WorldWideScience

Sample records for twenty-nine carbon atoms

  1. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  2. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  3. Chapter Twenty Nine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    From the liberal to the radical feminist, arguments abound as to which gender theory best would suit the African environment without it serving as “a red rag to the ..... change all this, it is still a man's world, which women will always help to.

  4. Nanoscale atomic waveguides with suspended carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Peano, V; Kasper, A; Egger, R

    2005-01-01

    We propose an experimentally viable setup for the realization of one-dimensional ultracold atom gases in a nanoscale magnetic waveguide formed by single doubly-clamped suspended carbon nanotubes. We show that all common decoherence and atom loss mechanisms are small guaranteeing a stable operation of the trap. Since the extremely large current densities in carbon nanotubes are spatially homogeneous, our proposed architecture allows to overcome the problem of fragmentation of the atom cloud. Adding a second nanowire allows to create a double-well potential with a moderate tunneling barrier which is desired for tunneling and interference experiments with the advantage of tunneling distances being in the nanometer regime.

  5. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  6. Normal Health-Related Quality of Life and Ability to Work Twenty-nine Years After in Situ Arthrodesis for High-Grade Isthmic Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joelson, Anders; Hedlund, Rune; Frennered, Karin

    2014-06-18

    The purpose of this mixed prospective and retrospective case series was to evaluate the long-term health-related quality of life and physical disability after in situ arthrodesis for high-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. Thirty-five of forty consecutive patients who had in situ spinal arthrodesis for high-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis at a mean age of fifteen years (range, nine to twenty-five years) completed validated questionnaires (Short Form-36 [SF-36], EuroQol-5 Dimensions [EQ-5D], Zung depression scale, Oswestry disability index [ODI], Million score, and back and leg pain visual analog scale [VAS]) and underwent physical examination twenty-nine years (range, twenty-three to thirty-five years) after surgery. The mean age at the time of follow-up was forty-three years (range, thirty-seven to fifty-one years). In the absence of a formal control group, the scores on the SF-36 and EQ-5D were compared with Swedish normative data. The proportion of patients at work was compared with an age-matched control group derived from official statistics of Sweden. The Million score at the long-term follow-up was compared with the corresponding results at the mid-term follow-up of the same patients at a mean age of twenty-two years. The scores on the SF-36 and EQ-5D were similar to the scores of the general Swedish population. The mean Zung depression scale score was 30 (range, 20 to 52), the mean ODI score was 10 (range, 0 to 34), the mean back pain VAS score was 13 (range, 0 to 72), and the mean leg pain VAS score was 9 (range, 0 to 60). The Million score averaged 28 (range, 0 to 109) and was slightly worsened compared with the score of 19 (range, 0 to 94) at the mid-term follow-up (p = 0.034). The proportion of patients at work was the same as that for the age-matched general Swedish population. Our study shows good outcomes in health-related quality of life, disability, pain, and ability to work at up to twenty-nine years after in situ lumbar spine arthrodesis for high

  7. Difference of Phytic Acid Content and its Relation to Four Protein Composition Contents in Grains of Twenty-nine japonica Rice Varieties from Jiangsu and Zhejiang Provinces, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Wei; CHENG Fang-min; LIU Zheng-hui; WEI Ke-su

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-nine japonica rice varieties collected from Jiangsu and Zhejiang Provinces, China were planted in Hangzhou,China, to investigate the phytic acid content in brown rice and its frequency distribution as well as the correlation among the contents of phytic acid, total protein and four protein compositions in brown rice. The phytic acid content in brown rice ranged from 0.699% to 1.034%, with a mean of 0.868% for the 29 tested rice varieties. Xiushui series rice varieties generally exhibited lower phytic acid level than Wuyujing and Huai series rice varieties. A rough normal distribution, with a mean of 8.722%, was observed for the total protein contents in the tested varieties. Of the four protein compositions, the glutelin, globulin and albumin contents had larger coefficient of variation than the prolamin content, although the difference in prolamin content was genotype-dependent. No significant correlation was found between the phytic acid and four protein composition contents, whereas the total protein content was significantly and positively related to the glutelin content in brown rice.

  8. Oxygen Atom Recombination in Carbon Dioxide Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Corey; Garcia, R. M.; Pejakovic, D. A.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2009-09-01

    Understanding processes involving atomic oxygen is crucial for the study and modeling of composition, energy transfer, airglow, and transport dynamics in planetary atmospheres. Significant gaps and uncertainties exist in our understanding of the above processes, and often the relevant input from laboratory measurements is missing or outdated. We are conducting experiments to measure the rate coefficients for O + O + CO2 and O + O2 + CO2 recombination and investigate the O2 excited states produced following O-atom recombination. These laboratory measurements are key input for a quantitative understanding and reliable modeling of the atmospheres of the CO2 planets and their airglow. An ArF excimer laser with 193-nm pulsed output radiation is employed to partially photodissociate carbon dioxide. In an ambient-pressure (760 Torr) background of CO2, the O atoms produced recombine in a time scale of a few milliseconds. Detection of laser-induced fluorescence at 845 nm following two-photon excitation near 226 nm monitors the decay of the oxygen atom population. From the temporal evolution of the signal we can extract the rate coefficients for recombination of O + O and O + O2 in the presence of CO2. We also use fluorescence and resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization techniques to detect the products of the O-atom recombination and subsequent relaxation in CO2. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation's (NSF) Planetary Astronomy Program. Rosanne Garcia's participation was funded by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program.

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, S [INFN - LNF Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Gaggiotti, G [2M Strumenti S.p.A., Roma (Italy); Marchetti, M [Universita degli Studi di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale e Astronautica, Roma (Italy); Micciulla, F [INFN - LNF Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Mucciato, R [2M Strumenti S.p.A., Roma (Italy); Regi, M [INFN - LNF Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy)

    2007-03-15

    Carbon Nanotubes (CN) form a new class of materials that has attracted large interest in the scientific community because of their extraordinary properties (mechanical, electrical, thermal, etc.), as well as owing to the diversity of the proposed technological applications. The characterization of CN is the result of specific sample preparation procedures and requires the use of selected tools (e.g. SEM, HRTEM, EDX, Micro Raman, AFM, STM). We report some studies we carried out based on the CN characterization with the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The general characteristics of the AFM employed and the sample preparation methods are illustrated. The research activities are focused on the development of specific analysis procedures. In fact, the interaction forces between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample, is the main parameter in the acquisition of a 3D topographic AFM micrograph.

  10. Chains of carbon atoms: A vision or a new nanomaterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banhart, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Linear strings of sp(1)-hybridized carbon atoms are considered as a possible phase of carbon since decades. Whereas the debate about the stability of the corresponding bulk phase carbyne continues until today, the existence of isolated chains of carbon atoms has meanwhile been corroborated experimentally. Since graphene, as the two-dimensional sp(2)-bonded allotrope of carbon, has become a vast field, the question about the importance of one-dimensional carbon became of renewed interest. The present article gives an overview of the work that has been carried out on chains of carbon atoms in the past one or two decades. The review concentrates on isolated chains of carbon atoms and summarizes the experimental observations to date. While the experimental information is still very limited, many calculations of the physical and chemical properties have been published in the past years. Some of the most important theoretical studies and their importance in the present experimental situation are reviewed.

  11. Chains of carbon atoms: A vision or a new nanomaterial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Banhart

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Linear strings of sp1-hybridized carbon atoms are considered as a possible phase of carbon since decades. Whereas the debate about the stability of the corresponding bulk phase carbyne continues until today, the existence of isolated chains of carbon atoms has meanwhile been corroborated experimentally. Since graphene, as the two-dimensional sp2-bonded allotrope of carbon, has become a vast field, the question about the importance of one-dimensional carbon became of renewed interest. The present article gives an overview of the work that has been carried out on chains of carbon atoms in the past one or two decades. The review concentrates on isolated chains of carbon atoms and summarizes the experimental observations to date. While the experimental information is still very limited, many calculations of the physical and chemical properties have been published in the past years. Some of the most important theoretical studies and their importance in the present experimental situation are reviewed.

  12. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs.

  13. Near-field Electrodynamics of Atomically Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Bondarev, Igor V.; Lambin, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    We develop a quantum theory of near-field electrodynamical properties of carbon nanotubes and investigate spontaneous decay dynamics of excited states and van der Waals attraction of the ground state of an atomic system close to a single-wall nanotube surface. Atomic spontaneous decay exhibits vacuum-field Rabi oscillations -- a principal signature of strong atom-vacuum-field coupling. The strongly coupled atomic state is nothing but a 'quasi-1D cavity polariton'. Its stability is mainly dete...

  14. Immersing carbon nano-tubes in cold atomic gases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the sympathetic relaxation of a free-standing, vibrating carbon nano-tube that is mounted on an atom chip and is immersed in a cloud of ultra-cold atoms. Gas atoms colliding with the nano-tube excite phonons via a Casimir-Polder potential. We use Fermi's Golden Rule to estimate the relaxation rates for relevant experimental parameters and develop a fully dynamic theory of relaxation for the multi-mode phononic field embedded in a thermal atomic reservoir. Based on currently ava...

  15. Atomic scale simulation of carbon nanotube nucleation from hydrocarbon precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Umedjon; Bogaerts, Annemie; Neyts, Erik C

    2015-12-22

    Atomic scale simulations of the nucleation and growth of carbon nanotubes is essential for understanding their growth mechanism. In spite of over twenty years of simulation efforts in this area, limited progress has so far been made on addressing the role of the hydrocarbon growth precursor. Here we report on atomic scale simulations of cap nucleation of single-walled carbon nanotubes from hydrocarbon precursors. The presented mechanism emphasizes the important role of hydrogen in the nucleation process, and is discussed in relation to previously presented mechanisms. In particular, the role of hydrogen in the appearance of unstable carbon structures during in situ experimental observations as well as the initial stage of multi-walled carbon nanotube growth is discussed. The results are in good agreement with available experimental and quantum-mechanical results, and provide a basic understanding of the incubation and nucleation stages of hydrocarbon-based CNT growth at the atomic level.

  16. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisler, H. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  17. Interpretation of Hund's multiplicity rule for the carbon atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Kenta; Maezono, Ryo; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Yasuhara, Hiroshi; Towler, M D; Needs, R J

    2004-10-15

    Hund's multiplicity rule is investigated for the carbon atom using quantum Monte Carlo methods. Our calculations give an accurate account of electronic correlation and obey the virial theorem to high accuracy. This allows us to obtain accurate values for each of the energy terms and therefore to give a convincing explanation of the mechanism by which Hund's rule operates in carbon. We find that the energy gain in the triplet with respect to the singlet state is due to the greater electron-nucleus attraction in the higher spin state, in accordance with Hartree-Fock calculations and studies including correlation. The method used here can easily be extended to heavier atoms.

  18. Neutral atomic carbon in dense molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmuidzinas, J.; Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.; Goldhaber, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    The 370 micron 3P2-3P1 fine-structure line of neutral carbon was detected in seven sources: OMC 1, NGC 2024, S140, W3, DR 21, M17, and W51. Simultaneous analysis of J = 2-1 data and available observations of the J = 1-0 line make it possible to deduce optical depths and excitation temperatures for these lines. These data indicate that both C I lines are likely to be optically thin, and that the ratio of C I to CO column densities in these clouds is typically about 0.1.

  19. Abundance of atomic carbon /C I/ in dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T. G.; Huggins, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The abundance of interstellar neutral atomic carbon is investigated by means of its ground state fine-structure line emission at 492 GHz using the 91.5 cm telescope of NASAs Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Atomic carbon is found to be very abundant in dense interstellar molecular clouds with column densities of about 10 to the 19th per sq cm. Because the observations have considerably greater column densities than current theories of carbon chemistry, it is suggested that the physical conditions of these clouds are not as simple as assumed in the models. Various situations are discussed which would lead to large C I abundances, including the possibility that the chemical lifetimes of the clouds are relatively short.

  20. Heterogeneous atoms in laser-induced synthesis of carbon black

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, E.; Gavrila Florescu, L.; Soare, I.; Scarisoreanu, M.; Sandu, I.; Prodan, G.; Fleaca, C. T.; Morjan, I.; Voicu, I.

    2009-03-01

    Based on a high temperature hydrocarbon/heterogeneous atoms system of well-established composition, the formation of carbon nanostructures by laser-induced pyrolysis is related to the presence of heteroatoms in the reactants. In this paper, the goal is to underline the influence of some heteroatoms on the morphology and functionalizing nanostructured carbon materials by changing both gas composition and experimental parameters, with the focus to drive these materials into a regime where they can naturally interface with the surrounding matter. To investigate, in the versatile laser pyrolysis method, how to in situ modulate - through the presence of heterogeneous atoms - the characteristics of carbon nanopowders claimed by specific application is a challenge. Some preliminary results confirm experimentally their particular behavior during interaction with polymer matrices of some nanocomposites.

  1. Negative Differential Resistance in Atomic Carbon Chain-Graphene Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安丽萍; 刘春梅; 刘念华

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of atomic carbon chain-graphene junctions by using the density-functionla theory combining with the non-equilibrium Green's functions. The results show that the transport properties are sensitively dependent on the contact geometry of carbon chain. From the calculated I-V curve we find negative differential resistance (NDR) in the two types of junctions. The NDR can be considered as a result of molecular orbitals moving related to the bias window.

  2. Heat conduction in double-walled carbon nanotubes with intertube additional carbon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liu; Feng, Yanhui; Tan, Peng; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-07-07

    Heat conduction of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with intertube additional carbon atoms was investigated for the first time using a molecular dynamics method. By analyzing the phonon vibrational density of states (VDOS), we revealed that the intertube additional atoms weak the heat conduction along the tube axis. Moreover, the phonon participation ratio (PR) demonstrates that the heat transfer in DWCNTs is dominated by low frequency modes. The added atoms cause the mode weight factor (MWF) of the outer tube to decrease and that of the inner tube to increase, which implies a lower thermal conductivity. The effects of temperature, tube length, and the number and distribution of added atoms were studied. Furthermore, an orthogonal array testing strategy was designed to identify the most important structural factor. It is indicated that the tendencies of thermal conductivity of DWCNTs with added atoms change with temperature and length are similar to bare ones. In addition, thermal conductivity decreases with the increasing number of added atoms, more evidently for atom addition concentrated at some cross-sections rather than uniform addition along the tube length. Simultaneously, the number of added atoms at each cross-section has a considerably more remarkable impact, compared to the tube length and the density of chosen cross-sections to add atoms.

  3. Ordering of carbon atoms in boron carbide structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomarev, V. I., E-mail: i2212@yandex.ru; Kovalev, I. D.; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Vershinnikov, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Boron carbide crystals have been obtained in the entire compositional range according to the phase diagram by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). Based on the results of X-ray diffraction investigations, the samples were characterized by the unit-cell metric and reflection half-width in the entire range of carbon concentrations. A significant spread in the boron carbide unit-cell parameters for the same carbon content is found in the data in the literature; this spread contradicts the structural concepts for covalent compounds. The SHS samples have not revealed any significant spread in the unit-cell parameters. Structural analysis suggests that the spread of parameters in the literary data is related to the unique process of ordering of carbon atoms in the boron carbide structure.

  4. Voronoi analysis of the short-range atomic structure in iron and iron-carbon melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron-carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short-range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  5. Properties of atomic intercalated carbon K4 crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Masahiro; Takami, Seiichi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Adschiri, Tadafumi

    2009-01-01

    The stability of atomic intercalated carbon $K_{4}$ crystals, XC$_{2}$ (X=H, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Rb or Sr) is evaluated by geometry optimization and frozen phonon analysis based on first principles calculations. Although C $K_{4}$ is unstable, NaC$_{2}$ and MgC$_{2}$ are found to be stable. It is shown that NaC$_{2}$ and MgC$_{2}$ are metallic and semi conducting, respectively.

  6. Atomic-focuser imaging in electron nanodiffraction from carbon nanoshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley

    2000-03-01

    When nanodiffraction patterns are obtained by transmission through the top and bottom walls of near-spherical, hollow carbon nano-shells, using the focused probe of a STEM instrument, a graphitic crystal in one wall may act as an atomic focuser to produce high-resolution images of small regions of the other wall within the central beam and the diffraction disks of the nanodiffraction pattern. A theoretical analysis of the imaging process is given. Images showing one- and two-dimensional periodicities, with fringe spacings as small as 0.124 nm, and also images showing non-periodic features have been obtained from carbon nanoshells having diameters of the order of 100 nm.

  7. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads

    2011-01-01

    voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed...... of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects. Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic...... carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias...

  8. Twenty-nine cases of the pregnant women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in nursing%29例妊娠合并系统性红斑狼疮的护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆云波

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨妊娠合并系统性红斑狼疮的护理方法.方法对本院29例妊娠合并系统性红斑狼疮孕产妇的临床资料进行回顾性分析.结果除了1例产妇因妊娠 29+1周新生儿重度窒息死亡外,其余28例孕产妇均能顺利度过孕产期,无并发症,新生儿均成活,母婴康复出院.结论 对妊娠合并系统性红斑狼疮孕产妇给予加强健康教育,重视产前检查,选择合适的妊娠时机,加强母儿监护,系统性红斑狼疮患者能够顺利生育.%Objective To investigate the nursing on pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Twenty-nine cases of pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus clinical data are analyzed retrospectively. Results One ease of severe neonatal asphyxia was dead due to maternal pregnancy (29 + 1 ) weeks, the remaining 28 cases of pregnant women survived with no serious complications, and neonates also survived. Conclusions SLE patients should be educated with maternal health knowledge, and they should master the right time of pregnancy. If the care of the maternal and the fetal can be intensified, the better outcomes could occur.

  9. An important atomic process in the CVD growth of graphene: Sinking and up-floating of carbon atom on copper surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yingfeng [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Li, Meicheng, E-mail: mcli@ncepu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Su Zhou Institute, North China Electric Power University, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Gu, TianSheng [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Bai, Fan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Yu, Yue; Trevor, Mwenya [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Yu, Yangxin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2013-11-01

    By density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the early stages of the growth of graphene on copper (1 1 1) surface are investigated. At the very first time of graphene growth, the carbon atom sinks into subsurface. As more carbon atoms are adsorbed nearby the site, the sunken carbon atom will spontaneously form a dimer with one of the newly adsorbed carbon atoms, and the formed dimer will up-float on the top of the surface. We emphasize the role of the co-operative relaxation of the co-adsorbed carbon atoms in facilitating the sinking and up-floating of carbon atoms. In detail: when two carbon atoms are co-adsorbed, their co-operative relaxation will result in different carbon–copper interactions for the co-adsorbed carbon atoms. This difference facilitates the sinking of a single carbon atom into the subsurface. As a third carbon atom is co-adsorbed nearby, it draws the sunken carbon atom on top of the surface, forming a dimer. Co-operative relaxations of the surface involving all adsorbed carbon atoms and their copper neighbors facilitate these sinking and up-floating processes. This investigation is helpful for the deeper understanding of graphene synthesis and the choosing of optimal carbon sources or process.

  10. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Tao Lü

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of electric current on the motion of atoms still poses many questions, and several mechanisms are at play. Recently there has been focus on the importance of the current-induced nonconservative forces (NC and Berry-phase derived forces (BP with respect to the stability of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects.Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed. Molecular dynamics including current-induced forces enables an energy redistribution mechanism among the modes, mediated by anharmonic interactions, which is found to be vital in the description of the electrical heating.Conclusion: We have developed a semiclassical Langevin equation approach that can be used to explore current-induced dynamics and instabilities. We find instabilities at experimentally relevant bias and gate voltages for the carbon-chain system.

  11. Atomic layer confined vacancies for atomic-level insights into carbon dioxide electroreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Sun, Zhongti; Liu, Wei; Jiao, Xingchen; Zu, Xiaolong; Hu, Qitao; Sun, Yongfu; Yao, Tao; Zhang, Wenhua; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2017-01-01

    The role of oxygen vacancies in carbon dioxide electroreduction remains somewhat unclear. Here we construct a model of oxygen vacancies confined in atomic layer, taking the synthetic oxygen-deficient cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers as an example. Density functional theory calculations demonstrate the main defect is the oxygen(II) vacancy, while X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy reveals their distinct oxygen vacancy concentrations. Proton transfer is theoretically/experimentally demonstrated to be a rate-limiting step, while energy calculations unveil that the presence of oxygen(II) vacancies lower the rate-limiting activation barrier from 0.51 to 0.40 eV via stabilizing the formate anion radical intermediate, confirmed by the lowered onset potential from 0.81 to 0.78 V and decreased Tafel slope from 48 to 37 mV dec−1. Hence, vacancy-rich cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers exhibit current densities of 2.7 mA cm−2 with ca. 85% formate selectivity during 40-h tests. This work establishes a clear atomic-level correlation between oxygen vacancies and carbon dioxide electroreduction. PMID:28220847

  12. Atomic layer confined vacancies for atomic-level insights into carbon dioxide electroreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Sun, Zhongti; Liu, Wei; Jiao, Xingchen; Zu, Xiaolong; Hu, Qitao; Sun, Yongfu; Yao, Tao; Zhang, Wenhua; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2017-02-01

    The role of oxygen vacancies in carbon dioxide electroreduction remains somewhat unclear. Here we construct a model of oxygen vacancies confined in atomic layer, taking the synthetic oxygen-deficient cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers as an example. Density functional theory calculations demonstrate the main defect is the oxygen(II) vacancy, while X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy reveals their distinct oxygen vacancy concentrations. Proton transfer is theoretically/experimentally demonstrated to be a rate-limiting step, while energy calculations unveil that the presence of oxygen(II) vacancies lower the rate-limiting activation barrier from 0.51 to 0.40 eV via stabilizing the formate anion radical intermediate, confirmed by the lowered onset potential from 0.81 to 0.78 V and decreased Tafel slope from 48 to 37 mV dec-1. Hence, vacancy-rich cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers exhibit current densities of 2.7 mA cm-2 with ca. 85% formate selectivity during 40-h tests. This work establishes a clear atomic-level correlation between oxygen vacancies and carbon dioxide electroreduction.

  13. The Unique Hoyle State of the Carbon Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorvaldsen, Steinar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The famous astronomer Fred Hoyle (1915-2001 started his research career as an atheist. Hoyle’s most important contribution to astrophysics is the theory of nucleosynthesis, i.e. the idea that chemical elements such as carbon can form in stars on the basis of hydrogen and helium. Essentially here was his prediction that the carbon core has a state with a specific energy which is precisely adapted to the basic fusion process. This result was one of the most important breakthroughs in modern astrophysics, and the so called Hoyle state has become a cornerstone for state-ofthe- art nuclear theory. The calculations he made, eventually revealed a fine-tuning of the universe. Hoyle’s work in this area supported the anthropic principle that the universe was fine-tuned so that intelligent life would be possible. It is said that what really made him conclude that creation demanded intelligence, were his calculations of the special properties of the carbon atom. This shook his atheism fundamentally [1, p. 57]. In this paper we describe this discovery.

  14. Atomic-Scale Investigations of Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Michael John

    The combination of unique mechanical, thermal, optical, and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them a desirable material for use in a wide range of applications. Many of these unique properties are highly sensitive to how carbon atoms are arranged within the graphene nanotube wall. Precise structural control of this arrangement remains the key challenge of CNT growth to realizing their technological potential. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from methane-hydrogen gas mixtures using catalytic nanoparticles enables large-scale growth of CNT films and controlled spatial placement of CNTs on a substrate, however, much is still unknown about what happens to the catalyst particle during growth, the atomistic mechanisms involved, and how these dictate the final nanotube structure. To investigate the fundamental processes of CNT growth by PECVD, a suite of characterization techniques were implemented, including attenuated total-reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), optical emission spectroscopy (OES), Raman spectroscopy, convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED), high-resolution transmission and scanning-transmission electron microscopy (TEM, STEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). It is found that hydrogen plays a critical role in determining the final CNT structure through controlling catalyst crystal phase and morphology. At low hydrogen concentrations in the plasma iron catalysts are converted to Fe3C, from which high-quality CNTs grow; however, catalyst particles remain as pure iron when hydrogen is in abundance, and produce highly defective CNTs with large diameters. The initially faceted and equiaxed catalyst nanocrystals become deformed and are elongated into a teardrop morphology once a tubular CNT structure is formed around the catalyst particles. Although catalyst particles are single crystalline, they exhibit combinations of small-angle (˜1°-3

  15. The Relativistic Effects on the Carbon-Carbon Coupling Constants Mediated by a Heavy Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodyński, Artur; Malkina, Olga L; Pecul, Magdalena

    2016-07-21

    The (2)JCC, (3)JCC, and (4)JCC spin-spin coupling constants in the systems with a heavy atom (Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, and Po) in the coupling path have been calculated by means of density functional theory. The main goal was to estimate the relativistic effects on spin-spin coupling constants and to explore the factors which may influence them, including the nature of the heavy atom and carbon hybridization. The methods applied range, in order of reduced complexity, from the Dirac-Kohn-Sham (DKS) method (density functional theory with four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian), through DFT with two- and one-component zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) Hamiltonians, to scalar effective core potentials (ECPs) with the nonrelativistic Hamiltonian. The use of DKS and ZORA methods leads to very similar results, and small-core ECPs of the MDF and MWB variety reproduce correctly the scalar relativistic effects. Scalar relativistic effects usually are larger than the spin-orbit coupling effects. The latter tend to influence the most the coupling constants of the sp(3)-hybridized carbon atoms and in compounds of the p-block heavy atoms. Large spin-orbit coupling contributions for the Po compounds are probably connected with the inverse of the lowest triplet excitation energy.

  16. Rotational Spectrum and Carbon Atom Structure of Dihydroartemisinic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Seifert, Nathan A.; Spada, Lorenzo; Pate, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Dihydroartemisinic acid (DHAA, C15H24O2, five chiral centers) is a precursor in proposed low-cost synthetic routes to the antimalarial drug artemisinin. In one reaction process being considered in pharmaceutical production, DHAA is formed from an enantiopure sample of artemisinic acid through hydrogenation of the alkene. This reaction needs to properly set the stereochemistry of the asymmetric carbon for the synthesis to produce artemisinin. A recrystallization process can purify the diastereomer mixture of the hydrogenation reaction if the unwanted epimer is produced in less than 10% abundance. There is a need in the process analytical chemistry to rapidly (less than 1 min) measure the diastereomer excess and current solutions, such a HPLC, lack the needed measurement speed. The rotational spectrum of DHAA has been measured at 300:1 signal-to-noise ratio in a chirped-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer operating from 2-8 GHz using simple heating of the compound. The 13C isotope analysis provides a carbon atom structure that confirms the diastereomer. This structure is in excellent agreement with quantum chemistry calculations at the B2PLYPD3/ 6-311++G** level of theory. The DHAA spectrum is expected to be fully resolved from the unwanted diastereomer raising the potential for fast diastereomer excess measurement by rotational spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical production process.

  17. Behavior of pure and modified carbon/carbon composites in atomic oxygen environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-chong Liu; Lai-fei Cheng; Li-tong Zhang; Xin-gang Luan; Hui Mei

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) is considered the most erosive particle to spacecraft materials in low earth orbit (LEO). Carbon fiber, car-bon/carbon (C/C), and some modified C/C composites were exposed to a simulated AO environment to investigate their behaviors in LEO. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), AO erosion rate calculation, and mechanical property testing were used to characterize the material properties. Results show that the carbon fiber and C/C specimens undergo significant degradation under the AO bombing. According to the effects of AO on C/C-SiC and CVD-SiC-coated C/C, a condensed CVD-SiC coat is a feasible approach to protect C/C composites from AO degradation.

  18. Process of Energetic Carbon Atom Deposition on Si (001) Substrate by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于威; 滕晓云; 李晓苇; 傅广生

    2002-01-01

    The process of energetic C atom deposition on Si (001)-(2×1) is studied by the molecular dynamics method using the semi-empirical many-bond Tersoff potential. It is found that the incident energy of the carbon atom has an important effect on the collision process and its diffusion process on the substrate. Most of the incident energy of the carbon atom is transferred to the substrate atoms within the initial two vibration periods of substrate atoms and its value increases with the incident energy. The spreading distance and penetration depth of the incident atom increasing with the incident energy are also identified. The simulated results imply that an important effect of energy of incident carbon on the film growth at Iow substrate temperature provides activation energy for silicon carbide formation through the vibration enhancement of local substrate atoms. In addition, suppressing carbon atom inhomogeneous collection and dispensing with the silicon diffusion process may be effectively promoted by the spreading and penetration of the energetic carbon atom in the silicon substrate.

  19. Exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen atoms ortho to the hydroxyl group in tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R B; Morlino, V J

    1965-10-22

    The carbon-bound hydrogen atoms of tyrosine that exchange with solvent protons in strongly acid solutions at about 100 degrees C are not the methylene hydrogen atoms but a pair on the aromatic ring. Of the two pairs of protons on the aromatic ring, observed in the proton magnetic resonance spectra, the pair at higher field undergoes exchange in 2.4N DCI at 100 degrees C. Other hydrogen atoms, attached either to aliphatic or aromatic carbon atoms, exhibit no noticeable exchange under the same conditions. From a chemicalshift analysis the exchanging protons are assigned as those ortho to the hydroxyl group on the aromatic ring.

  20. Surface reactions of molecular and atomic oxygen with carbon phosphide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham, Justin; Torres, Jessica; Wolfe, Glenn; d'Agostino, Alfred; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2005-11-01

    The surface reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon phosphide films have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Carbon phosphide films were produced by ion implantation of trimethylphosphine into polyethylene. Atmospheric oxidation of carbon phosphide films was dominated by phosphorus oxidation and generated a carbon-containing phosphate surface film. This oxidized surface layer acted as an effective diffusion barrier, limiting the depth of phosphorus oxidation within the carbon phosphide film to phosphorus atoms as well as the degree of phosphorus oxidation. For more prolonged AO exposures, a highly oxidized phosphate surface layer formed that appeared to be inert toward further AO-mediated erosion. By utilizing phosphorus-containing hydrocarbon thin films, the phosphorus oxides produced during exposure to AO were found to desorb at temperatures >500 K under vacuum conditions. Results from this study suggest that carbon phosphide films can be used as AO-resistant surface coatings on polymers.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Atomic Force Microscopy for Proteomics and Biological Forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noy, A; De Yoreo, J J; Malkin, A J

    2002-01-01

    The Human Genome Project was focused on mapping the complete genome. Yet, understanding the structure and function of the proteins expressed by the genome is the real end game. But there are approximately 100,000 proteins in the human body and the atomic structure has been determined for less than 1% of them. Given the current rate at which structures are being solved, it will take more than one hundred years to complete this task. The rate-limiting step in protein structure determination is the growth of high-quality single crystals for X-ray diffraction. Synthesis of the protein stock solution as well as X-ray diffraction and analysis can now often be done in a matter of weeks, but developing a recipe for crystallization can take years and, especially in the case of membrane proteins, is often completely unsuccessful. Consequently, techniques that can either help to elucidate the factors controlling macromolecular crystallization, increase the amount of structural information obtained from crystallized macromolecules or eliminate the need for crystallization altogether are of enormous importance. In addition, potential applications for those techniques extend well beyond the challenges of proteomics. The global spread of modern technology has brought with it an increasing threat from biological agents such as viruses. As a result, developing techniques for identifying and understanding the operation of such agents is becoming a major area of forensic research for DOE. Previous to this project, we have shown that we can use in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image the surfaces of growing macromolecular crystals with molecular resolution (1-5) In addition to providing unprecedented information about macromolecular nucleation, growth and defect structure, these results allowed us to obtain low-resolution phase information for a number of macromolecules, providing structural information that was not obtainable from X-ray diffraction(3). For some virus systems

  2. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    , by the purpose to integrate the carbon nanostructures in the carbon fibers by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, in order to develop the basic substrate of advanced carbon-based nanocomposite for atomic oxygen protection. The nanostructures grown onto the carbon fibers can be used to create multiscale hybrid carbon nanotube/carbon fiber composites where individual carbon fibers, which are several microns in diameter, are surrounded by nanotubes. The present objective is the setting-up of the CVD parameters for a reliable growth of carbon nanostructures on carbon fiber surface; after that, the results of a preliminary characterization related to atomic oxygen effects testing by means of a ground LEO simulation facility are reported and discussed.

  3. Detection and quantized conductance of neutral atoms near a charged carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristroph, Trygve; Goodsell, Anne; Golovchenko, J A; Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    2005-02-18

    We describe a novel single atom detector that uses the high electric field surrounding a charged single-walled carbon nanotube to attract and subsequently field-ionize neutral atoms. A theoretical study of the field-ionization tunneling rates for atomic trajectories in the attractive potential near a nanowire shows that a broadly applicable, high spatial resolution, low-power, neutral-atom detector with nearly 100% efficiency is realizable with present-day technology. Calculations also show that the system can provide the first opportunity to study quantized conductance phenomena when detecting cold neutral atoms with mean velocities less than 15 m/s.

  4. Ab initio study of semiconductor atoms impurities in zigzag edge (10,0) carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttaqien, Fahdzi; Suprijadi

    2015-04-01

    The substitutional impurities in zigzag edge (10,0) carbon nanotubes have been studied by using first principles calculations. Silicon (Si), gallium (Ga), and arsenic (As) atom have been chosen as semiconductor based-atom for replacing carbon atoms in CNT's surface. The silicon atom changes the energy gap of pristine zigzag (10,0) CNT, it is 0.19 eV more narrow than that of pristine CNT. Geometrically, the silicon atom creates sp3 bond with three adjacent carbon atoms, where the tetrahedral form of its sp3 bond is consisted of free unoccupied state. The silicon atom does not induce magnetism to zigzag CNT. Due to gallium (Ga) and arsenic (As) atom substitution, the zigzag CNT becomes metallic and has magnetic moment of 1 µB. The valance and conduction band are crossed each other, then the energy gap is vanished. The electronic properties of GaAs-doped CNT are dominantly affected by gallium atom and its magnetic properties are dominantly affected by arsenic atom. These results prove that the CNT with desired properties can be obtained with substitutional impurities without any giving structural defect.

  5. Dynamics of carbon-hydrogen and carbon-methyl exchanges in the collision of 3P atomic carbon with propene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shih-Huang; Chen, Wei-Kan; Chin, Chih-Hao; Huang, Wen-Jian

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the dynamics of the reaction of 3P atomic carbon with propene (C3H6) at reactant collision energy 3.8 kcal mol-1 in a crossed molecular-beam apparatus using synchrotron vacuum-ultraviolet ionization. Products C4H5, C4H4, C3H3, and CH3 were observed and attributed to exit channels C4H5 + H, C4H4 + 2H, and C3H3 + CH3; their translational-energy distributions and angular distributions were derived from the measurements of product time-of-flight spectra. Following the addition of a 3P carbon atom to the C=C bond of propene, cyclic complex c-H2C(C)CHCH3 undergoes two separate stereoisomerization mechanisms to form intermediates E- and Z-H2CCCHCH3. Both the isomers of H2CCCHCH3 in turns decompose to C4H5 + H and C3H3 + CH3. A portion of C4H5 that has enough internal energy further decomposes to C4H4 + H. The three exit channels C4H5 + H, C4H4 + 2H, and C3H3 + CH3 have average translational energy releases 13.5, 3.2, and 15.2 kcal mol-1, respectively, corresponding to fractions 0.26, 0.41, and 0.26 of available energy deposited to the translational degrees of freedom. The H-loss and 2H-loss channels have nearly isotropic angular distributions with a slight preference at the forward direction particularly for the 2H-loss channel. In contrast, the CH3-loss channel has a forward and backward peaked angular distribution with an enhancement at the forward direction. Comparisons with reactions of 3P carbon atoms with ethene, vinyl fluoride, and vinyl chloride are stated.

  6. Van der Waals and Casimir interactions between atoms and carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.(Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 196140, St. Petersburg, Russia); Blagov, E. V.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2008-01-01

    The van der Waals and Casimir interactions of a hydrogen atom (molecule) with a single-walled and a multiwalled carbon nanotubes are compared. It is shown that the macroscopic concept of graphite dielectric permittivity is already applicable for nanotubes with only two or three walls. The absorption of hydrogen atoms by a nanotube at separations below one nanometer is considered. The lateral force due to exchange repulsion moves the atom to a position above the cell center, where it is absorb...

  7. Quantitative Atomic Force Microscopy with Carbon Monoxide Terminated Tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Zhixiang; Boneschanscher, Mark P.; Swart, Ingmar; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Liljeroth, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently progressed tremendously in achieving atomic resolution imaging through the use of small oscillation amplitudes and well-defined modification of the tip apex. In particular, it has been shown that picking up simple inorganic molecules (such as CO)

  8. Tailoring Thermal Conductivity of Single-stranded Carbon-chain Polymers through Atomic Mass Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Quanwen; Zeng, Lingping; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei

    2016-10-07

    Tailoring the thermal conductivity of polymers is central to enlarge their applications in the thermal management of flexible integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by fabricating materials with various nanostructures, but a clear relationship between various functional groups and thermal properties of polymers remains to be established. Here, we numerically study the thermal conductivity of single-stranded carbon-chain polymers with multiple substituents of hydrogen atoms through atomic mass modification. We find that their thermal conductivity can be tuned by atomic mass modifications as revealed through molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results suggest that heavy homogeneous substituents do not assist heat transport and trace amounts of heavy substituents can in fact hinder heat transport substantially. Our analysis indicates that carbon chain has the biggest contribution (over 80%) to the thermal conduction in single-stranded carbon-chain polymers. We further demonstrate that atomic mass modifications influence the phonon bands of bonding carbon atoms, and the discrepancies of phonon bands between carbon atoms are responsible for the remarkable drops in thermal conductivity and large thermal resistances in carbon chains. Our study provides fundamental insight into how to tailor the thermal conductivity of polymers through variable substituents.

  9. Carbon nanotubes as tips for atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国立秋; 徐宗伟; 赵铁强; 赵清亮; 张飞虎; 董申

    2004-01-01

    Ordinary AFM probes' characters prevent the AFM' s application in various scopes. Carbon nanotubes represent ideal AFM probe materials for their higher aspect ratio, larger Young' s modulus, unique chemical structure, and well-defined electronic property. Carbon nanotube AFM probes are obtained by using a new method of attaching carbon nanotubes to the end of ordinary AFM probes, and are then used for doing AFM experiments. These experiments indicated that carbon nanotube probes have higher elastic deformation, higher resolution and higher durability. And it was also found that carbon nanotube probes can accurately reflect the morphology of deep narrow gaps, while ordinary probes can not reflect.

  10. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  11. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao

    2013-02-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi-and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM.

  12. Unexpected Huge Dimerization Ratio in One-Dimensional Carbon Atomic Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chang; Morishita, Shigeyuki; Koshino, Masanori; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Teng, Po-Yuan; Chiu, Po-Wen; Sawada, Hidetaka; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2017-01-11

    Peierls theory predicted atomic distortion in one-dimensional (1D) crystal due to its intrinsic instability in 1930. Free-standing carbon atomic chains created in situ in transmission electron microscope (TEM)1-3 are an ideal example to experimentally observe the dimerization behavior of carbon atomic chain within a finite length. We report here a surprisingly huge distortion found in the free-standing carbon atomic chains at 773 K, which is 10 times larger than the value expected in the system. Such an abnormally distorted phase only dominates at the elevated temperatures, while two distinct phases, distorted and undistorted, coexist at lower or ambient temperatures. Atom-by-atom spectroscopy indeed shows considerable variations in the carbon 1s spectra at each atomic site but commonly observes a slightly downshifted π* peak, which proves its sp(1) bonding feature. These results suggest that the simple model, relaxed and straight, is not fully adequate to describe the realistic 1D structure, which is extremely sensitive to perturbations such as external force or boundary conditions.

  13. Adsorption of hydrogen atoms onto the exterior wall of carbon nanotubes and their thermodynamics properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, T.Y.; Ren, Y.X. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liew, K.M. [Department of Building and Construction, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (China)

    2010-05-15

    In the present work, we present a systematic analysis of the chemisorption process pathway of hydrogen atoms onto the exterior wall of (5,5) carbon nanotubes using the ONIOM2 (B3LYP(6-31+G(d,p):UFF)) scheme, and we avoid the gross assumption of fixing any of the carbon atoms during the simulation. It is shown that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms onto the sidewall of CNTs are energetically favorable and the most stable state is to form two H-C {sigma}-bonds while the original {sigma}-bond between the carbon atoms is totally severed. In particular, we examined the molecular thermodynamics properties for the reaction at a range of temperatures from 77 K to 1000 K, and the results suggests that the reaction is possible at ambient temperature, but it is less favorable than that at lower temperatures. (author)

  14. Synthetic Strategies toward Natural Products Containing Contiguous Stereogenic Quaternary Carbon Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büschleb, Martin; Dorich, Stéphane; Hanessian, Stephen; Tao, Daniel; Schenthal, Kyle B; Overman, Larry E

    2016-03-18

    Strategies for the total synthesis of complex natural products that contain two or more contiguous stereogenic quaternary carbon atoms in their intricate structures are reviewed with 12 representative examples. Emphasis has been put on methods to create quaternary carbon stereocenters, including syntheses of the same natural product by different groups, thereby showcasing the diversity of thought and individual creativity. A compendium of selected natural products containing two or more contiguous stereogenic quaternary carbon atoms and key reactions in their total or partial syntheses is provided in the Supporting Information.

  15. Influence of Intertube Additional Atoms on Sliding Behaviors of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋海洋; 耿淑芳; 查新未; 孙建

    2012-01-01

    The effects of intertube additional atoms on (DWCNTs) are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) the sliding behaviors of double-walled carbon nanotubes simulation method. The interaction between carbon atoms is modeled using the second-generation reactive empirical bond-order potential coupled with the Lennard-Jones potential. The simulations indicate that intertube additional atoms of DWCNT can significantly enhance the load transfer between neighboring tubes of DWCNT. The improvement in load transfer is guaranteed by the addition of intertube atoms which are covalently bonded to the inner and outer tubes of DWCNT. The results also show that the sliding behaviors of DWCNT are strongly dependent of additional atom numbers. The results presented here demonstrate that the superior mechanical properties of DWCNT can be realized by controlling intertube coupling. The general conclusions derived from this work may be of importance in devising high-performance CNT composites.

  16. Metal-carbon clusters: The origin of the delayed atomic ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K. M.; Peppernick, S. J.; Castleman, A. W.

    2006-04-01

    Studies of the emission of electrons from excited metal-carbon cluster systems that include the Met-Car (M8C12, where M is Ti, Zr, and V) also have revealed the evolution of a delayed atomic ion. The source of the delayed atomic ion, which involves the emission of ionized atoms on the microsecond time scale, is the focus of this investigation. By studying the delayed ionization of mixed zirconium and titanium carbon complexes produced in a laser vaporization source coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, for the first time both the zirconium and titanium delayed atomic ions were observed to be emitted in the same experiment. These studies allowed a determination that the source of the delayed atomic ion is an excited metal dicarbide. A plausible mechanism involving the excitation of a high Rydberg state of the metal dicarbide prior to an excited ion pair separation is proposed.

  17. Study on nitrogen doped carbon atom chains with negative differential resistance effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji-Mei; Liu, Jing; Min, Yi; Zhou, Li-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Recent calculations (Mahmoud and Lugli, 2013, [21]) of gold leads sandwiching carbon chains which are separated by diphenyl-dimethyl demonstrated that the negative differential resistance (NDR) effect appears only for ;odd; numbers of carbon atoms. In this paper, according to a first-principles study based on non-equilibrium Green's function combining density functional theory, we find that the NDR effect appears both for ;odd; and for ;even; numbers of carbon atoms when the chains are doped by nitrogen atom. Our calculations remove the restriction of ;odd/even; chains for the NDR effect, which may promise the potential applications of carbon chains in the nano-scale or molecular devices in the future.

  18. Atomic Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes and their Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly Lynn

    Global issues related to energy and the environment have motivated development of advanced material solutions outside of traditional metals ceramics, and polymers. Taking inspiration from composites, where the combination of two or more materials often yields superior properties, the field of organic-inorganic hybrids has recently emerged. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-inorganic hybrids have drawn widespread and increasing interest in recent years due to their multifunctionality and potential impact across several technologically important application areas. Before the impacts of CNT-inorganic hybrids can be realized however, processing techniques must be developed for their scalable production. Optimization in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for synthesis of CNTs and vertically aligned CNT arrays has created production routes both high throughput and economically feasible. Additionally, control of CVD parameters has allowed for growth of CNT arrays that are able to be drawn into aligned sheets and further processed to form a variety of aligned 1, 2, and 3-dimensional bulk assemblies including ribbons, yarns, and foams. To date, there have only been a few studies on utilizing these bulk assemblies for the production of CNT-inorganic hybrids. Wet chemical methods traditionally used for fabricating CNT-inorganic hybrids are largely incompatible with CNT assemblies, since wetting and drying the delicate structures with solvents can destroy their structure. It is therefore necessary to investigate alternative processing strategies in order to advance the field of CNT-inorganic hybrids. In this dissertation, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is evaluated as a synthetic route for the production of large-scale CNT-metal oxide hybrids as well as pure metal oxide architectures utilizing CNT arrays, ribbons, and ultralow density foams as deposition templates. Nucleation and growth behavior of alumina was evaluated as a function of CNT surface chemistry. While highly graphitic

  19. Ultrafast atomic process in X-ray emission by using inner-shell ionization method for sodium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-07-01

    An ultrafast inner-shell ionization process with X-ray emission stimulated by high-intensity short-pulse X-ray is studied. Carbon and sodium atoms are treated as target matter. It is shown that atomic processes of the target determine the necessary X-ray intensity for X-ray laser emission as well as the features of X-ray laser such as wavelength and duration time. The intensity also depends on the density of initial atoms. Furthermore, we show that as the intensity of X-ray source becomes high, the multi-inner-shell ionization predominates, leading to the formation of hollow atoms. As the density of hollow atoms is increased by the pumping X-ray power, the emission of X-rays is not only of significance for high brightness X-ray measurement but also is good for X-ray lasing. New classes of experiments of pump X-ray probe and X-ray laser are suggested. (author)

  20. Growth and Destruction of PAH Molecules in Reactions with Carbon Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    A very high abundance of atomic carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM), and the high reactivity of these species toward different hydrocarbon molecules including benzene, raise questions regarding the stability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in space. To test the efficiency of destruction of PAH molecules via reactions with atomic carbon, we performed a set of laboratory and computational studies of the reactions of naphthalene, anthracene, and coronene molecules with carbon atoms in the ground state. The reactions were investigated in liquid helium droplets at T = 0.37 K and by quantum chemical computations. Our studies suggest that all small and all large catacondensed PAHs react barrierlessly with atomic carbon, and therefore should be efficiently destroyed by such reactions in a broad temperature range. At the same time, large compact pericondensed PAHs should be more inert toward such a reaction. In addition, taking into account their higher photostability, much higher abundances of pericondensed PAHs should be expected in various astrophysical environments. The barrierless reactions between carbon atoms and small PAHs also suggest that, in the ISM, these reactions could lead to the bottom-up formation of PAH molecules.

  1. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  2. Weighing a single atom using a coupled plasmon–carbon nanotube system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jin Li and Ka-Di Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an optical weighing technique with a sensitivity down to a single atom, using a surface plasmon and a doubly clamped carbon nanotube resonator. The mass of a single atom is determined via the vibrational frequency shift of the carbon nanotube while the atom attaches to the nanotube surface. Owing to the ultralight mass and high quality factor of the carbon nanotube, and the spectral enhancement by the use of surface plasmon, this method results in a narrow linewidth (kHz and high sensitivity (2.3×10−28 Hzcenterdot g−1, which is five orders of magnitude more sensitive than traditional electrical mass detection techniques.

  3. Synthesis of novel amorphous calcium carbonate by sono atomization for reactive mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Kanai, Makoto; Nishimiya, Nobuyuki

    2012-03-01

    Droplets of several micrometers in size can be formed in aqueous solution by atomization under ultrasonic irradiation at 2 MHz. This phenomenon, known as atomization, is capable of forming fine droplets for use as a reaction field. This synthetic method is called SARM (sono atomization for reactive mixing). This paper reports on the synthesis of a novel amorphous calcium carbonate formed by SARM. The amorphous calcium carbonate, obtained at a solution concentration of 0.8 mol/dm(3), had a specific surface area of 65 m(2)/g and a composition of CaCO(3)•0.5H(2)O as determined using thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). Because the ACC had a lower hydrate composition than conventional amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), the ACC synthesized in this paper was very stable at room temperature.

  4. Ultra-Low-Temperature Reactions of Carbon Atoms with Hydrogen Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnokutski, S A; Renzler, M; Jäger, C; Henning, Th; Scheier, P

    2016-01-01

    The reactions of carbon atoms with dihydrogen have been investigated in liquid helium droplets at $T$ = 0.37 K. A calorimetric technique was applied to monitor the energy released in the reaction. The barrierless reaction between a single carbon atom and a single dihydrogen molecule was detected. Reactions between dihydrogen clusters and carbon atoms have been studied by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The formation of hydrocarbon cations of the type C$_m$H$_n^+$, with $m$ = 1-4 and $n$ = 1-15 was observed. With enhanced concentration of dihydrogen, the mass spectra demonstrated the main "magic" peak assigned to the CH$_5^+$ cation. A simple formation pathway and the high stability of this cation suggest its high abundance in the interstellar medium.

  5. Tailoring Thermal Conductivity of Single-stranded Carbon-chain Polymers through Atomic Mass Modification

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Quanwen; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the thermal conductivity of polymers is central to enlarge their applications in the thermal management of flexible integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by fabricating materials with various nanostructures, but a clear relationship between various functional groups and thermal properties of polymers remains to be established. Here, we numerically study the thermal conductivity of single-stranded carbon-chain polymers with multiple substituents of hydrogen atoms through atomic mass modification. We find that their thermal conductivity can be tuned by atomic mass modifications as revealed through molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results suggest that heavy homogeneous substituents do not assist heat transport and trace amounts of heavy substituents can in fact hinder heat transport substantially. Our analysis indicates that carbon chain has the biggest contribution (over 80%) to the thermal conduction in single-stranded carbon-chain polymers. We further demonst...

  6. Integrating Carbon Nanotubes For Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qi; Cassell, Alan M.; Liu, Hongbing; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) related nanostructures possess remarkable electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. To produce these nanostructures for real world applications, a large-scale controlled growth of carbon nanotubes is crucial for the integration and fabrication of nanodevices and nanosensors. We have taken the approach of integrating nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon micro fabrication techniques. This integration requires a catalyst or nanomaterial protection scheme. In this paper, we report our recent work on fabricating wafer-scale carbon nanotube AFM cantilever probe tips. We will address the design and fabrication considerations in detail, and present the preliminary scanning probe test results. This work may serve as an example of rational design, fabrication, and integration of nanomaterials for advanced nanodevice and nanosensor applications.

  7. The over-step coalescence of carbon atoms on copper surface in the CVD growth of graphene: density functional calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ways in which carbon atoms coalesce over the steps on copper (111 surface are ascertained by density functional theory (DFT calculations in the context of chemical vapor deposition (CVD growth of graphene. Two strategies, (1 by putting carbon atoms on and under the steps separately and (2 by importing additional carbon atoms between the ones separated by the steps, have been attempted to investigate if an over-step coalescence of carbon atoms could take place. Based on analyses about the optimized configurations and adsorption energies of carbon atoms nearby the steps, as well as the energy evolution curve of the system throughout the geometry optimizations process, we determined the main way in which graphene grows over the steps continuously: the carbon atoms, adsorbed additionally on the locations between the already existing ones which are separated by the steps, link them (these carbon atoms separated by the steps together. The direct over-step coalescence of the carbon atoms separated by the steps is very difficult, although the energy barrier preventing their coalescence can be weakened by importing carbon atoms on and under the steps gradually. Our results imply potential applications in directing the fabrication of graphene with particular structure by controlling the surface topography of copper substrate.

  8. van der Waals energy under strong atom-field coupling in doped carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Bondarev, Igor; Lambin, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    Using a unified macroscopic QED formalism, we derive an integral equation for the van der Waals energy of a two-level atomic system near a carbon nanotube. The equation is valid for both strong and weak atom-vacuum-field coupling. By solving it numerically, we demonstrate the inapplicability of weak-coupling-based van der Waals interaction models in a close vicinity of the nanotube surface.

  9. van der Waals energy under strong atom field coupling in doped carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, I. V.; Lambin, Ph.

    2004-10-01

    Using a unified macroscopic QED formalism, we derive an integral equation for the van der Waals energy of a two-level atomic system near a carbon nanotube. The equation is valid for both strong and weak atom-vacuum-field coupling. By solving it numerically, we demonstrate the inapplicability of weak-coupling-based van der Waals interaction models in a close vicinity of the nanotube surface.

  10. Atomic carbon chains as spin-transmitters: An ab initio transport study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Joachim Alexander; Brandbyge, Mads; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2010-01-01

    An atomic carbon chain joining two graphene flakes was recently realized in a ground-breaking experiment by Jin et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 102 (2009) 205501). We present ab initio results for the electron transport properties of such chains and demonstrate complete spin-polarization of the transmi......An atomic carbon chain joining two graphene flakes was recently realized in a ground-breaking experiment by Jin et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 102 (2009) 205501). We present ab initio results for the electron transport properties of such chains and demonstrate complete spin...

  11. The influence of the atomic structure of basal planes on interplanar distance in pyrolytic carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgardt, N. I.; Prihodko, A. S.; Seibt, M.

    2016-12-01

    The atomic structure of carbon materials is studied using the example of pyrocarbon and boronrich pyrocarbon by means of the method of reconstruction of the wave function in transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that the digital processing of the phase distributions of these functions allows us to find the average distance between the basal planes. Using the method of molecular dynamics for the formation of the test structures and obtaining for them the calculated phase distributions, the effect of depletion of the basal planes of the carbon atoms on the interplanar distance in the pyrocarbon materials is quantified.

  12. Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-13

    A method for producing a hydrocarbon blendstock, the method comprising contacting at least one saturated acyclic alcohol having at least three and up to ten carbon atoms with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100°C and up to 550°C, wherein the metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and the metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting the alcohol to the hydrocarbon blendstock, wherein the method directly produces a hydrocarbon blendstock having less than 1 vol % ethylene and at least 35 vol % of hydrocarbon compounds containing at least eight carbon atoms.

  13. Atomically isolated nickel species anchored on graphitized carbon for efficient hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lili; Liu, Peng Fei; Yan, Xuecheng; Gu, Lin; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Yang, Hua Gui; Qiu, Shilun; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen production through electrochemical process is at the heart of key renewable energy technologies including water splitting and hydrogen fuel cells. Despite tremendous efforts, exploring cheap, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution still remains as a great challenge. Here we synthesize a nickel-carbon-based catalyst, from carbonization of metal-organic frameworks, to replace currently best-known platinum-based materials for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. This nickel-carbon-based catalyst can be activated to obtain isolated nickel atoms on the graphitic carbon support when applying electrochemical potential, exhibiting highly efficient hydrogen evolution performance with high exchange current density of 1.2 mA cm-2 and impressive durability. This work may enable new opportunities for designing and tuning properties of electrocatalysts at atomic scale for large-scale water electrolysis.

  14. Quantitative analysis of carbon in cementite using pulsed laser atom probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitaguchi, H.S., E-mail: hiroto.kitaguchi@twi.co.uk; Lozano-Perez, S.; Moody, M.P.

    2014-12-15

    Carbon quantification and the standardisation in a pure cementite were conducted using pulsed-laser atom probe tomography (APT). The results were analysed to investigate a dependence on three distinct experimental parameters; the laser pulse energy, the cryogenic specimen temperature and the laser pulse frequency. All the measurements returned an apparent carbon content of 25.0±1.0 at%. Carbon content measurements showed no clear dependence on the cryogenic temperature or the laser pulse frequency. However, the results did demonstrate a strong correlation with the laser pulse energy. For lower laser pulse energies, the analysis returned carbon contents higher than the stoichiometric ratio. It was suggested that this effect is due to pile up of {sup 56}Fe{sup ++} at the detector and as a consequence there is a systematic preferential loss of these ions throughout the course of the experiment. Conversely, in experiments utilising higher laser pulse energies, it was found that the carbon contents were smaller than the stoichiometric ratio. In these experiments an increasing fraction of the larger carbon molecular ions (e.g., C{sub 5} ions) were detected as part of a multiple detection events, which could affect the quantification measurements. - Highlights: • This paper describes carbon quantifications in cementite. • Laser pulsed atom probe tomography successfully quantified the carbon content. • A unique background subtraction method was applied. • Deviations from the stoichiometry were discussed.

  15. A Density Functional Study of Atomic Carbon Adsorption on δ-Pu(111)Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Hong-Yuan; XIONG Xiao-Ling; SONG Hong-Tao; LUO Shun-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Adsorption of atomic carbon on δ-Pu(111)surface is investigated systematically using density functional theory with RPBE functional.The adsorption energies,adsorption structures,Mulliken population,work functions,layer and projected density of states are calculated in wide ranges of coverage,which have never been studied before as far as we know.

  16. Quantification of tip-broadening in non-contact atomic force microscopy with carbon nanotube tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinander, Kristoffer; Jensen, Thomas N.; Simonsen, Soren B.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotube terminated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have been used for the imaging of 5 nm wide surface supported Pt nanoclusters by non-contact (dynamic mode) AFM in an ultra-high vacuum. The results are compared to AFM measurements done with conventional Si-tips, as well...

  17. Structural and chemical evolution of single-wall carbon nanotubes under atomic and molecular deuterium interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.; Keim, E.G.; Berg, van den A.H.J.; Smithers, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of atomic (D) and molecular (D2) deuterium, as present in a (D + D2) gas mixture, with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been studied by means of a combination of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The SWNT samp

  18. Phase transitions of adsorbed atoms on the surface of a carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zenghui; Wei, Jiang; Morse, Peter; Dash, J Gregory; Vilches, Oscar E; Cobden, David H

    2010-01-29

    Phase transitions of adsorbed atoms and molecules on two-dimensional substrates are well explored, but similar transitions in the one-dimensional limit have been more difficult to study experimentally. Suspended carbon nanotubes can act as nanoscale resonators with remarkable electromechanical properties and the ability to detect adsorption at the level of single atoms. We used single-walled carbon nanotube resonators to study the phase behavior of adsorbed argon and krypton atoms as well as their coupling to the substrate electrons. By monitoring the resonance frequency in the presence of gases, we observed the formation of monolayers on the cylindrical surface, phase transitions within them, and simultaneous modification of the electrical conductance.

  19. Multiphoton inner-shell ionization of the carbon atom

    CERN Document Server

    Rey, H F

    2015-01-01

    We apply time-dependent R-matrix theory to study inner-shell ionization of C atoms in ultra-short high-frequency light fields with a photon energy between 170 and 245 eV. At an intensity of 10$^{17}$ W/cm$^2$, ionization is dominated by single-photon emission of a $2\\ell$ electron, with two-photon emission of a 1s electron accounting for about 2-3\\% of all emission processes, and two-photon emission of $2\\ell$ contributing about 0.5-1\\%. Three-photon emission of a 1s electron is estimated to contribute about 0.01-0.03\\%. Around a photon energy of 225 eV, two-photon emission of a 1s electron, leaving C$^+$ in either 1s2s2p$^3$ or 1s2p$^4$ is resonantly enhanced by intermediate 1s2s$^2$2p$^3$ states. The results demonstrate the capability of time-dependent R-matrix theory to describe inner-shell ionization processes including rearrangement of the outer electrons.

  20. Modeling the Mechanical Properties of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes and Their Composites: Design at the Atomic Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Sheng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation focuses on the design of functionalization configuration at the atomic level to determine the influence of atomic structure on the mechanical properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes (F-CNTs and their composites. Tension and compressive buckling behaviors of different configurations of CNTs functionalized by H atoms are studied by a molecular dynamics (MD method. It is shown that H-atom functionalization reduces Young’s modulus of CNTs, but Young’s modulus is not sensitive to the functionalization configuration. The configuration does, however, affect the tensile strength and critical buckling stress of CNTs. Further, the stress-strain relations of composites reinforced by nonfunctionalized and various functionalized CNTs are analyzed.

  1. Functionalization of terminal carbon atoms of hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene by polyazido nitrogen rich molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajavelu Murali Sankar; Tapta Kanchan Roy; Tushar Jana

    2011-07-01

    We report a novel synthetic approach for the attachment of the polyazido nitrogen rich molecule on to the hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) backbone. The terminal carbon atoms of the HTPB are functionalized by attaching cyanuric chloride (CYC) covalently on the HTPB backbone. Further reaction of this modified HTPB with sodium azide yields polyazido nitrogen rich HTPB. The unique physico-chemical properties and the microstructure of the HTPB do not get affected upon modification. IR, gel permeable chromatography (GPC) and absorption spectroscopy studies prove that the polyazido nitrogen rich molecules are covalently attached at the terminal carbon atoms of the HTPB. The π electron delocalization owing to long butadiene chain, strong electron withdrawing effect of the triazine molecules are the major driving forces for the covalent attachment of the triazine at the terminal carbon atoms of the HTPB. The disruption of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the terminal hydroxyl groups of the HTPB chains and the presence of hydrogen bonding between the N atoms of the triazine ring with OH group of the HTPB are observed. Theoretical study also reveals the existence of the hydrogen bonding between the OH and N. Theoretical calculation shows that the detonation performance of the polyazido nitrogen rich HTPB are very promising.

  2. Silicon solar cell performance deposited by diamond like carbon thin film ;Atomic oxygen effects;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Abbas Ail; Eshaghi, Akbar; Karami, Esmaeil

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a diamond-like carbon thin film was deposited on p-type polycrystalline silicon solar cell via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method by using methane and hydrogen gases. The effect of atomic oxygen on the functioning of silicon coated DLC thin film and silicon was investigated. Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the DLC thin film. Photocurrent-voltage characteristics of the silicon solar cell were carried out using a solar simulator. The results showed that atomic oxygen exposure induced the including oxidation, structural changes, cross-linking reactions and bond breaking of the DLC film; thus reducing the optical properties. The photocurrent-voltage characteristics showed that although the properties of the fabricated thin film were decreased after being exposed to destructive rays, when compared with solar cell without any coating, it could protect it in atomic oxygen condition enhancing solar cell efficiency up to 12%. Thus, it can be said that diamond-like carbon thin layer protect the solar cell against atomic oxygen exposure.

  3. Theoretical realization of cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated carbon atomic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; An, Hui; Guo, Ling-Ju; Zeng, Zhi; Ju, Xin

    2011-01-14

    The capacity of carbon atomic chains with different terminations for hydrogen storage is studied using first-principles density functional theory calculations. Unlike the physisorption of H(2) on the H-terminated chain, we show that two Li (Na) atoms each capping one end of the odd- or even-numbered carbon chain can hold ten H(2) molecules with optimal binding energies for room temperature storage. The hybridization of the Li 2p states with the H(2)σ orbitals contributes to the H(2) adsorption. However, the binding mechanism of the H(2) molecules on Na arises only from the polarization interaction between the charged Na atom and the H(2). Interestingly, additional H(2) molecules can be bound to the carbon atoms at the chain ends due to the charge transfer between Li 2s2p (Na 3s) and C 2p states. More importantly, dimerization of these isolated metal-capped chains does not affect the hydrogen binding energy significantly. In addition, a single chain can be stabilized effectively by the C(60) fullerenes termination. With a hydrogen uptake of ∼10 wt.% on Li-coated C(60)-C(n)-C(60) (n = 5, 8), the Li(12)C(60)-C(n)-Li(12)C(60) complex, keeping the number of adsorbed H(2) molecules per Li and stabilizing the dispersion of individual Li atoms, can serve as better building blocks of polymers than the (Li(12)C(60))(2) dimer. These findings suggest a new route to design cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated sp carbon chains.

  4. Adsorption Sites of Hydrogen Atom on Pure and Mg-Doped Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Al-Ghamdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen adsorption sites on pure multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT and Mg-doped MWCNTs material system have been investigated using molecular dynamics (MD simulations as well as quantum chemical calculations. Through combining MWCNTs with Mg, the hydrogen adsorption sites energy on this Mg-MWCNTs system is found to be larger than that of the pure MWCNTs. Additionally, it was found that, through Mg-doping, new adsorption sites for hydrogen molecules are created in comparison with undoped nanotubes. It is also found that H atom is preferably adsorbed at every place near magnesium atom.

  5. Tunable Adsorption and Desorption of Hydrogen Atoms on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明文; 夏日源; 马玉臣; 英敏菊; 刘向东; 梅良模

    2002-01-01

    Chemical adsorption and desorption of hydrogen atoms on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are investi-gated by using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the adsorption and desorption energy of hydrogenatoms depend on the hydrogen coverage and the diameter of the SWNTs. Hydrogen-adsorption geometry at thecoverage of 1.0 is more energetically stable. The adsorption energy decreases with the increasing diameter ofthe armchair tubes. The adsorption and desorption energy of hydrogen atoms can be modified reversibly byexternally radial deformation. The averaged C-H bond energy on the high curvature sites of the deformed tubeincreases with increasing radial deformation, while that on the low curvature sites decreases.

  6. Influence of supersaturated carbon on the diffusion of Ni in ferrite determined by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kresse, T.

    2013-09-01

    In patented and cold-drawn pearlitic steel wires dissociation of cementite occurs during mechanical deformation. In this study the influence of the carbon decomposition on the diffusion of nickel in ferrite is investigated by means of atom probe tomography. In the temperature range 423-523 K we observed a much smaller activation energy of Ni diffusion than for self-diffusion in body-centered cubic iron, indicating an increased vacancy density owing to enhanced formation of vacancy-carbon complexes. © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Molecular Dynamics of Cold Neutral Atoms Captured by Carbon Nanotube Under Electric Field and Thermal Effect as a Selective Atoms Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elson C; Neto, Abel F G; Maneschy, Carlos E; Chen, James; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Neto, A M J C

    2015-05-01

    Here we analyzed several physical behaviors through computational simulation of systems consisting of a zig-zag type carbon nanotube and relaxed cold atoms (Rb, Au, Si and Ar). These atoms were chosen due to their different chemical properties. The atoms individually were relaxed on the outside of the nanotube during the simulations. Each system was found under the influence of a uniform electric field parallel to the carbon nanotube and under the thermal effect of the initial temperature at the simulations. Because of the electric field, the cold atoms orbited the carbon nanotube while increasing the initial temperature allowed the variation of the radius of the orbiting atoms. We calculated the following quantities: kinetic energy, potential energy and total energy and in situ temperature, molar entropy variation and average radius of the orbit of the atoms. Our data suggest that only the action of electric field is enough to generate the attractive potential and this system could be used as a selected atoms sensor.

  8. The abundance of atomic carbon near the ionization fronts in M17 and S140

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, J.; Blake, G. A.; Phillips, T. G.; Huggins, P. J.; Beichman, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The 492 GHz ground-state line of atomic carbon in the edge-on ionization fronts in M17 and S140 were observed. It was found that, contrary to expectation, the C I emission peaks farther into the molecular cloud from the ionization front than does the CO. In fact the peak C I abundance in M17 occurs more than 60 mag of visual extinction into the cloud from the ionization front. Calculations of the ratio of C I to CO column densities yield values of 0.1-0.2. These observations do not support chemical models which predict that neutral atomic carbon should be found only near the edges of molelcular clouds. Other models are discussed which may explain the observations.

  9. Small angle neutron and X-ray studies of carbon structures with metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, V. T.; Szhogina, A. A.; Bairamukov, V. Yu

    2017-05-01

    Encapsulation of metal atoms inside carbon single-wall cages or within multi-layer cells has been realized using molecular precursors and high temperature processes transforming them into desirable structures. Endohedral fullerenols Fe@C60(OH)X with 3d-metal (iron) have been studied by SANS in aqueous solutions where they form stable globular clusters with radii R C ∼ 10-12 nm and aggregation numbers N C ∼ 104. This self-assembly is a crucial feature of paramagnetic fullerenols as perspective contrast agents for Magneto-Resonance Imaging in medicine. Cellular carbon-metal structures have been created by the pyrolysis of diphthalocyanines of lanthanides and actinides. It was established that these ultra porous matrices consist of globular cells of molecular precursor size (∼ 1 nm) which are aggregated into superstructures. This provides retain of metal atoms inside matrices which may serve for safety storage of spent fuel of nuclear power plants.

  10. Doping of carbon nanotubes with aluminum atom to improve Pt adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganji, M.D., E-mail: ganji_md@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahangari, M. Ghorbanzadeh [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mazandaran University, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khosravi, A. [Department of Chemistry, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-30

    We implement the ab initio van der Waals (vdW) calculations at the density functional level of theory (vdW-DF) for the investigation of Pt adsorption ability of Al-doped carbon nanotubes (Al-CNTs). We present and discuss the energetically favorable sites for a single Pt atom adsorbed on the surface of Al-CNTs. Our results show significantly increment in the binding energy of Pt on the Al-CNT compared with pristine CNTs. We also find that Pt adsorption ability of Al-CNTs is more stronger than that of B- and N-doped CNTs. This is explained by the negative charges introduced in the neighboring C atoms by dopant atom. Our results verify that Al-doped CNTs seems to be more suitable materials for Pt adsorption than pure and also B- and N-doped CNTs.

  11. Doping of carbon nanotubes with aluminum atom to improve Pt adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, M. D.; Ahangari, M. Ghorbanzadeh; Khosravi, A.

    2014-01-01

    We implement the ab initio van der Waals (vdW) calculations at the density functional level of theory (vdW-DF) for the investigation of Pt adsorption ability of Al-doped carbon nanotubes (Al-CNTs). We present and discuss the energetically favorable sites for a single Pt atom adsorbed on the surface of Al-CNTs. Our results show significantly increment in the binding energy of Pt on the Al-CNT compared with pristine CNTs. We also find that Pt adsorption ability of Al-CNTs is more stronger than that of B- and N-doped CNTs. This is explained by the negative charges introduced in the neighboring C atoms by dopant atom. Our results verify that Al-doped CNTs seems to be more suitable materials for Pt adsorption than pure and also B- and N-doped CNTs.

  12. Influence of substitutional atoms on the Snoek peak of carbon in b.c.c. iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Hajime; Yoshinaga, Naoki; Ushioda, Kohsaku

    2004-03-08

    The influence of substitutional atoms (Mn, P, Si, Al, Cr, Co) on the C Snoek peak in b.c.c. iron was investigated. In the dilute range of the substitutes, the addition of Co, Mn, Cr, Si, P and Al resulted in the decreases in Snoek peak height in this ascending order. However, the addition of Mn to the Fe-C-P alloy hardly changes Snoek peak height. There is even a case that Snoek peak height is increased by further Mn addition to this alloy. They can be explained systematically by the proposed model wherein the solute carbon present in the influence region where the lattice distortion around the substitute is greater than the threshold value cannot contribute to the Snoek peak. The strain field generated by a substitutional atom due to the difference in atomic size is concluded to be the main reason for the reduction in Snoek peak height.

  13. Detection of the 610 micron /492 GHz/ line of interstellar atomic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T. G.; Huggins, P. J.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Miller, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The ground-state transition of neutral atomic carbon, 3P1-3P0, has been detected in the interstellar medium at the frequency of 492.162 GHz determined in the laboratory by Saykally and Evenson (1980). The observations were made from the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory using an InSb heterodyne bolometer receiver. The line was detected as strong emission from eight molecular clouds and apparently provides a widely useful probe of the interstellar medium.

  14. Noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment with quartz tuning fork and carbon nanotube probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kageshima, M.; Jensenius, Henriette; Dienwiebel, M.

    2002-01-01

    A force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment was developed by combining a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) probe with a quartz tuning fork. Solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane surface were detected both in the frequency shift and dissipation. Due...... to the high aspect ratio of the CNT probe, the long-range background force was barely detectable in the solvation region. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. IMPROVED FABRICATION METHOD FOR CARBON NANOTUBE PROBE OF ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY(AFM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zongwei; DONG Shen; GUO Liqiu; ZHAO Qingliang

    2006-01-01

    An improved arc discharge method is developed to fabricate carbon nanotube probe of atomic force microscopy (AFM) here. First, silicon probe and carbon nanotube are manipulated under an optical microscope by two high precision microtranslators. When silicon probe and carbon nanotube are very close, several tens voltage is applied between them. And carbon nanotube is divided and attached to the end of silicon probe, which mainly due to the arc welding function.Comparing with the arc discharge method before, the new method here needs no coat silicon probe with metal film in advance, which can greatly reduce the fabrication's difficulty. The fabricated carbon nanotube probe shows good property of higher aspect ratio and can more accurately reflect the true topography of silicon grating than silicon probe. Under the same image drive force, carbon nanotube probe had less indentation depth on soft triblock copolymer sample than silicon probe. This showed that carbon nanotube probe has lower spring constant and less damage to the scan sample than silicon probe.

  16. Controlled fabrication of theophylline imprinted polymers on multiwalled carbon nanotubes via atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianxiong; Gao, Yong; Li, Huaming

    2011-02-01

    Theophylline imprinted polymers were synthesized on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes via atom transfer radical polymerization using brominated multiwalled carbon nanotubes as an initiator. The nanotube-based initiator was prepared by directly reacting acyl chloride-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes with 2-hydroxylethyl-2'-bromoisobutyrate. The grafting copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl-2-methyl-2-propenoate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of template theophylline led to thin molecularly imprinted polymer films coating multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The thickness of molecularly imprinted polymer films prepared in this study was about 5 nm as determined by transmission electron microscopy. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was utilized to follow the introduction of initiator groups as well as polymers on the carbon nanotube surfaces. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the molecularly imprinted polymers were successfully grown from the carbon nanotube surfaces, with the final products having a polymer weight percentage of ca. 50 wt%. The adsorption properties, such as adsorption dynamics, special binding and selective recognition capacity, of the as-prepared molecularly imprinted polymer films were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the composite of molecularly imprinted polymers and multiwalled carbon nanotubes not only possessed a rapid dynamics but also exhibited a good selectivity toward theophylline, compared to caffeine.

  17. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2002-11-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation, before and/or during carbonation, may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (1) its structural and chemical simplicity, (2) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (3) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for minimizing the cost of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process. This final report covers the overall progress of this grant.

  18. Enhancement of oxygen reduction activity of nanoshell carbons by introducing nitrogen atoms from metal phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jozaki@cee.gunma-u.ac.j [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1, Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Tanifuji, Shin-ichi; Furuichi, Atsuya; Yabutsuka, Katsutoshi [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1, Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Nanoshell carbon is a type of catalytically grown nanocarbon with a hollow, round, shell-like structure, with a diameter in the range of approximately 20-50 nm. It has been shown to possess the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and is also expected to be a non-Pt catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. This paper reports the synergetic enhancement of the ORR activity of nanoshell carbons caused by the coexistence of nitrogen atoms. The nanoshell carbons were prepared by the carbonization of furan resin in the presence of acetylacetonates (AAs) and of phthalocyanines (Pcs), which contained Fe, Co, and Ni. The Pc-derived nanoshells (MP-T series; M = Co or Fe, T = carbonization temperature) showed higher ORR activities than the AA-derived nanoshells (MA-T series; M = Co or Fe, T = carbonization temperature) when the same metal elements were employed. An XPS study revealed that nitrogen species were introduced to the surface of the nanoshells when Pcs were used as the nanoshell-forming catalysts, and that no metal species remained on the nanoshells. Principally, the ORR activity of the carbons was governed by the presence of the nanoshells and further enhancement could be achieved by the introduction of nitrogen atoms. 0.78 V of OCV and 0.21 W cm{sup -2} of the maximum power density were observed for a fuel cell whose MEA consisted of 3CoP1000 cathode and a commercial Pt/C anode, when it was operated at 80 deg. C under a pressurized condition of 0.35 MPa.

  19. Development of carbon electrodes for electrochemistry, solid-state electronics and multimodal atomic force microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kirstin Claire

    Carbon is one of the most remarkable elements due to its wide abundance on Earth and its many allotropes, which include diamond and graphite. Many carbon allotropes are conductive and in recent decades scientists have discovered and synthesized many new forms of carbon, including graphene and carbon nanotubes. The work in this thesis specifically focuses on the fabrication and characterization of pyrolyzed parylene C (PPC), a conductive pyrocarbon, as an electrode material for diodes, as a conductive coating for atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes and as an ultramicroelectrode (UME) for the electrochemical interrogation of cellular systems in vitro. Herein, planar and three-dimensional (3D) PPC electrodes were microscopically, spectroscopically and electrochemically characterized. First, planar PPC films and PPC-coated nanopipettes were utilized to detect a model redox species, Ru(NH3) 6Cl3. Then, free-standing PPC thin films were chemically doped, with hydrazine and concentrated nitric acid, to yield p- and n-type carbon films. Doped PPC thin films were positioned in conjunction with doped silicon to create Schottky and p-n junction diodes for use in an alternating current half-wave rectifier circuit. Pyrolyzed parylene C has found particular merit as a 3D electrode coating of AFM probes. Current sensing-atomic force microscopy imaging in air of nanoscale metallic features was undertaken to demonstrate the electronic imaging applicability of PPC AFM probes. Upon further insulation with parylene C and modification with a focused ion beam, a PPC UME was microfabricated near the AFM probe apex and utilized for electrochemical imaging. Subsequently, scanning electrochemical microscopy-atomic force microscopy imaging was undertaken to electrochemically quantify and image the spatial location of dopamine exocytotic release, elicited mechanically via the AFM probe itself, from differentiated pheochromocytoma 12 cells in vitro.

  20. Carbon Co-Deposition During Gas Reduction of Water-Atomized Fe-Cr-Mo Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The water atomization of iron powder with a composition of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo (wt.% at 1600°C and 150 bar creates an oxide layer, which in this study was reduced using a mixture of methane (CH4 and argon (Ar gas. The lowest oxygen content was achieved with a 100 cc/min flow rate of CH4, but this also resulted in a co-deposition of carbon due to the cracking of CH4. This carbon can be used directly to create high-quality, sinter hardenable steel, thereby eliminating the need for an additional mixing step prior to sintering. An exponential relationship was found to exist between the CH4 gas flow rate and carbon content of the powder, meaning that its composition can be easily controlled to suit a variety of different applications.

  1. Quantification of tip-broadening in non-contact atomic force microscopy with carbon nanotube tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinander, Kristoffer; Jensen, Thomas N.; Simonsen, Soren B.;

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotube terminated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have been used for the imaging of 5 nm wide surface supported Pt nanoclusters by non-contact (dynamic mode) AFM in an ultra-high vacuum. The results are compared to AFM measurements done with conventional Si-tips, as well...... as with transmission electron microscopy images, which give accurate measures for cluster widths. Despite their ideal aspect ratio, tip-broadening is concluded to be a severe problem even when imaging with carbon nanotube tips, which overestimates the cluster width by several times the nominal width of the nanotube...... tip. This broadening is attributed to a bending of the carbon nanotubes, and not to pure geometrical factors, which coincidentally results in a significant improvement for relative height measurements of tightly spaced high aspect ratio structures, as compared to what can be achieved...

  2. Atomic Force and Optical Microscopy Characterization of the Deformation of Individual Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry P. Bigioni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A popular technique for characterizing the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes is to apply a one-dimension axial compression and measure its response to the compressive force. At some critical compression, a dramatic decrease in the force is observed. This has previously been attributed to Euler buckling, allowing the elastic modulus to be calculated from the Euler buckling force. We have attached individual plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs and thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs to the apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM cantilever to examine this mechanical response. By combining the force measurements and simultaneous video microscopy, we are able to observe the mechanical deformation and correlate points in the force curve with phenomena such as slipping and bending. Analysis of the mechanical response must therefore be interpreted in terms of bending and/or slipping of a tube compressed by an off-normal force.

  3. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  4. First-principles study of palladium atom adsorption on the boron- or nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Guoxiang [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062, Shaanxi (China); School of Science, Xi' an Shiyou University, Xi' an 710065, Shaanxi (China); Zhang Jianmin, E-mail: jianm_zhang@yahoo.co [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062, Shaanxi (China); Wang Doudou [Institute of Telecommunication Engineering of the Air Force Engineering University (AFEU1), Xi' an 710077, Shaanxi (China); Xu Kewei [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2009-11-15

    We have performed first-principles calculation to investigate the adsorption of a single palladium atom on the surface of the pristine and boron- or nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The results show that for the adsorption of a single palladium atom on the pristine CNT surface, the most stable site is Bridge1 site above the axial carbon-carbon bond. Either boron- or nitrogen-doped CNTs can assist palladium surface adsorption, but the detailed mechanisms are different. The enhanced palladium adsorption on boron-doped CNT is attributed to the palladium d orbital strongly hybridized with both boron p orbital and carbon p orbital. The enhancement in palladium adsorption on nitrogen-doped CNT results from activating the nitrogen-neighboring carbon atoms due to the large electron affinity of nitrogen. Furthermore, the axial bond is preferred over the zigzag bond for a palladium atom adsorbed on the surface of all three types of CNTs. The most energetically favorable site for a palladium atom adsorbed on three types of CNTs is above the axial boron-carbon bond in boron-doped CNT. The enhancement in palladium adsorption is more significant for the boron-doped CNT than it is for nitrogen-doped CNT with a similar configuration. So we conclude that accordingly, the preferred adsorption site is determined by the competition between the electron affinity of doped and adsorbed atoms and preferred degree of the axial bond over the zigzag bond.

  5. Influence of atomic vacancies on the dynamic characteristics of nanoresonators based on double walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic analysis of double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with different boundary conditions has been performed using atomistic finite element method. The double walled carbon nanotube is modeled considering it as a space frame structure similar to a three dimensional beam. The elastic properties of beam element are calculated by considering mechanical characteristics of covalent bonds between the carbon atoms in the hexagonal lattice. Spring elements are used to describe the interlayer interactions between the inner and outer tubes caused due to the van der Waals forces. The mass of each beam element is assumed as point mass at nodes coinciding with carbon atoms at inner and outer wall of DWCNT. It has been reported that atomic vacancies are formed during the manufacturing process in DWCNT which tend to migrate leading to a change in the mechanical characteristics of the same. Simulations have been carried out to visualize the behavior of such defective DWCNTs subjected to different boundary conditions and when used as mass sensing devices. The variation of such atomic vacancies in outer wall of Zigzag and Armchair DWCNT is performed along the length and the change in response is noted. Moreover, as CNTs have been used as mass sensors extensively, the present approach is focused to explore the use of zigzag and armchair DWCNT as sensing device with a mono-atomic vacancy in it. The results clearly state that the dynamic characteristics are greatly influenced by defects like vacancies in it. A higher frequency shift is observed when the vacancy is located away from the fixed end for both Armchair as well as zigzag type of CNTs. A higher frequency shift is reported for armchair CNT for a mass of 10-22 g which remains constant for 10-21 g and then decreases gradually. Comparison with the other experimental and theoretical studies exhibits good association which suggests that defective DWCNTs can further be explored for mass sensing. This investigation is helpful

  6. A comparison of carbon depletion on STS-8 with atmospheric atomic oxygen flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triolo, J. [Swales and Associates Inc., 5050 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States); Kruger, R. [Technical Services, 4740 Connecticut Ave. N. W., Washington, District of Columbia 20008 (United States); Chen, P.; Straka, S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    In the early and mid 1980s, there were a number of experiments flown aboard the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle to measure contamination accumulation and atomic oxygen erosion effects on various materials. One of these experiments was the Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP), designed and built at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The CMP was a small, easily integrated instrument which basically consisted of a box with four Temperature Controlled Quartz Crystal Microbalances (TQCMs), a tape recorder, and electronics. The CMP flew on several of the early Shuttle missions including STS-3, 8, and 11. The focus of this paper is to present the results of the CMP experiment flown on the STS-8 mission. This CMP mission was designed to measure atomic oxygen erosion of several different materials, including erosion of carbon from a TQCM. This paper presents the data and discusses the results from the STS-8 CMP experiment and seeks to establish a correlation model between predicted atomic oxygen densities and the carbon erosion rates observed during the STS-8 mission. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. The solar photospheric abundance of carbon.Analysis of atomic carbon lines with the CO5BOLD solar model

    CERN Document Server

    Caffau, E; Bonifacio, P; Faraggiana, R; Steffen, M; Freytag, B; Kamp, I; Ayres, T R

    2010-01-01

    The use of hydrodynamical simulations, the selection of atomic data, and the computation of deviations from local thermodynamical equilibrium for the analysis of the solar spectra have implied a downward revision of the solar metallicity. We are in the process of using the latest simulations computed with the CO5BOLD code to reassess the solar chemical composition. We determine the solar photospheric carbon abundance by using a radiation-hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model, and compute the departures from local thermodynamical equilibrium by using the Kiel code. We measure equivalent widths of atomic CI lines on high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio solar atlases. Deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium are computed in 1D with the Kiel code. Our recommended value for the solar carbon abundance, relies on 98 independent measurements of observed lines and is A(C)=8.50+-0.06, the quoted error is the sum of statistical and systematic error. Combined with our recent results for the solar oxygen and nitrogen...

  8. Atomic layer deposition encapsulated activated carbon electrodes for high voltage stable supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kijoo; Cho, Moonkyu; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-01-28

    Operating voltage enhancement is an effective route for high energy density supercapacitors. Unfortunately, widely used activated carbon electrode generally suffers from poor electrochemical stability over 2.5 V. Here we present atomic layer deposition (ALD) encapsulation of activated carbons for high voltage stable supercapacitors. Two-nanometer-thick Al2O3 dielectric layers are conformally coated at activated carbon surface by ALD, well-maintaining microporous morphology. Resultant electrodes exhibit excellent stability at 3 V operation with 39% energy density enhancement from 2.5 V operation. Because of the protection of surface functional groups and reduction of electrolyte degradation, 74% of initial voltage was maintained 50 h after full charge, and 88% of capacitance was retained after 5000 cycles at 70 °C accelerated test, which correspond to 31 and 17% improvements from bare activated carbon, respectively. This ALD-based surface modification offers a general method to enhance electrochemical stability of carbon materials for diverse energy and environmental applications.

  9. Characterization of carbon nanotube yarn after exposure to hyperthermal atomic oxygen and thermal fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misak, H. E.; Mall, S.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-yarn was evaluated for the survivability under hazardous space environmental conditions which were thermal fatigue, atomic oxygen and additive effect of these two exposures. Its tensile strength, tenacity, stiffness, strain to failure and electrical conductivity were characterized at the two extreme space temperatures of -150 and 120 °C before and after exposure to these environmental conditions. Tensile strength, stiffness and electrical conductivity of unexposed CNT yarn increased at the cryogenic temperature relative to at the elevated temperature. There was no change in the tensile properties after exposure to the space environmental conditions when measured at the elevated and cryogenic temperatures. Electrical conductivity decreased after exposure to three hazardous environments involving thermal fatigue, but it had no or small decrease when exposed to atomic oxygen only. No additive effect of thermal fatigue followed by atomic oxygen or by atomic oxygen followed by thermal fatigue environments on the CNTs' tensile properties and electrical conductivity was observed. Considering the low density 0.59 g/cc and good resistant to the extreme hazardous space environment, CNT-yarns have potential for applications in spacecraft and satellites.

  10. Role of atomic transverse migration in growth of diamond-like carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Tian-Bao; Hu Yuan-Zhong; Wang Hui

    2007-01-01

    The growth of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of impact angle on film structure is carefully studied, which shows that the transverse migration of the incident atoms is the main channel of film relaxation. A transverse-migration-induced film relaxation model is presented to elucidate the process of film relaxation which advances the original model of subplantation. The process of DLC film growth on a rough surface is also investigated, as well as the evolution of microstructure and surface morphology of the film. A preferential-to-homogeneous growth mode and a smoothing of the film are observed, which are due to the transverse migration of the incident atoms.

  11. Electron dynamics in the carbon atom induced by spin-orbit interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Rey, H F

    2014-01-01

    We use R-Matrix theory with Time dependence (RMT) to investigate multiphoton ionization of ground-state atomic carbon with initial orbital magnetic quantum number $M_L$=0 and $M_L$=1 at a laser wavelength of 390 nm and peak intensity of 10$^{14}$ W cm$^{-2}$. Significant differences in ionization yield and ejected-electron momentum distribution are observed between the two values for $M_L$. We use our theoretical results to model how the spin-orbit interaction affects electron emission along the laser polarization axis. Under the assumption that an initial C atom is prepared at zero time delay with $M_L=0$, the dynamics with respect to time delay of an ionizing probe pulse modelled using RMT theory is found to be in good agreement with available experimental data.

  12. Probing spin-orbit-interaction-induced electron dynamics in the carbon atom by multiphoton ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, H. F.; van der Hart, H. W.

    2014-09-01

    We use R-matrix theory with time dependence (RMT) to investigate multiphoton ionization of ground-state atomic carbon with initial orbital magnetic quantum number ML=0 and ML=1 at a laser wavelength of 390 nm and peak intensity of 1014W/cm2. Significant differences in ionization yield and ejected-electron momentum distribution are observed between the two values for ML. We use our theoretical results to model how the spin-orbit interaction affects electron emission along the laser polarization axis. Under the assumption that an initial C atom is prepared at zero time delay with ML=0, the dynamics with respect to time delay of an ionizing probe pulse modeled by using RMT theory is found to be in good agreement with available experimental data.

  13. Velocity distribution of carbon and oxygen atoms in front of a tokamak limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, P.; Rusbüldt, D.

    1992-12-01

    From the Doppler-broadened emission profiles of a CI line ( 3P 2→ 3P 20, λ=909.5 nm) and of an OI line ( 3P 2,1,0→ 3S 10, λ=844.6 nm), the velocity distribution of carbon and oxygen atoms in front of a graphite limiter has been deduced. For the π-component of the CI line, the Zeeman splitting is negligible, but for the π-components of the OI line, the Paschen-Back effect has to be taken into account. The contribution of chemical and physical sputtering to the release of impurities under various experimental conditions has been investigated at the tip of the limiter. For C atoms, chemical sputtering dominates at low boundary temperatures, and physical sputtering at high temperature. For oxygen, chemical sputtering is always indicated to be the more efficient process.

  14. Building a multi-walled carbon nanotube-based mass sensor with the atomic force microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Kuhle, A.; Marie, Rodolphe Charly Willy;

    2005-01-01

    We report an approach for building a mass sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). We propose a method with a great potential for the positioning of MWCNTs based on self-assembly onto patterned hydrophilic areas. For the experiments ultra flat mica substrates covered with gold...... are used. The gold substrate is first covered with hydrophobic thiol molecules: octadecanthiol. The octadecanthiol molecules are then selectively removed from small areas by nanoshaving the gold substrate with the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in contact mode. Hydrophilic thiols (2...

  15. NANOMECHANICAL MAPPING OF CARBON BLACK REINFORCED NATURAL RUBBER BY ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshio Nishi; Hideyuki Nukaga; So Fujinami; Ken Nakajima

    2007-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has the advantage of obtaining mechanical properties as well as topographic information at the same time. By analyzing force-distance curves measured over two-dimensional area using Hertzian contact mechanics, Young's modulus mapping was obtained with nanometer-scale resolution. Furthermore, the sample deformation by the force exerted was also estimated from the force-distance curve analyses. We could thus reconstruct a real topographic image by incorporating apparent topographic image with deformation image. We applied this method to carbon black reinforced natural rubber to obtain Young's modulus distribution image together with reconstructed real topographic image.Then we were able to recognize three regions; rubber matrix, carbon black (or bound rubber) and intermediate regions.Though the existence of these regions had been investigated by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance, this paper would be the first to report on the quantitative evaluation of the interfacial region in real space.

  16. An atomic electronegative distance vector and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of alcohols and alkanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU, Shu-Shea; XIA, Zhi-Ning; CAI, Shao-Xi; LIU, Yan

    2000-01-01

    A novel atomic electronegative distance vector (AEDV) has been developed to express the chemical environment of various chemically equivalent carbon atoms in alcohols and alkanes.Combining AEDV and γ parameter, four five-parameter Iinear relationship equations of chemical shift for four types of carbon atoms are created by using multiple linear regression.Correlation coefficients are R = 0.9887, 0.9972, 0.9978 and 0.9968 and roots of mean square error are RMS = 0.906, 0.821, 1.091and 1.091of four types of carbons, i.e., type1,2, 3, and 4 for primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary carbons, respectively. The stability and prediction capacity for external samples of four models have been tested by cross- validation.

  17. Raman spectroscopy as a tool to investigate the structure and electronic properties of carbon-atom wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Milani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures have shown potential as candidates for advanced technological applications due to the different coordination of carbon atoms and to the possibility of π-conjugation. In this context, atomic-scale wires comprised of sp-hybridized carbon atoms represent ideal 1D systems to potentially downscale devices to the atomic level. Carbon-atom wires (CAWs can be arranged in two possible structures: a sequence of double bonds (cumulenes, resulting in a 1D metal, or an alternating sequence of single–triple bonds (polyynes, expected to show semiconducting properties. The electronic and optical properties of CAWs can be finely tuned by controlling the wire length (i.e., the number of carbon atoms and the type of termination (e.g., atom, molecular group or nanostructure. Although linear, sp-hybridized carbon systems are still considered elusive and unstable materials, a number of nanostructures consisting of sp-carbon wires have been produced and characterized to date. In this short review, we present the main CAW synthesis techniques and stabilization strategies and we discuss the current status of the understanding of their structural, electronic and vibrational properties with particular attention to how these properties are related to one another. We focus on the use of vibrational spectroscopy to provide information on the structural and electronic properties of the system (e.g., determination of wire length. Moreover, by employing Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman scattering in combination with the support of first principles calculations, we show that a detailed understanding of the charge transfer between CAWs and metal nanoparticles may open the possibility to tune the electronic structure from alternating to equalized bonds.

  18. Effect of carbon and alloying solute atoms on helium behaviors in α-Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yange; You, Yu-Wei; Xu, Yichun; Liu, C. S.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-02-01

    Helium bubbles could strongly degrade the mechanical properties of ferritic steels in fission and fusion systems. The formation of helium bubble is directly affected by the interactions between helium and the compositions in steels, such as solute atoms, carbon and irradiation defects. We thereby performed systematical first-principles calculations to investigate the interactions of solute-helium and carbon-solute-helium. It is found that substitutional helium is more attractive than interstitial helium to all the considered 3p, 4p, 5p and 6p solutes. The attraction between carbon and substitutional helium suggests the carbon-solute-helium complex can be formed stably. By examining the charge density difference and thermal stability, it is found that the ternary complex shows stronger attraction with He than that of solute-helium pair for some solutes (S, Se, In, Te, Pb and Bi) and the complex could existed in iron stably at 700 K. The present theoretical results may be helpful for exploring alloy additions to mitigate the formation of large helium bubbles.

  19. Pore-Width-Dependent Preferential Interaction of sp2 Carbon Atoms in Cyclohexene with Graphitic Slit Pores by GCMC Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Kojima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of cyclohexene with two sp2 and four sp3 carbon atoms in graphitic slit pores was studied by performing grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. The molecular arrangement of the cyclohexene on the graphitic carbon wall depends on the pore width. The distribution peak of the sp2 carbon is closer to the pore wall than that of the sp3 carbon except for the pore width of 0.7 nm, even though the Lennard-Jones size of the sp2 carbon is larger than that of the sp3 carbon. Thus, the difference in the interactions of the sp2 and sp3 carbon atoms of cyclohexene with the carbon pore walls is clearly observed in this study. The preferential interaction of sp2 carbon gives rise to a slight tilting of the cyclohexene molecule against the graphitic wall. This is suggestive of a π-π interaction between the sp2 carbon in the cyclohexene molecule and graphitic carbon.

  20. Effect of elliptical deformation on molecular polarizabilities of model carbon nanotubes from atomic increments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, Francisco

    2003-08-01

    The interacting induced dipole polarization model implemented in our program POLAR is used for the calculation of the dipole-dipole polarizability alpha. The method is tested with single-wall carbon nanotube models as a function of nanotube radius and elliptical deformation. The results for polarizability follow the same trend as reference calculations performed with our version of the program PAPID. For the zigzag tubes, the polarizability is found to follow a remarkably simple law, that is, it varies as the inverse of the radius. A dramatic effect is also found with elliptical deformation. It is found that the polarizability and related properties can be modified continuously and reversibly by the external radial deformation. These results suggest an interesting technology in which mechanical deformation can control chemical properties of the carbon nanotubes. POLAR calculations differentiate more effectively than PAPID computations among single-wall nanotube models with increasing radial deformation. Different effective polarizabilities are calculated for the atoms at the highest and lowest curvature sites. POLAR calculations discriminate more efficiently than PAPID computations between the effective polarizabilities of the highest and lowest curvature sites. This remarkable and significant tunable polarizability can have important implications for metal coverage of metals on nanotubes and selective adsorption and desorption of foreign atoms and molecules on nanotubes and can lead to a wide variety of technological applications, such as catalysts, hydrogen storage, magnetic tubes, etc.

  1. 胸腔镜下胸交感干并旁路纤维切断术治疗原发性手汗症29例%Twenty-nine cases primary palmar hyperhidrosis treatment by thoracoscopic thoracic sympathetic trunk and kuntz beam cut off

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张东东; 洪丰; 江春苗

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨胸腔镜下胸交感干并旁路纤维切断术治疗原发性手汗症的疗效和预防术后并发症的措施.方法:回顾性分析29例原发性手汗症手术,对相关临床资料进行比较分析.结果:全组无手术死亡和严重并发症,术后手掌多汗症状消失,无复发病例,术后有2例出现轻度代偿性出汗,1例出现中度代偿性出汗,无重度代偿性出汗病例.结论:胸腔镜下胸交感干并旁路纤维切断术是治疗原发性手汗症安全有效的微创方法.%Aim: Explore the treatment of primary palmar hyperhidrosis efficacy and prevention of postoperative complications by thoracoscopic thoracic sympathetic trunk and kuntz beam amputation. Methods; Twenty-nine cases of primary palmar hyperhidrosis symptoms underwent surgery and clinical data were analysed. Results; No operative death and serious complications, palm hyperhidrosis symptoms disappeared postoperatively, no recurrence, 2 cases of mild compensatory sweating, 1 case of moderate compensatory sweating, no severe compensatory sweating cases. Conclusion:Thoracoscopic thoracic sympathetic trunk and kuntz beam amputation is safe and effective minimal invasive method for the treatment of primary palmar hyperhidrosis.

  2. Carbon nanotubes as solid-phase extraction sorbents prior to atomic spectrometric determination of metal species: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero Latorre, C., E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Alvarez Mendez, J.; Barciela Garcia, J.; Garcia Martin, S.; Pena Crecente, R.M. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain)

    2012-10-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of CNTs as sorbent for metal species in solid phase extraction has been described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical strategies for functionalization of carbon nanotubes have been discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Published analytical methods concerning solid phase extraction and atomic spectrometric determination have been reviewed. - Abstract: New materials have significant impact on the development of new methods and instrumentation for chemical analysis. From the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes - due to their high adsorption and desorption capacities - have been employed as sorption substrates in solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration of metal species from diverse matrices. Looking for successive improvements in sensitivity and selectivity, in the past few years, carbon nanotubes have been utilized as sorbents for solid phase extraction in three different ways: like as-grown, oxidized and functionalized nanotubes. In the present paper, an overview of the recent trends in the use of carbon nanotubes for solid phase extraction of metal species in environmental, biological and food samples is presented. The determination procedures involved the adsorption of metals on the nanotube surface, their quantitative desorption and subsequent measurement by means of atomic spectrometric techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry/mass spectrometry, among others. Synthesis, purification and types of carbon nanotubes, as well as the diverse chemical and physical strategies for their functionalization are described. Based on 140 references, the performance and general properties of the applications of solid phase extraction based on carbon nanotubes for metal species atomic spectrometric determination are discussed.

  3. Simple-Cubic Carbon Frameworks with Atomically Dispersed Iron Dopants toward High-Efficiency Oxygen Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biwei; Wang, Xinxia; Zou, Jinxiang; Yan, Yancui; Xie, Songhai; Hu, Guangzhi; Li, Yanguang; Dong, Angang

    2017-03-08

    Iron and nitrogen codoped carbons (Fe-N-C) have attracted increasingly greater attention as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Although challenging, the synthesis of Fe-N-C catalysts with highly dispersed and fully exposed active sites is of critical importance for improving the ORR activity. Here, we report a new type of graphitic Fe-N-C catalysts featuring numerous Fe single atoms anchored on a three-dimensional simple-cubic carbon framework. The Fe-N-C catalyst, derived from self-assembled Fe3O4 nanocube superlattices, was prepared by in situ ligand carbonization followed by acid etching and ammonia activation. Benefiting from its homogeneously dispersed and fully accessible active sites, highly graphitic nature, and enhanced mass transport, our Fe-N-C catalyst outperformed Pt/C and many previously reported Fe-N-C catalysts for ORR. Furthermore, when used for constructing the cathode for zinc-air batteries, our Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited current and power densities comparable to those of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst.

  4. Conformal atomic layer deposition of alumina on millimeter tall, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly L; Carroll, Murphy; Padbury, Richard; McCord, Marian; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2014-11-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to coat high aspect ratio and high surface area substrates with conformal and precisely controlled thin films. Vertically aligned arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with lengths up to 1.5 mm were conformally coated with alumina from base to tip. The nucleation and growth behaviors of Al2O3 ALD precursors on the MWCNTs were studied as a function of CNT surface chemistry. CNT surfaces were modified through a series of post-treatments including pyrolytic carbon deposition, high temperature thermal annealing, and oxygen plasma functionalization. Conformal coatings were achieved where post-treatments resulted in increased defect density as well as the extent of functionalization, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, it was determined that MWCNTs treated with pyrolytic carbon and plasma functionalization prior to ALD coating were more stable to thermal oxidation than pristine ALD coated samples. Functionalized and ALD coated arrays had a compressive modulus more than two times higher than a pristine array coated for the same number of cycles. Cross-sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that Al2O3 could be uniformly deposited through the entire thickness of the vertically aligned MWCNT array by manipulating sample orientation and mounting techniques. Following the ALD coating, the MWCNT arrays demonstrated hydrophilic wetting behavior and also exhibited foam-like recovery following compressive strain.

  5. Growth of Few-Layer Graphene on Sapphire Substrates by Directly Depositing Carbon Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Chao-Yang; TANG Jun; LIU Zhong-Liang; LI Li-Min; YAN Wen-Sheng; WEI Shi-Qiang; XU Peng-Shou

    2011-01-01

    Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber.The reflection high energy diffraction,Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample,which confirm the formation of graphene layers.The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2 nm and the layer number is about 2-3.The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated a-SiC surface.Graphene,a monolayer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms,is a quasi two-dimensional (2D) material.It has attracted great interest because of its distinctive band structure and physical properties.[1] Graphene can now be obtained by several different approaches including micromechanical[1] and chemical[2] exfoliation of graphite,epitaxial growth on hexagonal SiC substrates by Si sublimation in vacuum,[3] and CVD growth on metal substrates.[4] However,these preparation methods need special substrates,otherwise,in order to design microelectronic devices,the prepared graphene should be transferred to other appropriate substrates.Thus the growth of graphene on the suitable substrates is motivated.%Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber. The reflection high energy diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample, which confirm the formation of graphene layers. The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2nm and the layer number is about 2-3. The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated α-SiC surface.

  6. Energy of the Isolated Metastable Iron-Nickel FCC Nanocluster with a Carbon Atom in the Tetragonal Interstice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, Natalya V; Nedolya, Anatoliy V

    2017-12-01

    The energy of the isolated iron-nickel nanocluster was calculated by molecular mechanics method using Lennard-Jones potential. The cluster included a carbon atom that drifted from an inside octahedral interstice to a tetrahedral interstice in [Formula: see text] direction and after that in direction to the surface. In addition, one of 14 iron atoms was replaced by a nickel atom, the position of which was changing during simulation.The energy of the nanocluster was estimated at the different interatomic distances. As a result of simulation, the optimal interatomic distances of Fe-Ni-C nanocluster was chosen for the simulation, in which height of the potential barrier was maximal and face-centered cubic (FCC) nanocluster was the most stable.It is shown that there were three main positions of a nickel atom that significantly affected nanocluster's energy.The calculation results indicated that position of the carbon atom in the octahedral interstice was more energetically favorable than tetrahedral interstice in the case of FCC nanocluster. On the other side, the potential barrier was smaller in the direction [Formula: see text] than in the direction .This indicates that there are two ways for carbon atom to drift to the surface of the nanocluster.

  7. Dispersion C3 coefficients for the alkali-metal atoms interacting with a graphene layer and with a carbon nanotube

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B K

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate separation dependent van der Waal dispersion ($C_3$) coefficients for the interactions of the Li, Na, K and Rb alkali atoms with a graphene layer and with a single walled carbon nanotube (CNT) using the hydrodynamic and Dirac models. The results from both the models are evaluated using accurate values of the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atoms. Accountability of these accurate values of dynamical polarizabilities of the alkali atoms in determination of the above $C_3$ coefficients are accentuated by comparing them with the coefficients evaluated using the dynamic dipole polarizabilities estimated from the single oscillator approximation which are typically employed in the earlier calculations. For practical description of the atom-surface interaction potentials the radial dependent $C_3$ coefficients are given for a wide range of separation distances between the ground states of the considered atoms and the wall surfaces and also for different values of nanotube radii. The coefficients for...

  8. Numerical investigation on the influence of atomic defects on the tensile and torsional behavior of hetero-junction carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghavamian, Ali, E-mail: alighavamian@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Andriyana, Andri, E-mail: andri.andriyana@um.edu.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chin, Ang Bee, E-mail: amelynang@um.edu.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Öchsner, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.oechsner@gmail.com [Griffith School of Engineering, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Southport, 4222 (Australia)

    2015-08-15

    The finite element method was employed for the numerical simulation of hetero-junction carbon nanotubes with all possible connection types and their corresponding fundamental homogeneous tubes. Then, atomically defective hetero-junction carbon nanotubes were modeled by introducing silicon impurities and vacant sites into their structures. Finally, the elastic and shear moduli of all the models were evaluated under tensile and torsional loads, based on the assumption of linear-elastic deformation of these nanomaterials. The results showed that armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes have the highest Young's and shear moduli respectively, among homogeneous carbon nanotubes. The mechanical tests on the hetero-junction carbon nanotubes revealed that these nanotube types have lower moduli when compared to their fundamental tubes. It was clearly observed that armchair–armchair and zigzag–zigzag hetero-junction carbon nanotubes have the highest Young's modulus among the hetero-junction carbon nanotubes while the shear modulus peaks were seen in zigzag-zigzag models. On the other hand, the lowest values for the Young's and shear moduli of hetero-junction carbon nanotubes were obtained for the models with armchair-zigzag kinks. It was also discovered that the atomic defects in the structure of hetero-junction carbon nanotubes lead to a decrease in their Young's and shear moduli which seems to follow a linear trend and could be expressed by a mathematical relation in terms of the amount of the atomic defect in their structures which could be used for the prediction of the tensile and torsional strength of the atomically defective hetero-junction carbon nanotubes for their proper selection and applications in nanoindustry. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Hetero-junction and homogeneous carbon nanotubes are numerically simulated. • Two atomic defects i.e. Si-doping and carbon vacancy are introduced to the models. • Influence of

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotubes coated with ZnO by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Partha P.; Gilshteyn, Evgenia; Jiang, Hua; Timmermans, Marina; Kaskela, Antti; Tolochko, Oleg V.; Kurochkin, Alexey V.; Karppinen, Maarit; Nisula, Mikko; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Nasibulin, Albert G.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of ZnO deposition on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the help of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was successfully demonstrated. The utilization of pristine SWCNTs as a support resulted in a non-uniform deposition of ZnO in the form of nanoparticles. To achieve uniform ZnO coating, the SWCNTs first needed to be functionalized by treating the samples in a controlled ozone atmosphere. The uniformly ZnO coated SWCNTs were used to fabricate UV sensing devices. An UV irradiation of the ZnO coated samples turned them from hydrophobic to hydrophilic behaviour. Furthermore, thin films of the ZnO coated SWCNTs allowed us switch p-type field effect transistors made of pristine SWCNTs to have ambipolar characteristics.

  10. Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at the carbon atom wire modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Kuanhong [Chemistry Department, Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Bio-medical Function Materials, 122 NingHai Road, Nanjing, JiangSu 210097 (China)], E-mail: khxue@njnu.edu.cn; Liu Jiamei [Chemistry Department, Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Bio-medical Function Materials, 122 NingHai Road, Nanjing, JiangSu 210097 (China); Wei Ribing [Chemistry Department, Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Bio-medical Function Materials, 122 NingHai Road, Nanjing, JiangSu 210097 (China); Chen Shaopeng [Chemistry Department, Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Bio-medical Function Materials, 122 NingHai Road, Nanjing, JiangSu 210097 (China)

    2006-09-11

    Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at an electrode modified by carbon atom wires (CAWs), a new material, was investigated by cyclic voltammetry combined with UV-vis spectrometry, and forced convection method. As to the electrochemical response of redox of adrenaline/adrenalinequinone couple in 0.50 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, at a nitric acid treated CAW modified electrode, the anodic and cathodic peak potentials E {sub pa} and E {sub pc} shifted by 87 mV negatively and 139 mV in the positive direction, respectively, and standard heterogeneous rate constant k {sup 0} increased by 16 times compared to the corresponding bare electrode, indicating the extraordinary activity of CAWs in electrocatalysis for the process.

  11. Single ionization of helium atoms by energetic fully stripped carbon ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ebrahim Ghanbari-Adivi; Sadjad Eskandari

    2015-01-01

    A four-body distorted wave approximation is presented for theoretical investigations of the single ionization of ground-state helium atoms by fully stripped carbon ions at impact energies of 2 MeV/amu and 100 MeV/amu. The nine-dimensional integrals for the partial quantum-mechanical transition amplitudes of the specified reaction are reduced to some analytical expressions or one-dimensional integrals over real variables. Fully differential cross sections (FDCSs) are calculated and compared with their experimental values as well as the results obtained from other theories. Despite the simplicity and quickness of the proposed quadrature, the comparison shows that the obtained results are in reasonable agreement with the experiment and are compatible with those of other complicated theories.

  12. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Nuri; Chawla, Vipin; Edwards, Eve; Wood, Vanessa; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD). Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  13. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Yazdani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD. Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  14. Fragmentation of neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision; Fragmentation d'agregats de carbone neutres formes par collision atomique a haute vitesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinet, G

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the fragmentation of small neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision on atomic gas. In this experiment, the main way of deexcitation of neutral clusters formed by electron capture with ionic species is the fragmentation. To measure the channels of fragmentation, a new detection tool based on shape analysis of current pulse delivered by semiconductor detectors has been developed. For the first time, all branching ratios of neutral carbon clusters are measured in an unambiguous way for clusters size up to 10 atoms. The measurements have been compared to a statistical model in microcanonical ensemble (Microcanonical Metropolis Monte Carlo). In this model, various structural properties of carbon clusters are required. These data have been calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT-B3LYP) to find the geometries of the clusters and then with Coupled Clusters (CCSD(T)) formalism to obtain dissociation energies and other quantities needed to compute fragmentation calculations. The experimental branching ratios have been compared to the fragmentation model which has allowed to find an energy distribution deposited in the collision. Finally, specific cluster effect has been found namely a large population of excited states. This behaviour is completely different of the atomic carbon case for which the electron capture in the ground states predominates. (author)

  15. Influence of Helium Atoms Absorption on the Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaev, S. M.; Levchenko, A. A.; Kolesnikov, N. N.; Filatov, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the emission properties of charge sources based on carbon nanotubes prepared by arc discharge deposition of nanotubes onto a flat copper substrate (Borisenko et al. in Instrum Exp Tech 57(6):755, 2014; Low Temp Phys 41(7):567, 2015). The charge sources were submerged into superfluid helium at temperature T=1.3 K. The collector fixed above the charge source at a distance of 0.3 mm was connected to an electrometer. The current of charges was measured by the electrometer when a high voltage was applied to the charge source. In the originally prepared source, the emission of charges (electrons) on the level of 10^{-10}A is observed at a negative voltage above U=80 V and increases with increasing voltage. If the source of charge was kept in liquid helium for 15 h, the current-voltage characteristic changed significantly. The current of charges on the same level of 10^{-10} A was registered at a voltage of U=150 V. Extraction of gases from the source placed in a vacuum chamber at room temperature for 48 h leads to the complete recovery of the emission properties. One can assume that the degradation of the emission properties of the sources is associated with the adsorption of helium atoms by carbon nanotubes at low temperatures. We did not observe any degradation of the emission properties of the charge sources in the case of positive charges injection into superfluid helium.

  16. Boosting the local anodic oxidation of silicon through carbon nanofiber atomic force microscopy probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Rius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many nanofabrication methods based on scanning probe microscopy have been developed during the last decades. Local anodic oxidation (LAO is one of such methods: Upon application of an electric field between tip and surface under ambient conditions, oxide patterning with nanometer-scale resolution can be performed with good control of dimensions and placement. LAO through the non-contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM has proven to yield a better resolution and tip preservation than the contact mode and it can be effectively performed in the dynamic mode of AFM. The tip plays a crucial role for the LAO-AFM, because it regulates the minimum feature size and the electric field. For instance, the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT-functionalized tips showed great promise for LAO-AFM, yet, the fabrication of CNT tips presents difficulties. Here, we explore the use of a carbon nanofiber (CNF as the tip apex of AFM probes for the application of LAO on silicon substrates in the AFM amplitude modulation dynamic mode of operation. We show the good performance of CNF-AFM probes in terms of resolution and reproducibility, as well as demonstration that the CNF apex provides enhanced conditions in terms of field-induced, chemical process efficiency.

  17. Boosting the local anodic oxidation of silicon through carbon nanofiber atomic force microscopy probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Gemma; Lorenzoni, Matteo; Matsui, Soichiro; Tanemura, Masaki; Perez-Murano, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Many nanofabrication methods based on scanning probe microscopy have been developed during the last decades. Local anodic oxidation (LAO) is one of such methods: Upon application of an electric field between tip and surface under ambient conditions, oxide patterning with nanometer-scale resolution can be performed with good control of dimensions and placement. LAO through the non-contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven to yield a better resolution and tip preservation than the contact mode and it can be effectively performed in the dynamic mode of AFM. The tip plays a crucial role for the LAO-AFM, because it regulates the minimum feature size and the electric field. For instance, the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT)-functionalized tips showed great promise for LAO-AFM, yet, the fabrication of CNT tips presents difficulties. Here, we explore the use of a carbon nanofiber (CNF) as the tip apex of AFM probes for the application of LAO on silicon substrates in the AFM amplitude modulation dynamic mode of operation. We show the good performance of CNF-AFM probes in terms of resolution and reproducibility, as well as demonstration that the CNF apex provides enhanced conditions in terms of field-induced, chemical process efficiency.

  18. Prismatic modifications of single-walled carbon nanotubes and their electronic properties: Regular adsorption of fluorine atoms on graphene surfaces of nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilin, O. B.; Stankevich, I. V.; Muryumin, E. E.; Lesin, S. A.; Syrkina, N. P.

    2011-01-01

    The regular adsorption of fluorine atoms on surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotubes along their axes can lead to a modification of cylindrical carbon cores of these single-walled carbon nanotubes to carbon cores that have a nearly prismatic shape (prismatic modification). In faces of these modified single-walled carbon nanotubes, there can arise quasi-one-dimensional isolated carbon conjugated subsystems (tracks) with different structures. It has been established that the main characteristics of the single-walled carbon nanotubes thus modified are rather close to the corresponding characteristics of the related isostructural polymer conjugated systems (such as cis-polyenes, polyphenylenes, poly(periacenes), or polyphenantrenes). Fragments of model nanotubes of the ( n, n) and ( n, 0) types that contain up to 360 carbon atoms and their derivatives doped with fluorine atoms have been calculated using the semiempirical parametric method 3.

  19. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer to carbon atoms: nonadiabatic surface-hopping dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shu-Hua; Xie, Bin-Bin; Fang, Qiu; Cui, Ganglong; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-21

    Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) between two highly electronegative atoms, for example, oxygen and nitrogen, has been intensely studied experimentally and computationally, whereas there has been much less theoretical work on ESIPT to other atoms such as carbon. We have employed CASSCF, MS-CASPT2, RI-ADC(2), OM2/MRCI, DFT, and TDDFT methods to study the mechanistic photochemistry of 2-phenylphenol, for which such an ESIPT has been observed experimentally. According to static electronic structure calculations, irradiation of 2-phenylphenol populates the bright S1 state, which has a rather flat potential in the Franck-Condon region (with a shallow enol minimum at the CASSCF level) and may undergo an essentially barrierless ESIPT to the more stable S1 keto species. There are two S1/S0 conical intersections that mediate relaxation to the ground state, one in the enol region and one in the keto region, with the latter one substantially lower in energy. After S1 → S0 internal conversion, the transient keto species can return back to the S0 enol structure via reverse ground-state hydrogen transfer in a facile tautomerization. This mechanistic scenario is verified by OM2/MRCI-based fewest-switches surface-hopping simulations that provide detailed dynamic information. In these trajectories, ESIPT is complete within 118 fs; the corresponding S1 excited-state lifetime is computed to be 373 fs in vacuum. Most of the trajectories decay to the ground state via the S1/S0 conical intersection in the keto region (67%), and the remaining ones via the enol region (33%). The combination of static electronic structure computations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations is expected to be generally useful for understanding the mechanistic photophysics and photochemistry of molecules with intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

  20. Mechanism and model of atomic hydrogen cleaning for different types of carbon contamination on extreme ultraviolet multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130033 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Lu, Qipeng, E-mail: Luqipeng51@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130033 (China); Gong, Xuepeng [State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130033 (China)

    2016-08-01

    The use of atomic hydrogen to clean carbon contaminants on multilayers in extreme ultraviolet lithography systems has been extensively investigated. Additional knowledge of the cleaning rate would not only provide a better understanding of the reaction mechanism but would also inform the industry's cleaning process. In this paper, which focuses on the atomic-hydrogen-based carbon contamination cleaning process, a possible mechanism for the associated reactions is studied and a cleaning model is established. The calculated results are in good agreement with the existing experimental data in the literature. The influences of the main factors – such as activation energy and types of contamination – on the cleaning rate are addressed by the model. The model shows that the cleaning rate depends on the type of carbon contamination. The rate for a polymer-like carbon layer is higher than the rate for graphitic and diamond-like carbon layers. At 340 K, the rate for a polymer-like carbon layer is 10 times higher than for graphitic carbon layers. This model could be used effectively to predict and evaluate the cleaning rates for various carbon contamination types. - Highlights: • Mechanism of H{sup 0} cleaning with C contamination on EUV multilayers is given. • Reflectivity of multilayers rely on various types of C contamination is analyzed. • A model of H{sup 0} cleaning various types of C contamination layers is built. • Accurate predicting and evaluating the rate of H{sup 0} cleaning by the mode is proved. • It would be beneficial for improving H{sup 0} cleaning process of carbon layers.

  1. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). About 1,240 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1901 through 2000 for CO{sub 2}. Finally, author's comments for CO{sub 2} electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  2. Atomically precise understanding of nanofluids: nanodiamonds and carbon nanotubes in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Fileti, Eudes Eterno

    2016-09-29

    A nanofluid (NF) is composed of a base liquid and suspended nanoparticles (NPs). High-performance NFs exhibit significantly better heat conductivities, as compared to their base liquids. In the present work, we applied all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize diffusive and ballistic energy transfer mechanisms within nanodiamonds (NDs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and N-butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid (IL). We showed that heat transfer within both NDs and CNTs is orders of magnitude faster than that in the surrounding IL, whereas diffusion of all particles in the considered NF is similar. Intramolecular heat transfer in NPs is a key factor determining the difference of NFs from base liquids. Solvation free energy of NDs and CNTs in ILs was estimated from MD simulations. The geometric dimensions of NPs were shown to be a major source of entropic penalty. Temperature adjusts the entropic factor substantially by modifying a genuine local structure of the bulk base liquid. Our work contributes to engineering more stable and productive suspensions of NPs in ILs, which are necessary for essential progress in the field of NFs.

  3. Atomic carbon as a tracer of molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies: perspectives for ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Tomassetti, Matteo; Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Ludlow, Aaron D; Papadopoulos, Padelis P

    2014-01-01

    We use a high-resolution simulation that tracks the non-equilibrium abundance of molecular hydrogen, H2, within a massive high-redshift galaxy to produce mock ALMA maps of the fine-structure lines of atomic carbon CI 1-0 and CI 2-1. Inspired by recent observational and theoretical work, we assume that CI is thoroughly mixed in giant molecular clouds and demonstrate that its emission is an excellent proxy for H2. The entire H2 mass of a galaxy at redshift z<4 can be detected using a compact interferometric configuration with a large synthesized beam (that does not resolve the target galaxy) in less than 1 hour of integration time. Low-resolution imaging of the CI lines (in which the target galaxy is resolved into 3-4 beams) will detect nearly 50-60 per cent of the molecular hydrogen in less than 12 hours. In this case, the data cube also provides valuable information regarding the dynamical state of the galaxy. We conclude that ALMA observations of the CI 1-0 and 2-1 emission will widely extend the interval...

  4. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  5. A vortex line for K-shell ionization of a carbon atom by electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, S. J.; Macek, J. H.

    2014-10-01

    We obtained using the Coulomb-Born approximation a deep minimum in the TDCS for K-shell ionization of a carbon atom by electron impact for the electron ejected in the scattering plane. The minimum is obtained for the kinematics of the energy of incident electron Ei = 1801.2 eV, the scattering angle θf = 4°, the energy of the ejected electron Ek = 5 . 5 eV, and the angle for the ejected electron θk = 239°. This minimum is due to a vortex in the velocity field. At the position of the vortex, the nodal lines of Re [ T ] and Im [ T ] intersect. We decomposed the CB1 T-matrix into its multipole components for the kinematics of a vortex, taking the z'-axis parallel to the direction of the momentum transfer vector. The m = +/- 1 dipole components are necessary to obtain a vortex. We also considered the electron to be ejected out of the scattering plane and obtained the positions of the vortex for different values of the y-component of momentum of the ejected electron, ky. We constructed the vortex line for the kinematics of Ei = 1801.2 eV and θf = 4°. S.J.W. and J.H.M. acknowledge support from NSF under Grant No. PHYS- 0968638 and from D.O.E. under Grant Number DE-FG02-02ER15283, respectively.

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy of DNA-wrapped Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Takuya; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated hybrids of DNA and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous solution and in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Although intensive AFM observations of these hybrids were previously carried out for samples in air, this is the first report on AFM observations of these hybrids in solution. As expected, diameters of DNA-SWNT hybrids dramatically increased in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TE) buffer solution. The data suggest that DNA molecules maintain their structures even on the SWNT surfaces. Furthermore, we simultaneously observed single DNA-SWNT hybrids using three different AFM modes in air and in the TE buffer solution. Height value of the hybrids was largest in the solution, and lowest for the mode that repulsive force is expected in air. For the bare SWNT molecules, height differences among the three AFM modes were much lower than those of the DNA-SWNT hybrids. DNA molecules adsorbed on SWNT surfaces flexibly changed their morphology as well as DNA molecules on flat surfaces such as mica. This is hopeful results for biological applications of DNA-SWNT hybrids. In addition, our results revealed the importance of the single-molecule approach to evaluate DNA structures on SWNT surfaces.

  7. Quantitative Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leendert G J; de With, Gijsbertus

    2016-08-03

    Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) is a valuable technique for correlating the electrical properties of a material with its topographic features and for identifying and characterizing conductive pathways in polymer composites. However, aspects such as compatibility between tip material and sample, contact force and area between the tip and the sample, tip degradation and environmental conditions render quantifying the results quite challenging. This study aims at finding the suitable conditions for C-AFM to generate reliable, reproducible, and quantitative current maps that can be used to calculate the resistance in each point of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network, nonimpregnated as well as impregnated with a polymer. The results obtained emphasize the technique's limitation at the macroscale as the resistance of these highly conductive samples cannot be distinguished from the tip-sample contact resistance. Quantitative C-AFM measurements on thin composite sections of 150-350 nm enable the separation of sample and tip-sample contact resistance, but also indicate that these sections are not representative for the overall SWCNT network. Nevertheless, the technique was successfully used to characterize the local electrical properties of the composite material, such as sample homogeneity and resistance range of individual SWCNT clusters, at the nano- and microscale.

  8. Controlled manipulation of flexible carbon nanotubes through shape-dependent pushing by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung-Cheol; Qian, Xiaoping

    2013-09-17

    A systematic approach to manipulating flexible carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been developed on the basis of atomic force microscope (AFM) based pushing. Pushing CNTs enables efficient transport and precise location of individual CNTs. A key issue for pushing CNTs is preventing defective distortion in repetitive bending and unbending deformation. The approach presented here controls lateral movement of an AFM tip to bend CNTs without permanent distortion. The approach investigates possible defects caused by tensile strain of the outer tube under uniform bending and radial distortion by kinking. Using the continuum beam model and experimental bending tests, dependency of maximum bending strain on the length of bent CNTs and radial distortion on bending angles at a bent point have been demonstrated. Individual CNTs are manipulated by limiting the length of bent CNTs and the bending angle. In our approach, multiwalled CNTs with 5-15 nm diameter subjected to bending deformation produce no outer tube breakage under uniform bending and reversible radial deformation with bending angles less than 110°. The lateral tip movement is determined by a simple geometric model that relies on the shape of multiwalled CNTs. The model effectively controls deforming CNT length and bending angle for given CNT shape. Experimental results demonstrate successful manipulation of randomly dispersed CNTs without visual defects. This approach to pushing can be extended to develop a wide range of CNT based nanodevice applications.

  9. Sub-5 nm nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition using a carbon nanotube template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Hyo; Kim, Ji Weon; Lee, Seung-Mo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Shim, Joon Hyung; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanostructures having diameters of sub-5 nm is very a important issue for bottom-up nanofabrication of nanoscale devices. In this work, we report a highly controllable method to create sub-5 nm nano-trenches and nanowires by combining area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as templates. Alumina nano-trenches having a depth of 2.6 ∼ 3.0 nm and SiO2 nano-trenches having a depth of 1.9 ∼ 2.2 nm fully guided by the SWNTs have been formed on SiO2/Si substrate. Through infilling ZnO material by ALD in alumina nano-trenches, well-defined ZnO nanowires having a thickness of 3.1 ∼ 3.3 nm have been fabricated. In order to improve the electrical properties of ZnO nanowires, as-fabricated ZnO nanowires by ALD were annealed at 350 °C in air for 60 min. As a result, we successfully demonstrated that as-synthesized ZnO nanowire using a specific template can be made for various high-density resistive components in the nanoelectronics industry.

  10. Synthesis of porous carbon supported palladium nanoparticle catalysts by atomic layer deposition: application for rechargeable lithium-O2 battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Lu, Jun; Luo, Xiangyi; Wu, Tianpin; Du, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Ren, Yang; Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean J; Miller, Jeffrey T; Sun, Yang-Kook; Elam, Jeffrey W; Amine, Khalil

    2013-09-11

    In this study, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit nanostructured palladium on porous carbon as the cathode material for Li-O2 cells. Scanning transmission electron microscopy showed discrete crystalline nanoparticles decorating the surface of the porous carbon support, where the size could be controlled in the range of 2-8 nm and depended on the number of Pd ALD cycles performed. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Pd K-edge revealed that the carbon supported Pd existed in a mixed phase of metallic palladium and palladium oxide. The conformality of ALD allowed us to uniformly disperse the Pd catalyst onto the carbon support while preserving the initial porous structure. As a result, the charging and discharging performance of the oxygen cathode in a Li-O2 cell was improved. Our results suggest that ALD is a promising technique for tailoring the surface composition and structure of nanoporous supports in energy storage devices.

  11. A journey from order to disorder - atom by atom transformation from graphene to a 2D carbon glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Franz R; Kotakoski, Jani; Kaiser, Ute; Meyer, Jannik C

    2014-02-11

    One of the most interesting questions in solid state theory is the structure of glass, which has eluded researchers since the early 1900's. Since then, two competing models, the random network theory and the crystallite theory, have both gathered experimental support. Here, we present a direct, atomic-level structural analysis during a crystal-to-glass transformation, including all intermediate stages. We introduce disorder on a 2D crystal, graphene, gradually, utilizing the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope, which allows us to capture the atomic structure at each step. The change from a crystal to a glass happens suddenly, and at a surprisingly early stage. Right after the transition, the disorder manifests as a vitreous network separating individual crystallites, similar to the modern version of the crystallite theory. However, upon increasing disorder, the vitreous areas grow on the expense of the crystallites and the structure turns into a random network. Thereby, our results show that, at least in the case of a 2D structure, both of the models can be correct, and can even describe the same material at different degrees of disorder.

  12. Atomic-scale wear of amorphous hydrogenated carbon during intermittent contact: a combined study using experiment, simulation, and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdat, Vahid; Ryan, Kathleen E; Keating, Pamela L; Jiang, Yijie; Adiga, Shashishekar P; Schall, J David; Turner, Kevin T; Harrison, Judith A; Carpick, Robert W

    2014-07-22

    In this study, we explore the wear behavior of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM, an intermittent-contact AFM mode) tips coated with a common type of diamond-like carbon, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), when scanned against an ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) sample both experimentally and through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Finite element analysis is utilized in a unique way to create a representative geometry of the tip to be simulated in MD. To conduct consistent and quantitative experiments, we apply a protocol that involves determining the tip-sample interaction geometry, calculating the tip-sample force and normal contact stress over the course of the wear test, and precisely quantifying the wear volume using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The results reveal gradual wear of a-C:H with no sign of fracture or plastic deformation. The wear rate of a-C:H is consistent with a reaction-rate-based wear theory, which predicts an exponential dependence of the rate of atom removal on the average normal contact stress. From this, kinetic parameters governing the wear process are estimated. MD simulations of an a-C:H tip, whose radius is comparable to the tip radii used in experiments, making contact with a UNCD sample multiple times exhibit an atomic-level removal process. The atomistic wear events observed in the simulations are correlated with under-coordinated atomic species at the contacting surfaces.

  13. Computational insights into the effect of carbon structures at the atomic level for non-aqueous sodium-oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H. R.; Wu, M. C.; Zhou, X. L.; Yan, X. H.; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-09-01

    Carbon materials have been widely used to form air cathodes for non-aqueous sodium-oxygen (Nasbnd O2) batteries due to their large specific surface area, high conductivity and low cost. However, the effect of carbon structures at the atomic level remains poorly understood. In this work, a first-principles study is conducted to investigate how representative carbon structures, including graphite (0001) surface, point defects and fractured edge, influence the discharge and charge processes of non-aqueous Nasbnd O2 batteries. It is found that the single vacancy (SV) defect has the largest adsorption energy (5.81 eV) to NaO2 molecule among the structures studied, even larger than that of the NaO2 molecule on NaO2 crystal (2.81 eV). Such high adsorption energy is attributed to two factors: the dangling atoms in SV defects decrease the distance from NaO2 molecules, and the attachment through oxygen atoms increases the electrons transfer. The findings suggest that SV defects can act as the nucleation sites for NaO2 in the discharge process, and increasing the number of SV defects can facilitate the uniform formation of small-sized particles. The uniformly distributed discharge products lower the possibility for pore clogging, leading to an increased discharge capacity and improved cyclability for non-aqueous Nasbnd O2 batteries.

  14. Structural modifications of graphyne layers consisting of carbon atoms in the sp- and sp{sup 2}-hybridized states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belenkov, E. A., E-mail: belenkov@csu.ru [Chelyabinsk State University (Russian Federation); Mavrinskii, V. V. [Nosov Magnitogorsk State Technical University (Russian Federation); Belenkova, T. E.; Chernov, V. M. [Chelyabinsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    A model scheme is proposed for obtaining layered compounds consisting of carbon atoms in the sp- and (vnsp){sup 2}-hybridized states. This model is used to find the possibility of existing the following seven basic structural modifications of graphyne: α-, β1-, β2-, β3-, γ1-, γ2-, and γ3-graphyne. Polymorphic modifications β3 graphyne and γ3 graphyne are described. The basic structural modifications of graphyne contain diatomic polyyne chains and consist only of carbon atoms in two different crystallographically equivalent states. Other nonbasic structural modifications of graphyne can be formed via the elongation of the carbyne chains that connect three-coordinated carbon atoms and via the formation of graphyne layers with a mixed structure consisting of basic layer fragments, such as α-β-graphyne, α-γ-graphyne, and β-γ-graphyne. The semiempirical quantum-mechanical MNDO, AM1, and PM3 methods and ab initio STO6-31G basis calculations are used to find geometrically optimized structures of the basic graphyne layers, their structural parameters, and energies of their sublimation. The energy of sublimation is found to be maximal for γ2-graphyne, which should be the most stable structural modification of graphyne.

  15. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G; Orji, Ndubuisi G; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  16. Probing the role of an atomically thin SiNx interlayer on the structure of ultrathin carbon films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Rismani-Yazdi, Ehsan; Yeo, Reuben J; Goohpattader, Partho S; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Srinivasan, Narasimhan; Druz, Boris; Tripathy, S; Bhatia, C S

    2014-05-21

    Filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) processed carbon films are being considered as a promising protective media overcoat material for future hard disk drives (HDDs). However, at ultrathin film levels, FCVA-deposited carbon films show a dramatic change in their structure in terms of loss of sp3 bonding, density, wear resistance etc., compared to their bulk counterpart. We report for the first time how an atomically thin (0.4 nm) silicon nitride (SiNx) interlayer helps in maintaining/improving the sp3 carbon bonding, enhancing interfacial strength/bonding, improving oxidation/corrosion resistance, and strengthening the tribological properties of FCVA-deposited carbon films, even at ultrathin levels (1.2 nm). We propose the role of the SiNx interlayer in preventing the catalytic activity of Co and Pt in media, leading to enhanced sp3C bonding (relative enhancement~40%). These findings are extremely important in view of the atomic level understanding of structural modification and the development of high density HDDs.

  17. Voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed atom probe tomography of a multiphase high-strength low-carbon steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Michael D; Seidman, David N

    2011-12-01

    The differences in artifacts associated with voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed (wavelength = 532 or 355 nm) atom-probe tomographic (APT) analyses of nanoscale precipitation in a high-strength low-carbon steel are assessed using a local-electrode atom-probe tomograph. It is found that the interfacial width of nanoscale Cu precipitates increases with increasing specimen apex temperatures induced by higher laser pulse energies (0.6-2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm). This effect is probably due to surface diffusion of Cu atoms. Increasing the specimen apex temperature by using pulse energies up to 2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm is also found to increase the severity of the local magnification effect for nanoscale M2C metal carbide precipitates, which is indicated by a decrease of the local atomic density inside the carbides from 68 ± 6 nm(-3) (voltage pulsing) to as small as 3.5 ± 0.8 nm(-3). Methods are proposed to solve these problems based on comparisons with the results obtained from voltage-pulsed APT experiments. Essentially, application of the Cu precipitate compositions and local atomic density of M2C metal carbide precipitates measured by voltage-pulsed APT to 532 or 355 nm wavelength laser-pulsed data permits correct quantification of precipitation.

  18. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CARBON NANOTUBE PROBE AND CONVENTIONAL ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY PROBE ON SURFACE ROUGHNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinghe; WANG Hongxiang; XU Zongwei; DONG Shen; WANG Shiqian; ZHANG Huali

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, three different tips are employed, i.e., the carbon nanotube tip, monocrystalline silicon tip and silicon nitride tip. Resorting to atomic force microscope (AFM), they are used for measuring the surface roughness of indium tin oxide (ITO) film and the immunoglobulin G (IgG) proteins within the scanning area of 10 μm×10 μm and 0.5 μm×0.5 μm, respectively. Subsequently, the scanned surface of the ITO film and IgG proteins are analyzed by using fractal dimension. The results show that the fractal dimension measured by carbon nanotube tip is biggest with the highest frequency components and the most microscopic information. Therefore, the carbon nanotube tip is the ideal measuring tool for measuring super-smooth surface, which will play a more and more important role in the high-resolution imaging field.

  19. Erosion of Carbon-based spacecraft structures in LEO by Atomic Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is constantly generated on the topside of the atmosphere by ionizing radiation. The ionizing solar radiation, UV and particles, will on impact dissociate molecular oxygen to atomic oxygen. However, due to the ratio between the UV and the particle flux from the sun, and due to compar...

  20. Erosion of Carbon-based spacecraft structures in LEO by Atomic Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is constantly generated on the topside of the atmosphere by ionizing radiation. The ionizing solar radiation, UV and particles, will on impact dissociate molecular oxygen to atomic oxygen. However, due to the ratio between the UV and the particle flux from the sun, and due to compar...

  1. Carbon nanotubes randomly decorated with gold clusters: from nano{sup 2}hybrid atomic structures to gas sensing prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlier, J-C; Zanolli, Z [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux (PCPM), European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), Universite Catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Arnaud, L; Avilov, I V; Felten, A; Pireaux, J-J [Centre de Recherche en Physique de la Matiere et du Rayonnement (PMR-LISE), Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Delgado, M [Sensotran, s.l., Avenida Remolar 31, E-08820 El Prat de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Demoisson, F; Reniers, F [Service de Chimie Analytique et Chimie des Interfaces (CHANI), Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Faculte des Sciences, CP255, Boulevard du Triomphe 2, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Espinosa, E H; Ionescu, R; Leghrib, R; Llobet, E [Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avenida Paisos Catalans 26, E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ewels, C P; Suarez-Martinez, I [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universite de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssiniere-BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Guillot, J; Mansour, A; Migeon, H-N [Departement Science et Analyse des Materiaux, Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, rue du Brill 41, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Watson, G E, E-mail: jean-jacques.pireaux@fundp.ac.b [Vega Science Trust, Unit 118, Science Park SQ, Brighton, BN1 9SB (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-16

    Carbon nanotube surfaces, activated and randomly decorated with metal nanoclusters, have been studied in uniquely combined theoretical and experimental approaches as prototypes for molecular recognition. The key concept is to shape metallic clusters that donate or accept a fractional charge upon adsorption of a target molecule, and modify the electron transport in the nanotube. The present work focuses on a simple system, carbon nanotubes with gold clusters. The nature of the gold-nanotube interaction is studied using first-principles techniques. The numerical simulations predict the binding and diffusion energies of gold atoms at the tube surface, including realistic atomic models for defects potentially present at the nanotube surface. The atomic structure of the gold nanoclusters and their effect on the intrinsic electronic quantum transport properties of the nanotube are also predicted. Experimentally, multi-wall CNTs are decorated with gold clusters using (1) vacuum evaporation, after activation with an RF oxygen plasma and (2) colloid solution injected into an RF atmospheric plasma; the hybrid systems are accurately characterized using XPS and TEM techniques. The response of gas sensors based on these nano{sup 2}hybrids is quantified for the detection of toxic species like NO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  2. The solar photospheric abundance of carbon. Analysis of atomic carbon lines with the CO5BOLD solar model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Bonifacio, P.; Faraggiana, R.; Steffen, M.; Freytag, B.; Kamp, I.; Ayres, T. R.

    2010-01-01

    Context. The analysis of the solar spectra using hydrodynamical simulations, with a specific selection of lines, atomic data, and method for computing deviations from local thermodynamical equilibrium, has led to a downward revision of the solar metallicity, Z. We are using the latest simulations co

  3. a Proposal for a General Method for Determining Semi-Experimental Equilibrium Structures of Carbon Atom Backbones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Norman C.

    2010-06-01

    Semi-experimental equilibrium structures are determined from ground state rotational constants derived from the analysis of rotational transitions in high-resolution spectra and from the quantum chemical calculation of spectroscopic alphas. In the full application of this method, spectra of numerous isotopic species must be investigated. Most of these isotopic species require specialized synthesis. We now propose focusing on the carbon atoms, for which microwave spectroscopy routinely yields spectra for polar molecules with 13C substitution in natural abundance. Needed spectroscopic alphas can be computed with Gaussian software. Application of the Kraitchman substitution relationships gives Cartesian coordinates for the carbon atoms and thence bond parameters for the carbon backbone. This method will be evaluated with ethylene, 1,1-difluoroethylene, 1,1-difluorocyclopropane, propene, and butadiene. The method will then be applied to cis-hexatriene and the two conformers of glycidol. R. D. Suenram, B. H. Pate, A. Lessari, J. L. Neill, S. Shipman, R. A. Holmes, M. C. Leyden, and N. C. Craig, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 1864-1868 (2009). A. R. Conrad, N. H. Teumelsan, P. E. Wang, and M. J. Tubergen, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 336-342 (2010).

  4. Van der Waals interaction between microparticle and uniaxial crystal with application to hydrogen atoms and multiwall carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Blagov, E V; Mostepanenko, V M

    2005-01-01

    The Lifshitz theory of the van der Waals force is extended for the case of an atom (molecule) interacting with a plane surface of an uniaxial crystal or with a long solid cylinder or cylindrical shell made of isotropic material or uniaxial crystal. For a microparticle near a semispace or flat plate made of an uniaxial crystal the exact expressions for the free energy of the van der Waals and Casimir-Polder interaction are presented. An approximate expression for the free energy of microparticle- cylinder interaction is obtained which becomes precise for microparticle-cylinder separations much smaller than cylinder radius. The obtained expressions are used to investigate the van der Waals interaction between hydrogen atoms (molecules) and graphite plates or multiwall carbon nanotubes. To accomplish this the behavior of graphite dielectric permittivities along the imaginary frequency axis is found using the optical data for the complex refractive index of graphite for the ordinary and extraordinary rays. It is ...

  5. HYBRID ORBITALS OF CARBON ATOMS IN THE D6hC36 MOLECULE UNDER THE ROTATING ELLIPSOID MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Guo-ping

    2000-01-01

    The hybrid orbitals of carbon atoms in the D6h C36 molecule arestudied using two rotating ellipsoid models. The model 1 is 1.66R for theshort semi-axis and 2.34R for the long semi-axis, and the model 2 is 1.78R and 2.26R respectively, where R is the C-C bond length. By comparison,we think the model 2 to be more proper in revealing the electronic properties of the D6h C36 molecule. The component of s orbitals in the states hybridized for each of the atoms is much larger than C60, in which the sorbit component is 0.0380 and the porbit is 0.9620. The most component is 0.2098and the least is 0.0482 for model 1; the most is 0.1764 and the least is0.0656 for model 2.

  6. Effects of doping in 25-atom bimetallic nanocluster catalysts for carbon–carbon coupling reaction of iodoanisole and phenylacetylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We here report the catalytic effects of foreign atoms (Cu, Ag, and Pt doped into well-defined 25-gold-atom nanoclusters. Using the carbon-carbon coupling reaction of p-iodoanisole and phenylacetylene as a model reaction, the gold-based bimetallic MxAu25−x(SR18 (–SR=–SCH2CH2Ph nanoclusters (supported on titania were found to exhibit distinct effects on the conversion of p-iodoanisole as well as the selectivity for the Sonogashira cross-coupling product, 1-methoxy-4-(2-phenylethynylbenzene. Compared to Au25(SR18, the centrally doped Pt1Au24(SR18 causes a drop in catalytic activity but with the selectivity retained, while the AgxAu25−x(SR18 nanoclusters gave an overall performance comparable to Au25(SR18. Interestingly, CuxAu25−x(SR18 nanoclusters prefer the Ullmann homo-coupling pathway and give rise to product 4,4′-dimethoxy-1,1′-biphenyl, which is in opposite to the other three nanocluster catalysts. Our overall conclusion is that the conversion of p-iodoanisole is largely affected by the electronic effect in the bimetallic nanoclusters’ 13-atom core (i.e., Pt1Au12, CuxAu13−x, and Au13, with the exception of Ag doping, and that the selectivity is primarily determined by the type of atoms on the MxAu12−x shell (M=Ag, Cu, and Au in the nanocluster catalysts.

  7. Biosynthetic origin of the carbon skeleton and nitrogen atom of pamamycin-607, a nitrogen-containing polyketide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Komatsu, Haruhiko; Kozone, Ikuko; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Natsume, Masahiro

    2005-02-01

    The biosynthesis of pamamycin-607 (PM-607), a sixteen-membered macrodiolide compound, was studied with 13C- and 15N-labeled precursor units in Streptomyces alboniger. Feeding experiments with 13C-labeled acetate or propionate indicate that the carbon skeleton of PM-607 was derived from six acetate, four propionate and three succinate units. MS analyses of 15N-labeled PM-607 suggest that the nitrogen atom in PM-607 was derived from the alpha-amino group of an amino acid.

  8. Improved electroless plating method through ultrasonic spray atomization for depositing silver nanoparticles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Xie, Ming; Liu, Yichun; Yi, Jianhong

    2017-07-01

    A novel method was developed to deposit nanosized silver particles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The electroless plating of silver on MWCNTs accomplished in small solution drops generated by ultrasonic spray atomization, which inhibited excessive growth of silver particles and led to much more uniform nanometer grain-sized coatings. The results showed that pretreatment was essential for silver particles to deposit on the MWCNTs, and the electrolyte concentration and reaction temperature were important parameters which had a great influence on the morphology and structure of the silver coatings. Possible mechanisms of this method are also discussed in the paper.

  9. Attosecond angular flux of partial charges on the carbon atoms of benzene in non-aromatic excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Gunter; Liu, ChunMei; Manz, Jörn; Paulus, Beate; Pohl, Vincent; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2017-09-01

    Recently, it was discovered that excitation of the oriented model benzene from its aromatic electronic ground state S0 (1A1g) to the non-aromatic S0 +S2 (1B1u) superposition state generates negative and positive partial charges on alternating carbon atoms. Subsequently, they vary periodically, due to adiabatic attosecond charge migration AACM. Here, we determine the angular electronic flux that mediates this new type of AACM, by means of quantum dynamics simulations. It is found to be periodic, with period τ bar = 590as , and with a pincer motion type pattern such that a total of 1.2 valence electrons flow concertedly between alternating sources and sinks at the carbon nuclei.

  10. Operando atomic structure and active sites of TiO2(110)-supported gold nanoparticles during carbon monoxide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Lager, Marie-Claire; Laoufi, Issam; Bailly, Aude

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that gold nanoparticles supported on TiO2 act as a catalyst for CO oxidation, even below room temperature. Despite extensive studies, the origin of this catalytic activity remains under debate. Indeed, when the particle size decreases, many changes may occur; thus modifying the nanoparticles' electronic properties and consequently their catalytic performances. Thanks to a state-of-the-art home-developed setup, model catalysts can be prepared in ultra-high vacuum and their morphology then studied in operando conditions by Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering, as well as their atomic structure by Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction as a function of their catalytic activity. We previously reported on the existence of a catalytic activity maximum observed for three-dimensional gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3 nm and a height of 6-7 atomic planes. In the present work we correlate this size dependence of the catalytic activity to the nanoparticles' atomic structure. We show that even when their size decreases below the optimum diameter, the gold nanoparticles keep the face-centered cubic structure characteristic of bulk gold. Nevertheless, for these smallest nanoparticles, the lattice parameter presents anisotropic strains with a larger contraction in the direction perpendicular to the surface. Moreover a careful analysis of the atomic-scale morphology around the catalytic activity maximum tends to evidence the role of sites with a specific geometry at the interface between the nanoparticles and the substrate. This argues for models where atoms at the interface periphery act as catalytically active sites for carbon monoxide oxidation.

  11. Atomic Scale Interface Manipulation, Structural Engineering, and Their Impact on Ultrathin Carbon Films in Controlling Wear, Friction, and Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J; Yak, Leonard J K; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Dhand, Chetna; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2016-07-13

    Reducing friction, wear, and corrosion of diverse materials/devices using manipulation to engineer and control the friction, wear, corrosion, and structural characteristics of 0.7-1.7 nm carbon-based films on CoCrPt:oxide-based magnetic media. We demonstrate that when an atomically thin (∼0.5 nm) chromium nitride (CrNx) layer is sandwiched between the magnetic media and an ultrathin carbon overlayer (1.2 nm), it modifies the film-substrate interface, creates various types of interfacial bonding, increases the interfacial adhesion, and tunes the structure of carbon in terms of its sp(3) bonding. These contribute to its remarkable functional properties, such as stable and lowest coefficient of friction (∼0.15-0.2), highest wear resistance and better corrosion resistance despite being only ∼1.7 nm thick, surpassing those of ∼2.7 nm thick current commercial carbon overcoat (COC) and other overcoats in this work. While this approach has direct implications for advancing current magnetic storage technology with its ultralow thickness, it can also be applied to advance the protective and barrier capabilities of other ultrathin materials for associated technologies.

  12. Grafting of thermoresponsive polymer from the surface of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes via atom transfer radical polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU GuoYong; XIA Ru; WANG Hu; MENG XiangChun; ZHU QingRen

    2008-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were oxidized with concentrated HNOz and H2SO4 to introduce carboxylic groups onto carbon nanotubes surfaces. The oxidized carbon nanotubes were reacted subsequently with thionyl chloride and 2-Hydroxylethyl-2'-bromoisobutyrate, producing MWNT-based macroinitiators, MWNT-Br, for the atom transfer radical polymerization of (N-isopropylacrylamide). FTIR, XPS, 1H NMR, Raman and TGA were used to characterize the resulting products and to determine the content of the water-soluble poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) chains in the product. The MWNTs grafted with PNIPAM chains have good solubility in distilled water; THF and CHCl3. TEM images of the samples provide direct evidence for the formation of a nanostructure that MWNTs coated with polymer layer. The produced MWNT-g-PNIPAM has a PNIPAM shell, which is very sensitive to the change of temperature.This method would open a door for the fabrication of novel functional carbon nanotube-based nanomaterials or nanodevices with designable structure and tailor-made properties.

  13. Atomic Structure and Energy Distribution of Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes of Different Chiralities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Baimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For carbon nanotubes of sufficiently large diameter at sufficiently low temperature, due to the action of the van der Waals forces, the ground state is a bilayer graphene with closed edges, the so-called collapsed configuration. Molecular dynamics simulation of collapsed carbon nanotubes is performed. The effect of length, diameter, and chirality of the nanotubes on their properties is investigated. It is shown that collapsed nanotubes after relaxation have rippled structure which is strongly dependent on the nanotube chirality. The structural properties are studied by calculating the radial distribution function and energy distribution along various regions in the collapsed carbon nanotubes.

  14. Rehybridization of atomic orbitals and field electron emission from nanostructured carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Obraztsov, A N; Boronin, A I; Koshcheev, S V

    2001-01-01

    The results of the experimental study on the electron field emission, structural peculiarities and electron properties of carbon films, obtained through the gas-phase chemical deposition, are presented. It is shown that the field emission for the films, consisting of the spatially oriented carbon nanotubes and graphite laminar nanocrystallites, is observed by the electric field intensity by one-two orders lower than the values, representative for the metal emitters. The experimental data, testifying to the local decrease in the yield performance in such carbon materials in comparison with the graphite are obtained for the first time. The model of the emission center and the field emission mechanism for the nanostructured carbon are proposed

  15. Carbon Dioxide Activation by Scandium Atoms and Scandium Monoxide Molecules: Formation and Spectroscopic Characterization of ScCO3 and OCScCO3 in Solid Neon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingnan; Qu, Hui; Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei

    2016-01-28

    The reactions of carbon dioxide with scandium monoxide molecules and scandium atoms are investigated using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy in solid neon. The species formed are identified by the effects of isotopic substitution on their infrared spectra as well as density functional calculations. The results show that the ground state ScO molecule reacts with carbon dioxide to form the carbonate complex ScCO3 spontaneously on annealing. The ground state Sc atom reacts with two carbon dioxide molecules to give the carbonate carbonyl complex OCScCO3 via the previously reported OScCO insertion intermediate on annealing. The observation of these spontaneous reactions is consistent with theoretical predictions that both the Sc + 2CO2 → OCScCO3 and ScO + CO2 → ScCO3 reactions are thermodynamically exothermic and are kinetically facile, requiring little or no activation energy.

  16. 3D scaffolds from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/poly(methyl methacrylate) composites via atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tebikachew, Behabtu; Magina, Sandra [CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Mata, Diogo; Oliveira, Filipe J.; Silva, Rui F. [CICECO, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Barros-Timmons, Ana, E-mail: anabarros@ua.pt [CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) synthesized by Thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (TCVD) were modified using an Ar:O{sub 2} (97:3) plasma to generate oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface for subsequent modification. X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman analyses confirmed the grafting of those functional groups onto the surface of the nanotubes as well as the removal of amorphous carbon produced and deposited on the VACNT forests during the CVD process. The plasma treated VACNT forests were further modified with 2-bromo-2-methylpropionyl bromide, an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator, to grow poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chains from the forests via ATRP. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of the ensuing VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed the coating of the nanotube forests with the PMMA polymer. 3D scaffolds of polymeric composites with honeycomb like structure were then obtained. Compressive tests have shown that the VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength than the pristine forest. - Highlights: • Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) were synthesized and plasma modified. • X-ray photo-emission and Raman spectroscopies confirmed the VACNTs modification. • Poly(methyl methacrylate) chains were grown via ATRP from the VACNTs. • STEM of the VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed that PMMA surrounds the nanotubes. • VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength compared to the pristine forest.

  17. A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, A. S.; Higgins, S. R.; Knauss, K. G.; Rosso, K. M.

    2011-01-01

    A high-pressure atomic force microscope(AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ~350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO2, precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluidrefractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO3) mineral surface in scCO2; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (101¯4) surface are presented. Finally, this new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid–fluid interfaces under pressure.

  18. A Multi-line Study of Atomic Carbon and Carbon Monoxide in the Galactic Star- forming Region W3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, H.; Kramer, C.; Mookerjea, B.; Jeyakumar, S.; Stutzki, J.

    We present results from simultaneous observations of the fine structure line emissions of neutral carbon (C I) at 492 and 809 GHz from selected Galactic star forming regions. These observations include the first results using the the newly installed SMART (SubmilliMeter Array Receiver at Two wavelengths) on KOSMA. The regions observed were selected in order to cover a range of strengths of the incident UV radiation from the exciting star/stars and also densities of the interstellar medium. Extended maps of C I emission from massive star forming regions including W3, S106 and Orion BN/KL have been observed. Simultaneous observation of the two C I lines ensures better relative calibration. The results from these observations will be combined with observed intensities of low-J and mid-J CO and C+ lines and analyzed using radiation transfer based models for Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs).

  19. The abundances of atomic carbon and carbon monoxide compared with visual extinction in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerking, Margaret A.; Keene, Jocelyn; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Phillips, T. G.

    1989-01-01

    Emission from the 492 GHz lines of C I have been observed toward six positions in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud complex for which accurate visual extinctions are available. The column density of C I increases with A(V) to greater than 2 x 10 to the 17th/sq cm at 100 mag, the column-averaged fractional abundance reaches a peak of about 2.2 x 10 to the -5th for A(V) in the range 4-11 mag and the column-averaged abundance ratio of C I to CO decreases with A(V) from about 1 at 2 mag to greater that about 0.03 at 100 mag. These results imply that, while C I is not the primary reservoir of gaseous carbon even at cloud edges, its fractional abundance remains high for at least 10 mag into the cloud and may be significant at even greater depths.

  20. The effect of deposition energy of energetic atoms on the growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N

    2014-05-16

    The growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The second-generation reactive-empirical-bond-order potential was used to model atomic interactions. Films with different structures were simulated by varying the deposition energy of carbon atoms in the range of 1-120 eV. Intrinsic film characteristics (e.g. density and internal stress) were determined after the system reached equilibrium. Short- and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering is examined in the context of atomic hybridization and ring connectivity simulation results. It is shown that relatively high deposition energy (i.e., 80 eV) yields a multilayer film structure consisting of an intermixing layer, bulk film and surface layer, consistent with the classical subplantation model. The highest film density (3.3 g cm-3), sp3 fraction (∼43%), and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering correspond to a deposition energy of ∼80 eV, which is in good agreement with experimental findings. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Combined nano-SIMS/AFM/EBSD analysis and atom probe tomography, of carbon distribution in austenite/ε-martensite high-Mn steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Jae-Bok; Lee, B-H; Choi, P; Lee, S-G; Park, C-G

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a new experimental approach for the identification of the atomistic position of interstitial carbon in a high-Mn binary alloy consisting of austenite and ε-martensite. Using combined nano-beam secondary ion mass spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analyses, we clearly observe carbon partitioning to austenite. Nano-beam secondary ion mass spectroscopy and atom probe tomography studies also reveal carbon trapping at crystal imperfections as identified by transmission electron microscopy. Three main trapping sites can be distinguished: phase boundaries between austenite and ε-martensite, stacking faults in austenite, and prior austenite grain boundaries. Our findings suggest that segregation and/or partitioning of carbon can contribute to the austenite-to-martensite transformation of the investigated alloy.

  2. Nanopatterning on silicon surface using atomic force microscopy with diamond-like carbon (DLC-coated Si probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jingfang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atomic force microscope (AFM equipped with diamond-like carbon (DLC-coated Si probe has been used for scratch nanolithography on Si surfaces. The effect of scratch direction, applied tip force, scratch speed, and number of scratches on the size of the scratched geometry has been investigated. The size of the groove differs with scratch direction, which increases with the applied tip force and number of scratches but decreases slightly with scratch speed. Complex nanostructures of arrays of parallel lines and square arrays are further fabricated uniformly and precisely on Si substrates at relatively high scratch speed. DLC-coated Si probe has the potential to be an alternative in AFM-based scratch nanofabrication on hard surfaces.

  3. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Chu, Paul K.; Wu, Shuilin

    2017-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  4. Poly(glutamic acid) nanofibre modified glassy carbon electrode: Characterization by atomic force microscopy, voltammetry and electrochemical impedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Daniela Pereira; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin; Bergamini, Marcio Fernando [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Caixa Postal 355, 14800-900 Araraquara, S.P. (Brazil); Chiorcea-Paquim, Ana-Maria; Diculescu, Victor Constantin [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira Brett, Ana-Maria [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)], E-mail: brett@ci.uc.pt

    2008-04-20

    Glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) were modified with poly(glutamic acid) acid films prepared using three different procedures: glutamic acid monomer electropolymerization (MONO), evaporation of poly(glutamic acid) (PAG) and evaporation of a mixture of poly(glutamic acid)/glutaraldehyde (PAG/GLU). All three films showed good adherence to the electrode surface. The performance of the modified GCE was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry, and the films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The three poly(glutamic acid) modified GCEs were tested using the electrochemical oxidation of ascorbic acid and a decrease of the overpotential and the improvement of the oxidation peak current was observed. The PAG modified electrode surfaces gave the best results. AFM morphological images showed a polymeric network film formed by well-defined nanofibres that may undergo extensive swelling in solution, allowing an easier electron transfer and higher oxidation peaks.

  5. Removal of carbon and nanoparticles from lithographic materials by plasma assisted cleaning by metastable atom neutralization (PACMAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, W. M.; Lofgren, R. E.; Surla, V.; Neumann, M. J.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2010-04-01

    System cleanliness is a major issue facing the lithographic community as the prospects of integrating EUV lithography into integrated circuit manufacturing progress. Mask cleanliness, especially of particles in the sub-micron range, remains an issue for the implementation of EUV lithography since traditional mask cleaning processes are limited in their ability to remove nanometer scale contaminants. The result is lower wafer throughput due to errors in pattern transfer to the wafer from the particulate defects on the mask. Additionally, carbon contamination and growth on the collector optics due to energetic photon interactions degrade the mirror and shortens its functional life. Plasma cleaning of surfaces has been used for a variety of applications in the past, and now is being extended to cleaning surfaces for EUV, specifically the mask and collector optics, through a process developed in the Center for Plasma-Material Interactions (CPMI) called Plasma Assisted Cleaning by Metastable Atom Neutralization (PACMAN). This process uses energetic neutral atoms (metastables) in addition to a high-density plasma (Te ~ 3 eV and ne ~ 1017 m-3) to remove particles. The PACMAN process is a completely dry process and is carried out in a vacuum which makes it compatible with other EUV related processing steps. Experiments carried out on cleaning polystyrene latex (PSL) nanoparticles (30 nm to 500 nm) on silicon wafers, chrome coated mask blanks, and EUV mask blanks result in 100 % particle removal with a helium plasma and helium metastables. Removal rates greater than 20 nm/min have been achieved for PSL material. Similar removal rates have been achieved for the PACMAN cleaning of carbon from silicon wafers (simulating collector optic material) with 100% removal with helium plasma and helium metastables. The PACMAN cleaning technique has not caused any damage to the substrate type being cleaned either through roughening or surface sputtering. Current results of cleaning

  6. From atoms to minerals: how calcium carbonates form and why we should care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Rodriguez-Blanco, Juan

    2017-04-01

    Calcium carbonate minerals are ubiquitous on Earth where they play a key role in many marine and terrestrial biomineralization processes, controlling the evolution of past and future ocean chemistry and a large part of the global carbon cycle. However, the mechanisms by which biominerals form and transform are not well understood because these processes frequently involve the formation of poorly-ordered and crystalline metastable phases (e.g., amorphous calcium carbonate, vaterite, monohydrocalcite). Furthermore, the degree of ordering, hydration and particle size of these phases and their crystallisation pathways are largely controlled by their origin and conditions of formation. These include a number of factors like temperature, pH, and concentration of foreign ions in solution (e.g., Mg2+, Sr2+, SO42-, organics, etc.). Over the last few years, new experimental and characterization approaches have been developed, combining classical characterization techniques with synchrotron-based methods that allow in situ and real-time monitoring of the reactions (e.g., time-resolved synchrotron-based scattering and diffraction, pair distribution function). These techniques have provided very useful data to attain the mechanisms and quantify the kinetics of crystallization in abiotic systems. I will present a series of results obtained from synchrotron- and lab-based experiments that shed light on the mechanisms of formation of a number of biominerals (e.g., vaterite, calcite, aragonite, monohydrocalcite, dolomite). These results provide a detailed understanding of how calcium carbonate phases form during biomineralization processes, the effects of seawater ions and organics during the formation and transformation of biominerals, and the implications for past and future ocean chemistry, CO2 capture and storage and industrial mineral synthesis.

  7. The annealing of interstitial carbon atoms in high-resistivity n-type silicon after proton irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhnke, M; Lindström, G

    2002-01-01

    The annealing of interstitial carbon C sub i after 7-10 MeV and 23 GeV proton irradiations at room temperature in high-resistivity n-type silicon is investigated. Deep level transient spectroscopy is used to determine the defect parameters. The annealing characteristics of the impurity defects C sub i , C sub i C sub s , C sub i O sub i and VO sub i suggest that the mobile C sub i atoms are also captured at divacancy VV sites at the cluster peripheries and not only at C sub s and O sub i sites in the silicon bulk. The deviation of the electrical filling characteristic of C sub i from the characteristic of a homogeneously distributed defect can be explained by an aggregation of C sub i atoms in the environment of the clusters. The capture rate of electrons into defects located in the cluster environment is reduced due to a positive space charge region surrounding the negatively charged cluster core. The optical filling characteristic of C sub i suggests that the change of the triangle-shaped electric field dis...

  8. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of atomic-scale carbon nanotube defects produced by Ar{sup +} ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osvath, Z. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials, Sciences (MFA), H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)]. E-mail: osvath@mfa.kfki.hu; Vertesy, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials, Sciences (MFA), H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Tapaszto, L. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials, Sciences (MFA), H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Weber, F. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials, Sciences (MFA), H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Horvath, Z.E. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials, Sciences (MFA), H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Gyulai, J. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials, Sciences (MFA), H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Biro, L.P. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials, Sciences (MFA), H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2006-07-15

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) dispersed on graphite (HOPG) substrate were irradiated with Ar{sup +} ions of 30 keV, using a dose of D = 5 x 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}. The irradiated nanotubes were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) under ambient conditions. Atomic resolution STM images revealed individual nanotube defects, which appeared as 'hillocks' of 0.1-0.2 nm in height, due to the locally changed electronic structure. The results are in agreement with previous theoretical predictions. Electron density patterns (superstructures) were observed near the defect sites, which originated from the interference of incident waves and waves scattered by defects. The period of these superstructures is larger than the period determined by the atomic structure. After annealing at 450 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere, the irradiated MWCNTs were investigated again. The effect of heat treatment on the irradiation-induced nanotube-defects was observed both on the STM images and on the recorded STS spectra.

  9. Metals on graphene and carbon nanotube surfaces: From mobile atoms to atomtronics to bulk metals to clusters and catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Santanu C.

    2014-01-14

    In this Perspective, we present an overview of recent fundamental studies on the nature of the interaction between individual metal atoms and metal clusters and the conjugated surfaces of graphene and carbon nanotube with a particular focus on the electronic structure and chemical bonding at the metal-graphene interface. We discuss the relevance of organometallic complexes of graphitic materials to the development of a fundamental understanding of these interactions and their application in atomtronics as atomic interconnects, high mobility organometallic transistor devices, high-frequency electronic devices, organometallic catalysis (hydrogen fuel generation by photocatalytic water splitting, fuel cells, hydrogenation), spintronics, memory devices, and the next generation energy devices. We touch on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on metals, the reactivity of its surface, and its use as a template for asymmetric graphene functionalization chemistry (ultrathin Janus discs). We highlight some of the latest advances in understanding the nature of interactions between metals and graphene surfaces from the standpoint of metal overlayers deposited on graphene and SWNT thin films. Finally, we comment on the major challenges facing the field and the opportunities for technological applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. The effect of vanadium-carbon monolayer on the adsorption of tungsten and carbon atoms on tungsten-carbide (0001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moitra A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a first-principles calculations to study the effect of a vanadium-carbon (VC monolayer on the adsorption process of tungsten (W and carbon (C atoms onto tungsten-carbide (WC (0001 surface. The essential configuration for the study is a supercell of hexagonal WC with a (0001 surface. When adding the VC monolayer, we employed the lowest energy configuration by examining various configurations. The total energy of the system is computed as a function of the W or C adatoms’ height from the surface. The adsorption of a W and C adatom on a clean WC (0001 surface is compared with that of a W and C adatom on a WC (0001 surface with VC monolayer. The calculations show that the adsorption energy increased for both W and C adatoms in presence of the VC monolayer. Our results provide a fundamental understanding that can explain the experimentally observed phenomena of inhibited grain growth during sintering of WC or WC-Co powders in presence of VC.

  11. Chiral nonracemic late-transition-metal organometallics with a metal-bonded stereogenic carbon atom: development of new tools for asymmetric organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinakova, Helena C

    2004-06-07

    Transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions and the Heck reaction have evolved into powerful tools for the construction of carbon-carbon bonds. In most cases, the reactive organometallic intermediates feature a carbon-transition-metal sigma bond between a sp(2)-hybridized carbon atom and the transition metal (Csp(2)--TM). New, and potentially more powerful approach to transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric organic synthesis would arise if catalytic chiral nonracemic organometallic intermediates with a stereogenic sp(3)-hybridized carbon atoms directly bonded to the transition metal (C*sp(3)--TM bond) could be formed from racemic or achiral organic substrates, and subsequently participate in the formation of a new carbon-carbon bond (C*sp(3)-C) with retention of the stereochemical information. To date, only a few catalytic processes that are based on this concept, have been developed. In this account, both "classical" and recent studies on preparation and reactivity of stable chiral nonracemic organometallics with a metal-bonded stereogenic carbon, which provide the foundation for the future design of new synthetic transformations exploiting the outlined concept, are discussed, along with examples of relevant catalytic processes.

  12. The solid-liquid phase diagrams of binary mixtures of even saturated fatty acids differing by six carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Mariana C. [LPT, Department of Chemical Process, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); EXTRAE, Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Food Engineering, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6121, 13083-862, Campinas-SP (Brazil); CICECO, Departamento de Quimica da Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rolemberg, Marlus P. [DETQI, Department of Chemical Technology, Federal University of Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Meirelles, Antonio J.A. [EXTRAE, Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Food Engineering, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6121, 13083-862, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Coutinho, Joao A.P. [CICECO, Departamento de Quimica da Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Kraehenbuehl, M.A., E-mail: mak@feq.unicamp.br [LPT, Department of Chemical Process, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2009-12-10

    This study was aimed at using the solid-liquid phase diagrams for three binary mixtures of saturated fatty acids, especially the phase transitions below the liquidus line. These mixtures are compounded by caprylic acid (C{sub 8:0}) + myristic acid (C{sub 14:0}), capric acid (C{sub 10:0}) + palmitic acid (C{sub 16:0}), lauric acid (C{sub 12:0}) + stearic acid (C{sub 18:0}), differing by six carbon atoms between carbon chains. The phase diagrams were obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The polarized light microscopy was used to complement the characterization for a full grasp of the phase diagram. Not only do these phase diagrams present peritectic and eutectic reactions, but also metatectic reactions, due to solid-solid phase transitions common, in fatty acids. These findings have contributed to the elucidation of the phase behavior of these important biochemical molecules with implications in various industrial production.

  13. Evaluation of the nanotube intrinsic resistance across the tip-carbon nanotube-metal substrate junction by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamarguy David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Using an atomic force microscope (AFM at a controlled contact force, we report the electrical signal response of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs disposed on a golden thin film. In this investigation, we highlight first the theoretical calculation of the contact resistance between two types of conductive tips (metal-coated and doped diamond-coated, individual MWCNTs and golden substrate. We also propose a circuit analysis model to schematize the «tip-CNT-substrate» junction by means of a series-parallel resistance network. We estimate the contact resistance R of each contribution of the junction such as R tip-CNT, R CNT-substrate and R tip-substrate by using the Sharvin resistance model. Our final objective is thus to deduce the CNT intrinsic radial resistance taking into account the calculated electrical resistance values with the global resistance measured experimentally. An unwished electrochemical phenomenon at the tip apex has also been evidenced by performing measurements at different bias voltages with diamond tips. For negative tip-substrate bias, a systematic degradation in color and contrast of the electrical cartography occurs, consisting of an important and non-reversible increase of the measured resistance. This effect is attributed to the oxidation of some amorphous carbon areas scattered over the diamond layer covering the tip. For a direct polarization, the CNT and substrate surface can in turn be modified by an oxidation mechanism.

  14. Evaluation of the nanotube intrinsic resistance across the tip-carbon nanotube-metal substrate junction by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiczak, Maguy; Otubo, Larissa; Alamarguy, David; Houzé, Frédéric; Volz, Sebastian; Noël, Sophie; Bai, Jinbo

    2011-04-14

    Using an atomic force microscope (AFM) at a controlled contact force, we report the electrical signal response of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) disposed on a golden thin film. In this investigation, we highlight first the theoretical calculation of the contact resistance between two types of conductive tips (metal-coated and doped diamond-coated), individual MWCNTs and golden substrate. We also propose a circuit analysis model to schematize the «tip-CNT-substrate» junction by means of a series-parallel resistance network. We estimate the contact resistance R of each contribution of the junction such as Rtip-CNT, RCNT-substrate and Rtip-substrate by using the Sharvin resistance model. Our final objective is thus to deduce the CNT intrinsic radial resistance taking into account the calculated electrical resistance values with the global resistance measured experimentally. An unwished electrochemical phenomenon at the tip apex has also been evidenced by performing measurements at different bias voltages with diamond tips. For negative tip-substrate bias, a systematic degradation in color and contrast of the electrical cartography occurs, consisting of an important and non-reversible increase of the measured resistance. This effect is attributed to the oxidation of some amorphous carbon areas scattered over the diamond layer covering the tip. For a direct polarization, the CNT and substrate surface can in turn be modified by an oxidation mechanism.

  15. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures.

  16. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  17. Hetero-atom doped carbon nanotubes for dye degradation and oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandan, Ravi, E-mail: aerawat27@gmail.com; Nanda, Karuna Kar [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We report the synthesis of nitrogen doped vertically aligned multi-walled (MWNCNTs) carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis and its catalytic performance for degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye & oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The degradation of MB was monitored spectrophotometrically with time. Kinetic studies show the degradation of MB follows a first order kinetic with rate constant k=0.0178 min{sup −1}. The present rate constant is better than that reported for various supported/non-supported semiconducting nanomaterials. Further ORR performance in alkaline media makes MWNCNTs a promising cost-effective, fuel crossover tolerance, metal-free, eco-friendly cathode catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell.

  18. Hetero-atom doped carbon nanotubes for dye degradation and oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandan, Ravi; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2015-06-01

    We report the synthesis of nitrogen doped vertically aligned multi-walled (MWNCNTs) carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis and its catalytic performance for degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye & oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The degradation of MB was monitored spectrophotometrically with time. Kinetic studies show the degradation of MB follows a first order kinetic with rate constant k=0.0178 min-1. The present rate constant is better than that reported for various supported/non-supported semiconducting nanomaterials. Further ORR performance in alkaline media makes MWNCNTs a promising cost-effective, fuel crossover tolerance, metal-free, eco-friendly cathode catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell.

  19. Synthesis of a chiral quaternary carbon center bearing a fluorine atom: enantio- and diastereoselective guanidine-catalyzed addition of fluorocarbon nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhiyong; Pan, Yuanhang; Zhao, Yujun; Ma, Ting; Lee, Richmond; Yang, Yuanyong; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Wong, Ming Wah; Tan, Choon-Hong

    2009-01-01

    The perfect combination: The title reaction provides adducts having quaternary carbon centers bearing a fluorine atom with high ee and d.r. values (see scheme). The mechanism and origin of stereoselectivity were elucidated by DFT calculations. The bifunctional mode of the guanidine catalysis was demonstrated in the transition states resulting from the DFT results.

  20. TRACING H{sub 2} COLUMN DENSITY WITH ATOMIC CARBON (C I) AND CO ISOTOPOLOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, N.; Bronfman, L. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago, Casilla 36-D (Chile); Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A.; Lowe, V. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Cortes, P. C. [Joint ALMA Observatory, Santiago (Chile); Simon, R. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Straße 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Fissel, L.; Novak, G. [Northwestern University, Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We present the first results of neutral carbon ([C I] {sup 3} P {sub 1}-{sup 3} P {sub 0} at 492 GHz) and carbon monoxide ({sup 13}CO, J = 1-0) mapping in the Vela Molecular Ridge cloud C (VMR-C) and the G333 giant molecular cloud complexes with the NANTEN2 and Mopra telescopes. For the four regions mapped in this work, we find that [C I] has very similar spectral emission profiles to {sup 13}CO, with comparable line widths. We find that [C I] has an opacity of 0.1-1.3 across the mapped region while the [C I]/{sup 13}CO peak brightness temperature ratio is between 0.2 and 0.8. The [C I] column density is an order of magnitude lower than that of {sup 13}CO. The H{sub 2} column density derived from [C I] is comparable to values obtained from {sup 12}CO. Our maps show that C I is preferentially detected in gas with low temperatures (below 20 K), which possibly explains the comparable H{sub 2} column density calculated from both tracers (both C I and {sup 12}CO underestimate column density), as a significant amount of the C I in the warmer gas is likely in the higher energy state transition ([C I] {sup 3} P {sub 2}-{sup 3} P {sub 1} at 810 GHz), and thus it is likely that observations of both the above [C I] transitions are needed in order to recover the total H{sub 2} column density.

  1. Initial evaluation and comparison of plasma damage to atomic layer carbon materials using conventional and low T{sub e} plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Chang, Josephine; Farmer, Damon B.; Engel, Michael; Neumayer, Deborah; Han, Shu-Jen; Engelmann, Sebastian U., E-mail: suengelm@us.ibm.com; Joseph, Eric A. [IBM, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Boris, David R.; Hernández, Sandra C.; Walton, Scott G. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lock, Evgeniya H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The ability to achieve atomic layer precision is the utmost goal in the implementation of atomic layer etch technology. Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are single atomic layers of carbon with unique properties and, as such, represent the ultimate candidates to study the ability to process with atomic layer precision and assess impact of plasma damage to atomic layer materials. In this work, the authors use these materials to evaluate the atomic layer processing capabilities of electron beam generated plasmas. First, the authors evaluate damage to semiconducting CNTs when exposed to beam-generated plasmas and compare these results against the results using typical plasma used in semiconductor processing. The authors find that the beam generated plasma resulted in significantly lower current degradation in comparison to typical plasmas. Next, the authors evaluated the use of electron beam generated plasmas to process graphene-based devices by functionalizing graphene with fluorine, nitrogen, or oxygen to facilitate atomic layer deposition (ALD). The authors found that all adsorbed species resulted in successful ALD with varying impact on the transconductance of the graphene. Furthermore, the authors compare the ability of both beam generated plasma as well as a conventional low ion energy inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to remove silicon nitride (SiN) deposited on top of the graphene films. Our results indicate that, while both systems can remove SiN, an increase in the D/G ratio from 0.08 for unprocessed graphene to 0.22 to 0.26 for the beam generated plasma, while the ICP yielded values from 0.52 to 1.78. Generally, while some plasma-induced damage was seen for both plasma sources, a much wider process window as well as far less damage to CNTs and graphene was observed when using electron beam generated plasmas.

  2. Atomic and Molecular Layer Deposition for Enhanced Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes and Development of Conductive Metal Oxide/Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Jonathan

    The performance and safety of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are dependent on interfacial processes at the positive and negative electrodes. For example, the surface layers that form on cathodes and anodes are known to affect the kinetics and capacity of LIBs. Interfacial reactions between the electrolyte and the electrodes are also known to initiate electrolyte combustion during thermal runaway events that compromise battery safety. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) and molecular layer deposition (MLD) are thin film deposition techniques based on sequential, self-limiting surface reactions. ALD and MLD can deposit ultrathin and conformal films on high aspect ratio and porous substrates such as composite particulate electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. The effects of electrode surface modification via ALD and MLD are studied using a variety of techniques. It was found that sub-nm thick coatings of Al2O 3 deposited via ALD have beneficial effects on the stability of LIB anodes and cathodes. These same Al2O3 ALD films were found to improve the safety of graphite based anodes through prevention of exothermic solid electrolyte interface (SEI) degradation at elevated temperatures. Ultrathin and conformal metal alkoxide polymer films known as "metalcones" were grown utilizing MLD techniques with trimethylaluminum (TMA) or titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and organic diols or triols, such as ethylene glycol (EG), glycerol (GL) or hydroquinone (HQ), as the reactants. Pyrolysis of these metalcone films under inert gas conditions led to the development of conductive metal oxide/carbon composites. The composites were found to contain sp2 carbon using micro-Raman spectroscopy in the pyrolyzed films with pyrolysis temperatures ≥ 600°C. Four point probe measurements demonstrated that the graphitic sp2 carbon domains in the metalcone films grown using GL and HQ led to significant conductivity. The pyrolysis of conformal MLD films to obtain conductive metal oxide/carbon composite films

  3. ALMA observations of atomic carbon in z ∼ 4 dusty star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothwell, M. S.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aravena, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bisbas, T. G.; Chapman, S. C.; De Breuck, C.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Greve, T. R.; Hezaveh, Y.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Murphy, E. J.; Spilker, J. S.; Strandet, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Weiß, A.

    2017-04-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array [C I](1 - 0) (rest frequency 492 GHz) observations for a sample of 13 strongly lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) originally discovered at 1.4 mm in a blank-field survey by the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We compare these new data with available [C I] observations from the literature, allowing a study of the interstellar medium (ISM) properties of ∼30 extreme DSFGs spanning a redshift range 2 modern photodissociation region code (3D-PDR) to assess the physical conditions (including the density, UV radiation field strength and gas temperature) within the ISM of the DSFGs in our sample. We find that the ISM within our DSFGs is characterized by dense gas permeated by strong UV fields. We note that previous efforts to characterize photodissociation region regions in DSFGs may have significantly under-estimated the density of the ISM. Combined, our analysis suggests that the ISM of extreme dusty starbursts at high redshift consists of dense, carbon-rich gas not directly comparable to the ISM of starbursts in the local Universe.

  4. How does the exchange of one oxygen atom with sulfur affect the catalytic cycle of carbonic anhydrase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Stephan; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Anders, Ernst

    2004-06-21

    We have extended our investigations of the carbonic anhydrase (CA) cycle with the model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) and CO(2) by studying further heterocumulenes and catalysts. We investigated the hydration of COS, an atmospheric trace gas. This reaction plays an important role in the global COS cycle since biological consumption, that is, uptake by higher plants, algae, lichens, and soil, represents the dominant terrestrial sink for this gas. In this context, CA has been identified by a member of our group as the key enzyme for the consumption of COS by conversion into CO(2) and H(2)S. We investigated the hydration mechanism of COS by using density functional theory to elucidate the details of the catalytic cycle. Calculations were first performed for the uncatalyzed gas phase reaction. The rate-determining step for direct reaction of COS with H(2)O has an energy barrier of deltaG=53.2 kcal mol(-1). We then employed the CA model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) (1) and studied the effect on the catalytic hydration mechanism of replacing an oxygen atom with sulfur. When COS enters the carbonic anhydrase cycle, the sulfur atom is incorporated into the catalyst to yield [(H(3)N)(3)ZnSH](+) (27) and CO(2). The activation energy of the nucleophilic attack on COS, which is the rate-determining step, is somewhat higher (20.1 kcal mol(-1) in the gas phase) than that previously reported for CO(2). The sulfur-containing model 27 is also capable of catalyzing the reaction of CO(2) to produce thiocarbonic acid. A larger barrier has to be overcome for the reaction of 27 with CO(2) compared to that for the reaction of 1 with CO(2). At a well-defined stage of this cycle, a different reaction path can emerge: a water molecule helps to regenerate the original catalyst 1 from 27, a process accompanied by the formation of thiocarbonic acid. We finally demonstrate that nature selected a surprisingly elegant and efficient group of reactants, the [L(3)ZnOH](+)/CO(2)/H(2)O system, that helps

  5. Commission staff reports: impact of 1978--1979 winter curtailment for twenty-nine pipeline companies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-09-18

    Results of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) staff's survey are reported on short-term natural gas curtailment impacts as projected for the forthcoming winter heating season; November 1978, through March 1979, by interstate pipelines and their customers. Data are tabulated on estimated and actual gas supplies available, emergency gas transactions, weather, and potential availability of emergency gas. (JRD)

  6. Evaluation of Predicted and Observed Data on Biotransformation of Twenty-Nine Trace Organic Chemicals

    KAUST Repository

    Bertolini, Maria

    2011-07-01

    Trace organic chemicals present in household products, pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products may have adverse ecotoxicological effects once they are released to the environment. These chemicals are usually transported with the sewage to wastewater treatment facilities, where they might be attenuated depending on the degree of treatment applied prior to discharge to receiving streams. This study evaluates the removal performance of 29 trace organic compounds during two different activated sludge treatment systems. Predominant attenuation processes such as biotransformation and sorption for the target compounds were identified. Biotransformation rate constants determined in this study were used to assess removal of compounds from other treatment plants with similar operational conditions, using data gathered from the literature. The commercial software Catalogic was applied to predict environmental fate of chemicals. The software program consisted of four models able to simulate molecular transformations and to generate degradation trees. In order to assess the accuracy of this program in predicting biotransformation, one biodegradation model is used to contrast predicted degradation pathway with metabolic pathways reported in the literature. The predicted outcome was correct for more than 40 percent of the 29 targeted substances, while 38 percent of the chemicals exhibited some degree of lower agreement between predicted and observed pathways. Percent removal data determined for the two treatment facilities was compared with transformation probability output from Catalogic. About 80 percent of the 29 compounds exhibited a good correlation between probability of transformation of the parent compound and percent removal data from the two treatment plants (R2 = 0.82 and 0.9). Based upon findings for 29 trace organic chemicals regarding removal during activated sludge treatment, attacked fragments present in their structures, predicted data from Catalogic, and peer-reviewed pathways, possible indicator compounds capable of representing the removal of other compounds based on similar structures were identified. In conclusion, nine among the 29 select compounds were grouped into two categories showing similarities between removal, probability of transformation and attacked fragments. If more chemicals are evaluated, this approach could be useful to establish other indicator compounds based on identification of groups of chemicals with similar fate, properties, and structures.

  7. LECTURE ON ACUPUNCTURE Part Ⅰ Clinical Acupuncture Lecture Twenty-Nine ENURESIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玲; 尚秀葵; 董红英

    2003-01-01

    @@ Enuresis is referred to involuntary dischargeof urine in children who are more than threeyears at the age and have normal function of mic-turition. If bed-wetting happens occasionally dueto fatigue or drinking too much water beforesleep, it doesn't belong to pathological state.

  8. Twenty-nine-month follow-up of a paediatric zirconia dental crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Cazaux, Serena; Hyon, Isabelle; Prud'homme, Tony; Dajean Trutaud, Sylvie

    2017-06-14

    The aim of this paper is to present the long-term follow-up of one paediatric zirconia crown on a deciduous molar. Preformed crowns are part of the armamentarium in paediatric dentistry. In recent years, aesthetic alternatives to preformed metal crowns have been developed, first preveneered crowns and then zirconia crowns. This paper describes the restoration of a primary molar with a zirconia crown (EZ-Pedo, Loomis, California, USA) in an 8-year-old boy. In this clinical case, the protocol for the implementation and maintenance of zirconia crowns is detailed. The patient was followed up for 29 months until the natural exfoliation of his primary molar. The adaptation of the zirconia crown, the gingival health and the wear on the opposing tooth were considered. In this case, the paediatric zirconia crown allowed sustainable functional restoration while restoring a natural appearance of the tooth. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Twenty-nine day study of stability for six different parenteral nutrition mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desport; Hoedt; Pelagatti; Lagarde; Lorieul; Chalmel; Sultan; Feiss

    1997-01-01

    : BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to assess the particle size stability of six parenteral nutrition regimens, fitted to various pathologies, and used by the University Hospital of Limoges. The mixtures contained glucose (30 or 50%), amino acids (Hyperamine(R)25), and either long-chain triglycerides (20% Intralipide(R)) or a combination of medium and long-chain triglycerides (20% Médialipide(R)). The regimens were not supplemented. RESULTS: The visual examinations, particle size analysis and physico-chemical tests, carried out during a long storage period, did not reveal any significant evolution of the lipid emulsions. All the tested formulae were stable for 28 days at 4 degrees C plus 24 h at room temperature. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that the choice of lipid emulsions depends, for these formulae, on the metabolic and clinical needs of the treated patients.

  10. A New Nitrogenase Mechanism Using a CFe8S9 Model: Does H2 Elimination Activate the Complex to N2 Addition to the Central Carbon Atom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael L

    2016-02-11

    A truncated model of the FeMo cofactor is used to explore a new mechanism for the conversion of N2 to NH3 by the nitrogenase enzyme. After four initial protonation/reduction steps, the H4CFe8S9 cluster has two hydrogen atoms attached to sulfur, one hydrogen bridging two iron centers and one hydrogen bonded to carbon. The loss of the CH and FeHFe hydrogens as molecular hydrogen activates the cluster to addition of N2 to the carbon center. This unique step takes place at a nearly planar four-coordinate carbon center and leads to an intermediate with a significantly weakened N-N bond. A hydrogen attached to a sulfur atom is then transferred to the distal nitrogen atom. Additional prontonation/reduction steps are modeled by adding a hydrogen atom to sulfur and locating the transition states for transfer to nitrogen. The first NH3 is lost in a thermal neutral step, while the second step is endothermic. The loss of H2 activates the complex by reducing the barrier for N2 addition by 3.5 kcal/mol. Since this is the most difficult step in the mechanism, reducing the barrier for this step justifies the "extra expense" of H2 production.

  11. Study of double bond equivalents and the numbers of carbon and oxygen atom distribution of dissolved organic matter with negative-mode FT-ICR MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, EunJung; Yeo, In Joon; Jeong, Byungkwan; Shin, Yongsik; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2011-06-01

    A strong linear relationship was observed between the average double bond equivalence (DBE) and the ratio of carbon to oxygen atoms in oxygenated compounds of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Data were acquired by a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS), equipped with a negative-mode electrospray ionization source. The slope and y-intercepts extracted from the linear relationship can be used to compare DOM samples originating from different locations. Significant differences in these parameters were observed between inland riverine and offshore coastal DOM samples. Offshore coastal DOM molecules underwent a change of one DBE for each removal or addition of two oxygen atoms. This suggested the existence of multiple carboxyl groups, each of which contains a double bond and two oxygen atoms. Inland riverine samples exhibited a change of ~1.5 DBE following the addition or removal of two oxygen atoms. This extra change in DBE was attributed to cyclic structures or unsaturated chemical bonds. The DBE value with maximum relative abundance and the minimum DBE value for each class of oxygenated compounds showed that approximately two oxygen atoms contributed to a unity change in DBE. The qualitative analyses given here are in a good agreement with results obtained from analyses using orthogonal analytical techniques. This study demonstrates that DBE and the carbon number distribution, observed by high resolution mass spectrometry, can be valuable in elucidating and comparing structural features of oxygenated molecules of DOM.

  12. A transfer of carbon atoms from fatty acids to sugars and amino acids in yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Sławomir; Ratajczak, Wiktoria; Ratajczak, Lech

    2003-05-01

    The metabolism of 14C-acetate was investigated during the in vitro germination of yellow lupine seeds. Carbon atoms (14C) from the C-2 position of acetate were incorporated mainly into amino acids: aspartate, glutamate, and glutamine and into sugars: glucose, sucrose, and fructose. In contrast to this, 14C from the C-1 position of acetate was released mainly as 14CO2. Incorporation of 1-14C and 2-14C from acetate into amino acids and sugars in seedling axes was more intense when sucrose was added to the medium. However, in cotyledons where lipids are converted to carbohydrates, this process was inhibited by exogenous sucrose. Since acetate is the product of fatty acid beta-oxidation, our results indicate that, at least in lupine, seed storage lipids can be converted not only to sucrose, but mainly to amino acids. Inhibitory effects of sucrose on the incorporation of 14C from acetate into amino acids and sugars in cotyledons of lupine seedlings may be explained as the effect of regulation of the glyoxylate cycle by sugars.

  13. Synthesis of carbon nanofibers by CVD as a catalyst support material using atomically ordered Ni3C nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meifeng; Li, Na; Shao, Wei; Zhou, Chungen

    2016-12-01

    Atomically ordered nickel carbide (Ni3C) nanoparticles in polygonal shapes were prepared through the reduction of nickelocene. A novel type of carbon nanofiber (CNF) with twisted conformation was synthesized successfully by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) using the obtained Ni3C nanoparticles at a relatively low temperature of 350 °C, which is below the lower limit temperature of 400 °C for the growth of CNFs using metal catalysts. The growth mechanism of the twisted CNFs from Ni3C was freshly derived based on the detailed characterizations. Compared with the growth of CNFs from Ni, graphene layers nucleate at monoatomic step edges and grow in a layer-by-layer manner, while the rotation of the polygonal Ni3C nanoparticles fabricates the twisted conformation during the CNF growth. The electrochemical activity and performance of the twisted CNFs loaded with Pt as electrode catalysts for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) were measured to be better than those of straight CNFs grown from Ni nanoparticles at 500 °C, since the specific surface conformation helps to make the loaded Pt more homogeneous.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of tunnel barriers in a multi-walled carbon nanotube formed by argon atom beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomizawa, H. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Yamaguchi, T., E-mail: tyamag@riken.jp [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Akita, S. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Ishibashi, K. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    We have evaluated tunnel barriers formed in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by an Ar atom beam irradiation method and applied the technique to fabricate coupled double quantum dots. The two-terminal resistance of the individual MWNTs was increased owing to local damage caused by the Ar beam irradiation. The temperature dependence of the current through a single barrier suggested two different contributions to its Arrhenius plot, i.e., formed by direct tunneling through the barrier and by thermal activation over the barrier. The height of the formed barriers was estimated. The fabrication technique was used to produce coupled double quantum dots with serially formed triple barriers on a MWNT. The current measured at 1.5 K as a function of two side-gate voltages resulted in a honeycomb-like charge stability diagram, which confirmed the formation of the double dots. The characteristic parameters of the double quantum dots were calculated, and the feasibility of the technique is discussed.

  15. Direct formation of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes by atomic layer deposition and their photocatalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Hsin; Liao, Shih-Yun; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Kei, Chi-Chung; Gan, Jon-Yiew; Perng, Tsong-Pyng

    2016-10-01

    TiO2 with different morphology was deposited on acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by atomic layer deposition at 100 °C-300 °C to form a TiO2@CNT structure. The TiO2 fabricated at 100 °C was an amorphous film, but became crystalline anatase nanoparticles when fabricated at 200 °C and 300 °C. The saturation growth rates of TiO2 nanoparticles at 300 °C were about 1.5 and 0.4 Å/cycle for substrate-enhanced growth and linear growth processes, respectively. It was found that the rate constants for methylene blue degradation by the TiO2@CNT structure formed at 300 °C were more suitable to fit with second-order reaction. The size of 9 nm exhibited the best degradation efficiency, because of the high specific area and appropriate diffusion length for the electrons and holes.

  16. Synthesis of carbon nanotube-nickel nanocomposites using atomic layer deposition for high-performance non-enzymatic glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Taejin; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hangil; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Eunkyoung; Park, Jusang; Kim, Hyungjun

    2015-01-15

    A useful strategy has been developed to fabricate carbon-nanotube-nickel (CNT-Ni) nanocomposites through atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ni and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of functionalized CNTs. Various techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), were used to characterize the morphology and the structure of as-prepared samples. It was confirmed that the products possess uniform Ni nanoparticles that are constructed by finely controlled deposition of Ni onto oxygen or bromine functionalized CNT surface. Electrochemical studies indicate that the CNT-Ni nanocomposites exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for glucose oxidation in alkaline solutions, which enables the products to be used in enzyme-free electrochemical sensors for glucose determination. It was demonstrated that the CNT-Ni nanocomposite-based glucose biosensor offers a variety of merits, such as a wide linear response window for glucose concentrations of 5 μM-2 mM, short response time (3 s), a low detection limit (2 μM), high sensitivity (1384.1 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)), and good selectivity and repeatability.

  17. Catalytic Synthesis of Substrate-Free, Aligned and Tailored High Aspect Ratio Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes in an Ultrasonic Atomization Head CVD Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Fahad Ali Rabbani; Zuhair Omar Malaibari; Muataz Ali Atieh; Ammar Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has proven its benchmark, over other methods, for the production of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNT) on commercial and lab scale. In this study, an injection vertical CVD reactor fitted with an ultrasonic atomization head was used in a pilot-plant scale (height 274 cm, radius 25 cm) for semicontinuous production of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). p-Xylene was used as a hydrocarbon precursor in which ferrocene was dissolved and provided the ...

  18. The effect of defects on the catalytic activity of single Au atom supported carbon nanotubes and reaction mechanism for CO oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajjad; Fu Liu, Tian; Lian, Zan; Li, Bo; Sheng Su, Dang

    2017-08-23

    The mechanism of CO oxidation by O2 on a single Au atom supported on pristine, mono atom vacancy (m), di atom vacancy (di) and the Stone Wales defect (SW) on single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) surface is systematically investigated theoretically using density functional theory. We determine that single Au atoms can be trapped effectively by the defects on SWCNTs. The defects on SWCNTs can enhance both the binding strength and catalytic activity of the supported single Au atom. Fundamental aspects such as adsorption energy and charge transfer are elucidated to analyze the adsorption properties of CO and O2 and co-adsorption of CO and O2 molecules. It is found that CO binds stronger than O2 on Au supported SWCNT. We clearly demonstrate that the defected SWCNT surface promotes electron transfer from the supported single Au atom to O2 molecules. On the other hand, this effect is weaker for pristine SWCNTs. It is observed that the high density of spin-polarized states are localized in the region of the Fermi level due to the strong interactions between Au (5d orbital) and the adjacent carbon (2p orbital) atoms, which influence the catalytic performance. In addition, we elucidate both the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms of CO oxidation by O2. For the LH pathway, the barriers of the rate-limiting step are calculated to be 0.02 eV and 0.05 eV for Au/m-SWCNT and Au/di-SWCNT, respectively. To regenerate the active sites, an ER-like reaction occurs to form a second CO2 molecule. The ER pathway is observed on Au/m-SWCNT, Au/SW-SWCNT and Au/SWCNT in which the Au/m-SWCNT has a smaller barrier. The comparison with a previous study (Lu et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2009, 113, 20156-20160.) indicates that the curvature effect of SWCNTs is important for the catalytic property of the supported single Au. Overall, Au/m-SWCNT is identified as the most active catalyst for CO oxidation compared to pristine SWCNT, SW-SWCNT and di-SWCNT. Our findings give a clear

  19. Polarizabilities and van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes from an atomistic electrodynamics model: Anomalous scaling with number of carbon atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Wissam A.; Norman, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    The van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes are shown to exhibit an anomalous dependence on the number of carbon atoms N such that C6 ∝ N2.2 as predicted using state-of-the-art quantum mechanical calculations based on fullerenes with small sizes, and N2.75 as predicted using a classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation of the fullerenes. We use an atomistic electrodynamics model where each carbon atom is described by a polarizable object to extend the quantum mechanical calculations to larger fullerenes. The parameters of this model are optimized to describe accurately the static and complex polarizabilities of the fullerenes by fitting against accurate ab initio calculations. This model shows that C6 ∝ N2.8, which is supportive of the classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation. Additionally, we show that the anomalous dependence of the polarizability on N is attributed to the electric charge term, while the dipole-dipole term scales almost linearly with the number of carbon atoms.

  20. A low-temperature synthesis of electrochemical active Pt nanoparticles and thin films by atomic layer deposition on Si(111) and glassy carbon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Han, Lihao [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Photovoltaic Materials and Devices (PVMD) Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, GA Delft 2600 (Netherlands); Huang, Zhuangqun; Ferrer, Ivonne M. [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smets, Arno H.M.; Zeman, Miro [Photovoltaic Materials and Devices (PVMD) Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, GA Delft 2600 (Netherlands); Brunschwig, Bruce S., E-mail: bsb@caltech.edu [Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lewis, Nathan S., E-mail: nslewis@caltech.edu [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit nanoparticles and thin films of Pt onto etched p-type Si(111) wafers and glassy carbon discs. Using precursors of MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and ozone and a temperature window of 200–300 °C, the growth rate was 80–110 pm/cycle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the composition, structure, morphology, and thickness of the ALD-grown Pt nanoparticle films. The catalytic activity of the ALD-grown Pt for the hydrogen evolution reaction was shown to be equivalent to that of e-beam evaporated Pt on glassy carbon electrode. - Highlights: • Pure Pt films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe3 and ozone. • ALD-grown Pt thin films had high growth rates of 110 pm/cycle. • ALD-grown Pt films were electrocatalytic for hydrogen evolution from water. • Electrocatalytic activity of the ALD Pt films was equivalent to e-beam deposited Pt. • No carbon species were detected in the ALD-grown Pt films.

  1. Polarizabilities and van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes from an atomistic electrodynamics model: Anomalous scaling with number of carbon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Wissam A; Norman, Patrick

    2016-07-14

    The van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes are shown to exhibit an anomalous dependence on the number of carbon atoms N such that C6 ∝ N(2.2) as predicted using state-of-the-art quantum mechanical calculations based on fullerenes with small sizes, and N(2.75) as predicted using a classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation of the fullerenes. We use an atomistic electrodynamics model where each carbon atom is described by a polarizable object to extend the quantum mechanical calculations to larger fullerenes. The parameters of this model are optimized to describe accurately the static and complex polarizabilities of the fullerenes by fitting against accurate ab initio calculations. This model shows that C6 ∝ N(2.8), which is supportive of the classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation. Additionally, we show that the anomalous dependence of the polarizability on N is attributed to the electric charge term, while the dipole-dipole term scales almost linearly with the number of carbon atoms.

  2. Synergic effect of atomic oxygen and outgassing phenomena on Carbon/SiC composites for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Marta

    so that sublimation and ablation easily can take place. The key role played by carbon composites in re-entry environment is due to their high stability at high temperature, preserving their mechanical properties. However, most of these applications involve extended time periods in oxidizing environments where carbon reacts rapidly with oxygen at temperatures as low as 770K and the composites are subjected to oxidation degradation. For these reasons coated C/C and C/SiC composites are the most promising materials for the exposed surface of a thermal protection system. The modern approaches to a design of such materials assume broad application of mathematical and physical simulation methods. But mathematical simulation is impossible if there is no true information available on the characteristics (properties) of objects analyzed. In the majority of cases in practice the direct measurement of materials thermo physical properties, especially of complex composition, is impossible. There is only one way which permits to overcome these complexities - the indirect measurement. Mathematically, such an approach is usually formulated as a solution of the inverse problem: through direct measurements of system's state (temperature, component concentration, etc.) define the properties of a system analyzed, for example, the materials thermophysical characteristics. Violation of cause-and-effect relations in the statement of these problems results in their correctness in mathematical sense (i.e., the absence of existence and/or uniqueness and/or stability of the solution). Hence to solve such problems special methods are developed usually called regularized. In order to guarantee the success of a space structure there is the necessity to study the synergic effects of all the challenges that the harsh space environment place to the structure. For this reason here is presented a joint experimental study on synergic effects on C/SiC composites. Outgassing and atomic oxygen corrosion

  3. Atom probe study of the carbon distribution in a hardened martensitic hot-work tool steel X38CrMoV5-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchbacher, Christoph; Zinner, Silvia; Leitner, Harald

    2012-07-01

    The microstructure of the hardened common hot-work tool steel X38CrMoV5-1 has been characterized by atom probe tomography with the focus on the carbon distribution. Samples quenched with technically relevant cooling parameters λ from 0.1 (30 K/s) to 12 (0.25 K/s) have been investigated. The parameter λ is an industrially commonly used exponential cooling parameter, representing the cooling time from 800 to 500 °C in seconds divided with hundred. In all samples pronounced carbon segregation to dislocations and cluster formation could be observed after quenching. Carbon enriched interlath films with peak carbon levels of 6-10 at.%, which have been identified to be retained austenite by TEM, show a thickness increase with increasing λ. Therefore, the fraction of total carbon staying in the austenite grows. This carbon is not available for the tempering induced precipitation of secondary carbides in the bulk. Through all samples no segregation of any substitutional elements takes place. Charpy impact testing and fracture surface analysis of the hardened samples reveal the cooling rate induced microstructural distinctions.

  4. Warm ISM in the Sagittarius A Complex. I. Mid-J CO, atomic carbon, ionized atomic carbon, and ionized nitrogen sub-mm/FIR line observations with the Herschel-HIFI and NANTEN2/SMART telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, P.; Simon, R.; Stutzki, J.; Güsten, R.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Higgins, R.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We investigate the spatial and spectral distribution of the local standard of rest (LSR) velocity resolved submillimetre emission from the warm (25-90 K) gas in the Sgr A Complex, located in the Galactic centre. Methods: We present large-scale submillimetre heterodyne observations towards the Sgr A Complex covering ~300 arcmin2. These data were obtained in the frame of the Herschel EXtraGALactic guaranteed time key program (HEXGAL) with the Herschel-HIFI satellite and are complemented with submillimetre observations obtained with the NANTEN2/SMART telescope as part of the NANTEN2/SMART Central Nuclear Zone Survey. The observed species are CO(J = 4-3) at 461.0 GHz observed with the NANTEN2/SMART telescope, and [CI] 3P1-3P0 at 492.2 GHz, [CI] 3P2-3P1 at 809.3 GHz, [NII] 3P1-3P0 at 1461.1 GHz, and [CII] 2P3/2-2P1/2 at 1900.5 GHz observed with the Herschel-HIFI satellite. The observations are presented in a 1 km s-1 spectral resolution and a spatial resolution ranging from 46 arcsec to 28 arcsec. The spectral coverage of the three lower frequency lines is ±200 km s-1, while in the two high frequency lines, the upper LSR velocity limit is +94 km s-1 and +145 km s-1 for the [NII] and [CII] lines, respectively. Results: The spatial distribution of the emission in all lines is very widespread. The bulk of the carbon monoxide emission is found towards Galactic latitudes below the Galactic plane, and all the known molecular clouds are identified. Both neutral atomic carbon lines have their brightest emission associated with the +50 km s-1 cloud. Their spatial distribution at this LSR velocity describes a crescent-shape structure, which is probably the result of interaction with the energetic event (one or several supernovae explosions) that gave origin to the non-thermal Sgr A-East source. The [CII] and [NII] emissions have most of their flux associated with the thermal arched-filaments and the H region and bright spots in [CII] emission towards the central nuclear

  5. Characterization of carbon contamination under ion and hot atom bombardment in a tin-plasma extreme ultraviolet light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolgov, A., E-mail: a.dolgov@utwente.nl [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Lopaev, D. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lee, C.J. [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Zoethout, E. [Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER), Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Medvedev, V. [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Yakushev, O. [Institute for Spectroscopy Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bijkerk, F. [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Carbon film grown during exposure to EUV radiation and high energy ions was studied. • The carbon film is highly resistant to chemical and physical sputtering. • Surface contamination of plasma-facing components is similar to hydrogenated DLC. - Abstract: Molecular contamination of a grazing incidence collector for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography was experimentally studied. A carbon film was found to have grown under irradiation from a pulsed tin plasma discharge. Our studies show that the film is chemically inert and has characteristics that are typical for a hydrogenated amorphous carbon film. It was experimentally observed that the film consists of carbon (∼70 at.%), oxygen (∼20 at.%) and hydrogen (bound to oxygen and carbon), along with a few at.% of tin. Most of the oxygen and hydrogen are most likely present as OH groups, chemically bound to carbon, indicating an important role for adsorbed water during the film formation process. It was observed that the film is predominantly sp{sup 3} hybridized carbon, as is typical for diamond-like carbon. The Raman spectra of the film, under 514 and 264 nm excitation, are typical for hydrogenated diamond-like carbon. Additionally, the lower etch rate and higher energy threshold in chemical ion sputtering in H{sub 2} plasma, compared to magnetron-sputtered carbon films, suggests that the film exhibits diamond-like carbon properties.

  6. Performance evaluation of different diamond-like carbon samples as charge state conversion surfaces for neutral atom imaging detectors in space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Allenbach, Marc; Föhn, Martina; Wurz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The detection of energetic neutral atoms is a substantial requirement on every space mission mapping particle populations of a planetary magnetosphere or plasma of the interstellar medium. For imaging neutrals, these first have to be ionised. Regarding the constraints of weight, volume and power consumption, the technique of surface ionisation complies with all specifications of a space mission. Particularly low energy neutral atoms, which cannot be ionised by passing through a foil, are ionised by scattering on a charge state conversion surface [1]. Since more than 30 years intense research work is done to find and optimise suitable materials for use as charge state conversion surfaces for space application. Crucial parameters are the ionisation efficiency of the surface material and the scattering properties. Regarding these parameters, diamond-like carbon was proven advantageously: While efficiently ionising incoming neutral atoms, diamond stands out by its durability and chemical inertness [2]. In the IBEX-Lo sensor, a diamond-like carbon surface is used for ionisation of neutral atoms. Building on the successes of the IBEX mission [3], the follow up mission IMAP (InterstellarMApping Probe) will take up to further explore the boundaries of the heliosphere. The IMAP mission is planned to map neutral atoms in a larger energy range and with a distinct better angular resolution and sensitivity than IBEX [4]. The aspired performance of the IMAP sensors implies also for charge state conversion surfaces with improved characteristics. We investigated samples of diamond-like carbon, manufactured by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method, regarding their ionisation efficiency, scattering and reflexion properties. Experiments were carried out at the ILENA facility at the University of Bern [5] with hydrogen and oxygen atoms, which are the species of main interest in magnetospheric research [1]. We compare the results of earlier investigations of a metallised CVD

  7. Atomic Layer Deposition of ZnO on Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Its Use for Synthesis of CNT–ZnO Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, direct coating of ZnO on PECVD-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs is achieved using atomic layer deposition (ALD. Transmission electron microscopy investigation shows that the deposited ZnO shell is continuous and uniform, in contrast to the previously reported particle morphology. The ZnO layer has a good crystalline quality as indicated by Raman and photoluminescence (PL measurements. We also show that such ZnO layer can be used as seed layer for subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods, resulting in branched CNT–inorganic hybrid nanostructures. Potentially, this method can also apply to the fabrication of ZnO-based hybrid nanostructures on other carbon nanomaterials.

  8. Pd nanoparticles on ZnO-passivated porous carbon by atomic layer deposition: an effective electrochemical catalyst for Li-O2 battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiangyi; Piernavieja-Hermida, Mar; Lu, Jun; Wu, Tianpin; Wen, Jianguo; Ren, Yang; Miller, Dean; Zak Fang, Zhigang; Lei, Yu; Amine, Khalil

    2015-04-24

    Uniformly dispersed Pd nanoparticles on ZnO-passivated porous carbon were synthesized via an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, which was tested as a cathode material in a rechargeable Li-O2 battery, showing a highly active catalytic effect toward the electrochemical reactions-in particular, the oxygen evolution reaction. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed discrete crystalline nanoparticles decorating the surface of the ZnO-passivated porous carbon support in which the size could be controlled in the range of 3-6 nm, depending on the number of Pd ALD cycles performed. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Pd K-edge revealed that the carbon-supported Pd existed in a mixed phase of metallic palladium and palladium oxide. The ZnO-passivated layer effectively blocks the defect sites on the carbon surface, minimizing the electrolyte decomposition. Our results suggest that ALD is a promising technique for tailoring the surface composition and structure of nanoporous supports for Li-O2 batteries.

  9. Catalytic Synthesis of Substrate-Free, Aligned and Tailored High Aspect Ratio Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes in an Ultrasonic Atomization Head CVD Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Ali Rabbani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical vapor deposition (CVD method has proven its benchmark, over other methods, for the production of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNT on commercial and lab scale. In this study, an injection vertical CVD reactor fitted with an ultrasonic atomization head was used in a pilot-plant scale (height 274 cm, radius 25 cm for semicontinuous production of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. p-Xylene was used as a hydrocarbon precursor in which ferrocene was dissolved and provided the cracking catalyst. Atomization of the feed solution resulted in full and even dispersion of the catalytic solution. This dispersion led to the production of high aspect ratio MWCNTs (ranging from 8,000 to 12,000 at 850°C. Different experimental parameters affecting the quality and quantity of the produced CNTs were investigated. These included temperature, reaction time, and flow rate of the reaction and carrier gases. Different properties of the produced CNTs were characterized using SEM and TEM, while TGA was used to evaluate their purity. Specific surface area of selected samples was calculated by BET.

  10. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  11. 类碳体系基态能量的精细结构%Fine-structure of the ground state of carbon-like atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄时中; 马堃; 倪秀波; 胡健; 吴长义

    2008-01-01

    以多电子原子精细结构哈密顿的球张量形式和不可约张量理论为基础,建立了计算多电子原子精细结构(包括自旋-轨道相互作用、自旋-其它轨道相互作用和自旋-自旋相互作用)能量的一般性解析理论形式,应用所建立的理论对类碳体系(Z=6~8)基态的精细结构能量进行了具体计算,计算结果与实验数据符合得较好.%Based on the tensor expression of the fine-structure Hamiltonian for many-electron atoms, and with the help of irreducible tensor theory, a general analytical theory of calculating the fine structure energy (including spin-orbit interaction, spin-other-orbit interaction and the spin-spin interaction) of many-electron atoms has been established explicitly. The fine-structure energies of the ground state of carbon-like atoms from Z=6 to 8 have been calculated. The results are in close agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Atomic Data for Fusion. Volume 5: Collisions of Carbon and Oxygen Ions with Electrons, H, H2 and He

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    814 ( 1940 ). E.24 M. Lennon, R. W. McCullough, and H. B. Gilbody, J. Phys. B 16, 2191 (1983). 6-7 E.25 I. S. Dmitriev, V. S. Nikolaev, Y. A. Tashaev...Dept. of Physics, Tel-Aviv Univ., Tel-Aviv, Israel 383. Dr. I. N. Golovin , I. V. Kurchatov Inst., Atomic Energy, Ulitsa Kurchatova 46, Moscow 123182

  13. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sorbent material for the solid phase extraction of lead from urine and subsequent determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña Crecente, Rosa M.; Lovera, Carlha Gutiérrez; García, Julia Barciela; Méndez, Jennifer Álvarez; Martín, Sagrario García; Latorre, Carlos Herrero, E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es

    2014-11-01

    The determination of lead in urine is a way of monitoring the chemical exposure to this metal. In the present paper, a new method for the Pb determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) in urine at low levels has been developed. Lead was separated from the undesirable urine matrix by means of a solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used as a sorbent material. Lead from urine was retained at pH 4.0 and was quantitatively eluted using a 0.7 M nitric acid solution and was subsequently measured by ETAAS. The effects of parameters that influence the adsorption–elution process (such as pH, eluent volume and concentration, sampling and elution flow rates) and the atomic spectrometry conditions have been studied by means of different factorial design strategies. Under the optimized conditions, the detection and quantification limits obtained were 0.08 and 0.26 μg Pb L{sup −1}, respectively. The results demonstrate the absence of a urine matrix effect and this is the consequence of the SPE process carried out. Therefore, the developed method is useful for the analysis of Pb at low levels in real samples without the influence of other urine components. The proposed method was applied to the determination of lead in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained (in the range 3.64–22.9 μg Pb L{sup −1}). - Highlights: • Lead determination in urine using a solid phase extraction procedure followed by ETAAS • Carbon nanotubes as SPE adsorbent for Pb in urine • Matrix elimination for the Pb determination in urine by using SPE based on carbon nanotubes • The detection limit was 0.08 μg Pb L{sup −1}.

  14. Carbon-coated ZnO mat passivation by atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi-Hee

    2017-11-01

    ZnO has had little consideration as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries compared with other transition-metal oxides due to its inherent poor electrical conductivity and large volume expansion upon cycling and pulverization of ZnO-based electrodes. A logical design and facile synthesis of ZnO with well-controlled particle sizes and a specific morphology is essential to improving the performance of ZnO in lithium-ion batteries. In this paper, a simple approach is reported that uses a cation surfactant and a chelating agent to synthesize three-dimensional hierarchical nanostructured carbon-coated ZnO mats, in which the ZnO mats are composed of stacked individual ZnO nanowires and form well-defined nanoporous structures with high surface areas. In order to improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries, HfO2 is deposited on the carbon-coated ZnO mat electrode via atomic layer deposition. Lithium-ion battery devices based on the carbon-coated ZnO mat passivation by atomic layer deposited HfO2 exhibit an excellent initial discharge and charge capacities of 2684.01 and 963.21mAhg(-1), respectively, at a current density of 100mAg(-1) in the voltage range of 0.01-3V. They also exhibit cycle stability after 125 cycles with a capacity of 740mAhg(-1) and a remarkable rate capability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multielement determination of heavy metals in water samples by continuous powder introduction microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry after preconcentration on activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Krzysztof; Yao, Jun; Kasiura, Krzysztof; Jackowska, Adrianna; Sieradzka, Anna

    2005-03-01

    A novel continuous powder introduction microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry method (CPI-MIP-AES) has been developed for trace determination of metals in ground and tap water samples after preconcentration on activated carbon. The experimental setup consisted of integrated rectangular cavity TE 101 and vertically positioned plasma torch. The technical arrangement of the sample introduction system has been designed based on the fluidized bed concept. The satisfactory signal stability required for sequential analysis was attained owing to the vertical plasma configuration, as well as the plasma gas flow rate compatibility with sample introduction flow rate. The elements of interest (Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn) were preconcentrated in a batch procedure at pH 8-8.5 after addition of activated carbon and then, after filtering and drying of the activated carbon suspension, introduced to the MIP by the CPI system. An enrichment factor of about 1000-fold for a sample volume of 1 l was obtained. The detection limit values for the proposed method were 17-250 ng l -1. The proposed method was validated by analyzing the certified reference materials: SRW "Warta" Synthetic River Water and BCR CRM 399 major elements in freshwater. The method was successfully applied to the determination of the heavy metals in tap water samples.

  16. Multielement determination of heavy metals in water samples by continuous powder introduction microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry after preconcentration on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowski, Krzysztof [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Analytical Chemistry, 00-664 Warsaw, ul. Noakowskiego 3 (Poland)]. E-mail: kj@ch.pw.edu.pl; Yao Jun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jishou University, 120 Renmin South Road, Jishou 416000 (China); Kasiura, Krzysztof [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Analytical Chemistry, 00-664 Warsaw, ul. Noakowskiego 3 (Poland); Jackowska, Adrianna [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Analytical Chemistry, 00-664 Warsaw, ul. Noakowskiego 3 (Poland); Sieradzka, Anna [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Analytical Chemistry, 00-664 Warsaw, ul. Noakowskiego 3 (Poland)

    2005-03-31

    A novel continuous powder introduction microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry method (CPI-MIP-AES) has been developed for trace determination of metals in ground and tap water samples after preconcentration on activated carbon. The experimental setup consisted of integrated rectangular cavity TE{sub 101} and vertically positioned plasma torch. The technical arrangement of the sample introduction system has been designed based on the fluidized bed concept. The satisfactory signal stability required for sequential analysis was attained owing to the vertical plasma configuration, as well as the plasma gas flow rate compatibility with sample introduction flow rate. The elements of interest (Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn) were preconcentrated in a batch procedure at pH 8-8.5 after addition of activated carbon and then, after filtering and drying of the activated carbon suspension, introduced to the MIP by the CPI system. An enrichment factor of about 1000-fold for a sample volume of 1 l was obtained. The detection limit values for the proposed method were 17-250 ng l{sup -1}. The proposed method was validated by analyzing the certified reference materials: SRW 'Warta' Synthetic River Water and BCR CRM 399 major elements in freshwater. The method was successfully applied to the determination of the heavy metals in tap water samples.

  17. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in the particulate phase from burning incenses with various atomic hydrogen/carbon ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Tzu-Ting, E-mail: d89844001@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Health, Yuanpei University, No. 306, Yuanpei St., Hsin Chu, 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shaw-Tao [Department of Applied Chemistry, Providence University, 200 Chung-Chi Rd., Salu Dist., Taichung City 43301, Taiwan (China); Lin, Tser-Sheng [Department of Safety, Health, and Environmental Engineering, National United University, 2 Lien Da, Maioli, 360, Taiwan (China); Hong, Wei-Lun [Department of Environmental Engineering and Health, Yuanpei University, No. 306, Yuanpei St., Hsin Chu, 300, Taiwan (China)

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the particulate phase generated from burning various incense was investigated by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Among the used incenses, the atomic H/C ratio ranged from 0.51 to 1.69, yielding the emission factor ranges for total particulate mass and PAHs of 4.19-82.16 mg/g and 1.20-9.50 {mu}g/g, respectively. The atomic H/C ratio of the incense was the key factor affecting particulate mass and the PAHs emission factors. Both the maximum emission factor and the slowest burning rate appear at the H/C ratio of 1.57. The concentrations of the four-ring PAHs predominated and the major species among the 16 PAHs were fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and chrysene for most incense types. The benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene accounted for 87.08-93.47% of the total toxic equivalency emission factor. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The atomic H/C ratio of incense was the key factor affecting PAHs emission factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Burning incense with lower atomic H/C ratio minimized the production of total PAHs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The BaP, BaA, BbF, and DBA accounted for 87.08-93.47% of the TEQ emission factor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Special PAH ratios were regarded as characteristic ratios for burning incense.

  18. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageev, O. A., E-mail: ageev@sfedu.ru [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation); Bykov, Al. V. [NT-MDT (Russian Federation); Kolomiitsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G.; Rubashkina, M. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G. [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering.

  19. Characterization of carbon contamination under ion and hot atom bombardment in a tin-plasma extreme ultraviolet light source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolgov, A.; Lopaev, D.; Lee, C. J.; Zoethout, E.; Medvedev, V.; Yakushev, O.; F. Bijkerk,

    2015-01-01

    Molecular contamination of a grazing incidence collector for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography was experimentally studied. A carbon film was found to have grown under irradiation from a pulsed tin plasma discharge. Our studies show that the film is chemically inert and has characteristics that a

  20. Atomic layer deposition of amorphous oxygen-deficient TiO2-x on carbon nanotubes as cathode materials for lithium-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingbo; Ma, Dingtao; Li, Yongliang; Zhang, Peixin; Mi, Hongwei; Deng, Libo; Sun, Lingna; Ren, Xiangzhong

    2017-08-01

    The amorphous oxygen-deficient TiO2-x thin layer coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized by atomic layer deposition and employed as cathode materials for lithium-air battery. The cathode demonstrates high electrocatalytic activity toward electrode reactions, resulting from the introduction of oxygen-deficient TiO2-x into the nanocomposites. It is found that the intrinsically isotropic nature of amorphous TiO2 which a certain amount of Ti3.5+ and Ti3+ can improve the catalytic activity. Consequently, the battery with the corresponded CNT@TiO2-x cathode shows high discharge/charge capacities and good cycling performance, which the cyclic retention of more than 90 cycles are achieved, while with the pristine CNTs only 50 cycles are obtained. This study provides an approach to fabricate cathode materials for lithium-air battery and moreover clarifies the influence of oxygen vacancies of TiO2 on the electrochemical performance.

  1. Prototropic migrations in the phosphorylation of imidoyl chlorides containing hydrogen on the N-. cap alpha. -carbon atom. III. Phosphorylation of substituted N-benzylbenzimidoyl chlorides with triethyl phosphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onys' ko, P.P.; Kim, T.V.; Kiseleva, E.I.; Sinitsa, A.D.

    1987-11-20

    The reactions of substituted N-benzylbenzimidoyl chlorides with triethyl phosphite lead to imidoylphosphonates, which suffer a 1,3-H shift with the formation of ..cap alpha..-phosphorylated azomethines. In phosphorylated 1,3-diaryl-substituted azaallyl systems the most stable isomer is that in which the phosphoryl group is linked to the sp/sup 3/-carbon atom of the C=N-CH triad. Substituents in the benzene nucleus do not influence the position of the prototropic equilibrium. The spectra were recorded with the external standards HMDS and 85% H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ and the internal standard CCl/sub 3/F for /sup 1/H, /sup 31/P, and /sup 19/P nuclei, respectively.

  2. Hydrogen adsorption on activated carbon nanotubes with an atomic-sized vanadium catalyst investigated by electrical resistance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ji Sun; Yun, Jumi; Kang, Seok Chang; Lee, Sung Kyu; Lee, Young-Seak

    2012-01-01

    Activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared with appended vanadium as a hydrogen storage medium. The pore structure was significantly improved by an activation process that was studied using Raman spectroscopy, field emission transmission electron microscopy and pore analysis techniques. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results reveal that the vanadium catalyst was introduced into the carbon nanotubes in controlled proportions, forming V8C7. The improved pore structure functioned as a path through the carbon nanotubes that encouraged hydrogen molecule adsorption, and the introduced vanadium catalyst led to high levels of hydrogen storage through the dissociation of hydrogen molecules via the spill-over phenomenon. The hydrogen storage behavior was investigated by electrical resistance measurements for the hydrogen adsorbed on a prepared sample. The proposed mechanism of hydrogen storage suggests that the vanadium catalyst increases not only the amount of hydrogen that is stored but also the speed at which it is stored. A hydrogen storage capacity of 2.26 wt.% was achieved with the activation effects and the vanadium catalyst at 30 °C and 10 MPa.

  3. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sorbent material for the solid phase extraction of lead from urine and subsequent determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Crecente, Rosa M.; Lovera, Carlha Gutiérrez; García, Julia Barciela; Méndez, Jennifer Álvarez; Martín, Sagrario García; Latorre, Carlos Herrero

    2014-11-01

    The determination of lead in urine is a way of monitoring the chemical exposure to this metal. In the present paper, a new method for the Pb determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) in urine at low levels has been developed. Lead was separated from the undesirable urine matrix by means of a solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used as a sorbent material. Lead from urine was retained at pH 4.0 and was quantitatively eluted using a 0.7 M nitric acid solution and was subsequently measured by ETAAS. The effects of parameters that influence the adsorption-elution process (such as pH, eluent volume and concentration, sampling and elution flow rates) and the atomic spectrometry conditions have been studied by means of different factorial design strategies. Under the optimized conditions, the detection and quantification limits obtained were 0.08 and 0.26 μg Pb L- 1, respectively. The results demonstrate the absence of a urine matrix effect and this is the consequence of the SPE process carried out. Therefore, the developed method is useful for the analysis of Pb at low levels in real samples without the influence of other urine components. The proposed method was applied to the determination of lead in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained (in the range 3.64-22.9 μg Pb L- 1).

  4. Determination of total selenium content in sediments and natural water by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy after collection as a selenium(IV) complex on activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, T; Suzuki, K; Okutani, T

    1995-07-01

    A trace level of Se was collected on activated carbon (AC) as the Se(IV)-3-phenyl-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2(3H)-thione (Bismuthiol II) complex. The AC was directly introduced as an AC-suspension into the graphite tube atomizer and the Se concentration was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (T. Okutani, T. Kubota, N. Sugiyama and Y. Turuta, Nippon Kagaku Kaishi, (1991) 375). The amount of Se in heavily contaminated samples including sediment, lake water and seawater was determined using this method. The sediments were digested with HNO(3)HClO(4)HF and the interference from AlF(3) was removed using H(3)BO(3)HClO(4). Lake water and seawater were acidified with H(2)SO(4) and digested with KMnO(4). The Se concentrations of these samples were determined by this method with satisfactory results. The above method is simple, rapid and applicable to heavily contaminated samples.

  5. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine samples after dispersive solid–liquid extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez Méndez, J.; Barciela García, J.; García Martín, S.; Peña Crecente, R.M.; Herrero Latorre, C., E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es

    2015-04-01

    A new method for the determination of Cd and Pb in urine samples has been developed. The method involves dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE), slurry sampling (SS), and subsequent electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the sorbent material. The isolated MWCNT/analyte aggregates were treated with nitric acid to form a slurry and both metals were determined directly by injecting the slurry into the ETAAS-atomizer. The parameters that influence the adsorption of the metals on MWCNTs in the DSPE process, the formation and extraction of the slurry, and the ETAAS conditions were studied by different factorial design strategies. The detection and quantification limits obtained for Cd under optimized conditions were 9.7 and 32.3 ng L{sup −1}, respectively, and for Pb these limits were 0.13 and 0.43 μg L{sup −1}. The preconcentration factors achieved were 3.9 and 5.4. The RSD values (n = 10) were less than 4.1% and 5.9% for Cd and Pb, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed in recovery studies, with values in the range 96–102% obtained for Cd and 97–101% for Pb. In addition, the analysis of certified reference materials gave consistent results. The DSPE–SS–ETAAS method is a novel and useful strategy for the determination of Pb and Cd at low levels in human urine samples. The method is sensitive, fast, and free of matrix interferences, and it avoids the tedious and time-consuming on-column adsorption and elution steps associated with commonly used SPE procedures. The proposed method was used to determine Cd and Pb in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained. - Highlights: • Cd and Pb determination based on the combination of DSP, SS and ETAAS • Urine matrix was eliminated using DSPE based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes. • Slurry sampling technique permitted the direct injection of sample into the ETAAS atomizer.

  6. High temperature shock tube and theoretical studies on the thermal decomposition of dimethyl carbonate and its bimolecular reactions with H and D-atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, S L; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Michael, J V

    2013-05-09

    The shock tube technique was used to study the high temperature thermal decomposition of dimethyl carbonate, CH3OC(O)OCH3 (DMC). The formation of H-atoms was measured behind reflected shock waves by using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS). The experiments span a T-range of 1053-1157 K at pressures ∼0.5 atm. The H-atom profiles were simulated using a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for DMC thermal decomposition. Simulations indicate that the formation of H-atoms is sensitive to the rate constants for the energetically lowest-lying bond fission channel, CH3OC(O)OCH3 → CH3 + CH3OC(O)O [A], where H-atoms form instantaneously at high temperatures from the sequence of radical β-scissions, CH3OC(O)O → CH3O + CO2 → H + CH2O + CO2. A master equation analysis was performed using CCSD(T)/cc-pv∞z//M06-2X/cc-pvtz energetics and molecular properties for all thermal decomposition processes in DMC. The theoretical predictions were found to be in good agreement with the present experimentally derived rate constants for the bond fission channel (A). The theoretically derived rate constants for this important bond-fission process in DMC can be represented by a modified Arrhenius expression at 0.5 atm over the T-range 1000-2000 K as, kA(T) = 6.85 × 10(98)T (-24.239) exp(-65250 K/T) s(-1). The H-atom temporal profiles at long times show only minor sensitivity to the abstraction reaction, H + CH3OC(O)OCH3 → H2 + CH3OC(O)OCH2 [B]. However, H + DMC is an important fuel destruction reaction at high temperatures. Consequently, measurements of D-atom profiles using D-ARAS allowed unambiguous rate constant measurements for the deuterated analog of reaction B, D + CH3OC(O)OCH3 → HD + CH3OC(O)OCH2 [C]. Reaction C is a surrogate for H + DMC since the theoretically predicted kinetic isotope effect at high temperatures (1000 - 2000K) is close to unity, kC ≈ 1.2 kB. TST calculations employing CCSD(T)/cc-pv∞z//M06-2X/cc-pvtz energetics and molecular properties

  7. Non-destructive functionalisation for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on carbon nanotubes: effect of linking agents and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemnade, N.; Shearer, C. J.; Dieterle, D. J.; Cherevan, A. S.; Gebhardt, P.; Wilde, G.; Eder, D.

    2015-02-01

    The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and sustainable energy applications. The performance of such hybrids can be further improved by rationally designing interfaces and morphologies. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is among the most powerful techniques for the controlled deposition of inorganic compounds, due to its ability to form conformal coatings on porous substrates at low temperatures with high surface sensitivity and atomic control of film thickness. The hydrophobic nature of the nanocarbon surface has so far limited the applicability of ALD on CNTs. Herein we investigate the role of structural defects in CNTs, both intrinsic and induced by acid treatment, on coverage, uniformity and crystallinity of ZnO coatings. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of small aromatic molecules, including benzyl alcohol (BA), naphthalene carboxylic acid (NA) and pyrene carboxylic acid (PCA), as active nucleation sites and linking agents. Importantly, only PCA exhibits sufficiently strong interactions with the pristine CNT surface to withstand desorption under reaction conditions. Thus, PCA enables a versatile and non-destructive alternative route for the deposition of highly uniform metal oxide coatings onto pristine CNTs via ALD over a wide temperature range and without the typical surface corrosion induced by covalent functionalisation. Importantly, preliminary tests demonstrated that the improved morphology obtained with PCA has indeed considerably increased the hybrid's photocatalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution via sacrificial water splitting. The concept demonstrated in this work is transferable to a wide range of other inorganic compounds including metal oxides, metal (oxy)nitrides and metal chalcogenides on a variety of nanocarbons.The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and

  8. Crossed-beam reaction of carbon atoms with hydrocarbon molecules. V. Chemical dynamics of n-C4H3 formation from reaction of C(3Pj) with allene, H2CCCH2(X 1A1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, R. I.; Mebel, A. M.; Chang, A. H. H.; Lin, S. H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1999-06-01

    The crossed molecular beams technique was employed to investigate the reaction between ground state carbon atoms, C(3Pj), and allene, H2CCCH2(X 1A1), at two averaged collision energies of 19.6 and 38.8 kJ mol-1. Product angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra of C4H3 were recorded. Forward-convolution fitting of the data yields weakly polarized center-of-mass angular flux distributions isotropic at lower, but forward scattered with respect to the carbon beam at a higher collision energy. The maximum translational energy release and the angular distributions combined with ab initio and RRKM calculations are consistent with the formation of the n-C4H3 radical in its electronic ground state. The channel to the i-C4H3 isomer contributes less than 1.5%. Reaction dynamics inferred from the experimental data indicate that the carbon atom attacks the π-orbitals of the allenic carbon-carbon double bond barrierless via a loose, reactant-like transition state located at the centrifugal barrier. The initially formed cyclopropylidene derivative rotates in a plane almost perpendicular to the total angular momentum vector around its C-axis and undergoes ring opening to triplet butatriene. At higher collision energy, the butatriene complex decomposes within 0.6 ps via hydrogen emission to form the n-C4H3 isomer and atomic hydrogen through an exit transition state located 9.2 kJ mol-1 above the products. The explicit identification of the n-C4H3 radical under single collision represents a further example of a carbon-hydrogen exchange in reactions of ground state carbon atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons. This channel opens a barrierless route to synthesize extremely reactive hydrocarbon radicals in combustion processes, interstellar chemistry, and hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, as well as Triton.

  9. Investigating the lignocellulosic composition during delignification using confocal raman spectroscopy, cross-polarization magic angle spinning carbon 13 - nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13C- NMR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available spectroscopy, Cross-Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Carbon 13 - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP/MAS 13C-NMR) spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with image analysis. The confocal Raman results showed that there were differences...

  10. Recycling of 5'-methylthioadenosine-ribose carbon atoms into methionine in tomato tissue in relation to ethylene production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S Y; Adams, D O; Lieberman, M

    1982-07-01

    The ribose moiety of 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA) is metabolized to form the four-carbon unit (2-aminobutyrate) of methionine in tomato tissue (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., cv. Pik Red). When [U-(14)C-adenosine] MTA was administered to tomato tissue slices, label was recovered in 5-methylthioribose (MTR), methionine, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), C(2)H(4) and other unidentified compounds. However, when [U-(14)C-ribose]MTR was administered, radioactivities were recovered in methionine, ACC and C(2)H(4), but not MTA. This suggests that C(2)H(4) formed in tomato pericarp tissue may be derived from the ribose portion of MTA via MTR, methionine and ACC. The conversion of MTR to methionine is not inhibited by aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG), but is O(2) dependent. These data present a new salvage pathway for methionine biosynthesis which may be important in relation to polyamine and ethylene biosynthesis in tomato tissue.

  11. Relativistic corrections to the ground state energies of the carbon-like atoms%类碳体系基态能量的相对论修正

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马堃; 黄时中; 倪秀波; 吴长义; 胡健

    2008-01-01

    Based on the tensor expression for the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian, and with the aid of irreducible tensor theory, the theory of relativistic corrections to the non-relativistic energies of many-electron atoms has been generalized to the case in which Racah wave functions are the linear combinations of multi-Slater wave functions, analytic formulism for calculating the relativistic corrections, which include mass correction, one-and two-body Darwin correction and spin-spin contact interaction, has been derived, all the angular interactions and spin sums involved in the problem have been worked out explicitly by using irreducible theory. The theory is applied to the ground state of carbon-like atoms.%以Breit-Pauli哈密顿的球张量形式为基础,借助不可约张量理论,将多电子原子能量的相对论修正理论拓展到了原子的拉卡波函数为多个Slater基函数的线性组合的情形,导出了此情形下多电子原子能量相对论修正(包括相对论质量修正项、单体和双体迭尔文修正项、自旋-自旋接触相互作用项)的解析表达式,完成了所有角向积分和自旋求和计算.利用所建立的理论,对类碳体系基态能量的相对论修正进行了具体计算.

  12. Atomization energies of the carbon clusters C n (n = 2-10) revisited by means of W4 theory as well as density functional, Gn, and CBS methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karton, Amir; Tarnopolsky, Alex; Martin, Jan M. L.

    2009-01-01

    The thermochemistry of the carbon clusters C$_n$ (n=2--10) has been revisited by means of W4 theory and W3.2lite theory. Particularly the larger clusters exhibit very pronounced post-CCSD(T) correlation effects. Despite this, our best calculated total atomization energies agree surprisingly well with 1991 estimates obtained from scaled CCD(ST)/6-31G* data. Accurately reproducing the small singlet-triplet splitting in C$_2$ requires inclusion of connected quintuple and sextuple excitations. Post-CCSD(T) correlation effects in C$_4$ stabilize the linear form. Linear/cyclic equilibria in C$_6$, C$_8$, and C$_{10}$ are not strongly affected by connected quadruples, but they are affected by higher-order triples, which favor polyacetylenic rings but disfavor cumulenic ones. Near the CCSD(T) basis set limit, C$_{10}$ does undergo bond angle alternation in the bottom-of-the-well structure, although it is expected to be absent in the vibrationally averaged structure. The thermochemistry of these systems, and particularly the longer linear chains, is a particularly difficult test for density functional methods. Particularly for the smaller chains and the rings, double-hybrid functionals clearly outperform convential DFT functionals for these systems. Among compound thermochemistry schemes, G4 clearly outperforms the other members of the G$n$ family. Our best estimates for total atomization energies at 0 K should be reliable to 1 kJ/mol up to C$_5$ inclusive, and to better than 1 kcal/mol up to C$_9$ inclusive.

  13. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine samples after dispersive solid-liquid extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Méndez, J.; Barciela García, J.; García Martín, S.; Peña Crecente, R. M.; Herrero Latorre, C.

    2015-04-01

    A new method for the determination of Cd and Pb in urine samples has been developed. The method involves dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE), slurry sampling (SS), and subsequent electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the sorbent material. The isolated MWCNT/analyte aggregates were treated with nitric acid to form a slurry and both metals were determined directly by injecting the slurry into the ETAAS-atomizer. The parameters that influence the adsorption of the metals on MWCNTs in the DSPE process, the formation and extraction of the slurry, and the ETAAS conditions were studied by different factorial design strategies. The detection and quantification limits obtained for Cd under optimized conditions were 9.7 and 32.3 ng L- 1, respectively, and for Pb these limits were 0.13 and 0.43 μg L- 1. The preconcentration factors achieved were 3.9 and 5.4. The RSD values (n = 10) were less than 4.1% and 5.9% for Cd and Pb, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed in recovery studies, with values in the range 96-102% obtained for Cd and 97-101% for Pb. In addition, the analysis of certified reference materials gave consistent results. The DSPE-SS-ETAAS method is a novel and useful strategy for the determination of Pb and Cd at low levels in human urine samples. The method is sensitive, fast, and free of matrix interferences, and it avoids the tedious and time-consuming on-column adsorption and elution steps associated with commonly used SPE procedures. The proposed method was used to determine Cd and Pb in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained.

  14. Theoretical Investigation on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Doped with Nitrogen, Pyridine-Like Nitrogen Defects, and Transition Metal Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mananghaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the inherent difficulty in synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with uniform chirality and well-defined electronic properties through the introduction of dopants, topological defects, and intercalation of metals. Depending on the desired application, one can modify the electronic and magnetic properties of SWCNTs through an appropriate introduction of imperfections. This scheme broadens the application areas of SWCNTs. Under this motivation, we present our ongoing investigations of the following models: (i (10, 0 and (5, 5 SWCNT doped with nitrogen (CNxNT, (ii (10, 0 and (5, 5 SWCNT with pyridine-like defects (3NV-CNxNT, (iii (10, 0 SWCNT with porphyrine-like defects (4ND-CNxNT. Models (ii and (iii were chemically functionalized with 14 transition metals (TMs: Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pd, Ag, Pt and Au. Using the spin-unrestricted density functional theory (DFT, stable configurations, deformations, formation and binding energies, the effects of the doping concentration of nitrogen, pyridine-like and porphyrine-like defects on the electronic properties were all examined. Results reveal that the electronic properties of SWCNTs show strong dependence on the concentration and configuration of nitrogen impurities, its defects, and the TMs adsorbed.

  15. The transport properties of silicon and carbon nanotubes at the atomic scale: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tengying; Wen, Shizheng; Yan, Likai; Wu, Caixia; Zhang, Chunmei; Zhang, Min; Su, Zhongmin

    2016-08-24

    Nanotubes are one of the most promising functional materials in nanotechnology. Silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) have been experimentally validated; they are unique puckered nanotubular structures unlike carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Although the electronic and optical properties of SiNTs have been previously studied, their structure-related capability for electron transport has not been investigated. Here we report a comparative study of the intrinsic electronic and transport properties of four pairs of SiNTs and CNTs (one armchair nanotubes (3,3) and three zigzag nanotubes (5,0), (6,0) and (7,0)) using density functional theory (DFT) combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. All our investigated systems of SiNTs and CNTs are conductors. Both the armchair SiNTs and CNTs possess superior electron transport performance to their zigzag counterparts. Compared with CNTs, SiNTs have more advantages in the high bias voltage region. Especially, Si(3,3) possesses around double the potential charge capacity of C(3,3) under the bias voltage of 2.0 V. In particular, the CNT(6,0) exhibits distinct negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior and the peak-valley ratio (PVR) for C(6,0) is about 1.2.

  16. Morphology and crystallinity control of ultrathin TiO2 layers deposited on carbon nanotubes by temperature-step atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Nuñez, Carlos; Zhang, Yucheng; Li, Meng; Chawla, Vipin; Erni, Rolf; Michler, Johann; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the chemically inert CNTs and appropriate control of the morphology of the TiO2 layer have not been achieved so far. Here, we report a new strategy to obtain ultrathin TiO2 coatings deposited by ``Temperature-step'' Atomic Layer Deposition (TS-ALD) with complete surface coverage of non-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and controlled morphology and crystallinity of the TiO2 film. This strategy consists of adjusting the temperature during the ALD deposition to obtain the desired morphology. Complete coverage of long non-functionalized MWCNTs with conformal anatase layers was obtained by using a low temperature of 60 °C during the nucleation stage followed by an increase to 220 °C during the growth stage. This resulted in a continuous and amorphous TiO2 layer, covered with a conformal anatase coating. Starting with the deposition at 220 °C and reducing to 60 °C resulted in sporadic crystal grains at the CNT/TiO2 interface covered with an amorphous TiO2 layer. The results were accomplished through an extensive study of nucleation and growth of titanium oxide films on MWCNTs, of which a detailed characterization is presented in this work.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the

  17. Activated carbon-modified knotted reactor coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for sensitive determination of arsenic species in medicinal herbs and tea infusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Martinis, Estefanía M. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Research and Development (QUIANID), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Padre J. Contreras 1300, (5500) Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lascalea, Gustavo E. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Wuilloud, Rodolfo G., E-mail: rwuilloud@mendoza-conicet.gob.ar [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Research and Development (QUIANID), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Padre J. Contreras 1300, (5500) Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-01-01

    A flow injection system based on a modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) knotted reactor (KR) was developed for arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] species preconcentration and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Activated carbon (AC) was immobilized on the inner walls of a PTFE KR by a thermal treatment. A significant increase in analyte retention was obtained with the AC-modified KR (100%) as compared to the regular PTFE KR (25%). The preconcentration method involved the on-line formation of As(III)-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (As-APDC) complex, followed by its adsorption onto the inner walls of the AC-modified KR. After analyte retention, the complex was eluted with acetone directly into the graphite furnace of ETAAS. The parameters affecting the flow injection system were evaluated with a full central composite face centered design with three center points. Under optimum conditions, a preconcentration factor of 200 was obtained with 10 ml of sample. The detection limit was 4 ng L{sup −1} and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicate measurements at 0.2 μg L{sup −1} of As were 4.3% and 4.7% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The developed methodology was highly selective towards As(III), while As(V), monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic [DMA(V)] were not retained in the AC-modified KR. The proposed method was successfully applied for As speciation analysis in infusions originated from medicinal herbs and tea. - Highlights: • We report an efficient method for As speciation. • We have modified a knotted reactor with activated carbon for high sorption capacity. • We provide a simple procedure for surface modification of a PTFE knotted reactor. • We have selectively separated inorganic As species from complex matrix samples. • We have implemented a modified KR in a flow injection system coupled to ETAAS.

  18. Atomic layer deposition of Al-doped ZnO/Al2O3 double layers on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Gary A; Brown, Emery; Klankowski, Steven A; Liu, Jianwei; Elliot, Alan J; Lu, Rongtao; Li, Jun; Wu, Judy

    2014-05-14

    High-aspect-ratio, vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were conformally coated with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to produce a three-dimensional array of metal-insulator-metal core-shell nanostructures. Prefunctionalization before ALD, as required for initiating covalent bonding on a carbon nanotube surface, was eliminated on VACNFs due to the graphitic edges along the surface of each CNF. The graphitic edges provided ideal nucleation sites under sequential exposures of H2O and trimethylaluminum to form an Al2O3 coating up to 20 nm in thickness. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/CNF structures while energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy verified the elemental composition of the different layers. HRTEM selected area electron diffraction revealed that the as-made Al2O3 by ALD at 200 °C was amorphous, and then, after annealing in air at 450 °C for 30 min, was converted to polycrystalline form. Nevertheless, comparable dielectric constants of 9.3 were obtained in both cases by cyclic voltammetry at a scan rate of 1000 V/s. The conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/VACNF array structure demonstrated in this work provides a promising three-dimensional architecture toward applications of solid-state capacitors with large surface area having a thin, leak-free dielectric.

  19. 77 FR 43658 - Designation of Twenty-Nine (29) Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13573 of May 18, 2011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State: (1) To be a senior official of the Government of... 13573 of May 18, 2011, ``Blocking Property of Senior Officials of the Government of Syria''...

  20. An Analysis of the Twenty-Nine Capabilities of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Hostage Recovery ITG Initial Terminal Guidance JEO JTF Enabling Operations JTF Join Task Force JTT Joint/Combined Training/Instruction Team LAR Light...Limited Expeditionary Airfield Operations (EAO). 27. Show of Force Operations (SOFO). 28. JTF Enabling Operations ( JEO ). 29. Sniping Operations (SNO...Relief (HA/DR) Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) Airfield/Port Seizure (APS) Show of Force Operations (SOFO) JTF Enabling Operations ( JEO

  1. U.S. Marine 3rd Tank Battalion Lubrication Evaluation under Hot Ambient Temperatures at Twenty-Nine Palms, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    transmissions, and 50-grade oil in the final drives. TABLE I describes the test oils and their properties. TABUE 1. Test Lubricant Prorties ASTM Method...procedures were established as sho-’w in the program test plan (AppendiA A). Each company was to participate in norma ! -ission/training activities. B

  2. Effect of an acetylene bond on hydrogen adsorption in diamond-like carbon allotropes: from first principles to atomic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuanjun; Li, Lei; Fang, Tiange; Wang, YeTong; Cai, Weiquan; Xiang, Zhonghua

    2017-03-29

    By inserting an acetylene bond into the organic linkers of porous materials, hydrogen storage can be significantly enhanced; however, the mechanism of this enhancement remains elusive. Herein, we developed a new diamond-like carbon allotrope (referred as diamond-like diacetylene a.k.a. DDA) with medium pores constructed by inserting -C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C- ligands into the -C-C- bonds of diamond. The structural, mechanical, and electrical properties, as well as hydrogen storage capacities were investigated for this novel material using density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. The optimized geometry of DDA shows a high surface area and free pore volume of ca. 5498.76 m(2) g(-1) and 2.0486 m(3) g(-1), respectively. DDA also exhibits structural stability and special electronic properties. Interestingly, DDA exhibits exceptional gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity as well as volumetric one. The excess gravimetric and volumetric H2 uptakes at 77 K and 2.0 MPa hit a maximum of 14.12 wt% and 603.35 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3), respectively, which substantially exceeds those previously reported for MOF or PAF materials. Even at 243 K and 12 MPa, the total gravimetric H2 uptake of DDA reaches 5.38 wt%. To the best of our knowledge, DDA is one of porous materials with the maximum physical hydrogen uptake. It is also one of the few materials that can be close to meeting hydrogen storage target of the US department of energy at room temperature. Significantly, DDA shows the deliverable hydrogen storage capacity up to 5.28 wt% at room temperature. Through analyzing the effect of the acetylene position in the DLCAs on their hydrogen storage capacities, we found that the high hydrogen adsorption performance of DDA is mainly attributed to its high surface area, large number of adsorption sites, and appropriate binding energy. In summary, the newly developed DDA is a promising candidate for hydrogen storage and provides a new

  3. Neutral atomic-carbon QSO absorption-line systems at z>1.5: Sample selection, HI content, reddening, and 2175 A extinction feature

    CERN Document Server

    Ledoux, C; Petitjean, P; Srianand, R

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a search for cold gas at high redshift along QSO lines-of-sight carried out without any a priori assumption on the neutral atomic-hydrogen (HI) content of the absorbers. To do this, we systematically looked for neutral-carbon (CI) 1560,1656 transition lines in low-resolution QSO spectra from the SDSS database. We built up a sample of 66 CI absorbers with redshifts 1.521 compared to systematic DLA surveys. We study empirical relations between W_r(CI), N(HI), E(B-V) and the strength of the 2175 A extinction feature, the latter being detected in about 30% of the CI absorbers. We show that the 2175 A feature is weak compared to Galactic lines-of-sight exhibiting the same amount of reddening. This is probably the consequence of current or past star formation in the vicinity of the CI systems. We also find that the strongest CI systems tend to have the largest amounts of dust and that the metallicity of the gas and its molecular fraction is likely to be high in a large number of cases.

  4. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric detection of vanadium in water and food samples after solid phase extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Tuzen, Mustafa; Gul Kazi, Tasneem; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-11-15

    Vanadium(V) ions as 8-hydroxyquinoline chelates were loaded on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in a mini chromatographic column. Vanadium was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Various analytical parameters including pH of the working solutions, amounts of 8-hydroxyquinoline, eluent type, sample volume, and flow rates were investigated. The effects of matrix ions and some transition metals were also studied. The column can be reused 250 times without any loss in its sorption properties. The preconcentration factor was found as 100. Detection limit (3 s) and limit of quantification (10 s) for the vanadium in the optimal conditions were observed to be 0.012 µg L(-1) and 0.040 μg L(-1), respectively. The capacity of adsorption was 9.6 mg g(-1). Relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 5%. The validation of the method was confirmed by using NIST SRM 1515 Apple leaves, NIST SRM 1570a Spinach leaves and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure was applied to the determination of vanadium in tap water and bottled drinking water samples. The procedure was also successfully applied to microwave digested food samples including black tea, coffee, tomato, cabbage, zucchini, apple and chicken samples.

  5. Effect of surface finishing on early-stage corrosion of a carbon steel studied by electrochemical and atomic force microscope characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan; Cheng, Y. Frank, E-mail: fcheng@ucalgary.ca

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Imaged the topography of steel with various surface roughness. • Monitored the early-stage corrosion of steel by AFM. • Derived the corrosion growth at nano-scale surface features. - Abstract: In this work, the early-stage corrosion of a carbon steel with various surface roughness, which was created by different levels of surface finishing treatment, was characterized by an atomic force microscope and electrochemical measurements. It is found that the resulting surface roughness is at nano-meter scale. As the surface roughness increases, the corrosion activity of the steel is increased. The early-stage corrosion of the steel is featured with two stages of dissolution. While the first stage involves a rapid dissolution and increasing surface roughness of the steel, stage two is in an equilibrium state to have an approximately constant corrosion rate and surface roughness. Generally, the corrosion rate of the steel decreases when the surface finish of the specimen becomes finer. Local preferential corrosion occurs at surface irregularities, resulting in the deepening and widening of the features such as scratches with time.

  6. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.

    1997-12-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  7. Single-atom nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Prati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Single-Atom Nanoelectronics covers the fabrication of single-atom devices and related technology, as well as the relevant electronic equipment and the intriguing new phenomena related to single-atom and single-electron effects in quantum devices. It also covers the alternative approaches related to both silicon- and carbon-based technologies, also from the point of view of large-scale industrial production. The publication provides a comprehensive picture of the state of the art at the cutting edge and constitutes a milestone in the emerging field of beyond-CMOS technology. Although there are

  8. Carbonyl Activation by Borane Lewis Acid Complexation: Transition States of H2 Splitting at the Activated Carbonyl Carbon Atom in a Lewis Basic Solvent and the Proton-Transfer Dynamics of the Boroalkoxide Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmat, Mojgan; Privalov, Timofei

    2017-07-06

    By using transition-state (TS) calculations, we examined how Lewis acid (LA) complexation activates carbonyl compounds in the context of hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds by H2 in Lewis basic (ethereal) solvents containing borane LAs of the type (C6 F5 )3 B. According to our calculations, LA complexation does not activate a ketone sufficiently enough for the direct addition of H2 to the O=C unsaturated bond; but, calculations indicate a possibly facile heterolytic cleavage of H2 at the activated and thus sufficiently Lewis acidic carbonyl carbon atom with the assistance of the Lewis basic solvent (i.e., 1,4-dioxane or THF). For the solvent-assisted H2 splitting at the carbonyl carbon atom of (C6 F5 )3 B adducts with different ketones, a number of TSs are computed and the obtained results are related to insights from experiment. By using the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the DFT for electronic structure calculations, the evolution of the (C6 F5 )3 B-alkoxide ionic intermediate and the proton transfer to the alkoxide oxygen atom were investigated. The results indicate a plausible hydrogenation mechanism with a LA, that is, (C6 F5 )3 B, as a catalyst, namely, 1) the step of H2 cleavage that involves a Lewis basic solvent molecule plus the carbonyl carbon atom of thermodynamically stable and experimentally identifiable (C6 F5 )3 B-ketone adducts in which (C6 F5 )3 B is the "Lewis acid promoter", 2) the transfer of the solvent-bound proton to the oxygen atom of the (C6 F5 )3 B-alkoxide intermediate giving the (C6 F5 )3 B-alcohol adduct, and 3) the SN 2-style displacement of the alcohol by a ketone or a Lewis basic solvent molecule. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Application of multiwall carbon nanotubes impregnated with 5-dodecylsalicylaldoxime for on-line copper preconcentration and determination in water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiasz, Anna; Walas, Stanisław; Soto Hernández, Arlene; Mrowiec, Halina

    2012-07-15

    The paper presents application of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with 5-dodecylsalicylaldoxime to copper(II) flow-injection on-line preconcentration and flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determination. Two new sorbents were obtained by impregnation of MWCNTs with Cu(II)-LIX 622(®) complex, however in the first case modification was preceded by carbon wall activation via oxidization (Cu-LIX-CNT-A sorbent), and in the second one no surface activation was performed (Cu-LIX-CNT sorbent). It was found that effective leaching of initially introduced copper and Cu(II) retained in preconcentration process could be realized with the use 7% and 5% (v/v) nitric acid, for particular sorbents. Testing the influence of loading solution pH and rate of loading on sorption it was found out that optimal range of loading solution pH was about 4.5-6.3 for activated and 6.15-6.25 for non-activated CNT. Investigation of sorption kinetics showed that the process can be described by pseudo-second order reaction model. Sorption equilibrium conditions (90% sorption) for LIX-CNT-A and LIX-CNT were obtained after 8-15min, respectively and maximum sorption capacity for the new sorbents amounted to 18.1mgg(-1) and 31.6mgg(-1), respectively. For the examined sorbents enrichment factors increased with extension of loading time up to 180s: linearly for activated and non-linearly for non-activated MWCNTs. Influence of potential interferents such as Cd(II), Zn(II), Fe(III), Mg(II) and Ca(II) ions on copper(II) sorption on the new CNT materials was examined individually and with the use of 2(5-2) factorial design. The study revealed significant interference from iron, magnesium and calcium ions at relatively high concentrations. Applicability of the proposed sorbents was tested for Cu(II) determination in various kinds of water samples and the results were compared with those obtained with the use of ICP MS as a reference technique. Copper(II) determination in two certified

  10. Activated carbon-modified knotted reactor coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for sensitive determination of arsenic species in medicinal herbs and tea infusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Martinis, Estefanía M.; Lascalea, Gustavo E.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2015-01-01

    A flow injection system based on a modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) knotted reactor (KR) was developed for arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] species preconcentration and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Activated carbon (AC) was immobilized on the inner walls of a PTFE KR by a thermal treatment. A significant increase in analyte retention was obtained with the AC-modified KR (100%) as compared to the regular PTFE KR (25%). The preconcentration method involved the on-line formation of As(III)-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (As-APDC) complex, followed by its adsorption onto the inner walls of the AC-modified KR. After analyte retention, the complex was eluted with acetone directly into the graphite furnace of ETAAS. The parameters affecting the flow injection system were evaluated with a full central composite face centered design with three center points. Under optimum conditions, a preconcentration factor of 200 was obtained with 10 ml of sample. The detection limit was 4 ng L- 1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicate measurements at 0.2 μg L- 1 of As were 4.3% and 4.7% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The developed methodology was highly selective towards As(III), while As(V), monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic [DMA(V)] were not retained in the AC-modified KR. The proposed method was successfully applied for As speciation analysis in infusions originated from medicinal herbs and tea.

  11. Free energetics of carbon nanotube association in aqueous inorganic NaI salt solutions: Temperature effects using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-15

    In this study, we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association using graphical processing unit-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion, and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intratube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and

  12. L-Tyrosine immobilized on multiwalled carbon nanotubes: A new substrate for thallium separation and speciation using stabilized temperature platform furnace-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, Pablo H.; Gil, Raul A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, P.O. Box 375, 5700 San Luis (Argentina); Instituto de Quimica de San Luis (INQUISAL-CONICET), Chacabuco y Pedernera, CP 5700, San Luis (Argentina); Smichowski, Patricia, E-mail: smichows@cnea.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, CP C1033 AAJ, Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Gerencia Quimica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin (Argentina); Polla, Griselda [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Av.Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin (Argentina); Martinez, Luis D., E-mail: ldm@unsl.edu.ar [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, P.O. Box 375, 5700 San Luis (Argentina); Instituto de Quimica de San Luis (INQUISAL-CONICET), Chacabuco y Pedernera, CP 5700, San Luis (Argentina)

    2009-12-10

    An approach for the separation and determination of inorganic thallium species is described. A new sorbent, L-tyrosine-carbon nanotubes (L-tyr-CNTs), was used and applied to the analysis of tap water samples. At pH 5.0, L-tyr was selective only towards Tl(III), while total thallium was determined directly by stabilized temperature platform furnace-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (STPF-ETAAS). The Tl(III) specie, which was retained by L-tyrosine, was quantitatively eluted from the column with 10% of nitric acid. An on-line breakthrough curve was used to determine the column capacity, which resulted to be 9.00 {mu}mol of Tl(III) g{sup -1} of L-tyr-CNTs with a molar ratio of 0.14 (moles of Tl bound to moles of L-tyr at pH 5). Transient peak areas revealed that Tl stripping from the column occurred instantaneously. Effects of sample flow rate, concentration and flow rate of the eluent, and interfering ions on the recovery of the analyte were systematically investigated. The detection limit for the determination of total thallium (3{sigma}) by STPF-ETAAS was 150 ng L{sup -1}. The detection limit (3{sigma}) for Tl(III) employing the separation system was 3 ng L{sup -1}, with an enrichment factor of 40. The precision of the method expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD) resulted to be 3.4%. The proposed method was applied to the speciation and determination of inorganic thallium in tap water samples. The found concentrations were in the range of 0.88-0.91 {mu}g L{sup -1} of Tl(III), and 3.69-3.91 {mu}g L{sup -1} of total thallium.

  13. Separation of some mono-, di- and tri-unsaturated fatty acids containing 18 carbon atoms by high-performance liquid chromatography and photodiode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czauderna, M; Kowalczyk, J

    2001-08-25

    Positional and geometric isomers of mono-, di- and tri-unsaturated fatty acids containing 18 carbon atoms were separated on commercially available reversed-phase columns in gradient systems composed of acetonitrile and water, utilizing photodiode array detection. The biological samples were hydrolyzed with 2 M NaOH for 35-40 min at 85-90 degrees C. After cooling, the hydrolysates were acidified with 4 M HCl and the free fatty acids were extracted with dichloromethane. The organic solvent was removed in a gentle stream of argon. The fatty acids were determined after pre-column derivatization with dibromacetophenone in the presence of triethylamine. The reaction components were mixed and reacted for 2 h at 50 degrees C. Separations of derivatized fatty acids were performed on two C18 columns (Nova Pak C18, 4 microm, 250x4.6 mm, Waters) by binary or ternate gradient programs and UV detection at 254 and 235 nm. The geometric and positional isomers of some unsaturated fatty acids were substantially retained on the C18 columns and were distinct from some saturated fatty acids, endogenous substances in biological samples or background interference. Only slight separation of critical pairs of cis-9 C18:1/cis-11 C18:1 and cis-6 C18:1/trans-11 C18:1 was obtained. A ternate gradient program can be used for complete fractionation of a mixture of conjugated linoleic acid isomers (CLA) from cis-9, cis-12 and trans-9, trans-12 isomers of C18:2. The CLA isomers in the effluent were monitored at 235 nm. The CLA isomers were differentiated from saturated and unsaturated fatty acids using a photodiode array detector. The utility of the method was demonstrated by evaluating the fatty acid composition of duodenal digesta, rapeseed and maize oils.

  14. Atomic energy

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    Interviews following the 1991 co-operation Agreement between the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning the participation in the Large Hadron Collider Project (LHC) . With Chidambaram, R, Chairman, Atomic Energy Commission and Secretary, Department of Atomic Energy, Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and Professor Llewellyn-Smith, Christopher H, Director-General, CERN.

  15. Atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a stimulating and multifaceted picture of a rapidly developing field. The first part reviews fundamentals of atom chip research in tutorial style, while subsequent parts focus on the topics of atom-surface interaction, coherence on atom chips, and possible future directions of atom chip research. The articles are written by leading researchers in the field in their characteristic and individual styles.

  16. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  17. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  18. Atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}O{sub y} thin films on N{sub 2}O plasma pretreated carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markeev, Andrey M.; Chernikova, Anna G.; Chouprik, Anastasya A.; Zaitsev, Sergey A.; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry V.; Althues, Holger; Doerfler, Susanne [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskii per. 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology (IWS) of Dresden, Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden 01277 (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    A mild N{sub 2}O plasma treatment technique (low power and low substrate temperature) for carbon materials' (including graphite and carbon nanotubes) functionalization followed by subsequent high-k dielectric atomic layer deposition (ALD) was developed. It was shown that N{sub 2}O plasma carbon functionalization leads to the formation of epoxide and carboxylic groups on the carbon surface which act as active centers for ALD and, as a result, conformal and uniform Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ti{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}O{sub y} films' growth occurred on the carbon surfaces. It was shown that the electrical properties of multinary Ti{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}O{sub y} oxides are more promising in comparison to single Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide. Some electrical properties of the Ti{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}O{sub y} films observed were a high dielectric constant {approx}19, low leakage current density (<3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} A/cm{sup 2} at 1 MV/cm), and high breakdown field ({approx}5.5 MV/cm).

  19. Atomic-absorption determination of mercury in geological materials by flame and carbon-rod atomisation after solvent extraction and using co-extracted silver as a matrix modifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1983-01-01

    Based on modifications and expansion of the original Tindall's solvent extraction flame atomic-absorption procedure, an atomic-absorption spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of mercury in geological materials. The sample is digested with nitric and hydrochloric acids in a boiling water-bath. The solution is made ammoniacal and potassium iodide and silver nitrate are added. The mercury is extracted into isobutyl methyl ketone as the tetraiodomercurate(ll). Added silver is co-extracted with mercury and serves as a matrix modifier in the carbon-rod atomiser. The mercury in the isobutyl methyl ketone extract may be determined by either the flame- or the carbon-rod atomisation method, depending on the concentration level. The limits of determination are 0.05-10 p.p.m. of mercury for the carbon-rod atomisation and 1 -200 p.p.m. of mercury for the flame atomisation. Mercury values for reference samples obtained by replicate analyses are in good agreement with those reported by other workers, with relative standard deviations ranging from 2.3 to 0.9%. Recoveries of mercury spiked at two levels were 93-106%. Major and trace elements commonly found in geological materials do not interfere.

  20. (10, 10) Single walled carbon nanotube consisted of chemisorbed oxygen atoms as a promising supercapacitor electrode material: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targholi, Ehsan; Molaei, Masoumeh; Mousavi-Khoshdel, S. Morteza

    2016-11-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen chemisorption on the electronic structures and quantum capacitance of (10, 10) CNT have been studied in this article. The results indicated that the chemisorption on bonds aligned with nanotube axis is more favorable than other position. The most efficient configuration for enhancing quantum capacitance is the nanotube with oxygen atoms chemisorbed on axial bonds. Specifically, in water stability range, the quantum capacitance of (10, 10) CNT before and after chemisorption of six oxygen atoms (aligned with nanotube axis) were found to be 222.6 (anode) -117.6 (cathode) and 306.9 (anode) -217.2 (cathode) F/g, respectively.

  1. 硼原子掺杂对碳纳米管吸附 Ne 原子影响的第一性原理计算%First-principle calculations for the adsorption of neon atom in carbon nanotube doped with boron atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温述龙; 王茜; 潘敏; 闫跃阳; 黄整

    2015-01-01

    采用基于第一性原理的密度泛函理论( DFT)和局域密度近似( LDA)方法,优化计算得到碳纳米管( CNT),硼原子取代碳原子及其吸附氖原子前后系统的几何结构,能量,电子能带和态密度.结果显示,碳纳米管的能带结构与石墨的层状几何结构相似,能量的变化只在kz =0和kz =0.5平面之间沿着c轴方向出现.B原子取代C原子使价带和导带分别分裂为两个和三个能带.对Ne原子的吸附使价带能量沿着c轴方向升高并导致Fermi面附近的态密度下降.Ne原子的吸附在谷位H最稳定,顶位A其次.C-C间σ键的弯曲使Ne原子吸附在桥位b1比桥位b2处更为稳定.Ne原子在管外的吸附均为放热过程,而管内则为吸热过程.结构分析表明Ne原子对C原子有排斥作用,对B原子却具有吸引作用.B原子取代C原子的位置略凸出于CNT的管壁之外,使Ne原子的吸附能增加.%Based on density functional theory (DFT) and local density approximation (LDA) methods, the ge-ometries, the energies, electronic bands and density of states are optimized and calculated for the adsorption of neon atoms on carbon nanotubes (CNT) doped with boron atoms.The results show that the energy bands of CNT have a topology similar to the layered geometry of graphite .The energy changes of the bands between the two planes of kz=0 and kz=0.5 occur only along the c-axis direction.The substituting boron atom splits the va-lence and conduction bands into two and three energy bands , respectively .The adsorption of neon atom makes the energy of the valence band rise along the c -axis direction , and the density of states near the Fermi surface decreases .The valley site H is the most stable site for the adsorption of neon atom , and the top site A is the sec-ond .The bending of the carbonic σbond along the circumferential direction makes the bridge site b 1 more stable for the adsorption of neon than

  2. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1989-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  3. Atomic Calligraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, Matthias; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Han, Han; Tareen, Ammar; Chang, Jackson; Christopher, Jason; Corman, Benjamin; Bishop, David

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a MEMS based method to fabricate devices with a small number of atoms. In standard semiconductor fabrication, a large amount of material is deposited, after which etching removes what is not wanted. This technique breaks down for structures that approach the single atom limit, as it is inconceivable to etch away all but one atom. What is needed is a bottom up method with single or near single atom precision. We demonstrate a MEMS device that enables nanometer position controlled deposition of gold atoms. A digitally driven plate is swept as a flux of gold atoms passes through an aperture. Appling voltages on four comb capacitors connected to the central plate by tethers enable nanometer lateral precision in the xy plane over 15x15 sq. microns. Typical MEMS structures have manufacturing resolutions on the order of a micron. Using a FIB it is possible to mill apertures as small as 10 nm in diameter. Assuming a low incident atomic flux, as well as an integrated MEMS based shutter with microsecond response time, it becomes possible to deposit single atoms. Due to their small size and low power consumption, such nano-printers can be mounted directly in a cryogenic system at ultrahigh vacuum to deposit clean quench condensed metallic structures.

  4. Interaction of carbon with vacancy and self-interstitial atom clusters in {alpha}-iron studied using metallic-covalent interatomic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terentyev, Dmitry, E-mail: dterenty@sckcen.b [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna [Department Matematica Aplicada III, E.T.S. Enginyeria de Camins, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Jansson, Ville [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014, Helsinki 00014 (Finland); Khater, Hassan [Department Matematica Aplicada III, E.T.S. Enginyeria de Camins, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Bonny, Giovanni [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-01-31

    The presence of even small amount of carbon interstitial impurity affects properties of Fe and Fe-based ferritic alloys. From earlier experiments it follows that carbon exhibits considerably strong interaction with lattice defects and therefore influences their mobility, hence affecting the evolution of the microstructure under irradiation. This work is dedicated to understanding the interaction of carbon-vacancy complexes with glissile dislocation loops, which form in Fe, Fe-based alloys and ferritic steels under irradiation. We apply large scale atomistic simulations coupled with the so-called 'metallic-covalent bonding' interatomic model for the Fe-C system, known to be the most consistent interatomic model available today. With these techniques we have studied (i) the stability of vacancy-carbon clusters; (ii) the interaction of octahedral carbon with 1/2<1 1 1> loops; (iii) possibility of the dynamic drag of carbon by 1/2<1 1 1> loops and (iv) the interaction of 1/2<1 1 1> loops with the most stable vacancy-carbon clusters expected to occur under irradiation. Finally, we have shown that carbon-vacancy complexes act as strong traps for 1/2<1 1 1> loops.

  5. Kinetic Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  6. Structure and Reactivity of the Glutathione Radical Cation: Radical Rearrangement from the Cysteine Sulfur to the Glutamic Acid alpha-Carbon Atom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osburn, S.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Gulyuz, K.; Polfer, N.C.; O'Hair, R.A.J.; Ryzhov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A gas-phase radical rearrangement through intramolecular hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) was studied in the glutathione radical cation, [-ECG](+.), which was generated by a homolytic cleavage of the protonated S-nitrosoglutathione. Ion-molecule reactions suggested that the radical migrates from the ori

  7. Structure and Reactivity of the Glutathione Radical Cation: Radical Rearrangement from the Cysteine Sulfur to the Glutamic Acid alpha-Carbon Atom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osburn, S.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Gulyuz, K.; Polfer, N.C.; O'Hair, R.A.J.; Ryzhov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A gas-phase radical rearrangement through intramolecular hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) was studied in the glutathione radical cation, [-ECG](+.), which was generated by a homolytic cleavage of the protonated S-nitrosoglutathione. Ion-molecule reactions suggested that the radical migrates from the ori

  8. Structure and Reactivity of the Glutathione Radical Cation: Radical Rearrangement from the Cysteine Sulfur to the Glutamic Acid alpha-Carbon Atom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osburn, S.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Gulyuz, K.; Polfer, N.C.; O'Hair, R.A.J.; Ryzhov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A gas-phase radical rearrangement through intramolecular hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) was studied in the glutathione radical cation, [-ECG](+.), which was generated by a homolytic cleavage of the protonated S-nitrosoglutathione. Ion-molecule reactions suggested that the radical migrates from the

  9. High temperature shock tube studies on the thermal decomposition of O3 and the reaction of dimethyl carbonate with O-atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, S L; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Michael, J V

    2013-05-09

    The shock tube technique was used to study the thermal decomposition of ozone, O3, with a view to using this as a thermal precursor of O-atoms at high temperatures. The formation of O-atoms was measured behind reflected shock waves by using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS). The experiments span a T-range, 819 K ≤ T ≤ 1166 K, at pressures 0.13 bar ≤ P ≤ 0.6 bar. Unimolecular rate theory provides an excellent representation of the falloff characteristics from the present and literature data on ozone decomposition at high temperatures. The present decomposition study on ozone permits its usage as a thermal source for O-atoms allowing measurements for, O + CH3OC(O)OCH3 → OH + CH3OC(O)OCH2 [A]. Reflected shock tube experiments monitoring the formation and decay of O-atoms were performed on reaction A using mixtures of O3 and CH3OC(O)OCH3, (DMC), in Kr bath gas over the T-range, 862 K ≤ T ≤ 1167 K, and pressure range, 0.15 bar ≤ P ≤ 0.33 bar. A detailed model was used to fit the O-atom temporal profile to obtain experimental rate constants for reaction A. Rate constants from the present experiments for O + DMC can be represented by the Arrhenius expression: kA(T) = 2.70 × 10(-11) exp(-2725 K/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (862-1167 K). Transition state theory calculations employing CCSD(T)/cc-pv∞z//M06-2X/cc-pvtz energetics and molecular properties for reaction A are in good agreement with the experimental rate constants. The theoretical rate constants can be well represented (to within ±10%) over the 500-2000 K temperature range by: kA(T) = 1.87 × 10(-20)T(2.924) exp(-2338 K/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The present study represents the first experimental measurement and theoretical study on this bimolecular reaction which is of relevance to the high temperature oxidation of DMC.

  10. Similarity of atoms in molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cioslowski, J.; Nanayakkara, A. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Similarity of atoms in molecules is quantitatively assessed with a measure that employs electron densities within respective atomic basins. This atomic similarity measure does not rely on arbitrary assumptions concerning basis functions or 'atomic orbitals', is relatively inexpensive to compute, and has straightforward interpretation. Inspection of similarities between pairs of carbon, hydrogen, and fluorine atoms in the CH[sub 4], CH[sub 3]F, CH[sub 2]F[sub 2], CHF[sub 3], CF[sub 4], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 4], and C[sub 2]H[sub 6] molecules, calculated at the MP2/6-311G[sup **] level of theory, reveals that the atomic similarity is greatly reduced by a change in the number or the character of ligands (i.e. the atoms with nuclei linked through bond paths to the nucleus of the atom in question). On the other hand, atoms with formally identical (i.e. having the same nuclei and numbers of ligands) ligands resemble each other to a large degree, with the similarity indices greater than 0.95 for hydrogens and 0.99 for non-hydrogens. 19 refs., 6 tabs.

  11. 具有SiC缓冲层的Si衬底上直接沉积碳原子生长石墨烯%Direct Graphene Growth by Depositing Carbon Atoms on Si Substrate Covered by SiC Buffer Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐军; 康朝阳; 李利民; 徐彭寿

    2011-01-01

    石墨烯是近年发现的一种新型多功能材料.在合适的衬底上制备石墨烯成为目前材料制备的一大挑战.本文利用分子束外延(MBE)设备,在Si 衬底上生长高质量的SiC 缓冲层,然后利用直接沉积C原子的方法生长石墨烯,并通过反射式高能电子衍射(RHEED)、拉曼(Raman)光谱和近边X 射线吸收精细结构谱(NEXAFS)等实验技术对不同衬底温度(800、900、1000、1100 °C)生长的薄膜进行结构表征.实验结果表明,在以上衬底温度下都能生长出具有乱层堆垛结构的石墨烯薄膜.当衬底温度升高时,碳原子的活性增强,其成键的能力也增大,从而使形成的石墨烯结晶质量提高.衬底温度为1000 °C时结晶质量最好.其原因可能是当衬底温度较低时,碳原子活性太低不足以形成有序的六方C-sp2环.但过高的衬底温度会使SiC 缓冲层的孔洞缺陷增加,衬底的Si 原子有可能获得足够的能量穿过SiC薄膜的孔洞扩散到衬底表面,与沉积的碳原子反应生成无序的SiC,这一方面会减弱石墨烯的生长,另一方面也会使石墨烯的结晶质量变差.%Graphene is a newly discovered material with many functions. The preparation of graphene on suitable substrates is a challenge in the material preparation field. In this paper, graphene thin films were grown on Si substrates covered with SiC buffer layers (SiC/Si) by the direct deposition of carbon atoms using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) equipment. The structural properties of the samples produced at different substrate temperatures (800, 900, 1000, 1100 ° C) were investigated by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), Raman spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). The results indicate that the thin films grown at all temperatures exhibit the characteristics of graphene with a turbostratic stacking structure. As the substrate temperature increases the crystalline quality of the graphene

  12. High-energy X-ray powder diffraction and atomic-pair distribution-function studies of charged/discharged structures in carbon-hybridized Li2MnSiO4 nanoparticles as a cathode material for lithiumion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Maki; Miyahara, Masahiko; Hokazono, Mana; Sasaki, Hirokazu; Nemoto, Atsushi; Katayama, Shingo; Akimoto, Yuji; Hirano, Shin-ichi; Ren, Yang

    2014-10-01

    The stable cycling performance with a high discharge capacity of similar to 190 mAh g(-1) in a carbon-hybridized Li2MnSiO4 nanostructured powder has prompted an experimental investigation of the charged/discharged structures using synchrotron-based and laboratory-based X-rays and atomic-pair distributionfunction (PDF) analyses. A novel method of in-situ spray pyrolysis of a precursor solution with glucose as a carbon source enabled the successful synthesis of the carbon-hybridized Li2(M)nSiO(4) nanoparticles. The XRD patters of the discharged (lithiated) samples exhibit a long-range ordered structure characteristic of the (beta) Li2MnSiO4 crystalline phase (space group Pmn2(1)) which dissipates in the charged (delithiated) samples. However, upon discharging the long-range ordered structure recovers in each cycle. The disordered structure, according to the PDF analysis, is mainly due to local distortions of the MnO4 tetrahedra which show a mean Mn-O nearest neighbor distance shorter than that of the long-range ordered phase. These results corroborate the notion of the smaller Mn3+/Mn4+ ionic radii in the Li extracted phase versus the larger Mn2+ ionic radius in Li inserted phase. Thus Li extraction/insertion drives the fluctuation between the disordered and the long-range ordered structures. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The direct ionization processes in the collisions of partially stripped carbon and oxygen ions with helium atoms at low-to-intermediate energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Chun-Lin; Shao Jian-Xiong; Chen Xi-Meng; Sun Guang-Zhi; Zou Xian-Rong

    2008-01-01

    The values of direct double- to-single ionization ratio R of helium atoms induced by Cq+,Oq+ (q=1-4) ions at incident energies from 0.2 to 8.5MeV are measured.Based on the existing model (Shao J X,Chen X M and Ding B W 2007 Phys.Rev.A 75 012701) the effective charge of the projectile is introduced to theoretically estimate the value of R for the partially stripped ions impacting on helium atoms.The results calculated from our "effective charge" model are in good agreement with the experimental data,and the dependence of the effective charge on the ionization energy of the projectile is also discussed qualitatively.

  14. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  15. Simultaneous determination of mercury and organic carbon in sediment and soils using a direct mercury analyzer based on thermal decomposition–atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingjing [College of Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, No. 18 Chaowang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Chakravarty, Pragya [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (United States); Davidson, Gregg R. [Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (United States); Wren, Daniel G.; Locke, Martin A. [National Sedimentation Laboratory, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Oxford, MS 38655 (United States); Zhou, Ying, E-mail: yingzhou@zjut.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, No. 18 Chaowang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Brown, Garry [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (United States); Cizdziel, James V., E-mail: cizdziel@olemiss.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Graphical abstract: Comparison of LOI data obtained by a conventional method and by the DMA. The dark line represents a 1:1 ratio. - Highlights: • A direct mercury analyzer was used to estimate total organic carbon. • Mercury and organic carbon were measured in oxbow lake sediment cores. • Temporal and spatial deposition of Hg in the Mississippi Delta were evaluated. - Abstract: The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of using a direct mercury analyzer (DMA) to simultaneously determine mercury (Hg) and organic matter content in sediment and soils. Organic carbon was estimated by re-weighing the sample boats post analysis to obtain loss-on-ignition (LOI) data. The DMA-LOI results were statistically similar (p < 0.05) to the conventional muffle furnace approach. A regression equation was developed to convert DMA-LOI data to total organic carbon (TOC), which varied between 0.2% and 13.0%. Thus, mercury analyzers based on combustion can provide accurate estimates of organic carbon content in non-calcareous sediment and soils; however, weight gain from moisture (post-analysis), measurement uncertainty, and sample representativeness should all be taken into account. Sediment cores from seasonal wetland and open water areas from six oxbow lakes in the Mississippi River alluvial flood plain were analyzed. Wetland sediments generally had higher levels of Hg than open water areas owing to a greater fraction of fine particles and higher levels of organic matter. Annual loading of Hg in open water areas was estimated at 4.3, 13.4, 19.2, 20.7, 129, and 135 ng cm{sup −2} yr{sup −1} for Beasley, Roundaway, Hampton, Washington, Wolf and Sky Lakes, respectively. Generally, the interval with the highest Hg flux was dated to the 1960s and 1970s.

  16. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small

  17. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  18. Further Insight into the Lability of MeCN Ligands of Cytotoxic Cycloruthenated Compounds: Evidence for the Antisymbiotic Effect Trans to the Carbon Atom at the Ru Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ana Soraya Lima; Werlé, Christophe; Colunga, Claudia Olivia Oliva; Rodríguez, Cecilia Franco; Toscano, Ruben Alfredo; Le Lagadec, Ronan; Pfeffer, Michel

    2015-08-03

    The two MeCN ligands in [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(Phen, trans-C)(MeCN)2]PF6 (1), both trans to a sp(2) hybridized N atom, cannot be substituted by any other ligand. In contrast, the isomerized derivative [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(Phen, cis-C)(MeCN)2]PF6 (2), in which one MeCN ligand is now trans to the C atom of the phenyl ring orthometalated to Ru, leads to fast and quantitative substitution reactions with several monodentate ligands. With PPh3, 2 affords [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(Phen, cis-C)(PPh3)(MeCN)]PF6 (3), in which PPh3 is trans to the C σ bound to Ru. Compound 3 is not kinetically stable, because, under thermodynamic control, it leads to 4, in which the PPh3 is trans to a N atom of the Phen ligand. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) can also substitute a MeCN ligand in 2, leading to 5, in which DMSO is coordinated to Ru via its S atom trans to the N atom of the Phen ligand, the isomer under thermodynamic control being the only compound observed. We also found evidence for the fast to very fast substitution of MeCN in 2 by water or a chloride anion by studying the electronic spectra of 2 in the presence of water or NBu4Cl, respectively. An isomerization related to that observed between 3 and 4 is also found for the known monophosphine derivative [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(PPh3, trans-C)(MeCN)3]PF6 (10), in which the PPh3 is located trans to the C of the cyclometalated 2-phenylpyridine, since, upon treatment by refluxing MeCN, it leads to its isomer 11, [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(PPh3, cis-C)(MeCN)3]PF6. Further substitutions are also observed on 11, whereby N^N chelates (N^N = 2,2'-bipyridine and phenanthroline) substitute two MeCN ligands, affording [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(PPh3, cis-C)(N^N)(MeCN)]PF6 (12a and 12b). Altogether, the behavior of the obtained complexes by ligand substitution reactions can be rationalized by an antisymbiotic effect on the Ru center, trans to the C atom of the cyclometalated unit, leading to compounds having the least nucleophilic ligand trans to C

  19. Simultaneous determination of mercury and organic carbon in sediment and soils using a direct mercury analyzer based on thermal decomposition-atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Chakravarty, Pragya; Davidson, Gregg R; Wren, Daniel G; Locke, Martin A; Zhou, Ying; Brown, Garry; Cizdziel, James V

    2015-04-29

    The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of using a direct mercury analyzer (DMA) to simultaneously determine mercury (Hg) and organic matter content in sediment and soils. Organic carbon was estimated by re-weighing the sample boats post analysis to obtain loss-on-ignition (LOI) data. The DMA-LOI results were statistically similar (p<0.05) to the conventional muffle furnace approach. A regression equation was developed to convert DMA-LOI data to total organic carbon (TOC), which varied between 0.2% and 13.0%. Thus, mercury analyzers based on combustion can provide accurate estimates of organic carbon content in non-calcareous sediment and soils; however, weight gain from moisture (post-analysis), measurement uncertainty, and sample representativeness should all be taken into account. Sediment cores from seasonal wetland and open water areas from six oxbow lakes in the Mississippi River alluvial flood plain were analyzed. Wetland sediments generally had higher levels of Hg than open water areas owing to a greater fraction of fine particles and higher levels of organic matter. Annual loading of Hg in open water areas was estimated at 4.3, 13.4, 19.2, 20.7, 129, and 135 ng cm(-2) yr(-1) for Beasley, Roundaway, Hampton, Washington, Wolf and Sky Lakes, respectively. Generally, the interval with the highest Hg flux was dated to the 1960s and 1970s. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ionic liquid-assisted multiwalled carbon nanotube-dispersive micro-solid phase extraction for sensitive determination of inorganic As species in garlic samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Escudero, Leticia B.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2015-08-01

    A highly sensitive dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) method combining an ionic liquid (IL) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for inorganic As species (As(III) and As(V)) species separation and determination in garlic samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. Trihexyl(tetradecil)phosphonium chloride IL was used to form an ion pair with the arsenomolybdate complex obtained by reaction of As(V) with molybdate ion. Afterwards, 1.0 mg of MWCNTs was dispersed for As(V) extraction and the supernatant was separated by centrifugation. MWCNTs were re-dispersed with tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactant and ultrasound followed by direct injection into the graphite furnace of ETAAS for As determination. Pyrolysis and atomization conditions were carefully studied for complete decomposition of MWCNTs and IL matrices. Under optimum conditions, an extraction efficiency of 100% and a preconcentration factor of 70 were obtained with 5 mL of garlic extract. The detection limit was 7.1 ng L- 1 and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) for six replicate measurements at 5 μg L- 1 of As were 5.4% and 4.8% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The proposed D-μ-SPE method allowed the efficient separation and determination of inorganic As species in a complex matrix such as garlic extract.

  1. Direct observation of a long-lived single-atom catalyst chiseling atomic structures in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei Li; Santos, Elton J G; Jiang, Bin; Cubuk, Ekin Dogus; Ophus, Colin; Centeno, Alba; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Ciston, Jim; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-02-12

    Fabricating stable functional devices at the atomic scale is an ultimate goal of nanotechnology. In biological processes, such high-precision operations are accomplished by enzymes. A counterpart molecular catalyst that binds to a solid-state substrate would be highly desirable. Here, we report the direct observation of single Si adatoms catalyzing the dissociation of carbon atoms from graphene in an aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The single Si atom provides a catalytic wedge for energetic electrons to chisel off the graphene lattice, atom by atom, while the Si atom itself is not consumed. The products of the chiseling process are atomic-scale features including graphene pores and clean edges. Our experimental observations and first-principles calculations demonstrated the dynamics, stability, and selectivity of such a single-atom chisel, which opens up the possibility of fabricating certain stable molecular devices by precise modification of materials at the atomic scale.

  2. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in the particulate and gas phase from smoldering mosquito coils containing various atomic hydrogen/carbon ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Tzu-Ting, E-mail: d89844001@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Health, Yuanpei University, No. 306, Yuanpei St., Hsin Chu 30015, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shaw-Tao [Department of Applied Chemistry, Providence University, No. 200 Chung-Chi Rd., Salu Dist., Taichung City 43301, Taiwan (China); Lin, Tser-Sheng [Department of Safety, Health, and Environmental Engineering, National United University, 2 Lien Da, Maioli 360, Taiwan (China); Chung, Hua-Yi [Department of Environmental Engineering and Health, Yuanpei University, No. 306, Yuanpei St., Hsin Chu 30015, Taiwan (China)

    2015-02-15

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in particulate and gas phases generated from smoldering mosquito coils containing various atomic H/C ratios were examined. Five types of mosquito coils were burned in a test chamber with a total airflow rate of 8.0 L/min at a constant relative humidity and temperature. The concentrations of individual PAHs were determined using the GC/MS technique. Among the used mosquito coils, the atomic H/C ratio ranged from 1.23 to 1.57, yielding total mass, gaseous, and particulate PAH emission factors of 28.17–78.72 mg/g, 26,139.80–35,932.98 and 5735.22–13,431.51 ng/g, respectively. The various partitions of PAHs in the gaseous and particulate phases were in the ranges, 70.26–83.70% and 16.30–29.74% for the utilized mosquito coils. The carcinogenic potency of PAH emissions in the particulate phase (203.82–797.76 ng/g) was approximately 6.92–25.08 times higher than that of the gaseous phase (26.27–36.07 ng/g). Based on the analyses of PAH emissions, mosquito coils containing the lowest H/C ratio, a low oxygen level, and additional additives (i.e., CaCO{sub 3}) are recommended for minimizing the production of total PAH emission factors and carcinogenic potency. - Highlights: • PAHs emissions are influenced by mosquito coils containing various atomic H/C ratios. • The PAHs generated by burning mosquito coils mainly occur in the gaseous phase. • Total TEQ emission factors of PAHs mainly consisted of the particulate phase (> 87%). • The BaP and BaA accounted for 71.13–77.28% of the total TEQ emission factors. • Special PAH ratios were regarded as characteristic ratios for burning mosquito coil.

  3. Atomic rivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  4. Thermoelectric transport properties through a single-walled zig–zag carbon nanotube side coupled to a correlated quantum dot: Atomic approach for the finite U-impurity Anderson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Edwin, E-mail: eramosr@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL), A. A. 5997, Bogotá (Colombia); Franco, Roberto, E-mail: rfrancop@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL), A. A. 5997, Bogotá (Colombia); Instituto de Física de São Carlos-Universidade de São Paulo (IFSC-USP), 369 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil); Silva-Valencia, Jereson [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL), A. A. 5997, Bogotá (Colombia); Figueira, Marcos Sergio [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense (IF-UFF), Avenida litorânea s/n, CEP 24210-346, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    We study the thermopower S, linear thermal conductance κ, linear electric conductance G and thermoelectric figure of merit Z properties of a single-walled zig–zag carbon nanotube side coupled to a correlated quantum dot (QD). We employ the recently developed U-finite atomic approach for the Single Impurity Anderson model (SIAM). The quantum dot is linked to the localized states in the model, considering a finite Coulombic repulsion U, and the conduction band in the model is associated with the single walled zig–zag metallic carbon nanotube (n=3), and is described by a tight-binding approximation in order to obtain Green's function of the nanotube. The thermoelectric transport coefficients were obtained using the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function technique with the Onsager relation in the linear regime automatically satisfied. Results indicate that this system can be employed in possible thermoelectric device applications at low temperatures when strong charge fluctuations are present in the QD.

  5. Atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  6. Reactivity of boron- and nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes functionalized by (Pt, Eu) atoms toward O2 and CO: A density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Aal, S.

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and electronic properties of CO and O2 molecules at the supported Pt and Eu atoms on (5,5) armchair SWCNT have been systematically investigated within density functional theory (DFT). Fundamental aspects such as adsorption energy, natural bond orbital (NBO), charge transfer, frontier orbitals and the projected density of states (PDOS) are elucidated to analyze the adsorption properties of CO and O2 molecules. The results reveal that B- and N-doping CNTs can enhance the binding strength and catalytic activity of Pt (Eu) anchored on the doped-CNT, where boron-doping is more effective. The electronic structures of supported metal are strongly influenced by the presence of gases. After adsorption of CO and O2, the changes in binding energy, charge transfer and conductance may lead to the different response in the metal-doped CNT-based sensors. It is expected that these results could provide helpful information for the design and fabrication of the CO and O2 sensing devices. The high catalytic activity of Pt supported at doped-CNT toward the interaction with CO and O2 may be attributed to the electronic resonance particularly among Pt-5d, CO-2π* and O2-2π* antibonding orbitals. In contrast to the supported Eu at doped-CNT, the Eu atom becomes more positively charged, which leads to weaken the CO adsorption and promote the O2 adsorption, consequently enhancing the activity for CO oxidation and alleviating the CO poisoning of the europium catalysts. A notable orbital hybridization and electrostatic interaction between these two species in adsorption process being an evidence of strong interaction. The electronic structure of O2 adsorbed on Eu-doped CNT resembles that of O2-, therefore the transferred charge weakens the O-O bonds and facilitates the dissociation process, which is the precondition for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR).

  7. Is there a Difference in Van Der Waals Interactions between Rare Gas Atoms Adsorbed on Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, De-Li [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Mandeltort, Lynn [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Saidi, Wissam A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Yates, John T. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Cole, Milton W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept of Physics; Johnson, J. Karl [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Differences in polarizabilities of metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) might give rise to differences in adsorption potentials. We show from experiments and van der Waals-corrected density functional theory (DFT) that binding energies of Xe adsorbed on M- and S-SWNTs are nearly identical. Temperature programmed desorption of Xe on purified M- and S-SWNTs give similar peak temperatures, indicating that desorption kinetics and binding energies are independent of the type of SWNT. Binding energies computed from vdW-corrected DFT are in good agreement with experiments.

  8. Is there a difference in van der Waals interactions between rare gas atoms adsorbed on metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De-Li; Mandeltort, Lynn; Saidi, Wissam A; Yates, John T; Cole, Milton W; Johnson, J Karl

    2013-03-29

    The differences in the polarizabilities of metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) might give rise to differences in adsorption potentials. We show from experiments and van der Waals--corrected density functional theory that the binding energies of Xe adsorbed on M- and S-SWNTs are nearly identical. Temperature programed desorption experiments of Xe on purified M- and S-SWNTs give similar peak temperatures, indicating that desorption kinetics and binding energies are independent of the type of SWNT. Binding energies computed from vdW-corrected density functional theory are in good agreement with experiments.

  9. A new type of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer: proton transfer from phenol OH to a carbon atom of an aromatic ring observed for 2-phenylphenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeman, Matthew; Wan, Peter

    2002-08-14

    The photochemical deuterium incorporation at the 2'- and 4'-positions of 2-phenylphenol (4) and equivalent positions of related compounds has been studied in D(2)O (CH(3)OD)-CH(3)CN solutions with varying D(2)O (CH(3)OD) content. Predominant exchange was observed at the 2'-position with an efficiency that is independent of D(2)O (MeOD) content. Exchange at the 2'-position (but not at the 4'-position) was also observed when crystalline samples of 4-OD were irradiated. Data are presented consistent with a mechanism of exchange that involves excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) from the phenol to the 2'-carbon position of the benzene ring not containing the phenol, to generate the corresponding keto tautomer (an o-quinone methide). This is the first explicit example of a new class of ESIPT in which an acidic phenolic proton is transferred to an sp(2)-hybridized carbon of an aromatic ring. The complete lack of exchange observed for related substrates 6-9 and for planar 4-hydroxyfluorene (10) is consistent with a mechanism of ESIPT that requires an initial hydrogen bonding interaction between the phenol proton and the benzene pi-system. Similar exchange was observed for 2,2'-biphenol (5), suggesting that this new type of ESIPT is a general reaction for unconstrained 2'-aryl-substituted phenols and other related hydroxyarenes.

  10. Self-Assembled Fe-N-Doped Carbon Nanotube Aerogels with Single-Atom Catalyst Feature as High-Efficiency Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Song, Junhua [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Shi, Qiurong [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Su, Dong [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Li, Xiaolin [Energy and Environmental Directory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Xiao, Dongdong [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Li, Dongsheng [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Estevez, Luis [Energy and Environmental Directory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Lin, Yuehe [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-02-06

    Finely controlled synthesis of high active and robust non-precious metal catalysts with excellent electrocatalytic efficiency towards oxygen reduction reaction is extremely vital for successful implementation of fuel cells and metal batteries. Unprecedented oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalytic performances and the diversified synthetic procedure in term of favorable structure/morphology characteristics make transition metals-derived M–N–C (M=Fe, Co) structures the most promising nanocatalysts. Herein, using the nitrogen-containing small molecular and inorganic salt as precursors and ultrathin tellurium nanowires as templates, we successfully synthesized a series of well-defined M-N-doped hollow carbon nanowire aerogels through one step hydrothermal route and subsequent facile annealing treatment. Taking advantage of the porous nanostructures, one-dimensional building block as well as homogeneity of active sites, the resultant Fe-N-doped carbon hollow nanowire aerogels exhibited excellent ORR electrocatalytic performance even better than commercial Pt/C in alkaline solution, holding great potential in fuel cell applications.

  11. The Atomic orbitals of the topological atom

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador Sedano, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These c...

  12. Secondary electron emission of thin carbon foils under the impact of hydrogen atoms, ions and molecular ions, under energies within the MeV range; Multiplicite des electrons secondaires emis par des cibles minces de carbone sous l'impact de projectiles H0, H2+, H3+ d'energie de l'ordre du MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovic, Z

    1997-06-15

    This work focuses on the study of the emission statistics of secondary electrons from thin carbon foils bombarded with H{sup 0}, H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} projectiles in the 0.25-2.2 MeV energy range. The phenomenon of secondary electron emission from solids under the impact of swift ions is mainly due to inelastic interactions with target electrons. The phenomenological and theoretical descriptions, as well as a summary of the main theoretical models are the subject of the first chapter. The experimental set-up used to measure event by event the electron emission of the two faces of a thin carbon foil traversed by an energetic projectile is described in the chapter two. In this chapter are also presented the method and algorithms used to process experimental spectra in order to obtain the statistical distribution of the emitted electrons. Chapter three presents the measurements of secondary electron emission induced by H atoms passing through thin carbon foils. The secondary electron yields are studied in correlation with the emergent projectile charge state. We show the peculiar role of the projectile electron, whether it remains or not bound to the incident proton. The fourth chapter is dedicated to the secondary electron emission induced by H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} polyatomic ions. The results are interpreted in terms of collective effects in the interactions of these ions with solids. The role of the proximity of the protons, molecular ion fragments, upon the amplitude of these collective effects is evidenced from the study of the statistics of forward emission. These experiences allowed us to shed light on various aspects of atom and polyatomic ion inter-actions with solid surfaces. (author)

  13. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  14. Ionic liquid-assisted multiwalled carbon nanotube-dispersive micro-solid phase extraction for sensitive determination of inorganic As species in garlic samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Escudero, Leticia B.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G., E-mail: rwuilloud@mendoza-conicet.gob.ar

    2015-08-01

    A highly sensitive dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) method combining an ionic liquid (IL) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for inorganic As species (As(III) and As(V)) species separation and determination in garlic samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. Trihexyl(tetradecil)phosphonium chloride IL was used to form an ion pair with the arsenomolybdate complex obtained by reaction of As(V) with molybdate ion. Afterwards, 1.0 mg of MWCNTs was dispersed for As(V) extraction and the supernatant was separated by centrifugation. MWCNTs were re-dispersed with tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactant and ultrasound followed by direct injection into the graphite furnace of ETAAS for As determination. Pyrolysis and atomization conditions were carefully studied for complete decomposition of MWCNTs and IL matrices. Under optimum conditions, an extraction efficiency of 100% and a preconcentration factor of 70 were obtained with 5 mL of garlic extract. The detection limit was 7.1 ng L{sup −1} and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) for six replicate measurements at 5 μg L{sup −1} of As were 5.4% and 4.8% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The proposed D-μ-SPE method allowed the efficient separation and determination of inorganic As species in a complex matrix such as garlic extract. - Highlights: • Efficient retention and preconcentration of As by combining an IL with MWCNTs • Determination of As by ETAAS with direct injection of MWCNTs • Thermal degradation of MWCNTs in the graphite furnace of ETAAS • Highly sensitive speciation and determination of As in garlic.

  15. Fabrication of 3D core-shell multiwalled carbon nanotube@RuO2 lithium-ion battery electrodes through a RuO2 atomic layer deposition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorczyk, Keith E; Kozen, Alexander C; Chen, Xinyi; Schroeder, Marshall A; Noked, Malachi; Cao, Anyuan; Hu, Liangbing; Rubloff, Gary W

    2015-01-27

    Pushing lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology forward to its fundamental scaling limits requires the ability to create designer heterostructured materials and architectures. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has recently been applied to advanced nanostructured energy storage devices due to the wide range of available materials, angstrom thickness control, and extreme conformality over high aspect ratio nanostructures. A class of materials referred to as conversion electrodes has recently been proposed as high capacity electrodes. RuO2 is considered an ideal conversion material due to its high combined electronic and ionic conductivity and high gravimetric capacity, and as such is an excellent material to explore the behavior of conversion electrodes at nanoscale thicknesses. We report here a fully characterized atomic layer deposition process for RuO2, electrochemical cycling data for ALD RuO2, and the application of the RuO2 to a composite carbon nanotube electrode scaffold with nucleation-controlled RuO2 growth. A growth rate of 0.4 Å/cycle is found between ∼ 210-240 °C. In a planar configuration, the resulting RuO2 films show high first cycle electrochemical capacities of ∼ 1400 mAh/g, but the capacity rapidly degrades with charge/discharge cycling. We also fabricated core/shell MWCNT/RuO2 heterostructured 3D electrodes, which show a 50× increase in the areal capacity over their planar counterparts, with an areal lithium capacity of 1.6 mAh/cm(2).

  16. Clarifying atomic weights: A 2016 four-figure table of standard and conventional atomic weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Meyers, Fabienne; Holden, Norman E.

    2017-01-01

    To indicate that atomic weights of many elements are not constants of nature, in 2009 and 2011 the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights (CIAAW) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) replaced single-value standard atomic weight values with atomic weight intervals for 12 elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, bromine, and thallium); for example, the standard atomic weight of nitrogen became the interval [14.00643, 14.00728]. CIAAW recognized that some users of atomic weight data only need representative values for these 12 elements, such as for trade and commerce. For this purpose, CIAAW provided conventional atomic weight values, such as 14.007 for nitrogen, and these values can serve in education when a single representative value is needed, such as for molecular weight calculations. Because atomic weight values abridged to four figures are preferred by many educational users and are no longer provided by CIAAW as of 2015, we provide a table containing both standard atomic weight values and conventional atomic weight values abridged to four figures for the chemical elements. A retrospective review of changes in four-digit atomic weights since 1961 indicates that changes in these values are due to more accurate measurements over time or to the recognition of the impact of natural isotopic fractionation in normal terrestrial materials upon atomic weight values of many elements. Use of the unit “u” (unified atomic mass unit on the carbon mass scale) with atomic weight is incorrect because the quantity atomic weight is dimensionless, and the unit “amu” (atomic mass unit on the oxygen scale) is an obsolete term: Both should be avoided.

  17. Atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  18. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  19. Detecting Neutral Atoms on an Atom Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Wilzbach, M.; Haase, A.; Schwarz, M; Heine, D.; Wicker, K.; Liu, X; Brenner, K. -H.; Groth, S.; Fernholz, Th.; Hessmo, B.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Detecting single atoms (qubits) is a key requirement for implementing quantum information processing on an atom chip. The detector should ideally be integrated on the chip. Here we present and compare different methods capable of detecting neutral atoms on an atom chip. After a short introduction to fluorescence and absorption detection we discuss cavity enhanced detection of single atoms. In particular we concentrate on optical fiber based detectors such as fiber cavities and tapered fiber d...

  20. Risk profile of patients developing nonunion of the clavicle and outcome of treatment-analysis of fifty five nonunions in seven hundred and twenty nine consecutive fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ban, Ilija; Troelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The most common complication following treatment of a clavicle fracture is nonunion. Most nonunions are symptomatic and treatment is mostly operative. The aim of this study was to describe risk profiles of patients developing nonunion and what outcome is observed following operative...... treatment of clavicle nonunions. METHODS: In a consecutive series of 729 clavicle fractures we retrospectively identified 55 that developed nonunion (49 diaphysial and six lateral). All were treated operatively by reconstruction with (n = 28) or without (n = 27) autologous bone graft. Assessment...... was anatomic site, fracture complexity, female gender, smoking habits and initial treatment. A total of eight post-operative complications were found. Remission of symptoms was reported by 29 of the 33. Outright satisfaction with current shoulder condition was reported by 24. The overall median DASH was 8...

  1. High Prevalence of Pseudotumors in Patients with a Birmingham Hip Resurfacing Prosthesis A Prospective Cohort Study of One Hundred and Twenty-nine Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, R.; Boomsma, M. F.; Van Raay, J. J. A. M.; Tiebosch, A. T. M. G.; Maas, M.; Gerritsma, C. L. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recently, concern has emerged about pseudotumors (lesions that are neither malignant nor infective in the soft tissues surrounding total hip arthroplasty components) after hip arthroplasties with metal-on-metal bearings. Patients treated in our hospital for degenerative arthritis of the

  2. Air-stable conversion of separated carbon nanotube thin-film transistors from p-type to n-type using atomic layer deposition of high-κ oxide and its application in CMOS logic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialu; Wang, Chuan; Fu, Yue; Che, Yuchi; Zhou, Chongwu

    2011-04-26

    Due to extraordinary electrical properties, preseparated, high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes hold great potential for thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuit applications. One of the main challenges it still faces is the fabrication of air-stable n-type nanotube TFTs with industry-compatible techniques. Here in this paper, we report a novel and highly reliable method of converting the as-made p-type TFTs using preseparated semiconducting nanotubes into air-stable n-type transistors by adding a high-κ oxide passivation layer using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The n-type devices exhibit symmetric electrical performance compared with the p-type devices in terms of on-current, on/off ratio, and device mobility. Various factors affecting the conversion process, including ALD temperature, metal contact material, and channel length, have also been systematically studied by a series of designed experiments. A complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverter with rail-to-rail output, symmetric input/output behavior, and large noise margin has been further demonstrated. The excellent performance gives us the feasibility of cascading multiple stages of logic blocks and larger scale integration. Our approach can serve as the critical foundation for future nanotube-based thin-film macroelectronics.

  3. Non-uniform binding of single-stranded DNA binding proteins to hybrids of single-stranded DNA and single-walled carbon nanotubes observed by atomic force microscopy in air and in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Kazuo; Ishizaka, Kei; Nii, Daisuke; Izumi, Katsuki

    2016-12-01

    Using atomic force spectroscopy (AFM), we observed hybrids of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with or without protein molecules in air and in an aqueous solution. This is the first report of ssDNA-SWNT hybrids with proteins in solution analyzed by AFM. In the absence of protein, the height of the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids was 1.1 ± 0.3 nm and 2.4 ± 0.6 nm in air and liquid, respectively, suggesting that the ssDNA molecules adopted a flexible structure on the SWNT surface. In the presence of single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins, the heights of the hybrids in air and liquid increased to 6.4 ± 3.1 nm and 10.0 ± 4.5 nm, respectively. The AFM images clearly showed binding of the SSB proteins to the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. The morphology of the SSB-ssDNA-SWNT hybrids was non-uniform, particularly in aqueous solution. The variance of hybrid height was quantitatively estimated by cross-section analysis along the long-axis of each hybrid. The SSB-ssDNA-SWNT hybrids showed much larger variance than the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids.

  4. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2013-03-07

    To understand structural and chemical properties of metal-graphene composites, it is crucial to unveil the chemical bonding along the interface. We provide direct experimental evidence of atomic bonding between typical metal nano structures and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal atoms and clusters under electron irradiation. We demonstrate no electron-instigated interaction between Cr clusters and pristine graphene, though Cr has been reported to be highly reactive to graphene. The metal-mediated etching is a dynamic effect between metal clusters and pre-existing defects. The resolved atomic configurations of typical nano metal structures on graphene offer insight into modeling and simulations on properties of metal-decorated graphene for both catalysis and future carbon-based electronics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  6. The atomic orbitals of the topological atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador, Pedro; Mayer, István

    2013-06-07

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These correspond to atomic hybrids that closely resemble the core and valence shells of the atom. The occupation numbers of the remaining effective orbitals are almost negligible, except for atoms with hypervalent character. In addition, the molecular orbitals of a calculation can be exactly expressed as a linear combination of this orthonormalized set of numerical atomic orbitals, and the Mulliken population analysis carried out on this basis set exactly reproduces the original QTAIM atomic populations of the atoms. Approximate expansion of the molecular orbitals over a much reduced set of orthogonal atomic basis functions can also be accomplished to a very good accuracy with a singular value decomposition procedure.

  7. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or

  8. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or semiconduct

  9. Atomic layer deposition coating of carbon nanotubes with aluminum oxide alters pro-fibrogenic cytokine expression by human mononuclear phagocytes in vitro and reduces lung fibrosis in mice in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia J Taylor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs pose a possible human health risk for lung disease as a result of inhalation exposure. Mice exposed to MWCNTs develop pulmonary fibrosis. Lung macrophages engulf MWCNTs and produce pro-fibrogenic cytokines including interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and osteopontin (OPN. Atomic layer deposition (ALD is a novel process used to enhance functional properties of MWCNTs, yet the consequence of ALD-modified MWCNTs on macrophage biology and fibrosis is unknown. METHODS: The purpose of this study was to determine whether ALD coating with aluminum oxide (Al2O3 would alter the fibrogenic response to MWCNTs and whether cytokine expression in human macrophage/monocytes exposed to MWCNTs in vitro would predict the severity of lung fibrosis in mice. Uncoated (U-MWCNTs or ALD-coated (A-MWCNTs were incubated with THP-1 macrophages or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and cell supernatants assayed for cytokines by ELISA. C57BL6 mice were exposed to a single dose of A- or U-MWCNTs by oropharyngeal aspiration (4 mg/kg followed by evaluation of histopathology, lung inflammatory cell counts, and cytokine levels at day 1 and 28 post-exposure. RESULTS: ALD coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 enhanced IL-1β secretion by THP-1 and PBMC in vitro, yet reduced protein levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN production by THP-1 cells. Moreover, Al2O3 nanoparticles, but not carbon black NPs, increased IL-1β but decreased OPN and IL-6 in THP-1 and PBMC. Mice exposed to U-MWCNT had increased levels of all four cytokines assayed and developed pulmonary fibrosis by 28 days, whereas ALD-coating significantly reduced fibrosis and cytokine levels at the mRNA or protein level. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that ALD thin film coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 reduces fibrosis in mice and that in vitro phagocyte expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN, but not IL-1β, predict MWCNT-induced fibrosis in the lungs of

  10. Atomic layer deposition coating of carbon nanotubes with aluminum oxide alters pro-fibrogenic cytokine expression by human mononuclear phagocytes in vitro and reduces lung fibrosis in mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexia J; McClure, Christina D; Shipkowski, Kelly A; Thompson, Elizabeth A; Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Parsons, Gregory N; Bonner, James C

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) pose a possible human health risk for lung disease as a result of inhalation exposure. Mice exposed to MWCNTs develop pulmonary fibrosis. Lung macrophages engulf MWCNTs and produce pro-fibrogenic cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and osteopontin (OPN). Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a novel process used to enhance functional properties of MWCNTs, yet the consequence of ALD-modified MWCNTs on macrophage biology and fibrosis is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ALD coating with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) would alter the fibrogenic response to MWCNTs and whether cytokine expression in human macrophage/monocytes exposed to MWCNTs in vitro would predict the severity of lung fibrosis in mice. Uncoated (U)-MWCNTs or ALD-coated (A)-MWCNTs were incubated with THP-1 macrophages or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cell supernatants assayed for cytokines by ELISA. C57BL6 mice were exposed to a single dose of A- or U-MWCNTs by oropharyngeal aspiration (4 mg/kg) followed by evaluation of histopathology, lung inflammatory cell counts, and cytokine levels at day 1 and 28 post-exposure. ALD coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 enhanced IL-1β secretion by THP-1 and PBMC in vitro, yet reduced protein levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN production by THP-1 cells. Moreover, Al2O3 nanoparticles, but not carbon black NPs, increased IL-1β but decreased OPN and IL-6 in THP-1 and PBMC. Mice exposed to U-MWCNT had increased levels of all four cytokines assayed and developed pulmonary fibrosis by 28 days, whereas ALD-coating significantly reduced fibrosis and cytokine levels at the mRNA or protein level. These findings indicate that ALD thin film coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 reduces fibrosis in mice and that in vitro phagocyte expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN, but not IL-1β, predict MWCNT-induced fibrosis in the lungs of mice in vivo.

  11. Atomic phase diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shichun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Cheng model, atomic phase diagram or electron density versus atomic radius diagram describing the interaction properties of atoms of different kinds in equilibrium state is developed. Atomic phase diagram is established based on the two-atoms model. Besides atomic radius, electron density and continuity condition for electron density on interfaces between atoms, the lever law of atomic phase diagram involving other physical parameters is taken into account, such as the binding energy, for the sake of simplicity.

  12. Sub-Angstrom Atomic-Resolution Imaging of Heavy Atoms to Light Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2003-05-23

    Three decades ago John Cowley and his group at ASU achieved high-resolution electron microscope images showing the crystal unit cell contents at better than 4Angstrom resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with Cs-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  13. Effect of dietary fats with odd or even numbers of carbon atoms on metabolic response and muscle damage with exercise in Quarter Horse-type horses with type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Lisa A; Valberg, Stephanie J; McCue, Molly E; Pagan, Joe D; Roe, Charles R

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate effects of fats with odd and even numbers of carbon atoms on muscle metabolism in exercising horses with polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM). 8 horses with PSSM (6 females and 2 males; mean +/- SD age, 6.3 +/- 3.9 years). Isocaloric diets (grain, triheptanoin, corn oil, and high-fat, low-starch [HFLS] feed) were fed for 3 weeks each; horses performed daily treadmill exercise. Grain was fed to establish an exercise target, and HFLS feed was fed as a negative control diet. Daily plasma samples were obtained. For each diet, a 15-minute exercise test was performed, and gluteus medius muscle specimens and blood samples were obtained before and after exercise. Feeding triheptanoin, compared with the corn oil diet, resulted in exercise intolerance; higher plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and concentrations of C3:0- and C7:0-acylcarnitine and insulin; and lower concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and C16:0-, C18:1-, and C18:2-acylcarnitine, without changes in concentrations of plasma glucose or resting muscle substrates and metabolites. Feeding grain induced higher CK activity and insulin concentrations and lower NEFA concentrations than did corn oil or HFLS feed. Feeding grain induced higher glucose concentrations than did triheptanoin and corn oil. In muscle, feeding grain resulted in lower glucose-6-phosphate, higher citrate, and higher postexercise lactate concentrations than did the other diets. Triheptanoin had detrimental effects, reflecting decreased availability of NEFA, increased insulin stimulation of glycogen synthesis, and potential inhibition of lipid oxidation. Long-chain fats are the best dietetic for PSSM.

  14. Simultaneous speciation of inorganic arsenic and antimony in water samples by hydride generation-double channel atomic fluorescence spectrometry with on-line solid-phase extraction using single-walled carbon nanotubes micro-column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hong, E-mail: wuhong1968@hotmail.com; Wang Xuecui; Liu Bing; Liu Yueling; Li Shanshan; Lu Jusheng; Tian Jiuying; Zhao Wenfeng; Yang Zonghui

    2011-01-15

    A new method was developed for the simultaneous speciation of inorganic arsenic and antimony in water by on-line solid-phase extraction coupled with hydride generation-double channel atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-DC-AFS). The speciation scheme involved the on-line formation and retention of the ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complexes of As(III) and Sb(III) on a single-walled carbon nanotubes packed micro-column, followed by on-line elution and simultaneous detection of As(III) and Sb(III) by HG-DC-AFS; the total As and total Sb were determined by the same protocol after As(V) and Sb(V) were reduced by thiourea, with As(V) and Sb(V) concentrations obtained by subtraction. Various experimental parameters affecting the on-line solid-phase extraction and determination of the analytes species have been investigated in detail. With 180 s preconcentration time, the enrichment factors were found to be 25.4 for As(III) and 24.6 for Sb(III), with the limits of detection (LODs) of 3.8 ng L{sup -1} for As(III) and 2.1 ng L{sup -1} for Sb(III). The precisions (RSD) for five replicate measurements of 0.5 {mu}g L{sup -1} of As(III) and 0.2 {mu}g L{sup -1} of Sb(III) were 4.2 and 4.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of standard reference materials (NIST SRM 1640a), and was applied to the speciation of inorganic As and Sb in natural water samples.

  15. Atomic level spatial variations of energy states along graphene edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Jamie H; Lin, Yung-Chang; He, Kuang; Koshino, Masanori; Suenaga, Kazu

    2014-11-12

    The local atomic bonding of carbon atoms around the edge of graphene is examined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). High-resolution 2D maps of the EELS combined with atomic resolution annular dark field STEM images enables correlations between the carbon K-edge EELS and the atomic structure. We show that energy states of graphene edges vary across individual atoms along the edge according to their specific C-C bonding, as well as perpendicular to the edge. Unique spectroscopic peaks from the EELS are assigned to specific C atoms, which enables unambiguous spectroscopic fingerprint identification for the atomic structure of graphene edges with unprecedented detail.

  16. Cold Matter Assembled Atom-by-Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Manuel; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-01-01

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a novel platform for the deterministic preparation of regular arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of over 50 atoms in less than 400 ms. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach enables controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements.

  17. Atomic carbon in an infrared dark cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossenkopf, Volker; Ormel, Chris W.; Simon, Robert; Sun, Kefeng; Stutzki, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) are potential sites of massive star formation, dark in the near-infrared, but in many cases already with indications of active star-formation from far-infrared and submm observations. They are an ideal test bed to study the role of internal and external heating on the

  18. Atomic covalent functionalization of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-01-15

    Although graphene's physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp(2) bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene's electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (∼1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Toward this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  19. Atomic Covalent Functionalization of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus Although graphene’s physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp2 bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene’s electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (~1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Towards this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  20. Simulations of phenol adsorption on activated carbon and carbon black

    OpenAIRE

    Prosenjak, Claudia; Valente Nabais, Joao; Laginhas, Carlos; Carrott, Peter; Carrott, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    We use grand canonical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption of phenol on carbon materials. Activated carbon is modelled by pore size distributions based on DFT methods; carbon black is represented by a single carbon slab with varying percentages of surface atoms removed. GCMC results for the adsorption from the corresponding gas phase gave reasonable agreement with experimental adsorption results. MD simulations, that studied the influence of the presence of ...

  1. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  2. Atom Lithography with a Chromium Atomic Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; LI Tong-Bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Direct write atom lithography is a new technique in which resonant light is used to pattern an atomic beam and the nanostructures are formed when the atoms deposit on the substrate. We design an experiment setup to fabricate chromium nanolines by depositing an atomic beam of 52 Cr through an off-resonant laser standing wave with the wavelength of 425.55 nm onto a silicon substrate. The resulting nanolines exhibit a period of 215 ± 3 nm with height of 1 nm.

  3. Properties of Atoms in Molecules:  Caged Atoms and the Ehrenfest Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Richard F W; Fang, De-Cai

    2005-05-01

    This paper uses the properties of atom X enclosed within an adamantane cage, denoted by X@C10H16, as a vehicle to introduce the Ehrenfest force into the discussion of bonding, the properties being determined by the physics of an open system. This is the force acting on an atom in a molecule and determining the potential energy appearing in Slater's molecular virial theorem. The Ehrenfest force acting across the interatomic surface of a bonded pair atoms [Formula: see text] atoms linked by a bond path [Formula: see text] is attractive, each atom being drawn toward the other, and the associated surface virial that measures the contribution to the energy arising from the formation of the surface is stabilizing. It is the Ehrenfest force that determines the adhesive properties of surfaces. The endothermicity of formation for X = He or Ne is not a result of instabilities incurred in the interaction of X with the four methine carbons to which it is bonded, interactions that are stabilizing both in terms of the changes in the atomic energies and in the surface virials. The exothermicity for X = Be(2+), B(3+), and Al(3+) is a consequence of the transfer of electron density from the hydrogen atoms to the carbon and X atoms, the exothermicity increasing with charge transfer despite an increase in the contained volume of X.

  4. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  5. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  6. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu

    2017-09-01

    A nano - scale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon - atom interactions . A neutral - atom platf orm based on this microfabrication technology will be pre - aligned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano - waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  7. Toward the Atomic-Level Mass Analysis of Biomolecules by the Scanning Atom Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2016-12-22

    In 1994, a new type of atom probe instrument, named the scanning atom probe (SAP), was proposed. The unique feature of the SAP is the introduction of a small extraction electrode, which scans over a specimen surface and confines the high field, required for field evaporation of surface atoms in a small space, between the specimen and the electrode. Thus, the SAP does not require a sharp specimen tip. This indicates that the SAP can mass analyze the specimens which are difficult to form in a sharp tip, such as organic materials and biomolecules. Clean single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT), made by high-pressure carbon monoxide process are found to be the best substrates for biomolecules. Various amino acids and dipeptide biomolecules were successfully mass analyzed, revealing characteristic clusters formed by strongly bound atoms in the specimens. The mass analysis indicates that SAP analysis of biomolecules is not only qualitative, but also quantitative.

  8. The mean excitation energy of atomic ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Oddershede, Jens

    2015-01-01

    A method for calculation of the mean excitation energies of atomic ions is presented, making the calculation of the energy deposition of fast ions to plasmas, warm, dense matter, and complex biological systems possible. Results are reported to all ions of helium, lithium, carbon, neon, aluminum...

  9. Nano-soldering to single atomic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girit, Caglar O.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2011-10-11

    A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

  10. Atomization mechanisms and gas phase reactions in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frech, W.; Lindberg, A.O.; Lundberg, E.; Cedergren, A.

    1986-04-01

    The amounts of carbon monoxide as well as the total amounts of hydrocarbons generated in different types of graphite tubes were investigated under various experimental conditions. Depending on whether or not a matrix like 50 ..mu..g of sodium nitrate was added the amount of carbon monoxide formed during atomization at 1,700 K in a pyrocoated tube was in the range 60 to 600 nmoles when using a thermal pretreatment temperature of 1,200 K. The corresponding values for an uncoated tube were 250 to 1,300 nmoles. The effect of carbon monoxide on the atomization behaviour of silver, bismuth, chromium, copper and lead was investigated experimentally and the results were evaluated by means of thermodynamically based models. In accordance with theoretical predications, only lead, bismuth and chromium, which are assumed to be atomized by oxide decomposition, showed substantial shifts in their appearance temperatures in different gas mixtures, and changes in activation energies.

  11. Atomic Particle Detection, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. The instruments used to detect both particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerge from the nucleus are described. The counters reviewed include ionization chambers,…

  12. Formation of nanoscale titanium carbides in ferrite: an atomic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanan; Hodgson, Peter; Kong, Lingxue; Gao, Weimin

    2016-03-01

    The formation and evolution of nanoscale titanium carbide in ferrite during the early isothermal annealing process were investigated via molecular dynamics simulation. The atomic interactions of titanium and carbon atoms during the initial formation process explained the atoms aggregation and carbides formation. It was found that the aggregation and dissociation of titanium carbide occurred simultaneously, and the composition of carbide clusters varied in a wide range. A mechanism for the formation of titanium carbide clusters in ferrite was disclosed.

  13. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  14. 老年支气管肺炎患者雾化吸入方法的探讨%The atomization inhalation in older patients with bronchopneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐燕

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨使用氨溴索进行雾化吸入治疗老年支气管肺炎的最佳方法.方法 将29例患者随机分成2组,分别采用氧气雾化和超声雾化两种不同的雾化方法,比较两组雾化吸入后症状缓解的例数、雾化时间、交叉感染情况.结果 氧气雾化吸入方法时间短、效果好,无交叉感染现象,优于超声雾化吸入方法.结论 应用氨溴索氧气雾化吸入方法更适用于老年支气管肺炎患者,患者感觉舒适,容易接受,值得推广应用.%Objective To explore the best method of aerosol inhalation with ambroxol on treating the patients with bronchopneumonia. Methods Twenty- nine cases of patients were randomly divided into two groups, using oxygen atomization method or ultrasonic atomization method respectively. Cases reaching symptomatic relief after aerosol inhalation, the average treatment time,and condition of cross infection between the two groups were compared. Results The method of oxygen atomization is superior to the method of ultrasonic atomization, with shorter treating time,better effect, and no cross- infection phenomenon. Conclusion The method of oxygen atomization with ambroxol is more suitable for old patients with bronchopneumonia, and it is worth popularizing because patients feel comfortable and easy to accept.

  15. Direct in situ observations of single Fe atom catalytic processes and anomalous diffusion at graphene edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Fu, Lei; Eckert, Jürgen; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-atom catalysts are of great interest because of their high efficiency. In the case of chemically deposited sp2 carbon, the implementation of a single transition metal atom for growth can provide crucial insight into the formation mechanisms of graphene and carbon nanotubes. This knowledge is particularly important if we are to overcome fabrication difficulties in these materials and fully take advantage of their distinct band structures and physical properties. In this work, we present atomically resolved transmission EM in situ investigations of single Fe atoms at graphene edges. Our in situ observations show individual iron atoms diffusing along an edge either removing or adding carbon atoms (viz., catalytic action). The experimental observations of the catalytic behavior of a single Fe atom are in excellent agreement with supporting theoretical studies. In addition, the kinetics of Fe atoms at graphene edges are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion, which again, is in agreement with our theoretical investigations. PMID:25331874

  16. Direct in situ observations of single Fe atom catalytic processes and anomalous diffusion at graphene edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Fu, Lei; Eckert, Jürgen; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2014-11-01

    Single-atom catalysts are of great interest because of their high efficiency. In the case of chemically deposited sp(2) carbon, the implementation of a single transition metal atom for growth can provide crucial insight into the formation mechanisms of graphene and carbon nanotubes. This knowledge is particularly important if we are to overcome fabrication difficulties in these materials and fully take advantage of their distinct band structures and physical properties. In this work, we present atomically resolved transmission EM in situ investigations of single Fe atoms at graphene edges. Our in situ observations show individual iron atoms diffusing along an edge either removing or adding carbon atoms (viz., catalytic action). The experimental observations of the catalytic behavior of a single Fe atom are in excellent agreement with supporting theoretical studies. In addition, the kinetics of Fe atoms at graphene edges are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion, which again, is in agreement with our theoretical investigations.

  17. Trace element determination-I Use of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline in determination of copper in heavy matrices by carbon furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistoni, P; Bruni, P; Cardellini, L; Fava, G; Gobbi, G

    1980-08-01

    A method for the determination of copper in complex matrices by electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrometry has been developed. It uses neocuproine as complexing agent. The detection limit is 0.2 ng/ml, and interferences are minimized.

  18. Imaging and dynamics of light atoms and molecules on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jannik C; Girit, C O; Crommie, M F; Zettl, A

    2008-07-17

    Observing the individual building blocks of matter is one of the primary goals of microscopy. The invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope revolutionized experimental surface science in that atomic-scale features on a solid-state surface could finally be readily imaged. However, scanning tunnelling microscopy has limited applicability due to restrictions in, for example, sample conductivity, cleanliness, and data acquisition rate. An older microscopy technique, that of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has benefited tremendously in recent years from subtle instrumentation advances, and individual heavy (high-atomic-number) atoms can now be detected by TEM even when embedded within a semiconductor material. But detecting an individual low-atomic-number atom, for example carbon or even hydrogen, is still extremely challenging, if not impossible, via conventional TEM owing to the very low contrast of light elements. Here we demonstrate a means to observe, by conventional TEM, even the smallest atoms and molecules: on a clean single-layer graphene membrane, adsorbates such as atomic hydrogen and carbon can be seen as if they were suspended in free space. We directly image such individual adatoms, along with carbon chains and vacancies, and investigate their dynamics in real time. These techniques open a way to reveal dynamics of more complex chemical reactions or identify the atomic-scale structure of unknown adsorbates. In addition, the study of atomic-scale defects in graphene may provide insights for nanoelectronic applications of this interesting material.

  19. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individ...

  20. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, A.; Niegemann, J.; Ma, P.; Haffner, C; Pedersen, A.; Luisier, M.; Hafner, C.; Schimmel, T.; Leuthold, J.

    2016-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore’s law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocat...

  1. Atoms Talking to SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, J E; Kim, Z; Wood, A K; Anderson, J R; Dragt, A J; Hafezi, M; Lobb, C J; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L; Taylor, J M; Vlahacos, C P; Wellstood, F C

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to couple trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms to a superconducting flux qubit through a magnetic dipole transition. We plan to trap atoms on the evanescent wave outside an ultrathin fiber to bring the atoms to less than 10 $\\mu$m above the surface of the superconductor. This hybrid setup lends itself to probing sources of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Our current plan has the intermediate goal of coupling the atoms to a superconducting LC resonator.

  2. Atomic Storage States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪凯戈; 朱诗尧

    2002-01-01

    We present a complete description of atomic storage states which may appear in the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The result shows that the spatial coherence has been included in the atomic collective operators and the atomic storage states. In some limits, a set of multimode atomic storage states has been established in correspondence with the multimode Fock states of the electromagnetic field. This gives a better understanding of the fact that, in BIT, the optical coherent information can be preserved and recovered.

  3. Polarimetric studies of carbon stars at high Galactic latitude

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Aruna

    2012-01-01

    Very little is known about the polarimetric properties of CH stars and carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, although many of these objects have been studied in detail both photometrically and spectroscopically. We aim to derive polarimetric properties for a large sample of CEMP stars and CH stars to fill this gap. Multiband polarimetric observations were conducted in the first run for a sample of twenty-nine objects that include twenty-two CEMP and CH stars and seven polarization standards. Estimates of polarization were obtained using standard procedures of polarization calculation. Five objects in our sample do not show any significant polarization over the different colours of BVRI. For the rest of the objects the derived percentage polarization estimates are less than or equal to 1%, and they are found to exhibit random behaviour with respect to the inverse of the effective wavelength of observations. Polarization also does not seem to have any correlation with the effective temperatures of the stars....

  4. The Nature of Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Alan

    This monograph was written for the purpose of presenting physics to college students who are not preparing for careers in physics. It deals with the nature of atoms, and treats the following topics: (1) the atomic hypothesis, (2) the chemical elements, (3) models of an atom, (4) a particle in a one-dimensional well, (5) a particle in a central…

  5. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  6. Atomic mobility in energetic cluster deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Zheng-Ying; WANG Yue-Xia; WEI Qi; LI Zhi-Jie; ZHOU Liang; ZHANG Liang-Kun

    2004-01-01

    This paper tries to outline the influence of atomic mobility on the initial fabrication of thin films formed by LECBD. Based on our recent studies on low-energy cluster beam deposition (LECBD) by molecular dynamics simulation, two examples, the deposition of small carbon clusters on Si and diamond surfaces and Al clusters on Ni substrate, were mainly discussed. The impact energy of the cluster ranges from 0.1 eV to 100 eV. In the former case,the mobility and the lateral migration of surface atoms, especially the recoil atoms, are enhanced with increasing the impact energy, which promote the film to be smoother and denser. For the latter case, the transverse kinetic energy of cluster atoms, caused mainly by the collision between moving cluster atoms, dominates the lateral spread of cluster atoms on the surface, which is contributive to layer-by-layer growth of thin films. Our result is consistent with the experimental observations that the film structure is strongly dependent on the impact energy. In addition, it elucidates that the atomic mobility takes a leading role in the structure characteristic of films formed by LECBD.

  7. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    CERN Document Server

    Emboras, Alexandros; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most - a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully i...

  8. Pattern recognition approach to quantify the atomic structure of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    We report a pattern recognition approach to detect the atomic structure in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of graphene. The approach provides quantitative information such as carbon-carbon bond lengths and bond length variations on a global and local scale alike. © 2014...

  9. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarillo-Herrero, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    Electronic transport through nanostructures can be very different from trans- port in macroscopic conductors, especially at low temperatures. Carbon na- notubes are tiny cylinders made of carbon atoms. Their remarkable electronic and mechanical properties, together with their small size (a few nm in

  10. Electronic and Quantum Transport Properties of Atomically Identified Si Point Defects in Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Zhou, Wu; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2014-05-15

    We report high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images displaying a range of inclusions of isolated silicon atoms at the edges and inner zones of graphene layers. Whereas the incorporation of Si atoms to a graphene armchair edge involves no reconstruction of the neighboring carbon atoms, the inclusion of a Si atom to a zigzag graphene edge entails the formation of five-membered carbon rings. In all the observed atomic edge terminations, a Si atom is found bridging two C atoms in a 2-fold coordinated configuration. The atomic-scale observations are underpinned by first-principles calculations of the electronic and quantum transport properties of the structural anomalies. Experimental estimations of Si-doped graphene band gaps realized by means of transport measurements may be affected by a low doping rate of 2-fold coordinated Si atoms at the graphene edges, and 4-fold coordinated at inner zones due to the apparition of mobility gaps.

  11. Adsorption on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yi; YANG Xiao-bao; NI Jun

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is a subject of growing experimental and theoretical interest.The possible adsorbed patterns of atoms and molecules on the single-walled carbon nanotubes vary with the diameters and chirality of the tubes due to the confinement.The curvature of the carbon nanotube surface enlarges the distance of the adsorbate atoms and thus enhances the stability of high coverage structures of adsorbate.There exist two novel high-coverage stable structures of potassium adsorbed on SWCNTs,which are not stable on graphite.The electronic properties of SWCNTs can be modified by adsorbate atoms and metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semi-conductor transitions can be achieved by the doping of alkali atoms.

  12. Carbon Superatom Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canning, A. [Cray Research, PSE, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Canning, A.; Galli, G. [Institut Romand de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux (IRRMA), IN-Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kim, J. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    1997-06-01

    We report on quantum molecular dynamics simulations of C{sub 28} deposition on a semiconducting surface. Our results show that under certain deposition conditions C{sub 28} {close_quote}s act as building blocks on a nanometer scale to form a thin film of nearly defect-free molecules. The C{sub 28} {close_quote}s behave as carbon superatoms, with the majority of them being threefold or fourfold coordinated, similar to carbon atoms in amorphous systems. The microscopic structure of the deposited film supports recent suggestions about the stability of a new form of carbon, the hyperdiamond solid. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Long range intermolecular forces in triatomic systems: connecting the atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The long-range forces that act between three atoms are analysed in both atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations. Expressions for atom-diatom dispersion coefficients are obtained in terms of 3-body nonadditive coefficients. The anisotropy of atom-diatom C_6 dispersion coefficients arises primarily from nonadditive triple-dipole and quadruple-dipole forces, while pairwise-additive forces and nonadditive triple-dipole and dipole-dipole-quadrupole forces contribute significantly to atom-di...

  14. Interactions of Pb and Te atoms with graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chuncheng; Robertson, Alex W; He, Kuang; Ford, Camden; Watt, Andrew A R; Warner, Jamie H

    2014-05-28

    PbTe nanocrystals were deposited onto the surface of graphene and used as a reservoir of Pb and Te atoms. Electron beam irradiation at 80 kV caused Pb and Te atoms to mobilize and disperse across the surface of graphene. We studied the dynamics of these atoms in real time using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. The Pb and Te atoms were found to attach to the surface layer of amorphous carbon that resides upon the graphene, as well as its edge. Pb and Te atoms were not found residing on pristine graphene, but were found to bond to the free edge states along graphene hole edges. Small PbTe nanoclusters tended to only form on the surface of the amorphous carbon regions and not on pristine graphene.

  15. Atom capture by nanotube and scaling anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, Pulak Ranjan

    2007-01-01

    The existence of bound state of the polarizable neutral atom in the inverse square potential created by the electric field of single walled charged carbon nanotube (SWNT) is shown to be theoretically possible. The consideration of inequivalent boundary conditions due to self-adjoint extensions lead to this nontrivial bound state solution. It is also shown that the scaling anomaly is responsible for the existence of bound state. Binding of the polarizable atoms in the coupling constant interval \\eta^2\\in[0,1) may be responsible for the smearing of the edge of steps in quantized conductance, which has not been considered so far in literature.

  16. Machine Learning for Quantum Mechanical Properties of Atoms in Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Rupp, Matthias; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2015-01-01

    We introduce machine learning models of quantum mechanical observables of atoms in molecules. Instant out-of-sample predictions for proton and carbon nuclear chemical shifts, atomic core level excitations, and forces on atoms reach accuracies on par with density functional theory reference. Locality is exploited within non-linear regression via local atom-centered coordinate systems. The approach is validated on a diverse set of 9k small organic molecules. Linear scaling is demonstrated for saturated polymers with up to sub-mesoscale lengths.

  17. Simultaneous K plus L shell ionized atoms during heavy-ion collision process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G A V Ramana Murty; G J Naga Raju; V Vijayan; T Ranjan Rautray; B Seetharami Reddy; S Lakshminarayana; K L Narasimham; S Bhuloka Reddy

    2004-06-01

    The fraction of simultaneous K plus L shell ionized atoms is estimated in Fe, Co and Cu elements using carbon ions at different projectile energies. The present results indicate that the fraction of simultaneous K plus L shell ionization probability decreases with increase in projectile energy as well as with increase in the atomic number of the targets atoms.

  18. Change of Energy of the Cubic Subnanocluster of Iron Under Influence of Interstitial and Substitutional Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedolya, Anatoliy V; Bondarenko, Natalya V

    2016-12-01

    Energy change of an iron face-centred cubic subnanocluster was evaluated using molecular mechanics method depending on the position of a carbon interstitial atom and substitutional atoms of nickel. Calculations of all possible positions of impurity atoms show that the energy change of the system are discrete and at certain positions of the atoms are close to continuous.In terms of energy, when all impurity atoms are on the same edge of an atomic cluster, their positions are more advantageous. The presence of nickel atoms on the edge of a cubic cluster resulted in decrease of potential barrier for a carbon atom and decrease in energy in the whole cluster. A similar drift of a carbon atom from central octahedral interstitial site to the surface in the direction occurred under the influence of surface factors.Such configuration corresponds to decreasing symmetry and increasing the number of possible energy states of a subnanocluster, and it corresponds to the condition of spontaneous crystallization process in an isolated system.Taking into account accidental positions of the nickel atom in the iron cluster, such behaviour of the carbon atom can explain the mechanism of growth of a new phase and formation of new clusters in the presence of other kind of atoms because of surface influence.

  19. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  20. A rechargeable carbon-oxygen battery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to a rechargeable battery and a method to operate a rechargeable battery having high efficiency and high energy density for storing energy. The battery stores electrical energy in the bonds of carbon and oxygen atoms by converting carbon dioxide into solid carbon and oxygen....

  1. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  2. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1995-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is promarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  3. The Software Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Javanainen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  4. The Software Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanainen, Juha

    2017-03-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  5. Atomicity in Electronic Commerce,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    tremendous demand for the ability to electronically buy and sell goods over networks. Electronic commerce has inspired a large variety of work... commerce . It then briefly surveys some major types of electronic commerce pointing out flaws in atomicity. We pay special attention to the atomicity...problems of proposals for digital cash. The paper presents two examples of highly atomic electronic commerce systems: NetBill and Cryptographic Postage Indicia.

  6. Atomic homodyne detection of weak atomic transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Mevan; Elliott, D S

    2007-01-26

    We have developed a two-color, two-pathway coherent control technique to detect and measure weak optical transitions in atoms by coherently beating the transition amplitude for the weak transition with that of a much stronger transition. We demonstrate the technique in atomic cesium, exciting the 6s(2)S(1/2) --> 8s(2)S(1/2) transition via a strong two-photon transition and a weak controllable Stark-induced transition. We discuss the enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for this measurement technique over that of direct detection of the weak transition rate, and project future refinements that may further improve its sensitivity and application to the measurement of other weak atomic interactions.

  7. Atom probe crystallography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses new developments in the emerging area of "atom probe crystallography", a materials characterization tool with the unique capacity to reveal both composition and crystallographic...

  8. Dephasing in an atom

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    When an atom in vacuum is near a surface of a dielectric the energy of a fluctuating electromagnetic field depends on a distance between them resulting, as known, in the force called van der Waals one. Besides this fluctuation phenomenon there is one associated with formation of a mean electric field which is equivalent to an order parameter. In this case atomic electrons are localized within atomic distances close to the atom and the total ground state energy is larger, compared to the bare ...

  9. Wood Companies Look to RFID to Raise Yield,Reduce Carbon Footprint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rhea; Wessel

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine European partners are developing an RFID-based application and supply-chain analysis system that may be used to increase sawmill eff iciency and raw materials usage,improve logistic operations and minimize environmental impacts.

  10. Solid Hydrogen Formed for Atomic Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2000-01-01

    Several experiments on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium were recently conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The solid hydrogen experiments are the first step toward seeing these particles and determining their shape and size. The particles will ultimately store atoms of boron, carbon, or hydrogen, forming an atomic propellant. Atomic propellants will allow rocket vehicles to carry payloads many times heavier than possible with existing rockets or allow them to be much smaller and lighter. Solid hydrogen particles are preferred for storing atoms. Hydrogen is generally an excellent fuel with a low molecular weight. Very low temperature hydrogen particles (T < 4 K) can prevent the atoms from recombining, making it possible for their lifetime to be controlled. Also, particles that are less than 1 mm in diameter are preferred because they can flow easily into a pipe when suspended in liquid helium. The particles and atoms must remain at this low temperature until the fuel is introduced into the engine combustion (or recombination) chamber. Experiments were, therefore, planned to look at the particles and observe their formation and any changes while in liquid helium.

  11. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  12. Classroom Demonstration: Combustion of Diamond to Carbon Dioxide Followed by Reduction to Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, Takuya; Kamata, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    An educational demonstration shows the combustion of carbon to carbon dioxide and then the reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon. A melee diamond is the source of the carbon and the reaction is carried out in a closed flask. The demonstration helps students to realize that diamonds are made of carbon and that atoms do not change or vanish in…

  13. Accurate atom-mapping computation for biochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latendresse, Mario; Malerich, Jeremiah P; Travers, Mike; Karp, Peter D

    2012-11-26

    The complete atom mapping of a chemical reaction is a bijection of the reactant atoms to the product atoms that specifies the terminus of each reactant atom. Atom mapping of biochemical reactions is useful for many applications of systems biology, in particular for metabolic engineering where synthesizing new biochemical pathways has to take into account for the number of carbon atoms from a source compound that are conserved in the synthesis of a target compound. Rapid, accurate computation of the atom mapping(s) of a biochemical reaction remains elusive despite significant work on this topic. In particular, past researchers did not validate the accuracy of mapping algorithms. We introduce a new method for computing atom mappings called the minimum weighted edit-distance (MWED) metric. The metric is based on bond propensity to react and computes biochemically valid atom mappings for a large percentage of biochemical reactions. MWED models can be formulated efficiently as Mixed-Integer Linear Programs (MILPs). We have demonstrated this approach on 7501 reactions of the MetaCyc database for which 87% of the models could be solved in less than 10 s. For 2.1% of the reactions, we found multiple optimal atom mappings. We show that the error rate is 0.9% (22 reactions) by comparing these atom mappings to 2446 atom mappings of the manually curated Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) RPAIR database. To our knowledge, our computational atom-mapping approach is the most accurate and among the fastest published to date. The atom-mapping data will be available in the MetaCyc database later in 2012; the atom-mapping software will be available within the Pathway Tools software later in 2012.

  14. Adsorption of atomic S and C on Mg(0001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yu-lin; ZHANG Wei-bing; TANG Bi-yu; DING Wen-jiang; ZENG Xiao-qin

    2006-01-01

    First-principle calculations based on density functional theory were used to study the adsorption of atomic sulfur and carbon on the Mg(0001) surface in a wide range of coverages from 1/4 ML(monolayer) to 1 ML. It is found that the adsorption of atomic S and C on the high coordinate hollow site is more energetically favorable than that on other adsorption sites. S atom is favorable to be adsorbed at on-surface site and C atom is favorable to be adsorbed at subsurface site. The results suggest that when the coverage increases,the binding energy for S and C atoms will decrease and the interaction between adsorbed atoms tends to be stronger. It indicates that as coverage increases,S-Mg and C-Mg interaction weakens.

  15. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  16. Greek Atomic Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-01-01

    Focusing on history of physics, which began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reaching full development within three centuries, suggests that the creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists. (Author/SK)

  17. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  18. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  19. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  20. 基于原子和分子谱线分析的 LIBS 快速测量 CO2%Rapid Measurement of Carbon Dioxide with Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Atomic and Molecular Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐嘉隆; 李越胜; 陆继东; 白凯杰; 卢伟业; 姚顺春

    2016-01-01

    作为温室气体的主要成分,CO2的排放控制有利于应对全球气候变暖以及生态环境变化,对 CO2的快速检测具有重要意义。目前检测 CO2的方法有滴定法,电化学法,气相色谱法,红外吸收光谱法等,但对应用于工业现场的在线监测还存在着不足。激光诱导击穿光谱(LIBS)具有远程测量,无需或仅需简单预处理,多组分同步测量等优点,本文提出将其应用于 CO2在线监测,期望发展适用于工业过程碳排放的在线监测技术。利用质量流量控制器控制纯度为99.99%的 CO2和 N2配比形成不同 CO2浓度的混合气体模拟烟气环境,经过混气瓶充分混合后送入密封样品池进行 LIBS 测量实验。研究不同延迟时间下 C247.86 nm 和 CN38.34 nm 谱线的演化规律,验证了等离子体形成过程中存在部分 CO2分子解离反应生成 CN 分子,在 CO2定量分析时应考虑 CN 分子谱线的影响,并获得同步测量 C 原子和分子谱线的最佳延迟时间为800 ns 。在此基础上,由于等离子体演化过程中,各种信息相互影响,分析指标与多个测量参数存在关系,综合考虑 C 原子、CN 碎片及修正高浓度影响下的自吸收效应,采用多元回归分析方法建立了 CO2定量分析曲线,其拟合度 R2和斜率分别达到了0.978和0.981,结果表明相比单个指标直接定标,该方法提高了定量分析模型的可靠性,验证了 LIBS 技术快速测量 CO2的可行性。%With the rapid development of economy and industrialization ,global warming is becoming the most serious sensitive global climate issues ,which causes the rising of sea level and many other negative effects .The cause of global warming is the emission of greenhouse gases and carbon dioxide is the main component of greenhouse gases .The control of CO2 emssion is bene‐ficial to addressing gobal climate change and environmental degradation .Therefore ,it

  1. Coaxial airblast atomizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to quantify the characteristics of the sprays of coaxial injectors with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to the performance of rocket engines. Measurements for coaxial air blast atomizers were obtained using air to represent the gaseous stream and water to represent the liquid stream. A wide range of flow conditions were examined for sprays with and without swirl for gaseous streams. The parameters varied include Weber number, gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, swirl, and nozzle geometry. Measurements were made with a phase Doppler velocimeter. Major conclusions of the study focused upon droplet size as a function of Weber number, effect of gas flow rate on atomization and spray spread, effect of nozzle geometry on atomization and spread, effect of swirl on atomization, spread, jet recirculation and breakup, and secondary atomization.

  2. Theoretical atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This expanded and updated well-established textbook contains an advanced presentation of quantum mechanics adapted to the requirements of modern atomic physics. It includes topics of current interest such as semiclassical theory, chaos, atom optics and Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases. In order to facilitate the consolidation of the material covered, various problems are included, together with complete solutions. The emphasis on theory enables the reader to appreciate the fundamental assumptions underlying standard theoretical constructs and to embark on independent research projects. The fourth edition of Theoretical Atomic Physics contains an updated treatment of the sections involving scattering theory and near-threshold phenomena manifest in the behaviour of cold atoms (and molecules). Special attention is given to the quantization of weakly bound states just below the continuum threshold and to low-energy scattering and quantum reflection just above. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamen...

  3. Maximally Atomic Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Brzozowski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The atoms of a regular language are non-empty intersections of complemented and uncomplemented quotients of the language. Tight upper bounds on the number of atoms of a language and on the quotient complexities of atoms are known. We introduce a new class of regular languages, called the maximally atomic languages, consisting of all languages meeting these bounds. We prove the following result: If L is a regular language of quotient complexity n and G is the subgroup of permutations in the transition semigroup T of the minimal DFA of L, then L is maximally atomic if and only if G is transitive on k-subsets of 1,...,n for 0 <= k <= n and T contains a transformation of rank n-1.

  4. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  5. An Atom Counting QSPR Protocol

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, S; Chattaraj, P K; Roy, D R; Subramanian, V

    2006-01-01

    A deceptively simple descriptor, viz. the number of carbon / non-hydrogenic atoms present in a molecule, is proposed for the development of useful quantitative-structure-property-relationship (QSPR) models. It is tested in models pertaining to the estimation of boiling point of alcohols, enthalpy of vaporization of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), n-octanol / water partition coefficient of PCBs and chloroanisoles, pKa values of carboxylic acids, phenols and alcohols etc. Very high values of various regression coefficients (R2, R2CV, R2Ad) suggest the significance of this descriptor which further improves in the resulting two-parameter QSPR models with electrophilicity or its local variant as an additional descriptor.

  6. 78 FR 58571 - Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic Electric Company... Power Company (Maine Yankee), Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (Connecticut Yankee), and the Yankee Atomic Electric Company (Yankee Atomic) (together, ``licensees'' or ``the Yankee Companies'')...

  7. Linear atomic quantum coupler

    CERN Document Server

    El-Orany, Faisal A A

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop the notion of the linear atomic quantum coupler. This device consists of two modes propagating into two waveguides, each of them includes a localized and/or a trapped atom. These waveguides are placed close enough to allow exchanging energy between them via evanescent waves. Each mode interacts with the atom in the same waveguide in the standard way, i.e. as the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM), and with the atom-mode in the second waveguide via evanescent wave. We present the Hamiltonian for the system and deduce the exact form for the wavefunction. We investigate the atomic inversions and the second-order correlation function. In contrast to the conventional linear coupler, the atomic quantum coupler is able to generate nonclassical effects. The atomic inversions can exhibit long revival-collapse phenomenon as well as subsidiary revivals based on the competition among the switching mechanisms in the system. Finally, under certain conditions, the system can yield the results of the two-m...

  8. Atomic Structure Theory Lectures on Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Walter R

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Structure Theory is a textbook for students with a background in quantum mechanics. The text is designed to give hands-on experience with atomic structure calculations. Material covered includes angular momentum methods, the central field Schrödinger and Dirac equations, Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Hartree-Fock equations, multiplet structure, hyperfine structure, the isotope shift, dipole and multipole transitions, basic many-body perturbation theory, configuration interaction, and correlation corrections to matrix elements. Numerical methods for solving the Schrödinger and Dirac eigenvalue problems and the (Dirac)-Hartree-Fock equations are given as well. B-spline basis sets are used to carry out sums arising in higher-order many-body calculations. Illustrative problems are provided, together with solutions. FORTRAN programs implementing the numerical methods in the text are included.

  9. Inside the Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Nowakowski, M; Fierro, D Bedoya; Manjarres, A D Bermudez

    2016-01-01

    We apply the non-linear Euler-Heisenberg theory to calculate the electric field inside the hydrogen atom. We will demonstrate that the electric field calculated in the Euler-Heisenberg theory can be much smaller than the corresponding field emerging from the Maxwellian theory. In the hydrogen atom this happens only at very small distances. This effect reduces the large electric field inside the hydrogen atom calculated from the electromagnetic form-factors via the Maxwell equations. The energy content of the field is below the pair production threshold.

  10. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  11. Atom probe tomography today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cerezo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks and also the atomic-level characterization of interfaces in multilayers, oxide films, and semiconductor materials and devices.

  12. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.

  13. Rydberg atoms in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Yu N; Ignjatovic, Lj M; Sakan, N M; Sreckovic, V A; Zakharov, M Yu; Bezuglov, N N; Klycharev, A N; 10.1016/j.newar.2009.07.003

    2012-01-01

    Elementary processes in astrophysical phenomena traditionally attract researchers attention. At first this can be attributed to a group of hemi-ionization processes in Rydberg atom collisions with ground state parent atoms. This processes might be studied as a prototype of the elementary process of the radiation energy transformation into electrical one. The studies of nonlinear mechanics have shown that so called regime of dynamic chaos should be considered as typical, rather than exceptional situation in Rydberg atoms collision. From comparison of theory with experimental results it follows that a such kind of stochastic dynamic processes, occurred during the single collision, may be observed.

  14. Atomic entanglement and decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genes, Claudiu

    The generation of entanglement in atomic systems plays a central topic in the fields of quantum information storage and processing. Moreover, a special category of entangled states of multi-atom ensembles, spin squeezed states, have been proven to lead to considerable improvement in the sensitivity of precision measurements compared to systems involving uncorrelated atoms. A treatment of entanglement in open systems is, however, incomplete without a precise description of the process of decoherence which necessarily accompanies it. The theory of entanglement and decoherence are the two main topics of this thesis. Methods are described for the generation of strong correlations in large atomic ensembles using either cavity quantum electrodynamics or measurement outcome conditioned quantum dynamics. Moreover, the description of loss of entanglement resulting from the coupling to a noise reservoir (electromagnetic vacuum) is explored. A spin squeezing parameter is used throughout this thesis as both a measure of entanglement strength and as an indication of the sensitivity improvement above the so-called standard quantum limit (sensitivity obtained with uncorrelated particles) in metrology. The first scheme considered consists of a single mode cavity field interacting with a collection of atoms for which spin squeezing is produced in both resonant and off-resonant regimes. In the resonant case, transfer of squeezing from a field state to the atoms is analyzed, while in the off-resonant regime squeezing is produced via an effective nonlinear interaction (one-axis twisting Hamiltonian). A second, more experimentally realistic case, is one involving the interaction of free space atoms with laser pulses; a projective measurement of a source field originating from atomic fluctuations provides a means of preparing atomic collective states such as spin squeezed and Schrodinger cat states. A new "unravelling" is proposed, that employs the detection of photon number in a single

  15. EINSTEIN, SCHROEDINGER, AND ATOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider gravitation theory in multidimensional space. The model of the metric satisfying the basic requirements of quantum theory is proposed. It is shown that gravitational waves are described by the Liouville equation and the Schrodinger equation as well. The solutions of the Einstein equations describing the stationary states of arbitrary quantum and classical systems with central symmetry have been obtained. Einstein’s atom model has been developed, and proved that atoms and atomic nuclei can be represented as standing gravitational waves

  16. Application of gas-fluid atomization technology in ultrosonic vibration cutting titanium alloy workpiece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhimin; Zhang, Yuangliang; Li, Xiaoyan; Sun, Baoyuan

    2009-11-01

    To further improve machined surface quality of diamond cutting titanium workpiece and reduce diamond tool wear, it puts forward a kind of machining technology with mixture of carbon dioxide gas, water and vegetable oil atomized mist as cooling media in the paper. The cooling media is sprayed to cutting area through gas-liquid atomizer device to achieve purpose of cooling, lubricating, and protecting diamond tool. Experiments indicate that carbon dioxide gas can touch cutting surface more adequately through using gas-liquid atomization technology, which makes iron atoms of cutting surface cause a chemical reaction directly with carbon in carbon dioxide gas and reduce graphitizing degree of diamond tool. Thus, this technology of using gas-liquid atomization and ultrasonic vibration together for cutting Titanium Alloy is able to improve machined surface quality of workpiece and slow of diamond tool wear.

  17. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  18. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rohini Devi

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several industrial and biomedical applications. The multidirectional carbon-carbon product technology is versatile and offers design flexibility. This paper describes the multidirectional preform and carbon-carbon process technology and research and development activities within the country. Carbon-carbon product experience at DRDL has also been discussed. Development of carbon-carbon brake discs process technology using the liquid impregnation process is described. Further the test results on material characterisation, thermal, mechanical and tribological properties are presented.

  19. History of early atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, N.F. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Lyman Lab. of Physics

    2005-06-01

    This review of the history of early atomic clocks includes early atomic beam magnetic resonance, methods of separated and successive oscillatory fields, microwave absorption, optical pumping and atomic masers. (author)

  20. Interpretation of Hund's multiplicity rule for the atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Kenta; Maezono, Ryo; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Towler, M. D.

    2005-03-01

    We have studied Hund's multiplicity rule for the carbon atom using quantum Monte Carlo methods[1]. Our calculations give a high-level description of electron correlation and satisfy the virial theorem to high accuracy. This allows us to obtain accurate and reliable values for each of the energy terms and therefore to give a convincing explanation of the mechanism by which Hund's rule operates in carbon. We obtain the following results: (1) the energy gain in the triplet with respect to the singlet state is due to the greater electron-nucleus attraction in the higher spin state, and (2) the electron-electron repulsion in the triplet is greater than that in the singlet, in accordance with Hartree-Fock results and studies including correlation. Although our main topic is the carbon atom, we would also like to show our current results of the nitrogen atom.[1]K. Hongo, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 121, 7144 (2004).

  1. Identification of C4H5, C4H4, C3H3 and CH3 radicals produced from the reaction of atomic carbon with propene: Implications for the atmospheres of Titan and giant planets and for the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chih-Hao; Chen, Wei-Kan; Huang, Wen-Jian; Lin, Yi-Cheng; Lee, Shih-Huang

    2013-01-01

    We observed the products C4H5, C4H4, C3H3 and CH3 of the C(3P) + C3H6 reaction using product time-of-flight spectroscopy and selective photoionization. The identified species arise from the product channels C4H5 + H, C4H4 + 2H and C3H3 + CH3. Product isomers were identified via measurements of photoionization spectra and calculations of adiabatic ionization energy. Product C4H5 probably involves three isomers HCCCHCH3, H2CCCCH3 and H2CCCHCH2. In contrast, products C4H4 and C3H3 involve exclusively HCCCHCH2 and H2CCCH, respectively. Reaction mechanisms are unraveled with crossed-beam experiments and quantum-chemical calculations. The 3P carbon atom attacks the π orbital of propene (C3H6) to form a cyclic complex c-H2C(C)CHCH3 that rapidly opens the ring to form H2CCCHCH3 followed by decomposition to HCCCHCH3/H2CCCCH3/H2CCCHCH2 + H and H2CCCH + CH3; the corresponding branching ratios are 7:5:10:78 predicted with RRKM calculations at collision energy 4 kcal mol-1. Nascent C4H5 with enough internal energy further decomposes to HCCCHCH2 + H. Ratios of products C4H5, C4H4 and C3H3 are experimentally evaluated to be 17:8:75. This work provides a comprehensive look at product channels of the title reaction and gives implications for the formation of hydrocarbons in extra-terrestrial environments such as Titan and carbon-rich interstellar media. We suggest that the title reaction, hitherto excluded in any chemical networks, needs to be taken into account at least in the atmosphere of Titan and carbon-rich molecular clouds where rapid neutral-neutral reactions are dominant and carbon atoms and propene are abundant.

  2. Atomical Grothendieck categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Năstăsescu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the study of Gabriel dimension of a Grothendieck category, we introduce the concept of atomical Grothendieck category, which has only two localizing subcategories, and we give a classification of this type of Grothendieck categories.

  3. Atomic bomb health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckey, T D

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation, leukemia and solid tissue cancer mortality rates, and increased average lifespan. Each study exhibits a threshold that repudiates the LNT dogma. The average threshold for acute exposures to atomic bombs is about 100 cSv. Conclusions from these studies of atomic bomb survivors are: One burst of low dose irradiation elicits a lifetime of improved health.Improved health from low dose irradiation negates the LNT paradigm.Effective triage should include radiation hormesis for survivor treatment.

  4. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  5. Atom chip gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  6. Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadeishi, T.; McLaughlin, R.

    1978-08-01

    The design and development of a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer for trace element analysis are described. An instruction manual is included which details the operation, adjustment, and maintenance. Specifications and circuit diagrams are given. (WHK)

  7. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  8. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  9. Atomic Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is a new technology which can be used for developing high performance laser components for atom-based sensors...

  10. Heavy atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneth, Piotr

    1994-05-01

    The theory of isotope effects, which has proved to be extremely useful in providing geometrical details of transition states in a variety of chemical reactions, has recently found an application in studies of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. These reactions are multistep in nature with few steps being partially rate-limiting, thus interpretation of these isotope effects is more complex. The theoretical framework of heavy-atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions is critically analyzed on the basis of recent results of: carbon kinetic isotope effects on carbonic anhydrase and catalytic antibodies; multiple carbon, deuterium isotope effects on reactions catalyzed by formate decarboxylase; oxygen isotope effects on binding processes in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase; and equilibrium oxygen isotope effect on binding an inhibitor to lactate dehydrogenase. The advantages and disadvantages of reaction complexity in learning details of formal and molecular mechanisms are discussed in the examples of reactions catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, orotidine decarboxylase and glutamine synthetase.

  11. Cl atom initiated oxidation of 1-alkenes under atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walavalkar, M.; Sharma, A.; Alwe, H. D.; Pushpa, K. K.; Dhanya, S.; Naik, P. D.; Bajaj, P. N.

    2013-03-01

    In view of the importance of the oxidation pathways of alkenes in the troposphere, and the significance of Cl atom as an oxidant in marine boundary layer (MBL) and polluted industrial atmosphere, the reactions of four 1-alkenes (C6-C9) with Cl atoms are investigated. The rate coefficients at 298 K are measured to be (4.0 ± 0.5), (4.4 ± 0.7), (5.5 ± 0.9) and (5.9 ± 1.7) × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for 1-hexene, 1-heptene, 1-octene and 1-nonene, respectively. The quoted errors include the experimental 2σ, along with the error in the reference rate coefficients. From the systematic increase in the rate coefficients with the number of carbon atoms, an approximate value for the average rate coefficient for hydrogen abstraction per CH2 group in alkenes is estimated to be (4.9 ± 0.3) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Based on these rate coefficients, the contribution of Cl atom reactions towards the degradation of these molecules is found to be comparable to that of OH radical reactions, under MBL conditions. The products identified in gas phase indicate that Cl atom addition occurs mainly at the terminal carbon, leading to the formation of 1-chloro-2-ketones and 1-chloro-2-ols. The major gas phase products from the alkenyl radicals (formed by H atom abstraction) are different positional isomers of long chain enols and enones. A preference for dissociation leading to an allyl radical, resulting in aldehydes, lower by three carbon atoms, is indicated. The observed relative yields suggest that in general, the increased contribution of the reactions of Cl atoms towards degradation of 1-alkenes in NOx free air does not result in an increase in the generation of small aldehydes (carbon number < 4), including chloroethanal, as compared to that in the reaction of 1-butene.

  12. Quantum galvanometer by interfacing a vibrating nanowire and cold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kálmán, O.; Kiss, T.; Fortágh, J.; Domokos, P.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the coupling of a Bose-Einstein condensate of ultracold, paramagnetic atoms to the magnetic field of the current in a mechanically vibrating carbon nanotube within the frame of a full quantum theory. We find that the interaction is strong enough to sense quantum features of the nanowire current noise spectrum by means of hyperfine-state-selective atom counting. Such a non-destructive measurement of the electric current via its magnetic field corresponds to the classical galvanomet...

  13. Bonding character of lithium atoms adsorbed on a graphene layer

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros, P.V.C.; Mota,F.B.; Mascarenhas, A.J.S.; de Castilho, C. M. C.

    2011-01-01

    Acesso restrito: Texto completo. p. 529-531. This work uses first-principles calculations to investigate the aspects of the bonding character of lithium atoms adsorbed on a graphene layer. The presented results are in contradiction to other results that have recently appeared in the specialized literature, although they confirm some previous claims. In particular, a discussion of the characteristics of the bonding between lithium and carbon atoms and whether they interact via an sp2 ...

  14. Atom probe tomography today

    OpenAIRE

    Alfred Cerezo; Peter H. Clifton; Mark J. Galtrey; Humphreys, Colin J.; Kelly, Thomas. F.; David J. Larson; Sergio Lozano-Perez; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Gang Sha; Keith Thompson; Mathijs Zandbergen; Roger L. Alvis

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments) but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks) and also...

  15. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  16. Optical atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  17. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  18. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  19. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert Crepaz; Li Yuan Ley; Rainer Dumke

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage...

  20. Fabrication of porous carbon nanotube network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jun-Wei; Fu, Shu-Juan; Gwo, Shangjr; Lin, Kuan-Jiuh; Lin, Kuna-Jiuh

    2008-11-21

    We used the spin-coating method combined with ultrasonic atomization as a continuous, one-step process to generate a two-dimensional honeycomb network that was constructed from pure multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  1. Effective potentials for atom-atom interaction at low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Bo

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the concept and design of effective atom-atom potentials that accurately describe any physical processes involving only states around the threshold. The existence of such potentials gives hope to a quantitative, and systematic, understanding of quantum few-atom and quantum many-atom systems at relatively low temperatures.

  2. Teleportation of Atomic States for Atoms in a Lambda Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss a scheme of teleportation of atomic states making use of three-level lambda atoms. The experimental realization proposed makes use of cavity QED involving the interaction of Rydberg atoms with a micromaser cavity prepared in a coherent state. We start presenting a scheme to prepare atomic EPR states involving two-level atoms via the interaction of these atoms with a cavity. In our scheme the cavity and some atoms play the role of auxiliary systems used to achieve the teleportation.

  3. Intense-Field Photoionization of Molecules using Ultrashort Radiation Pulses: Carbon Disulfide and Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Joshua; Uiterwaal, Cornelis

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the photoionization and photofragmentation of molecules using intense fields from an 800 nm, femtosecond laser source and an experimental method that eliminates the focal volume effect without the need for data deconvolution. Targets include carbon disulfide and carbon dioxide. We show that ionization is insignificant for intensities that maximize alignment of carbon disulfide, which validates ultrafast electron diffraction experiments from aligned carbon disulfide. For comparison, we also investigate the analogous molecule carbon dioxide. In this molecule the molecular bonding orbitals include the n = 2 atomic orbitals of the oxygen atom, while in carbon disulfide the n = 3 orbitals of the sulfur atom contribute to the bonding. Recent work will be presented. This work supported by U.S. Dept. of Education GAANN Grants Nos. P200A090156 and P200A120188 and National Science Foundation EPSCoR RII Track-2 CA Award No. IIA-1430519 (Cooperative Nebraska-Kansas Grant).

  4. Strengthened PAN-based carbon fibers obtained by slow heating rate carbonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-A; Jang, Dawon; Tejima, Syogo; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Hwan Chul; Lee, Sungho; Endo, Morinobu

    2016-03-23

    Large efforts have been made over the last 40 years to increase the mechanical strength of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers (CFs) using a variety of chemical or physical protocols. In this paper, we report a new method to increase CFs mechanical strength using a slow heating rate during the carbonization process. This new approach increases both the carbon sp(3) bonding and the number of nitrogen atoms with quaternary bonding in the hexagonal carbon network. Theoretical calculations support a crosslinking model promoted by the interstitial carbon atoms located in the graphitic interlayer spaces. The improvement in mechanical performance by a controlled crosslinking between the carbon hexagonal layers of the PAN based CFs is a new concept that can contribute further in the tailoring of CFs performance based on the understanding of their microstructure down to the atomic scale.

  5. Carbon Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    electrodes, high temperature molds, rocket nozzles and exit cones, tires , ink, nuclear reactors and fuel particles, filters, prosthetics, batteries and...carbon would be highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is formed by depositing one atom at a time on a surface utilizing the pyrolysis of a...Moreover, it is well known that during pyrolysis , mesophase converts into a matrix that is very anisotropic. The formation of onion-like “sheaths

  6. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    OpenAIRE

    Deltuva, A.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  7. Single-atom spintronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susan Z. HUA; Matthew R. SULLIVAN; Jason N. ARMSTRONG

    2006-01-01

    Recent work on magnetic quantum point contacts (QPCs) was discussed. Complete magnetoresistance loops across Co QPCs as small as a single atom was measured. The remarkable feature of these QPCs is the rapid oscillatory decay in magnetoresistance with the increase of contact size. In addition,stepwise or quantum magnetoresistance loops are observed,resulting from varying transmission probability of the available discrete conductance channels because the sample is cycled between the ferromagnetic (F) and antiferromagnetic (AF) aligned states. Quantized conductance combined with spin dependent transmission of electron waves gives rise to a multi-channel system with a quantum domain wall acting as a valve,i.e.,a quantum spin-valve. Behavior of a few-atom QPC is built on the behavior of a single-atom QPC and hence the summarization of results as 'single-atom spintronics'. An evolutionary trace of spin-dependent electron transmission from a single atom to bulk is provided,the requisite hallmarks of artefact-free magnetoresistance is established across a QPC - stepwise or quantum magnetoresistance loops and size dependent oscillatory magnetoresistance.

  8. Quantum magnetism through atomic assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinelli, A.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of magnetic structures, composed of only a few atoms. Those structures are first built atom-by-atom and then locally probed, both with a low-temperature STM. The technique that we use to assemble them is vertical atom manipulation, while to study their phy

  9. 表面引发原子转移自由基聚合制备聚电解质修饰的碳纳米管%Preparation of Polyelectrolyte Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes via Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙庆文; 于颖; 张南; 张法永

    2012-01-01

    Surface modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) by polyelectrolyte can enhance the dispersibility of carbon nanotubes in various solvents. Hydroxyl groups were firstly introduced onto the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNT) via esterification of glycol with MWNT which previously treated by concentrated HNO3 and then excess thionyl chloride. Initiating sites (MWNT-Br or MWNT-C1) for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were formed by reacting MWNT-OH with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide or 2-chloropropionyl chloride. Grafting polymerization of poly(terf-butyl acry-late) (PtBA) or poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) from MWNT-Br or MWNT-C1 was carried out by surface-initiated ATRP polymerization. The content of grafted polymer, determined by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), was tuned through the feed ratio of monomer to the initiating-sites on MWNT. After hydrolysis (or quaternary amination) of the polymers, different types of polyelectrolyte-functionalized MWNT with good dispersibility in water were prepared successfully. All the materials were well characterized by TGA and infer-red spectrum (IR).%利用聚电解质对多壁碳纳米管(MWNT的表面进行修饰,能有效改善碳纳米管在溶剂中的分散性.首先将经硝酸氧化的碳纳米管与二甲亚砜和乙二醇反应,得到羟基修饰的碳纳米管.然后利用羟基与α-溴异丁酰溴(或α-氯丙酰氯)的酯化反应,在碳纳米管的表面引入了原子转移自由基聚合(atom transfer radical polymerization,ATRP)引发基团,引发丙烯酸叔丁酯(tBA)或4-乙烯基吡啶(4VP)聚合,通过投料比的改变,得到接入量不同的聚合物修饰的碳纳米管.利用热重分析(TGA)和红外对聚合物修饰的碳纳米管进行表征.将聚合物修饰的碳纳米管进行水解(或季胺化),制备得到在水溶液中良好分散的聚电解质修饰的碳纳米管.

  10. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Fragmentation in Carbon Therapy Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Charara, Y M

    2010-01-01

    The state of the art Monte Carlo code HETC-HEDS was used to simulate spallation products, secondary neutron, and secondary proton production in A-150 Tissue Equivalent Plastic phantoms to investigate fragmentation of carbon therapy beams. For a 356 MeV/Nucleon carbon ion beam, production of charged particles heavier than protons was 0.24 spallation products per incident carbon ion with atomic numbers ranging from 1 through 5 (hydrogen to boron). In addition, there were 4.73 neutrons and 2.95 protons produced per incident carbon ion. Furthermore, as the incident energy increases, the neutron production rate increases at a rate of 20% per 10 MeV/nucleon. Secondary protons were created at a rate between 2.62-2.87 per carbon ion, while spallation products were created at a rate between 0.20-0.24 per carbon ion.

  12. Sampling the Hydrogen Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed for the hydrogen atom in which the electron is an objectively real particle orbiting at very near to light speed. The model is based on the postulate that certain velocity terms associated with orbiting bodies can be considered as being af- fected by relativity. This leads to a model for the atom in which the stable electron orbits are associated with orbital velocities where Gamma is n /α , leading to the idea that it is Gamma that is quantized and not angular momentum as in the Bohr and other models. The model provides a mechanism which leads to quantization of energy levels within the atom and also provides a simple mechanical explanation for the Fine Struc- ture Constant. The mechanism is closely associated with the Sampling theorem and the related phenomenon of aliasing developed in the mid-20th century by engineers at Bell labs.

  13. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea).

  14. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  15. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia C. Capelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's, all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules, the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  16. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  17. Atoms in Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Thomas S. [University of Tennessee

    1965-01-01

    Agriculture benefits from the applications of research. Radioactive techniques have been used to study soils, plants, microbes, insects, farm animals, and new ways to use and preserve foodstuffs. Radioactive atoms are not used directly by farmers but are used in research directed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Atomic Energy Commission, by the agricultural experiment stations of the various states, and by numerous public and private research institutions. From such research come improved materials and methods which are used on the farm.

  18. Atomic displacements due to spin-spin repulsion in conjugated alternant hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Benzi, Michele

    2013-05-01

    We develop a theoretical model to account for the spin-induced atomic displacements in conjugated alternant hydrocarbons. It appears to be responsible for an enlargement of the distance between pairs of atoms separated by two atoms and located at the end of linear polyenes. It also correlates very well with the bond dissociation enthalpies for the cleavage of the C-H bond as well as to the spin density at carbon atoms in both open and closed shell at graphene nanoflakes (GNFs). Finally, we have modified the Schrödinger equation to study the propagation of the spin-induced perturbations through the atoms of GNFs.

  19. A Search for CD36 Ligands from Flavor Volatiles in Foods with an Aldehyde Moiety: Identification of Saturated Aliphatic Aldehydes with 9-16 Carbon Atoms as Potential Ligands of the Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Amitsuka, Takahiko; Okahashi, Tatsuya; Kimoto, Yusaku; Inoue, Kazuo

    2017-08-09

    Volatile compounds with an aldehyde moiety such as (Z)-9-octadecenal are potential ligands for cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36), a transmembrane receptor that has recently been shown to play a role in mammalian olfaction. In this study, by performing an assay using a peptide mimic of human CD36, we aimed to discover additional ligands for the receptor from volatiles containing a single aldehyde group commonly found in human foods. Straight-chain, saturated aliphatic aldehydes with 9-16 carbons exhibited CD36 ligand activities, albeit to varying degrees. Notably, the activities of tridecanal and tetradecanal were higher than that of oleic acid, the most potent ligand among the fatty acids tested. Among the aldehydes other than aliphatic aldehydes, only phenylacetaldehyde showed a weak activity. These findings make a contribution to our knowledge of recognition mechanisms for flavor volatiles in foods with an aldehyde group.

  20. Atom addition reactions in interstellar ice analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Linnartz, Harold; Fedoseev, Gleb

    2015-01-01

    This review paper summarizes the state-of-the-art in laboratory based interstellar ice chemistry. The focus is on atom addition reactions, illustrating how water, carbon dioxide and methanol can form in the solid state at astronomically relevant temperatures, and also the formation of more complex species such as hydroxylamine, an important prebiotic molecule, and glycolaldehyde, the smallest sugar, is discussed. These reactions are particularly relevant during the dark ages of star and planet formation, i.e., when the role of UV light is restricted. A quantitative characterization of such processes is only possible through dedicated laboratory studies, i.e., under full control of a large set of parameters such as temperature, atom-flux, and ice morphology. The resulting numbers, physical and chemical constants, e.g., barrier heights, reaction rates and branching ratios, provide information on the molecular processes at work and are needed as input for astrochemical models, in order to bridge the timescales t...

  1. Determination of Fe, Ca, Mg, Zn and Pb in Cinder and Activated Carbon by Flame Atomic Absorption Method%火焰原子吸收法测定煤渣和煤质活性炭中铁、钙、镁、锌、铅

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛慧; 董宾

    2014-01-01

    A method for measurement of metal microelements in cinders and activated carbon,such as Fe, Ca, Mg, Zn and Pb by flame atomic absorption method was established. Pretreatment procedure was studied. Cinders was treated with dry ashing and then digested,activated carbon was treated with acid extraction method. Metal microelements such as Fe,Ca and Mg in cinder were measured using standard curve method,while microelements such as Fe,Zn and Pb in activated carbon from coal were measured based on standard addition method,in order to reduce the interference of the basic. Results detected by the method were in accordance with existed references. Microelements contents were higher in cinders,especially after burning. In comparison,microelements dropped dramatically in activated carbon, due to the complex processing procedure. Recoveries of each element ranged from 88.5% to 105.5%, and the relative standard deviation was less than 2% (n=7). The detecting limits of the six elements were 0.010,0.015,0.005,0.012,0.013, 0.110 mg/L respectively, in two kinds of the specimen. It can be concluded that the flame atomic absorption method is accurate,convenient, it is suitable for the measurement of metal microelements in cinders and activated carbon.%建立了火焰原子吸收法测定煤渣和煤质活性炭中微量金属元素铁、钙、镁、锌、铅含量的方法。煤渣样品采用干灰化后消解,煤质活性炭样品采用稀酸提取进行处理。煤渣中铁、钙、镁元素用标准曲线法定量,活性炭中铁、锌、铅则采用标准加入法定量以减少基体干扰的影响。样品测定结果与文献报道相一致,煤渣尤其是燃烧处理后的煤渣中微量元素含量较高,而煤质活性炭通过复杂工艺处理后,微量元素大大减少。样品中被测元素的加标回收率在88.5%~105.5%之间,测定结果的相对标准偏差小于2%(n=7),两类样品中6种元素的检出限分别为0.010,0.015,0.005,0.012

  2. Atomic physics and reality

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    An account of the long standing debate between Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein regarding the validity of the quantum mechanical description of atomic phenomena.With physicts, John Wheeler (Texas), John Bell (CERN), David Rohm (London), Abner Shimony (Boston), Alain Aspect (Paris)

  3. Energy from the Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia L.

    This curriculum guide was written to supplement fifth and sixth grade science units on matter and energy. It was designed to provide more in-depth material on the atom. The first part, "Teacher Guide," contains background information, biographical sketches of persons in the history of nuclear energy, vocabulary, answer sheets, management sheets…

  4. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  5. Chiral atomically thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm-1) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  6. Atomic and Molecular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-25

    The topics investigated experimentally and theoretically by the Pittsburgh Atomic Sciences Institute with applications to high power laser development and atmospheric IR backgrounds are enumerated. Reports containing the detailed scientific progress in these studies are cited. Finally, a list of the journal articles describing the results of the programs, with full references, is given.

  7. Single-Atom Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Fu, Shaofang; Shi, Qiurong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-05-23

    Recent years have witnessed the increasing production of the sustainable and renewable energy. The limitations of electrochemical performances are closely associated with the search for highly efficient electrocatalysts with more rational control of size, shape, composition and structure. Specifically, the rapidly emerging studies on single-atom catalysts (SACs) have sparked new interests in electrocatalysis because of the unique properties such as high catalytic activity, selectivity and 100% atom utilization. In this review, we introduce the innovative synthesis and advanced characterizations of SACs and primarily focus on their electrochemical applications in oxygen reduction/evolution reaction, hydrogen evolution reaction, hydrocarbon conversion reactions for fuel cells (methanol, ethanol and formic acid electrooxidation) and other related fields. Significantly, this unique single atom-depended electrocatalytic performance together with the underlying mechanism will also be discussed. Furthermore, future research directions and challenges are proposed to further realize the ultimate goal of tailoring single-atoms for electrochemical applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  9. Atomism, Pragmatism, Holism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John P.

    1986-01-01

    Examines three world views influencing curriculum development--atomism (underpinning competency-based education), pragmatism (promoting inquiry-based approaches), amd holism (associated with confluent or Waldorf education). Holism embodies the perennial philosophy and attempts to integrate cognitive, affective, and transpersonal dimensions,…

  10. Experiments with Ξ- atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, C. J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments with Ξ- atoms are proposed in order to study the nuclear interaction of Ξ hyperons. The production of Ξ- in the (K-,K+) reaction, the Ξ- stopping in matter, and its atomic cascade are incorporated within a realistic evaluation of the results expected for Ξ- x-ray spectra across the periodic table, using an assumed Ξ-nucleus optical potential Vopt. Several optimal targets for measuring the strong-interaction shift and width of the x-ray transition to the ``last'' atomic level observed are singled out: F, Cl, I, and Pb. The sensitivity of these observables to the parameters of Vopt is considered. The relevance of such experiments is discussed in the context of strangeness -2 nuclear physics and multistrange nuclear matter. Finally, with particular reference to searches for the H dibaryon, the properties of Ξ-d atoms are also discussed. The role of Stark mixing and its effect on S and P state capture of Ξ- by the deuteron together with estimates of the resulting probability for producing the H dibaryon are considered in detail.

  11. Ludwig Boltzmann: Atomic genius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cercignani, C. [Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)]. E-mail: carcer@mate.polimi.it

    2006-09-15

    On the centenary of the death of Ludwig Boltzmann, Carlo Cercignani examines the immense contributions of the man who pioneered our understanding of the atomic nature of matter. The man who first gave a convincing explanation of the irreversibility of the macroscopic world and the symmetry of the laws of physics was the Austrian physicist Ludwig Boltzmann, who tragically committed suicide 100 years ago this month. One of the key figures in the development of the atomic theory of matter, Boltzmann's fame will be forever linked to two fundamental contributions to science. The first was his interpretation of 'entropy' as a mathematically well-defined measure of the disorder of atoms. The second was his derivation of what is now known as the Boltzmann equation, which describes the statistical properties of a gas as made up of molecules. The equation, which described for the first time how a probability can evolve with time, allowed Boltzmann to explain why macroscopic phenomena are irreversible. The key point is that while microscopic objects like atoms can behave reversibly, we never see broken coffee cups reforming because it would involve a long series of highly improbable interactions - and not because it is forbidden by the laws of physics. (U.K.)

  12. Sulfur(IV)-mediated carbon-carbon bond formation

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, William Michael

    2016-01-01

    This thesis details the development of methods for and application of the synthesis of carbon carbon bonds using organic sulfur(IV) chemistry. More specifically, the formation of C(sp2) C(sp3) and C(sp3) C(sp3) bonds is explored in detail. The necessity for this research stems from a correlation between a high proportion of sp3 centres in drug candidates, and their success in clinical trials. By facilitating the synthesis of drug candidates with higher fractions of sp3 hybridised carbon atoms...

  13. Correlation Effects in Kinetics of One-Dimensional Atomic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Borman

    2013-01-01

    properties of 1D systems (such as spatial heterogeneity that is associated with strong density fluctuations, the lack of phase transitions, the presence of frozen disorder, confinement, and blocked movement of nuclear particle by its neighbours in nonequilibrium phenomena by considering the four examples. The anomalous transport in zeolite channels is considered. The mechanism of the transport may appear in carbon nanotubes and MOF structures, relaxation, mechanical properties, and stability of nonequilibrium states of free chains of metal atoms, non-Einstein atomic mobility in 1D atomic systems. Also we discuss atomic transport and separation of two-component mixture of atoms in a 1D system—a zeolite membrane with subnanometer channels. We discuss the atomic transport and separation of two-component mixture of atoms in a 1D system—zeolite membrane with subnanometer channels. These phenomena are described by the response function method for nonequilibrium systems of arbitrary density that allows us to calculate the dynamic response function and the spectrum of relaxation of density fluctuations 1D atomic system.

  14. Dynamics of single Fe atoms in graphene vacancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alex W; Montanari, Barbara; He, Kuang; Kim, Judy; Allen, Christopher S; Wu, Yimin A; Olivier, Jaco; Neethling, Jan; Harrison, Nicholas; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2013-04-10

    Focused electron beam irradiation has been used to create mono and divacancies in graphene within a defined area, which then act as trap sites for mobile Fe atoms initially resident on the graphene surface. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy at 80 kV has been used to study the real time dynamics of Fe atoms filling the vacancy sites in graphene with atomic resolution. We find that the incorporation of a dopant atom results in pronounced displacements of the surrounding carbon atoms of up to 0.5 Å, which is in good agreement with density functional theory calculations. Once incorporated into the graphene lattice, Fe atoms can transition to adjacent lattice positions and reversibly switch their bonding between four and three nearest neighbors. The C atoms adjacent to the Fe atoms are found to be more susceptible to Stone-Wales type bond rotations with these bond rotations associated with changes in the dopant bonding configuration. These results demonstrate the use of controlled electron beam irradiation to incorporate dopants into the graphene lattice with nanoscale spatial control.

  15. Stability of sp carbon (carbyne) chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Yunyang, E-mail: yunhangh@mtu.ed [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931-1295 (United States)

    2009-09-21

    An sp carbon chain, which contains only one carbon atom in its cross section, is generally considered unstable. In this Letter, however, the DFT calculations showed that an isolated sp carbon chain is more stable than the smallest armchair (3,0) and zigzag (2,2) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). This is consistent with the fact that an isolated sp carbon chain was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but isolated (3,0) and (2,2) SWCNTs were never produced. Nevertheless, the sp chain is less stable than lager SWCNTs.

  16. Radio recombination lines from the largest bound atoms in space

    CERN Document Server

    Stepkin, S V; Kantharia, N G; Shankar, N U

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report the detection of a series of radio recombination lines (RRLs) in absorption near 26 MHz arising from the largest bound carbon atoms detected in space. These atoms, which are more than a million times larger than the ground state atoms are undergoing delta transitions (n~1009, Delta n=4) in the cool tenuous medium located in the Perseus arm in front of the supernova remnant, Cassiopeia A. Theoretical estimates had shown that atoms which recombined in tenuous media are stable up to quantum levels n~1500. Our data indicates that we have detected radiation from atoms in states very close to this theoretical limit. We also report high signal-to-noise detections of alpha, beta and gamma transitions in carbon atoms arising in the same clouds. In these data, we find that the increase in line widths with quantum number (proportional to n^5) due to pressure and radiation broadening of lines is much gentler than expected from existing models which assume a power law background radiation field. T...

  17. Single-Atom Catalysts of Precious Metals for Electrochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiwhan; Kim, Hee-Eun; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2017-09-11

    Single-atom catalysts (SACs), where the metal atom is dispersed on the support without forming nanoparticles, have been used for various heterogeneous reactions and most recently for electro-chemical reactions. In this mini-review, we introduce recent exam-ples of single-atom electrocatalysts used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), hydrogen evo-lution reaction (HER), formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR), and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Many density functional theory (DFT) simulations have predicted that SACs may be effective for CO2 reduction towards methane or methanol production while sup-pressing H2 evolution, and those cases are introduced here as well. Single atoms, mainly Pt single atoms, have been deposited on TiN or TiC nanoparticles, defective graphene nanosheets, N-doped covalent triazine framework, graphitic carbon nitride, S-doped zeo-lite template carbon, and Sb-doped SnO2 surfaces. Scanning transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurement, and in-situ infrared spectroscopy have been used to detect the single-atom structure and confirm the ab-sence of nanoparticles. SACs have shown high mass activity, min-imizing the use of precious metal, and unique selectivity distinct from nanoparticle catalysts due to the absence of ensemble sites. Additional features that SACs should possess for effective elec-trochemical applications were also suggested. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Ordered phases of cesium in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung; Song, Ki Oh; Choi, Won Young; Byun, Ki Ryang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Woo [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    We investigate the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes by using a structural optimization process applied to an atomistic simulation method. As the radius of the carbon nanotubes is increased, the structures are found in various phases from an atomic strand to multishell packs composed of coaxial cylindrical shells. Both helical structures and layered structures are found. The numbers of helical atom rows composed of coaxial tubes and the orthogonal vectors of the circular rolling of a triangular network can explain the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes.

  19. On the trends of Fukui potential and hardness potential derivatives in isolated atoms vs. atoms in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Rituparna; Roy, Ram Kinkar

    2014-10-28

    In the present study, trends of electronic contribution to molecular electrostatic potential [Vel(r¯)(r=0)], Fukui potential [v(+)f|(r=0) and v(-)f|(r=0)] and hardness potential derivatives [Δ(+)h(k) and Δ(-)h(k)] for isolated atoms as well as atoms in molecules are investigated. The generated numerical values of these three reactivity descriptors in these two electronically different situations are critically analyzed through the relevant formalism. Values of Vel(r¯) (when r → 0, i.e., on the nucleus) are higher for atoms in molecules than that of isolated atoms. In contrast, higher values of v(+)|(r=0) and v(-)|(r=0) are observed for isolated atoms compared to the values for atoms in a molecule. However, no such regular trend is observed for the Δ(+)h(k) and Δ(-)h(k) values, which is attributed to the uncertainty in the Fukui function values of atoms in molecules. The sum of Fukui potential and the sum of hardness potential derivatives in molecules are also critically analyzed, which shows the efficacy of orbital relaxation effects in quantifying the values of these parameters. The chemical consequence of the observed trends of these descriptors in interpreting electron delocalization, electronic relaxation and non-negativity of atomic Fukui function indices is also touched upon. Several commonly used molecules containing carbon as well as heteroatoms are chosen to make the investigation more insightful.

  20. Absorption imaging of ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David A.; Aigner, Simon; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Imaging ultracold atomic gases close to surfaces is an important tool for the detailed analysis of experiments carried out using atom chips. We describe the critical factors that need be considered, especially when the imaging beam is purposely reflected from the surface. In particular we present...... methods to measure the atom-surface distance, which is a prerequisite for magnetic field imaging and studies of atom surface-interactions....

  1. Atomic Coherent Trapping and Properties of Trapped Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guo-Jian; XIA Li-Xin; XIE Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theory of velocity-selective coherent population trapping, we investigate an atom-laser system where a pair of counterpropagating laser fields interact with a three-level atom. The influence of the parametric condition on the properties of the system such as velocity at which the atom is selected to be trapped, time needed for finishing the coherent trapping process, and possible electromagnetically induced transparency of an altrocold atomic medium,etc., is studied.

  2. Influence of heterogeneous sulfur atoms on the negative differential resistance effect in polythiophene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiao Jing; Dong, Kang Liang; An, Zhong, E-mail: zan@mail.hebtu.edu.cn [College of Physics, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2014-09-07

    In this work, we have carried out theoretical investigations aiming to clarify the effects of sulfur heteroatoms on the transport characteristics in polythiophene. Sulfur atoms in polythiophene are demonstrated to influence the structure and transport process by two aspects: the electron hopping between carbon atoms on both sides of the sulfur atom as well as the effective confinement of π electrons from the sulfur atom. Based on the static Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model and the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism, we simulate the electron transportation in a metal/polythiophene/metal structure. The simulation results show that the electron hopping via sulfur atoms is responsible for the observed negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior in the I-V curves. The NDR disappears if the electron transport channels from carbon to carbon via sulfur atoms are forbidden. The weaker the effective confinement of π electrons and the electron hopping between carbon atoms on both sides of the sulfur atom are, the higher is the peak-to-valley ratio of the NDR and the wider the voltage range where the current remains at low levels. These results can help in understanding the NDR effect in polythiophene.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Atomic H Etching SiC Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, W.; Liu, H.; Lin, L.; Zhao, C. L.; Lu, X. D.; He, P. N.; Gou, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study interactions between atomic H and SiC, silicon carbon surfaces were continuously bombarded by atomic H with different energies. The Tersoff-Brenner potentials were implemented. The simulation results show that with increasing

  4. Graphene on SiC(0001 inspected by dynamic atomic force microscopy at room temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Telychko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated single-layer graphene on SiC(0001 by atomic force and tunneling current microscopy, to separate the topographic and electronic contributions from the overall landscape. The analysis revealed that the roughness evaluated from the atomic force maps is very low, in accord with theoretical simulations. We also observed that characteristic electron scattering effects on graphene edges and defects are not accompanied by any out-of-plane relaxations of carbon atoms.

  5. A Carbon Nanotube Cable for a Space Elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are discussed in connection with the possibility to use them for the construction of a space elevator. From the fundamental information about the structure of a carbon nanotube and the chemical bond between carbon atoms, Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength are…

  6. A Carbon Nanotube Cable for a Space Elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are discussed in connection with the possibility to use them for the construction of a space elevator. From the fundamental information about the structure of a carbon nanotube and the chemical bond between carbon atoms, Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength are…

  7. Adsorption and migration behavior of Si atoms on the hydrogen-terminated diamond (001) surface: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejie; Qiao, Haimao; Kang, Congjie; Ren, Yuan; Tan, Xin; Sun, Shiyang

    2017-10-01

    The adsorption and migration activation energies of a silicon (Si) atom on a hydrogen-terminated diamond (001) surface were calculated using first principles methods based on density functional theory. On the fully hydrogen-terminated surface, the surface carbon atoms possess saturated bonds. The Si atom cannot bond with the surface carbon atoms; thus, the adsorption energy of the Si atom is low. However, on the hydrogen-terminated surface with one or two open radical sites (ORS), the adsorption energy of a Si atom increases to 3.1 eV and even up to 4.7 eV, thereby forming a stable configuration. Along the three ORS in the direction of dimer row or chain, a Si atom can migrate between two deep basins with migration activation energies at 1.5 or 1.3 eV. Given the relatively large energy barrier at approximately 3.8 or 4.7 eV, escaping from the deep basin is difficult for the Si atom. This investigation showed that the number and distribution of ORS, namely, the adsorption site of hydrogen atoms and the removal site of surface hydrogen atoms, can affect the adsorption and migration of Si atoms on the hydrogen-terminated diamond surface. Electron structure analysis further reveals that the reactivity of the surface C atoms and the charge transfer amount between the Si and surface C atoms affect the adsorption and migration of Si atoms.

  8. Optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, N; Gill, P; Tino, G M

    2014-01-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femto-second optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in $10^{18}$. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  9. Rotary cup slurry atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, H. T.; Marnicio, R. J.

    1983-06-01

    The theory of a two-phase flow in a rotating cup atomizer is described. The analysis considers the separation of the solid and liquid media thus realistically modeling the flow of two layers along the inner cup wall: a slurry of increasing solids concentration and a supernatent liquid layer. The analysis is based on the earlier work of Hinze and Milborn (1950) which addressed the flow within a rotary cup for a homogeneous liquid. The superimposition of a settling velocity under conditions of high centrifugal acceleration permits the extended analysis of the separation of the two phases. Appropriate boundary conditions have been applied to the film's free surface and the cup wall and to match the flow characteristics at the liquid-slurry interface. The changing slurry viscosity, increasing nonlinearly with growing solid loading, was also considered. A parameter study illustrates the potential for a cup design to provide optimal slurry and liquid film thicknesses for effective atomization.

  10. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  11. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  12. Real and Hybrid Atomic Orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. B.; Fowler, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that the Schrodinger equation for the hydrogenlike atom separates in both spheroconal and prolate spheroidal coordinates and that these separations provide a sound theoretical basis for the real and hybrid atomic orbitals. (Author/SK)

  13. Atom-Light Hybrid Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Qiu, Cheng; Chen, Shuying; Guo, Jinxian; Chen, L Q; Ou, Z Y; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-07-24

    A new type of hybrid atom-light interferometer is demonstrated with atomic Raman amplification processes replacing the beam splitting elements in a traditional interferometer. This nonconventional interferometer involves correlated optical and atomic waves in the two arms. The correlation between atoms and light developed with the Raman process makes this interferometer different from conventional interferometers with linear beam splitters. It is observed that the high-contrast interference fringes are sensitive to the optical phase via a path change as well as the atomic phase via a magnetic field change. This new atom-light correlated hybrid interferometer is a sensitive probe of the atomic internal state and should find wide applications in precision measurement and quantum control with atoms and photons.

  14. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  15. Into the atom and beyond

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    Magnifying an atom to football pitch size. The dense nucleus, carrying almost all the atomic mass, is much smaller than the ball. The players (the electrons) would see something about the size of a marble!

  16. Artificial Rydberg atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Yong S. [Center for Computational Nanoscience, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306 (United States)], E-mail: ysjoe@bsu.edu; Mkrtchian, Vanik E. [Institute for Physical Research, Armenian Academy of Sciences, Ashtarak-2, 378410, Republic of Armenia (Armenia); Lee, Sun H. [Center for Computational Nanoscience, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306 (United States)

    2009-03-02

    We analyze bound states of an electron in the field of a positively charged nanoshell. We find that the binding and excitation energies of the system decrease when the radius of the nanoshell increases. We also show that the ground and the first excited states of this system have remarkably the same properties of the highly excited Rydberg states of a hydrogen-like atom, i.e., a high sensitivity to the external perturbations and long radiative lifetimes.

  17. Atom Interferometry Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-19

    Casher effect . RECENT PUBLICATION Atom Optics, David W. Keith and David E. Pritchard, New frontiers in QED and Quantumoptics, (Plenum Press, New York...frequencies (< 10 Hz) where the passive system is least effective . The reduction of relative motion provided by the active system will allow us to use much...experimental objective will probably be a demonstration of Berry’s phase with bosons. Another possibility would be an improved measurement of the Aharonov

  18. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  19. Strange exotic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    1998-08-01

    Exotic atoms of K- and Σ- are analyzed using density-dependent optical potentials constrained by a low-density limit. Emphasis is placed on radial sensitivities of the real potential. A potential depth of 180MeV inside nuclei is confirmed for K-. For Σ- a shallow attractive potential outside the nuclear surface becomes repulsive in the interior. The information content of limited data sets is demonstrated.

  20. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency.