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Sample records for twinpod physaria obcordata

  1. Predicted disappearance of Cephalantheropsis obcordata in Luofu Mountain due to changes in rainfall patterns.

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    Xin-Ju Xiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the past century, the global average temperature has increased by approximately 0.74°C and extreme weather events have become prevalent. Recent studies have shown that species have shifted from high-elevation areas to low ones because the rise in temperature has increased rainfall. These outcomes challenge the existing hypothesis about the responses of species to climate change. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With the use of data on the biological characteristics and reproductive behavior of Cephalantheropsis obcordata in Luofu Mountain, Guangdong, China, trends in the population size of the species were predicted based on several factors. The response of C. obcordata to climate change was verified by integrating it with analytical findings on meteorological data and an artificially simulated environment of water change. The results showed that C. obcordata can grow only in waterlogged streams. The species can produce fruit with many seeds by insect pollination; however, very few seeds can burgeon to become seedlings, with most of those seedlings not maturing into the sexually reproductive phase, and grass plants will die after reproduction. The current population's age pyramid is kettle-shaped; it has a Deevey type I survival curve; and its net reproductive rate, intrinsic rate of increase, as well as finite rate of increase are all very low. The population used in the artificial simulation perished due to seasonal drought. CONCLUSIONS: The change in rainfall patterns caused by climate warming has altered the water environment of C. obcordata in Luofu Mountain, thereby restricting seed burgeoning as well as seedling growth and shortening the life span of the plant. The growth rate of the C. obcordata population is in descending order, and models of population trend predict that the population in Luofu Mountain will disappear in 23 years.

  2. Seed development and hydroxy fatty acid biosynthesis in physaria lindheimeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydroxy fatty acids (HFAs) are valuable industrial raw materials used in many industries. Physaria lindheimeri (Pl) accumulates over 80% HFA, in the form of lesquerolic acid (20:1OH), in its seed oil. Understanding the seed development of Pl is an important step to utilizing this unique wild specie...

  3. 傣药倒心盾翅藤种子萌发特性初步研究%Preliminary Study on Seed Germination Characteristics of Dai Medicine Aspidopterys obcordata var.Obcordata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽霞; 牛迎凤; 李海涛; 彭朝忠; 管燕红

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究倒心盾翅藤种子的萌发特性.方法:测定倒心盾翅藤种子的形态、千粒重和含水量等指标,利用不同温度和光照、种子带翅或不带翅、不同成熟度、贮藏等处理对种子进行发芽试验,测定其发芽率、发芽势和发芽指数.结果:倒心盾翅藤种子发芽适温为25~ 35℃,其中30℃条件发芽率最高,光照或黑暗条件均可.果翅对种子的发芽率无显著影响,但会影响种子发芽速度和整齐度.不成熟种子采集后经过贮藏后熟,可显著提高发芽率.种子在室温条件下贮藏6个月,发芽率仍高达93.68%,但贮藏12个月后发芽率显著下降.结论:倒心盾翅藤种子属于高温萌发型、光中性种子;种子最适贮藏时间不超过1年.%Objective: To study seed Germination characteristics of Aspidopterys obcordata var. Obcordata. Method: The morphological characters, 1 000-grains weight and moisture content of A. Obcordata var. Obcordata seed were observed. And studied different temperature and light, seeds with or without wings, seed maturity and storage on the seed germination. Result: The optimal germination temperature of A. Obcordata var. Obcordata seeds was 25 t to 35 °C , and seed germination percentage reached a peak at 30 °C. Seeds could germinate no matter in light or dark. The fruit wings had no significant effect an seed germination percentage,but it showed significant effects on the germination energy and germination index. The germination percentages of immature seeds were evidently increased after a period of storage and after-ripening. The seed germination ratio was still as high as 93.68% after seeds were storied for 6 months at room temperature,but it dropped significantly after for 12 months. Conclusion: Aspidopterys obcordata var. Obcordata seeds belonged to the high-temperature-germinating and non-photoblastic type. The most suitable storing time for the seeds was less than 12 months.

  4. Quantification of the molecular species of tetraacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) Oil by HPLC and MS

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    Thirteen molecular species of tetraacylglycerols in the seed oil of Physaria fendleri were recently identified. We report here the quantification of these tetraacylglycerols using HPLC with evaporative light scattering detector and the MS of the HPLC fractions. Ion signal intensities of MS1 from th...

  5. Quantification of the molecular species of diacylglycerols,triacylglycerols and tetraacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil by HPLC and MS

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    Ten diacylglycerols (DAG), 74 triacylglycerols (TAG) and 13 tetraacylglycerols in the seed oil of Physaria fendleri were recently identified by HPLC and MS. These acylglycerols (AG) were quantified by HPLC with evaporative light scattering detector and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of th...

  6. Identification of multiple lipid genes with modifications in expression and sequence associated with the evolution of hydroxy fatty acid accumulation in Physaria fendleri.

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    Horn, Patrick J; Liu, Jinjie; Cocuron, Jean-Christophe; McGlew, Kathleen; Thrower, Nicholas A; Larson, Matt; Lu, Chaofu; Alonso, Ana P; Ohlrogge, John

    2016-05-01

    Two Brassicaceae species, Physaria fendleri and Camelina sativa, are genetically very closely related to each other and to Arabidopsis thaliana. Physaria fendleri seeds contain over 50% hydroxy fatty acids (HFAs), while Camelina sativa and Arabidopsis do not accumulate HFAs. To better understand how plants evolved new biochemical pathways with the capacity to accumulate high levels of unusual fatty acids, transcript expression and protein sequences of developing seeds of Physaria fendleri, wild-type Camelina sativa, and Camelina sativa expressing a castor bean (Ricinus communis) hydroxylase were analyzed. A number of potential evolutionary adaptations within lipid metabolism that probably enhance HFA production and accumulation in Physaria fendleri, and, in their absence, limit accumulation in transgenic tissues were revealed. These adaptations occurred in at least 20 genes within several lipid pathways from the onset of fatty acid synthesis and its regulation to the assembly of triacylglycerols. Lipid genes of Physaria fendleri appear to have co-evolved through modulation of transcriptional abundances and alterations within protein sequences. Only a handful of genes showed evidence for sequence adaptation through gene duplication. Collectively, these evolutionary changes probably occurred to minimize deleterious effects of high HFA amounts and/or to enhance accumulation for physiological advantage. These results shed light on the evolution of pathways for novel fatty acid production in seeds, help explain some of the current limitations to accumulation of HFAs in transgenic plants, and may provide improved strategies for future engineering of their production.

  7. Impact of Lygus spp. (Hemiptera: Miridae) on damage, yield and quality of lesquerella (Physaria fendleri), a potential new oil-seed crop.

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    Naranjo, Steven E; Ellsworth, Peter C; Dierig, David A

    2011-10-01

    Lesquerella, Physaria fendleri (A. Gray) S. Watson, is a mustard native to the western United States and is currently being developed as a commercial source of valuable hydroxy fatty acids that can be used in a number of industrial applications, including biolubricants, biofuel additives, motor oils, resins, waxes, nylons, plastics, corrosion inhibitors, cosmetics, and coatings. The plant is cultivated as a winter-spring annual and in the desert southwest it harbors large populations of arthropods, several of which could be significant pests once production expands. Lygus spp. (Hemiptera: Miridae) are common in lesquerella and are known pests of a number of agronomic and horticultural crops where they feed primarily on reproductive tissues. A 4-yr replicated plot study was undertaken to evaluate the probable impact of Lygus spp. on production of this potential new crop. Plant damage and subsequent seed yield and quality were examined relative to variable and representative densities of Lygus spp. (0.3-4.9 insects per sweep net) resulting from variable frequency and timing of insecticide applications. Increasing damage to various fruiting structures (flowers [0.9-13.9%], buds [1.2-7.1%], and seed pods [19.4-42.5%]) was significantly associated with increasing pest abundance, particularly the abundance of nymphs, in all years. This damage, however, did not consistently translate into reductions in seed yield (481-1,336 kg/ha), individual seed weight (0.5-0.7 g per 1,000 seed), or seed oil content (21.8-30.4%), and pest abundance generally explained relatively little of the variation in crop yield and quality. Negative effects on yield were not sensitive to the timing of pest damage (early versus late season) but were more pronounced during years when potential yields were lower due to weed competition and other agronomic factors. Results suggest that if the crop is established and managed in a more optimal fashion, Lygus spp. may not significantly limit yield

  8. 78 FR 47059 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Physaria...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ..., plants receive full sunlight for most of the day (Schotz 2011, p. 5) and herbaceous species that are... open, sunny exposures of limestone outcrops of the Bangor formation within glade plant communities that... sunlight to whorled sunflower plants for most of the day, and which support vegetation characteristic of...

  9. Quantification of TAG and DAG in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil by HPLC and MS

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    Castor oil has many industrial uses because of its high content (90%) of the hydroxy fatty acid, ricinoleic acid (OH1218:19). Lesquerella oil containing lesquerolic acid (Ls, OH1420:111, 56.5%) is potentially useful in industry. Ten diacylglycerols (DAG) and 74 triacylglycerols (TAG) in the seed oil...

  10. 78 FR 47109 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Status for Physaria globosa (Short's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... (switch grass). Other common herbaceous associates include Bidens bipinnata (Spanish needles), Carex cherokeensis (Cherokee sedge), Hypericum sphaerocarpum (roundseed St. Johnswort), Helianthus...

  11. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

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    The ratios of regioisomers of 72 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lesquerella oil. The ratios of ion signal intensities (or relative abundances) of ...

  12. Host plant preference of Lygus hesperus exposed to three desert-adapted industrial crops

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    The desert-adapted crops vernonia (Centrapalus pauciflorus), lesquerella (Physaria fendleri), and camelina (Camelina sativa) are being grown in the arid southwestern USA as potential feedstock for biofuel and/or other environmentally friendly products. A plant feeding choice test was conducted to de...

  13. Trends in literature on new oilseed crops and related species: Seeking evidence of increasing or waning interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibliographic records on eight new crop species Camelina, Crambe, Cuphea, Physaria, Limnanthes, Stokesia, Thlaspi, and Vernonia from Agricola, CAB Abstracts, Scopus, and Web of Science were analyzed for historical and recent trends in the areas of research, author distribution, and quantity and impa...

  14. Biotechnology for improving hydroxy fatty acid production in lesquerella

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    P Lesquerella [Physaria fendleri (A. Gray)], formerly Lesquerella fendleri, (Brassicaceae), being developed as a new industrial oilseed crop in the southwestern region of the United States, is valued for its unusual hydroxy fatty acid (HFA) in seed. The majority of HFA in lesquerella is lesquerolic...

  15. Expression of castor LPAT2 enhances ricinoleic acid content at the sn-2 position of triacylglycerols in lesquerella seed

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    Lesquerella (Physaria fendelri) is a potential crop for hydroxy fatty acid (HFA) production. Its seed triacylglcerols (TAGs) contain 55–60% lesquerolic acid (20:1OH), mostly at the sn-1 and the sn-3 positions of TAG. Castor (Ricinus communis) TAGs contain 90% of ricinoleic acid (18:1OH) which is est...

  16. Phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences confirm a unique plant intercontinental disjunction between tropical Africa, the Caribbean, and the Hawaiian Islands.

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    Namoff, Sandra; Luke, Quentin; Jiménez, Francisco; Veloz, Alberto; Lewis, Carl E; Sosa, Victoria; Maunder, Mike; Francisco-Ortega, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacers and 5.8 regions of the nuclear ribosomal DNA and of the trnH-psbA spacer of the chloroplast genome confirm that the three taxa of the Jacquemontia ovalifolia (Choicy) Hallier f. complex (Convolvulaceae) form a monophyletic group. Levels of nucleotide divergence and morphological differentiation among these taxa support the view that each should be recognized as distinct species. These three species display unique intercontinental disjunction, with one species endemic to Hawaii (Jacquemontia sandwicensis A. Gray.), another restricted to eastern Mexico and the Antilles [Jacquemontia obcordata (Millspaugh) House], and the third confined to East and West Africa (J. ovalifolia). The Caribbean and Hawaiian species are sister taxa and are another example of a biogeographical link between the Caribbean Basin and Polynesia. We provide a brief conservation review of the three taxa based on our collective field work and investigations; it is apparent that J. obcordata is highly threatened and declining in the Caribbean.

  17. Selenium hyperaccumulators harbor a diverse endophytic bacterial community characterized by high selenium resistance and plant growth promoting properties

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    Martina eSura - de Jong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se-rich plants may be used to provide dietary Se to humans and livestock, and also to clean up Se-polluted soils or waters. This study focused on endophytic bacteria of plants that hyperaccumulate selenium (Se to 0.5-1% of dry weight. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis was used to compare the diversity of endophytic bacteria of hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae and Astragalus bisulcatus (Fabaceae with those from related non-accumulators Physaria bellii (Brassicaceae and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae collected on the same, seleniferous site. Hyperaccumulators and non-accumulators showed equal T-RF diversity. Parsimony analysis showed that T-RFs from individuals of the same species were more similar to each other than to those from other species, regardless of plant Se content or spatial proximity. Cultivable endophytes from hyperaccumulators S. pinnata and A. bisulcatus were further identified and characterized. The 66 bacterial morphotypes were shown by MS MALDI-TOF Biotyper analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to include strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Staphylococcus, Paenibacillus, Advenella, Arthrobacter and Variovorax. Most isolates were highly resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM and all could reduce selenite to red elemental Se, reduce nitrite and produce siderophores. Seven isolates were selected for plant inoculation and found to have plant growth promoting properties, both in pure culture and when co-cultivated with crop species Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae or M. sativa. There were no effects on plant Se accumulation. We conclude that Se hyperaccumulators harbor an endophytic bacterial community in their natural seleniferous habitat that is equally diverse to that of comparable non-accumulators. The hyperaccumulator endophytes are characterized by high Se resistance, capacity to produce elemental Se and plant growth promoting properties.

  18. Root traits contributing to plant productivity under drought.

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    Comas, Louise H; Becker, Steven R; Cruz, Von Mark V; Byrne, Patrick F; Dierig, David A

    2013-11-05

    Geneticists and breeders are positioned to breed plants with root traits that improve productivity under drought. However, a better understanding of root functional traits and how traits are related to whole plant strategies to increase crop productivity under different drought conditions is needed. Root traits associated with maintaining plant productivity under drought include small fine root diameters, long specific root length, and considerable root length density, especially at depths in soil with available water. In environments with late season water deficits, small xylem diameters in targeted seminal roots save soil water deep in the soil profile for use during crop maturation and result in improved yields. Capacity for deep root growth and large xylem diameters in deep roots may also improve root acquisition of water when ample water at depth is available. Xylem pit anatomy that makes xylem less "leaky" and prone to cavitation warrants further exploration holding promise that such traits may improve plant productivity in water-limited environments without negatively impacting yield under adequate water conditions. Rapid resumption of root growth following soil rewetting may improve plant productivity under episodic drought. Genetic control of many of these traits through breeding appears feasible. Several recent reviews have covered methods for screening root traits but an appreciation for the complexity of root systems (e.g., functional differences between fine and coarse roots) needs to be paired with these methods to successfully identify relevant traits for crop improvement. Screening of root traits at early stages in plant development can proxy traits at mature stages but verification is needed on a case by case basis that traits are linked to increased crop productivity under drought. Examples in lesquerella (Physaria) and rice (Oryza) show approaches to phenotyping of root traits and current understanding of root trait genetics for breeding.

  19. Root traits contributing to plant productivity under drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eComas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Geneticists and breeders are positioned to breed plants with root traits that improve productivity under drought. However, a better understanding of root functional traits and how traits are related to whole plant strategies to increase crop productivity under different drought conditions is needed. Root traits associated with maintaining plant productivity under drought include small fine root diameters, long specific root length (SRL, and considerable root length density, especially at depths in soil with available water. In environments with late season water deficits, small xylem diameters in targeted seminal roots save soil water deep in the soil profile for use during crop maturation and result in improved yields. Capacity for deep root growth and large xylem diameters in deep roots may also improve root acquisition of water when ample water at depth is available. Xylem pit anatomy that makes xylem less ‘leaky’ and prone to cavitation warrants further exploration holding promise that such traits may improve plant productivity in water-limited environments without negatively impacting yield under adequate water conditions. Rapid resumption of root growth following soil rewetting may improve plant productivity under episodic drought. Genetic control of many of these traits through breeding appears feasible. Several recent reviews have covered methods for screening root traits but an appreciation for the complexity of root systems (e.g. functional differences between fine and coarse roots needs to be paired with these methods to successfully identify relevant traits for crop improvement. Screening of root traits at early stages in plant development can proxy traits at mature stages but verification is needed on a case by case basis that traits are linked to increased crop productivity under drought. Examples in lesquerella (Physaria and rice (Oryza show approaches to phenotyping of root traits and current understanding of root trait