in time (dr...function defined only over a surface. Equation 2.2 may be integrated to yield A , = constant in time (2.32) following a wake point x,. which has velocity v...points on the wake, the velocity is given by (see Eq. 2.29) v (V;( - V;p) (2.37) whereas, (see Eq. 2.32) A;p = constant in time (2.38) following x

  18. A Review of Sparsity-Based Methods for Analysing Radar Returns from Helicopter Rotor Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    ISR Division Defence Science and Technology Group PO Box 1500 Edinburgh, South Australia 5111, Australia Telephone: 1300 333 362 Facsimile: (08) 7389...nonquadratic optimization-based SAR imaging’. In: IEEE Trans. Aerosp. Electron. Syst. 39 (4), 1375–1395. 4. Moses, R. L., Potter , L. C. and Cetin, M. (Apr...Y. C. Eldar, G. K., ed. (2012) Compressed Sensing: Theory and Applications. Cambridge University Press. New York. 22. Potter , L. C. et al. (June 2010

  19. Calculation of a Helicopter Rotor in Hover by Viscous-Inviscid Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    1995-01-01

    A viscous inviscid interaction model has been developed for the calculation of steady and unsteady aerodynamic flows. The model is validfor two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows alike. We use a fully three-dimensional boundary element method as inviscid flow model, and a two-dimensional or ...

  20. Rotor Embedded with Shape Memory Alloy Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gupta

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present analysis, the fundamental natural frequency of a Jeffcott and a two-mass rotor with fibre reinforced composite shaft embedded with shape memory alloy (SMA wires is evaluated by Rayleigh's procedure. The flexibility of rotor supports is taken into account. The effect of three factors, either singly or in combination with each other, on rotor critical speed is studied. The three factors are: (i increase in Young's modulus of SMA (NITINOL wires when activated, (ii tension in wires because of phase recovery stresses, and (iii variation of support stiffness by three times because of activation of SMA in rotor supports. It is shown by numerical examples that substantial variation in rotor critical speeds can be achieved by a combination of these factors which can be effectively used to avoid resonance during rotor coast up/down.