WorldWideScience

Sample records for twenty-two laboratory columns

  1. Complex conductivity results to silver nanoparticles in partically saturated laboratory columns

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Laboratory complex conductivity data from partially saturated sand columns with silver nanoparticles. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: It involves...

  2. The effect of redox conditions and adaptation time on organic micropollutant removal during river bank filtration: A laboratory-scale column study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelkamp, C; Verliefde, A R D; Schoutteten, K; Vanhaecke, L; Vanden Bussche, J; Singhal, N; van der Hoek, J P

    2016-02-15

    This study investigated the redox dependent removal and adaptive behaviour of a mixture of 15 organic micropollutants (OMPs) in laboratory-scale soil columns fed with river water. Three separate pilot systems were used consisting of: (1) two columns, (2) ten columns and (3) twenty two columns to create oxic, suboxic (partial nitrate removal) and anoxic (complete nitrate removal). The pilot set-up has some unique features--it can simulate fairly long residence times (e.g., 45 days using the 22 column system) and reduced conditions developed naturally within the system. Dimethoate, diuron, and metoprolol showed redox dependent removal behaviour with higher biodegradation rates in the oxic zone compared to the suboxic/anoxic zone. The redox dependent behaviour of these three OMPs could not be explained based on their physico-chemical properties (hydrophobicity, charge and molecular weight) or functional groups present in the molecular structure. OMPs that showed persistent behaviour in the oxic zone (atrazine, carbamazepine, hydrochlorothiazide and simazine) were also not removed under more reduced conditions. Adaptive behaviour was observed for five OMPs: dimethoate, chloridazon, lincomycin, sulfamethoxazole and phenazone. However, the adaptive behaviour could not be explained by the physico-chemical properties (hydrophobicity, charge and molecular weight) investigated in this study and only rough trends were observed with specific functional groups (e.g. ethers, sulphur, primary and secondary amines). Finally, the adaptive behaviour of OMPs was found to be an important factor that should be incorporated in predictive models for OMP removal during river bank filtration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Using polymer mats to biodegrade atrazine in groundwater: laboratory column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, B. M.; Franzmann, P. D.; Davis, G. B.; Elbers, J.; Zappia, L. R.

    2002-02-01

    Large-scale column experiments were undertaken to evaluate the potential of in situ polymer mats to deliver oxygen into groundwater to induce biodegradation of the pesticides atrazine, terbutryn and fenamiphos contaminating groundwater in Perth, Western Australia. The polymer mats, composed of woven silicone (dimethylsiloxane) tubes and purged with air, were installed in 2-m-long flow-through soil columns. The polymer mats proved efficient in delivering dissolved oxygen to anaerobic groundwater. Dissolved oxygen concentrations increased from biodegradation rates, suggesting that organic carbon was not limiting biodegradation. Atrazine degradation rates estimated in the column experiments were similar to rates determined in laboratory culture experiments, using pure cultures of atrazine-mineralising bacteria. No significant degradation of terbutryn or fenamiphos was observed under the experimental conditions within the time frames of the study. Results from these experiments indicate that remediation of atrazine in a contaminated aquifer may be achievable by delivery of oxygen using an in situ polymer mat system.

  4. Laboratory column studies for evaluating a barrier system for providing oxygen and substrate for TCE biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, C M; Chen, S C; Su, M C

    2001-08-01

    The industrial solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is among the most ubiquitous chlorinated compounds found in groundwater contamination. The objective of this study was to develop a biobarrier system containing oxygen-organic releasing material to enhance the aerobic cometabolism of TCE in situ. The oxygen-organic material, which contains calcium peroxide and peat, is able to release oxygen and primary substrates continuously upon contact with water. Batch experiments were conducted to design and identify the components of the oxygen-organic releasing material, and evaluate the oxygen and organic substrate (presented as COD equivalent) release from the designed oxygen-organic material. The observed oxygen and chemical oxygen demand (COD) release rates were approximately 0.0246 and 0.052 mg/d/g of material, respectively. A laboratory-scale column experiment was then conducted to evaluate the feasibility of this proposed system for the bioremediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater. This system was performed using a series of continuous-flow glass columns including a soil column, an oxygen-organic material column, followed by two consecutive soil columns. Aerobic acclimated sludges were inoculated in all three soil columns to provide microbial consortia for TCE biodegradation. Simulated TCE-contaminated groundwater with a flow rate of 0.25 l/day was pumped into this system. Effluent samples from each column were analyzed for TCE and other indicating parameters (e.g., pH, dissolved oxygen). Results show that the decreases in TCE concentrations were observed over a 4-month operating period. Up to 99% of TCE removal efficiency was obtained in this passive system. Results indicate that the continuously released oxygen and organic substrates from the oxygen-organic materials enhanced TCE biotransformation. Thus, the biobarrier treatment scheme has the potential to be developed into an environmentally and economically acceptable remediation technology.

  5. Investigating Controls on Denitrification Rates During Managed Aquifer Recharge: Linking Field and Laboratory Column Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, G.; Beganskas, S.; Weir, W. B.; Karim, P.; Saltikov, C.; Hernandez, J.; Fisher, A. T.

    2016-12-01

    We present initial results from a series of laboratory column experiments aimed at elucidating the underlying controls on water quality improvement during managed aquifer recharge (MAR). During field infiltration experiments, we have observed decreases in nitrate (NO3-) concentrations of up to 20% at infiltration rates as high as 15 m/day in the presence of woodchips, but no nitrate removal in the absence of woodchips at slower infiltration rates. These results suggest that the extent of nitrate removal is strongly influenced by the rate of infiltrating water and the presence of a carbon amendment in the form of redwood chips or biochar, which facilitates microbial processing. We probe these relationships at a finer spatial scale with laboratory flow-through column experiments. The columns are constructed as analogues to field experiments, with fluid and substrate sampled directly from field sites. Each day, we sample fluid along the length of the column during experiments to analyze for nitrate, dissolved oxygen, and dissolved organic carbon, in order to track changes in redox conditions and biogeochemistry. The experimental setup allows us to finely control the fluid flow rate and fluid residence time, in order to quantify the relationship between nitrate removal rate and total infiltration rate over a wider range of conditions than is possible during field studies. To determine how the addition of reactive media might increase nitrate removal rates, we conduct side-by-side comparisons of native soil and soil amended with a carbon source. We also analyze changes in nitrate isotope enrichment and microbial ecology to gain a better understanding of the microbial processes and communities responsible for nitrate removal. These field and lab experiments are helping us learn how fluid flow rate, soil type, and availability of carbon sources influences nitrate removal during infiltration for MAR, which can improve the quality of MAR water resources.

  6. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  7. Model prediction uncertainty of bromide and pesticides transport in laboratory column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal; Snehota, Michal; Sobotkova, Martina; Ray, Chittaranjan; Vogel, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of transport parameters of reactive solutes such as pesticides is a prerequisite for reliable predictions of their fate and transport in soil porous systems. Water flow and transport of bromide tracer and five pesticides (atrazine, imazaquin, sulfometuron methyl, S-metolachlor, and imidacloprid) through an undisturbed soil column of tropical Oxisol were analyzed using a one-dimensional numerical model. Laboratory column leaching experiment with three flow interruptions was conducted. The applied numerical model is based on Richards' equation for solving water flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solving solute transport. A global optimization method was used to evaluate the model's sensitivity to transport parameters and the uncertainty of model predictions. Within the Monte Carlo modeling framework, multiple forward simulations searching through the parametric space, were executed to describe the observed breakthrough curves. All pesticides were found to be relatively mobile. Experimental data indicated significant non-conservative behavior of bromide tracer. All pesticides, with the exception of imidacloprid, were found less persistent. Three of the five pesticides (atrazine, sulfometuron methyl, and S-metolachlor) were better described by the linear kinetic sorption model, while the breakthrough curves of imazaquin and imidacloprid were more appropriately approximated using nonlinear instantaneous sorption. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the model is most sensitive to sorption distribution coefficient. The prediction limits contained most of the measured points of the experimental breakthrough curves, indicating adequate model concept and model structure for the description of transport processes in the soil column under study.

  8. Performance of a Novel Gas Separation Research Column at Sanford Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanson Chiller, Angela; Chiller, Christopher; Mei, Dongming

    2014-03-01

    A world-wide rise in demand for ultrapure materials has necessitated innovation in the production of low impurity and isotopically separated materials that either has not been utilized in these new applications or relies on aging or energy intensive methods. These materials are sought after for large physics investigations, nuclear non-proliferation detection industries, medical imaging and new frontiers in electronic applications. Techniques in separating and purifying nuclear magnetic resonance isotopes of carbon, oxygen, xenon, krypton, and nitrogen are being developed at Sanford Laboratory, Lead, SD. A two-meter laboratory scale selective phase change column designed specifically for real-time sampling of the gas space at specific temperature and pressure is operated at gas/liquid and gas/solid equilibrium temperatures and pressures for selected gases. We report initial results and future applications. Research Funded by SD Governors 2010 Center.

  9. Insight into the dynamics of granular column collapse using Discrete Element Methods and laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hugo; Mangeney, Anne; Farin, Maxime; Richard, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of granular flows is still an open issue. In particular, quantitative agreement between the detailed dynamics of the flow and laboratory experiments is necessary to better constrain the performance and limits of the models. We propose here to compare quantitatively the flow profiles and the force during granular column collapse simulated using Discrete Element Models and laboratory experiments. These small scale experiments are performed with dry granular material released initially from a cylinder on a sloping plane. The flow profiles and the acoustic signal generated by the granular impacts and stresses on the plane are recorded systematically [Farin et al., 2015]. These experiments are simulated using the Discrete Element Method Modys [Richard et al., 2000]. We show that the effect of the removing gate should be taken into account in the model in order to quantatively reproduce the flow dynamics. Furthermore we compare the simulated and observed acoustic signals that are generated by the fluctuating stresses exerted by the grains on the substrate in different frequency bands. [1] P. Richard et Luc Oger. 2000 Etude de la géométrie de milieux granulaires modèles tridimensionnels par simulation numérique. [2] Farin, M., Mangeney, A., Toussaint, R., De Rosny, J., Shapiro, N., Dewez, T., Hibert, C., Mathon, C., Sedan, O., Berger. 2015, Characterization of rockfalls from seismic signal: insights from laboratory experiments

  10. Redox-sensitivity and mobility of selected pharmaceutical compounds in a laboratory column experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzhaf, S.; Nödler, K.; Licha, T.; Krein, A.; Scheytt, T.

    2012-04-01

    Laboratory column experiments are suitable to investigate the sediment water interaction and to study the transport behaviour of solutes. Processes like retardation and degradation can be identified and quantified. The conducted experiment, which is closely connected to a field study in Luxembourg, investigated the transport behaviour of selected pharmaceutical compounds and their redox-dependent metabolism under water saturated conditions. Fine-grained natural sediment with a low hydraulic conductivity from a study site in Luxembourg was filled into the column. The water for the experiment was taken from a small stream at the same fieldsite. It was spiked with four pharmaceutical compounds (carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen, sulfamethoxazole) with concentrations between 170 and 300 ng/L for the different substances. The chosen pharmaceuticals were also detected in groundwater and surface water samples at the study site and used to qualify exchange/mixing of surface water and groundwater (BANZHAF et al., 2011). As some of the substances are known to exhibit redox-sensitive degradation, the redox-conditions were systematically varied throughout the experiment. This was realised by adding nitrate at the inflow of the column. During the experiment, which lasted for 2.5 months, four different nitrate concentrations (20-130 mg/L) were applied, beginning with the highest concentration. During the experiment water from the reservoir tank was sampled daily in order to detect a potential degradation of the pharmaceutical compounds before they enter the column. The effluent water was sampled every three hours to guarantee a maximum resolution for the analysis of the pharmaceuticals where necessary. In addition, major ions were analysed in the influent and effluent samples. Throughout the experiment physicochemical parameters (oxidation reduction potential (ORP), dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity, and pH-value) were measured and logged at the outflow of the column

  11. Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Weimin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Criddle, Craig S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-11-16

    We (the Stanford research team) were invited as external collaborators to contribute expertise in environmental engineering and field research at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN, for projects carried out at the Argonne National Laboratory and funded by US DOE. Specifically, we assisted in the design of batch and column reactors using ORNL IFRC materials to ensure the experiments were relevant to field conditions. During the funded research period, we characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments in batch microcosm and column experiments conducted at ANL, and we communicated with ANL team members through email and conference calls and face-to-face meetings at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings. Microcosm test results demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) when amended with ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but unknown U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. Due to budget reductions at ANL, Stanford contributions ended in 2011.

  12. Removal of PAHs from laboratory columns simulating the humus upper layer of vertical flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, N; Merlin, G

    2008-10-01

    Removal of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs (fluoranthene, pyrene and benzo(k)fluoranthene) from two types of PAH-contaminated effluents was investigated using four laboratory columns filled with two different organic media: a green compost and a layer coming from the first stage of vertical flow constructed wetlands. Synthetic runoff polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were fed through the columns during a period of two months. After a period of hydrodynamic stabilisation, the results showed a great adsorption of PAHs (>95%) on the solid media due to their large adsorption capacities. Leaching of these compounds by water was monitored. The concentrations of PAHs in leaching samples indicated that PAHs were strongly adsorbed on organic substrates and that lixiviation was limited. Fluoranthene metabolites were also investigated. Accumulation of metabolites was transitory and located in the first few cm of the media, as was observed for PAH concentrations. A toxicity test of leachates based on the inhibition of the bioluminescence of luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri indicated a low inhibition which can be enhanced by metal traces.

  13. Laboratory analogue of a supersonic accretion column in a binary star system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. E.; Gregori, G.; Foster, J. M.; Graham, P.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J. -M.; Busschaert, C.; Charpentier, N.; Danson, C. N.; Doyle, H. W.; Drake, R. P.; Fyrth, J.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Kuranz, C. C.; Loupias, B.; Michaut, C.; Mouchet, M.; Patankar, S.; Skidmore, J.; Spindloe, C.; Tubman, E. R.; Woolsey, N.; Yurchak, R.

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical flows exhibit rich behaviour resulting from the interplay of different forms of energy—gravitational, thermal, magnetic and radiative. For magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, material from a late, main sequence star is pulled onto a highly magnetized (B>10 MG) white dwarf. The magnetic field is sufficiently large to direct the flow as an accretion column onto the poles of the white dwarf, a star subclass known as AM Herculis. A stationary radiative shock is expected to form 100–1,000 km above the surface of the white dwarf, far too small to be resolved with current telescopes. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment showing the evolution of a reverse shock when both ionization and radiative losses are important. We find that the stand-off position of the shock agrees with radiation hydrodynamic simulations and is consistent, when scaled to AM Herculis star systems, with theoretical predictions. PMID:27291065

  14. Laboratory analogue of a supersonic accretion column in a binary star system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J E; Gregori, G; Foster, J M; Graham, P; Bonnet-Bidaud, J-M; Busschaert, C; Charpentier, N; Danson, C N; Doyle, H W; Drake, R P; Fyrth, J; Gumbrell, E T; Koenig, M; Krauland, C; Kuranz, C C; Loupias, B; Michaut, C; Mouchet, M; Patankar, S; Skidmore, J; Spindloe, C; Tubman, E R; Woolsey, N; Yurchak, R; Falize, É

    2016-06-13

    Astrophysical flows exhibit rich behaviour resulting from the interplay of different forms of energy-gravitational, thermal, magnetic and radiative. For magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, material from a late, main sequence star is pulled onto a highly magnetized (B>10 MG) white dwarf. The magnetic field is sufficiently large to direct the flow as an accretion column onto the poles of the white dwarf, a star subclass known as AM Herculis. A stationary radiative shock is expected to form 100-1,000 km above the surface of the white dwarf, far too small to be resolved with current telescopes. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment showing the evolution of a reverse shock when both ionization and radiative losses are important. We find that the stand-off position of the shock agrees with radiation hydrodynamic simulations and is consistent, when scaled to AM Herculis star systems, with theoretical predictions.

  15. Validating the Goldstein-Wehner Law for the Stratified Positive Column of DC Discharge in an Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisovskiy, V. A.; Koval, V. A.; Artushenko, E. P.; Yegorenkov, V. D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we suggest a simple technique for validating the Goldstein-Wehner law for a stratified positive column of dc glow discharge while studying the properties of gas discharges in an undergraduate laboratory. To accomplish this a simple device with a pre-vacuum mechanical pump, dc source and gas pressure gauge is required. Experiments may…

  16. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study reports twenty-two Hispanic leaders' responses to interviews assessing their perspectives on the nature, prevalence, and causes of poverty among Hispanics. This report contains six parts. Part 1 is an introduction. Part 2 presents the methodology used in the study. Part 3 gives the leaders' demographic and educational backgrounds. Part…

  17. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study reports twenty-two Hispanic leaders' responses to interviews assessing their perspectives on the nature, prevalence, and causes of poverty among Hispanics. This report contains six parts. Part 1 is an introduction. Part 2 presents the methodology used in the study. Part 3 gives the leaders' demographic and educational backgrounds. Part…

  18. Response of Atmospheric-Methane Oxidation to Methane-Flux Manipulation in a Laboratory Soil-Column Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, M. H.; Mignola, I.; Henneberger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Upland soils are an important sink for atmospheric methane (CH4). Uptake of atmospheric CH4 in soils is generally diffusion limited, and is mediated by aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria (MOB) that possess a high-affinity form of a key enzyme, allowing CH4 consumption at near-atmospheric concentrations (≤ 1.9 µL/L). As cultivation attempts for these high-affinity MOB have shown little success, there remains much speculation regarding their functioning in different environments. For example, it is frequently assumed that they are highly sensitive to physical disturbance, but their response in activity and abundance to changes in substrate availability remains largely unknown. We present results of a laboratory column experiment conducted to investigate the response in activity and abundance of high-affinity MOB to an increase in CH4 flux. Intact soil cores, collected at a field site where atmospheric CH4 oxidation activity is frequently quantified, were transferred into two 1-m-long, 12-cm-dia. columns. The columns were operated at constant temperature in the dark, their headspace being continuously flushed with air. Diffusive gas-transport conditions were maintained in the reference column, whereas CH4 flux was increased in several steps in the treatment column by inducing advective gas flow using a diaphragm pump. Soil-gas samples periodically collected from ports installed along the length of the columns were analyzed for CH4 content. Together with measurements of soil-water content, atmospheric CH4 oxidation was quantified using the soil-profile method. First results indicate that atmospheric CH4 oxidation activity comparable with the field was maintained in the reference column throughout the experiment. Moreover, high-affinity MOB quickly adjusted to an increase in CH4 flux in the treatment column, efficiently consuming CH4. Quantification of MOB abundance is currently ongoing. Our data provide new insights into controls on atmospheric CH4 oxidation in soils.

  19. Remediation of PCE-contaminated aquifer by an in situ two-layer biobarrier: laboratory batch and column studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, C M; Chen, S C; Wang, J Y; Chen, Y L; Lee, S Z

    2003-01-01

    The industrial solvent tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is among the most ubiquitous chlorinated compounds found in groundwater contamination. The objective of this study was to develop an in situ two-layer biobarrier system consisting of an organic-releasing material layer followed by an oxygen-releasing material layer. The organic-releasing material, which contained sludge cakes from a domestic wastewater treatment plant, is able to release biodegradable organics continuously. The oxygen-releasing material, which contained calcium peroxide, is able to release oxygen continuously upon contact with water. The first organic-releasing material layer was to supply organics (primary substrates) to reductively dechlorinate PCE in situ. The second oxygen-releasing material layer was to release oxygen to aerobic biodegrade or cometabolize PCE degradation byproducts from the first anaerobic layer. Batch experiments were conducted to design and identify the components of the organic and oxygen-releasing materials, and evaluate the organic substrate (presented as chemical oxygen demand (COD) equivalent) and oxygen release rates from the organic-releasing material and oxygen-releasing materials, respectively. The observed oxygen and COD release rates were approximately 0.0368 and 0.0416 mg/d/g of material, respectively. A laboratory-scale column experiment was then conducted to evaluate the feasibility of this proposed system for the bioremediation of PCE-contaminated groundwater. This system was performed using a series of continuous-flow glass columns including a soil column, an organic-releasing material column, two consecutive soil columns, and an oxygen-releasing material column, followed by two other consecutive soil columns. Anaerobic acclimated sludges were inoculated in the first four columns, and aerobic acclimated sludges were inoculated in the last three columns to provide microbial consortia for contaminant biodegradation. Simulated PCE-contaminated groundwater with a

  20. Effects of Heterogeneous Adsorption Affinity on Natural Organic Matter (NOM) Transport in Laboratory Sand Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis, D. P.; Bolster, D.; Maurice, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Transport of reactive sorbing solutes through porous media is commonly quantified by implementing an effective retardation coefficient in the advection-dispersion equation (ADE), which describes dispersion in accordance with Fick's law. However, anomalous (non-Fickian) transport behavior can be observed in systems with heterogeneous retardation coefficients (Dentz & Castro, 2009). In such systems, the ADE is unable to reproduce the non-Fickian nature of plume shapes and breakthrough curves, motivating the development and application of alternative solute transport theories, such as the continuous time random walk (CTRW) or multi-rate mass transfer (MRMT). Heterogeneity in retardation coefficients in practice arises from variability in the geochemical properties controlling sorption-desorption kinetics between the solute and mineral surfaces. These distributions have been described in the context of heterogeneity of the porous medium, but to date little attention has been given to the potential role of a geochemically heterogeneous solute. In this work, we consider a system in which anomalous transport arises during the passage of natural organic matter (NOM), a polydisperse mixture of compounds derived from the breakdown of plants and microorganisms in the environment, through homogeneous laboratory sand columns. NOM solutions were passed through columns containing either hematite, corundum, or a naturally-coated quartz sand at a variety of pH and ionic strength conditions. Influent and effluent NOM concentration was measured as UV absorbance at 254 nm. The resulting breakthrough curves are non-Fickian, displaying power-law tailing at late times. Such curves cannot be predicted by the ADE model. Reactivity of NOM components is known to be related to their molecular weight (MW), which tends to be log-normally distributed in aquatic NOM isolates (Cabaniss et al., 2000). Low-MW compounds are more water-soluble, have a higher diffusion coefficient, and due to their

  1. Laboratory evaporation experiments in undisturbed peat columns for determining peat soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmann, U.; Frahm, E.; Bechtold, M.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge about hydraulic properties of organic soils is crucial for the interpretation of the hydrological situation in peatlands. This in turn is the basis for designing optimal rewetting strategies, for assessing the current and future climatic water balance and for quantifying greenhouse gas emissions of CO2, CH4 and N2O, which are strongly controlled by the depth of the peat water table. In contrast to mineral soils, the hydraulic properties of organic soils differ in several aspects. Due to the high amount of organic components, strong heterogeneity, and shrinkage and swelling of peat, accompanied by changing soil volume and bulk density, the applicability of standard hydraulic functions developed for mineral soils for describing peat soil moisture dynamics is often questioned. Hence, the objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of the commonly applied van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) parameterization and to evaluate model errors for various peat types. Laboratory column experiments with undisturbed peat soils (diameter: 30 cm, height: 20 cm) from 5 different peatlands in Germany were conducted. In numerical simulations using HYDRUS-1D the experimental data were used for an inverse estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters. Using the VGM parameterization, the model errors between observed and measured pressure heads were quantified with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 20 - 65 cm. The RMSE increased for soils with higher organic carbon content and higher porosity. Optimizing the VGM 'tortuosity' parameter (τ) instead of fixing it to its default of 0.5 strongly reduced the RMSE, especially for the soils that showed high pressure head gradients during the experiment. Due to the fact, that very negative pressure heads in peatlands occur rarely, we reduced the range of pressured heads in the inversion to a 'field-relevant' range from 0 to -200 cm which strongly reduced the RMSE to 6 - 12 cm and makes the VGM parameterization applicable for all

  2. Reductive dissolution of Mn oxides in river-recharged aquifers: a laboratory column study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrunic, B. M.; MacQuarrie, K. T. B.; Al, T. A.

    2005-01-01

    River-recharged aquifers are developed for drinking water supplies in many parts of the world. Often, however, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) present in the infiltrating river water causes biogeochemical reactions to occur in the adjacent aquifer that create elevated Mn and Fe. Mn concentrations in groundwater from some of the production wells installed in the aquifer at Fredericton, New Brunswick exceed the Canadian Drinking Water Guideline of 9.1×10 -4 mmol/l by up to 5.5×10 -2 mmol/l. It has previously been hypothesized that the influx of DOC from the Saint John River is causing bacterially mediated reductive dissolution of Mn oxides in the aquifer system, leading to elevated aqueous Mn concentrations. Previous work was limited to the collection of water samples from production wells and several observation wells installed in the glacial outwash aquifer. The objective of this study was to investigate the biogeochemical controls on Mn concentrations using sand-filled columns. One column was inoculated with bacteria while a second column was treated with ethanol in order to decrease the microbial population initially present in the system. Both columns received the same influent solution that contained acetate as a source of DOC. The results of the experiments suggested that the two main controls on Mn concentrations in the columns were microbially mediated reductive dissolution of Mn oxides and cation exchange. The conceptual model that was developed based on the experimental data was supported by the results obtained using a one-dimensional reactive-transport model. The reductive dissolution of Mn oxides in the aquifer sands could be adequately simulated using dual-Monod kinetics. Similar trends are observed in the experimental data and field data collected from Production Well 5, located in the Fredericton Aquifer. From the experiments, it is evident that cation-exchange reactions may be an important geochemical control on Mn concentrations during the initial

  3. Topical melagenine for repigmentation in twenty-two child patients with vitiligo on the scalp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许爱娥; 尉晓冬

    2004-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of topical melagenine for repigmentation in child patients with vitiligo on the scalp. Methods Twenty-two child patients with vitiligo on the scalp were treated with 1.2 mg/ml aqueous melagenine in combination with 20 minutes of infrared exposure twice daily. Results In 4 patients (18.2%), melagenine treatment in combination with infrared exposure led to complete recovery; in 6 patients (27.3%), treatment was shown to be effective; in 8 patients(36.3%), treatment led to improvements in patient condition; and only 4 patients (18.2%) showed no response after 1 -2 treatment sessions. The general effective rate of melagenine-infrared combination treatment was 45. 5% for the children with vitiligo on the scalp, and treatment was accompanied by minimal side effects.Conclusion Melagenine may be efficacious and a safe treatment option for childhood vitiligo affecting the scalp.

  4. Simulation of estrogen transport and behavior in laboratory soil columns using a cellular automata model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingcai; Shi, Jianghong; Liu, Xiaowei; Wu, Wei; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Hui

    2013-03-01

    A cellular automata model (CA model) was used to simulate the soil column leaching process of estrogens during the processes of migration and transformation. The results of the simulated leaching experiment showed that the first-order degradation rates of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), 17β-estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1) were 0.131 h- 1 for E2, 0.099 h- 1 for E1 and 0.064 h- 1 for EE2 in the EE2 and E2 leaching process, and the first-order sorption rates were 5.94 h- 1 for E2, 5.63 h- 1 for EE2, 3.125 h- 1 for E1. Their sorption rates were positively correlated with the n-octanol/water partition coefficients. When the diffusion rate was low, its impact on the simulation results was insignificant. The increase in sorption and degradation rates caused the decrease in the total estrogens that leached. In addition, increasing the sorption rate could delay the emerging time of the maximum concentration of estrogen that leached, whereas increasing the degradation rate could shorten the emerging time of the maximum concentration of estrogen that leached. The comparison made between the experimental data and the simulation results of the CA model and the HYDRUS-1D software showed that the establishment of one-component and multi-component CA models could simulate EE2 and E2 soil column leaching processes, and the CA models achieve an intuitive, dynamic, and visual simulation.

  5. Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, G.O. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Dept.

    1998-04-01

    Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with {sup 3}H, {sup 22}Na, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Np, {sup 228}Th, {sup 232}U and {sup 241}Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The {sup 3}H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics.

  6. Toxicity of twenty-two plant essential oils against pathogenic bacteria of vegetables and mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorović, Biljana; Potočnik, Ivana; Rekanović, Emil; Stepanović, Miloš; Kostić, Miroslav; Ristić, Mihajlo; Milijašević-Marčić, Svetlana

    2016-12-01

    ASBTRACT Toxicity of twenty-two essential oils to three bacterial pathogens in different horticultural systems: Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (causing blight of bean), Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (bacterial wilt and canker of tomato), and Pseudomonas tolaasii (causal agent of bacterial brown blotch on cultivated mushrooms) was tested. Control of bacterial diseases is very difficult due to antibiotic resistance and ineffectiveness of chemical products, to that essential oils offer a promising alternative. Minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations are determined by applying a single drop of oil onto the inner side of each plate cover in macrodilution assays. Among all tested substances, the strongest and broadest activity was shown by the oils of wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens), oregano (Origanum vulgare), and lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus. Carvacrol (64.0-75.8%) was the dominant component of oregano oils, while geranial (40.7%) and neral (26.7%) were the major constituents of lemongrass oil. Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli was the most sensitive to plant essential oils, being susceptible to 19 oils, while 11 oils were bactericidal to the pathogen. Sixteen oils inhibited the growth of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and seven oils showed bactericidal effects to the pathogen. The least sensitive species was Pseudomonas tolaasii as five oils inhibited bacterial growth and two oils were bactericidal. Wintergreen, oregano, and lemongrass oils should be formulated as potential biochemical bactericides against different horticultural pathogens.

  7. Lead Biosorption by Self-Immobilized Rhizopus nigricans Pellets in a Laboratory Scale Packed Bed Column: Mathematical Model and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Kogej

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosorption of lead ions from aqueous solution on a self-immobilized Rhizopus nigricans biomass has been studied. Experiments were performed in a laboratory scale packed bed column at different liquid flow rates and biosorbent bed heights. Recorded experimental breakthrough curves were compared to those predicted by a mathematical model, which was developed to simulate a packed bed biosorption process by a soft, self-immobilized fungal biosorbent. In the range of examined experimental conditions, the biomass characteristics such as pellet porosity and biosorption capacity substantially affected the predicted response curve. General correlations for the estimation of the intra-pellet effective diffusivity, the external mass transfer coefficient, as well as axial dispersion were successfully applied in this biological system with specific mechanical properties. Under the experimental conditions, mass transfer is controlled by the external film resistance, while the intra-pellet mass transfer resistance, as well as the effect of axial dispersion, can be neglected. A new parameter α, the fraction of active biomass, with an average value of α=0.7, was introduced to take into account the specific biomass characteristics, and consequently the observed non-ideal liquid flow through the bed of fungal pellets.

  8. A microfluidic device for preparing next generation DNA sequencing libraries and for automating other laboratory protocols that require one or more column chromatography steps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Jin Tan

    Full Text Available Library preparation for next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS remains a key bottleneck in the sequencing process which can be relieved through improved automation and miniaturization. We describe a microfluidic device for automating laboratory protocols that require one or more column chromatography steps and demonstrate its utility for preparing Next Generation sequencing libraries for the Illumina and Ion Torrent platforms. Sixteen different libraries can be generated simultaneously with significantly reduced reagent cost and hands-on time compared to manual library preparation. Using an appropriate column matrix and buffers, size selection can be performed on-chip following end-repair, dA tailing, and linker ligation, so that the libraries eluted from the chip are ready for sequencing. The core architecture of the device ensures uniform, reproducible column packing without user supervision and accommodates multiple routine protocol steps in any sequence, such as reagent mixing and incubation; column packing, loading, washing, elution, and regeneration; capture of eluted material for use as a substrate in a later step of the protocol; and removal of one column matrix so that two or more column matrices with different functional properties can be used in the same protocol. The microfluidic device is mounted on a plastic carrier so that reagents and products can be aliquoted and recovered using standard pipettors and liquid handling robots. The carrier-mounted device is operated using a benchtop controller that seals and operates the device with programmable temperature control, eliminating any requirement for the user to manually attach tubing or connectors. In addition to NGS library preparation, the device and controller are suitable for automating other time-consuming and error-prone laboratory protocols requiring column chromatography steps, such as chromatin immunoprecipitation.

  9. Attenuation of landfill leachate by UK Triassic sandstone aquifer materials. 2. Sorption and degradation of organic pollutants in laboratory columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Steven F.; Bright, Mildred I.; Lerner, David N.; Tellam, John H.

    2000-05-01

    The sorption and degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and 13 organic micropollutants (BTEX, aromatic hydrocarbons, chloro-aromatic and -aliphatic compounds, and pesticides) in acetogenic and methanogenic landfill leachate was studied in laboratory columns containing Triassic sandstone aquifer materials from the English Midlands. Solute sorption and degradation relationships were evaluated using a simple transport model. Relative to predictions, micropollutant sorption was decreased up to eightfold in acetogenic leachate, but increased up to sixfold in methanogenic leachate. This behaviour reflects a combination of interactions between the micropollutants, leachate DOM and aquifer mineral fraction. Sorption of DOM was not significant. Degradation of organic fractions occurred under Mn-reducing and SO 4-reducing conditions. Degradation of some micropollutants occurred exclusively under Mn-reducing conditions. DOM and benzene were not significantly degraded under the conditions and time span (up to 280 days) of the experiments. Most micropollutants were degraded immediately or after a lag phase (32-115 days). Micropollutant degradation rates varied considerably (half-lives of 8 to >2000 days) for the same compounds (e.g., TeCE) in different experiments, and for compounds (e.g., naphthalene, DCB and TeCA) within the same experiment. Degradation of many micropollutants was both simultaneous and sequential, and inhibited by the utilisation of different substrates. This mechanism, in combination with lag phases, controls micropollutant degradation potential in these systems more than the degradation rate. These aquifer materials have a potentially large capacity for in situ bioremediation of organic pollutants in landfill leachate and significant degradation may occur in the Mn-reducing zones of leachate plumes. However, degradation of organic pollutants in acetogenic leachate may be limited in aquifers with low pH buffering capacity and reducible Mn oxides

  10. Chapter Twenty Two

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    As a matter of fact, the act of writing novel in English language in Africa began ... advent of European colonial masters and the myths with which they have been ..... According to Odili, the surrogate author: “A common saying, in the country after.

  11. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz eSeiffert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872 and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1 to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  12. Reactive-transport modeling of fly ash-wate-brines interactions from laboratory-scale column studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbugua, John M.; Catherine Ngila, J.; Kindness, Andrew; Demlie, Molla

    Dynamic leaching tests are important studies that provide more insights into time-dependent leaching mechanisms of any given solid waste. Hydrogeochemical modeling using PHREEQC was applied for column modeling of two ash recipes and brines generated from South African coal utility plants, Sasol and Eskom. The modeling results were part of a larger ash-brine study aimed at acquiring knowledge on (i) quantification and characterization of the products formed when ash is in contact with wate-brines in different scenarios, (ii) the mineralogical changes associated with wate-brine-ash interactions over time, (iii) species concentration, and (iv) leaching and transport controlling factors. The column modeling was successfully identified and quantified as important reactive mineralogical phases controlling major, minor and trace elements' release. The pH of the solution was found to be a very important controlling factor in leaching chemistry. The highest mineralogical transformation took place in the first 10 days of ash contact with either water or brines, and within 0.1 m from the column inflow. Many of the major and trace elements Ca, Mg, Na, K, Sr, S(VI), Fe, are leached easily into water systems and their concentration fronts were high at the beginning (within 0.1 m from the column inflow and within the first 10 days) upon contact with the liquid phase. However, their concentration decreased with time until a steady state was reached. Modeling results also revealed that geochemical reactions taking place during ash-wate-brine interactions does affect the porosity of the ash, whereas the leaching processes lead to increased porosity. Besides supporting experimental data, modeling results gave predictive insights on leaching of elements which may directly impact on the environment, particularly ground water. These predictions will help develop scenarios and offer potential guide for future sustainable waste management practices as a way of addressing the co

  13. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Franz; Bandow, Nicole; Kalbe, Ute; Milke, Ralf; Gorbushina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB) are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872) and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm) were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1) to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i) the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii) by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  14. Laboratory-scale column study for remediation of TCE-contaminated aquifers using three-section controlled-release potassium permanganate barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Baoling; Li, Fei; Chen, Yanmei; Fu, Ming-Lai

    2013-05-01

    A laboratory-scale study with a sand column was designed to simulate trichloroethylene (TCE) pollution in the aquifer environment with three-section controlled-release potassium permanganate (CRP) barriers. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of CRP barriers in remediation of TCE in aquifers in a long-term and controlled manner. CRP particles with a 1:3 molar ratio of KMnO4 to stearic acid showed the best controlled-release properties in pure water, and the theoretical release time was 138.5 days. The results of TCE removal in the test column indicated that complete removal efficiency of TCE in a sand column by three-section CRP barriers could be reached within 15 days. The molar ratio of KMnO4 to TCE in the three-section CRP barriers was 16:1, which was much lower than 82:1 as required when KMnO4 solution is used directly to achieve complete destruction of TCE. This result revealed that the efficiency of CRP for remediation of TCE was highly improved after encapsulation.

  15. Laboratory-scale column study for remediation of TCE-contaminated aquifers using three-section controlled-release potassium permanganate barriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baoling Yuan; Fei Li; Yanmei Chen; Ming-Lai Fu

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory-scale study with a sand column was designed to simulate trichloroethylene (TCE) pollution in the aquifer environment with three-section controlled-release potassium permanganate (CRP) barriers.The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of CRP barriers in remediation of TCE in aquifers in a long-term and controlled manner.CRP particles with a 1:3 molar ratio of KMnO4 to stearic acid showed the best controlled-release properties in pure water,and the theoretical release time was 138.5 days.The results of TCE removal in the test column indicated that complete removal efficiency of TCE in a sand column by three-section CRP barriers could be reached within 15 days.The molar ratio of KMnO4 to TCE in the three-section CRP barriers was 16:1,which was much lower than 82∶1 as required when KMnO4 solution is used directly to achieve complete destruction of TCE.This result revealed that the efficiency of CRP for remediation of TCE was highly improved after encapsulation.

  16. A Laboratory Experiment To Measure Henry's Law Constants of Volatile Organic Compounds with a Bubble Column and a Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Mukherjee, Souptik; Brewer, Brittany; Ryan, Raphael; Yu, Huan; Gangoda, Mahinda

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to measure Henry's law constants of organic compounds using a bubble column and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). This experiment is designed for upper-division undergraduate laboratory courses and can be implemented in conjunction with physical chemistry, analytical…

  17. A Laboratory Experiment To Measure Henry's Law Constants of Volatile Organic Compounds with a Bubble Column and a Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Mukherjee, Souptik; Brewer, Brittany; Ryan, Raphael; Yu, Huan; Gangoda, Mahinda

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to measure Henry's law constants of organic compounds using a bubble column and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). This experiment is designed for upper-division undergraduate laboratory courses and can be implemented in conjunction with physical chemistry, analytical…

  18. Biosurfactant-producing and oil-degrading Bacillus subtilis strains enhance oil recovery in laboratory sand-pack columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiña, Eduardo J; Pereira, Jorge F B; Costa, Rita; Coutinho, João A P; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2013-10-15

    Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) technology uses microorganisms and their metabolites to retrieve unrecoverable oil from mature reservoirs. In situ stimulation of biosurfactant-producing and oil-degrading microorganisms reduces the capillary forces retaining the oil inside the reservoir and decreases its viscosity, thus promoting oil flow and consequently production. In this work, a sand-pack column model was designed to simulate oil recovery operations and evaluate mobilization of residual oil by the selected microorganisms. Four different hydrocarbon mixtures and three Bacillus subtilis strains isolated from crude oil samples were used. Additional oil recoveries ranged from 6 to 24% depending on the hydrocarbon mixture and microorganism used. Biosurfactant production was observed with all the microorganisms and hydrocarbon mixtures studied. The oils recovered after incubation with B. subtilis isolates showed a reduction in the percentage of long-chain n-alkanes and lower viscosity when compared with the original oils. The results obtained suggest that stimulation of the selected B. subtilis strains in situ can contribute to mobilize entrapped oil in mature reservoirs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A new treatment strategy for severe arthrofibrosis of the knee. A review of twenty-two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Jin-Zhong; He, Yao-Hua

    2006-06-01

    To reduce the morbidity of traditional quadricepsplasty for the treatment of severe arthrofibrosis of the knee, we instituted a treatment regimen consisting of an initial extra-articular mini-invasive quadricepsplasty and subsequent intra-articular arthroscopic lysis of adhesions during the same anesthesia session. The purpose of the present study was to determine the results of this technique. From 1998 to 2001, twenty-two patients with severely arthrofibrotic knees were managed with this operative technique. The mean age of the patients at the time of the operation was thirty-seven years. After a mean duration of follow-up of forty-four months (minimum, twenty-four months), all patients were evaluated according to the criteria of Judet and The Hospital for Special Surgery knee-rating system. The average maximum degree of flexion increased from 27 degrees preoperatively to 115 degrees at the time of the most recent follow-up (p < 0.001). According to the criteria of Judet, the result was excellent for sixteen knees, good for five, and fair for one. The average Hospital for Special Surgery knee score improved from 74 points preoperatively to 94 points at the time of the most recent follow-up (p < 0.001). A superficial wound infection occurred in one patient. Only one patient had a persistent 15 degrees extension lag. This mini-invasive operation for the severely arthrofibrotic knee can be used to increase the range of motion and enhance functional outcome.

  20. Microbially mediated clinoptilolite regeneration in a multifunctional permeable reactive barrier used to remove ammonium from landfill leachate contamination: laboratory column evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooten, Thomas Van; Diels, Ludo; Bastiaens, Leen

    2010-05-01

    This study focuses on multifunctional permeable reactive barrier (multibarrier) technology, combining microbial degradation and abiotic ion exchange processes for removal of ammonium from landfill leachate contamination. The sequential multibarrier concept relies on the use of a clinoptilolite-filled buffer compartment to ensure a robust ammonium removal in case of temporary insufficient microbial activities. An innovative strategy was developed to allow in situ clinoptilolite regeneration. Laboratory-scale clinoptilolite-filled columns were first saturated with ammonium, using real landfill leachate as well as synthetic leachates as feed media. Other inorganic metal cations, typically present in landfill leachate, had a detrimental influence on the ammonium removal capacity by competing for clinoptilolite exchange sites. On the other hand, the metals had a highly favorable impact on regeneration of the saturated material. Feeding the columns with leachate deprived from ammonium (e.g., by microbial nitrification in an upgradient compartment), resulted in a complete release of the previously sorbed ammonium from the clinoptilolite, due to exchange with metal cations present in the leachate. The released ammonium is then available for microbial consumption in a downgradient compartment. The regeneration process resulted in a slightly increased ammonium exchange capacity afterward. The described strategy throws a new light on sustainable use of sorption materials for in situ groundwater remediation, by avoiding the need for material replacement and the use of external chemical regenerants.

  1. Effects of pulsed and oscillatory flow on water vapor removal from a laboratory soil column. Final report, November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, K.E.

    1993-05-01

    Subsurface contamination by volatile organic contaminants (VOC`s) in the vadose zone and groundwater is primarily due to leaking underground storage tanks and industrial spills. Soil vapor extraction is a technique that is being used successfully to remove VOC`s from the subsurface. A flow of air is established through the soil to remove the vapor phase component of the contaminant. Soil vapor extraction will initially remove high levels of contaminant that is already present in the macropores. The concentration will start to decline as the removal from the soil matrix becomes limited by diffusion of contaminant from regions away from the air flow paths. This study examines potential methods of overcoming the diffusion limitation by adding an oscillatory component to the steady air flow and by pulsed flow, which involves turning air flow on and off at predetermined intervals. The study considered only the removal of water from the soil to try to establish general vapor behavior in the soil under the imposed conditions. Based on a statistical analysis, both the oscillatory and pulsed flow showed an improved water removal rate over the steady state flow. The effect of oscillatory flow was only examined at higher frequencies. The literature indicates that oscillations at lower frequencies may be more effective. Pulsed flow showed the most efficient removal of water compared to steady state conditions. The pulsed flow was most efficient because rather than reducing the diffusion limitation, the system would shut down and wait for diffusion to occur. This optimizes energy consumption, but does not reduce treatment time. The oscillatory flow actually reduced the diffusion limitation within the column which could result in a shorter treatment time.

  2. Screening of antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate extracts of phylum Mollusca from South East Coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pankaj Gupta; Muthuvel Arumugam; Raj Vardhan Azad; Rohit Saxena; Supriyo Ghose; Nihar Ranjan Biswas; Thirumurthy Velpandian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate species of Phylum Mollusca from south east coast of India.Methods:Live specimens of molluscan species were collected and their methanolic extracts were evaluated for preliminary antiangiogenic activity using the in ovo chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay. The extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity using chemical cautery induced corneal neovascularization assay in rats and oxygen induced retinopathy assay in rat pups.Results:In the chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay, four methanolic extracts of marine molluscan species viz. Meretrix meretrix, Meretrix casta, Telescopium telescopium and Bursacrumena methanolic extracts exhibited noticeable antiangiogenic activity at the tested concentration of 200 µg whereby they significantly inhibited the VEGF induced proliferation of new blood vessels. Among these four extracts, the methanolic extract of Meretrix casta exhibited relatively higher degree of antiangiogenic activity with an inhibitiory percentage (64.63%) of the VEGF induced neovascularization followed by the methanolic extracts of Telescopium telescopium (62.02%), Bursa crumena (60.48%) and Meretrix meretrix (47.01%). These four methanolic extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity whereby the methanolic extract of Telescopium telescopium exhibited most noticeable inhibition (42.58%) of the corneal neovascularization in rats in comparison to the sham treated group, and also exhibited most noticeable inhibition (31.31%) of the oxygen induced retinal neovascularization in rat pups in comparison to the hyperoxia group that was observed for considerable retinal neovascularization.Conclusions:The significant antiangiogenic activity evinced by the extract of Telescopium telescopium merits further investigation for ocular neovascular diseases.

  3. Twenty-Two Years of Combined GPS Daily Coordinate Time Series and Derived Parameters: Implications for ITRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Y.; Kedar, S.; Moore, A. W.; Fang, P.; Liu, Z.; Owen, S. E.; Squibb, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA-funded "Solid Earth Science ESDR System (SESES)" MEaSUREs project publishes long-term Earth Science Data Records (ESDRs), the result of a combined solution of independent daily JPL (GIPSY-OASIS software) and SIO (GAMIT software) GPS analyses, using a common source of metadata from the SOPAC database. The project has now produced up to twenty-two years of consistent, calibrated and validated ESDR products for over 3200 GPS stations from Western North America, other plate boundaries, and global networks made available through the GPS Explorer data portal and NASA's CDDIS archive. The combined solution of daily coordinate time series uses SOPAC h-files and JPL STACOV files as input to the st_filter software. The combined time series are then fit with the analyze_tseri software for daily positions/displacements, secular velocities, coseismic and postseismic displacements, as well as annual and semi-annual signatures and non-coseismic offsets due primarily to equipment (antenna) changes. Published uncertainties for the estimated parameters take into account temporal noise in the daily coordinate time series. The resulting residual coordinate time series with typical daily RMS values of 1.5-4.0 mm in the horizontal and 4.0-8.0 mm in the vertical can then can be mined for other signals such as transient deformation associated with earthquake tremor and slip (ETS) and hydrological effects. As part of this process we have catalogued and characterized coseismic displacements due to more than 80 earthquakes affecting over hundreds of regional and global stations, as well as significant postseismic deformation for the larger events. The larger events can affect stations 1000's of km from the earthquake epicenters and thus significantly affect the positions of stations used in defining the reference frame. We discuss the implications and contributions of our ongoing analysis to the long-term maintenance of the international terrestrial reference frame.

  4. Analysis of Twenty-Two Performance Properties of Diesel, Gasoline, and Jet Fuels Using a Field-Portable Near-Infrared (NIR) Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Carl; Smith, Wayne; Shende, Chetan; Gladding, Zack; Farquharson, Stuart; Morris, Robert E; Cramer, Jeffrey A; Schmitigal, Joel

    2016-05-01

    The change in custody of fuel shipments at depots, pipelines, and ports could benefit from an analyzer that could rapidly verify that properties are within specifications. To meet this need, the design requirements for a fuel analyzer based on near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, such as spectral region and resolution, were examined. It was found that the 1000 to 1600 nm region, containing the second CH overtone and combination vibrational modes of hydrocarbons, provided the best near-infrared to fuel property correlations when path length was taken into account, whereas 4 cm(-1) resolution provided only a modest improvement compared to 16 cm(-1) resolution when four or more latent variables were used. Based on these results, a field-portable near-infrared fuel analyzer was built that employed an incandescent light source, sample compartment optics to hold 2 mL glass sample vials with ∼1 cm path length, a transmission grating, and a 256 channel InGaAs detector that measured the above stated wavelength range with 5-6 nm (∼32 cm(-1)) resolution. The analyzer produced high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of samples in 5 s. Twenty-two property correlation models were developed for diesel, gasoline, and jet fuels with root mean squared error of correlation - cross-validated values that compared favorably to corresponding ASTM reproducibility values. The standard deviations of predicted properties for repeat measurements at 4, 24, and 38℃ were often better than ASTM documented repeatability values. The analyzer and diesel property models were tested by measuring seven diesel samples at a local ASTM certification laboratory. The standard deviations between the analyzer determined values and the ASTM measured values for these samples were generally better than the model root mean squared error of correlation-cross-validated values for each property.

  5. Detection of respiratory viruses and bacteria in children using a twenty-two target reverse-transcription real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Chelsey; Misir, Amita; Hui, Charles; Jabbour, Mona; Barrowman, Nicholas; Langill, Jonathan; Bowes, Jennifer; Slinger, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Rapid detection of the wide range of viruses and bacteria that cause respiratory infection in children is important for patient care and antibiotic stewardship. We therefore designed and evaluated a ready-to-use 22 target respiratory infection reverse-transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) panel to determine if this would improve detection of these agents at our pediatric hospital. RT-qPCR assays for twenty-two target organisms were dried-down in individual wells of 96 well plates and saved at room temperature. Targets included 18 respiratory viruses and 4 bacteria. After automated nucleic acid extraction of nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) samples, rapid qPCR was performed. RT-qPCR results were compared with those obtained by the testing methods used at our hospital laboratories. One hundred fifty-nine pediatric NPA samples were tested with the RT-qPCR panel. One or more respiratory pathogens were detected in 132/159 (83%) samples. This was significantly higher than the detection rate of standard methods (94/159, 59%) (Pviruses, bocavirus, and coronaviruses. The panel internal control assay performance remained stable at room temperature storage over a two-month testing period. The RT-qPCR panel was able to identify pathogens in a high proportion of respiratory samples. The panel detected more positive specimens than the methods in use at our hospital. The pre-made panel format was easy to use and rapid, with results available in approximately 90 minutes. We now plan to determine if use of this panel improves patient care and antibiotic stewardship.

  6. Transport of microbial tracers in clean and organically contaminated silica sand in laboratory columns compared with their transport in the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Louise, E-mail: louise.weaver@esr.cri.nz; Sinton, Lester W.; Pang, Liping; Dann, Rod; Close, Murray

    2013-01-15

    Waste disposal on land and the consequent transport of bacterial and viral pathogens in soils and aquifers are of major concern worldwide. Pathogen transport can be enhanced in the presence of organic matter due to occupation of attachment sites in the aquifer materials thus preventing pathogen attachment leading to their faster transport for longer distances. Laboratory column studies were carried out to investigate the effect of organic matter, in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), on the transport of Escherichia coli and MS2 phage in saturated clean silica sand. Transport rates of these microbial tracers were also studied in a contaminated field site. Laboratory column studies showed that low concentrations (0.17 mg L{sup −1}) of DOC had little effect on E. coli J6-2 removal and slightly reduced the attachment of MS2 phage. After progressive conditioning of the column with DOC (1.7 mg L{sup −1} and 17 mg L{sup −1}), neither E. coli J6-2 nor MS2 phage showed any attachment and recovery rates increased dramatically (up to 100%). The results suggest that DOC can affect the transport rates of microbial contaminants. For E. coli J6-2 the predominant effect appeared to be an increase in the secondary energy minimum leading to an increase in E. coli attachment initially. However, after 17 mg L{sup −1} DOC conditioning of the silica sand no attachment of E. coli was observed as the DOC took up attachment sites in the porous media. MS2 phage appeared to be affected predominantly by out-competition of binding sites in the clean silica sand and a steady reduction in attachment was observed as the DOC conditioning increased. Field study showed a high removal of both E. coli and MS2 phage, although E. coli was removed at a lower rate than MS2 phage. In the field it is likely that a combination of effects are seen as the aquifer material will be heterogeneous in its surface nanoscale properties, demonstrated by the differing removal of E. coli and MS2 phage

  7. Column flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohmuench, J.N.; Norrgran, D.A.; Luttrell, E.; Luttrell, G.H. [Virginia Tech. (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Over the last decade, column flotation has been recognised in the industry to be most efficient and economical means of recovering fine coal while maximizing product grade. When designed properly, flotation columns provide a high combustible recovery while maintaining a low product ash. The paper looks at the benefits of using column flotation for fine coal recovery. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Impact of sludge stabilization processes and sludge origin (urban or hospital) on the mobility of pharmaceutical compounds following sludge landspreading in laboratory soil-column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachassagne, Delphine; Soubrand, Marilyne; Casellas, Magali; Gonzalez-Ospina, Adriana; Dagot, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of sludge stabilization treatments (liming and anaerobic digestion) on the mobility of different pharmaceutical compounds in soil amended by landspreading of treated sludge from different sources (urban and hospital). The sorption and desorption potential of the following pharmaceutical compounds: carbamazepine (CBZ), ciprofloxacin (CIP), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), salicylic acid (SAL), ibuprofen (IBU), paracetamol (PAR), diclofenac (DIC), ketoprofen (KTP), econazole (ECZ), atenolol (ATN), and their solid-liquid distribution during sludge treatment (from thickening to stabilization) were investigated in the course of batch testing. The different sludge samples were then landspread at laboratory scale and leached with an artificial rain simulating 1 year of precipitation adapted to the surface area of the soil column used. The quality of the resulting leachate was investigated. Results showed that ibuprofen had the highest desorption potential for limed and digested urban and hospital sludge. Ibuprofen, salicylic acid, diclofenac, and paracetamol were the only compounds found in amended soil leachates. Moreover, the leaching potential of these compounds and therefore the risk of groundwater contamination depend mainly on the origin of the sludge because ibuprofen and diclofenac were present in the leachates of soils amended with urban sludge, whereas paracetamol and salicylic acid were found only in the leachates of soils amended with hospital sludge. Although carbamazepine, ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, ketoprofen, econazole, and atenolol were detected in some sludge, they were not present in any leachate. This reflects either an accumulation and/or (bio)degradation of these compounds (CBZ, CIP, SMX, KTP, ECZ, and ATN ), thus resulting in very low mobility in soil. Ecotoxicological risk assessment, evaluated by calculating the risk quotients for each studied pharmaceutical compound, revealed no high risk due to the

  9. Reading Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Coutts, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Reading Columns are twin permanent public sculptures commissioned as part of a £245m scheme for the redevelopment of the Chatham Place area in Reading. Dimensions: 3.5m high x 1.3m diameter each Field of knowledge: The work consists of twin bespoke columns of stainless steel and glass over digital colour transparencies. The piece revisits and reworks the idea of the Morris Column, a 19th C feature characteristic of major European metropolitan centres. A wraparound image on each of ...

  10. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of pesticides in water by C-18 solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Smith, Steven G.; Fehlberg, Kevin M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 41 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in natural-water samples using C-18 solid-phase extraction and determination by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the pesticides. The columns are dried using carbon dioxide or nitrogen gas, and adsorbed pesticides are removed from the columns by elution with 3.0 milliliters of hexane-isopropanol (3:1). Extracted pesticides are determined by capillary- column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 4 micrograms per liter (g/L) for most pesticides, with the exception of widely used corn herbicides--atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor--which have upper concentration limits of 20 g/L. Single- operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.001 to 0.018 g/L. Average short-term single-operator precision in reagent- water samples is 7 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 8 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. Mean recoveries in reagent-water samples are 73 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 83 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on the solid-phase extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time.

  11. PULSE COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  12. Column: lef

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reep, Frans van der

    2012-01-01

    1e alinea column: Ook in je beleggingsbeslissingen is het voor echte performance wellicht tijd om eens voorbij best practices (dan word je namelijk hoogstens tweede) te kijken naar next practices. Als je op zeker speelt, verdien je weinig geld. Want anderen gingen je al voor. Maar kun je nog meer op

  13. Geophysical surveys combined with laboratory soil column experiments to identify and explore risk areas for soil and water pollution in feedlots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo-Pérez, Antonio Jesus; Sainato, Claudia Mabel; Jairo Márquez-Molina, John; Giráldez, Juan Vicente; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Changes of land use without a correct planning may produce its deterioration with their social, economical and environmental irreversible consequences over short to medium time range. In Argentina, the expansion of soybean fields induced a reduction of the area of pastures dedicated to stockbreeding. As cattle activity is being progressively concentrated on small pens, at feedlots farms, problems of soil and water pollution, mainly by nitrate, have been detected. The characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of soil water content is very important because the mostly advective transport of solutes. To avoid intensive soil samplings, very expensive, one has to recur to geophysical exploration methods. The objective of this work was to identify risk areas within a feedlot of the NW zone of Buenos Aires Province, in Argentina through geophysical methods. The surveys were carried out with an electromagnetic induction profiler EMI-400 (GSSI) and a Time domain Reflectometry (TDR) survey of depth 0-0.10 m with soil sampling and measurement of moisture content with gravimetric method (0-1.0 m). Several trenches were dug inside the pens and also at a test site, where texture, apparent density, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), electrical conductivity of the saturation paste extract and organic matter content (OM) were measured. The water retention curves for these soils were also determined. At one of the pens undisturbed soil columns were extracted at 3 locations. Laboratory analysis for 0-1.0 m indicated that soil texture was classified as sandy loam, average organic matter content (OM) was greater than 2.3% with low values of apparent density in the first 10 cm. The range of spatial dependence of data suggested that the number of soil samples could be reduced. Soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and soil moisture were well correlated and indicated a clear spatial pattern in the corrals. TDR performance was acceptable to identify the spatial

  14. Optimized determination of trace jet fuel volatile organic compounds in human blood using in-field liquid-liquid extraction with subsequent laboratory gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis and on-column large-volume injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Pleil, J D

    2001-03-05

    A practical and sensitive method to assess volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from JP-8 jet fuel in human whole blood was developed by modifying previously established liquid-liquid extraction procedures, optimizing extraction times, solvent volume, specific sample processing techniques, and a new on-column large-volume injection method for GC-MS analysis. With the optimized methods, the extraction efficiency was improved by 4.3 to 20.1 times and the detection sensitivity increased up to 660 times over the standard method. Typical detection limits in the parts-per-trillion (ppt) level range were achieved for all monitored JP-8 constituents; this is sufficient for assessing human fuels exposures at trace environmental levels as well as occupational exposure levels. The sample extractions are performed in the field and only solvent extracts need to be shipped to the laboratory. The method is implemented with standard biological laboratory equipment and a modest bench-top GC-MS system.

  15. Degradation of toluene by a mixed population of archetypal aerobes, microaerophiles, and denitrifiers: laboratory sand column experiment and multispecies biofilm model formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Su; Jaffé, Peter R

    2008-02-01

    An experiment was conducted in a saturated sand column with three bacterial strains that have different growth characteristics on toluene, Pseudomonas putida F1 which degrades toluene only under aerobic conditions, Thauera aromatica T1 which degrades toluene only under denitrifying conditions, and Ralstonia pickettii PKO1 has a facultative nature and can perform nitrate-enhanced biodegradation of toluene under hypoxic conditions (DO concentration profiles showed that oxygen and nitrate appeared to be utilized simultaneously, regardless of the dissolved oxygen concentration and the results from fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that PKO1 maintained stable cells numbers throughout the column, even when the pore water oxygen concentration was high. Since PKO1's growth rate under aerobic condition is much lower than that of F1, except under hypoxic conditions, these observations were not anticipated. Therefore these observations require a mechanistic explanation that can account for localized low oxygen concentrations under aerobic conditions. To simulate the observed dynamics, a multispecies biofilm model was implemented. This model formulation assumes the formation of a thin biofilm that is composed of the three bacterial strains. The individual strains grow in response to the substrate and electron acceptor flux from bulk fluid into the biofilm. The model was implemented such that internal changes in bacterial composition and substrate concentration can be simulated over time and space. The model simulations from oxic to denitrifying conditions compared well to the experimental profiles of the chemical species and the bacterial strains, indicating the importance of accounting for the biological activity of individual strains in biofilms that span different redox conditions. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Preparation of tamarind fruit seed activated carbon by microwave heating for the adsorptive treatment of landfill leachate: A laboratory column evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, K Y; Lee, L K; Hameed, B H

    2013-04-01

    The preparation of tamarind fruit seed granular activated carbon (TSAC) by microwave induced chemical activation for the adsorptive treatment of semi-aerobic landfill leachate has been attempted. The chemical and physical properties of TSAC were examined. A series of column tests were performed to determine the breakthrough characteristics, by varying the operational parameters, hydraulic loading rate (5-20 mL/min) and adsorbent bed height (15-21 cm). Ammonical nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand (COD), which provide a prerequisite insight into the prediction of leachate quality was quantified. Results illustrated an encouraging performance for the adsorptive removal of ammonical nitrogen and COD, with the highest bed capacity of 84.69 and 55.09 mg/g respectively, at the hydraulic loading rate of 5 mL/min and adsorbent bed height of 21 cm. The dynamic adsorption behavior was satisfactory described by the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models. The findings demonstrated the applicability of TSAC for the adsorptive treatment of landfill leachate.

  17. Tropospheric vertical column densities of NO2 over managed dryland ecosystems (Xinjiang, China): MAX-DOAS measurements vs. 3-D dispersion model simulations based on laboratory-derived NO emission from soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtimin, B.; Behrendt, T.; Badawy, M. M.; Wagner, T.; Qi, Y.; Wu, Z.; Meixner, F. X.

    2015-01-01

    We report on MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 over an oasis-ecotone-desert ecosystem in NW China. There, local ambient NO2 concentrations originate from enhanced biogenic NO emission of intensively managed soils. Our target oasis "Milan" is located at the southern edge of the Taklimakan desert, very remote and well isolated from other potential anthropogenic and biogenic NOx sources. Four observation sites for MAX-DOAS measurements were selected, at the oasis centre, downwind and upwind of the oasis, and in the desert. Biogenic NO emissions in terms of (i) soil moisture and (ii) soil temperature of Milan oasis (iii) different land-cover type sub-units (cotton, Jujube trees, cotton/Jujube mixture, desert) were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. Net potential NO fluxes were up-scaled to oasis scale by areal distribution and classification of land-cover types derived from satellite images using GIS techniques. A Lagrangian dispersion model (LASAT, Lagrangian Simulation of Aerosol Transport) was used to calculate the dispersion of soil emitted NO into the atmospheric boundary layer over Milan oasis. Three-dimensional (3-D) NO concentrations (30 m horizontal resolution) have been converted to 3-D NO2 concentrations, assuming photostationary state conditions. NO2 column densities were simulated by suitable vertical integration of modelled 3-D NO2 concentrations at those downwind and upwind locations, where the MAX-DOAS measurements were performed. Downwind-upwind differences (a direct measure of Milan oasis' contribution to the areal increase of ambient NO2 concentration) of measured and simulated slant (as well as vertical) NO2 column densities show excellent agreement. This agreement is considered as the first successful attempt to prove the validity of the chosen approach to up-scale laboratory-derived biogenic NO fluxes to ecosystem field conditions, i.e. from the spatial scale of a soil sample (cm2) to the size of an entire agricultural

  18. Tropospheric vertical column densities of NO2 over managed dryland ecosystems (Xinjiang, China): MAX-DOAS measurements vs. 3-D dispersion model simulations based on laboratory derived NO emission from soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtimin, B.; Behrendt, T.; Badawy, M. M.; Wagner, T.; Qi, Y.; Wu, Z.; Meixner, F. X.

    2014-07-01

    We report on MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 over an oasis-ecotone-desert ecosystem in NW-China. There, local ambient NO2 concentrations originate from enhanced biogenic NO emission of intensively managed soils. Our target oasis "Milan" is located at the southern edge of the Taklimakan desert, very remote and well isolated from other potential anthropogenic and biogenic NOx sources. Four observation sites for MAX-DOAS measurements were selected, at the oasis center, downwind and upwind of the oasis, and in the desert. Biogenic NO emissions in terms of (i) soil moisture and (ii) soil temperature of Milan oasis' (iii) different land-cover type sub-units (cotton, Jujube trees, cotton/Jujube mixture, desert) were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. Net potential NO fluxes were up-scaled to oasis scale by areal distribution and classification of land-cover types derived from satellite images using GIS techniques. A Lagrangian dispersion model (LASAT, Lagrangian Simulation of Aerosol-Transport) was used to calculate the dispersion of soil emitted NO into the atmospheric boundary layer over Milan oasis. Three dimensional NO concentrations (30 m horizontal resolution) have been converted to 3-D NO2 concentrations, assuming photostationary state conditions. NO2 column densities were simulated by suitable vertical integration of modeled 3-D NO2 concentrations at those downwind and upwind locations, where the MAX-DOAS measurements were performed. Downwind-upwind differences (a direct measure of Milan oasis' contribution to the areal increase of ambient NO2 concentration) of measured and simulated slant (as well as vertical) NO2 column densities show excellent agreement. This agreement is considered as the first successful attempt to prove the validity of the chosen approach to up-scale laboratory derived biogenic NO fluxes to ecosystem field conditions, i.e. from the spatial scale of a soil sample (cm2) to the size of an entire agricultural

  19. Tropospheric vertical column densities of NO2 over managed dryland ecosystems (Xinjiang, China: MAX-DOAS measurements vs. 3-D dispersion model simulations based on laboratory derived NO emission from soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mamtimin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 over an oasis-ecotone-desert ecosystem in NW-China. There, local ambient NO2 concentrations originate from enhanced biogenic NO emission of intensively managed soils. Our target oasis "Milan" is located at the southern edge of the Taklimakan desert, very remote and well isolated from other potential anthropogenic and biogenic NOx sources. Four observation sites for MAX-DOAS measurements were selected, at the oasis center, downwind and upwind of the oasis, and in the desert. Biogenic NO emissions in terms of (i soil moisture and (ii soil temperature of Milan oasis' (iii different land-cover type sub-units (cotton, Jujube trees, cotton/Jujube mixture, desert were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. Net potential NO fluxes were up-scaled to oasis scale by areal distribution and classification of land-cover types derived from satellite images using GIS techniques. A Lagrangian dispersion model (LASAT, Lagrangian Simulation of Aerosol-Transport was used to calculate the dispersion of soil emitted NO into the atmospheric boundary layer over Milan oasis. Three dimensional NO concentrations (30 m horizontal resolution have been converted to 3-D NO2 concentrations, assuming photostationary state conditions. NO2 column densities were simulated by suitable vertical integration of modeled 3-D NO2 concentrations at those downwind and upwind locations, where the MAX-DOAS measurements were performed. Downwind-upwind differences (a direct measure of Milan oasis' contribution to the areal increase of ambient NO2 concentration of measured and simulated slant (as well as vertical NO2 column densities show excellent agreement. This agreement is considered as the first successful attempt to prove the validity of the chosen approach to up-scale laboratory derived biogenic NO fluxes to ecosystem field conditions, i.e. from the spatial scale of a soil sample (cm2 to the size of an entire

  20. Analysis of the avoidance of nitrogen fertilizers in the water column by juvenile Iberian water frog, Pelophylax perezi (Seoane, 1885), in laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea-Serrano, Andrés; Tejedo, Miguel; Torralva, Mar

    2008-02-01

    In an experiment carried out in the laboratory in beakers, the avoidance of ammonium chloride, isolated or combined with sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate, in aquatic habitat by froglets of Pelophylax perezi was studied. The results obtained suggest that nitrogen polluted treatments were not avoided by froglets of the studied species. However, despite the non-avoidance of the aquatic environment as a consequence of the presence of nitrogen compounds, significant inter-individual variation in treatment avoidance was detected. Although these results are not conclusive, they would suggest that froglets of P. perezi might occupy habitats which contain high levels of organic compounds and that they differ in their level of avoidance to fertilizer exposure.

  1. Produced fluids separation using a coalascer column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renouf, G.; Soveran, D.; Soveran, L. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This paper reports the results of a laboratory study in which a coalescer column was used to successfully remove water from produced heavy oil emulsions. The coalescer column is a simple, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly technology that can improve basic sediment and water values after 4 hours of settling time by about 38 per cent. The laboratory study tested the use of the column, and the effects of column length, column packing size, temperature, flow rate, demulsifier concentration, and water addition. More than 100 tests were conducted and 24 pairs of tests compared the treating effects with and without the column. The use of the coalescer column in the treatment facility resulted in a a reduction of demulsifier concentration from 250 ppm to 70 ppm, translating to an annual cost savings of $320,000 to $1,100,000 per battery. Incorporating the coalescer column also allowed operators to reduce both temperatures and demulsifier concentrations. The column also promoted faster treating. Water droplets grew by as much as 34 per cent, suggesting that treating time could be faster by 21 to 80 per cent. It was concluded that the coalescer column was very successful at improving water removal from heavy oil battery emulsions. 22 refs., 9 tabs., 7 figs.

  2. Recovery of a lowland dipterocarp forest twenty two years after selective logging at Sekundur, Gunung Leuser National Park, North Sumatra, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly - Priatna

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available PRIATNA, D.; KARTAWINATA, K.; ABDULHADI, R. 2004. Recovery of a lowland dipterocarp forest twenty two years after selective logging at Sekundur, Gunung Leuser National Park, North Sumatra, Indonesia. Reinwardtia 12 (3: 237–255. — A permanent 2-ha plot of lowland forest selectively logged in 1978 at Sekundur, Gunung Leuser National Park, which is also a Biosphere Reserve and a World Heritage Site, North Sumatra, was established and investigated in 1982. It was re-examined in 2000, where remeasurement and reidentification of all trees with DBH 10 cm were made. The areas of gap, building and mature phases of the canopy were also measured and mapped. Within this plot, 133 species, 87 genera and 39 families were recorded, with the total number of trees of 1145 or density of 572.5/ha. Euphorbiaceae was the richest family with 18 species (13.5 % of the total and total number of trees of 248 (21.7 % of the total or density of 124 trees/ha. The most important families were Dipterocarpaceae with IV (Importance Value = 52.0, followed by Euphorbiaceae with IV = 51.8. The most prevalent species was Shorea kunstleri (Dipterocarpaceae with IV =24.4, followed by Macaranga diepenhorstii (Euphorbiaceae with IV = 12.4. They were the species with highest density, 34 trees/ha and 23.5 trees/ha, respectively. During the period of 18 years there has been no shift in the richest families, most important families and most important species. Euphorbiaceae was the richest family and Dipterocarpaceae was the most important family, with Shorea kunstleri as the most important species with highest importance value throughout the period. The number of species increased from 127 to 133 with increase in density by 36.8% , from 418.5 trees/ha to 572.5 trees/ha. The mortality was 25.57 % or 1.4 % per year. The diameter class distribution indicated that the forest recovery has not been complete. Trees were small, comprising 67.6 % with diameters of 10-20 cm and only two trees

  3. Automated Composite Column Wrapping

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    The Automated Composite Column Wrapping is performed by a patented machine known as Robo-Wrapper. Currently there are three versions of the machine available for bridge retrofit work depending on the size of the columns being wrapped. Composite column retrofit jacket systems can be structurally just as effective as conventional steel jacketing in improving the seismic response characteristics of substandard reinforced concrete columns.

  4. Modeling Stone Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Castro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the main modeling techniques for stone columns, both ordinary stone columns and geosynthetic-encased stone columns. The paper tries to encompass the more recent advances and recommendations in the topic. Regarding the geometrical model, the main options are the “unit cell”, longitudinal gravel trenches in plane strain conditions, cylindrical rings of gravel in axial symmetry conditions, equivalent homogeneous soil with improved properties and three-dimensional models, either a full three-dimensional model or just a three-dimensional row or slice of columns. Some guidelines for obtaining these simplified geometrical models are provided and the particular case of groups of columns under footings is also analyzed. For the latter case, there is a column critical length that is around twice the footing width for non-encased columns in a homogeneous soft soil. In the literature, the column critical length is sometimes given as a function of the column length, which leads to some disparities in its value. Here it is shown that the column critical length mainly depends on the footing dimensions. Some other features related with column modeling are also briefly presented, such as the influence of column installation. Finally, some guidance and recommendations are provided on parameter selection for the study of stone columns.

  5. Modeling Stone Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the main modeling techniques for stone columns, both ordinary stone columns and geosynthetic-encased stone columns. The paper tries to encompass the more recent advances and recommendations in the topic. Regarding the geometrical model, the main options are the “unit cell”, longitudinal gravel trenches in plane strain conditions, cylindrical rings of gravel in axial symmetry conditions, equivalent homogeneous soil with improved properties and three-dimensional models, either a full three-dimensional model or just a three-dimensional row or slice of columns. Some guidelines for obtaining these simplified geometrical models are provided and the particular case of groups of columns under footings is also analyzed. For the latter case, there is a column critical length that is around twice the footing width for non-encased columns in a homogeneous soft soil. In the literature, the column critical length is sometimes given as a function of the column length, which leads to some disparities in its value. Here it is shown that the column critical length mainly depends on the footing dimensions. Some other features related with column modeling are also briefly presented, such as the influence of column installation. Finally, some guidance and recommendations are provided on parameter selection for the study of stone columns. PMID:28773146

  6. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  7. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Wastewater Compounds by Polystyrene-Divinylbenzene Solid-Phase Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Barber, Larry B.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the determination of 67 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater on aquatic organisms. This method also may be useful for evaluating the impact of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are an indicator of wastewater or that have been chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclicaromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are extracted by vacuum through disposable solid-phase cartridges that contain polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. Cartridges are dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds are eluted with dichloromethane-diethyl ether (4:1) and determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 4 micrograms per liter averaged 74 percent ? 7 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method detection limits for single-component compounds (excluding hormones and sterols) averaged 0.15 microgram per liter. Samples are preserved by filtration, the addition of 60 grams NaCl, and storage at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory has established a sample-holding time (prior to sample extraction) of 14 days from the date of sample collection until a statistically accepted method can be used to determine the effectiveness of these sample-preservation procedures.

  8. Circulation in gas-slurry column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, N.; Kuhlman, J.; Celik, I.; Gross, R.; Nebiolo, E.; Wang, Yi-Zun.

    1990-08-15

    Circulation in bubble columns, such as those used in fischer-tropsch synthesis, detracts from their performance in that gas is carried on average more rapidly through the column, and the residence time distribution of the gas in the column is widened. Both of these factors influence mass-transfer operations in bubble columns. Circulation prediction and measurement has been undertaken using probes, one-dimensional models, laser Doppler velocimetry, and numerical modeling. Local void fraction was measured using resistance probes and a newly developed approach to determining air/water threshold voltage for the probe. A tall column of eight inch diameter was constructed of Plexiglas and the distributor plate was manufactured to distribute air evenly through the base of the column. Data were gathered throughout the volume at three different gas throughputs. Bubble velocities proved difficult to measure using twin probes with cross-correlation because of radial bubble movement. A series of three-dimensional mean and RMS bubble and liquid velocity measurements were also obtained for a turbulent flow in a laboratory model of a bubble column. These measurements have been made using a three-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV), to determine velocity distributions non-intrusively. Finally, the gas-liquid flow inside a vertically situated circular isothermal column reactor was simulated numerically. 74 refs., 170 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Spiral multicapillary columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimenko, A. P.; Naumenko, I. I.; Soboleva, V. K.

    2008-08-01

    It was shown in a theoretical study and confirmed by experiment that a spiral multicapillary column had maximum efficiency if the bunch of capillaries was additionally coiled around its longitudinal axis to produce an integral number of coils. This technique made it possible to manufacture gas-chromatographic columns with performance as high as 12 to 16 thousand theoretical plates. These columns can find various applications, especially if quick separation is required.

  10. Comparison between a spray column and a sieve tray column operating as liquid-liquid heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, A. S.; Jacobs, H. R.; Boehm, R. F.

    The reported investigation was conducted in connection with research intended to improve the efficiency of direct contact devices for geothermal and solar applications. The investigation had the objective to evaluate the effect of adding sieve trays to the laboratory column used in studies concerned with the development of models for spray column heat transfer. Hot water is pumped from a supply vessel into the top of the heat exchanger column where, as the continuous phase, it flows down through the column. The dispersed phase is kerosene. Using an identical pump to that used for the water, the kerosene flows into a dispersion plate in the bottom of the column. The droplets rise through the column and coalesce at the top. It was found that the heat transfer performance of the perforated plate column was significantly improved over that in a spray column for similar operating conditions.

  11. JCE Feature Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  12. Glass-silicon column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  13. Behavior of high strength concrete columns under eccentric loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany A. Kottb

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, high strength concrete (HSC has been widely accepted by designers and contractors to be used in concrete structures, especially in high compressive stress elements. The research aims to study the behavior of high strength concrete columns under eccentric compression using experimental and analytical programs. The research is divided into two main parts; the first part is an experimental investigation for ten square columns tested at the Cairo University Concrete Research Laboratory. The main studied parameters were eccentricity of the applied load, column slenderness ratio; and ratios of longitudinal and transverse reinforcement. The second part is analytical analysis using nonlinear finite element program ANSYS11 on nineteen columns (ten tested square columns and nine rectangular section columns to study the effect of the previous parameters on the column ultimate load, mid-height displacement, and column cracking patterns. The analyzed columns revealed a good agreement with the experimental results with an average difference of 16% and 17% for column ultimate load and mid-height displacement respectively. Results showed an excellent agreement for cracking patterns. Predictions of columns capacities using the interaction diagrams based on ACI 318-08 stress block parameters indicated a safe design procedure of HSC columns under eccentric compression, with ACI 318-08 being more conservative for moderate reinforced HSC columns.

  14. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of chlorinated pesticides in aquatic tissue by capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiker, Thomas J.; Madsen, J.E.; Deacon, J.R.; Foreman, W.T.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the determination of chlorinated organic compounds in aquatic tissue by dual capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection is described. Whole-body-fish or corbicula tissue is homogenized, Soxhlet extracted, lipid removed by gel permeation chromatography, and fractionated using alumina/silica adsorption chromatography. The extracts are analyzed by dissimilar capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. The method reporting limits are 5 micrograms per kilogram (μg/kg) for chlorinated compounds, 50 μg/kg for polychlorinated biphenyls, and 200 μg/kg for toxaphene.

  15. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid

  16. Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1999-06-16

    This document reports results from an ion exchange column heat transfer analysis requested by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades.

  17. Behaviour of the gasoline containing ethanol (E-20) and the pure one after a leakage simulation in laboratory columns; Comportamento da gasolina com etanol (E-20) e da gasolina pura apos a simulacao de um vazamento em colunas de laboratorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Silvia Maria; Oliveira, Everton [Hidrologia e Planejamento Ambiental - HIDROPLAN, Cotia, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: silvia@hidroplan.com.br; Duarte, Uriel [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geologia Sedimentar e Ambiental

    2004-10-15

    Commercial gasolines sold in Brazil are added ethanol from 20 to 24% by volume. This oxygenated additive raises the octane level and reduces carbon monoxide emissions to the atmosphere. Underground storage tanks and gasoline lines are a major potential problem for soil and groundwater contamination. Since ethanol has cosolvent properties that alter the behavior of phase distribution in subsurface, this study compares the existing relationship between apparent and real thicknesses of free phase gasoline and E-20 (80% gasoline and 20% ethanol by volume) found respectively in monitoring wells and porous medium material used in two column experiments. Two cylindrical plexiglass columns were used (100 cm long and 23 cm in internal diameter). The bottom ends were capped using plexiglass plate 0.60 cm thick. A spout-like connection of PVC was fitted near the base of each column as an inlet/outlet. One well screen (100 cm long and 3,5 cm in internal diameter) in white PVC was cut in half lengthwise and attached to the inside walls of columns to be used as monitoring wells. The columns were then filled with 0,088 mm grain size sand (very fine). The apparent thickness of pure gasoline was 2.6 times thicker than the actual thickness in the aquifer while it was only 0.6 thicker for E-20. The interfacial tension of E-20 is 67% lower than that of the pure gasoline, allowing a larger quantity of pores to be accessed, which was reflected in oil saturation 54% greater than that of pure gasoline. (author)

  18. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of semivolatile organic compounds in bottom sediment by solvent extraction, gel permeation chromatographic fractionation, and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, E.T.; Vaught, D.G.; Merten, L.M.; Foreman, W.T.; Gates, Paul M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for the determination of 79 semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) and 4 surrogate compounds in soils and bottom sediment is described. The SOCs are extracted from bottom sediment by solvent extraction, followed by partial isolation using high-performance gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The SOCs then are qualitatively identified and quantitative concentrations determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This method also is designed for an optional simultaneous isolation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine (OC) insecticides, including toxaphene. When OCs and PCBs are determined, an additional alumina- over-silica column chromatography step follows GPC cleanup, and quantitation is by dual capillary- column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC/ECD). Bottom-sediment samples are centrifuged to remove excess water and extracted overnight with dichloromethane. The extract is concentrated, centrifuged, and then filtered through a 0.2-micrometer polytetrafluoro-ethylene syringe filter. Two aliquots of the sample extract then are quantitatively injected onto two polystyrene- divinylbenzene GPC columns connected in series. The SOCs are eluted with dichloromethane, a fraction containing the SOCs is collected, and some coextracted interferences, including elemental sulfur, are separated and discarded. The SOC-containing GPC fraction then is analyzed by GC/MS. When desired, a second aliquot from GPC is further processed for OCs and PCBs by combined alumina-over-silica column chromatography. The two fractions produced in this cleanup then are analyzed by GC/ECD. This report fully describes and is limited to the determination of SOCs by GC/MS.

  19. The maximum force in a column under constant speed compression

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic buckling of an elastic column under compression at constant speed is investigated assuming the first-mode buckling. Two cases are considered: (i) an imperfect column (Hoff's statement), and (ii) a perfect column having an initial lateral deflection. The range of parameters, where the maximum load supported by a column exceeds Euler static force is determined. In this range, the maximum load is represented as a function of the compression rate, slenderness ratio, and imperfection/initial deflection. Considering the results we answer the following question: "How slowly the column should be compressed in order to measure static load-bearing capacity?" This question is important for the proper setup of laboratory experiments and computer simulations of buckling. Additionally, it is shown that the behavior of a perfect column having an initial deflection differ significantlys form the behavior of an imperfect column. In particular, the dependence of the maximum force on the compression rate is non-monotoni...

  20. Eruption column physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper the author focuses on the fluid dynamics of large-scale eruption columns. The dynamics of these columns are rooted in multiphase flow phenomena, so a major part of the paper sets up a foundation on that topic that allows one to quickly assess the inherent assumptions made in various theoretical and experimental approaches. The first part is centered on a set of complex differential equations that describe eruption columns, but the focus is on a general understanding of important physical processes rather than on the mathematics. The author discusses briefly the relative merits and weaknesses of different approaches, emphasizing that the largest advances in understanding are made by combining them. He then focuses on dynamics of steady eruption columns and then on transient phenomena. Finally he briefly reviews the effects of varying behavior of the ambient medium through which an eruption column moves. These final sections will emphasize concepts and a qualitative understanding of eruption dynamics. This paper relies on principles of continuum mechanics and transport processes but does not go into detail on the development of those principles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Stone Columns - Determination of the soil improvement factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivarč, J.

    2011-09-01

    A stone column is one of the soil stabilizing methods that is used to increase strength, decrease the compressibility of soft and loose fine graded soils, accelerate a consolidation effect and reduce the liquefaction potential of soils. The columns consist of compacted gravel or crushed stone arranged by a vibrator. This paper deals with Priebe's theory (1976) on the design of an improvement factor, which belongs among the most used analytical methods and also describes the numerical and laboratory models of stone columns. The improvement factors calculated from numerical and laboratory models are compared with the improvement factors resulting from Priebe's theory.

  2. Methods of analysis by the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - determination of organonitrogen herbicides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Wydoski, Duane S.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Zamboni, Jana L.; Foreman, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the isolation of organonitrogen herbicides from natural water samples using solid-phase extraction and analysis by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction cartridges containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to remove the herbicides. The cartridges are dried using carbon dioxide, and adsorbed herbicides are removed from the cartridges by elution with 1.8 milliliters of hexaneisopropanol (3:1). Extracts of the eluants are analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of at least three characteristic ions. The method detection limits are dependent on sample matrix and each particular herbicide. The method detection limits, based on a 100-milliliter sample size, range from 0.02 to 0.25 microgram per liter. Recoveries averaged 80 to 115 percent for the 23 herbicides and 2 metabolites in 1 reagent-water and 2 natural-water samples fortified at levels of 0.2 and 2.0 micrograms per liter.

  3. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  4. Slender CRC Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarup, Bendt; Jensen, Lars Rom; Ellegaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    CRC is a high-performance steel fibre reinforced concrete with a typical compressive strength of 150 MPa. Design methods for a number of structural elements have been developed since CRC was invented in 1986, but the current project set out to further investigate the range of columns for which...

  5. Elevated Triglyceride Level Is Independently Associated With Increased All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Established Coronary Heart Disease: Twenty-Two-Year Follow-Up of the Bezafibrate Infarction Prevention Study and Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klempfner, Robert; Erez, Aharon; Sagit, Ben-Zekry; Goldenberg, Ilan; Fisman, Enrique; Kopel, Eran; Shlomo, Nir; Israel, Ariel; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    The independent association between elevated triglycerides and all-cause mortality among patients with established coronary heart disease is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate this association in a large cohort of patients with proven coronary heart disease. The study cohort comprised 15 355 patients who were screened for the Bezafibrate Infarction Prevention (BIP) trial. Twenty-two-year mortality data were obtained from the national registry. Patients were divided into 5 groups according to strata of fasting serum triglycerides: (1) low-normal triglycerides (triglycerides (100-149 mg/dL); (3) borderline hypertriglyceridemia triglycerides (150-199 mg/dL); (4) moderate hypertriglyceridemia triglycerides (200-499 mg/dL); (5) severe hypertriglyceridemia triglycerides (≥500 mg/dL). Age- and sex-adjusted survival was 41% in the low-normal triglycerides group than 37%, 36%, 35%, and 25% in groups with progressively higher triglycerides (Ptriglycerides elevation was associated with a corresponding 6% (P=0.016) increased risk of 22-year all-cause mortality. The 22-year mortality risk for patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia was increased by 68% when compared with patients with low-normal triglycerides (Pdisease, higher triglycerides levels are independently associated with increased 22-year mortality. Even in patients with triglycerides of 100 to 149 mg/dL, the elevated risk for death could be detected than in patients with lower triglycerides levels, whereas severe hypertriglyceridemia denotes a population with particularly increased mortality risk. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in bottom sediment by dual capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, William T.; Connor, Brooke F.; Furlong, Edward T.; Vaught, Deborah G.; Merten, Leslie M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the determination of 30 individual organochlorine pesticides, total toxaphene, and total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in bottom sediment is described. The method isolates the pesticides and PCBs by solvent extraction with dichlorobenzene, removes inorganic sulfur, large naturally occurring molecules, and other unwanted interferences by gel permeation chromatography, and further cleans up and class fractionates the extract using adsorption chromatography. The com- pounds then are instrumentally determined using dual capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. Reporting limits range from 1 to 5 micrograms per kilogram for 30 individual pesticides, 50 micrograms per kilogram for total PCBs, and 200 micrograms per kilogram for total toxaphene. The method also is designed to allow the simultaneous isolation of 79 other semivolatile organic compounds from the sediment, which are separately quantified using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The method was developed in support of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment program.

  7. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  8. Enhanced reductive dechlorination in columns treated with edible oil emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Cameron M.; Borden, Robert C.

    2006-09-01

    The effect of edible oil emulsion treatment on enhanced reductive dechlorination was evaluated in a 14 month laboratory column study. Experimental treatments included: (1) emulsified soybean oil and dilute HCl to inhibit biological activity; (2) emulsified oil only; (3) emulsified oil and anaerobic digester sludge; and (4) continuously feeding soluble substrate. A single application of emulsified oil was effective in generating strongly reducing, anaerobic conditions for over 14 months. PCE was rapidly reduced to cis-DCE in all three live columns. Bioaugmentation with a halorespiring enrichment culture resulted in complete dechlorination of PCE to ethene in the soluble substrate column (yeast extract and lactate). However, an additional treatment with a pulse of yeast extract and bioaugmentation culture was required to stimulate complete dechlorination in the emulsion treated columns. Once the dechlorinating population was established, the emulsion only column degraded PCE from 90-120 μM to below detection with concurrent ethene production in a 33 day contact time. The lower biodegradation rates in the emulsion treated columns compared to the soluble substrate column suggest that emulsified oil barriers may require a somewhat longer contact time for effective treatment. In the HCl inhibited column, partitioning of PCE to the retained oil substantially delayed PCE breakthrough. However, reduction of PCE to more soluble degradation products ( cis-DCE, VC and ethene) greatly reduced the impact of oil-water partitioning in live columns. There was only a small decline in the hydraulic conductivity ( K) of column #1 (low pH + emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.57) and column #2 (live + emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.73) indicating emulsion injection did not result in appreciable clogging of the clayey sand. However, K loss was greater in column #3 (sludge +emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.12) and column #4 (soluble substrate, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.03) indicating clogging due

  9. Behavior of Columns During Earthquakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The behavior of columns during earthquakes is very important since column failures may lead to additional structural failures and result in total building collapses....

  10. Determination of Two Columns Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    When protein is analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the selection of column is one of the most important factors. There are four quality control parameters for the column, which are theoretical plates n, capacity facto

  11. NMFS Water Column Sonar Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water column sonar data are an important component of fishery independent surveys, habitat studies and other research. NMFS water column sonar data are archived here.

  12. Methods of analysis and quality-assurance practices of the U.S. Geological Survey organic laboratory, Sacramento, California; determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    1994-01-01

    Analytical method and quality-assurance practices were developed for a study of the fate and transport of pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Sacramento and San Joaquin River. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended parti- culate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide, and the pesticides were eluted with three 2-milliliter aliquots of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1). The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for analytes determined per 1,500-milliliter samples ranged from 0.006 to 0.047 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 47 to 89 percent for 12 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.05 and 0.26 microgram per liter. The method was modified to improve the pesticide recovery by reducing the sample volume to 1,000 milliliters. Internal standards were added to improve quantitative precision and accuracy. The analysis also was expanded to include a total of 21 pesticides. The method detection limits for 1,000-milliliter samples ranged from 0.022 to 0.129 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 38 to 128 percent for 21 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.10 and 0.75 microgram per liter.

  13. Study of clean up procedures using Charcoal-Alumina-Celite column, immunoaffinity column and strata x column to determine deoxynivalenol by high performance liquid chromatography in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Cea

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is the most common toxic fungal species affecting grains in Uruguay. Since 1977, due to favorable climate conditions, there have been harvests with prominent Fusarium Head Blight in wheat. This were in 1984, 1990, 1993, 1996 and 2001.Natural Toxin Department of Technological Laboratory of Uruguay as National Reference Laboratory, is continuously improving the analytical methods in order to have a good response to the industry requirements and to the monitoring programs for import and exports commodities. The objective of this work was to compare different clean up methods in order to select the best one for routine determination of deoxynivalenol (DON in wheat (grain and flour.  Charcoal-alumina-celite (7+5+3,  immunoaffinity columns DONPREP R-Biopharm Rhone and Strata X 33 m polymeric sorbent  Phenomenex columns were used to perform the study. Considering as reference analytical method the internal protocol  PEC.TOX.063 accredited by United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS  following the ISO 17025 requirements, and  based on AOAC method 986.17( chapter 49, 2002 for extraction and clean-up  and on J.AOAC 70(3, 1987:479-483 for the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC detection, two more clean up methods were evaluated. In all of them PEC.TOX.063 detection procedure was carried out. PEC.TOX.063 used for the clean up an in house column chromatography prepared with charcoal-alumina-celite (7+5+3 . Extraction was performed using acetonitrile- water (84+16 and an aliquot of the extract was passed through the column. Extract was dryed under vacuum and DON detected by HPLC using photodiode array detector. For the method that used immunoaffinity columns, water was the extraction solvent, and manufacture protocol was followed up. An aliquot of the extract was passed through the column. Column was washed using water and DON eluated using methanol 100%. For the method that used Strata X column for the clean up, the

  14. Column: Every Last Byte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Garfinkel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Inheritance powder is the name that was given to poisons, especially arsenic, that were commonly used in the 17th and early 18th centuries to hasten the death of the elderly. For most of the 17th century, arsenic was deadly but undetectable, making it nearly impossible to prove that someone had been poisoned. The first arsenic test produced a gas—hardly something that a scientist could show to a judge. Faced with a growing epidemic of poisonings, doctors and chemists spent decades searching for something better.(see PDF for full column

  15. Water Column Profile Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fisheries Science Center Mississippi Laboratories conducts standardized fisheries independent resource surveys in the Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic,...

  16. Discrete Water Column Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fisheries Science Center Mississippi Laboratories conducts standardized fisheries independent resource surveys in the Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic,...

  17. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of organophosphate pesticides in whole water by continuous liquid-liquid extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Virendra K.; Wydoski, Duane S.

    2003-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 20 parent organophosphate pesticides and 5 organophosphate pesticide degradates from natural-water samples is described. Compounds are extracted from water samples with methylene chloride using a continuous liquid-liquid extractor for 6 hours. The solvent is evaporated using heat and a flow of nitrogen to a volume of 1 milliliter and solvent exchanged to ethyl acetate. Extracted compounds are determined by capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Single-operator derived method detection limits in three water-matrix samples ranged from 0.003 to 0.009 microgram per liter. Method performance was validated by spiking all compounds in three different matrices at three different concentrations. Eight replicates were analyzed at each concentration in each matrix. Mean recoveries of most method compounds spiked in surface-water samples ranged from 54 to 137 percent and those in ground-water samples ranged from 40 to 109 percent for all pesticides. Recoveries in reagent-water samples ranged from 42 to 104 percent for all pesticides. The only exception was O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate, which had variable recovery in all three matrices ranging from 27 to 79 percent. As a result, the detected concentration of O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate in samples is reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Based on the performance issue, two more compounds, disulfoton and ethion monoxon, also will be reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Estimated-value compounds, which are ?E-coded? in the data base, do not meet the performance criteria for unqualified quantification, but are retained in the method because the compounds are important owing to high use or potential environmental effects and because analytical performance has been consistent and reproducible.

  18. Design, testing, and simulation of microscale gas chromatography columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, M.L.; Kottenstette, R.; Matzke, C.M.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Shollenberger, K.A.; Adkins, D.R.; Wong, C.C.

    1998-08-01

    A microscale gas chromatography column is one component in a microscale chemistry laboratory for detecting chemical agents. Several columns were fabricated using the Bosch etch process which allows deep, high aspect ratio channels of rectangular cross-section. A design tool, based on analytical models, was developed to evaluate the effects of operating conditions and column specifications on separation resolution and time. The effects of slip flow, channel configuration, and cross-sectional shape were included to evaluate the differences between conventional round, straight columns and the microscale rectangular, spiral columns. Experimental data were obtained and compared with the predicted flowrates and theoretical number of plates. The design tool was then employed to select more optimum channel dimensions and operating conditions for high resolution separations.

  19. Round robin testing of a percolation column leaching procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Roeland; Spooren, Jeroen; Quaghebeur, Mieke; Broos, Kris; Kenis, Cindy; Debaene, Luc

    2016-09-01

    Round robin test results of a percolation column leaching procedure (CEN/TS 14405:2004), organised by the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), over a time span of 13years with a participation of between 8 and 18 different laboratories are presented and discussed. Focus is on the leachability of heavy metals As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn from mineral waste materials. By performing statistical analyses on the obtained results, insight into the reproducibility and repeatability of the column leaching test is gathered. A ratio of 1:3 between intra- and inter-laboratory variability is found. The reproducibility of the eluates' element concentrations differ significantly between elements, materials and fractions (i.e. different liquid-to-solid ratios). The reproducibility is discussed in light of the application of the column leaching test for legal and environmental policy purposes. In addition, the performances of laboratories are compared.

  20. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-09

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition.

  1. Column: File Cabinet Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Garfinkel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers can spend their time reverse engineering, performing reverse analysis, or making substantive contributions to digital forensics science. Although work in all of these areas is important, it is the scientific breakthroughs that are the most critical for addressing the challenges that we face.Reverse Engineering is the traditional bread-and-butter of digital forensics research. Companies like Microsoft and Apple deliver computational artifacts (operating systems, applications and phones to the commercial market. These artifacts are bought and used by billions. Some have evil intent, and (if society is lucky, the computers end up in the hands of law enforcement. Unfortunately the original vendors rarely provide digital forensics tools that make their systems amenable to analysis by law enforcement. Hence the need for reverse engineering.(see PDF for full column

  2. European Analytical Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, B.; Grasserbauer, M.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2009-01-01

    The European Analytical Column has once more invited a guest columnist to give his views on various matters related to analytical chemistry in Europe. This year, we have invited Professor Manfred Grasserbauer of the Vienna University of Technology to present some of the current challenges...... for European analytical chemistry. During the period 2002–07, Professor Grasserbauer was Director of the Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (EC), Ispra, Italy. There is no doubt that many challenges exist at the present time for all of us representing...... a major branch of chemistry, namely analytical chemistry. The global financial crisis is affecting all branches of chemistry, but analytical chemistry, in particular, since our discipline by tradition has many close links to industry. We have already noticed decreased industrial commitment with respect...

  3. SPIRAL CONTACTOR FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, C.R.

    1961-06-13

    The patented extraction apparatus includes a column, perforated plates extending across the column, liquid pulse means connected to the column, and an imperforate spiral ribbon along the length of the column.

  4. Compact electron beam focusing column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-07-13

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2-D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  5. Evaluation of Seismic Behaviors of Partially Deteriorated Reinforced Concrete Circular Columns Retrofitted with CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxu Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of the concrete strength in some regions of reinforced concrete (RC columns in practice may weaken the seismic behaviors of columns. Its effects on RC columns should be well understood. This paper aims to investigate the influences of deteriorated segment on the seismic behaviors of partially deteriorated RC columns and attempts to recover the seismic behaviors of partially deteriorated columns with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP composites. A finite element analysis was carried out to simulate the seismic behaviors of CFRP-confined partially deteriorated RC columns. The numerical results were verified by the laboratory tests of six specimens. Based on the finite element results, the failure location of partially deteriorated columns in an earthquake was predicted, and the effectiveness of CFRP retrofitted on partially deteriorated columns was evaluated.

  6. Practical design of stepped columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girao Coelho, A.M.; Simao, P.D.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with buckling aspects of the design of stepped columns in heavy mill buildings. In these structures, columns have to carry significant axial loads that usually act eccentrically and strength reducing bending moments due to lateral loads. A simple physical model for buckling behaviou

  7. An Undergraduate Column Chromatography Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danot, M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for an experiment designed to introduce undergraduate students to the theoretical and technical aspects of column chromatography. The experiment can also be shortened to serve as a demonstration of the column chromatography technique. (JN)

  8. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  9. Preparation and Characterization of a Polymeric Monolithic Column for Use in High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindis, Michael P.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Danielson, Neil D.

    2011-01-01

    The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiment, most often done in the undergraduate analytical instrumentation laboratory course, generally illustrates reversed-phase chromatography using a commercial C[subscript]18 silica column. To avoid the expense of periodic column replacement and introduce a choice of columns with different…

  10. Preparation and Characterization of a Polymeric Monolithic Column for Use in High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindis, Michael P.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Danielson, Neil D.

    2011-01-01

    The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiment, most often done in the undergraduate analytical instrumentation laboratory course, generally illustrates reversed-phase chromatography using a commercial C[subscript]18 silica column. To avoid the expense of periodic column replacement and introduce a choice of columns with different…

  11. Numerical models of Plinian eruption columns and pyroclastic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Greg A.; Wohletz, Kenneth H.

    1989-02-01

    Numerical simulations of physical processes governing the large-scale dynamics of Plinian eruption columns reveal conditions contributing to column collapse and emplacement of pyroclastic flows. The simulations are based on numerical solution of the time-dependent, two-phase, compressible Navier-Stokes equations for jets in a gravitational field. This modeling effort is directed toward studying the steady discharge phase of eruptions in contrast to our previous models of the initial, unsteady blast phase. Analysis of 51 eruption models covers a wide range of vent exit pressures, inertial and buoyancy driving forces, and coupling of energy and momentum between gas and pyroclasts. Consideration of three dimensionless groups (Richardson and Rouse numbers and thermogravitational parameter) facilitates this analysis and defines conditions leading to column collapse. For eruptions with similar particle size characteristics, exit pressure ratios are also very important in determining column behavior; column behavior is much more sensitive to exit pressure ratio than to the density ratio between the column and the atmosphere. Model eruption columns with exit pressures exceeding atmospheric pressure have diamond-shaped patterns at their bases with internal dynamics that correspond closely to observations of overpressured jets in laboratory experiments. Collapsing fountains form pyroclastic flows that consist of low-concentration fronts, relatively thick heads, vortex development along the top surfaces, and rising clouds of buoyant ash. The presence of coarse-grained proximal deposits primarily reflects tephra size sorting within the eruption column before collapse, as opposed to that which occurs during lateral transport of the material in pyroclastic flows. The dynamics and particle behavior in the proximal zone around collapsing eruption columns is examined; the modeling indicates that flow within a few kilometers of a vent will be at its highest particle concentration

  12. Water Column Sonar Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The collection and analysis of water column sonar data is a relatively new avenue of research into the marine environment. Primary uses include assessing biological...

  13. Leaching Behavior Of Mineral Processing Waste: Comparison Of Batch And Column Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, a comparison of laboratory batch and column experiments on metal release profile from a mineral processing waste (MPW) is presented. Batch (equilibrium) and column (dynamic) leaching tests were conducted on ground MPW at different liquid–solid ratios (LS) to determ...

  14. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  15. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory The Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose...

  16. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  17. Radiotracer Imaging of Sediment Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, W. W.; O'Neil, J. P.; Boutchko, R.; Nico, P. S.; Druhan, J. L.; Vandehey, N. T.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear medical PET and SPECT cameras routinely image radioactivity concentration of gamma ray emitting isotopes (PET - 511 keV; SPECT - 75-300 keV). We have used nuclear medical imaging technology to study contaminant transport in sediment columns. Specifically, we use Tc-99m (T1/2 = 6 h, Eγ = 140 keV) and a SPECT camera to image the bacteria mediated reduction of pertechnetate, [Tc(VII)O4]- + Fe(II) → Tc(IV)O2 + Fe(III). A 45 mL bolus of Tc-99m (32 mCi) labeled sodium pertechnetate was infused into a column (35cm x 10cm Ø) containing uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment from the Rifle, CO site. A flow rate of 1.25 ml/min of artificial groundwater was maintained in the column. Using a GE Millennium VG camera, we imaged the column for 12 hours, acquiring 44 frames. As the microbes in the sediment were inactive, we expected most of the iron to be Fe(III). The images were consistent with this hypothesis, and the Tc-99m pertechnetate acted like a conservative tracer. Virtually no binding of the Tc-99m was observed, and while the bolus of activity propagated fairly uniformly through the column, some inhomogeneity attributed to sediment packing was observed. We expect that after augmentation by acetate, the bacteria will metabolically reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), leading to significant Tc-99m binding. Imaging sediment columns using nuclear medicine techniques has many attractive features. Trace quantities of the radiolabeled compounds are used (micro- to nano- molar) and the half-lives of many of these tracers are short (Image of Tc-99m distribution in a column containing Rifle sediment at four times.

  18. Stationary phase modulation in liquid chromatography through the serial coupling of columns: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Segura, T; Torres-Lapasió, J R; Ortiz-Bolsico, C; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C

    2016-06-01

    Liquid chromatography with single columns often does not succeed in the analysis of complex samples, in terms of resolution and analysis time. A relatively simple solution to enhance chromatographic resolution is the modulation of the stationary phase through the serial coupling of columns. This can be implemented with any type of column using compatible elution conditions and conventional instruments. This review describes the key features of column coupling and published procedures, where two or more columns were coupled in series to solve separation problems. In all reports, the authors could not resolve their samples with single columns, whereas significant enhancement in chromatographic performance was obtained when the columns were combined. Particularly interesting is the reduction in the analysis time in the isocratic mode, which alleviates the "general elution problem" of liquid chromatography, and may represent a stimulus for the proposal of new procedures, especially in combination with mass spectrometric, electrochemical and refractometric detection. Developments proposed to make the serial coupling of columns useful in routine and research laboratories are outlined, including optimisation strategies that facilitate the selection of the appropriate column combination and elution conditions (solvent content, flow rate or temperature) in both isocratic and gradient modes. The availability of zero dead volume couplers, able to connect standard columns, and the commercialisation of short columns with multiple lengths, have expanded the possibilities of success.

  19. Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J

    2006-04-11

    This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients

  20. Column Holdup Formula of Soil Solute Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The shortcomings of the present two formulae for describing column holdup are analyzed and deductions are made to find a new formula. The column holdup, Hw, described by the new formula is dimensional,and related to soil solute transport kinesis and column physical properties. Compared with the other two column holdups, Hw is feasible to describe dimensional column holdup during solute transport process. The relationships between Hw and retardation factor, R, in different solute transport boundary conditions are established.

  1. Partially saturated granular column collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Barbara; Johnson, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Debris flows are gravity-driven sub-aerial mass movements containing water, sediments, soil and rocks. These elements lead to characteristics common to dry granular media (e.g. levee formation) and viscous gravity currents (viscous fingering and surge instabilities). The importance of pore fluid in these flows is widely recognised, but there is significant debate over the mechanisms of build up and dissipation of pore fluid pressure within debris flows, and the resultant effect this has on dilation and mobility of the grains. Here we specifically consider the effects of the liquid surface in the flow. We start with a simple experiment constituting a classical axisymmetric granular column collapse, but with fluid filling the column up to a depth comparable to the depth of grains. Thus, as the column collapses, capillary forces may be generated between the grains that prevent dilation. We explore a parameter space to uncover the effects of fluid viscosity, particle size, column size, aspect ratio, grain shape, saturation level, initial packing fraction and significantly, the effects of fine sediments in suspension which can alter the capillary interaction between wetted macroscopic grains. This work presents an initial scaling analysis and attempts to relate the findings to current debris flow modelling approaches.

  2. Increase the Visibility of Microbial Growth in a Winogradsky Column by Substituting Diatomaceous Earth for Sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Benoit

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty students have seeing the color associated with microbial growth in a traditional Winogradsky column can be overcome by substituting diatomaceous earth (DE for sediment. Microbial growth in a DE column is visible from the early stages of ecological succession and the colors produced appear more vibrant. A flat-sided tissue culture flask can be used as a column container to provide a large surface area for observation. The enhanced visual experience provided by a DE column increases student engagement and learning. Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory techniques. For more information, read the laboratory safety section of the ASM Curriculum Recommendations: Introductory Course in Microbiology and the Guidelines for Biosafety in Teaching Laboratories, available at www.asm.org. The Editors of JMBE recommend that adopters of the protocols included in this article follow a minimum of Biosafety Level 1 practices.

  3. Verificação intralaboratorial da performance obtida em método de determinação de ocratoxina A por purificação em coluna de imunoafinidade e cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência usando café Verifying the performance in the determination of ochratoxin by immunoaffinity column cleanup and high performance liquid chromatography in a laboratory using single laboratory validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Mendes de Souza

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A ocratoxina A é um contaminante que pode estar presente em vários alimentos e ser prejudicial tanto para a saúde quanto para a economia, então deve ser medida. Mas, para bem quantificar um analito, mesmo com o uso de métodos oficiais, é necessário verificar o sistema de medição; nisto se empregam requisitos de validação. Assim, procedeu-se a uma verificação intralaboratorial de método por purificação em coluna de imunoafinidade e cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência em amostras de café verde artificialmente contaminadas e medidas. Foi obtido o comportamento de medição esperado ao longo do analito, a faixa de trabalho teve o limite inferior entre 0,489 e 1,59 e o superior entre 220 e 300 μg.kg-1. A linearidade não foi rejeitada nesta faixa e não houve interferência externa significativa no modelo. O intercepto não diferiu significativamente da origem e o coeficiente linear não diferiu significativamente de 1,00. Os níveis de desvios padrão dependeram das concentrações estudadas, como ocorrido em diversas publicações, e os desvios padrão relativos não demonstraram inconformidade nos estudos colaborativos localizados. Concluiu-se pela competência do laboratório no método pesquisado, especialmente para café verde.Ochratoxin A is a food contaminant which can appear in several foods and can be harmful not only to human health, but also to the economy. In order to quantify properly an analite, even when using standard methods, it is necessary to check the validation method requirements. Therefore, a single laboratory validation of the method using immunoaffinity column and high performance liquid chromatography in spiked samples of ground green coffee beans was conducted. The evolution of the measurements along the analyte was sigmoid, as expected, and the range showed botton between 0.489 and 1.59, and top between 220 and 300 μg.kg-1, top. Linear regression was not rejected in this range and there was no

  4. Columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于晓悠; 丁燕燕; 韩多妮; Ray; Carrie; 未冉

    2010-01-01

    <正>New York Whitney艺术双年展今年第75届纽约Whitney双年展不设题目,但以"2010"指示策展方向,继续以发掘年轻艺术家、展示创作实验为目标。参展的55位艺术家,最年轻的是23岁摄影师Tam Tran,最老资历的是75岁的概念艺术家Lorraine O’Grady。这届的另一先创性,是每位艺术家只限一件或一个系列的作品,避免了去届双年展的"小型个人回顾展"现象,而五层楼的展场各有特色,如录像及短片将独立于三楼展出,而美术馆馆藏则移师五楼。这届双年展由著名的意大利策展人Francesco Bonami联同助手Gary Carrion-Murayarn共同制作,两位策展人说明,双年展的重要性是预示未来,创新及前瞻性依然是取决原则。

  5. Columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carrie Tsang; 丁燕燕; 韩多妮; RAY

    2009-01-01

    <正>Paris承诺的展现33岁的墨西哥艺术家Mario Garcia Torres是近年国际艺坛炙手可热的新星,他以录象、摄影、幻灯及装置为创作形式,透过个人视点及独特演绎手法来重新思考历史。他是一个思考型艺术家,同时又是一个淘气的大孩子,作品往往反映了他的双重性格——嬉戏中带有深沉的历史感。这次是GarciaTorres首次在法国的国家博物馆举行展览,整合出版了他过往两年间在

  6. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  7. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR).DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  8. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  9. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  10. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR). DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  11. Modeling of column apparatus processes

    CERN Document Server

    Boyadjiev, Christo; Boyadjiev, Boyan; Popova-Krumova, Petya

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new approach for the modeling of chemical and interphase mass transfer processes in industrial column apparatuses, using convection-diffusion and average-concentration models. The convection-diffusion type models are used for a qualitative analysis of the processes and to assess the main, small and slight physical effects, and then reject the slight effects. As a result, the process mechanism can be identified. It also introduces average concentration models for quantitative analysis, which use the average values of the velocity and concentration over the cross-sectional area of the column. The new models are used to analyze different processes (simple and complex chemical reactions, absorption, adsorption and catalytic reactions), and make it possible to model the processes of gas purification with sulfur dioxide, which form the basis of several patents.

  12. Comparison of drug substance impurity profiles generated with extended length columns during packed-column SFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roston, D A; Ahmed, S; Williams, D; Catalano, T

    2001-10-01

    The current study assesses the effect of extending column length during gradient packed column sub/supercritical fluid chromatography (PCSFC) experiments on the detection of known and unknown impurities in a drug substance sample. Quantitative drug substance impurity profiles were generated and compared using multiple column PCSFC and HPLC conditions. Also, chromatographic figures of merit were estimated and compared for components of a standard mixture during PCSFC experiments, which used one column, four columns, and six columns in series.

  13. Beam Studies with Electron Columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; /Fermilab; Kamerdzhiev, V.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum; Romanov, A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    We report preliminary results of experimental studies of 'electron columns' in the Tevatron and in a specialized test setup. In the Tevatron, a beam of 150 GeV protons ionizes residual gas and ionization electrons are stored in an electrostatic trap immersed into strong longitudinal magnetic field. Shifts of proton betatron frequencies are observed. In the test setup, we observe effects pointing to accumulation and escape of ionization electrons.

  14. Water Column Methylation in Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartup, A. T.; Calder, R.; Soerensen, A. L.; Mason, R. P.; Balcom, P. H.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs and affects humans and wildlife through fish consumption. Many studies have measured active methylation/demethylation in ocean margin sediments but few have reported similar rates for the marine water column. This presentation will review available evidence for water column methylation in estuaries, including new experimental measurements of methylation/demethylation rates from a deep subarctic fjord in Labrador Canada collected in Spring and Fall of 2012-2013. We used these and other data to construct a mass budget for MeHg in the estuary and show that water column methylation (with rates ranging from 1.5 to 2.8 % day-1), is the largest contributor, followed by inputs from rivers (4.9 mol year-1), to the in situ pool of MeHg available for uptake by biota. By contrast, the sediment in this system is a net sink for MeHg (-1.5 mol year-1). We discuss the relationship between observed MeHg and other ancillary environmental factors (organic carbon, sulfur and nutrients) as well as implications for the response time of fish to future changes in mercury inputs.

  15. Conjunctival melanoma: survival analysis in twenty-two Mexican patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Angélica Salcedo-Hernández

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Descrever o intervalo livre de doença (DFI e sobrevida global (OS de pacientes com melanoma conjuntival (CM. Método: Prontuários de 22 pacientes que foram internados em dois hospitais entre 1985 e 2006 foram revisados para dados pertinentes, incluindo dados demográficos, local de envolvimento na conjuntiva e outros locais de acometimento, tratamento cirúrgico e tratamento adjuvante. Resultados: Dez (45,45% homens e 12 (54,55% mulheres foram selecionados. A média de idade foi de 52,3 anos. Em 15 pacientes (68,1% CM envolveu a conjuntiva bulbar, e em 7 (31,9% envolveu a conjuntiva palpebral. Dos 22 pacientes, 72,72% tinham história de melanose conjuntival. O tamanho médio do tumor foi de 20,4 mm. Oito (36,36% pacientes foram submetidos à exenteração orbital, 2 (9,06% à enucleação, 5 (22,72% à ampla excisão da lesão seguida de radioterapia, 2 (9,06% à exenteração orbital com esvaziamento cervical e os restantes 5 pacientes (22,72% foram considerados adequadamente tratados apenas com excisão ampla. Oito (36,36% pacientes receberam tratamento adjuvante. Sobrevida livre de doença em 5 anos foi de 51% e sobrevida global em 5 e 10 anos foi de 50% e 37%, respectivamente. Conclusão: Melanoma conjuntival é uma entidade rara. Comportamento do tumor é agressivo, e o melhor tratamento é a cirurgia com terapia adjuvante.

  16. Twenty-two cases of low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    In Denmark and in other industrialized countries there are cases where people complain about annoying low-frequency or infrasonic noise in their homes. Besides noise annoyance people often report other adverse effects such as insomnia, headache, lack of concentration etc. In many cases the noise...

  17. Lesson Twenty-two The early repolarization variant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 王劲

    2007-01-01

    @@ The ST-segment elevation seen in apparently healthy and asymptomatic persons,the so-called early repolarization variant (ERPV)1.Hiss et al reported that 91% of 6014 healthy men in the US Air Force who were between 16 and 58 years old had an ST-segment elevation of 0.1 to 0.3 mV in one or more precordial leads2.The elevation was most common and marked in lead V2.

  18. Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis. Twenty-two years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, L W; Tompkins, R K; Urrea, P T; Longmire, W P

    1979-01-01

    Seventy-four patients underwent operation for chronic pancreatitis during a 22 year period at UCLA Hospital. Follow-up data obtained for 60% of these patients an average of 3.2 years postoperation were analyzed by computer for statistically significant benefit between paired operation combinations and the variables of pain relief, stool habits, alcohol use, readmission for pancreatitis, and narcotic use. The combined group of total and cephalic pancreaticoduodenectomy proved more effective with respect to pain relief and readmission (p less than 0.05) than the group that had pseudocyst drainage. The comparison of groups that underwent resection or ductal drainage showed no statistical differences for the above variables. Regardless of type of operation, if the patient had evidence of pancreatic calcifications and had abstained from alcohol postoperatively, the likelihood of a return to normal activity was more favorable (p less than 0.05). PMID:485605

  19. [Ion-pair chromatography-indirect ultraviolet detection for determination of tetraethyl ammonium using a monolithic column and a packed column].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chunmiao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yu, Hong; Guan, Chao; Wang, Miaoyu

    2015-07-01

    Two methods were developed for the determination of tetraethyl ammonium by ion-pair chromatography-indirect ultraviolet detection using a monolithic column and a packed column with ionic liquid as additive in mobile phase. Chromatographic separations were performed on a monolithic column and a packed column both on reversed phase using imidazolium ionic liquid aqueous solution-ion-pair reagent-organic solvent as mobile phase. The effects of the background ultraviolet absorption reagent, detection wavelength, ion-pair reagent, organic solvent, column temperature and flow rate on the determination of tetraethyl ammonium were investigated. The difference between the two chromatographic columns was compared and the retention rules were discussed. Under the optimized chromatographic conditions, for tetraethyl ammonium on monolithic column and packed column, the retention times were 2.40 and 3.02 min; the detection limits (S/N=3), 0.04 and 0.07 mg/L; the RSDs (n = 5) for peak areas, 0.16% and 0.11%; and the RSDs (n=5) for retention times, 0.02% and 0.01%, respectively. The two methods have been successfully applied to the determination of tetraethyl ammonium ionic liquids synthesized by laboratory. The recoveries of the tetraethyl ammonium after spiking were 98.2% and 99.1%, respectively. The two methods can meet the requirements for the quantitative analysis of tetraethyl ammonium.

  20. Fast HPLC for quality control of Harpagophytum procumbens by using a monolithic silica column: method transfer from conventional particle-based silica column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alexander H

    2005-05-06

    The applicability of a monolithic C18-bonded silica column for the rapid HPLC separation of ingredients in medicinal plants and their phytopharmaceutical preparations has been evaluated in the author's laboratory. In this presentation, an existing method for the determination of the iridoid glycoside harpagoside in Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw) was successfully transferred from a conventional particle-based C18 silica column to a monolithic silica column. The very high porosity of the stationary phase allows chromatography with a much lower backpressure than on conventional columns. Therefore, the flow rate could be easily increased from 0.8 mL/min (particle-based column) to 5 mL/min (monolithic column) and the run-time reduced from 30 to 5 min (that is a reduction about 85% !), without losing any chromatographic resolution of the compound of interest. The amount of harpagoside was measured with the original method on a conventional particle-based silica column and on the adapted method on a monolithic silica column. The statistical mean t-test showed no significant differences of the variances and the means indicating that the fast HPLC method is an acceptable alternative. The shorter analysis time makes the method very valuable for commercial quality control of Harpagophytum extracts and its pharmaceutical preparations.

  1. A Simple Design to Realize Micro-column Separation by Conventional Analytical HPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG,Wenjun; ZHANG,Junxia; ZHANG,Yuping; ZHANG,Yijun; TIAN,Mengkui; WU,Dafu

    2009-01-01

    The conventional analytical HPLC was successfully developed for micro-column separation by using a simple eluate splitting system,self-preparation of packing column and on-capillary column detector in our laboratory.Porous inlet frit in fused silica capillary was rapidly prepared by sintering stainless steel powders under 500 meshes for about 20 s.The use of such frits or metal meshes in capillary to retain C18 particles of chromatographic packing was demonstrated to be stable and specially robust with continuous packing and long chromatographic runs.Furthermore,the chromatographic behavior was detailedly evaluated by changing the flow rate and the percentage of mobile phase using the prepared capillary column.Under the optimal experimental conditions,baseline separation of the model analytes including thiourea,benzene,toluene,ethylbenzene was obtained with a high column efficiency near 70000N (plates/m) by the developed capillary-HPLC.

  2. Fate of triclocarban during soil aquifer treatment: Soil column studies

    KAUST Repository

    Essandoh, H. M K

    2010-04-01

    There are current concerns about the presence of persistent chemicals in recharge water used in soil aquifer treatment systems. Triclocarban (TCC) has been reported as a persistent, high production volume chemical with the potential to bioaccumulate in the environment. It is also known to have adverse effects such as toxicity and suspected endocrine disruption. This study was carried out to study the fate of TCC in soil aquifer treatment (SAT) through laboratory simulations in a soil column. The system performance was evaluated with regards to TCC influent concentration, sand (column) depth, and residence time. Results obtained confirmed the ability of SAT to reduce TCC concentrations in wastewater. Sorption and biodegradation were responsible for TCC removal, the latter mechanism however being unsustainable. The removal efficiency was found to be dependent on concentration and decreased over time and increased with column depth. Within the duration of the experimental run, TCC negatively impacted on treatment performance through a reduction in COD removals observed in the column. © IWA Publishing 2010.

  3. Bubble Size Distribution in a Vibrating Bubble Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohagheghian, Shahrouz; Wilson, Trevor; Valenzuela, Bret; Hinds, Tyler; Moseni, Kevin; Elbing, Brian

    2016-11-01

    While vibrating bubble columns have increased the mass transfer between phases, a universal scaling law remains elusive. Attempts to predict mass transfer rates in large industrial scale applications by extrapolating laboratory scale models have failed. In a stationary bubble column, mass transfer is a function of phase interfacial area (PIA), while PIA is determined based on the bubble size distribution (BSD). On the other hand, BSD is influenced by the injection characteristics and liquid phase dynamics and properties. Vibration modifies the BSD by impacting the gas and gas-liquid dynamics. This work uses a vibrating cylindrical bubble column to investigate the effect of gas injection and vibration characteristics on the BSD. The bubble column has a 10 cm diameter and was filled with water to a depth of 90 cm above the tip of the orifice tube injector. BSD was measured using high-speed imaging to determine the projected area of individual bubbles, which the nominal bubble diameter was then calculated assuming spherical bubbles. The BSD dependence on the distance from the injector, injector design (1.6 and 0.8 mm ID), air flow rates (0.5 to 5 lit/min), and vibration conditions (stationary and vibration conditions varying amplitude and frequency) will be presented. In addition to mean data, higher order statistics will also be provided.

  4. Elastic stability of non-uniform columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. Y.; Kuo, Y. H.

    1991-07-01

    A simple and efficient method is proposed to investigate the elastic stability of three different tapered columns subjected to uniformly distributed follower forces. The influences of the boundary conditions and taper ratio on critical buckling loads are investigated. The critical buckling loads of columns of rectangular cross section with constant depth and linearly varied width ( T1), constant width and linearly varied depth ( T2) and double taper ( T3) are investigated. Among the three different non-uniform columns considered, taper ratio has the greatest influence on the critical buckling load of column T3 and the lowest influence on that of column T1. The types of instability mechanisms for hinged-hinged and cantilever non-uniform columns are divergence and flutter respectively. However, for clamped-hinged and clamped-clamped non-uniform columns, the type of instability mechanism for column T1 is divergence, while that for columns T2 and T3 is divergence only when the taper ratio of the columns is greater than certain critical values and flutter for the rest value of taper ratio. When the type of instability mechanism changes from divergence to flutter, there is a finite jump for the critical buckling load. The influence of taper ratio on the elastic stability of cantilever column T3 is very sensitive for small values of the taper ratio and there also exist some discontinieties in the critical buckling loads of flutter instability. For a hinged-hinged non-uniform column ( T2 or T3) with a rotational spring at the left end of the column, when the taper ratio is less than the critical value the instability mechanism changes from divergence to flutter as the rotational spring constant is increased. For a clamped-elastically supported non-uniform column, when the taper ratio is greater than the critical value the instability mechanism changes from flutter to divergence as the translational spring constant is increased.

  5. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil columns packed to different bulk densities and water uptake by plantroots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi-Pisa, P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory metbod used to determine both the soil moisture retention curve and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in soil columns under transient flow conditions during evaporation.

  6. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  7. Analytical Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s analytical laboratories in Pittsburgh, PA, and Albany, OR, give researchers access to the equipment they need to thoroughly study the properties of materials...

  8. Geomechanics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geomechanics Laboratory allows its users to measure rock properties under a wide range of simulated service conditions up to very high pressures and complex load...

  9. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  10. Temperature of Steel Columns under Natural Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Wald

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Current fire design models for time-temperature development within structural elements as well as for structural behaviour are based on isolated member tests subjected to standard fire regimes, which serve as a reference heating, but do not model natural fire. Only tests on a real structure under a natural fire can evaluate future models of the temperature developments in a fire compartment, of the transfer of heat into the structure and of the overall structural behaviour under fire.To study overall structural behaviour, a research project was conducted on an eight storey steel frame building at the  Cardington Building Research Establishment laboratory on January 16, 2003. A fire compartment 11×7 m was prepared on the fourth floor. A fire load of 40 kg/m2 was applied with 100 % permanent mechanical load and 65 % of imposed load. The paper summarises the experimental programme and shows the temperature development of the gas in the fire compartment and of the fire protected columns bearing the unprotected floors.

  11. Determining the Influence of Groundwater Composition on the Performance of Arsenic Adsorption Columns Using Rapid Small-Scale Column Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, A. R.; Siegel, M.

    2004-12-01

    The USEPA has established a more stringent drinking water standard for arsenic, reducing the maximum contaminant level (MCL) from 50 μ g/L to 10 μ g/L. This will affect many small communities in the US that lack the appropriate treatment infrastructure and funding to reduce arsenic to such levels. For such communities, adsorption systems are the preferred technology based on ease of operation and relatively lower costs. The performance of adsorption media for the removal of arsenic from drinking water is dependent on site-specific water quality. At certain concentrations, co-occurring solutes will compete effectively with arsenic for sorption sites, potentially reducing the sorption capacity of the media. Due to the site-specific nature of water quality and variations in media properties, pilot scale studies are typically carried out to ensure that a proposed treatment technique is cost effective before installation of a full-scale system. Sandia National Laboratories is currently developing an approach to utilize rapid small-scale columns in lieu of pilot columns to test innovative technologies that could significantly reduce the cost of treatment in small communities. Rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs) were developed to predict full-scale treatment of organic contaminants by adsorption onto granular activated carbon (GAC). This process greatly reduced the time and costs required to verify performance of GAC adsorption columns. In this study, the RSSCT methodology is used to predict the removal of inorganic arsenic using mixed metal oxyhydroxide adsorption media. The media are engineered and synthesized from materials that control arsenic behavior in natural and disturbed systems. We describe the underlying theory and application of RSSCTs for the performance evaluation of novel media in several groundwater compositions. Results of small-scale laboratory columns are being used to predict the performance of pilot-scale systems and ultimately to design full

  12. Column flotation testing at Suncor Energy Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleyle, P.; Lee, L. [Suncor Energy Inc. Oil Sands, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The operations at Suncor's primary extraction plant were reviewed with reference to the column flotation process and the history of column flotation testing at Suncor. Tertiary bitumen recovery processes were also reviewed. In March and August 2005, an in-plant pilot scale column flotation test was conducted at Suncor's Millennium Primary Extraction plant near Fort McMurray, Alberta. The purpose was to evaluate the feasibility of using column flotation for tertiary bitumen recovery from cyclone overflow. The test was performed in a 4 ft diameter by 25 ft high column to determine the effects of column feed flow rate, froth wash water supply, and froth depth. The feed ranged from 0.14 to 3.79 wt per cent bitumen. Feed flow rate ranged from 59 to 237 USGPM. The test results indicated that wash water reduced froth mineral content. Increasing the wash water did not make any difference in mineral rejection. Although bitumen upgrading improved when the test column was operated at a deeper froth depth, the mineral content was not reduced. Both mechanical cell and flotation column tailings samples were collected in the flotation column tests. The average tailings composition for the last cell in the tertiary mechanical bank was 0.22 per cent bitumen, 12.10 per cent mineral, and 87.66 per cent water. At an average test column feed rate of 158 USGPM, the average tailings composition was 0.23 per cent bitumen, 12.13 per cent mineral, and 87.62 per cent water. It was concluded that flotation columns are capable of producing a tailings product similar to that of the tertiary mechanical bank. Therefore, it is feasible to use flotation columns as an alternative to mechanical cells. In fact, since there are no rotating parts requiring off-line maintenance work, flotation columns may be a better alternative from a maintenance and operations perspective. tabs., figs.

  13. 荒诞世界里的自由选择——《第二十二条军规》中的存在主义解读%The free choice in absurd world—— Existentialism in "twenty-two military discipline"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄新川

    2012-01-01

      作为黑色幽默文学流派的重要作家,约瑟夫·海勒和他的代表作《第二十二条军规》在世界文坛上占有重要的地位。海勒是黑色幽默的代表作家,但是他的写作过程中深受存在主义的影响。作为流行于二十世纪欧美的一种非理性主义哲学思潮,存在主义可以概括为三个方面:“自由选择”,“存在先于本质”,“世界是荒诞的,人生是痛苦的”。本文试图通过分析小说中主要人物尤索林的行为选择来解读海勒的《第二十二条军规》中的存在主义思想,以期能对这部经典有更好的理解%  As the writer of black humor literature genre, Joseph Heller and his masterpiece "twenty-two military discipline" occupies an important position in the world literature. Heller is the representative writer of black humor, but influenced by the existentialism in his writing process. As a non rationalist philosophy popular in Europe and the United States in twentieth Century, existentialism can be summarized as three respects:" freedom of choice"," existence precedes essence"," the world is absurd, life is painful". This paper attempts to analyze the major characters in the novel Usolin's choice behavior to explain existentialism in Heller's "twenty-two military discipline", in order to have a better understanding of this classic.

  14. Deformation Monitoring of Retrofitted Short Concrete Columns with Laser Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsar, E. Ö.; Celik, M. F.; Binbir, E.; Arslan, A. E.; Çokkeçeci, D.; Seker, D. Z.; Pala, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents one of the applications of monitoring mechanical tests carried out in Construction Materials Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University. In Turkey, as in many countries, large amount of existing buildings exposed to seismic hazard, therefore various analytical and experimental studies are being conducted to contribute to the solution of the problem. One of the new generation retrofitting techniques is to strength the structural members by using Fiber Reinforcing Polymer (FRP). This study summarize the results of monitoring of deformations short concrete column samples under the incremental compression load. In this study, result of two rectangular short columns are given. One of them was tested as a reference sample, the other sample were tested after strengthening by PET reinforced polymer composite materials. Besides conventional displacement and strain measurement systems, laser scanning method was used to get three dimensional deformed shape of sample at each selected steps.

  15. Oscillating water column structural model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Guild [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jepsen, Richard Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  16. On-line testing of a horizontally-baffled flotation column in an operating coal-cleaning plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisele, T.C.; Kawatra, S.K. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    1995-10-01

    A horizontal-baffle arrangement has been developed to prevent excessive axial mixing in flotation columns. These baffles have been shown in previous work to improve the grade/recovery performance of both a laboratory-scale column and a pilot-scale column. In this paper, results are given for continuous on-line operation of the pilot-scale baffled column in a commercial coal-cleaning plant. These results show its ability to operate for extended periods without plugging, to produce a consistent-quality product even while the feed quality was fluctuating, and to remove much of the pyritic sulfur from the coal.

  17. Study on a continuous heat integrated distillation column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenchur, T.; Govind, R.

    1987-12-01

    A novel continuous heat integrated distillation column called a concentric column has been studied using computer simulation. It is shown that a concentric column is a novel implementation of a thermodynamically reversible distillation column and has a lower energy loss than an ordinary distillation column. Their studies show that a concentric column has reduced column height, since the stripping section is configured concentrically around the rectifying section, and uses less utilities than a conventional column.

  18. The jet flotation column control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Zhiqiang; Ming Shangzhi; Liu Lijian; Huangfu Jinghua; Huo Sen; Zhang Rongzeng [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China). Mineral Processing Dept.; Yang Hongjun [Hebi Coal Mine Administrative (China)

    1998-12-31

    Compared with the conventional mechanical flotation column, the jet flotation column has the advantages of high selectivity of separation, low investment and production cost, low floor space requirement, low dosage of reagent, easy control; it is more suitable to process fine particles. Recently, many new types of flotation columns have been developed with new methods. Mineral Processing Dept., China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing) designed an aerated, double-jet flotation column in the lab and the industrial trial will be put into operation. One of the significant characteristics of the new type of flotation column is high selectivity of separation, fast bubble mineralization speed. As it is sensitive to various factors, a control system for flotation column has been developed to stabilize the working condition, and this set of control system has been operated in the lab experiment.

  19. SNAP-TITE Composite Column Reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Recent earthquakes throughout the world have demonstrated the vulnerabilities of older reinforced concrete columns to seismic deformation demands. The Snap Tite Composite Column Reinforcement strengthens a concrete column by confining it in an external composite jacket, which prevents the concrete from expanding during seismic activity or prolonged freeze-thaw cycles. The pre-manufactured fiberglass jacket is comprised of glass fibers and corrosion resistant isopolyester resins.

  20. Parametric resonance in concrete beam-columns

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma,Mamta R.; Singh,Arbind K; Benipal,Gurmail S

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic instability, called parametric resonance, is exhibited by undampedelastic beam-columns when under the action of pulsating axial force. The scope of the existing theory of parametric resonance is restricted to physically linear beam-columns undergoing finite lateral displacements. In this Paper, the dynamic behaviour of physically nonlinear elastic cracked concrete beam-columns under pulsating axial force and constant lateral force is investigated. The constitutive equations derived ...

  1. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  2. Laboratory Building.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  3. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  4. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  5. Psychology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides testing stations for computer-based assessment of cognitive and behavioral Warfighter performance. This 500 square foot configurable space can...

  6. Propulsion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Propulsion Lab simulates field test conditions in a controlled environment, using standardized or customized test procedures. The Propulsion Lab's 11 cells can...

  7. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  8. Analytical Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Analytical Labspecializes in Oil and Hydraulic Fluid Analysis, Identification of Unknown Materials, Engineering Investigations, Qualification Testing (to support...

  9. Column: Factors Affecting Data Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fairbanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear physics, the phrase decay rate is used to denote the rate that atoms and other particles spontaneously decompose. Uranium-235 famously decays into a variety of daughter isotopes including Thorium and Neptunium, which themselves decay to others. Decay rates are widely observed and wildly different depending on many factors, both internal and external. U-235 has a half-life of 703,800,000 years, for example, while free neutrons have a half-life of 611 seconds and neutrons in an atomic nucleus are stable.We posit that data in computer systems also experiences some kind of statistical decay process and thus also has a discernible decay rate. Like atomic decay, data decay fluctuates wildly. But unlike atomic decay, data decay rates are the result of so many different interplaying processes that we currently do not understand them well enough to come up with quantifiable numbers. Nevertheless, we believe that it is useful to discuss some of the factors that impact the data decay rate, for these factors frequently determine whether useful data about a subject can be recovered by forensic investigation.(see PDF for full column

  10. Learning Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Lyn; Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Considers the school library media center as an information learning laboratory. Topics include information literacy; Kuhlthau's Information Search Process model; inquiry theory and approach; discovery learning; process skills of laboratory science; the information scientist; attitudes of media specialists, teachers, and students; displays and Web…

  11. Rasch models with exchangeable rows and columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt

    The article studies distributions of doubly infinite binary matrices with exchangeable rows and columns which satify the further property that the probability of any $m \\times n$ submatrix is a function of the row- and column sums of that matrix. We show that any such distribution is a (unique...... of existence of measures with given marginals....

  12. Influence of tray hydraulics on tray column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Betlem, Bernardus H.L.; Rijnsdorp, J.E.; Rijnsdorp, J.E.; Azink, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    To column control, in contrast to column design, tray hold-up and dependencies of tray hold-up on the operating conditions play an important role. The essence of this article is the development of an improved model of tray hydraulics over a broad operating range and its experimental validation by

  13. Chemometrics applications in biotechnology processes: predicting column integrity and impurity clearance during reuse of chromatography resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Anurag S; Mittal, Shachi; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Separation media, in particular chromatography media, is typically one of the major contributors to the cost of goods for production of a biotechnology therapeutic. To be cost-effective, it is industry practice that media be reused over several cycles before being discarded. The traditional approach for estimating the number of cycles a particular media can be reused for involves performing laboratory scale experiments that monitor column performance and carryover. This dataset is then used to predict the number of cycles the media can be used at manufacturing scale (concurrent validation). Although, well accepted and widely practiced, there are challenges associated with extrapolating the laboratory scale data to manufacturing scale due to differences that may exist across scales. Factors that may be different include: level of impurities in the feed material, lot to lot variability in feedstock impurities, design of the column housing unit with respect to cleanability, and homogeneity of the column packing. In view of these challenges, there is a need for approaches that may be able to predict column underperformance at the manufacturing scale over the product lifecycle. In case such an underperformance is predicted, the operators can unpack and repack the chromatography column beforehand and thus avoid batch loss. Chemometrics offers one such solution. In this article, we present an application of chemometrics toward the analysis of a set of chromatography profiles with the intention of predicting the various events of column underperformance including the backpressure buildup and inefficient deoxyribonucleic acid clearance.

  14. Fabry-Perot Interferometer for Column CO2: Airborne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. R.; Heaps, W. S.; Mao, J.; Andrews, A. E.; Burris, J. F.; Miodek, M.; Georgieva, E.

    2002-01-01

    Global atmospheric CO2 measurements are essential to resolving significant discrepancies in our understanding of the global carbon budget and, hence, humankind's role in global climate change. The science measurement requirements for CO2 are, however, extremely demanding (precision approximately 0.3%). We are developing a novel application of a Fabry-Perot interferometer to detect spectral absorption of reflected sunlight by CO2 and O2 in the atmosphere that should be able to achieve sufficient sensitivity and signal-to-noise to measure column CO2 at the target specification. We are currently constructing a prototype instrument for deployment on aircraft. The aircraft version will measure total column CO2 and CO2 below the aircraft as well as O2, which allows normalization of CO2 column amounts for varying surface height and pressure. This instrument will be a valuable asset in carbon budget field studies as well as a useful tool for evaluating existing and future space-based CO2 measurements. We will present the instrument concept, sensitivity calculations, and the results of testing a bench system in the laboratory and outdoors on the ground. We will also discuss our plan for deployment on the aircraft and potential flight applications to the CO2 budget problem.

  15. Methodology for optimally sized centrifugal partition chromatography columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, Sébastien; Marchal, Luc; Jérémy Meucci; Renault, Jean-Hugues; Legrand, Jack; Foucault, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Centrifugal Partition Chromatography (CPC) is a separation process based on the partitioning of solutes between two partially miscible liquid phases. There is no solid support for the stationary phase. The centrifugal acceleration is responsible for both stationary phase retention and mobile phase dispersion. CPC is thus a process based on liquid-liquid mass transfer. The separation efficiency is mainly influenced by the hydrodynamics of the phases in each cell of the column. Thanks to a visualization system, called "Visual CPC", it was observed that the mobile phase can flow through the stationary phase as a sheet, or a spray. Hydrodynamics, which directly governs the instrument efficiency, is directly affected during scale changes, and non-linear phenomena prevent the successful achievement of mastered geometrical scale changes. In this work, a methodology for CPC column sizing is proposed, based on the characterization of the efficiency of advanced cell shapes, taking into account the hydrodynamics. Knowledge about relationship between stationary phase volume, cell efficiency and separation resolution in CPC allowed calculating the optimum cell number for laboratory and industrial scale CPC application. The methodology is highlighted with results on five different geometries from 25 to 5000 mL, for two applications: the separation of alkylbenzene by partitioning with heptane/methanol/water biphasic system; and the separation of peptides by partitioning with n-butanol/acetic acid/water (4/1/5) biphasic system. With this approach, it is possible to predict the optimal CPC column length leading to highest productivity.

  16. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongying Dong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were applied to specimens while being subjected to simulated building fire conditions in a laboratory furnace. Several parameters from the experimental results were comparatively analyzed, including the temperature change, vertical displacement, lateral deflection, fire endurance, and failure characteristics of specimens. The temperature field of specimens was simulated with ABAQUS Software (ABAQUS Inc., Provindence, RI, USA and the results agreed quite well with those from the experiments. Results show that the rate of heat transfer from the surface to the interior of the column increases with the increase of the concrete’s compressive strength for both RAC columns and normal concrete columns. Under the same initial axial force ratio, for columns with the same cross section, those with lower concrete compressive strengths demonstrate better fire resistance performance. The fire resistance performance of RAC columns is better than that of normal concrete columns, with the same concrete compressive strength.

  17. A study of thin-walled Taylor column under the influence of rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kuan-Ruei; Chu, Chin-Chou; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2016-11-01

    An extended study of thin-walled Taylor column under the influence of rotating cylinder is presented with very consistent results in numerical simulations and laboratory experiments. In the previous set-up, the Taylor column effect is produced under the influence of protruded cylinder from the top lid, and the thin-walled Taylor column is formed by draining of the fluid at the bottom. The primary interest of this study is to investigate the influence to thin-walled Taylor column when the cylinder is exerted with a relative rotation rate under very small Rossby number (Ro = U / fR) and Ekman number (Ek = ν / fR2) . The flow patterns are performed with different cylinder height ratios (h/ H) along with varying relative rotation ratio of cylinder to the background α = ω / Ω . Steady-state solutions being solved numerically in the rotating frame are shown to have good agreements with experimental flow visualizations on the resulting appearance of deformed thin-walled Taylor columns. As a result, the thin-walled Taylor column is observed to strengthen up with increasing α, and weakens with decreasing α. In addition, the weakening thin-walled Taylor column is observed to experience a break through transition near the bottom, which penetration diverged the recirculating region into two portions. Supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology, TAIWAN ROC, Contract No's 103-2221-E002-099-MY3; 105-2221-E002-097-MY3.

  18. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Bian, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-12-08

    In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were applied to specimens while being subjected to simulated building fire conditions in a laboratory furnace. Several parameters from the experimental results were comparatively analyzed, including the temperature change, vertical displacement, lateral deflection, fire endurance, and failure characteristics of specimens. The temperature field of specimens was simulated with ABAQUS Software (ABAQUS Inc., Provindence, RI, USA) and the results agreed quite well with those from the experiments. Results show that the rate of heat transfer from the surface to the interior of the column increases with the increase of the concrete's compressive strength for both RAC columns and normal concrete columns. Under the same initial axial force ratio, for columns with the same cross section, those with lower concrete compressive strengths demonstrate better fire resistance performance. The fire resistance performance of RAC columns is better than that of normal concrete columns, with the same concrete compressive strength.

  19. Highly efficient capillary columns packed with superficially porous particles via sequential column packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadway, James W; Wyndham, Kevin D; Jorgenson, James W

    2015-11-27

    Highly efficient capillary columns packed with superficially porous particles were created for use in ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography. Superficially porous particles around 1.5μm in diameter were packed into fused silica capillary columns with 30, 50, and 75μm internal diameters. To create the columns, several capillary columns were serially packed from the same slurry, with packing progress plots being generated to follow the packing of each column. Characterization of these columns using hydroquinone yielded calculated minimum reduced plate heights as low as 1.24 for the most efficient 30μm internal diameter column, corresponding to over 500,000plates/m. At least one highly efficient column (minimum reduced plate height less than 2) was created for all three of the investigated column inner diameters, with the smallest diameter columns having the highest efficiency. This study proves that highly efficient capillary columns can be created using superficially porous particles and shows the efficiency potential of these particles.

  20. Structural model for the dynamic buckling of a column under constant rate compression

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic buckling behavior of a column (rod, beam) under constant rate compression is considered. The buckling is caused by prescribed motion of column ends toward each other with constant velocity. Simple model with one degree of freedom simulating static and dynamic buckling of a column is derived. In the case of small initial disturbances the model yields simple analytical dependencies between the main parameters of the problem: critical force, compression rate, and initial disturbance. It is shown that the time required for buckling is inversely proportional to cubic root of compression velocity and logarithmically depends on the initial disturbance. Analytical expression for critical buckling force as a function of compression velocity is derived. It is shown that in a range of compression rates typical for laboratory experiments the dependence is accurately approximated by a power law with exponent equal to $2/3$. Theoretical findings are supported by available results of laboratory experiments. Keywords...

  1. Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory is a research laboratory which complements the Optical Measurements Laboratory. The laboratory provides for Hall...

  2. Audio Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment and facilities for auditory display research. A primary focus is the performance use of binaurally rendered 3D sound in conjunction...

  3. Elastomers Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Primary capabilities include: elastomer compounding in various sizes (micro, 3x5, 8x12, 8x15 rubber mills); elastomer curing and post curing (two 50-ton presses, one...

  4. A Computer-Interfaced Drop Counter as an Inexpensive Fraction Collector for Column Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Barbara T.

    2008-01-01

    A computer-interfaced drop counter is described that serves as an inexpensive alternative to a fraction collector for column chromatography experiments. Undergraduate biochemistry laboratories frequently do not have the budget to purchase fraction collectors. Protocols that call for the manual measurement of fraction volumes as well as the manual…

  5. A Computer-Interfaced Drop Counter as an Inexpensive Fraction Collector for Column Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Barbara T.

    2008-01-01

    A computer-interfaced drop counter is described that serves as an inexpensive alternative to a fraction collector for column chromatography experiments. Undergraduate biochemistry laboratories frequently do not have the budget to purchase fraction collectors. Protocols that call for the manual measurement of fraction volumes as well as the manual…

  6. Environmental Characterization of Mine Countermeasure Test Ranges: Hydrography and Water Column Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    the performance characteristics of laser imaging systems. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as...5 IMPACT/APPLICATIONS This work is an important aspect of the transition of laser imaging systems to the fleet for mine countermeasure...Environmental Characterization of Mine Countermeasure Test Ranges: Hydrography and Water Column Optics David A. Phinney Bigelow Laboratory for

  7. Dynamic Effects of Diabatization in Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic eects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation with primary focus on the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, rst-principle model has been formulated, which is exible to describe various diabatic distillation congurations....... Dynamic Relative Gain Array and Singular Value Analysis have been applied in a comparative study of a conventional distillation column and a HIDiC. The study showed increased input-output coupling due to diabatization. Feasible SISO control structures for the HIDiC were also found. Control...

  8. Dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation emphasizing the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, first-principle model has been formulated, which is flexible enough to describe various diabatic distillation configurations....... Dynamic Relative Gain Array and Singular Value Analysis have been applied in a comparative study of a conventional distillation column and a HIDiC. The study showed increased input-output coupling due to diabatization. Feasible SISO control structures for the HIDiC were also found and control...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.756 - Beams and columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (.46 m) from the extreme outer face of the column in each direction at the top of the column shaft. (e) Perimeter columns. Perimeter columns shall not be erected unless: (1) The perimeter columns extend a minimum of 48 inches (1.2 m) above the finished floor to permit installation of perimeter safety cables prior...

  10. Electroosmotic Driving Liquid Using Nanosilica Packed Column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Xin CHEN; Guo An LUO; Tao WEN

    2005-01-01

    The electroosmotic pump (EOP) using nanosilica particles packed-bed column was experimentally studied. The relationship between flowrate, pressure and applied voltage of the pump, and pressure-flowrate (P-Q) characteristic were investigated.

  11. Early development of the vertebral column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaal, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The segmental organization of the vertebrate body is most obviously visible in the vertebral column, which consists of a series of vertebral bones and interconnecting joints and ligaments. During embryogenesis, the vertebral column derives from the somites, which are the primary segments of the embryonic paraxial mesoderm. Anatomical, cellular and molecular aspects of vertebral column development have been of interest to developmental biologists for more than 150 years. This review briefly summarizes the present knowledge on early steps of vertebral column development in amniotes, starting from sclerotome formation and leading to the establishment of the anatomical bauplan of the spine composed of vertebral bodies, vertebral arches, intervertebral discs and ribs, and their specific axial identities along the body axis.

  12. Modeling Tropical Precipitation in a Single Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Bretherton, Christopher S.

    2000-12-01

    A modified formulation of the traditional single column model for representing a limited area near the equator is proposed. This formulation can also be considered a two-column model in the limit as the area represented by one of the columns becomes very large compared to the other. Only a single column is explicitly modeled, but its free tropospheric temperature, rather than its mean vertical velocity, is prescribed. This allows the precipitation and vertical velocity to be true prognostic variables, as in prior analytical theories of tropical precipitation. Two models developed by other authors are modified according to the proposed formulation. The first is the intermediate atmospheric model of J. D. Neelin and N. Zeng, but with the horizontal connections between columns broken, rendering it a set of disconnected column models. The second is the column model of N. O. Rennó, K. A. Emanuel, and P. H. Stone. In the first model, the set of disconnected column models is run with a fixed temperature that is uniform in the Tropics, and insolation, SST, and surface wind speed taken from a control run of the original model. The column models produce a climatological precipitation field that is grossly similar to that of the control run, despite that the circulation implied by the column models is not required to conserve mass. The addition of horizontal moisture advection by the wind from the control run substantially improves the simulation in dry regions. In the second model the sensitivity of the modeled steady-state precipitation and relative humidity to varying SST and wind speed is examined. The transition from shallow to deep convection is simulated in a `Lagrangian' calculation in which the column model is subjected to an SST that increases in time. In this simulation, the onset of deep convection is delayed to a higher SST than in the steady-state case, due to the effect of horizontal moisture advection (viewed in a Lagrangian reference frame). In both of the

  13. Nonlinear control of high purity distillation columns

    OpenAIRE

    Groebel, Markus; Allgöwer, Frank; Storz, Markus; Gilles, Ernst Dieter

    1994-01-01

    Two simple models of distillation columns are studied to investigate their suitability for the practical use with exact I/O-linearization. An extension of exact I/O-linearization, the asymptotically exact I/O-linearization is applied to the control of a high purity distillation column, using one of these models to derive the static state feedback law. Simulation studies demonstrate the advantage of asymptotically exact I/O-linearization versus classical exact I/O-linearization techniques. Exp...

  14. The Dissipative Column: A New Hysteretic Damper

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Palazzo; Paolo Castaldo; Ivana Marino

    2015-01-01

    A new replaceable hysteretic damper to better control seismic building damage, consisting of two or more adjacent steel vertical elements connected to each other with continuous mild/low strength steel shear links, is proposed and investigated in this paper. New Dampers, called Dissipative Columns (DC), continuously linked with X-shaped steel plates, provide additional stiffness and damping to a lateral system by using a basic and minimally invasive construction element: the column. Working i...

  15. Fuzzy Based composition Control of Distillation Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guru.R

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a control scheme based on fuzzy logic for a methanol - water system of bubble cap distillation column. Fuzzy rule base and Inference System of fuzzy (FIS is planned to regulatethe reflux ratio (manipulated variable to obtain the preferred product composition (methanol for a distillation column. Comparisons are made with conventional controller and the results confirmed the potentials of the proposed strategy of fuzzy control.

  16. The handedness of historiated spiral columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzin, Robert

    2016-11-17

    Trajan's Column in Rome (AD 113) was the model for a modest number of other spiral columns decorated with figural, narrative imagery from antiquity to the present day. Most of these wind upwards to the right, often with a congruent spiral staircase within. A brief introductory consideration of antique screw direction in mechanical devices and fluted columns suggests that the former may have been affected by the handedness of designers and the latter by a preference for symmetry. However, for the historiated columns that are the main focus of this article, the determining factor was likely script direction. The manner in which this operated is considered, as well as competing mechanisms that might explain exceptions. A related phenomenon is the reversal of the spiral in a non-trivial number of reproductions of the antique columns, from Roman coinage to Renaissance and baroque drawings and engravings. Finally, the consistent inattention in academic literature to the spiral direction of historiated columns and the repeated publication of erroneous earlier reproductions warrants further consideration.

  17. Gas Chromatograph Method Optimization Trade Study for RESOLVE: 20-meter Column v. 8-meter Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huz, Kateryna

    2014-01-01

    RESOLVE is the payload on a Class D mission, Resource Prospector, which will prospect for water and other volatile resources at a lunar pole. The RESOLVE payload's primary scientific purpose includes determining the presence of water on the moon in the lunar regolith. In order to detect the water, a gas chromatograph (GC) will be used in conjunction with a mass spectrometer (MS). The goal of the experiment was to compare two GC column lengths and recommend which would be best for RESOLVE's purposes. Throughout the experiment, an Inficon Fusion GC and an Inficon Micro GC 3000 were used. The Fusion had a 20m long column with 0.25mm internal diameter (Id). The Micro GC 3000 had an 8m long column with a 0.32mm Id. By varying the column temperature and column pressure while holding all other parameters constant, the ideal conditions for testing with each column length in their individual instrument configurations were determined. The criteria used for determining the optimal method parameters included (in no particular order) (1) quickest run time, (2) peak sharpness, and (3) peak separation. After testing numerous combinations of temperature and pressure, the parameters for each column length that resulted in the most optimal data given my three criteria were selected. The ideal temperature and pressure for the 20m column were 95 C and 50psig. At this temperature and pressure, the peaks were separated and the retention times were shorter compared to other combinations. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 operated better at lower temperature mainly due to the shorter 8m column. The optimal column temperature and pressure were 70 C and 30psig. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 8m column had worse separation than the Inficon Fusion 20m column, but was able to separate water within a shorter run time. Therefore, the most significant tradeoff between the two column lengths was peak separation of the sample versus run time. After performing several tests, it was concluded that better

  18. Studies and research concerning BNFP pilot-scale pulsed columns: column profile and holdup studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cermak, A. F.

    1980-11-01

    Experimental studies were conducted on pilot-scaled pulsed columns for the purpose of obtaining data for verification of contactor computer programs. This work is in support of safeguards programs related to determination of near real-time inventories in pulsed columns. Holdup tests were performed resulting in the derivation of an empirical equation for estimation of the dispersed phase holdup in a column. Uranium solvent extraction mass-transfer tests were conducted in which all four process cycles were simulated under coprocessing flowsheet conditions. Extensive data were obtained during these tests on uranium profiles and inventories within the columns. Transient profile data were also determined between selected runs under the tested operating conditions. No concentration peaks could be observed during the transient period. Based on the extensive inventory data taken, empirical equations were developed for relating uranium inventory in a column to the test parameters. These equations were found useful for predicting and estimating the column inventory under the known run conditions.

  19. The Lack of Affect and Imbalances of Character--An Interpretation of Mao Zhen in Twenty-two Nights in Spring%情感缺失与角色失衡--《春天的二十二个夜晚》主人公毛榛形象解析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单静

    2014-01-01

    《春天的二十二个夜晚》是徐坤的一部半自叙传小说,是徐坤人生体验的艺术再现和审美创造。它通过对主人公毛榛的成长经历的内部和外部的描述展现了一代女人甚至一类女人的生存遭际和情感体验,展现了职业女性成长过程中的得与失,以及她们在事业与家庭之间角色转换的失衡。这部小说强烈的时代特征,对当代文学中职业女性的生存状况的研究具有重要意义。%Twenty-two Nights in Spring is a Semi-autobiographical novel of Xu Kun,and it is aesthetic creation and art reproduction of his life experience . Based on internal and external description of Mao Zhen's grow-up experience , this paper presents the living condition and emotional experience of generation of women's , even a type of women , as well as the gain or loss in the process of female professional grow-up , the balance of changing roles between family and enterprise . The prominent feature of times in this novel has important role in the research for living condition of professional female.

  20. RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E

    2007-02-28

    The potential use of a peat bed to treat the H-12 Outfall discharge to bring it to new compliance limits was previously investigated and reported utilizing a 7 hour retention time. The influence of retention time (contact time) of water with peat moss on the removal of copper from the water was investigated under laboratory conditions using vertical flow peat moss columns. Reduction of the necessary retention time has a large influence on the design sizing of any peat bed that would be constructed to treat the H-12 discharge on a full scale basis. Retention times of 5 hours, 3 hours and 1 hour were tested to determine the copper removal by the peat columns using vertical flow. Water samples were collected after 4, 8, 12, and 16 water volumes had passed through the columns and analyzed for a suite of metals, with quantitative emphasis on copper. Laboratory results indicated that copper removal was very high at each of the 3 retention times tested, ranging from 99.6 % removal at 5 and 3 hours to 98.8% removal at 1 hour. All these values are much lower that the new compliance limit for the outfall. The results also indicated that most divalent metals were removed to their normal reporting detection limit for the analytical methods used, including zinc. Lead levels in the H-12 discharge used in this study were below PQL in all samples analyzed. While each of the retention times studied removed copper very well, there were indications that 1 hour is probably too short for an operational, long-term facility. At that retention time, there was about 6% compaction of the peat in the column due to the water velocity, and this may affect long term hydraulic conductivity of the peat bed. At that retention time, copper concentration in the effluent was higher than the other times tested, although still very low. Because of the potential compacting and somewhat reduced removal efficiency at a 1 hour retention time, it would be prudent to design to at least a 3 hour retention

  1. Structural Decoupling and Disturbance Rejection in a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahar, Mehrdad; Jantzen, Jan; Commault, C.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references.......Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references....

  2. Column Selection for Biomedical Analysis Supported by Column Classification Based on Four Test Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenis, Alina; Rekowska, Natalia; Bączek, Tomasz

    2016-01-21

    This article focuses on correlating the column classification obtained from the method created at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KUL), with the chromatographic resolution attained in biomedical separation. In the KUL system, each column is described with four parameters, which enables estimation of the FKUL value characterising similarity of those parameters to the selected reference stationary phase. Thus, a ranking list based on the FKUL value can be calculated for the chosen reference column, then correlated with the results of the column performance test. In this study, the column performance test was based on analysis of moclobemide and its two metabolites in human plasma by liquid chromatography (LC), using 18 columns. The comparative study was performed using traditional correlation of the FKUL values with the retention parameters of the analytes describing the column performance test. In order to deepen the comparative assessment of both data sets, factor analysis (FA) was also used. The obtained results indicated that the stationary phase classes, closely related according to the KUL method, yielded comparable separation for the target substances. Therefore, the column ranking system based on the FKUL-values could be considered supportive in the choice of the appropriate column for biomedical analysis.

  3. Column flotation of bitumen at Fort Hills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizama, H.M. [Teck Cominco, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Romero, D. [UTS Energy Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Armour, M. [Petro-Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-05-15

    Flotation columns are used by mineral processors to separate mineral species. The separation is based on the premise that different mineral particles have different surface hydrophobicities. There are 2 carrier phases, notably air bubbles moving up and aqueous pulp moving down. Hydrophobic particles predominantly adhere to rising air bubbles and form a froth, while hydrophilic particles remain in aqueous suspension and flow down and out the bottom of the column. This paper described a demonstration plant near Fort McMurray where bitumen extraction was tested. The plant included 2 columns for bitumen flotation. Oil sands material was passed through a roll sizer and fed to a countercurrent drum separator, where it was mixed with water at 75 degrees C. Column data from the demonstration plant provided the opportunity to examine the separation behaviour during flotation of bitumen. The bitumen grade was described only in terms of bitumen content and solids content in order to simplify the interpretation of the bitumen flotation data. Bitumen/solids separation in the first column was successful at 50 to 60 degrees C, with feeds having bitumen grades between 1 and 19 per cent, and where the solids had about 60 per cent fines. Bitumen/solids separation did not occur in the second column at 50 to 60 degrees C, with feeds having bitumen grades between 8 and 63 per cent, and where the solids had about 90 per cent fines. The lack of separation was probably due to high solids entrainment in the flotation froth. It was concluded that bitumen column flotation data can be analyzed and interpreted by adopting mineral processing principles. Bitumen/solids separation can be evaluated and predicted by plotting solids recovery as a function of bitumen recovery. 7 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  4. Design and Prototype of an Automated Column-Switching HPLC System for Radiometabolite Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasdev, Neil; Collier, Thomas Lee

    2016-08-17

    Column-switching high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is extensively used for the critical analysis of radiolabeled ligands and their metabolites in plasma. However, the lack of streamlined apparatus and consequently varying protocols remain as a challenge among positron emission tomography laboratories. We report here the prototype apparatus and implementation of a fully automated and simplified column-switching procedure to allow for the easy and automated determination of radioligands and their metabolites in up to 5 mL of plasma. The system has been used with conventional UV and coincidence radiation detectors, as well as with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  5. Design and Prototype of an Automated Column-Switching HPLC System for Radiometabolite Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Vasdev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Column-switching high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC is extensively used for the critical analysis of radiolabeled ligands and their metabolites in plasma. However, the lack of streamlined apparatus and consequently varying protocols remain as a challenge among positron emission tomography laboratories. We report here the prototype apparatus and implementation of a fully automated and simplified column-switching procedure to allow for the easy and automated determination of radioligands and their metabolites in up to 5 mL of plasma. The system has been used with conventional UV and coincidence radiation detectors, as well as with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  6. Post Column Derivatization Using Reaction Flow High Performance Liquid Chromatography Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan; Hua, Stanley; Kocic, Danijela; Camenzuli, Michelle; Dennis, Gary; Shalliker, Andrew

    2016-04-26

    A protocol for the use of reaction flow high performance liquid chromatography columns for methods employing post column derivatization (PCD) is presented. A major difficulty in adapting PCD to modern HPLC systems and columns is the need for large volume reaction coils that enable reagent mixing and then the derivatization reaction to take place. This large post column dead volume leads to band broadening, which results in a loss of observed separation efficiency and indeed detection in sensitivity. In reaction flow post column derivatization (RF-PCD) the derivatization reagent(s) are pumped against the flow of mobile phase into either one or two of the outer ports of the reaction flow column where it is mixed with column effluent inside a frit housed within the column end fitting. This technique allows for more efficient mixing of the column effluent and derivatization reagent(s) meaning that the volume of the reaction loops can be minimized or even eliminated altogether. It has been found that RF-PCD methods perform better than conventional PCD methods in terms of observed separation efficiency and signal to noise ratio. A further advantage of RF-PCD techniques is the ability to monitor effluent coming from the central port in its underivatized state. RF-PCD has currently been trialed on a relatively small range of post column reactions, however, there is currently no reason to suggest that RF-PCD could not be adapted to any existing one or two component (as long as both reagents are added at the same time) post column derivatization reaction.

  7. Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory (Saxton Laboratory) is a state-of-the-art facility for conducting transportation operations research. The laboratory...

  8. Robust Matrix Completion with Corrupted Columns

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yudong; Caramanis, Constantine; Sanghavi, Sujay

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of matrix completion, when some number of the columns are arbitrarily corrupted, potentially by a malicious adversary. It is well-known that standard algorithms for matrix completion can return arbitrarily poor results, if even a single column is corrupted. What can be done if a large number, or even a constant fraction of columns are corrupted? In this paper, we study this very problem, and develop an efficient algorithm for its solution. Our results show that with a vanishing fraction of observed entries, it is nevertheless possible to succeed in performing matrix completion, even when the number of corrupted columns grows. When the number of corruptions is as high as a constant fraction of the total number of columns, we show that again exact matrix completion is possible, but in this case our algorithm requires many more -- a constant fraction -- of observations. One direct application comes from robust collaborative filtering. Here, some number of users are so-called mani...

  9. RDX degradation in bioaugmented model aquifer columns under aerobic and low oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Mark E; Hatzinger, Paul B; Condee, Charles W; Andaya, Christina; Rezes, Rachel; Michalsen, Mandy M; Crocker, Fiona H; Indest, Karl J; Jung, Carina M; Alon Blakeney, G; Istok, Jonathan D; Hammett, Steven A

    2017-07-01

    Degradation of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in laboratory columns following biostimulation and bioaugmentation was investigated using sediment and groundwater from a contaminated aquifer at a US Navy facility. No RDX degradation was observed following aerobic biostimulation with either fructose or lactate (both 0.1 mM) prior to bioaugmentation. Replicate columns were then bioaugmented with either Gordonia sp. KTR9, Pseudomonas fluorescens I-C (Ps I-C), or both strains. Under aerobic conditions (influent dissolved oxygen (DO) >6 mg/L), RDX was degraded following the addition of fructose, and to a lesser extent with lactate, in columns bioaugmented with KTR9. No degradation was observed in columns bioaugmented with only Ps I-C under aerobic conditions, consistent with the known anaerobic RDX degradation pathway for this strain. When influent DO was reduced to RDX degradation was observed in the KTR9-bioaugmented column, and some degradation was also observed in the Ps I-C-bioaugmented column. After DO levels were kept below 1 mg/L for more than a month, columns bioaugmented with KTR9 became unresponsive to fructose addition, while RDX degradation was still observed in the Ps I-C-bioaugmented columns. These results indicate that bioaugmentation with the aerobic RDX degrader KTR9 could be effective at sites where site geology or geochemistry allow higher DO levels to be maintained. Further, inclusion of strains capable of anoxic RDX degradation such as Ps I-C may facilitate bimodal RDX removal when DO levels decrease.

  10. Lunar laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  11. Virtual Laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Hut, P

    2006-01-01

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simul...

  12. Method of analysis and quality-assurance practices for determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry at the U.S. Geological Survey California District Organic Chemistry Laboratory, 1996-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Baker, Lucian M.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2000-01-01

    A method of analysis and quality-assurance practices were developed to study the fate and transport of pesticides in the San Francisco Bay-Estuary by the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended-particulate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide and the pesticides were eluted with three cartridge volumes of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1) solution. The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for pesticides ranged from 0.002 to 0.025 microgram per liter for 1-liter samples. Recoveries ranged from 44 to 140 percent for 25 pesticides in samples of organic-free reagent water and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Bay water fortified at 0.05 and 0.50 microgram per liter. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges ranged from 10 to 257 days.

  13. Buckling driven debonding in sandwich columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Rasmus Christian

    2008-01-01

    A compression loaded sandwich column that contains a debond is analyzed using a geometrically non-linear finite element model. The model includes a cohesive zone along one face sheet/core interface whereby the debond can extend by interface crack growth. Two geometrical imperfections are introduced......; a global imperfection of the sandwich column axis and a local imperfection of the debonded face sheet axis. The model predicts the sandwich column to be very sensitive to the initial debond length and the local face sheet imperfection. The study shows that the sensitivity to the face sheet imperfection...... results from two mechanisms: (a) interaction of local debond buckling and global buckling and (b) the development of a damaged zone at the debond crack tip. Based on the pronounced imperfection sensitivity, the author predicts that an experimental measurement of the strength of sandwich structures may...

  14. Non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Patrick R.; Wheeler, David R.

    2007-09-25

    A non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column comprises a planar substrate having a plurality of through holes, a top lid and a bottom lid bonded to opposite surfaces of the planar substrate, and inlet and outlet ports for injection of a sample gas and elution of separated analytes. A plurality of such planar substrates can be aligned and stacked to provide a longer column length having a small footprint. Furthermore, two or more separate channels can enable multi-channel or multi-dimensional gas chromatography. The through holes preferably have a circular cross section and can be coated with a stationary phase material or packed with a porous packing material. Importantly, uniform stationary phase coatings can be obtained and band broadening can be minimized with the circular channels. A heating or cooling element can be disposed on at least one of the lids to enable temperature programming of the column.

  15. Computational analysis of ozonation in bubble columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinones-Bolanos, E. [Univ. of Guelph, School of Engineering, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)]|[Univ. de Cartagena, Facultad de Ciencias e Ingenieria, Cartagena de Indias (Colombia); Zhou, H.; Otten, L. [Univ. of Guelph, School of Engineering, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: hzhou@uoguelph.ca

    2002-06-15

    This paper presents a new computational ozonation model based on the principle of computational fluid dynamics along with the kinetics of ozone decay and microbial inactivation to predict the performance of ozone disinfection in fine bubble columns. The model can be represented using a mixture two-phase flow model to simulate the hydrodynamics of the water flow and using two transport equations to track the concentration profiles of ozone and microorganisms along the height of the column, respectively. The applicability of this model was then demonstrated by comparing the simulated ozone concentrations with experimental measurements obtained from a pilot scale fine bubble column. One distinct advantage of this approach is that it does not require the prerequisite assumptions such as plug flow condition, perfect mixing, tanks-in-series, uniform radial or longitudinal dispersion in predicting the performance of disinfection contactors without carrying out expensive and tedious tracer studies. (author)

  16. Methylmercury production in the marine water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, G.; Davies, I. M.

    1981-03-01

    Although the biosynthesis of methylmercury in sediments is well established1, this is not necessarily the exclusive natural source of methylmercury entering the marine food chain, particularly commercial fish and shellfish species for human consumption. An examination of mercury levels in freshwater fish2, collected from a lake with a history of industrial mercury contamination, suggested that levels in fish are controlled in part by mercury in suspension and it followed that methylation should occur in the water column. Although methylmercury is present in seawater in coastal areas receiving discharges of waste containing either inorganic mercury3 or methylmercury4 there is no evidence that methylmercury is actually formed in the water column. We now present data which demonstrate that inorganic mercury can be methylated in the water column and we compare this production with that known to occur in marine sediments.

  17. Neutron camera employing row and column summations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clonts, Lloyd G.; Diawara, Yacouba; Donahue, Jr, Cornelius; Montcalm, Christopher A.; Riedel, Richard A.; Visscher, Theodore

    2016-06-14

    For each photomultiplier tube in an Anger camera, an R.times.S array of preamplifiers is provided to detect electrons generated within the photomultiplier tube. The outputs of the preamplifiers are digitized to measure the magnitude of the signals from each preamplifier. For each photomultiplier tube, a corresponding summation circuitry including R row summation circuits and S column summation circuits numerically add the magnitudes of the signals from preamplifiers for each row and for each column to generate histograms. For a P.times.Q array of photomultiplier tubes, P.times.Q summation circuitries generate P.times.Q row histograms including R entries and P.times.Q column histograms including S entries. The total set of histograms include P.times.Q.times.(R+S) entries, which can be analyzed by a position calculation circuit to determine the locations of events (detection of a neutron).

  18. Accelerating selected columns of the density matrix computations via approximate column selection

    CERN Document Server

    Damle, Anil; Ying, Lexing

    2016-01-01

    Localized representation of the Kohn-Sham subspace plays an important role in quantum chemistry and materials science. The recently developed selected columns of the density matrix (SCDM) method [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 1463, 2015] is a simple and robust procedure for finding a localized representation of a set of Kohn-Sham orbitals from an insulating system. The SCDM method allows the direct construction of a well conditioned (or even orthonormal) and localized basis for the Kohn-Sham subspace. The SCDM procedure avoids the use of an optimization procedure and does not depend on any adjustable parameters. The most computationally expensive step of the SCDM method is a column pivoted QR factorization that identifies the important columns for constructing the localized basis set. In this paper, we develop a two stage approximate column selection strategy to find the important columns at much lower computational cost. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this process using a dissociation process of a BH$_{3}...

  19. Final Report, Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2003-05-31

    The Flooding Predictor is an advanced process control strategy comprising a patented pattern-recognition methodology that identifies pre-flood patterns discovered to precede flooding events in distillation columns. The grantee holds a U.S. patent on the modeling system. The technology was validated at the Separations Research Program, The University of Texas at Austin under a grant from the U. S. Department of Energy, Inventions & Innovation Program. Distillation tower flooding occurs at abnormally high vapor and/or liquid rates. The loss in tray efficiencies is attributed to unusual behavior of liquid inventories inside the column leading to conditions of flooding of the space in between trays with liquid. Depending on the severity of the flood condition, consequences range from off spec products to equipment damage and tower shutdown. This non-intrusive pattern recognition methodology, processes signal data obtained from existing column instrumentation. Once the pattern is identified empirically, it is modeled and coded into the plant's distributed control system. The control system is programmed to briefly "unload" the tower each time the pattern appears. The unloading takes the form of a momentary reduction in column severity, e.g., decrease bottom temperature, reflux or tower throughput. Unloading the tower briefly at the pre-flood state causes long-term column operation to become significantly more stable - allowing an increase in throughput and/or product purity. The technology provides a wide range of value between optimization and flooding. When a distillation column is not running at capacity, it should be run in such a way ("pushed") that optimal product purity is achieved. Additional benefits include low implementation and maintenance costs, and a high level of console operator acceptance. The previous commercial applications experienced 98% uptime over a four-year period. Further, the technology is unique in its ability to distinguish between

  20. Retention Models on Core-Shell Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandera, Pavel; Hájek, Tomáš; Růžičková, Marie

    2017-07-13

    A thin, active shell layer on core-shell columns provides high efficiency in HPLC at moderately high pressures. We revisited three models of mobile phase effects on retention for core-shell columns in mixed aqueous-organic mobile phases: linear solvent strength and Snyder-Soczewiński two-parameter models and a three-parameter model. For some compounds, two-parameter models show minor deviations from linearity due to neglect of possible minor retention in pure weak solvent, which is compensated for in the three-parameter model, which does not explicitly assume either the adsorption or the partition retention mechanism in normal- or reversed-phase systems. The model retention equation can be formulated as a function of solute retention factors of nonionic compounds in pure organic solvent and in pure water (or aqueous buffer) and of the volume fraction of an either aqueous or organic solvent component in a two-component mobile phase. With core-shell columns, the impervious solid core does not participate in the retention process. Hence, the thermodynamic retention factors, defined as the ratio of the mass of the analyte mass contained in the stationary phase to its mass in the mobile phase in the column, should not include the particle core volume. The values of the thermodynamic factors are lower than the retention factors determined using a convention including the inert core in the stationary phase. However, both conventions produce correct results if consistently used to predict the effects of changing mobile phase composition on retention. We compared three types of core-shell columns with C18-, phenyl-hexyl-, and biphenyl-bonded phases. The core-shell columns with phenyl-hexyl- and biphenyl-bonded ligands provided lower errors in two-parameter model predictions for alkylbenzenes, phenolic acids, and flavonoid compounds in comparison with C18-bonded ligands.

  1. Complex osteotomies vertebral column resection and decancellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Ibrahim; Bourghli, Anouar; Boissière, Louis; Vital, Jean-Marc; Barrey, Cédric

    2014-07-01

    Pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) is nowadays widely used to treat sagittal imbalance. Some complex malalignment cases cannot be treated by a PSO, whereas the imbalance is coronal or mixed or the sagittal imbalance is major and cannot be treated by a single PSO. The aim of this article was to review these complex situations--coronal imbalance, mixed imbalance, two-level PSO, vertebral column resection, and vertebral column decancellation, and to focus on their specificities. It wills also to evoke the utility of navigation in these complex cases.

  2. Multi-Column Experimental Test Bed Using CaSDB MOF for Xe/Kr Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welty, Amy Keil [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Greenhalgh, Mitchell Randy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garn, Troy Gerry [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Processing of spent nuclear fuel produces off-gas from which several volatile radioactive components must be separated for further treatment or storage. As part of the Off-gas Sigma Team, parallel research at INL and PNNL has produced several promising sorbents for the selective capture of xenon and krypton from these off-gas streams. In order to design full-scale treatment systems, sorbents that are promising on a laboratory scale must be proven under process conditions to be considered for pilot and then full-scale use. To that end, a bench-scale multi-column system with capability to test multiple sorbents was designed and constructed at INL. This report details bench-scale testing of CaSDB MOF, produced at PNNL, and compares the results to those reported last year using INL engineered sorbents. Two multi-column tests were performed with the CaSDB MOF installed in the first column, followed with HZ-PAN installed in the second column. The CaSDB MOF column was placed in a Stirling cryocooler while the cryostat was employed for the HZ-PAN column. Test temperatures of 253 K and 191 K were selected for the first column while the second column was held at 191 K for both tests. Calibrated volume sample bombs were utilized for gas stream analyses. At the conclusion of each test, samples were collected from each column and analyzed for gas composition. While CaSDB MOF does appear to have good capacity for Xe, the short time to initial breakthrough would make design of a continuous adsorption/desorption cycle difficult, requiring either very large columns or a large number of smaller columns. Because of the tenacity with which Xe and Kr adhere to the material once adsorbed, this CaSDB MOF may be more suitable for use as a long-term storage solution. Further testing is recommended to determine if CaSDB MOF is suitable for this purpose.

  3. Copper biosorption on immobilized seaweed biomass: column breakthrough characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The biosorption of copper by the brown seaweed Sargassum baccularia, immobilized onto polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) gel beads, was investigated with fixed-bed experiments. Laboratory-scale column tests were performed to determine breakthrough curves with varying flow rates and feed concentrations. A theoretical fixed-bed model, known as the Bohart-Adams equation, was evaluated in simulating the experimental breakthrough curves. The Bohart-Adams model qualitatively predicted the breakthrough trends. PVA-immobilized seaweed biomass beads were amenable to efficient regeneration with aqueous solution containing the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The biosorbent retained most of its original uptake capacity over three cycles of use. The excellent reusability of the biosorbent could lead to the development of a viable metal remediation technology.

  4. Column flotation in coal: does it make `cents?`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurila, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Column flotation technology was introduced into the coal industry in 1986. The column can produce higher grade concentrates than conventional cells. This has created a niche market for columns in recovering ultrafine (-100 mesh) coal from waste streams. However, column flotation is much more expensive than froth flotation and columns can only process a maximum of 20 tons per hour per unit and consume more reagents than conventional cells. Researchers at Michigan Technological University have found that baffles along the axis of a column vastly improved performance. Today only two companies in the US participate in the column flotation market, ICF Kaiser and Deister.

  5. Sample Disturbance in Resonant Column Test Measurement of Small-Strain Shear-Wave Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Nicola; Stokoe, K. H.

    The accurate assessment of dynamic soil properties is a crucial step in the solution process of geotechnical earthquake engineering problems. The resonant column test is one of the ordinary procedures for dynamic characterization of soil. In this paper, the impact of sample disturbance on the resonant column test measurement of small-strain S-wave velocity is examined. Sample disturbance is shown to be a function of the ratio of the laboratory to field S-wave velocities: Vs, lab/Vs,field. The influence of four parameters - soil stiffness, soil plasticity index, in-situ sample depth and in-situ effective mean confining pressure - on sample disturbance is investigated both qualitatively and quantitatively. The relative importance of each parameter in predicting the small-strain field S-wave velocity from the resonant column test values is illustrated and predictive equations are presented.

  6. Application of column tests and electrical resistivity methods for leachate transport monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wychowaniak Dorota

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of the human civilization leads to the pollution of environment. One of the contamination which are a real threat to soil and groundwater are leachates from landfills. In this paper the solute transport through soil was considered. For this purpose, the laboratory column tests of chlorides tracer and leachates transport on two soil samples have been carried out. Furthermore, the electrical resistivity method was applied as auxiliary tool to follow the movements of solute through the soil column what allowed to compare between the results obtained with column test method and electrical resistivity measurements. Breakthrough curves obtained by conductivity and resistivity methods represents similar trends which leads to the conclusion about the suitability of electrical resistivity methods for contamination transport monitoring in soil-water systems.

  7. The industrial practice and development of flotation column in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jiongtian; Zhang Shuangquan [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China). Dept. of Energy Utilization and Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    This paper reviewed the developing course of the flotation column since the 1960`s in China. Based on the practical data from several coal preparation plants, two types of flotation columns (the pressure aerated column and the jetting-cyclone column) were compared by their operation, performance and the reasons why they succeeded in the coal industry in China. The paper points out that the flotation column has come into commercial use and has good application prospects in China.

  8. Wall-Friction Support of Vertical Loads in Submerged Sand and Gravel Columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, O. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vollmer, H. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hepa, V. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Laboratory studies of the ‘floor-loads’ under submerged vertical columns of sand and/or gravel indicate that such loads can be approximated by a buoyancy-corrected Janssen-silo-theory-like relationship. Similar to conditions in storage silos filled with dry granular solids, most of the weight of the sand or gravel is supported by wall friction forces. Laboratory measurements of the loads on the floor at the base of the water-filled columns (up to 25-diameters tall) indicate that the extra floor-load from the addition of the granular solid never exceeded the load that would exist under an unsupported (wide) bed of submerged sand or gravel that has a total depth corresponding to only two column-diameters. The measured floorloads reached an asymptotic maximum value when the depth of granular material in the columns was only three or four pipe-diameters, and never increased further as the columns were filled to the top (e.g. up to heights of 10 to 25 diameters). The floor-loads were stable and remained the same for days after filling. Aggressive tapping (e.g. hitting the containing pipe on the outside, manually with a wrench up and down the height and around the circumference) could increase (and occasionally decrease) the floor load substantially, but there was no sudden collapse or slumping to a state without significant wall friction effects. Considerable effort was required, repeatedly tapping over almost the entire column wall periphery, in order to produce floor-loads that corresponded to the total buoyancy-corrected weight of granular material added to the columns. Projecting the observed laboratory behavior to field conditions would imply that a stable floor-load condition, with only a slightly higher total floor pressure than the preexisting hydrostatic-head, would exist after a water-filled bore-hole is filled with sand or gravel. Significant seismic vibration (either a large nearby event or many micro-seismic events over an extended period) would likely

  9. Virtual Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, P.

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations playa central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

  10. Reducing axial mixing in flotation columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Taweel, A.M.; Ramadan, A.M. [Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, Halifax (Canada). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Moharam, M.R.; Hassan, T.A. [Al Azhar Univ., Cairo (Egypt); El Mofty, S.M. [Cairo Univ., Giza (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The axial mixing characteristics of a pilot-scale flotation column were investigated with the objective of identifying means to mitigate the extent of axial mixing that adversely affects its grade/recovery performance. A wide range of design and operating conditions wa investigated and the experimental results, obtained using the dynamic response method, were analyzed using three axial mixing models. The dynamic response of the column can best be described using the axial dispersion model. The results obtained suggest that the value of the axial dispersion coefficient, E{sub L}, can be significantly reduced by judicial selection of hydrodynamic conditions and/or the use of column inserts that suppress the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities inherent to the operation of conventional flotation columns. Up to 40% reduction in the value of E{sub L} was thus obtained by using spargers that produce more uniform bubble sizes, while up to 30% reductions were obtained by controlling the residual frother concentration. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  11. On Row Rank Equal Column Rank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    We will prove a well-known theorem in Linear Algebra, that is, for any "m x n" matrix the dimension of row space and column space are the same. The proof is based on the subject of "elementary matrices" and "reduced row-echelon" form of a matrix.

  12. Robust Geometric Control of a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kymmel, Mogens; Andersen, Henrik Weisberg

    1987-01-01

    A frequency domain method, which makes it possible to adjust multivariable controllers with respect to both nominal performance and robustness, is presented. The basic idea in the approach is that the designer assigns objectives such as steady-state tracking, maximum resonance peaks, bandwidth, m...... is used to examine and improve geometric control of a binary distillation column....

  13. The Special Column of Primate Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baoguo LI; Guest Editor

    2010-01-01

    @@ It is a long-term policy to publish SPECIAL COLUMNs in Current Zoology, and I am delighted that the journal is publishing this special colunm devoted to the topic of Primate Behavior. The eight papers in this seetion present significant new data and synthesize these findings with existing information on sexual selection of human-being and behaviors of living primates.

  14. "Dry-column" chromatography of plant pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woeller, F. H.; Lehwalt, M. F.; Oyama, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    Separation of plant pigments which can be accomplished on thin-layer silica plates with mixture of petroleum ether, halocarbon, acetone, and polar solvent can be readily translated into dry-column technique that yields reproducible chromatograms after elution in fashion of liquid chromatography with fluorimeter as detector. Best solvent system was found to be mixture of petroleum ether, dichloromethane, acetone, and ethyl acetate.

  15. WATER COLUMN DATA AND SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water samples collected monthly, for 18 months, from six sites in the Laguna Madre were analyzed to identify and quantify phytopigments using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). In addition, water column pigment and nutrient data were acquired at 12 stations in Upper ...

  16. Flexural buckling of fire exposed aluminium columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Twilt, L.; Soetens, F.

    2009-01-01

    In order to study buckling of fire exposed aluminium columns, a finite element model is developed. The results of this model are verified with experiments. Based on a parametric study with the finite element model, it is concluded that the simple calculation model for flexural buckling of fire expos

  17. Contexts for Column Addition and Subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Fernandez, Jorge M.; Velazquez Estrella, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss their approach to column addition and subtraction algorithms. Adapting an original idea of Paul Cobb and Erna Yackel's from "A Contextual Investigation of Three-Digit Addition and Subtraction" related to packing and unpacking candy in a candy factory, the authors provided an analogous context by…

  18. Contexts for Column Addition and Subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Fernandez, Jorge M.; Velazquez Estrella, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss their approach to column addition and subtraction algorithms. Adapting an original idea of Paul Cobb and Erna Yackel's from "A Contextual Investigation of Three-Digit Addition and Subtraction" related to packing and unpacking candy in a candy factory, the authors provided an analogous context by…

  19. The effect of column purification on cDNA indirect labelling for microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss John Z

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The success of the microarray reproducibility is dependent upon the performance of standardized procedures. Since the introduction of microarray technology for the analysis of global gene expression, reproducibility of results among different laboratories has been a major problem. Two of the main contributors to this variability are the use of different microarray platforms and different laboratory practices. In this paper, we address the latter question in terms of how variation in one of the steps of a labelling procedure affects the cDNA product prior to microarray hybridization. Results We used a standard procedure to label cDNA for microarray hybridization and employed different types of column chromatography for cDNA purification. After purifying labelled cDNA, we used the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer and agarose gel electrophoresis to assess the quality of the labelled cDNA before its hybridization onto a microarray platform. There were major differences in the cDNA profile (i.e. cDNA fragment lengths and abundance as a result of using four different columns for purification. In addition, different columns have different efficiencies to remove rRNA contamination. This study indicates that the appropriate column to use in this type of protocol has to be experimentally determined. Finally, we present new evidence establishing the importance of testing the method of purification used during an indirect labelling procedure. Our results confirm the importance of assessing the quality of the sample in the labelling procedure prior to hybridization onto a microarray platform. Conclusion Standardization of column purification systems to be used in labelling procedures will improve the reproducibility of microarray results among different laboratories. In addition, implementation of a quality control check point of the labelled samples prior to microarray hybridization will prevent hybridizing a poor quality sample to expensive

  20. Laboratory Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  1. A radiation-hydrodynamics model of accretion columns for ultra-luminous X-ray pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Tomohisa; Mineshige, Shin; Ohsuga, Ken; Ogawa, Takumi

    2016-10-01

    Prompted by the recent discovery of pulsed emission from an ultra-luminous X-ray source, M 82 X-2 ("ULX-pulsar"), we perform a two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of a supercritical accretion flow onto a neutron star through a narrow accretion column. We set an accretion column with a cone shape filled with tenuous gas with the density of 10-4 g cm-3 above a neutron star and solve the two-dimensional gas motion and radiative transfer within the column. The side boundaries are set such that radiation can freely escape, but gas cannot. Since the initial gas layer is not in a hydrostatic balance, the column gas falls onto the neutron-star surface, and thereby a shock is generated. As a result, the accretion column is composed of two regions: an upper, nearly free-fall region and a lower settling region, as noted by Basko and Sunyaev (1976, MNRAS, 175, 395). The average accretion rate is very high; dot{M}˜ 10^{2{-}3} L_E/c2 (with LE being the Eddington luminosity), and so radiation energy dominates over gas internal energy entirely within the column. Despite the high accretion rate, the radiation flux in the laboratory frame is kept barely below LE/(4πr2) at a distance r in the settling region so that matter can slowly accrete. This adjustment is made possible, since a large amount of photons produced via dissipation of kinetic energy of matter can escape through the side boundaries. The total luminosity can greatly exceed LE by several orders of magnitude, whereas the apparent luminosity observed from the top of the column is much less. Due to such highly anisotropic radiation fields, the observed flux should exhibit periodic variations with the rotation period, provided that the rotation and magnetic axes are misaligned.

  2. The opposing effects of bacterial activity and gas production on anaerobic TCE degradation in soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Naresh; Jaffé, Peter; Maier, Walter; Jho, Eun Hea

    2007-11-01

    This laboratory study explores the effect of growth substrate concentration on the anaerobic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in sand packed columns. In all columns the growth substrate rapidly degraded to gas, that formed a separate phase. Biomass accumulated in the 0-4.8 cm section of the columns in proportion to the influent growth substrate concentration and biomass concentrations in the remaining sections of all columns were similar to the column receiving the lowest substrate concentration. Increases in growth substrate concentration up to 3030 mg-CODl(-1) promoted TCE degradation, but a further increase to 14300 mg-CODl(-1) reduced the amount of TCE completely dechlorinated but did not affect the production of chlorinated TCE intermediates. The mathematical model developed here satisfactorily described the enhancement in TCE dehalogenation for substrate concentration up to 3030 mg-CODl(-1); reproducing TCE dehalogenation for 14300 mg-CODl(-1) required that the moisture content used in simulation be lowered to 0.1. The study shows that volatilization of TCE can be significant and volatilization losses should be taken into account when anaerobic activity in in-situ bioremediation applications is stimulated via addition of growth substrates. An implication of the modeling simulations is that maintaining a lower, but uniform, substrate concentration over the contaminated region may lead to faster contaminant degradation.

  3. Experimental evaluation of the prevention methods for the interface between masonry infill walls and concrete columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Tramontin

    Full Text Available Cracks that form at the interfaces between masonry structures are common uncontrolled occurrences in buildings. Numerous methods have been proposed by the construction industry to address this problem. Cracks continuously form in the joints between concrete columns and masonry infill walls. In this study, the most common methods for preventing these types of cracks were evaluated in laboratory experiments. Column masonry models were constructed using different types of joints between concrete columns and masonry infill walls, such as steel bars and steel mesh. The efficiency of each type of joint method was evaluated by performing direct tensile tests (pullout tests on the models and monitoring the evolution of the crack opening in the joint between the column and wall, as a function of load applied to the model. The results from this study indicate that the model composed of "electrowelded wire mesh without steel angles" is the best model for controlling cracking in the joints between concrete columns and masonry infill walls.

  4. Study of scattering cross section of a plasma column using Green's function volume integral equation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanmoradi, Elmira; Shokri, Babak

    2017-05-01

    In this article, the electromagnetic wave scattering from plasma columns with inhomogeneous electron density distribution is studied by the Green's function volume integral equation method. Due to the ready production of such plasmas in the laboratories and their practical application in various technological fields, this study tries to find the effects of plasma parameters such as the electron density, radius, and pressure on the scattering cross-section of a plasma column. Moreover, the incident wave frequency influence of the scattering pattern is demonstrated. Furthermore, the scattering cross-section of a plasma column with an inhomogeneous collision frequency profile is calculated and the effect of this inhomogeneity is discussed first in this article. These results are especially used to determine the appropriate conditions for radar cross-section reduction purposes. It is shown that the radar cross-section of a plasma column reduces more for a larger collision frequency, for a relatively lower plasma frequency, and also for a smaller radius. Furthermore, it is found that the effect of the electron density on the scattering cross-section is more obvious in comparison with the effect of other plasma parameters. Also, the plasma column with homogenous collision frequency can be used as a better shielding in contrast to its inhomogeneous counterpart.

  5. Novel pre-fractionation method of trans fatty acids by gas chromatography with silver-ion cartridge column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hirofumi; Shionoya, Noriko; Sugie, Megumi; Tominaga, Makoto; Shimelis, Olga; Taniguchi, Makoto; Igarashi, Tomoji; Hirata, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    We developed a novel pre-separation method of trans fatty acids (TFAs) using a silver-ion cartridge column and GC. As a preliminary study, a mixture of fatty acid methyl esters consisting of saturated, cis-unsaturated, and trans-unsaturated fatty acids was dissolved in dichloromethane and loaded onto a Bond Elut SCX ion-exchange cartridge column that was converted to the silver-ion form. The column was then eluted with dichloromethane to obtain the saturated fatty acids, dichloromethane/ethyl acetate (90/10) for the trans mono-ene, dichloromethane/ethyl acetate (65/35) for the cis mono-ene, dichloromethane/acetone (60/40) for the trans di-ene, and acetone/acetonitrile (80/20) for the others. Satisfactory separation of the cis/trans isomers was confirmed by GC analysis. To generalize this technique, the elution conditions of the ready-to-use Discovery Ag-ION SPE cartridge column were also optimized. Both cartridge columns had good separation, recovery, and repeatability. Peer laboratory verification was carried out between two laboratories using different production lots of the ready-to-use cartridge column, and the robustness of the product and reproducibility of the method were found to be satisfactory. This technique is therefore a powerful tool not only for routine analyses of TFAs in oils, fats, and foods but also for detailed analyses of TFAs in various research fields.

  6. An applicable method for efficiency estimation of operating tray distillation columns and its comparison with the methods utilized in HYSYS and Aspen Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza

    2015-10-01

    Developing general methods that rely on column data for the efficiency estimation of operating (existing) distillation columns has been overlooked in the literature. Most of the available methods are based on empirical mass transfer and hydraulic relations correlated to laboratory data. Therefore, these methods may not be sufficiently accurate when applied to industrial columns. In this paper, an applicable and accurate method was developed for the efficiency estimation of distillation columns filled with trays. This method can calculate efficiency as well as mass and heat transfer coefficients without using any empirical mass transfer or hydraulic correlations and without the need to estimate operational or hydraulic parameters of the column. E.g., the method does not need to estimate tray interfacial area, which can be its most important advantage over all the available methods. The method can be used for the efficiency prediction of any trays in distillation columns. For the efficiency calculation, the method employs the column data and uses the true rates of the mass and heat transfers occurring inside the operating column. It is highly emphasized that estimating efficiency of an operating column has to be distinguished from that of a column being designed.

  7. Part 1: Vadose-zone column studies of toluene (enhanced bioremediation) in a shallow unconfined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, J.A.; Friedel, M.J.; Szmajter, R.J.; Cuffin, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of the laboratory study described in this paper were (1) to determine the effectiveness of four nutrient solutions and a control in stimulating the microbial degradation of toluene in the unsaturated zone as an alternative to bioremediation methodologies such as air sparging, in situ vitrification, or others (Part I), and (2) to compare the effectiveness of the addition of the most effective nutrient solution from Part I (modified Hoagland type, nitrate-rich) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on microbial degradation of toluene for repeated, simulated spills in the unsaturated zone (Part II). For Part 1, fifteen columns (30-cm diameter by 150-cm height), packed with air-dried, 0.25-mm, medium-fine sand, were prepared to simulate shallow unconfined aquifer conditions. Toluene (10 mL) was added to the surface of each column, and soil solution and soil gas samples were collected from the columns every third day for 21 days. On day 21, a second application of toluene (10 mL) was made, and the experiment was run for another 21 days. Solution 4 was the most effective for microbial degradation in Part I. For Part II, three columns were designated nutrient-rich 3-day toluene columns and received toluene injections every 3 days; three columns were designated as nutrient-rich 7-day columns and received toluene injections every 7 days; and two columns were used as controls to which no nutrient was added. As measured by CO2 respiration, the initial benefits for aerobic organisms from the O2 enhancement were sustained by the bacteria for only a short period of time (about 8 days). Degradation benefits from the nutrient solution were sustained throughout the experiment. The O2 and nutrient-enhanced columns degraded significantly more toluene than the control columns when simulating repeated spills onto the unsaturated zone, and demonstrated a potentially effective in situ bioremediation technology when used immediately or within days after a spill. The combined usage

  8. Composite support column assembly for offshore drilling and production platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, R.H.

    1989-04-18

    This patent describes a support column assembly for an offshore drilling and/or production comprising: means for anchoring the column assembly on the seabed; an elongated cylindrical support column including at least one generally cylindrical column member having a cylindrical wall formed of a composite of elongated filaments of at least one of carbon and boron bonded in a resin matrix, the support column including a plurality of the column members coupled end to end by coupling means at opposite ends of the column members, the coupling means including a plurality of radially project pins for coupling the composite wall to a coupling member interposed between the column members, respectively; and means for connecting the column to a platform for transmitting platform loads between the platform and the anchor means.

  9. Immobilized Lactase in the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Matthew J.; Bering, C. Larry

    1998-10-01

    Immobilized enzymes have many practical applications. They may be used in clinical, industrial, and biotechnological laboratories and in many clinical diagnostic kits. For educational purposes, use of immobilized enzymes can easily be taught at the undergraduate or even secondary level. We have developed an immobilized enzyme experiment that combines many practical techniques used in the biochemistry laboratory and fits within a three-hour time frame. In this experiment, lactase from over-the-counter tablets for patients with lactose intolerance is immobilized in polyacrylamide, which is then milled into small beads and placed into a chromatography column. A lactose solution is added to the column and the eluant is assayed using the glucose oxidase assay, available as a kit. We have determined the optimal conditions to give the greatest turnover of lactose while allowing the immobilized enzymes to be active for long periods at room temperature.

  10. Do column frits contribute to the on-column, flow-induced degradation of macromolecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel, André M

    2014-09-12

    Flow-induced, on-column degradation is a major hindrance to the accurate characterization of ultra-high molar mass macromolecules and colloids. This degradation is a direct result of the large shear rates which are generated within the column, which cause chain scission to occur both in the interstitial medium and, it has been postulated, at the packing particle pore boundary. An additional putative source of degradation has been the column frits, though little experimental evidence exists to either support or refute this claim. To this effect, the present experiments examine the role of the frits in the degradation of high molar mass macromolecules. Two narrow dispersity polystyrene standards, the molar mass of which differs by a factor of two, were analyzed on three different size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) columns, each with frits of different pore size, at various flow rates. In the smallest pore size column, which also contained the smallest frits and which was packed with the smallest diameter particles, the larger standard was forced to degrade by increasing the flow rate of the mobile phase. During the course of the latter portion of the study, the inlet and the outlet frits were removed from the column, in stepwise fashion. It was concluded that neither frit played any appreciable role in the degradation. Results of our studies were applied to explain previously observed degradation in ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography of polymers. The general conclusion arrived at herein is that the column frits are likely to have a secondary role (as compared to interstitial and pore boundary stresses), or no role at all, in polymer degradation for cases where the frit radius is larger than or equal to the hydraulic radius rcof the column.

  11. Engineering evaluation of 55-year-old timber columns recycled from an industrial military building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. Falk; David Green; Douglas Rammer; Scott F. Lantz

    2000-01-01

    A large sample of timber was collected from a 548,000-ft.2 (50,900-m2) World War II era industrial military building containing approximately 1, 875,000 board feet (4,400 m3) of lumber and timber. Sixty 12-foot- (3.6-m-) long, nominal 8- by 8-inches (190-by 190-mm) Douglas-fir columns were tested at the USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, and the results...

  12. Influence of Brick Walls on the Temperature Distribution in Steel Columns in Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António J. P. Moura Correia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study of steel columns embedded in walls in fire. Several fire resistance tests were carried out at the Laboratory of Testing Materials and Structures of the University of Coimbra, in Portugal. The temperatures registered in several points of the experimental models are compared with those obtained in numerical simulations carried out with the SUPERTEMPCALC finite element program. 

  13. Numerical analysis of an oscillating water column converter considering a physical constraint in the chimney outlet

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Mateus das Neves; Seibt, Flávio Medeiros; Rocha, Luiz Alberto Oliveira; Santos, Elizaldo Domingues dos; Isoldi, Liércio André

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a 2D numerical study of an Oscillating Water Column (OWC) converter considering physical constraints in its outlet chimney to represent the turbine pressure drop. Two strategies were adopted. The first considers different dimensions for a physical constraint similar to an orifice plate, being the analysis performed in a laboratory scale. After that, other physical restriction with geometry similar to a rotor turbine was investigated in a real scale by means a dimensional va...

  14. Separation of Oil from Wastewater by Column Flotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new type of device, a dissolved-air flotation column, was developed for separation of oily wastewater.The unique design idea of the dissolved-air flotation column is the combined use of dissolved-air flotation and column flotation.The dissolved air release occurred within the column separation system.As a potential application the column was investigated for its performance in separating emulsified oil droplets in oily wastewater.A high separation efficiency was obtained in a series of tests.The aeration performance of the bubble generator used in the dissolved-air flotation column was also studied in particular.

  15. Synchronized oscillation in a modular neural network composed of columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Su; QI; Xianglin; HU; Hong; WANG; Yunjiu

    2005-01-01

    The columnar organization is a ubiquitous feature in the cerebral cortex. In this study, a neural network model simulating the cortical columns has been constructed. When fed with random pulse input with constant rate, a column generates synchronized oscillations, with a frequency varying from 3 to 43 Hz depending on parameter values. The behavior of the model under periodic stimulation was studied and the input-output relationship was non-linear. When identical columns were sparsely interconnected, the column oscillator could be locked in synchrony. In a network composed of heterogeneous columns, the columns were organized by intrinsic properties and formed partially synchronized assemblies.

  16. Stability of embankments over cement deep soil mixing columns; Estabilidad de terraplenes sobre columnas de suelo-cemento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morilla Moar, P.; Melentijevic, S.

    2014-07-01

    The deep soil mixing (DSM) is one of the ground improvement methods used for the construction of embankments over soft soils. DSM column-supported embankments are constructed over soft soils to accelerate its construction, improve embankment stability, increase bearing capacity and control of total and differential settlements. There are two traditional design methods, the Japanese (rigid columns) and the scandinavian (soft and semi-rigid columns). Based on Laboratory analysis and numerical analysis these traditional approaches have been questioned by several authors due to its overestimation of the embankment stability considering that the most common failures types are not assumed. This paper presents a brief review of traditional design methods for embankments on DSM columns constructed in soft soils, studies carried out determine the most likely failure types of DSM columns, methods to decrease the overestimation when using limit equilibrium methods and numerical analysis methods that permit detect appropriate failure modes in DSM columns. Finally a case study was assessed using both limited equilibrium and finite element methods which confirmed the overestimation in the factors of safety on embankment stability over DSM columns. (Author)

  17. Operation of a Batch Stripping Distillation Column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A stripping batch distillation column is preferred when the amount of the light component in the feed is small and the products are to be recovered at high purity. The operation modes of a batch stripping are believed to be the same as those of a rectifier. However, the control system of a stripper is different. In this paper, we explore three different control methods with Hysys (Hyprotech Ltd. 1997) for a batch stripper. The main difference is the control scheme for reboiler liquid level: (a) controlled by reflux flow; (b) controlled by reboiler heat duty; (c) controlled by bottom product flow. The main characteristics of operating a batch stripper with different control scheme are presented in this paper. Guidelines are provided for the startup of a batch stripper, the effects of somecontrol tuning parameters on the column performance are discussed.

  18. The Dissipative Column: A New Hysteretic Damper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Palazzo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A new replaceable hysteretic damper to better control seismic building damage, consisting of two or more adjacent steel vertical elements connected to each other with continuous mild/low strength steel shear links, is proposed and investigated in this paper. New Dampers, called Dissipative Columns (DC, continuously linked with X-shaped steel plates, provide additional stiffness and damping to a lateral system by using a basic and minimally invasive construction element: the column. Working in a way similar to coupled shear walls, the proposed element behavior is theoretically analyzed at linear and non-linear ranges. In fact, considering different restrained cases, a parametric analysis is developed in order both to evaluate the effect of the main geometrical and structural parameters and to provide the design capacity curves of this new damper. The DC can be considered a new damping device, easy to install in new as well as existing buildings in order to protect them from seismic damage.

  19. Pressure drop in CIM disk monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihelic, Igor; Nemec, Damjan; Podgornik, Ales; Koloini, Tine

    2005-02-11

    Pressure drop analysis in commercial CIM disk monolithic columns is presented. Experimental measurements of pressure drop are compared to hydrodynamic models usually employed for prediction of pressure drop in packed beds, e.g. free surface model and capillary model applying hydraulic radius concept. However, the comparison between pressure drop in monolith and adequate packed bed give unexpected results. Pressure drop in a CIM disk monolithic column is approximately 50% lower than in an adequate packed bed of spheres having the same hydraulic radius as CIM disk monolith; meaning they both have the same porosity and the same specific surface area. This phenomenon seems to be a consequence of the monolithic porous structure which is quite different in terms of the pore size distribution and parallel pore nonuniformity compared to the one in conventional packed beds. The number of self-similar levels for the CIM monoliths was estimated to be between 1.03 and 2.75.

  20. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-09

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports.

  1. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  2. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratories The Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  3. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratory The Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  4. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratoriesThe Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  5. FOOTWEAR PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory provides biomechanical and physical analyses for both military and commercial footwear. The laboratory contains equipment that is integral to the us...

  6. Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) houses 22 research laboratories for conducting a wide-range of research including catalyst formulation, chemical analysis,...

  7. Water Column Variability in Coastal Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    offshore waters of energy, mass, and biota. OBJECTIVES Our objective is to determine the processes that cause water column variations in coastal regions...meteorological conditions (solar radiation, wind velocity, and heat fluxes), (iv) tidal mixing, stratification, water mass variations, (v) runoff from land...air-sea gas exchange and biological activity in these offshore waters. Two papers are being submitted to Limnology and Oceanography on the annual

  8. COLLISIONS OF ROAD VEHICLES WITH BRIDGE COLUMNS

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    As speed limits and traffic on city roads continue to increase, collisions between road vehicles and bridge columns are becoming more common. Current regulations analyze collision with one major simplification: replacing dynamic action with the equivalent static force. In the present paper, we develop a numerical model of a typical Croatian overpass and loaded it with an equivalent static load according to the EN1991-7 and ASSHTO LRFD provisions, analyzing the differences in overpass behavior...

  9. Using Dividing Wall Columns (DWC) in LNG Production: deviding wall column, double dividing wall column, prefractionator arrangement, Petlyuk column, NGL recovery, distillation

    OpenAIRE

    Ashrafian, Roohollah

    2014-01-01

    The Dividing Wall Columns (DWC) distillation has attracted growing interest for fractionation of multicomponent mixture due to reduction of energy consumption, auxiliary equipment and space within fractionation process. Recent developments of the process show considerable energy saving, up to 30%-40%, compared to conventional fractionation schemes. The objective of this thesis is to introduce DWC configurations, governing equations and applications in LNG and gas processing as well as explana...

  10. [Cervical vertebral column--anatomy, fractures, treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłosiński, Michał; Sienkiewicz-Zawilińska, Justyna; Lipski, Marcin; Zawiliński, Jarosław; Matyja, Andrzej; Walocha, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with anatomy of human cervical spine. It shows close relation between knowledge on the normal structure and methods of treatment of different kinds of spine injuries. It describes detailed anatomy and mechanical features of cervical vertebral column, including the structure of distinct vertebrae, their joints and arrangement of muscles. It reviews also historical methods of treatment of fractures in this region considering current methods.

  11. SVD row or column symmetric matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new architecture for row or column symmetric matrix called extended matrix is defined, and a precise correspondence of the singular values and singular vectors between the extended matrix and its original (namely, the mother matrix) is derived. As an illustration of potential, we show that, for a class of extended matrices, the singular value decomposition using the mother matrix rather than the extended matrix per se can save the CPU time and memory without loss of numerical precision.

  12. Use of a pulsed column contactor as a continuous oxalate precipitation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borda, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.borda@cea.f [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Nuclear Energy Division, Fuel Cycle Technology Department, BP17171, F 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France); Brackx, Emmanuelle; Boisset, Laurence; Duhamet, Jean [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Nuclear Energy Division, Fuel Cycle Technology Department, BP17171, F 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France); Ode, Denis, E-mail: denis.ode@cea.f [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Nuclear Energy Division, Fuel Cycle Technology Department, BP17171, F 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} A new type of continuous precipitating device was patented by CEA and tested with reaction between a surrogate nitrate cerium(III) or neodymium(III) and oxalate complexing agent. {yields} Precipitate is confined in aqueous phase emulsion in tetrapropylene hydrogen and does not form deposit on the vessel walls. {yields} Measure size of the precipitate ranges from 20 to 40 {mu}m, it meets the process requirements to filter, and the precipitation reaction is complete. {yields} The laboratory design can be extrapolated to an industrial uranium(IV) and minor actinide(III) coprecipitating column. - Abstract: The current objective of coprecipitating uranium, and minor actinides in order to fabricate a new nuclear fuel by direct (co)precipitation for further transmutation, requires to develop specific technology in order to meet the following requirements: nuclear maintenance, criticity, and potentially high flowrates due to global coprecipitation. A new type of device designed and patented by the CEA was then tested in 2007 under inactive conditions and with uranium. The patent is for organic confinement in a pulsed column (PC). Actually, pulsed columns have been working for a long time in a nuclear environment, as they allow high capacity, sub-critical design (annular geometry) and easy high activity maintenance. The precipitation reaction between the oxalate complexing agent and a surrogate nitrate - cerium(III) or neodymium(III) alone, or coprecipitated uranium(IV) and cerium(III) - occurs within an emulsion created in the device by these two phases flowing with a counter-current chemically inert organic phase (for example tetrapropylene hydrogen-TPH) produced by the stirring action of the column pulsator. The precipitate is confined and thus does not form deposits on the vessel walls (which are also water-repellent); it flows downward by gravity and exits the column continuously into a settling tank. The results obtained for precipitation

  13. LABORATORY STUDIES ON THE STABILITY AND TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS THROUGH NATURAL AQUIFER MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stability and transport of radio-labeled Fe2O3 particles were studied using laboratory batch and column techniques. Core material collected from shallow sand and gravel aquifer was used as the immobile column matrix material. Variables in the study included flow rate, pH, i...

  14. Plant practices in fine coal column flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, V.L. Jr.; Bethell, P.J.; Stanley, F.L. [Pittston Coal Management Co., Lebanon, VA (United States); Luttrell, G.H. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Mining and Minerals Engineering

    1995-10-01

    Five 3 m (10 ft) diameter Microcel{trademark} flotation columns were installed at Clinchfield Coal Company`s Middle Fork preparation facility in order to reduce product ash and increase recovery and plant capacity. The Middle Fork facility is utilized for the recovery of fine coal from a feed stream that consists primarily of 1.5 mm x 0 material. The columns replaced conventional flotation cells for the treatment of the minus 150 {micro}m fraction while spirals are used to upgrade the plus 150 {micro}m material in the plant feed. The addition of the column flotation circuit resulted in an increase in plant capacity in excess of 20 percent while reducing the flotation product ash content by approximately 7 percentage points. Flotation circuit combustible recovery wa increased by 17 percentage points. This paper discusses circuit design, commissioning, and sparging system design. Circuit instrumentation, level control, reagent system control, performance comparisons with conventional flotation, and general operating procedures are also discussed.

  15. Seepage characteristics of collapse column fillings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Boyang; Bai Haibo; Zhang Kai

    2016-01-01

    With concealment and hysteresis, water-inrush from Karst collapse column has become an important security hazard of lower group coal mining in North China. Based on the MTS815.02 seepage test system, we analyzed the impact of consolidation pressure, initial moisture content and confining pressure on the permeability of fillings in order to study the seepage characteristics of collapse column fillings. The results show that:(1) The permeability of collapse column fillings is of the order of 10?16–10?15 magni-tude and decreases with an increase in consolidation pressure and decrease in initial moisture content. (2) The essence of filling seepage law change is the change in porosity, and a power function relationship exists between the permeability ratio and porosity ratio. (3) With increasing confining pressure, the per-meability of fillings decreases. However, under low confining pressure (1.2–4 MPa), the change of confin-ing pressure has no obvious influence on the permeability.

  16. SPEEDUP{trademark} ion exchange column model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang, T.

    2000-03-06

    A transient model to describe the process of loading a solute onto the granular fixed bed in an ion exchange (IX) column has been developed using the SpeedUp{trademark} software package. SpeedUp offers the advantage of smooth integration into other existing SpeedUp flowsheet models. The mathematical algorithm of a porous particle diffusion model was adopted to account for convection, axial dispersion, film mass transfer, and pore diffusion. The method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements was employed to solve the governing transport equations. The model allows the use of a non-linear Langmuir isotherm based on an effective binary ionic exchange process. The SpeedUp column model was tested by comparing to the analytical solutions of three transport problems from the ion exchange literature. In addition, a sample calculation of a train of three crystalline silicotitanate (CST) IX columns in series was made using both the SpeedUp model and Purdue University's VERSE-LC code. All test cases showed excellent agreement between the SpeedUp model results and the test data. The model can be readily used for SuperLig{trademark} ion exchange resins, once the experimental data are complete.

  17. Modular evolution of the Cetacean vertebral column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholtz, Emily A

    2007-01-01

    Modular theory predicts that hierarchical developmental processes generate hierarchical phenotypic units that are capable of independent modification. The vertebral column is an overtly modular structure, and its rapid phenotypic transformation in cetacean evolution provides a case study for modularity. Terrestrial mammals have five morphologically discrete vertebral series that are now known to be coincident with Hox gene expression patterns. Here, I present the hypothesis that in living Carnivora and Artiodactyla, and by inference in the terrestrial ancestors of whales, the series are themselves components of larger precaudal and caudal modular units. Column morphology in a series of fossil and living whales is used to predict the type and sequence of developmental changes responsible for modification of that ancestral pattern. Developmental innovations inferred include independent meristic additions to the precaudal column in basal archaeocetes and basilosaurids, stepwise homeotic reduction of the sacral series in protocetids, and dissociation of the caudal series into anterior tail and fluke subunits in basilosaurids. The most dramatic change was the novel association of lumbar and anterior caudal vertebrae in a module that crosses the precaudal/caudal boundary. This large unit is defined by shared patterns of vertebral morphology, count, and size in all living whales (Neoceti).

  18. Dynamics of a Tapped Granular Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Anthony; Blackmore, Denis; Zuo, Luo; Hao, Wu; Horntrop, David

    2015-11-01

    We consider the behavior of a column of spheres subjected to a time-dependent vertical taps. Of interest are various dynamical properties, such as the motion of its mass center, its response to taps of different intensities and forms, and the effect of system size and material properties. The interplay between diverse time and length scales are the key contributors to the column's evolving dynamics. Soft sphere discrete element simulations were conducted over a very wide parameter space to obtain a portrait of column behavior as embodied by the collective dynamics of the mass center motion. Results compared favorably with a derived reduced-order paradigm of the mass center motion (surprisingly analogous to that for a single bouncing ball on an oscillating plate) with respect to dynamical regimes and their transitions. A continuum model obtained from a system of Newtonian equations, as a locally averaged limit in the transport mode along trajectories is described, and a numerical solution protocol for a one-dimensional system is outlined. Typical trajectories and density evolution profiles are shown. We conclude with a discussion of our investigations to relate predictions of the continuum and reduced dynamical systems models with discrete simulations.

  19. Employing anatomical knowledge in vertebral column labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column constitutes the central axis of human torso and is often used by radiologists to reference the location of organs in the chest and abdomen. However, visually identifying and labeling vertebrae is not trivial and can be timeconsuming. This paper presents an approach to automatically label vertebrae based on two pieces of anatomical knowledge: one vertebra has at most two attached ribs, and ribs are attached only to thoracic vertebrae. The spinal column is first extracted by a hybrid method using the watershed algorithm, directed acyclic graph search and a four-part vertebra model. Then curved reformations in sagittal and coronal directions are computed and aggregated intensity profiles along the spinal cord are analyzed to partition the spinal column into vertebrae. After that, candidates for rib bones are detected using features such as location, orientation, shape, size and density. Then a correspondence matrix is established to match ribs and vertebrae. The last vertebra (from thoracic to lumbar) with attached ribs is identified and labeled as T12. The rest of vertebrae are labeled accordingly. The method was tested on 50 CT scans and successfully labeled 48 of them. The two failed cases were mainly due to rudimentary ribs.

  20. Graphing techniques for materials laboratory using Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1994-01-01

    Engineering technology curricula stress hands on training and laboratory practices in most of the technical courses. Laboratory reports should include analytical as well as graphical evaluation of experimental data. Experience shows that many students neither have the mathematical background nor the expertise for graphing. This paper briefly describes the procedure and data obtained from a number of experiments such as spring rate, stress concentration, endurance limit, and column buckling for a variety of materials. Then with a brief introduction to Microsoft Excel the author explains the techniques used for linear regression and logarithmic graphing.

  1. Evaluations of Mechanisms for Pu Uptake and Retention within Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fiskum, Sandra K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The unexpected uptake and retention of plutonium (Pu) onto columns containing spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin during ion exchange testing of Cs (Cs) removal from alkaline tank waste was observed in experiments at both the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). These observations have raised concern regarding the criticality safety of the Cs removal unit operation within the low-activity waste pretreatment system (LAWPS). Accordingly, studies have been initiated at Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), who manages the operations of the Hanford Site tank farms, including the LAWPS, PNNL, and elsewhere to investigate these findings. As part of these efforts, PNNL has prepared the present report to summarize the laboratory testing observations, evaluate these phenomena in light of published and unpublished technical information, and outline future laboratory testing, as deemed appropriate based on the literature studies, with the goal to elucidate the mechanisms for the observed Pu uptake and retention.

  2. Strength change of clay in the vicinity of soil-cement column; Soil cement kairyotai dasetsu ni tomonau shuhen nendo no sendan kyodo henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, N.; Koga, K. [Saga University, Saga (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Shen, S. [Saga University, Saga (Japan); Nakamura, R.

    1998-06-21

    In relation to the installation of the improved soil cement column for improving soft ground, a laboratory experiment and on-site experimental installation are carried out for the study of the surrounding area supporting mechanism of the improved column. In the laboratory experiment, a column is installed using cement slurry into a model ground prepared by placing Ariake clay in a concrete tank, and a load test is conducted after a 28-day curing. In the on-site installation experiment, a column is installed near the mouth of a river flowing into the Ariake Sea, where changes in pore water pressure and soil strength, the latter by use of a double tube cone, are measured before and after the installation, and specimens are collected. Studies are conducted and findings are obtained as outlined below. The effects on the surrounding clay of the improved soil cement column installation consist of a decrease in soil strength during the installation, its recovery to the normal level, and an increase in soil strength due to recompaction and cementation to follow. Surrounding the installed column, there is formed a solidified region as wide as several percent of the column radius and, further surrounding the solidified region, there is formed a region with its strength enhanced, which is as wide by 1.5-20 times as the column radius. 26 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Microbial Life in a Winogradsky Column: From Lab Course to Diverse Research Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha T. Parks

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many traditional lab courses include both standard and inquiry-based experiments, yet lack cooperative and authentic lab experiences.  Such experiences are important for microbiology students and burgeoning researchers.  In a novel lab environment, students constructed Winogradsky columns using common soil and water sources.  During initial column incubation, students learned methods for identification of microbial isolates including staining, microscopy, biochemistry and 16S-rRNA sequencing.  Concurrently, students challenged their columns via varied substrates and contaminants including enrichment with nitro-compounds, hydrocarbons, acids and other environmental stressors.  Students were encouraged to use both basic and more advanced identification methods to study the effect of such challenges within their columns.  The students were required to maintain lab notebooks and attend weekly lab meetings, which were designed to share progress and facilitate experimentation among their lab-mates.  At the end of the semester, students gathered to present their data and conclusions.  By engaging in weekly meetings and a final conference, students were able to construct a snapshot of the microbial diversity, including phylogeny and metabolism, in the soil and water used to construct the Winogradsky columns.  By using a common source, students were able to observe an array of diversity within individual columns and extrapolate towards the tremendous microbial diversity in the initial soil and water samples.  Equally important to the data obtained, the students engaged in a collaborative effort through discussion, trouble-shooting, weekly meetings and the summative conference.  Such efforts enabled students to participate in an authentic research experience within a traditional undergraduate laboratory course. Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory

  4. Affinity Chromatography of Lactate Dehydrogenase: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alexander J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a laboratory technique of enzyme purification by affinity chromatography as part of an undergraduate biochemical methodology course. Provides preparation details of the rat muscle homogenate and reagents. Proposes column requirements and assaying information. (MVL)

  5. Experimental Testing Of Partially Encased Composite Beam Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab M. Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The past few decades have seen outstanding advances in the use of composite materials in structural applications. There can be little doubt that, within engineering circles, composites have revolutionized traditional design concepts and made possible an unparalleled range of new and exciting possibilities as viable materials for construction. In addition to the well-known advantages of composite columns, partially encased composite columns offered simplified beam-to-column connection as well as reduced or omitted shuttering thus achieved more cost effective construction. Some companies have patented these new types of partially encased composite column made of light welded steel shapes; moreover, the Canadian Institute of Steel construction CISC has recognized and codified this type of columns. In This paper, Partially Encased Composite Beam Columns is introduced; experimental studies are made on five partially encased beam columns to investigate the behavior of eccentrically loaded partially encased composite columns using different parameters.

  6. Composition Estimation in Dividing-Wall Columns Using Temperature Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadrdan, Maryam; Ivar J. Halvorsen; Skogestad, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we propose a method to estimate the product compositions in a distillation column section based on a combination of a number of temperature measurements from different locations in the column stages.

  7. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  8. Determination of the sediment oxidation capacity by column and field experiments with reactive tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dethlefsen, F.; Bliss, F.; Wachter, T.; Dahmke, A. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geowissenschaften; Meckenstock, R. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften

    2003-07-01

    The oxidation capacity of ferric iron in column studies was determined by phosphate tracer tests and validated by biodegradation experiments with toluene as a carbon source and the iron(III)-oxide reducing bacterium Geobacter metallireducens as well as with wet chemical extraction. Toluene mass balance, Fe(II) production and tracer test results showed that about 1/3 of the total Fe(III) mass had been reduced during the biodegradation experiment. The redox reactive tracer sulfide is supposed to be more practicable for field purposes, because a sulfide mass or electron balance enables evaluation of the tracer test. In this way, consideration of mineral specific sorption parameters and long residence periods of a sorptive reactive tracer can be avoided. Laboratory column experiments were performed with an artificially composed sediment (quartz sand and ferrihydrite) as well as with natural sediments from the margin of the benzene contaminated RETZINA test site in Zeitz (Germany). Fast reaction kinetics of sulfide with iron(III) minerals allowed the observation of a successive fixation of black iron sulfides in all the glas columns. Depending on the mineral iron content, the sedimentary oxidation capacity of the column material was used up in few days to weeks. Mass of sulfide reacted in the tracer test and sulfide mass recovered by sediment extraction after the experiment were in very good agreement. Evaluation of the column experiments confirmed the calculated ratio that 3 molar equivalents sulfide were used to reduce and fix 2 molar equivalents of Fe(III). Mean Fe(III) content of natural sediment samples (drilling SafZz 28/02 in Zeitz) was 0.35 mg/g sediment determined by laboratory sulfide tracer test and 5 M HCl extractions. Finally, a single well push-pull test was performed at the RETZINA test site Zeitz to test the applicability of the sulfide tracer in a field-scale experiment. (orig.)

  9. Numerical Simulations of Settlement of Jet Grouting Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juzwa Anna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the comparison of results of numerical analyses of interaction between group of jet grouting columns and subsoil. The analyses were conducted for single column and groups of three, seven and nine columns. The simulations are based on experimental research in real scale which were carried out by authors. The final goal for the research is an estimation of an influence of interaction between columns working in a group.

  10. Anchoring FRP laminates for the seismic strengthening of RC columns

    OpenAIRE

    Sadone, Raphaëlle; Quiertant, Marc; FERRIER, Emmanuel; Chataigner, Sylvain; Mercier, Julien

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the effectiveness of seismic strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) columns by externally bonded Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP). Particularly, a novel strengthening system, designed for the flexural strengthening of columns is studied. This flexural strengthening is achieved by FRP plates bonded longitudinally and anchored at the column-stub junction. The proposed system is validated through an experimental campaign carried out on full-scale RC columns. Different...

  11. Flexural strength enhancement of confined reinforced concrete columns

    OpenAIRE

    Pam, HJ; Ho, JCM

    2001-01-01

    As part of a continuing research study, this paper proposes a new design aid to calculate the actual moment capacity of confined reinforced concrete columns. Up to now the moment capacity of a reinforced concrete column is calculated based on the code's guidelines for an unconfined section. As most reinforced concrete columns contain transverse or confining reinforcement, which will enhance the column moment capacity, the actual moment capacity will be much higher than the unconfined moment c...

  12. QR factorization for row or column symmetric matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU; Hongxing(邹红星); WANG; Dianjun(王殿军); DAI; Qionghai(戴琼海); LI; Yanda(李衍达)

    2003-01-01

    The problem of fast computing the QR factorization of row or column symmetric matrix isconsidered. We address two new algorithms based on a correspondence of Q and R matrices between the rowor column symmetric matrix and its mother matrix. Theoretical analysis and numerical evidence show that, fora class of row or column symmetric matrices, the QR factorization using the mother matrix rather than therow or column symmetric matrix per se can save dramatically the CPU time and memory without loss of anynumerical precision.

  13. Combination of Slag, Limestone and Sedimentary Apatite in Columns for Phosphorus Removal from Sludge Fish Farm Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Chazarenc

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory scale studies have repeatedly reported high P-retention in slag, a by-product of the steel manufacturing industry. Thus, it has emerged as a potential material to increase P-removal from constructed wetlands (CWs. However, several limitations were highlighted by field experiments, including the high pH of treated water and clogging. We hypothesized that the addition of sedimentary rocks to slag would preserve P-removal properties while reducing the pH of treated water. Four 2.5 L-columns were filled with 100% apatite (column A; a 50% weight each mixture of limestone with apatite (column B; 10% steel slag located at the inlet, plus 45% limestone mixed with 45% apatite (column C; and a mixture of steel slag (10%, limestone (45% apatite (45% (column D. A synthetic effluent (26 mg P/L and a reconstituted sludge fish farm effluent containing 97 mg/L total suspended solids (TSS, 220 mg/L chemical oxygen demand (COD and 23.5 mg P/L phosphorus (P were applied sequentially during 373 and 176 days, under saturated flow conditions and 12–24 hours hydraulic residence time (HRT, respectively. Treatment performance, P-removal, pH and calcium (Ca2+ were monitored. Results indicated that columns that contained 10% weight steel slag resulted in a higher P retention capacity than the columns without steel slag. The highest P removal was achieved in column C, containing a layer of slag in the inlet zone, 45% apatite and 45% limestone. Feeding the columns with a reconstituted fish farm effluent led to biofilm development, but this had little effect on the P-removal. A combination of slag and sedimentary rocks represents a promising filtration material that could be useful downstream of CWs to further increase P-removal.

  14. Behavior of reinforced concrete columns strenghtened by partial jacketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. FERREIRA

    Full Text Available This article presents the study of reinforced concrete columns strengthened using a partial jacket consisting of a 35mm self-compacting concrete layer added to its most compressed face and tested in combined compression and uniaxial bending until rupture. Wedge bolt connectors were used to increase bond at the interface between the two concrete layers of different ages. Seven 2000 mm long columns were tested. Two columns were cast monolithically and named PO (original column e PR (reference column. The other five columns were strengthened using a new 35 mm thick self-compacting concrete layer attached to the column face subjected to highest compressive stresses. Column PO had a 120mm by 250 mm rectangular cross section and other columns had a 155 mm by 250mm cross section after the strengthening procedure. Results show that the ultimate resistance of the strengthened columns was more than three times the ultimate resistance of the original column PO, indicating the effectiveness of the strengthening procedure. Detachment of the new concrete layer with concrete crushing and steel yielding occurred in the strengthened columns.

  15. Self-organizing strategies for a column-store database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, M.G.; Kersten, M.L.; Nes, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    Column-store database systems open new vistas for improved maintenance through self-organization. Individual columns are the focal point, which simplify balancing conflicting requirements. This work presents two workload-driven self-organizing techniques in a column-store, i.e. adaptive segmentation

  16. Mechanistic model for dispersion coefficients in bubble column

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Skosana, PJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic model describing the mass and momentum exchange in bubble columns is proposed that is based on the observations that the gas distribution in a bubble column is not uniform across the column and that as a consequence large liquid...

  17. Enhanced nitrobenzene removal and column longevity by coupled abiotic and biotic processes in zero-valent iron column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao; Wu, Jinhua; Huang, Weilin;

    2015-01-01

    /or co-precipitation and the reduction of NB to aniline (AN) via abiotic reaction in the abiotic column and via both abiotic and biotic reactions in the biotic column. Due to the interactive effect of ZVI and microorganisms, more effective iron consumption and more reactive minerals such as green rust......In this study, abiotic zero-valent iron (ZVI) column and biotic ZVI column were employed to investigate abiotic and biotic effects between iron and microorganisms on NB removal and column longevity. Physical removal and kinetics analysis revealed that NB was largely removed through adsorption and...... and iron sulfide were found in the biotic column. This led to approximately 50% higher total NB removal and 6 times higher AN production in the biotic column as compared to the abiotic column during the entire operation. According to the NB breakthrough curves, longer stability and longer life...

  18. From Single Droplet to Column Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The technique state to design counter-current extraction columns is based on the performance of pilot plant experiments. The modelling is then either with the equilibrium or dispersion model, whereas in the latter the dispersion coefficient accounts for all hydrodynamic non-idealities. A new approach uses single droplet experiments to obtain the basic laws and functions governing droplet breakage, coalescence,relative velocity, and axial dispersion when using droplet populance balance models (DPBM). The hydrodynamics simulation results show that the mean Sauter diameter, hold-up, and concentration profiles could be well predicted, which promotes the use of DPBM models for further applications in industrial scale.

  19. Column: The Physics of Digital Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Cohen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the interesting questions underlying creating a science of digital forensics is what form that science might take. At the end of the IEEE Oakland Conference in 2011, I presented some of the underlying questions and identified my approach and why I favored it.2 My basic position is that science is about causality and a scientific theory should require that cause(C produces effect (E via mechanism M (written C→ME. The scientific method then identifies the criteria for rejecting (refuting or accepting (for a time a scientific theory.(see PDF for full column

  20. Lattice approaches to packed column simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a review of the findings into the ability of a digitally based particle packing algorithm, called DigiPac, to predict bed structure in a variety of packed columns, for a range of generic pellet shapes frequently used in the chemical and process engineering industries.Resulting macroscopic properties are compared with experimental data derived from both invasive and non-destructive measurement techniques.Additionally, fluid velocity distributions, through samples of the resulting bed structures, are analysed using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) simulations and are compared against experimental data from the literature.

  1. Hydrodynamic Study Of Column Bioleaching Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadowski Zygmunt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of flow leaching solution through the porous media has been considered. The heap bioleaching process can be tested using the column experimental equipment. This equipment was employed to the hydrodynamic studies of copper ore bioleaching. The copper ore (black shale ore with the support, inertial materials (glass small balls and polyethylene beads was used to the bioleaching tests. The packed beds were various composition, the ore/support ratio was changed. The correlation between the bed porosity and bioleaching kinetics, and copper recovery was investigated.

  2. Preinjector for Linac 1, accelerating column

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    For a description of the Linac 1 preinjector, please see first 7403070X. High up on the wall of the Faraday cage (7403073X) is this drum-shaped container of the ion source (7403083X). It is mounted at the HV end of the accelerating column through which the ions (usually protons; many other types of ions in the course of its long history) proceed through the Faraday cage wall to the low-energy end (at ground potential) of Linac 1. The 520 kV accelerating voltage was supplied by a SAMES generator (7403074X).

  3. Hydrodynamics and Mass Transfer Performance in Supercritical Fluid Extraction Columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石冰洁; 张泽廷; 等

    2002-01-01

    New models for describing hydrodynamics and mass transfer performance in supercritical fluid extraction columns were proposed.Those models were proved by experimental data,which were obtained in supercritical fluid extraction packed column,spray column and sieve tray column respectively.The inner diameter of those columns areΦ25mm,These experimental systems include supercritical carbon dioxideisopropanol-water and supercritical carbon dioxide-ethanol-water,in which supercritical carbon dioxide was dispersed phase,and another was continuous phase.The extraction processes were operated with continuous countercurrent flow.The predicted values are agreed well with experimental data.

  4. A thin-walled Taylor column surrounding a bathtub vortex in rotating tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chin-Chou; Lai, Kuan-Ruei; Chen, Yin-Chung; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Vortex Dynamics Team

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments were jointly conducted to investigate a bathtub vortex under the influence of a protruding cylinder in a rotating tank. The flow pattern depends on Rossby number (Ro = U /fR), Ekman number (Ek = ν /fR2) , and height ratio, h/ H, where R is the radius of the cylinder, f the Coriolis parameter, ν the kinematic viscosity of the fluid, h the vertical length of the cylinder and H the height of the tank. Steady-state solutions obtained by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations in the rotating frame are shown to have good agreements with flow visualizations measurements. The bathtub vortex exhibits an interesting two-celled structure with an inner Ekman pumping and an outer up-drafting motion. The two regions of up-drafting motion are separated by a notable finite-thickness structure, identified as thin-walled Taylor column. The Taylor column sets a barrier to the fluid flow that flows into the inner region only through the narrow gaps, one above the Taylor column and one beneath it. Moreover, the dependence of thickness and height of the thin-walled Taylor column on angular velocity ratio of cylinder to background rotation (ω/ Ω) , ranging from -8/3 to 8/3 are also discussed. Supported by Ministry of Science and Technology, TAIWAN ROC, under contract no's 102-2221-E-002-068-MY3 & 103C-4514-1.

  5. Bioretention column study of bacteria community response to salt-enriched artificial stormwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endreny, Theodore; Burke, David J; Burchhardt, Kathleen M; Fabian, Mark W; Kretzer, Annette M

    2012-01-01

    Cold climate cities with green infrastructure depend on soil bacteria to remove nutrients from road salt-enriched stormwater. Our research examined how bacterial communities in laboratory columns containing bioretention media responded to varying concentrations of salt exposure from artificial stormwater and the effect of bacteria and salt on column effluent concentrations. We used a factorial design with two bacteria treatments (sterile, nonsterile) and three salt concentrations (935, 315, and 80 ppm), including a deionized water control. Columns were repeatedly saturated with stormwater or deionized and then drained throughout 5 wk, with the last week of effluent analyzed for water chemistry. To examine bacterial communities, we extracted DNA from column bioretention media at time 0 and at week 5 and used molecular profiling techniques to examine bacterial community changes. We found that bacterial community taxa changed between time 0 and week 5 and that there was significant separation between taxa among salt treatments. Bacteria evenness was significantly affected by stormwater treatment, but there were no differences in bacterial richness or diversity. Soil bacteria and salt treatments had a significant effect on the effluent concentration of NO, PO, Cu, Pb, and Zn based on ANOVA tests. The presence of bacteria reduced effluent NO and Zn concentrations by as much as 150 and 25%, respectively, while having a mixed effect on effluent PO concentrations. Our results demonstrate how stormwater can affect bacterial communities and how the presence of soil bacteria improves pollutant removal by green infrastructure.

  6. Reactive transport of metal contaminants in alluvium - Model comparison and column simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J.G.; Bassett, R.L.; Glynn, P.D.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative assessment of two reactive-transport models, PHREEQC and HYDROGEOCHEM (HGC), was done to determine the suitability of each for simulating the movement of acidic contamination in alluvium. For simulations that accounted for aqueous complexation, precipitation and dissolution, the breakthrough and rinseout curves generated by each model were similar. The differences in simulated equilibrium concentrations between models were minor and were related to (1) different units in model output, (2) different activity coefficients, and (3) ionic-strength calculations. When adsorption processes were added to the models, the rinseout pH simulated by PHREEQC using the diffuse double-layer adsorption model rose to a pH of 6 after pore volume 15, about 1 pore volume later than the pH simulated by HGC using the constant-capacitance model. In PHREEQC simulation of a laboratory column experiment, the inability of the model to match measured outflow concentrations of selected constituents was related to the evident lack of local geochemical equilibrium in the column. The difference in timing and size of measured and simulated breakthrough of selected constituents indicated that the redox and adsorption reactions in the column occurred slowly when compared with the modeled reactions. MINTEQA2 and PHREEQC simulations of the column experiment indicated that the number of surface sites that took part in adsorption reactions was less than that estimated from the measured concentration of Fe hydroxide in the alluvium.

  7. Transport and degradation of metalaxyl and isoproturon in biopurification columns inoculated with pesticide-primed material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wilde, Tineke; Spanoghe, Pieter; Sniegowksi, Kristel; Ryckeboer, Jaak; Jaeken, Peter; Springael, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory column displacement experiments were performed to examine whether addition of pesticide-primed material to the matrix of an on-farm biopurification system (BPS), intended to remove pesticides from agricultural waste water, positively affects the degradation of mobile pesticides in the system. Percolated column microcosms with varying types and amounts of metalaxyl and/or isoproturon-primed material or non-primed material were irrigated with water artificially contaminated with isoproturon and/or metalaxyl. Transport of isoproturon was well described using the convection dispersion equation and no dissipation was observed, even in columns inoculated with isoproturon-primed material. On the other hand, delayed dissipation of metalaxyl, i.e., after an initial lag phase, was encountered in all columns receiving metalaxyl. In all systems, dissipation could be described using the Monod model indicating that a metalaxyl degrading population grew in the systems. There was a clear correlation between the lag phase and the amount of metalaxyl-primed material added to the system, i.e., increasing amounts of added material resulted into shorter lag phases and hence more rapid initiation of growth-associated metalaxyl degradation in the system. Our observations suggest that indeed pesticide-primed material can reduce the start-up phase of degradation of mobile pesticides in a BPS and as such can increase its efficiency. However, the primed material should be chosen carefully and preferentially beforehand tested for its capacity to degrade the pesticide.

  8. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using Cassava peel (Manihot Esculenta: column experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ricardo Albis Arrieta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic metal and it is considered one of the contaminants with the highest environmental impact. Bioadsorbents have been considered as a viable option for chromium removal, leading to the necessity to study the behavior of these adsorbents in unit operations similar to the ones employed in the industry. Objective: To study the potential of cassava peels as bio-sorbent in the adsorption of hexavalent chromium in a semi-continuous process in fixed bed columns. Methodology: The effect of parameters such as feed flow rate, initial concentration and bed column height on the response variables rupture time and removal capacity was analyzed using a laboratory scale experimental set-up. Results: Low feed flow rates, low initial concentrations, and higher bed height produce the best conditions for chromium removal. Additionally, three classical models for removal on the packed column were used to fit the dynamic behavior of this process and to obtain significantly physical parameters. However, the best fitting was obtained using the model of the response surface. Conclusions: The concentration of chromium in the feed stream is the experimental factor that has the most influence on removal capacity and rupture time in fixed bed columns packed with cassava peel.

  9. Frontal crash simulation of vehicles against lighting columns using FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehia A. Abdel-Nasser

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many severe and fatal crashes that result from vehicles colliding with street columns such as lighting columns. These cause extremely high impact forces and deformation on the frontal area of the car. The objective of the study is to demonstrate the frontal crash simulation of vehicle against lighting columns to examine injury risk and potential of safety. In particular, various FE models are used to perform contact–impact nonlinear dynamic analysis of lighting columns with vehicle. In this paper Abaqus explicit code is used to numerically simulate the crash of the vehicle with present columns and other lighting columns fabricated from a new suggested material. The acceleration, contact force and deformed energy at the frontal region of the vehicle are traced. It is found that the lighting columns with new suggested material have impact properties to decelerate the vehicle and absorb higher energy during impact.

  10. Monolithic columns in plant proteomics and metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigobello-Masini, Marilda; Penteado, José Carlos Pires; Masini, Jorge Cesar

    2013-03-01

    Since "omics" techniques emerged, plant studies, from biochemistry to ecology, have become more comprehensive. Plant proteomics and metabolomics enable the construction of databases that, with the help of genomics and informatics, show the data obtained as a system. Thus, all the constituents of the system can be seen with their interactions in both space and time. For instance, perturbations in a plant ecosystem as a consequence of application of herbicides or exposure to pollutants can be predicted by using information gathered from these databases. Analytical chemistry has been involved in this scientific evolution. Proteomics and metabolomics are emerging fields that require separation, identification, and quantification of proteins, peptides, and small molecules of metabolites in complex biological samples. The success of this work relies on efficient chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques, and on mass spectrometric detection. This paper reviews recent developments in the use of monolithic columns, focusing on their applications in "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches, including their use as supports for immobilization of proteolytic enzymes and their use in two-dimensional and multidimensional chromatography. Whereas polymeric columns have been predominantly used for separation of proteins and polypeptides, silica-based monoliths have been more extensively used for separation of small molecules of metabolites. Representative applications in proteomics and in analysis of plant metabolites are given and summarized in tables.

  11. Faster Energy Efficient Column Compression Multiplication

    CERN Document Server

    Ramkumar, B

    2011-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate that faster, energy efficient, column compression multiplication, can be achieved by using a combination of two design techniques: partitioning of the partial products into two parts for independent parallel column compression and acceleration of the final addition using a hybrid adder proposed in this work. In order to demonstrate the efficacy of the techniques we have chosen the Dadda multiplier as an example. Based on the proposed techniques 8, 16, 32 and 64-bit Dadda multipliers are developed and compared with the regular Dadda multiplier. The performance of the proposed multiplier is analyzed by evaluating the delay, area and power, with 180 nm process technologies on interconnect and layout using industry standard design and layout tools. The result analysis shows that the 64-bit regular Dadda multiplier is as much as 41.1% slower than the proposed multiplier and requires only 1.4% and 3.7% less area and power respectively. Also the power-delay product of the proposed design ...

  12. Observations of iodine monoxide columns from satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schönhardt

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Iodine species in the troposphere are linked to ozone depletion and new particle formation. In this study, a full year of iodine monoxide (IO columns retrieved from measurements of the SCIAMACHY satellite instrument is presented, coupled with a discussion of their uncertainties and the detection limits. The largest amounts of IO are found near springtime in the Antarctic. A seasonal variation of iodine monoxide in Antarctica is revealed with high values in springtime, slightly less IO in the summer period and again larger amounts in autumn. In winter, no elevated IO levels are found in the areas accessible to satellite measurements. This seasonal cycle is in good agreement with recent ground-based measurements in Antarctica. In the Arctic region, no elevated IO levels were found in the period analysed. This implies that different conditions with respect to iodine release exist in the two Polar Regions. To investigate possible release mechanisms, comparisons of IO columns with those of tropospheric BrO, and ice coverage are described and discussed. Some parallels and interesting differences between IO and BrO temporal and spatial distributions are identified. Overall, the large spatial coverage of satellite retrieved IO data and the availability of a long-term dataset provide new insight about the abundances and distributions of iodine compounds in the troposphere.

  13. Recovery of fine coal from waste streams using advanced column flotation. Annual report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groppo, J.G.

    1991-12-31

    The advanced flotation techniques, namely column flotation, have shown potential in obtaining a low ash, low pyritic sulfur fine size clean coal. The overall objective of this program is to evaluate applicability of an advanced flotation technique, `Ken-Flote` column to recover clean coal with minimum mineral matter content at greater than 90 percent combustible recovery from two Illinois preparation plant waste streams. Column flotations tests were conducted on the flotation feed obtained from the Kerr-McGee Galatia and Ziegler No. 26 plants using three different bubble-generating devices: sparger, gas saver and foam jet. Each of these devices was tested with three different frothers and various column-operating variable to provide maximum combustible recovery, minimum product ash and maximum pyrite rejection. For the Galatia slurry, the column provided a clean coal containing 5 percent ash, 0.48 percent pyritic sulfur at combustible recovery averaging 90 percent. In other words, about 90 percent ash and about 75 percent pyritic sulfur rejection were attained for the Galatia slurry. Pilot plant studies on this slurry basically obtained results similar to the laboratory studies. For the Ziegler No. 26, slurry column flotation provided a clean coal containing about 5 percent ash, 0.44 percent pyritic sulfur at more than 90 percent combustible recovery. The ash and pyrite sulfur rejection was about 85 percent and 65 percent, respectively.

  14. Assessing herbicide leaching from field measurements and laboratory experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas Sánchez, Mª Victoria; Calderón, M.J.; Fernández Luque, José Enrique; Hermosín, M.C.; Moreno Lucas, Félix; Cornejo, J.

    2001-01-01

    Field and laboratory experiments with undisturbed soil columns were performed for assessing the mobility and persistence of chloridazon and lenacil in a clayey soil in the marshes of Lebrija, southwest Spain. In the laboratory we tried to evaluate the herbicides fate when applied with doses greater than normal, as it happens by overlap when spraying the herbicides. Thus, the herbicides doses in the field experiments were similar to those applied by the growers in the area, while the doses app...

  15. Treatment of Copper Contaminated Municipal Wastewater by Using UASB Reactor and Sand-Chemically Carbonized Rubber Wood Sawdust Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Swarup; Mishra, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    The performance of a laboratory scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and its posttreatment unit of sand-chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust (CCRWSD) column system for the treatment of a metal contaminated municipal wastewater was investigated. Copper ion contaminated municipal wastewater was introduced to a laboratory scale UASB reactor and the effluent from UASB reactor was then followed by treatment with sand-CCRWSD column system. The laboratory scale UASB reactor and column system were observed for a period of 121 days. After the posttreatment column the average removal of monitoring parameters such as copper ion concentration (91.37%), biochemical oxygen demand (BODT) (93.98%), chemical oxygen demand (COD) (95.59%), total suspended solid (TSS) (95.98%), ammonia (80.68%), nitrite (79.71%), nitrate (71.16%), phosphorous (44.77%), total coliform (TC) (99.9%), and fecal coliform (FC) (99.9%) was measured. The characterization of the chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust was done by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray fluorescence spectrum (XRF), and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Overall the system was found to be an efficient and economical process for the treatment of copper contaminated municipal wastewater.

  16. BROAD SPECTRUM ANALYSIS FOR TRACE ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN LARGE VOLUMES OF WATER BY XAD RESINS-COLUMN DESIGN-FACTS AND MYTHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibs, J.; Wicklund, A.; Suffet, I.H.

    1986-01-01

    The 'rule of thumb' that large volumes of water can be sampled for trace organic pollutants by XAD resin columns which are designed by small column laboratory studies or pure compounds is examined and shown to be a problem. A theory of multicomponent breakthrough is presented as a frame of reference to help solve the problem and develop useable criteria to aid the design of resin columns. An important part of the theory is the effect of humic substances on the breakthrough character of multicomponent chemical systems.

  17. Hydrotreater/Distillation Column Hazard Analysis Report Rev. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Peter P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wagner, Katie A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    This project Hazard and Risk Analysis Report contains the results of several hazard analyses and risk assessments. An initial assessment was conducted in 2012, which included a multi-step approach ranging from design reviews to a formal What-If hazard analysis. A second What-If hazard analysis was completed during February 2013 to evaluate the operation of the hydrotreater/distillation column processes to be installed in a process enclosure within the Process Development Laboratory West (PDL-West) facility located on the PNNL campus. The qualitative analysis included participation of project and operations personnel and applicable subject matter experts. The analysis identified potential hazardous scenarios, each based on an initiating event coupled with a postulated upset condition. The unmitigated consequences of each hazardous scenario were generally characterized as a process upset; the exposure of personnel to steam, vapors or hazardous material; a spray or spill of hazardous material; the creation of a flammable atmosphere; or an energetic release from a pressure boundary.

  18. Removal of suspended solids from municipal wastewater using geotextile columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, M.H. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, Texas (United States); Kotha, K.K. [Hillis-Carnes Inc., Manassas, VA (United States)

    2002-06-15

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to investigate the filtration behavior of geotextiles to remove suspended solids from municipal wastewater. Four nonwoven geotextiles were used in this preliminary investigation. The study also involved evaluating the suspended solids removal efficiency and regeneration potential of geotextiles for using as filter media. Wastewater samples were collected from the local wastewater treatment plant. Influent and effluent suspended solids concentration, chemical oxygen demand, and effluent flow rates were monitored during the tests. During filtration tests, suspended solids were retained on the upstream face and within the geotextile as wastewater passed through it. Due to the formation of a thin layer of suspended solids or filter cake on the upstream face of the geotextile, the effluent flow rate and suspended solids concentration decreased exponentially with time. When the effluent flow rate reduced below 90%, the filter media was backwashed to restore its filtering efficiency, for reuse. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that using geotextile columns, it was possible to remove 50 to 70% of suspended solids and decrease in chemical oxygen demand from 70 to 90% from the influent. This technique may be suitable for treating wastewater streams with low inflow and suspended solids concentrations, preferably in the range of 100 to 200 mg/L. The technique may be further evaluated for determining its suitability for treatment of wastewater generated from less populated areas and as a polishing step after secondary treatment. (author)

  19. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  20. Fabry-Perot Interferometer for Column CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, William S.; Kawa, Randolph; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Global atmospheric CO2 measurements are essential to resolving significant discrepancies in our understanding of the global carbon budget and, hence, humankind's role in global climate change. The science measurement requirements for CO2 are extremely demanding (precision approx. 0.3%). No atmospheric chemical species has ever been measured from space with this precision. We are developing a novel application of a Fabry-Perot interferometer to detect spectral absorption of reflected sunlight by CO2 and O2 in the atmosphere. Preliminary design studies indicate that the method will be able to achieve the sensitivity and signal-to-noise detection required to measure column CO2 at the target specification. The objective of this program is to construct a prototype instrument for deployment on an aircraft to test the instrument performance and our ability to retrieve the data in the real atmosphere. To date we have assembled a laboratory bench system to begin testing the optical and electronic components. We are also measuring signal and noise levels in actual sunlight to evaluate component performance.

  1. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffin, V. L.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from 1 Sep. 1989 to 28 Feb. 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe in supercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  2. Refreshment topics II: Design of distillation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milojević Svetomir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available For distillation column design it is necessary to define all the variable parameters such as component concentrations in different streams temperatures, pressures, mass and energy flow, which are used to represent the separation process of some specific system. They are related to each other according to specific laws, and if the number of such parameters exceeds the number of their relationships, in order to solve a problem some of them must be specified in advance or some constraints assumed for the mass balance, the balance of energy, phase equilibria or chemical equilibria. Knowledge of specific elements which are the constituents of a distillation unit must be known to define the number of design parameters as well as some additional apparati also necessary to realize the distilation. Each separate apparatus might be designed and constructed only if all the necessary and variable parameters for such a unit are defined. This is the right route to solve a distilation unit in many different cases. The construction of some distillation unit requires very good knowledge of mass, heat and momentum transfer phenomena. Moreover, the designer needs to know which kind of apparatus will be used in the distillation unit to realize a specific production process. The most complicated apparatus in a rectification unit is the distillation column. Depending on the complexity of the separation process one, two or more columns are often used. Additional equipment are heat exchangers (reboilers, condensers, cooling systems, heaters, separators, tanks for reflux distribution, tanks and pumps for feed transportation, etc. Such equipment is connected by pipes and valves, and for the normal operation of a distillation unit other instruments for measuring the flow rate, temperature and pressure are also required. Problems which might arise during the determination and selection of such apparati and their number requires knowledge of the specific systems which must

  3. Strengthening of Steel Columns under Load: Torsional-Flexural Buckling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Vild

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental and numerical research into the strengthening of steel columns under load using welded plates. So far, the experimental research in this field has been limited mostly to flexural buckling of columns and the preload had low effect on the column load resistance. This paper focuses on the local buckling and torsional-flexural buckling of columns. Three sets of three columns each were tested. Two sets corresponding to the base section (D and strengthened section (E were tested without preloading and were used for comparison. Columns from set (F were first preloaded to the load corresponding to the half of the load resistance of the base section (D. Then the columns were strengthened and after they cooled, they were loaded to failure. The columns strengthened under load (F had similar average resistance as the columns welded without preloading (E, meaning the preload affects even members susceptible to local buckling and torsional-flexural buckling only slightly. This is the same behaviour as of the tested columns from previous research into flexural buckling. The study includes results gained from finite element models of the problem created in ANSYS software. The results obtained from the experiments and numerical simulations were compared.

  4. Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of Hollow Steel Columns Strengthening by CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keykha A.H.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The need for strengthening and retrofitting is well known and extensive research is progressing in this field. The reasons for strengthening and retrofitting are numerous: increased loads, changes in use, deterioration, and so on. In recent years, the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP for strengthening has shown to be a competitive method, both regarding structural performance, and economical aspects. Extensive research has been carried out in this field. However, most of the research has been undertaken on concrete structures and for confinement, flexural, and shear strengthening. Limited research has been carried out on steel structures strengthened with CFRP. This paper presents axially loaded steel columns strengthened for increased load. The topic is studied theoretically and through laboratory tests. The theory covers analytical methods. Carbon fiber reinforced polymers has been used to strengthen the columns. The tests have been undertaken on full scale specimens, non-strengthened for reference, partially strengthened and fully strengthened

  5. Transfer of gold nanoparticles from the water column to the estuarine food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, John L.; Craig, Preston; Hexel, Cole; Sisco, Patrick; Frey, Rebecca; Pennington, Paul L.; Fulton, Michael H.; Scott, I. Geoff; Decho, Alan W.; Kashiwada, Shosaku; Murphy, Catherine J.; Shaw, Timothy J.

    2009-07-01

    Within the next five years the manufacture of large quantities of nanomaterials may lead to unintended contamination of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The unique physical, chemical and electronic properties of nanomaterials allow new modes of interaction with environmental systems that can have unexpected impacts. Here, we show that gold nanorods can readily pass from the water column to the marine food web in three laboratory-constructed estuarine mesocosms containing sea water, sediment, sea grass, microbes, biofilms, snails, clams, shrimp and fish. A single dose of gold nanorods (65 nm length × 15 nm diameter) was added to each mesocosm and their distribution in the aqueous and sediment phases monitored over 12 days. Nanorods partitioned between biofilms, sediments, plants, animals and sea water with a recovery of 84.4%. Clams and biofilms accumulated the most nanoparticles on a per mass basis, suggesting that gold nanorods can readily pass from the water column to the marine food web.

  6. A novel closed system bubble column photobioreactor for detailed characterisation of micro and macroalgal growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt, Susan Løvstad; Christensen, L.; Iversen, J. J.L.

    Growth of the marine microalgae Tetraselmis striata Butcher and macroalgae Chondrus crispus Stackhouse was investigated in batch cultures in a closed system bubble column photobioreactor. A laboratory cultivation system was constructed that allowed on-line monitoring of temperature, p...... produced oxygen was catalytically removed from the closed system by addition of hydrogen over a palladium catalyst to avoid photorespiration and to quantify oxygen production. In addition, the bubble column photobioreactor was well suited for cultivation of algae due to fast gas to liquid mass transfer (k......La) and fast mixing provided by split and dual sparging. Specific growth rates (SGRs) were measured using both off-line and on-line measurements. The latter was possible, because linear correlation was observed between carbon dioxide addition and optical density, which proves that carbon dioxide addition may...

  7. Denver District Laboratory (DEN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program CapabilitiesDEN-DO Laboratory is a multi-functional laboratory capable of analyzing most chemical analytes and pathogenic/non-pathogenic microorganisms found...

  8. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  9. Lincoln Laboratory Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lincoln Laboratory Grid (LLGrid) is an interactive, on-demand parallel computing system that uses a large computing cluster to enable Laboratory researchers to...

  10. Gun Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Gun Dynamics Laboratory is a research multi-task facility, which includes two firing bays, a high bay area and a second floor laboratory space. The high bay area...

  11. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratoryThe Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  12. Experimental validation of pulsed column inventory estimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyerlein, A.L.; Geldard, J.F. (Clemson Univ., SC (United States)); Weh, R. (Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Hannover (Germany)); Eiben, K.; Dander, T. (Wiederaufbereitungsanlage Karlsruhe Betriebsgesellschaft mbH (WAK), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)); Hakkila, E.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Near-real-time accounting (NRTA) for reprocessing plants relies on the timely measurement of all transfers through the process area and all inventory in the process. It is difficult to measure the inventory of the solvent contractors; therefore, estimation techniques are considered. We have used experimental data obtained at the TEKO facility in Karlsruhe and have applied computer codes developed at Clemson University to analyze this data. For uranium extraction, the computer predictions agree to within 15% of the measured inventories. We believe this study is significant in demonstrating that using theoretical models with a minimum amount of process data may be an acceptable approach to column inventory estimation for NRTA. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Maximum Variance Hashing via Column Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Luo

    2013-01-01

    item search. Recently, a number of data-dependent methods have been developed, reflecting the great potential of learning for hashing. Inspired by the classic nonlinear dimensionality reduction algorithm—maximum variance unfolding, we propose a novel unsupervised hashing method, named maximum variance hashing, in this work. The idea is to maximize the total variance of the hash codes while preserving the local structure of the training data. To solve the derived optimization problem, we propose a column generation algorithm, which directly learns the binary-valued hash functions. We then extend it using anchor graphs to reduce the computational cost. Experiments on large-scale image datasets demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms state-of-the-art hashing methods in many cases.

  14. Permutation Analysis of Track and Column Braiding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李毓陵; 丁辛; 胡良剑

    2004-01-01

    The positions of braiding carrier in track and column braiding are represented by a diagrammatic braiding plan and a corresponding lattice-array is defined. A set is then formed so that the permutation analysis can be performed to represent the movement of carriers in a braiding process. The process of 4-step braiding is analyzed as an example to describe the application of the proposed method by expressing a braiding cycle as a product of disjoint cycles. As a result, a mapping relation between the disjoint cycles and the movement of carriers is deduced. Following the same analysis principles, a process of 8-step braiding and the corresponding initial state of the lattice-array is developed. A successful permutation analysis to the process manifests the general suitability of the proposed method.

  15. Education and training column: the learning collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald-Wilson, Kim L; Nemec, Patricia B

    2015-03-01

    This column describes the key components of a learning collaborative, with examples from the experience of 1 organization. A learning collaborative is a method for management, learning, and improvement of products or processes, and is a useful approach to implementation of a new service design or approach. This description draws from published material on learning collaboratives and the authors' experiences. The learning collaborative approach offers an effective method to improve service provider skills, provide support, and structure environments to result in lasting change for people using behavioral health services. This approach is consistent with psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices, and serves to increase the overall capacity of the mental health system by structuring a process for discovering and sharing knowledge and expertise across provider agencies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Near shore floating oscillating wave column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Three different types of floating buoys, using oscillating wave columns, have been considered for generating electric power in an Atlantic environment. The study considered the situation close to the shore, but in the ultimate it was hoped to deploy units offshore. Although other designs would have greater power capture efficiency, the Spar Buoy was studied in greatest depth as it was expected to have the edge in terms of building cost and operating economics. A risk assessment was carried out for both concrete and steel buoys. The report covers (1) history of the project development; (2) project definition; (3) power generation and sensitivities and (4) lessons learned. The study was sponsored by Great Britain's DTI.

  17. Column: Putting the Science in Digital Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Cohen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In a recent study, digital forensics was found to lack a consensus around even the most basis notions and terminology of the field. To quote: “These two preliminary studies individually suggest that scientific consensus in the area of digital forensic evidence examination is lacking in the broad sense, but that different groups within that overall community may have limited consensus around areas in which they have special expertise, and that the current peerreviewed publication process is not acting to bring about the sorts of elements typically found in the advancement of a science toward such a consensus. ... perhaps the most significant challenge may be in the development of a common language to describe the field...”(see PDF for full column

  18. The vertebral column of Australopithecus sediba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Scott A; Ostrofsky, Kelly R; Frater, Nakita; Churchill, Steven E; Schmid, Peter; Berger, Lee R

    2013-04-12

    Two partial vertebral columns of Australopithecus sediba grant insight into aspects of early hominin spinal mobility, lumbar curvature, vertebral formula, and transitional vertebra position. Au. sediba likely possessed five non-rib-bearing lumbar vertebrae and five sacral elements, the same configuration that occurs modally in modern humans. This finding contrasts with other interpretations of early hominin regional vertebral numbers. Importantly, the transitional vertebra is distinct from and above the last rib-bearing vertebra in Au. sediba, resulting in a functionally longer lower back. This configuration, along with a strongly wedged last lumbar vertebra and other indicators of lordotic posture, would have contributed to a highly flexible spine that is derived compared with earlier members of the genus Australopithecus and similar to that of the Nariokotome Homo erectus skeleton.

  19. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  20. Laboratory Assessment of Nano-Silver Transport in Sand Columns Using Complex Conductivity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nano-materials are emerging into the global marketplace. Nano-particles, and other throwaway nano-devices may constitute a whole new class of non-biodegradable pollutants of which scientists have very little understanding. Therefore, the production of significant quantities of n...

  1. Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory is used to design and integrate computer hardware and software and related electronic subsystems for tactical vehicles....

  2. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  3. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  4. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  5. Central Laboratories Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TVA Central Laboratories Services is a comprehensive technical support center, offering you a complete range of scientific, engineering, and technical services....

  6. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  7. Wind Structural Testing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides office space for industry researchers, experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, and space for assembling components...

  8. Vehicle Development Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the development of prototype deployment platform vehicles for offboard countermeasure systems.DESCRIPTION: The Vehicle Development Laboratory is...

  9. Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory at the University of Maryland provides the state of the art facilities for realizing next generation products and educating the...

  10. Intelligent Optics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Intelligent Optics Laboratory supports sophisticated investigations on adaptive and nonlinear optics; advancedimaging and image processing; ground-to-ground and...

  11. Geospatial Services Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: To process, store, and disseminate geospatial data to the Department of Defense and other Federal agencies.DESCRIPTION: The Geospatial Services Laboratory...

  12. Wind Structural Testing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides office space for industry researchers, experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, and space for assembling components...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 60 years, Sandia has delivered essential science and technology to resolve the nation's most challenging security issues.Sandia National Laboratories...

  14. Fuels Processing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Fuels Processing Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, provides researchers with the equipment they need to thoroughly explore the catalytic issues associated with...

  15. Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, researchers study how chemical looping combustion (CLC) can be applied to fossil energy systems....

  16. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  17. Vehicle Development Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the development of prototype deployment platform vehicles for offboard countermeasure systems. DESCRIPTION: The Vehicle Development Laboratory is...

  18. Laboratory of Chemical Physics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current research in the Laboratory of Chemical Physics is primarily concerned with experimental, theoretical, and computational problems in the structure, dynamics,...

  19. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  20. ANALYTICAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment that performs a broad array of microbiological analyses for pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. It performs challenge studies...

  1. Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — With its pressure vessels that simulate the pressures and temperatures found deep underground, NETL’s Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory in Pittsburgh, PA, gives...

  2. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  3. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, located in Bldg. 644 provides a dual-gas respirometer for measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide evolution...

  4. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  5. Composites Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose of the Composites Characterization Laboratory is to investigate new and/or modified matrix materials and fibers for advanced composite applications both...

  6. Embedded Processor Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Embedded Processor Laboratory provides the means to design, develop, fabricate, and test embedded computers for missile guidance electronics systems in support...

  7. Photovoltaic Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST's PV characterization laboratory is used to measure the electrical performance and opto-electronic properties of solar cells and modules. This facility consists...

  8. Wireless Emulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Wireless Emulation Laboratory (WEL) is a researchtest bed used to investigate fundamental issues in networkscience. It is a research infrastructure that emulates...

  9. Geospatial Services Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: To process, store, and disseminate geospatial data to the Department of Defense and other Federal agencies. DESCRIPTION: The Geospatial Services Laboratory...

  10. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  11. Microgravity Emissions Laboratory (MEL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microgravity Emissions Laboratory (MEL) utilizes a low-frequency acceleration measurement system for the characterization of rigid body inertial forces generated...

  12. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  13. COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory conducts basic and applied human research studies to characterize cognitive performance as influenced by militarily-relevant contextual and physical...

  14. Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML) is one of the nation's leading research facilities for understanding aerosols, clouds, and their interactions. The AML...

  15. FOOD SAFETY TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory develops screening assays, tests and modifies biosensor equipment, and optimizes food safety testing protocols for the military and civilian sector...

  16. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  17. A Comparative Study of Pollutant Removal Stability in Hybrid Wetland Columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tanveer Ferdous Saeed; Guang zhi Sun

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two alternative substrates (wood mulch and zeolite) on the performance of three laboratory-scale hybrid wetland systems that had identical system components and configurations.Each system consisted of a vertical flow (VF) wetland column,followed by a horizontal flow (HF) column and a vertical flow column.The substrates employed were wood mulch,gravel and zeolite,and Phragmites australis were planted in each column.The systems received synthetic wastewater,with pollutant loadings in the range of 8.5-38.0g/(m2· d) total nitrogen (TN) and 4.0-46.4 g/(m2· d) biological oxygen demand (BOD5).Wood mulch and zeolite substrates showed higher efficiencies in terms of removing nitrogenous compounds and biodegradable organics.The supply of organic carbon from the organic mulch substrates enhanced denitrification,while adsorption of influent ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4—N) in zeolite played a major role in the removal of nitrogenous species in the wetland columns.Overall,the average percentage removals of TN and BOD5 reached>66% and >96% respectively,indicating stable performances by the hybrid wetland systems under the experimental loading ranges.Mathematical models were developed,based on the combination of Monod kinetics and continuously-stirred tank reactor (CSTR) flow patterns to describe the degradation of nitrogenous compounds.Predictions by the models closely matched the experimental data,indicating the validity and potential application of Monod kinetics in the modelling and design of treatment wetlands.

  18. Temperature-compensated 8-bit column driver for AMLCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwall, Andrew G. F.; Lin, Mark L.

    1995-06-01

    An all-digital, 5 V input, 50 Mhz bandwidth, 10-bit resolution, 128- column, AMLCD column driver IC has been designed and tested. The 10-bit design can enhance display definition over 6-bit nd 8-bit column drivers. Precision is realized with on-chip, switched-capacitor DACs plus transparently auto-offset-calibrated, opamp outputs. Increased resolution permits multiple 10-bit digital gamma remappings in EPROMs over temperature. Driver IC features include externally programmable number of output column, bi-directional digital data shifting, user- defined row/column/pixel/frame inversion, power management, timing control for daisy-chained column drivers, and digital bit inversion. The architecture uses fewer reference power supplies.

  19. Effect of axial mixing on RDC and PSE columns performance

    CERN Document Server

    Bastani, D

    2001-01-01

    Using the experimental data obtained from two RDC columns at two different sizes (7.62 and 21.9 cm) and one PSE column with 21.5 cm size, the effect of axial mixing on the performance of these columns was studied. Comparison between the experimental and theoretical (neglecting the axial mixing) number of transfer units indicates that, this effect in PSE columns is more than RDC columns (400% and 200% respectively). These results show that this effect can increase the height of the PSE column up to 4 times for a specific efficiency. Also the results show that this effect is more in law interfacial tension systems, which shows no need of application of agitation facilities when these systems are used.

  20. Multiple column high-throughput e-beam inspection (EBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, David K.; Monahan, Kevin M.; Liu, Enden D.; Tran, Cong; Prescop, Ted

    2012-03-01

    Single-column e-beam systems are used in production for the detection of electrical defects, but are too slow to be used for the detection of small physical defects, and can't meet future inspection requirements. This paper presents a multiplecolumn e-beam technology for high throughput wafer inspection. Multibeam has developed all-electrostatic columns for high-resolution imaging. The elimination of magnetic coils enables the columns to be small; e-beam deflection is faster in the absence of magnetic hysteresis. Multiple miniaturecolumns are assembled in an array. An array of 100 columns covers the entire surface of a 300mm wafer, affording simultaneous cross-wafer sampling. Column performance simulations and system architecture are presented. Also provided are examples of high throughput, more efficient, multiple-column wafer inspection.

  1. Simulating a fuzzy level controller for flotation columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Yinfei; Liu Jiongtian; Wang Yongtian; Cao Yijun

    2011-01-01

    Level control in flotation columns is an important factor that influences the recovery and the grade of concentrate from the column.A flotation column is a nonlinear,multi-variable problem with changeable parameters that traditional methods have difficulty controlling.We have applied fuzzy control methods to the flotation column and tested the performance of the design by Matlab/Simulink simulation.The simulations show that level control in the flotation column becomes smoother and more rapid with the fuzzy controller.Compared to PID control methods the overshoot in valve position,the adjustment time,and the robustness of the controller are all improved.This indicates that it is suitable to model fuzzy controllers in applications for the study of automatic control of flotation column.

  2. Two-dimensional ion chromatography using tandem ion-exchange columns with gradient-pulse column switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Cameron; Shellie, Robert A; Pohl, Christopher A; Haddad, Paul R

    2009-10-09

    A two-dimensional ion chromatography (2D-IC) approach has been developed which provides greater resolution of complex samples than is possible currently using a single column. Two columns containing different stationary phases are connected via a tee-piece, which enables an additional eluent flow and independent control of eluent concentration on each column. The resultant mixed eluent flow at the tee-piece can be varied to produce a different eluent concentration on the second column. This allows analytes strongly retained on the first column to be separated rapidly on the second column, whilst maintaining a highly efficient, well resolved separation of analytes retained weakly on the first column. A group of 18 inorganic anions has been separated to demonstrate the utility of this approach and the proposed 2D-IC method provided separation of this mixture with resolution of all analytes greater than 1.3. Careful optimisation of the eluent profiles on both columns resulted in run times of less than 28 min, including re-equilibration. Separations were performed using isocratic or gradient elution on the first column, with an isocratic separation being used on the second column. Switching of the analytes onto the second column was performed using a gradient pulse of concentrated eluent to quickly elute strongly retained analytes from the first column onto the second column. The separations were highly repeatable (RSD of 0.01-0.12% for retention times and 0.08-2.9% for peak areas) and efficient (typically 8000-260,000 plates). Detection limits were 3-80 ppb.

  3. Column studies on transport of deicing additive benzotriazole in a sandy aquifer and a zerovalent iron barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yu; Breedveld, Gijs D; Aagaard, Per

    2007-11-01

    Benzotriazole (BTA), a chemical with wide industrial applications, is a typical additive in deicer/anti-icer used at airport. To achieve a better understanding of the transport behaviour and environmental fate of BTA, laboratory column studies have been performed on subsoil samples from Oslo Airport, Gardermoen. To explore possibilities for aquifer remediation, BTA behaviour was also studied in a column of granular zerovalent iron (Fe(0)). The subsoil column study demonstrates a very limited retardation of BTA. Consecutive loadings of BTA of the subsoil column showed no change of the break-through curve (BTC) and complete desorption was observed. The sorption behaviour of BTA to metallic iron (Fe(0)) was rather complex. Considerable retardation was observed in the Fe(0) column and repeated BTA loading resulted in an earlier break-through. Between 20% and 50% of the input concentration was retained permanently in the iron (Fe(0)) column. The BTA sorption to metallic iron was found to be enhanced by chloride which lowered the break-through concentration (i.e the C/C(0) plateau). The fraction of BTA remaining in the iron column was found to vary with the flow rate, indicating a time dependant multilayer sorption mechanism. The steady increase in the amount of adsorbed BTA to the iron column during loading corresponds to a rather strong bonding of 4-15 BTA layers to the iron surface. A very slow desorption of BTA was observed; even after flushing with 753 pore volumes of BTA free water, 7.5% of the BTA remained in the column. A geochemical model was developed based on PHREEQC-2 to simulate the sorption and transport of BTA in the tested materials. The BTA sorption was modelled with Freundlich sorption isotherms, as earlier determined in batch experiments. A slight adjustment of the Freundlich parameters was required to fit the observed column break-through. However, our model was not able to simulate the long-term retainment of BTA in the granular iron columns. The

  4. Completing electron scattering studies with the inert gas column:e - Rn scattering and Ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Foram M; Chaudhari, Asha S; Modi, Hitesh S; Pindaria, Manish J

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the inert or noble- gas atoms in general arises because they are ideal as test systems for various theoretical models of electron scattering and also since their interaction processes serve as reference for the determination of instrumental responses in electron scattering experiments. The ionization cross section data of ground state inert gas atoms He through Xe are considered to be benchmark data. Our aim in this paper is to provide theoretical results on electron scattering with Radon atoms, as it would complete the studies on the entire inert gas column. That is possible with this particular column only, in view of the preceding literature on He through Xe . Inert gas radon is radioactive, and would be a difficult target for electron scattering experiments. In the present calculations, the complications arising from radioactivity are not considered. We provide hitherto unavailable cross sections on atomic radon, and also provide opportunity of the comparison of electron impact cross sections ...

  5. Mini-columns for Conducting Breakthrough Experiments. Design and Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ware, Stuart Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Experiments with moderately and strongly sorbing radionuclides (i.e., U, Cs, Am) have shown that sorption between experimental solutions and traditional column materials must be accounted for to accurately determine stationary phase or porous media sorption properties (i.e., sorption site density, sorption site reaction rate coefficients, and partition coefficients or Kd values). This report details the materials and construction of mini-columns for use in breakthrough columns to allow for accurate measurement and modeling of sorption parameters. Material selection, construction techniques, wet packing of columns, tubing connections, and lessons learned are addressed.

  6. Tubular composite columns in a non-symmetrical fire

    OpenAIRE

    Markku Heinisuo; Timo Jokinen

    2014-01-01

    A considerable number of studies have been conducted worldwide on fires that act on all four sides of a column (symmetrical fire). These cases are used for the validation of the analysis models developed in this study. In real buildings the columns are often embedded. If the fire does not act similarly on all surfaces of the column (non-symmetrical fire), it is extremely difficult to predict how the column will behave. The key research questions are: Is resistance stronger in non-symmetri...

  7. Morphological modularity in the vertebral column of Felidae (Mammalia, Carnivora)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marcela Randau; Anjali Goswami

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that the clear morphological differences among vertebrae across the presacral column are accompanied by heterogeneous functional signals in vertebral shape...

  8. Laboratory Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, Walter H

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory information systems (LISs) supply mission-critical capabilities for the vast array of information-processing needs of modern laboratories. LIS architectures include mainframe, client-server, and thin client configurations. The LIS database software manages a laboratory's data. LIS dictionaries are database tables that a laboratory uses to tailor an LIS to the unique needs of that laboratory. Anatomic pathology LIS (APLIS) functions play key roles throughout the pathology workflow, and laboratories rely on LIS management reports to monitor operations. This article describes the structure and functions of APLISs, with emphasis on their roles in laboratory operations and their relevance to pathologists.

  9. Multi column cell (MCC) e-beam exposure system for mask writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Yamada, Akio; Yamabe, Masaki

    2008-05-01

    Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) Mask Design, Drawing, and Inspection Technology Research Department (Mask D2I) started a 4-year development program for the total optimization of mask design, drawing, and inspection technologies to reduce photomask manufacturing costs in 2006. At the Mask Writing Equipment Technology Research Laboratory, we are developing an e-beam exposure system introducing concepts of MCC (multi column cell), CP (character projection), and VSB (variable shaped beam), which has several times higher throughput than currently commercially available e-beam writing systems.

  10. Selective detachment process in column flotation froth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honaker, R.Q.; Ozsever, A.V.; Parekh, B.K. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2006-05-15

    The selectivity in flotation columns involving the separation of particles of varying degrees of floatability is based on differential flotation rates in the collection zone, reflux action between the froth and collection zones, and differential detachment rates in the froth zone. Using well-known theoretical models describing the separation process and experimental data, froth zone and overall flotation recovery values were quantified for particles in an anthracite coal that have a wide range of floatability potential. For highly floatable particles, froth recovery had a very minimal impact on overall recovery while the recovery of weakly floatable material was decreased substantially by reductions in froth recovery values. In addition, under carrying-capacity limiting conditions, selectivity was enhanced by the preferential detachment of the weakly floatable material. Based on this concept, highly floatable material was added directly into the froth zone when treating the anthracite coal. The enriched froth phase reduced the product ash content of the anthracite product by five absolute percentage points while maintaining a constant recovery value.

  11. SPR Hydrostatic Column Model Verification and Validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettin, Giorgia [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lord, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rudeen, David Keith [Gram, Inc. Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A Hydrostatic Column Model (HCM) was developed to help differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen for testing the pressure integrity of crude oil storage wells at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This effort was motivated by steady, yet distinct, pressure behavior of a series of Big Hill caverns that have been placed under nitrogen for extended period of time. This report describes the HCM model, its functional requirements, the model structure and the verification and validation process. Different modes of operation are also described, which illustrate how the software can be used to model extended nitrogen monitoring and Mechanical Integrity Tests by predicting wellhead pressures along with nitrogen interface movements. Model verification has shown that the program runs correctly and it is implemented as intended. The cavern BH101 long term nitrogen test was used to validate the model which showed very good agreement with measured data. This supports the claim that the model is, in fact, capturing the relevant physical phenomena and can be used to make accurate predictions of both wellhead pressure and interface movements.

  12. GPR Diagnostics of columns in archaeological contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Persico, Raffaele; Catapano, Ilaria

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade the use of Ground Penetrating radar (GPR) applied to cultural heritage has been strongly increasing thanks to both technological development of sensors and softwares for data processing and cultural reasons such as the increasing awareness of conservators and archaeologist of the benefits of this method in terms of reduction of costs and time and risk associated with restoration works. This made GPR a mature technique for investigating different types of works of art and building elements of historical interest, including masonry structures, frescoes, mosaics [1-3], in the context of scientific projects, decision support activities aimed at the diagnosis of decay pathologies, and educational activities. One of the most complex building elements to be investigated by GPR are the columns both for the geometry of the object and for the several expected features to be detected including fractures, dishomogeneities and metallic connection elements. The work deals with the Ground Penetrating Radar diagnostic surveys at the prestigious archaeological site of Pompei. In particular, GPR surveys were carried out in two different areas, Palestra Grande and Tempio di Giove. The first campaign was carried out also as educational activity of the "International School "GEOPHYSICS AND REMOTE SENSING FOR ARCHAEOLOGY". The School aimed at giving the opportunity to scholars, PhD students, researchers and specialists in Geophysics, Remote Sensing and Archaeology to deepen their knowledge and expertise with geophysical and remote sensing techniques for archaeology and cultural heritage documentation and management. This survey was carried on two kinds of columns, with circular and rectangular section in order to detect possible hidden defects affecting their integrity. The second survey was carried out at Tempio di Giove, on request of the Soprintendenza Pompei, in order to gain information about the presence of reinforcement structures, which may be put inside the

  13. Energy Materials Research Laboratory (EMRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Materials Research Laboratory at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) creates a cross-disciplinary laboratory facility that lends itself to the...

  14. Experimental studies on the physico-mechanical properties of jet-grout columns in sandy and silty soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Muge K.

    2016-04-01

    The term of ground improvement states to the modification of the engineering properties of soils. Jet-grouting is one of the grouting methods among various ground improvement techniques. During jet-grouting, different textures of columns can be obtained depending on the characteristics of surrounding subsoil as well as the adopted jet-grouting system for each site is variable. In addition to textural properties, strength and index parameters of jet-grout columns are highly affected by the adjacent soil. In this study, the physical and mechanical properties of jet-grout columns constructed at two different sites in silty and sandy soil conditions were determined by laboratory tests. A number of statistical relationships between physical and mechanical properties of soilcrete were established in this study in order to investigate the dependency of numerous variables. The relationship between qu and γd is more reliable for sandy soilcrete than that of silty columns considering the determination coefficients. Positive linear relationships between Vp and γd with significantly high determination coefficients were obtained for the jet-grout columns in silt and sand. The regression analyses indicate that the P-wave velocity is a very dominant parameter for the estimation of physical and mechanical properties of jet-grout columns and should be involved during the quality control of soilcrete material despite the intensive use of uniaxial compressive strength test. Besides, it is concluded that the dry unit weight of jet-grout column is a good indicator of the efficiency of employed operational parameters during jet-grouting.

  15. Removal of dissolved organic carbon by aquifer material: Correlations between column parameters, sorption isotherms and octanol-water partition coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Snigdhendubala; Boernick, Hilmar; Kumar, Pradeep; Mehrotra, Indu

    2016-07-15

    The correlation between octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW) and the transport of aqueous samples containing single organic compound is well documented. The concept of the KOW of river water containing the mixture of organics was evolved by Pradhan et al. (2015). The present study aims at determining the KOW and sorption parameters of synthetic aqueous samples and river water to finding out the correlation, if any. The laboratory scale columns packed with aquifer materials were fed with synthetic and river water samples. Under the operating conditions, the compounds in the samples did not separate, and all the samples that contain more than one organic compound yielded a single breakthrough curve. Breakthrough curves simulated from sorption isotherms were compared with those from the column runs. The sorption parameters such as retardation factor (Rf), height of mass transfer zone (HMTZ), rate of mass transfer zone (RMTZ), breakpoint column capacity (qb) and maximum column capacity (qx) estimated from column runs, sorption isotherms and models developed by Yoon-Nelson, Bohart-Adam and Thomas were in agreement. The empirical correlations were found between the KOW and sorption parameters. The transport of the organics measured as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) through the aquifer can be predicted from the KOW of the river water and other water samples. The novelty of the study is to measure KOW and to envisage the fate of the DOC of the river water, particularly during riverbank filtration. Statistical analysis of the results revealed a fair agreement between the observed and computed values.

  16. Graph Modelling Approach: Application to a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovelaque, V.; Commault, C.; Bahar, Mehrdad

    1997-01-01

    Introduction, structured systems and digraphs, distillation column model, generic input-output decoupling problem, generic disturbance rejection problem, concluding remarks.......Introduction, structured systems and digraphs, distillation column model, generic input-output decoupling problem, generic disturbance rejection problem, concluding remarks....

  17. A Modeling Framework for Conventional and Heat Integrated Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a generic, modular model framework for describing fluid separation by distillation is presented. At present, the framework is able to describe a conventional distillation column and a heat-integrated distillation column, but due to a modular structure the database can be further ex...

  18. A Better Method for Filling Pasteur Pipet Chromatography Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruekberg, Ben

    2006-01-01

    An alternative method for the preparation of Pasteur pipet chromatography columns is presented that allows the column to be filled with solvent without bubbles and allows greater control of fluid flow while the materials to be separated are added. Students are required to wear gloves and goggles and caution should be used while handling glass…

  19. SURFACTANT ENHANCED REMEDIATION OF SOIL COLUMNS CONTAMINATED BY RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of aqueous surfactant solutions to recover tetrachloroethylene (PCE) entrapped in Ottawa sand was evaluated in four column experiments. Residual PCE was emplaced by injecting 14C-labeled PCE into water-saturated soil columns and displacing the free product ...

  20. Nonlinear model predictive control of a packed distillation column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patwardhan, A.A.; Edgar, T.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    A rigorous dynamic model based on fundamental chemical engineering principles was formulated for a packed distillation column separating a mixture of cyclohexane and n-heptane. This model was simplified to a form suitable for use in on-line model predictive control calculations. A packed distillation column was operated at several operating conditions to estimate two unknown model parameters in the rigorous and simplified models. The actual column response to step changes in the feed rate, distillate rate, and reboiler duty agreed well with dynamic model predictions. One unusual characteristic observed was that the packed column exhibited gain-sign changes, which are very difficult to treat using conventional linear feedback control. Nonlinear model predictive control was used to control the distillation column at an operating condition where the process gain changed sign. An on-line, nonlinear model-based scheme was used to estimate unknown/time-varying model parameters.

  1. Experimental study on the seismic response of braced reinforced concrete frame with irregular columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianzhuang; Li, Jie; Chen, Jun

    2011-12-01

    A 15-storey K-braced reinforced concrete model frame with irregular columns, i.e., T-shaped, L-shaped, as well as +-shaped columns, was constructed and tested on the six-degree-of-freedom shaking table at the State Key Laboratory for Disaster Reduction in Civil Engineering in Tongji, China. Two types of earthquake records, El-Centro wave (south-north direction) and Shanghai artifi cial wave (SHAW) with various peak accelerations and principal-secondary sequences, were input and experimentally studied. Based on the shaking table tests and theoretical analysis, several observations can be made. The failure sequence of the model structure is brace→beam→column→joints, so that the design philosophy for several lines of defense has been achieved. Earthquake waves with different spectrums not only infl uence the magnitude and distribution of the earthquake force and the storey shear force, but also obviously affect the magnitude of the displacement response. The aftershock seismic response of previously damaged reinforced concrete braced frames with irregular columns possesses the equivalent elastic performance characteristic. Generally speaking, from the aspects of failure features and drift ratio, this type of reinforced concrete structure provides adequate earthquake resistance and can be promoted for use in China.

  2. Evolution of clog formation with time in columns permeated with synthetic landfill leachate

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanGulck, Jamie F.; Rowe, R. Kerry

    2004-11-01

    Laboratory column tests conducted to gain insight regarding the biological and chemical clogging mechanisms in a porous medium are presented. To seed the porous medium with landfill bacteria, a mixture of Keele Valley Landfill and synthetic leachate permeated through the column under anaerobic conditions for the first 9 days of operation. After this, 100% synthetic leachate was used. The synthetic leachate approximated Keele Valley Landfill leachate in chemical composition but contained negligible suspended solids and bacteria compared with real leachate. The removal of volatile fatty acids (VFAs), primarily acetate, in leachate as it passed through the medium was highly correlated with the precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3(s)) from solution. The columns experienced a decrease in drainable porosity from an initial value of about 0.38 to less than 0.1 after steady state chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, resulting in a five-order magnitude decrease in hydraulic conductivity. The decrease in drainable porosity prior to steady state COD removal was primarily due to the growth of a biofilm on the medium surface. After steady state COD removal, calcium precipitation was at least equally responsible for the decrease in drainable porosity as biofilm growth. Clog composition analyses showed that CaCO 3(s) was the dominant clog constituent and that 99% of the carbonate in the clog material was bound to calcium.

  3. Fine coal flotation plant waste comparison--column vs. sub-a cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrlinger, H.P. III.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project was to compare results from a small commercially sized Deister Flotaire column flotation cell with the subaeration cells at Kerr-McGee's Galatia plant during side by side testing of feed splits from the same sources. Typical cell criteria for both cells are included in the appendix. The project involved the activities of three organizations: the Kerr-McGee Coal Corporation, the Deister Concentrator Company, and the Illinois State Geological Survey. Their roles were as follows: Kerr-McGee installed the Deister column with sample splitter and tailings volume measuring cell in the Galatia Coal Preparation Plant to treat a representative split of their flotation feed; Deister provided a 30 inch diameter {times} 35{prime} high Deister Flotaire Column Flotation Cell capable of treating nominally one ton per hour or slightly over 1% of the plant feed. Deister additionally provided the sample splitter and the tailings volume measuring cell. ISGS personnel worked with both companies on the installation, conducted laboratory tests to direct the early plant test reagent practice, attended all of the plant runs cutting representative samples of feed, measuring slurry and reagent flows, preparing samples and writing reports.

  4. The timing and intensity of column collapse during explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carazzo, Guillaume; Kaminski, Edouard; Tait, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Volcanic columns produced by explosive eruptions commonly reach, at some stage, a collapse regime with associated pyroclastic density currents propagating on the ground. The threshold conditions for the entrance into this regime are mainly controlled by the mass flux and exsolved gas content at the source. However, column collapse is often partial and the controls on the fraction of total mass flux that feeds the pyroclastic density currents, defined here as the intensity of collapse, are unknown. To better understand this regime, we use a new experimental apparatus reproducing at laboratory scale the convecting and collapsing behavior of hot particle-laden air jets. We validate the predictions of a 1D theoretical model for the entrance into the regime of partial collapse. Furthermore, we show that where a buoyant plume and a collapsing fountain coexist, the intensity of collapse can be predicted by a universal scaling relationship. We find that the intensity of collapse in the partial collapse regime is controlled by magma gas content and temperature, and always exceeds 40%, independent of peak mass flux and total erupted volume. The comparison between our theoretical predictions and a set of geological data on historic and pre-historic explosive eruptions shows that the model can be used to predict both the onset and intensity of column collapse, hence it can be used for rapid assessment of volcanic hazards notably ash dispersal during eruptive crises.

  5. Influence of urban ozone in the measurements of the total ozone column in Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, A.; Gay, C. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bravo, J. L. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we examine measurements of the thickness of the total ozone column between 1986 and 1989 in Mexico City. We consider the contribution of the surface ozone in measurement of the total ozone column made with the Dobson Spectrophotometer located at the Solar Radiation Laboratory (National University), in the southwest of Mexico City. We consider different depths of the mixing layer depending on the season and we compare our results with those reported for Mauna Loa in Hawaii and Poona in India, at the same latitude as Mexico City. In conclusion we confirm that in highly polluted areas the surface ozone has an important effect on measurements of the total ozone column. [Spanish] En este trabajo se examinan las mediciones del grosor de la columna total de ozono entre 1986 y 1989 en la Ciudad de Mexico. En esta revision se considera la contribucion del ozono superficial a las mediciones efectuadas con el Espectrofotometro Dobson instalado en el Laboratorio de Radiacion Solar de la UNAM al suroeste de la Ciudad de Mexico. Consideramos diferentes capas de mezcla para el ozono dependiendo del periodo estacional y comparamos los resultados obtenidos con los valores de las mediciones reportadas para Mauna Loa en Hawai y Poona en la India, ambos a latitudes similares a la de la Ciudad de Mexico. Nuestra conclusion es que en regiones urbanas con alta contaminacion ambiental, el ozono superficial afecta apreciablemente las mediciones del grosor de la columna total de ozono.

  6. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, Roelof; Slater, Lee; LaBrecque, Douglas

    2009-05-12

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO(3) and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO(3) as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO(3) dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO(3) forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO(3) precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  7. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  8. Characterizing fluid dynamics in a bubble column aimed for the determination of reactive mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováts, Péter; Thévenin, Dominique; Zähringer, Katharina

    2017-09-01

    Bubble column reactors are multiphase reactors that are used in many process engineering applications. In these reactors a gas phase comes into contact with a fluid phase to initiate or support reactions. The transport process from the gas to the liquid phase is often the limiting factor. Characterizing this process is therefore essential for the optimization of multiphase reactors. For a better understanding of the transfer mechanisms and subsequent chemical reactions, a laboratory-scale bubble column reactor was investigated. First, to characterize the flow field in the reactor, two different methods have been applied. The shadowgraphy technique is used for the characterisation of the bubbles (bubble diameter, velocity, shape or position) for various process conditions. This technique is based on particle recognition with backlight illumination, combined with particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). The bubble trajectories in the column can also be obtained in this manner. Secondly, the liquid phase flow has been analysed by particle image velocimetry (PIV). The combination of both methods, delivering relevant information concerning disperse (bubbles) and continuous (liquid) phases, leads to a complete fluid dynamical characterization of the reactor, which is the pre-condition for the analysis of mass transfer between both phases.

  9. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2011-05-23

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature.

  10. Boron and Zinc Transport Through Intact Columns of Calcareous Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. MAHMOOD-UL-HASSAN; M. S. AKHTAR; G. NABI

    2008-01-01

    Leaching of boron (B) and zinc (Zn) can be significant in some pedomorphic conditions, which can cause contamination of shallow groundwater and economic losses. Boron and Zn adsorption and transport was studied using 8.4 cm diameter ×28 cm long intact columns from two calcareous soil series with differing clay contents and vadose zone structures:Lyallpur soil series, clay loam (fine-silty, mixed, hyperthermic Ustalfic Haplargid), and Sultanpur soil series, sandy loam (coarse-silty, mixed, hyperthermic Ustollic Camborthid). The adsorption isotherms were developed by equilibrating soil with 0.01 mol L-1 CaCl2 aqueous solution containing varying amounts of B and Zn and were fitted to the Langmuir equation. The B and Zn breakthrough curves were fitted to the two-domain convective-dispersive equation. At the end of the leaching experiment, 0.11 L 10 g L-1 blue dye solution was also applied to each column to mark the flow paths.The Lyallpur soil columns had a slightly greater adsorption partition coefficient both for B and Zn than the Sultanpur soil columns. In the Lyallpur soil columns, B arrival was immediate but the peak concentration ratio (the concentration in solution at equilibrium/concentration applied) was lower than that in the Sultanpur soil columns. The breakthrough of B in the Sultanpur soil columns occurred after about 10 cm of cumulative drainage in both the columns; the rise in effluent concentration was fast and the peak concentration ratio was almost 1. Zinc leaching through the soil columns was very limited as only one column from the Lyallpur soil series showed Zn breakthrough in the effluent where the peak concentration ratio was only 0.05. This study demonstrates the effect of soil structure on B transport and has implications for the nutrient management in field soils.

  11. Mitigation of Liquefaction in Sandy Soils Using Stone Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Levent; Kayabalı, Kamil

    2010-05-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the leading causes of earthquake-induced damage to structures. Soil improvement methods provide effective solutions to reduce the risk of soil liquefaction. Thus, soil ground treatments are applied using various techniques. However, except for a few ground treatment methods, they generally require a high cost and a lot of time. Especially in order to prevent the risk of soil liquefaction, stone columns conctructed by vibro-systems (vibro-compaction, vibro-replacement) are one of the traditional geotechnical methods. The construction of stone columns not only enhances the ability of clean sand to drain excess pore water during an earthquake, but also increases the relative density of the soil. Thus, this application prevents the development of the excess pore water pressure in sand during earthquakes and keeps the pore pressure ratio below a certain value. This paper presents the stone column methods used against soil liquefaction in detail. At this stage, (a) the performances of the stone columns were investigated in different spacing and diameters of columns during past earthquakes, (b) recent studies about design and field applications of stone columns were presented, and (c) a new design method considering the relative density of soil and the capacity of drenage of columns were explained in sandy soil. Furthermore, with this new method, earthquake performances of the stone columns constructed at different areas were investigated before the 1989 Loma Prieta and the 1994 Northbridge earthquakes, as case histories of field applications, and design charts were compiled for suitable spacing and diameters of stone columns with consideration to the different sandy soil parameters and earhquake conditions. Key Words: Soil improvement, stone column, excess pore water pressure

  12. Valorization of bituminous coal pulps using column flotation; Valorisation de fines de charbon bitumineux par flottation en colonnes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gursu, G.; Hicyilmaz, C. [Universite du Moyen-Orient, Ankara (Turkey); Bilgen, S. [Universite de Mersin (Turkey)

    2001-03-01

    Washing tests were performed with 5 x 5 x 200 cm{sup 3} laboratory flotation columns on bituminous coal pulps from Zonguldak (Turkey) containing 47.52% of ash. The final product contains 10% of ash with a 73.52% recovery. A re-washing of this concentrate allows to obtain a final product with 5.88% of ash and a 59.27% recovery. Abstract only. (J.S.)

  13. Optimization and Annual Average Power Predictions of a Backward Bent Duct Buoy Oscillating Water Column Device Using the Wells Turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Christopher; Willits, Steven; Bull, Diana; Fontaine, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents work completed by The Applied Research Laboratory at The Pennsylvania State University, in conjunction with Sandia National Labs, on the optimization of the power conversion chain (PCC) design to maximize the Average Annual Electric Power (AAEP) output of an Oscillating Water Column (OWC) device. The design consists of two independent stages. First, the design of a floating OWC, a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB), and second the design of the PCC. The pneumatic power output ...

  14. Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudukovic, M.P.

    1999-05-14

    The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research Engineering Company was to improve the knowledge base for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. During the first year (July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996) of this three year program novel experimental tools (computer aided radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), particle image velocimetry (PIV), heat probe, optical fiber probe and gamma ray tomography) were developed and tuned for measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field, holdup distribution, heat transfer and bubble size. The accomplishments were delineated in the First Technical Annual Report. The second year (July, 1996--June 30, 1997) was spent on further development and tuning of the novel experimental tools (e.g., development of Monte Carlo calibration for CARPT, optical probe development), building up the hydrodynamic data base using these tools and comparison of the two techniques (PIV and CARPT) for determination of liquid velocities. A phenomenological model for gas and liquid backmixing was also developed. All accomplishments were summarized in the Second Annual Technical Report. During the third and final year of the program (July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998) and during the nine months no cost extension, the high pressure facility was completed and a set of data was taken at high pressure conditions. Both PIV, CT and CARPT were used. More fundamental hydrodynamic modeling was also undertaken and model predictions were compared to data. The accomplishments for this period are summarized in this report.

  15. Column Grid Array Rework for High Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Atul C.; Bodie, Charles C.

    2008-01-01

    Due to requirements for reduced size and weight, use of grid array packages in space applications has become common place. To meet the requirement of high reliability and high number of I/Os, ceramic column grid array packages (CCGA) were selected for major electronic components used in next MARS Rover mission (specifically high density Field Programmable Gate Arrays). ABSTRACT The probability of removal and replacement of these devices on the actual flight printed wiring board assemblies is deemed to be very high because of last minute discoveries in final test which will dictate changes in the firmware. The questions and challenges presented to the manufacturing organizations engaged in the production of high reliability electronic assemblies are, Is the reliability of the PWBA adversely affected by rework (removal and replacement) of the CGA package? and How many times can we rework the same board without destroying a pad or degrading the lifetime of the assembly? To answer these questions, the most complex printed wiring board assembly used by the project was chosen to be used as the test vehicle, the PWB was modified to provide a daisy chain pattern, and a number of bare PWB s were acquired to this modified design. Non-functional 624 pin CGA packages with internal daisy chained matching the pattern on the PWB were procured. The combination of the modified PWB and the daisy chained packages enables continuity measurements of every soldered contact during subsequent testing and thermal cycling. Several test vehicles boards were assembled, reworked and then thermal cycled to assess the reliability of the solder joints and board material including pads and traces near the CGA. The details of rework process and results of thermal cycling are presented in this paper.

  16. Column-by-column compositional mapping by Z-contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, S.I. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)], E-mail: sergio.molina@uca.es; Sales, D.L. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Galindo, P.L. [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, Y.; Alen, B.; Gonzalez, L. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Varela, M.; Pennycook, S.J. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    A phenomenological method is developed to determine the composition of materials, with atomic column resolution, by analysis of integrated intensities of aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy images. The method is exemplified for InAs{sub x}P{sub 1-x} alloys using epitaxial thin films with calibrated compositions as standards. Using this approach we have determined the composition of the two-dimensional wetting layer formed between self-assembled InAs quantum wires on InP(0 0 1) substrates.

  17. Optimization of SHINE Process: Design and Verification of Plant-Scale AG 1 Anion-Exchange Concentration Column and Titania Sorbent Pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Dominique C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Abdul, Momen [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Youker, Amanda J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Rotsch, David A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-06-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a Mo-recovery and -purification system for the SHINE medical technologies process, which uses a uranyl sulfate solution for the accelerator-driven production of Mo-99. The objective of this effort is to reduce the processing time for the acidification of the Mo-99 product prior to loading onto a concentration column and concentration of the Mo-99 product solution. Two methods were investigated: (1) the replacement of the titania concentration column by an anion-exchange column to decrease processing time and increase the radioiodine-decontamination efficiency and (2) pretreatment of the titania sorbent to improve its effectiveness for the Mo-recovery and -concentration columns. Promising results are reported for both methods.

  18. A Bathtub Vortex under the Influence of a Taylor Column in a Rotating Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Lin; Chen, Yin-Chung; Li, Zi-Ya; Chu, Chin-Chou; Chang, Chien C.

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate a bathtub vortex under the influence of a Taylor column in a rotating tank. A central drain hole is placed at the bottom of the tank and a top-down cylinder is suspended from the rigid lid. We examine the effects of the Rossby number, Ro and the Ekman number, Ek. Steady-state solutions are shown to have good agreements with flow visualizations and PTV measurements. It is found that at Ro 10-2, a bottom Ekman pumping forms a classic one-celled structure for the case of no suspended cylinder h / H =0, while for various h / H ≠ 0, the strong interaction of the bathtub vortex and Taylor column results in a two-celled structure with an inner Ekman pumping and an outer Taylor column induced upwelling. In h / H ≠ 0, the Taylor wall separates the vortex into an inner and an outer region, but allows the outer fluid to flow into the inner region through a top and a bottom gap which can be classified into two and three flow paths, respectively. Moreover, the individual flow rate of each path and the weaker influence of the Taylor column at Ro 1 and 102 are also discussed. Finally, we observe that the vorticity strength of the vortex exhibits the relationship with a dimensionless group √{ fQ / gH2 (1 - h / H) }. NSC 98-2221-E-002-094-MY3; NSC 99-2111-M-002-005-MY2.

  19. Detroit District Laboratory (DET)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program Capabilities DET-DO Laboratory is equipped with the usual instrumentation necessary to perform a wide range of analyses of food, drugs and cosmetics. Program...

  20. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  1. Product Evaluation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory offers the services of highly trained and experienced specialists that have a full complement of measuring equipment. It is equipped with two optical...

  2. Protective Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a 40 by 28 by 9 foot facility that is equipped with tools for the development of various items of control technology related to the transmission...

  3. Laboratory Demographics Lookup Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This website provides demographic information about laboratories, including CLIA number, facility name and address, where the laboratory testing is performed, the...

  4. Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is an astronaut training facility and neutral buoyancy pool operated by NASA and located at the Sonny Carter Training Facility,...

  5. Aircraft Fire Protection Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Navy Aircraft Protection Laboratory provides complete test support for all Navy air vehicle fire protection systems. The facility allows for the simulation of a...

  6. Geometric Design Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Geometric Design Laboratory (GDL) is to support the Office of Safety Research and Development in research related to the geometric design...

  7. Laboratory of Biological Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Biological Modeling is defined by both its methodologies and its areas of application. We use mathematical modeling in many forms and apply it to...

  8. Aircraft Fire Protection Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Navy Aircraft Protection Laboratory provides complete test support for all Navy air vehicle fire protection systems.The facility allows for the simulation of a...

  9. Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL)�is a scientific facility funded by DOE to create and implement innovative processes for environmental clean-up and...

  10. Mechanical Testing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Mechanical Testing Laboratory in Albany, OR, helps researchers investigate materials that can withstand the heat and pressure commonly found in fossil energy...

  11. Laboratory of Biological Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Biological Modeling is defined by both its methodologies and its areas of application. We use mathematical modeling in many forms and apply it to a...

  12. High Bay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a specially constructed facility with elevated (37 feet) ceilings and an overhead catwalk, and which is dedicated to research efforts in reducing...

  13. FLEXIBLE FOOD PACKAGING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment to fabricate and test prototype packages of many types and sizes (e.g., bags, pouches, trays, cartons, etc.). This equipment can...

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lab has a proud history and heritage of almost 70 years of science and innovation. The people at the Laboratory work on advanced technologies to provide the best...

  15. Geological Services Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Researchers use computed tomography (CT) scanners at NETL’s Geological Services Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, to peer into geologic core samples to determine how...

  16. Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Outpatient clinical laboratory services are paid based on a fee schedule in accordance with Section 1833(h) of the Social Security Act. The clinical laboratory fee...

  17. Philadelphia District Laboratory (PHI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program Capabilities PHI-DO Pharmaceutical Laboratory specializes in the analyses of all forms and types of drug products.Its work involves nearly all phases of drug...

  18. Energetics Laboratory Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — These energetic materials laboratories are equipped with explosion proof hoods with blow out walls for added safety, that are certified for safe handling of primary...

  19. Human Factors Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The purpose of the Human Factors Laboratory is to further the understanding of highway user needs so that those needs can be incorporated in roadway design,...

  20. Space Systems Laboratory (SSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) is part of the Aerospace Engineering Department and A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland in College...

  1. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  2. Philadelphia District Laboratory (PHI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program CapabilitiesPHI-DO Pharmaceutical Laboratory specializes in the analyses of all forms and types of drug products.Its work involves nearly all phases of drug...

  3. Moriah Wind System Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Moriah Wind System Laboratory provides in-service support for the more than 50 U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and Military Sealift Command ships on which...

  4. Detroit District Laboratory (DET)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program CapabilitiesDET-DO Laboratory is equipped with the usual instrumentation necessary to perform a wide range of analyses of food, drugs and cosmetics. Program...

  5. NEW DESIGNS OF COLUMNS, INHABITED, INDUSTRIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belokur K. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Original screw designs of buildings and columns are offered. Frameworks of these buildings and columns are the bearing elements and means of external and internal decoration of buildings and constructions. Originality of such buildings and columns frameworks is ensured by the fact that their design is decorated on the outer surface with broken or smooth screw edges and screw surfaces. Versatility of the offered screw columns trunks designs, as well as the possibility of performance of their left or right screwing allows reaching certain symmetry or their repeatability in the form of harmonious alternation of the bearing trunks of screw columns and spaces between them. Giving to numerous sides of trunks of screw columns of a certain invoice, or their coloring in different colors, will contribute even more to their expressiveness and beauty. Durability and vibration resistance (including seismic of such trunks of screw columns at the same volumes of construction materials, in comparison with round and rectangular trunks is higher

  6. Modeling atrazine transport in soil columns with HYDRUS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Leju CELESTINO LADU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Both physical and chemical processes affect the fate and transport of herbicides. It is useful to simulate these processes with computer programs to predict solute movement. Simulations were run with HYDRUS-1D to identify the sorption and degradation parameters of atrazine through calibration from the breakthrough curves (BTCs. Data from undisturbed and disturbed soil column experiments were compared and analyzed using the dual-porosity model. The study results show that the values of dispersivity are slightly lower in disturbed columns, suggesting that the more heterogeneous the structure is, the higher the dispersivity. Sorption parameters also show slight variability, which is attributed to the differences in soil properties, experimental conditions and methods, or other ecological factors. For both of the columns, the degradation rates were similar. Potassium bromide was used as a conservative non-reactive tracer to characterize the water movement in columns. Atrazine BTCs exhibited significant tailing and asymmetry, indicating non-equilibrium sorption during solute transport. The dual-porosity model was verified to best fit the BTCs of the column experiments. Greater or lesser concentration of atrazine spreading to the bottom of the columns indicated risk of groundwater contamination. Overall, HYDRUS-1D successfully simulated the atrazine transport in soil columns.

  7. Analysis of Cordyceps by multi-column liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengming Qian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cordyceps is a famous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM that has been used in China for hundreds of years. In the present study a multi-column liquid chromatography (MC-LC system was developed for the qualitative analysis of macromolecules and micromolecules in Cordyceps. The MC-LC system includes a size exclusion pre-column, a size exclusion column (SEC and a reversed phase column (RP which were controlled by column-switching valves. The sample was separated by the size exclusion pre-column into two fractions (macromolecules and micromolecules. These fractions were further separated on SEC and RP columns, respectively. A diode array detector (DAD and a mass spectrometer (MS were used to detect the components. This MC-LC method was utilized for analysis of Cordyceps samples. Two macromolecular peaks and 15 micromolecular peaks were found in Cordyceps, and 11 of the micromolecular peaks were identified as adenosine-5′-monophosphate (AMP, phenylalanine, uridine, hypoxanthine, inosine, guanine, guanosine, deoxyadenosine-5′-monophosphate (dAMP, adenosine, adenine and cordycepin (or its isomer. This method is useful for quality control of Cordyceps.

  8. Analysis of Cordyceps by multi-column liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhengming; Li, Shaoping

    2017-03-01

    Cordyceps is a famous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) that has been used in China for hundreds of years. In the present study a multi-column liquid chromatography (MC-LC) system was developed for the qualitative analysis of macromolecules and micromolecules in Cordyceps. The MC-LC system includes a size exclusion pre-column, a size exclusion column (SEC) and a reversed phase column (RP) which were controlled by column-switching valves. The sample was separated by the size exclusion pre-column into two fractions (macromolecules and micromolecules). These fractions were further separated on SEC and RP columns, respectively. A diode array detector (DAD) and a mass spectrometer (MS) were used to detect the components. This MC-LC method was utilized for analysis of Cordyceps samples. Two macromolecular peaks and 15 micromolecular peaks were found in Cordyceps, and 11 of the micromolecular peaks were identified as adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP), phenylalanine, uridine, hypoxanthine, inosine, guanine, guanosine, deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate (dAMP), adenosine, adenine and cordycepin (or its isomer). This method is useful for quality control of Cordyceps.

  9. Interpreting satellite column observations of formaldehyde over tropical South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Paul I; Barkley, Michael P; Kurosu, Thomas P; Lewis, Alastair C; Saxton, Julie E; Chance, Kelly; Gatti, Luciana V

    2007-07-15

    Space-borne column measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO), a high-yield oxidation product of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), represent important constraints for quantifying net regional fluxes of VOCs. Here, we interpret observed distributions of HCHO columns from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) over tropical South America during 1997-2001. We present the first comparison of year-long in situ isoprene concentrations and fire-free GOME HCHO columns over a tropical ecosystem. GOME HCHO columns and in situ isoprene concentrations are elevated in the wet and dry seasons, with the highest values in the dry season. Previous analysis of the in situ data highlighted the possible role of drought in determining the elevated concentrations during the dry season, inferring the potential of HCHO columns to provide regional-scale constraints for estimating the role of drought on isoprene emissions. The agreement between the observed annual cycles of GOME HCHO columns and Along-Track Scanning Radiometer firecount data over the Amazon basin (correlations typically greater than 0.75 for a particular year) illustrates the potential of HCHO column to provide quantitative information about biomass burning emissions.

  10. EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

  11. Inner-pipe structure to improve column heterogeneity and peak shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Di; Mei, Xiang; Shi, Pengchao; Zhou, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Column heterogeneity plays an important role in peak tailing and asymmetric profiles. We have designed a novel column structure (concentric column structure) that has a concentric inner-pipe nested in a column. This structure was studied by a number calculation method and wider diameter column experiments. The results showed that column heterogeneity and column efficiency were improved by inner-pipe structure. Moreover, the results showed that high-efficiency columns were stronger influenced by inner-pipe structure than low-efficiency columns. The influence of an inner-pipe was related to its size. The optimal inner-pipe diameter was nearly 0.625 times of column diameter. By using inner-pipe structure in this way, it was possible to decrease column heterogeneity and increase column efficiency of a wide-diameter column. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Improvement of band segmentation in Epo images via column shift transformation with cost functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, S; Bajla, I

    2006-04-01

    In recent years, the development of methodology and laboratory techniques for doping control (DC) of recombinant erythropoietin (rEpo) has become one of the most important topics pursued by doping control laboratories accredited by World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). The software system GASepo has been developed within the international WADA project as a support for Epo doping control. Although a great number of functions for automatic image processing have been involved in this software, for Epo images with considerably distorted bands additional effort is required from the user to interactively correct the results of improper band segmentation. In this paper a problem of geometrically distorted bands is addressed from the viewpoint of how to transform the lanes in distorted Epo images in order to reach better band segmentation. A method of band straightening via column shift transformation has been proposed that is formulated as an optimization procedure with cost functions. The method involves several novel approaches: two-stage optimization procedure, four cost functions and selection of relevant columns. The developed band straightening algorithm (BSA) has been tested on real Epo images with distorted bands. Based on the evaluation scheme involving the GASepo software itself a recommendation is made for implementation of the method with the cost function based on correlation matrix. Estimates of computational complexity of the individual steps of BSA are also given.

  13. Miniature electron microscope beam column optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody Stuart

    This investigation is in the area of electrostatic lens design with the overarching goal of contributing to the creation of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope (SEM) for use in mineralogical analysis or detection of signs of life on the surface of Mars. Such an instrument could also have application in the exploration of Earth's moon, planetary moons, asteroids, or comets. Other embodiments could include tabletop or field portable SEMs for use on Earth. The scope of this research is in the design of a beam column that attains focusing, demagnification, and aberration control within the smallest achievable package. The goals of planetary exploration and of spaceflight in general impose severe constraints on the instrument's mass and electrical power consumption, while favoring a robust design of small size and high rigidity that is also simple to align. To meet these requirements a design using electrostatic lenses was favored because of the lower power requirement and mass of electrostatic versus magnetic lenses, their relatively simple construction, as well as inherently easier shielding from extraneous fields. In modeling the lens field, a hybrid of a Boundary Element Method (BEM) and a Fourier series solution was employed, whereby an initial solution from the BEM is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain for the subsequent Fourier series solution. The approach is applicable to many problems in physics and combines the inherent precision of this series solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized electrode shapes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. A significant speed increase in tracing rays is also observed. The modeling technique has been validated by reproducing example ray-traces through

  14. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Frindte, Katharina; Dziallas, Claudia; Eckert, Werner; Tang, Kam W

    2011-12-01

    The prevailing paradigm in aquatic science is that microbial methanogenesis happens primarily in anoxic environments. Here, we used multiple complementary approaches to show that microbial methane production could and did occur in the well-oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake (Lake Stechlin, Germany). Oversaturation of methane was repeatedly recorded in the well-oxygenated upper 10 m of the water column, and the methane maxima coincided with oxygen oversaturation at 6 m. Laboratory incubations of unamended epilimnetic lake water and inoculations of photoautotrophs with a lake-enrichment culture both led to methane production even in the presence of oxygen, and the production was not affected by the addition of inorganic phosphate or methylated compounds. Methane production was also detected by in-lake incubations of lake water, and the highest production rate was 1.8-2.4 nM⋅h(-1) at 6 m, which could explain 33-44% of the observed ambient methane accumulation in the same month. Temporal and spatial uncoupling between methanogenesis and methanotrophy was supported by field and laboratory measurements, which also helped explain the oversaturation of methane in the upper water column. Potentially methanogenic Archaea were detected in situ in the oxygenated, methane-rich epilimnion, and their attachment to photoautotrophs might allow for anaerobic growth and direct transfer of substrates for methane production. Specific PCR on mRNA of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A gene revealed active methanogenesis. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water represents a hitherto overlooked source of methane and can be important for carbon cycling in the aquatic environments and water to air methane flux.

  15. Separation of the Components of a Commercial Analgesic Tablet: A Two-Week Sequence Comparing Purification by Two-Base Extraction and Column Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    A new laboratory experiment is described in which students compare two benchtop separation methods to isolate the three active components of the commercial analgesic Excedrin. In the two-week sequence, aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine are separated using either a two-base liquid-liquid extraction or silica column chromatography. Students then…

  16. Separation of the Components of a Commercial Analgesic Tablet: A Two-Week Sequence Comparing Purification by Two-Base Extraction and Column Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    A new laboratory experiment is described in which students compare two benchtop separation methods to isolate the three active components of the commercial analgesic Excedrin. In the two-week sequence, aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine are separated using either a two-base liquid-liquid extraction or silica column chromatography. Students then…

  17. COED Transactions, Vol. X, No. 5, May 1978. STAGEF, A Program to Compute the Internal Variables of an Operating Distillation Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovitz, Alan B., Ed.

    A digital computer program, STAGEF, designed for use with the distillation experiments in a typical undergraduate Chemical Engineering laboratory in Unit Operations is explained. The program enables the student to determine the rate of liquid overflow and vapor boil-up which leaves each tray within the distillation column. The student may also…

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  19. Confined High Strength Concrete Columns: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannathan Saravanan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: An experimental study on GFRP confined high strength concrete columns has been carried out with a view to evaluate its performances under uni-axial compression in terms of load and deformation capacity. Approach: High strength concrete columns strengthened with different configuration and stiffness of GFRP wraps were tested under axial compression until failure. Their response evaluated at different load levels. Results: The test results clearly indicated GFRP wrapped high strength concrete columns exhibit enhances performance. Conclusion: The study concluded that the three GFRP materials attempted UDC GFRP provided the maximum benefit with respect to load and deformation.

  20. Partial Path Column Generation for the Vehicle Routing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Mads Kehlet; Petersen, Bjørn

    This paper presents a column generation algorithm for the Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem (CVRP) and the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows (VRPTW). Traditionally, column generation models of the CVRP and VRPTW have consisted of a Set Partitioning master problem with each column repres...... of the giant tour’; a so-called partial path, i.e., not necessarily starting and ending in the depot. This way, the length of the partial path can be bounded and a better control of the size of the solution space for the pricing problem can be obtained....

  1. Numerical Simulation of Fluid Dynamics in a Monolithic Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Yamamoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As for the measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC is used for PAH identification and densitometry. However, when a solvent containing a substance to be identified passes through a column of UPLC, a dedicated high-pressure-proof device is required. Recently, a liquid chromatography instrument using a monolithic column technology has been proposed to reduce the pressure of UPLC. The present study tested five types of monolithic columns produced in experiments. To simulate the flow field, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM was used. The velocity profile was discussed to decrease the pressure drop in the ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC system.

  2. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF SOLID FLUIDIZATION IN A RESIN COLUMN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.

    2014-06-24

    The objective of the present work is to model the resin particles within the column during fluidization and sedimentation processes using computation fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The calculated results will help interpret experimental results, and they will assist in providing guidance on specific details of testing design and establishing a basic understanding of particle’s hydraulic characteristics within the column. The model is benchmarked against the literature data and the test data (2003) conducted at Savannah River Site (SRS). The paper presents the benchmarking results and the modeling predictions of the SRS resin column using the improved literature correlations applicable for liquid-solid granular flow.

  3. Control structure selection for energy integrated distillation column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.E.; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1998-01-01

    This paper treats a case study on control structure selection for an almost binary distillation column. The column is energy integrated with a heat pump in order to transfer heat from the condenser to the reboiler. This integrated plant configuration renders the possible control structures somewhat...... different from what is usual for binary distillation columns. Further the heat pump enables disturbances to propagate faster through the system. The plant has six possible actuators of which three must be used to stabilize the system. Hereby three actuators are left for product purity control. An MILP...

  4. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT COLUMN DEGRADATION ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G.

    2014-10-28

    PORFLOW related analyses supporting a Sensitivity Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) column degradation were performed. Previous analyses, Flach and Taylor 2014, used a model in which the SDU columns degraded in a piecewise manner from the top and bottom simultaneously. The current analyses employs a model in which all pieces of the column degrade at the same time. Information was extracted from the analyses which may be useful in determining the distribution of Tc-99 in the various SDUs throughout time and in determining flow balances for the SDUs.

  5. Transient flow and heating characteristics in a pinched plasma column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, T. M.; Stover, E. K.

    1972-01-01

    The generation of axial flow and heating of an argon plasma in a pinched plasma column of a pulsed, linear z-pinch device was examined experimentally and analytically. Transient (about 5 microsec) axial pressure profiles identify three characteristic periods in the column history. These include (1) strong axial pressure asymmetry indicative of plasma streaming, (2) isotropic, rapidly rising plasma pressure indicative of plasma heating, and (3) column breakup. An efficient conversion of radial collapse to axial streaming velocity is identified. Mechanisms for such an effect and subsequent heating are evaluated; significance to transients in pulsed plasma accelerators is identified.

  6. Column generation approaches to ship scheduling with flexible cargo sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønmo, Geir; Nygreen, Bjørn; Lysgaard, Jens

    cargo sizes to the column generation framework is not straightforward, and we handle the flexible cargo sizes heuristically when solving the subproblems. This leads to convergence issues in the branch-and-price search tree, and the optimal solution cannot be guaranteed. Hence we have introduced a method...... that generates an upper bound on the optimal objective. We have compared our method with an a priori column generation approach, and our computational experiments on real world cases show that the Dantzig-Wolfe approach is faster than the a priori generation of columns, and we are able to deal with larger...

  7. Underground laboratory in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Heshengc

    2012-09-01

    The underground laboratories and underground experiments of particle physics in China are reviewed. The Jinping underground laboratory in the Jinping mountain of Sichuan, China is the deepest underground laboratory with horizontal access in the world. The rock overburden in the laboratory is more than 2400 m. The measured cosmic-ray flux and radioactivities of the local rock samples are very low. The high-purity germanium experiments are taking data for the direct dark-matter search. The liquid-xenon experiment is under construction. The proposal of the China National Deep Underground Laboratory with large volume at Jinping for multiple discipline research is discussed.

  8. Ion chromatographic separation of inorganic ions using a combination of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic column and cation-exchange resin column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kaori; Mori, Masanobu; Hironaga, Takahiro; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    A combination of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic (HILIC) column and a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin (WCX) column was used for simultaneous separation of inorganic anions and cations by ion chromatography (IC). Firstly, the capability of HILIC column for the separation of analyte ions was evaluated under acidic eluent conditions. The columns used were SeQuant ZIC-HILIC (ZIC-HILIC) with a sulfobetaine-zwitterion stationary phase (ZIC-HILIC) and Acclaim HILIC-10 with a diol stationary phase (HILIC-10). When using tartaric acid as the eluent, the HILIC columns indicated strong retentions for anions, based on ion-pair interaction. Especially, HILIC-10 could strongly retain anions compared with ZIC-HILIC. The selectivity for analyte anions of HILIC-10 with 5 mmol/L tartaric acid eluent was in the order of I(-) > NO3(-) > Br(-) > Cl(-) > H2PO4(-). However, since HILIC-10 could not separate analyte cations, a WCX column (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) was connected after the HILIC column in series. The combination column system of HILIC and WCX columns could successfully separate ten ions (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, H2PO4(-), Cl(-), Br(-), NO3(-) and I(-)) with elution of 4 mmol/L tartaric acid plus 8 mmol/L 18-crown-6. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of analyte ions by the system were in the ranges of 0.02% - 0.05% in retention times and 0.18% - 5.3% in peak areas through three-time successive injections. The limits of detection at signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 0.24 - 0.30 micromol/L for the cations and 0.31 - 1.2 micromol/L for the anions. This system was applied for the simultaneous determination of the cations and the anions in a vegetable juice sample with satisfactory results.

  9. Characterizing the Laboratory Market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehabi, Arman; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; DeMates, Lauren; Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale

    2017-04-11

    Laboratories are estimated to be 3-5 times more energy intensive than typical office buildings and offer significant opportunities for energy use reductions. Although energy intensity varies widely, laboratories are generally energy intensive due to ventilation requirements, the research instruments used, and other health and safety concerns. Because the requirements of laboratory facilities differ so dramatically from those of other buildings, a clear need exists for an initiative exclusively targeting these facilities. The building stock of laboratories in the United States span different economic sectors, include governmental and academic institution, and are often defined differently by different groups. Information on laboratory buildings is often limited to a small subsection of the total building stock making aggregate estimates of the total U.S. laboratories and their energy use challenging. Previous estimates of U.S. laboratory space vary widely owing to differences in how laboratories are defined and categorized. A 2006 report on fume hoods provided an estimate of 150,000 laboratories populating the U.S. based in part on interviews of industry experts, however, a 2009 analysis of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) generated an estimate of only 9,000 laboratory buildings. This report draws on multiple data sources that have been evaluated to construct an understanding of U.S. laboratories across different sizes and markets segments. This 2016 analysis is an update to draft reports released in October and December 2016.

  10. Personalized laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.

    2015-01-01

    Developments in "omics" are creating a paradigm shift in Laboratory Medicine leading to Personalised Medicine. This allows the increasing in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether Laboratory Medicine is able to implement new...... diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready...... for the era of Personalized Medicine?". 48 laboratories from 18 European countries participated at this survey. The answers of the participating Laboratory Medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that Personalized Medicine can represent a new and promising health model. Whereas they are aware...

  11. Personalized laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.

    2015-01-01

    Developments in "omics" are creating a paradigm shift in Laboratory Medicine leading to Personalised Medicine. This allows the increasing in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether Laboratory Medicine is able to implement new...... diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready...... for the era of Personalized Medicine?". 48 laboratories from 18 European countries participated at this survey. The answers of the participating Laboratory Medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that Personalized Medicine can represent a new and promising health model. Whereas they are aware...

  12. Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This study included the deployment of the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Mobile Facility (AMF), ARM Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) and the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF). The study was a collaborative effort involving scientists from DOE national laboratories, NOAA, NASA, and universities. The AAF and MAOS were deployed for two approximately month-long Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) conducted in June 2012 and February 2013. Seasonal differences in the aerosol chemical and optical properties observed using the AMF, AAF, and MAOS are presented in this report. The total mass loading of aerosol is found to be much greater in the summer than in the winter, with the difference associated with greater amounts of organic aerosol. The mass fraction of organic aerosol is much reduced in the winter, when sulfate is the dominant aerosol type. Surprisingly, very little sea-salt aerosol was observed in the summer. In contrast, much more sea salt aerosol was observed in the winter. The mass loading of black carbon is nearly the same in both seasons. These differences lead to a relative increase in the aerosol light absorption in the winter and an associated decrease in observed single-scattering albedo. Measurements of aerosol mixing state were made using a single-particle mass spectrometer, which showed that the majority of the summertime aerosol consisted of organic compounds mixed with various amounts of sulfate. A number of other findings are also summarized in the report, including: impact of aerosol layers aloft on the column aerosol optical depth; documentation of the aerosol properties at the AMF; differences in the aerosol properties associated with both columns, which are not systematic but reflect the complicated meteorological and chemical processes that impact aerosol as it is advected away from North America; and new instruments and data-processing techniques for measuring both aerosol and

  13. Seismic Behavior of Short Concrete Columns with Prestressing Steel Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Zong-Cai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The seismic behavior of short circular reinforced concrete columns was studied by testing seven columns retrofitted with prestressing steel wire (PSW, subjected to combined constant axial compression and lateral cyclic load. The main test parameters were configuration index of PSW, prestressing level of PSW, and axial compression ratio. An analysis and discussion of the test results including failure mode, hysteresis curves, skeleton curves, ductility, and degradation of stiffness was done. The results show that the seismic performance of the retrofitted specimens could be effectively enhanced even if the axial compression ratio of columns reached 0.81. The ductility index and the energy absorption capacity of the retrofitted specimens increase with the prestressing level of PSW. The formulas for calculating shear capacity of RC short columns strengthened with PSW were proposed which may be useful for future engineering designs and researches.

  14. A column generation approach to a carpentry cutting stock problem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A column generation approach to a carpentry cutting stock problem: a case study for planks cutting in Zimbabwe. ... African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences. Journal Home ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  15. EX1601 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1601: Transit and Mission Patch Test...

  16. Science Column: Reconstruction: The Experimental Side of Digital Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Cohen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many in digital forensics seem to forget that the science part of digital forensics means experimentation and that implies a whole lot of things that most practitioners never learned.(see PDF for full column

  17. A Modelling Framework for Conventional and Heat Integrated Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Diabatic operation of distillation columns can lead to signicant reductions in energy utilization and operation cost compared to conventional (adiabatic) distillation columns, at an expense of an increased complexity of design and operation. The earliest diabatic distillation conguration dates back...... to the late 70s, and various dierent congurations have appeared since. However, at present, no full-scale diabatic distillation columns are currently operating in the industry. Current studies related to alternative distillation congurations report very dierent gures for potential energy savings which...... constitutes a problem in relations to achieving industrial acceptance. There is clearly a need for research and comparative studies which can help to provide analysis of the pros and cons of novel and intensied distillation processes compared to conventional columns for a range of separations. These studies...

  18. Impact on Model Uncertainty of Diabatization in Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2014-01-01

    This work provides uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of design of conventional and heat integrated distillation columns using Monte Carlo simulations. Selected uncertain parameters are relative volatility, heat of vaporization, the overall heat transfer coefficient , tray hold-up, and adiabat ...

  19. EX1604 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1604: CAPSTONE Wake Island PRIMNM...

  20. Optimization of bubble column performance for nanoparticle collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid-Rodriguez, M C; Charvet, A; Bemer, D; Thomas, D

    2014-04-30

    Fibrous media embody the most effective and widely used method of separating ultrafine particles from a carrier fluid. The main problem associated with them is filter clogging, which induces an increasingly marked pressure drop with time and thus imposes regular media cleaning or replacement. This context has prompted the idea of investigating bubble columns, which operate at constant pressure drop, as alternatives to fibrous filters. This study examines the influence of different operating conditions, such as liquid height, air flow rate, bubble size and presence of granular beds on ultrafine particle collection. Experimental results show that bubble columns are characterised by high collection efficiency, when they feature a large liquid height and small diameter bubbling orifices, while their efficiencies remain lower than those of fibrous filters. Gas velocity does not greatly influence collection efficiency, but the inclusion of a granular bed, composed of beads, increases the bubble residence time in the column, thereby increasing the column collection efficiency.

  1. EX1301 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1301: Ship Shakedown and Patch Test...

  2. Varied overstrain injuries of the vertebral column conditioned by evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlbach, W.

    1983-08-01

    During physiological growth of the juvenile vertebral column, various stages of stability occur which are characterized by the condition of the marginal rim of the vertebral bodies. If the vertebral juvenile column is overstrained, these variations in stability results in a variety of damage to vertebral bodies and vertebral disks. One of these lesions corresponds to Scheuermann's disease (osteochondrosis of vertebral epiphyses in juveniles). Damage of the vertebral column due to overstrain can occur only if the overstrain is applied in upright position. Since Man alone can damage his vertebral column in upright position (as a result of his evolutionary development), Scheuermann's thesis is confirmed that Scheuermann's disease is confined to Man. Spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis is also a damage caused by overstrain. Here, too, the damage can occur only if the load is exercised in upright position, with the exception of a slanted positioning of the intervertebral components.

  3. Relationship between chlorophyll-a and column primary production

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dalal, S.G.; Bhargava, R.M.S.

    Relationship between surface chlorophyll a and column primary production has been established to help in estimating the latter more quickly and accurately. The equation derived is Primary Production, y = 0.54 Ln Chl a - 0.6. The relationship...

  4. EX0902 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0902: ROV Harbor Trials between 20090425...

  5. EX1401 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1401: Ship Shakedown and Patch Test...

  6. EX1101 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1101: Ship Shakedown and Patch Tests...

  7. Study on Micro-extraction Column of Uranium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Some samples of uranium are very complicated therefore they can not be determined directly by analysis instrument, so pretreatment is necessary. The micro-extraction column of uranium is a kind of

  8. EX1104 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1104: Mid-Cayman Rise Exploration...

  9. EX1602 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1602: Mission System Shakedown/CAPSTONE...

  10. EX1102 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1102: ROV and Camera Sled Integration...

  11. Fire response of composite columns subject to sway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virdi, Kuldeep

    conditions is adequately covered in the relevant standard, Eurocode 4, simplified design of unbraced composite columns for the fire limit state has not been included. Recognising this, a collaborative research project was undertaken with funding from the Research Fund for Coal and Steel. The paper describes......Composite columns, using profiled steel sections encased in concrete or steel tubes filled with concrete, are increasingly used in practice taking advantage of speed of erection as well as offering cost-effective solutions. While the design of braced and unbraced composite columns under ambient...... the scope of the project which covered control tests under ambient conditions, carried out by the author while at City University London. Other aspects covered in the project included fire tests carried out by CTICM in France, on isolated columns and on two frames designed by Leibniz Universität Hannover...

  12. EX1005 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1005: Guam to Honolulu, HI Transit...

  13. EX1105 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1105: Field Trials of EM302 Multibeam...

  14. EX1006 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1006: Hawaii to San Francisco Transit...

  15. Modelling of acid mine drainage (AMD in columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Bernardes de Souza

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed in this paper to describe the generation of acid mine drainage (AMD in leaching columns. The model considers: (i Water flow through the column, which is calculated using the 1 - D analytic solution of the Richards' equation assuming the existence of a similarity relationship between the water retention function and the water content profiles at a given time; and (ii Pyrite oxidation weighted by microbiological effects occurring in spherical particles according to the shrinking core model. Mass balances of oxygen and pyrite were derived in order to evaluate the intrinsic oxidation rate and the pyrite fraction reacted with time and column position. The model was used to simulate a six month operation of a leaching column, which comprised successive weekly cycles of dry and wet periods. Simulation results demonstrated that AMD generation is strongly affected by the presence of microorganisms. A relative deviation of 5% between simulation and experimental data was obtained.

  16. EX1603 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1603: Hohonu Moana: Exploring the Deep...

  17. design chart procedures for polygonal concrete-filled steel columns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    hexagonal and octagonal steel-concrete composite columns subjected to uniaxial bending. Comparative ... cold-formed and welded sections are generally avoided in .... selected for drawing the chart as this range utilizes comparatively less ...

  18. EX0802 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0802: Operation Halloween Shakedown...

  19. Column studies for biosorption of dyes from aqueous solutions on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Biosorption is becoming a promising alternative to replace or ... biomass was immobilised in a polysulphone matrix in the form of spherical beads. In column studies, adsorption and elution tests were conducted for each dye and the ...

  20. EX1303 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1303: New England Seamount Chain...