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Sample records for twelve semi-structured interviews

  1. Situating and Constructing Diversity in Semi-Structured Interviews

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    Michele J. McIntosh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although semi-structured interviews (SSIs are used extensively in research, scant attention is given to their diversity, underlying assumptions, construction, and broad applications to qualitative and mixed-method research. In this three-part article, we discuss the following: (a how the SSI is situated historically including its evolution and diversification, (b the principles of constructing SSIs, and (c how SSIs are utilized as a stand-alone research method, and as strategy within a mixed-method design.

  2. [SCAN system--semi-structured interview based on diagnostic criteria].

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    Adamowski, Tomasz; Kiejna, Andrzej; Hadryś, Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the main features of contemporary diagnostic systems which are implemented into the SCAN--modern and semi-structured diagnostic interview. The concepts of further development of the classifications, rationale for operationalized diagnostic criteria and for the divisional approach to mental diagnoses will be in focus. The structure and components of SCAN ver. 2.1 (WHO), i.e. Present State Examination--10th edition, Item Group Checklist, Clinical History Schedule, Glossary of Definitions and computer software with the diagnostic algorithm: I-Shell, as well as rules for a reliable use of diagnostic rating scales, will be discussed within the scope of this paper. The materials and training sets necessary for the learning of proper use of the SCAN, especially training sets for SCAN Training Centers and the Reference Manual--a form of guidebook for SCAN shall be introduced. Finally the paper will present evidence that SCAN is an instrument feasible in different cultural settings. Reliability and validity data of SCAN will also be dealt with indicating that SCAN could be widely used in research studies as well as in everyday clinical practice facilitating more detailed diagnostic approach to a patient.

  3. The use of semi-structured interviews for the characterisation of farmer irrigation practices

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    O'Keeffe, Jimmy; Buytaert, Wouter; Mijic, Ana; Brozović, Nicholas; Sinha, Rajiv

    2016-05-01

    For the development of sustainable and realistic water security, generating information on the behaviours, characteristics, and drivers of users, as well as on the resource itself, is essential. In this paper we present a methodology for collecting qualitative and quantitative data on water use practices through semi-structured interviews. This approach facilitates the collection of detailed information on actors' decisions in a convenient and cost-effective manner. Semi-structured interviews are organised around a topic guide, which helps lead the conversation in a standardised way while allowing sufficient opportunity for relevant issues to emerge. In addition, they can be used to obtain certain types of quantitative data. While not as accurate as direct measurements, they can provide useful information on local practices and users' insights. We present an application of the methodology on farmer water use in two districts in the state of Uttar Pradesh in northern India. By means of 100 farmer interviews, information was collected on various aspects of irrigation practices, including irrigation water volumes, irrigation cost, water source, and their spatial variability. Statistical analyses of the information, along with data visualisation, are also presented, indicating a significant variation in irrigation practices both within and between districts. Our application shows that semi-structured interviews are an effective and efficient method of collecting both qualitative and quantitative information for the assessment of drivers, behaviours, and their outcomes in a data-scarce region. The collection of this type of data could significantly improve insights on water resources, leading to more realistic management options and increased water security in the future.

  4. [The semi-structured interview: at the border of public health and anthropology].

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    Imbert, Geneviève

    2010-09-01

    The interview is the tool for data collection the most used in the context of research conducted in health sciences, human sciences and social sciences. After completing some generalities about the different types of interviews, the focus is on semi-structured interview during its various stages including the processing and data analysis, this from the return of a lived experience of research in work on the border of the field of public health and that of anthropology. If this approach and contextualized the semistructured interview may a priori appear specific, the reader interested in the development of qualitative research in a humanistic perspective and the implementation of multidisciplinary strategies to ascertain its universal character.

  5. Assessment of Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Mobile ‎Phone ‎Addiction Disorder

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    Seyyed Salman Alavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR classified mobile phone addiction disorder under ‎‎"impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified". This study surveyed the ‎diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for the diagnosis of mobile phone ‎addiction in correspondence with Iranian society and culture.‎Method: Two hundred fifty students of Tehran universities were entered into this ‎descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. Quota sampling method ‎was used. At first, semi- structured clinical interview (based on DSM-IV-‎TR was performed for all the cases, and another specialist re-evaluated the ‎interviews. Data were analyzed using content validity, inter-scorer reliability (Kappa coefficient and test-retest via SPSS18 software.Results: The content validity of the semi- structured clinical interview matched the ‎DSM –IV-TR criteria for behavioral addiction. Moreover, their content was ‎appropriate, and two items, including "SMS pathological use" and "High ‎monthly cost of using the mobile phone” were added to promote its validity. ‎Internal reliability (Kappa and test –retest reliability were 0.55 and r = 0.4 ‎‎(p<0. 01 respectively.‎Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that semi- structured diagnostic criteria of ‎DSM-IV-TR are valid and reliable for diagnosing mobile phone addiction, ‎and this instrument is an effective tool to diagnose this disorder.‎

  6. Assessment of Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Mobile Phone Addiction Disorder.

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    Alavi, Seyyed Salman; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Jannatifard, Fereshteh; Mohammadi Kalhori, Soroush; Sepahbodi, Ghazal; BabaReisi, Mohammad; Sajedi, Sahar; Farshchi, Mojtaba; KhodaKarami, Rasul; Hatami Kasvaee, Vahid

    2016-04-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) classified mobile phone addiction disorder under "impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified". This study surveyed the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for the diagnosis of mobile phone addiction in correspondence with Iranian society and culture. Two hundred fifty students of Tehran universities were entered into this descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. Quota sampling method was used. At first, semi- structured clinical interview (based on DSM-IV-TR) was performed for all the cases, and another specialist reevaluated the interviews. Data were analyzed using content validity, inter-scorer reliability (Kappa coefficient) and test-retest via SPSS18 software. The content validity of the semi- structured clinical interview matched the DSM-IV-TR criteria for behavioral addiction. Moreover, their content was appropriate, and two items, including "SMS pathological use" and "High monthly cost of using the mobile phone" were added to promote its validity. Internal reliability (Kappa) and test-retest reliability were 0.55 and r = 0.4 (pmobile phone addiction, and this instrument is an effective tool to diagnose this disorder.

  7. Combining Dual Scaling with Semi-Structured Interviews to Interpret Rating Differences

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    Ruth A. Childs

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Dual scaling, a variation of multidimensional scaling, can reveal the dimensions underlying scores, such as raters' judgments. This study illustrates the use of a dual scaling analysis with semi-structured interviews of raters to investigate the differences among the raters as captured by the dimensions. Thirty applications to a one-year post-Bachelor's degree teacher education program were rated by nine teacher educators. Eight of the raters were subsequently interviewed about how they rated the responses. A three-dimensional model was found to explain most of the variance in the ratings for two of the questions and a two-dimensional model was most interpretable for the third question. The interviews suggested that the dimensions reflected, in addition to differences in raters' stringency, differences in their beliefs about their roles as raters and about the types of insights that were required of applicants.

  8. A semi-structured, phenomenologically oriented psychiatric interview: Descriptive congruens in assessing anomalous subjective experience and mental status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Parnas, Josef Stefan Stanislaw

    2012-01-01

    the interrater congruens between experienced clinicians with a semi structured, phenomenologically oriented psychopathological interview assessing anomalous self-experience and mental status. Method: Seventeen inpatients were interviewed by one of the raters, with both raters were present. The interview......, phenomenological-oriented semi-structured interview. Limitations: The major limitation of the study is a relatively small sample size, conditioned by the time-consuming nature of the individual interviews. Second, we should have included a measurement of reliability in a less experiencedrecently EASE......-introduced rater, since it is that kind of researchers that are typically enrolled for the empirical data collections....

  9. PERCEIVED RISK WHEN BUYING ONLINE: EVIDENCE FROM A SEMI-STRUCTURED INTERVIEW

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    Iconaru Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to gain deeper understanding in consumers’ perceptions regarding risk involved when buying online, a semi-structured interview was employed. 30 internet users that have purchased a product or service using the Internet within the last three months were questioned regarding their fears when deciding to buy from an e-commerce web site. The respondents were selected according to a stratified sampling technique. Based on the respondents’ answers but also taking into consideration previous empirical findings, I classify different types of perceived risk into: financial risk, privacy risk, performance risk, delivery risk, time risk, psychological risk and social risk. The results show that Romanian consumers perceive a high degree of risk when conducting an electronic transaction, which could be the reason why Romania has a small e-commerce adoption rate although the internet penetration rate is quite high. Further managerial implications are discussed.

  10. The modern Russian teacher: Studying awareness with the use of the semi-structured interview

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    Ilyushin, Leonid S.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research is based on the ideas of Humanistic-Existential Psychology, a positive approach to personal growth, and modern educational concepts concerning the dynamics of professional and social identity in the stratum of secondary and primary school teachers. The goal of the study is to get an objective picture of the professional and personal changes among Russian teachers under the conditions of school modernization. We offer a detailed model of the semi-structured interview with modern teachers, in combination with observation. The interview consists of 63 questions divided into 9 topics, and deals with issues related to what their professional activities mean to the teachers; the teachers’ evaluation of professional dynamics; their attitude toward various aspects of professional life; and their general world outlook and values. We also briefly describe a pre-interview “warm-up” strategy. This stage of the research resulted in the successful pilot use of the research methodology, and data sufficient to evaluate the initial trends of the analysis of all the data. The study’s main conclusions concern the observation technique, which offers a significant increase in the potential of the interview method, mainly through providing the ability to interpret non-verbal reactions, the level of openness, and the teacher’s trust in the dialogue. Moreover, we must note that, when we asked teachers to answer complicated written questions, their answers, judgments, and arguments varied greatly, regardless of their professional and personal characteristics (employment history, qualification category, the subject they teach, type of school, etc.

  11. Semi-structured interview is a reliable and feasible tool for selection of doctors for general practice specialist training

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    Isaksen, Jesper; Hertel, Niels Thomas; Kjær, Niels Kristian

    2013-01-01

    In order to optimise the selection process for admission to specialist training in family medicine, we developed a new design for structured applications and selection interviews. The design contains semi-structured interviews, which combine individualised elements from the applications with stan...... with standardised behaviour-based questions. This paper describes the design of the tool, and offers reflections concerning its acceptability, reliability and feasibility....

  12. Development and preliminary validation of a semi-structured interview for the screening of law enforcement candidates.

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    Varela, J G; Scogin, F R; Vipperman, R K

    1999-01-01

    A standard practice among most law enforcement agencies is to include psychological screening in the selection of job candidates. Although the use of personality tests in predicting job performance of law enforcement officers has received empirical support (e.g., the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, the Inwald Personality Inventory), there is a conspicuous absence of data regarding the reliability and validity of interview procedures. The present study represents the first step in the development of a standardized, semi-structured interview for use in the screening of law enforcement personnel. This interview, the Law Enforcement Candidate Interview, was constructed using content areas drawn from measures used in the screening of law enforcement personnel (e.g., Inwald Personality Inventory) and assessment of personality functioning (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Personality Disorders). This interview was then administered by two doctoral students to a group of law enforcement academy cadets (n=34). A modest degree of inter-rater reliability was achieved, although internal consistency was somewhat lacking. Interview scores were correlated with measures of academy performance (final grade-point average and peer and supervisor ranking of academy performance). Results of these analyses suggest the LECI is a modest predictor of academy performance. Potential uses of the LECI and future research indications are outlined. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. HPV vaccine decision making in pediatric primary care: a semi-structured interview study

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    Feemster Kristen A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite national recommendations, as of 2009 human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination rates were low with Methods Between March and June, 2010, we conducted qualitative interviews with 20 adolescent-mother-clinician triads (60 individual interviews directly after a preventive visit with the initial HPV vaccine due. Interviews followed a guide based on published HPV literature, involved 9 practices, and continued until saturation of the primary themes was achieved. Purposive sampling balanced adolescent ages and practice type (urban resident teaching versus non-teaching. Using a modified grounded theory approach, we analyzed data with NVivo8 software both within and across triads to generate primary themes. Results The study population was comprised of 20 mothers (12 Black, 9 Conclusions Programs to improve HPV vaccine delivery in primary care should focus on promoting effective parent-clinician communication. Research is needed to evaluate strategies to help clinicians engage reluctant parents and passive teens in discussion and measure the impact of distinct clinician decision making approaches on HPV vaccine delivery.

  14. Barriers to administering non-oral formulations in a paediatric population: A semi-structured interview study.

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    Venables, Rebecca; Batchelor, Hannah; Stirling, Heather; Marriott, John

    2016-01-30

    There is a paucity of research exploring barriers to non-oral medicines administration in paediatric patients; however, these undoubtedly influence medicines adherence. Studies conducted with healthcare professionals have identified various issues with the administration and acceptance of non-oral medicines and devices (Venables et al., 2012; Walsh et al., 2015). EMA (2014) guidelines specify that formulation teams should demonstrate 'acceptability' of paediatric formulations when developing pharmaceutical formulations. Semi-structured interviews exploring barriers to administering non-oral medicines were conducted with young persons and the parents/legal guardians of children (0-17 years) with chronic conditions at the University Hospital of Coventry and Warwickshire, UK. 90 children prescribed a total of 148 non-oral medicines were recruited to the study; 88 barriers to administering non-oral medicines were reported. The most commonly reported barriers were: poor acceptance of face mask/difficulties with spacer for inhaled formulations (38% of reports); disliking parenteral/preferring alternative formulations (38% of reports); greasy texture of topical preparations; difficulty with administering an ocular ointment and the large dose volume of a nasal preparation. Formulation teams should consider the use of child-friendly, age-appropriate designs to improve usability and acceptance, thus medicines adherence. These findings should be used to inform future development of non-oral formulations and devices, suitable in terms of safety, efficacy and acceptability to paediatric patients.

  15. The use of semi-structured interviews for collection of qualitative and quantitative data in hydrological studies

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    O'Keeffe, Jimmy; Buytaert, Wouter; Mijic, Ana; Brozovic, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    To build an accurate, robust understanding of the environment, it is important to not only collect information describing its physical characteristics, but also the drivers which influence it. As environmental change, from increasing CO2 levels to decreasing water levels, is often heavily influenced by human activity, gathering information on anthropogenic as well as environmental variables is extremely important. This can mean collecting qualitative, as well as quantitative information. In reality studies are often bound by financial and time constraints, limiting the depth and detail of the research. It is up to the researcher to determine what the best methodology to answer the research questions is likely to be. Here we present a methodology of collecting qualitative and quantitative information in tandem for hydrological studies through the use of semi-structured interviews. This is applied to a case study in two districts of Uttar Pradesh, North India, one of the most intensely irrigated areas of the world. Here, decreasing water levels exacerbated by unchecked water abstraction, an expanding population and government subsidies, have put the long term resilience of the farming population in doubt. Through random selection of study locations, combined with convenience sampling of the participants therein, we show how the data collected can provide valuable insight into the drivers which have led to the current water scenario. We also show how reliable quantitative information can, using the same methodology, be effectively and efficiently extracted for modelling purposes, which along with developing an understanding of the characteristics of the environment is vital in coming up with realistic and sustainable solutions for water resource management in the future.

  16. How to capture patients’ concerns and related changes: Comparing the MYCaW questionnaire, semi-structured interview and a priority list of outcome areas

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    Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann; Johannessen, Helle

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the capacity of the MYCaW questionnaire, a priority list of concerns covered by validated questionnaires, and semi-structured interviews to identify patients’ personalized concerns and related changes. Design In a pragmatic trial on the effectiveness of energy healing...... as rehabilitation after colorectal cancer, a sub-sample of 31 participants completed the MYCaW questionnaire and the priority list and were interviewed before, during and after the treatment period. Setting Treatments were provided in healers’ clinics in Denmark. Main outcome measures For each participant...... experience with the treatment, while concerns stated in interviews and the priority list remained stable throughout the study; (2) emotional concerns were reported more often in interviews than in MYCaW, physical concerns were predominant in MYCaW, and quality of life was marked as a primary concern most...

  17. A semi-structured, phenomenologically oriented psychiatric interview: Descriptive congruens in assessing anomalous subjective experience and mental status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Parnas, Josef Stefan Stanislaw

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The contemporary methodology in obtaining psychopathological information relies almost exclusively on the use of structured questionnaires and interview schedules. These interviews yield high interrater reliability and reduce cost. The assessments of anomalous self-experience and of me......-introduced rater, since it is that kind of researchers that are typically enrolled for the empirical data collections....

  18. A semi-structured, phenomenologically oriented psychiatric interview: Descriptive congruens in assessing anomalous subjective experience and mental status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Parnas, Josef Stefan Stanislaw

    2012-01-01

    -experience and of mental status (disorders of experience and expression) are often considered as “soft”, “subjective” and hence unreliable. In spite of the advantages of the structured interviews, concerns have been raised about the epistemological coherence and the validity of the structured interviews. To examine......: “Withdrawn/shy” (kappa=0.77), “Suspicious, guarded and hostile” (kappa=0.77), “Raport insecure and anxious” (kappa=0.76), “Restless” (kappa=0.64). Conclusions: High interrater-congruens can be achieved for the assessment of anomalous self-experience and mental status in the context of conversational...

  19. Students' exposure and career aspirations in ecology: A study using semi-structured interviews to gain knowledge of public school students

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    Miller, Heather C.

    Ecology as a field is dominated by white males, McCarter (2003) has noted that women and minorities are underrepresented in the discipline of ecology across the United States. The contribution of this research is to assess and quantify, in a scientific manner, students' exposure, and career aspirations towards ecology; 226 student responses were coded from semi-structured interviews. The main objectives of this study, using student interviews, were the following: (1) assess the importance of exposure to ecology and ecological related topics to: gender, ethnicity, region, grades in science, grades in non-science, grade level, and interest in ecology career. (2) determine if early exposure to ecology (i.e. gained in high school) and ecological related topics is related to an increased interest of students continuing in an ecologically related field and (3) assess if high school students who have been involved in more outdoor related activities such as camping, hiking, hunting, and/or fishing, will be more likely to be interested in an ecological career. Overall, the results indicated that students interviewed for this study generally responded in a positive manner, and were generally interested in ecology. Some students were even interested in pursuing a career in ecology. The study revealed significant differences in the exposure of ecology between school locations, girls and boys, and whites and non-whites. The results of this research and avenues for future research are discussed.

  20. Perceived barriers to pharmacist engagement in adverse drug event prevention activities in Ghana using semi-structured interview.

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    Acheampong, Franklin; Anto, Berko Panyin

    2015-09-07

    Pharmacist involvement in the prevention of medication errors is well documented. One such method, the process by which hospital pharmacists undertake these clinical interventions needs to be described and documented. The perceived barriers to pharmacists succeeding in getting their recommendations accepted could inform future safety strategy development. This study was therefore to trace the typical process involved and explore the perceived barriers to pharmacists' medication safety efforts. This study involved a retrospective evaluation of routine clinical interventions collected at a tertiary hospital in Ghana over 23 months. A sample of pharmacists who had submitted these reports were then interviewed. The interventions made related to drug therapy changes (76.0%), monitoring (13.0%), communication (5.4%), counselling (5.0%) and adverse drug events (0.6%). More than 90% of interventions were accepted. The results also showed that undertaking clinical interventions by pharmacists followed a sequential order with two interlinked subprocesses: Problem Identification and Problem Handling. In identifying the problem, as much information needed to be gathered, clinical issues identified and then the problems prioritised. During the problem handling stage, detailed assessment was made which led to the development of a pharmaceutical plan. The plan was then implemented and monitored to ensure appropriateness of desired outcomes. The main barrier mentioned by pharmacist related to the discrepant attitudes of doctors/nurses. The other barriers encountered during these tasks related to workload, and inadequate clinical knowledge. The attitudes were characterised by conflicts and egos resulting from differences in status/authority, responsibilities, and training. Though the majority of recommendations from pharmacists were accepted, the main barrier to hospital pharmacist engagement in medication error prevention activities related to discrepant attitudes of doctors and

  1. Reliability and validity of a semi-structured DSM-based diagnostic interview module for the assessment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in adult psychiatric outpatients.

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    Gorlin, Eugenia I; Dalrymple, Kristy; Chelminski, Iwona; Zimmerman, Mark

    2016-08-30

    Despite growing recognition that the symptoms and functional impairments of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) persist into adulthood, only a few psychometrically sound diagnostic measures have been developed for the assessment of ADHD in adults, and none have been validated for use in a broad treatment-seeking psychiatric sample. The current study presents the reliability and validity of a semi-structured DSM-based diagnostic interview module for ADHD, which was administered to 1194 adults presenting to an outpatient psychiatric practice. The module showed excellent internal consistency and interrater reliability, good convergent and discriminant validity (as indexed by relatively high correlations with self-report measures of ADHD and ADHD-related constructs and little or no correlation with other, non-ADHD symptom domains), and good construct validity (as indexed by significantly higher rates of psychosocial impairment and self-reported family history of ADHD in individuals who meet criteria for an ADHD diagnosis). This instrument is thus a reliable and valid diagnostic tool for the detection of ADHD in adults presenting for psychiatric evaluation and treatment.

  2. Assessment of personality-related levels of functioning: A pilot study of clinical assessment of the DSM-5 Level of Personality Functioning based on a semi-structured interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Simonsen, Sebastian; Nemery, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    was to test the Clinical Assessment of the Level of Personality Functioning Scale [CALF], a semi-structured clinical interview, designed to assess the Level of Personality Functioning Scale of the DSM-5 (Section III) by applying strategies similar to what characterizes assessments in clinical practice...

  3. Implementing the semi-structured interview Kiddie-SADS-PL into an in-patient adolescent clinical setting: impact on frequency of diagnoses

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    Ferrari Pierre

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research is needed to establish the utility of diagnostic interviews in clinical settings. Studies comparing clinical diagnoses with diagnoses generated with structured instruments show generally low or moderate agreement and clinical diagnostic assignment (e.g. admission or chart diagnoses are often considered to underdiagnose disorders. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of implementing the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children – Present and Lifetime Version (Kiddie-SADS-PL into an in-patient adolescent clinical setting. Methods Participants were all adolescents admitted through the years 2001–2004 (N = 333 admissions, age 12–17 years. The authors reviewed the charts of the previous three years of consecutive admissions, patients being evaluated using routine psychiatric evaluation, before the Kiddie-SADS-PL was introduced. They then reviewed the charts of all consecutive admissions during the next twelve months, patients being evaluated by adding the instrument to routine practice. Results The rates of several main diagnostic categories (depressive, anxiety, bipolar and disruptive disorders increased considerably, suggesting that those disorders were likely underreported when using non-structured routine assessment procedures. The rate of co-morbidity increased markedly as the number of diagnoses assigned to each patient increased. Conclusion The major differences in diagnostic assignment rates provide arguments for the utility of diagnostic interviews in inpatient clinical settings but need further research, especially on factors that affect clinical diagnostic assignment in "real world" settings.

  4. Assessment of personality-related levels of functioning: A pilot study of clinical assessment of the DSM-5 Level of Personality Functioning based on a semi-structured interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Simonsen, Sebastian; Nemery, Caroline;

    2016-01-01

    Background: The personality disorder categories in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV have been extensively criticized, and there is a growing consensus that personality pathology should be represented dimensionally rather than categorically. The aim of this pilot study...... was to test the Clinical Assessment of the Level of Personality Functioning Scale [CALF], a semi-structured clinical interview, designed to assess the Level of Personality Functioning Scale of the DSM-5 (Section III) by applying strategies similar to what characterizes assessments in clinical practice....... Methods: The inter-rater reliability of the assessment of the four domains and the total impairment in the Level of Personality Functioning Scale were measured in a patient sample that varied in terms of severity and type of pathology. Ratings were done independently by the interviewer and two experts who...

  5. The effect of validating and invalidating communication on satisfaction, pain and affect in nurses suffering from low back pain during a semi-structured interview.

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    Vangronsveld, K L; Linton, S J

    2012-02-01

    When physicians interview patients with ambiguous or nonspecific symptoms, they often try to reassure them with the purpose of explaining that no dangerous illness or disease is causing the symptoms. Unfortunately the evidence suggests that patients with benign (back) pain instead feel misunderstood, frustrated and unsatisfied with the consultation. Validation is a communication method that focuses on understanding and empathy as a platform for problem solving and it may be applicable for interviews in medical settings. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of validation on patient satisfaction, pain and affect. To this end 28 nurses with (re)current back pain were recruited and randomly assigned to be interviewed in a validating or invalidating condition. Patient satisfaction, affect, pain, disability, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement were assessed immediately after the interview. The results show that the participants in the validated group were more satisfied with the interview than participants in the invalidating condition. Moreover, they showed a significant decrease on all measures of negative affect as well as for pain. For example, there was a significant between group difference in frustration where frustration decreased in the validation group, while it increased in the invalidation condition. A validating communication style seems to be beneficial for enhancing patient satisfaction, as well as diminishing negative affect and pain intensity ratings. Our results suggest that validation might be a viable technique to use in clinical examinations of patients suffering pain. © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  6. Concerns and expectations about returning to work with low back pain: identifying themes from focus groups and semi-structured interviews.

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    Shaw, William S; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang

    2005-11-15

    Studies of occupational low back pain (OLBP) have shown that return to work after injury is influenced by workers' concerns and expectations; however, these theoretical constructs have not been explored. The specific aim of this study was to identify themes related to self-efficacy and outcome expectancy for returning to work using qualitative research methods. Twenty-eight individuals who recently returned to work (work (n = 23) were referred by their physiotherapists and interviewed to provide more immediate accounts of their concerns and experiences. Notes and recordings from both sources were searched for utterances describing beliefs about self-efficacy or outcome expectancy for returning to work. Two primary self-efficacy constructs emerged: self-efficacy for resuming physical activity and self-efficacy for resuming work. Self-efficacy for resuming physical activity included 8 sub-domains: lift, carry, sit, stand, push/pull, bend, climb, and reach. Self-efficacy for resuming work included 3 sub-domains: pain control, obtaining help, and meeting job demands. Outcome expectancy included four sub-domains: financial/job security, re-injury, workplace support, and self-image. Hesitation to return to work after OLBP involves not only concerns about pain and re-injury, but also the perceived ability to perform physical tasks, meet role expectations, obtain workplace support, and maintain job security.

  7. Twelve Years of Interviews with the Inupiat people of Arctic Alaska: Report from a Community Workshop

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    Eisner, W. R.; Hinkel, K. M.; Cuomo, C.

    2015-12-01

    On 20 August 2015, a workshop was held in Barrow, Alaska, which presented the highlights of 12 years of research connecting local indigenous knowledge of landscape processes with scientific research on arctic lakes, tundra changes, and permafrost stability. Seventy-six Iñupiat elders, hunters, and other knowledge-holders from the North Slope villages of Barrow, Atqasuk, Wainwright, Nuiqsut, and Anaktuvuk Pass were interviewed, and over 75 hours of videotaped interviews were produced. The interviews provided information and observations on landforms, lakes, erosion, permafrost degradation and thermokarst, changes in the environment and in animal behavior, human modification of lakes, tundra damage from 4-wheel off-road vehicles, tundra trail expansion, and other phenomena. Community concerns regarding the impact of environmental change on food procurement, animal migration, human travel routes, and the future of subsistence practices were also prominent themes. Following an interview, each videotaped session was logged. Each time an elder pointed to a location on a map and explained a landscape event/observation or told a story, the time-stamp in the video was recorded. Each logged event consisted of a code and a short account of the observation. From these reference sheets, a Geographic Information System (GIS) dataset was created. A logged account for each videotape, with geographic coordinates, event code, and event description is available for each videotape. The goal of the workshop was to report on our findings, thank the community for their support, and collaboratively develop plans for archiving and disseminating this data. A complete video library and searchable, printed and digital issues of the logging dataset for archiving in the communities were also produced. Discussions with administrative personnel at the Tuzzy Library in Barrow and the Inupiat Heritage Center have enabled us to set standards and develop a timeline for turning over the library of

  8. 半结构性问询在儿童复发性头痛诊断中的运用%Use of the semi-structured interview in the diagnosis of pediatric recurrent headaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施玉梅; 叶晓蕾

    2012-01-01

    Objective To studythe use of the semi-structured interview in the diagnosis of pediatric recurrent headaches. Methods 90 children with recurrent headaches participated in the semi-structured interviews. The clinical data of 90 children , including the information from the interviews, physical and laboratory examination were studied . Results ①Migraine was found in 63 of the 90 patients , nervous headache in 3 , hysteria in 2. Secondary headache was 2/ 90, intracranial tumor in 1, ametropia in 1 ;②Some patients with chronic sinusitis were suspected to have sinus headache. But they were not respond to antibiotics;③There was no relativity between the part of cerebro-vascular spasm or vasodilation in TCD and the part of headache; most EEGs were normal. Conclusions Recurrent headaches occur commonly in children and are diagnosed on a clinical basis rather than by any testing. Migraine is the common reason of childhood recurrent headaches. The use of the semi-structured interview in the diagnosis of pedi-atric recurrent headaches may obtain a more thorough evaluation of headaches.%目的 探讨半结构性问询在儿童复发性头痛诊断中的运用.方法 对2007年10月至2010年10月门诊及病房诊治的90例复发性头痛病人进行半结构性问询、随访、全面的体格检查及神经系统检查并辅以必要的辅助检查.结果 ①90例复发性头痛患者中88例(97.8%)为原发性头痛,63例偏头痛,其中3例合并紧张性头痛,22例为可能的偏头痛,2例癔病性头痛;继发性头痛2例(2%),分别为颅内肿瘤1例、屈光不正1例;②疑诊为窦性头痛的复发性头痛患者经抗生素及中成药治疗鼻窦炎后头痛无缓解;③实验室检查中经颅多普勒超声检查显示的血管痉挛或扩张的部位与头痛部位无相关性,EEG检查多无明显异常.结论 偏头痛是复发性头痛的常见原因;慢性鼻窦炎无急性发作不会导致窦性头痛.在复发性头痛诊断中应用结构性

  9. A semi-structured interview for psychological autopsy in suicide cases Entrevista semi-estruturada para autópsia psicológica em casos de suicídio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Guevara Werlang

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the applicability and the interrater reliability of a Semi-Structured Interview for psychological autopsy in cases of suicide. METHOD: The Semi-Structured Interview for Psychological Autopsy (SSIPA proposed in this paper consists of four modules which evaluate key-topics associated to suicide. In order to evaluate the instrument's applicability, a sample formed by 42 subjects related to 21 suicide cases was used. The interviews were tape-recorded first and then transcribed. The related material as well as the police inquiry data were presented to four judges. Evaluation of information has been performed with the help of a four-module formulary for decision making: precipitants and/or stressors, motivation, lethality, and intentionality. Data processing, whenever possible, has been accomplished using kappa statistics. When kappa statistic was not applicable, concordance percentage has been used. RESULTS: The SSIPA is applicable because it provides information containing a significant degree of agreement between evaluators, found in one hundred and twenty measurements of judgements made by four judges. There has been significant statistical agreement between the judges in three modules (precipitants and/or stressors, motivation, and intentionality of the model for decision, except in one step of each module, which did not interfere in the final agreement on the present evaluation. In the lethality evaluation module, there has been a 100% agreement between judges. The judgement made by the raters on the four modules have allowed to reach a final agreement regarding the death mode as suicide. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show that it is possible to use a semi-structured instrument for psychological autopsy in cases of suicide, when the interviewees are relatives who accepted to provide information.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver uma entrevista semi-estruturada para autópsia psicológica de casos de suicídio e avaliar a

  10. Applyication of The Method of Semi -structured Interview In Theoretical Framework of Dialectical Normalization of Traditional Chinese Medicine%运用半结构式访谈法构建中医辨证规范理论框架的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘悦; 张哲; 张会永; 杜莹; 李爽; 齐文诚; 杨关林

    2011-01-01

    Objective:to build the oretical framework of dialectical normalization of TCM. Method: to adopt semi -structured interview to collect qualitative data, and data were analyzed by grounded theory. Results: the oretical framework of dialectical normalization of TCM was structured initially ,and it contains assortment,concept,content and research method of dialectical normalization. Conclusion :application of Semi -structured Interview on the oretical framework of dialectical normalization of TCM will provide a theoretical basis and practical architecture for clinical practice.%目的:构建中医辨证规范的理论框架.方法:采用半结构式访谈法收集定性资料,运用扎根理论分析.结果:本研究构建出的中医辨证规范理论框架由辨证规范的分类、辨证规范的概念、辨证规范的内容以及辨证规范的研究方法四部分组成.结论:应用半结构式访谈法构建中医辨证规范的理论框架,可为中医规范辩证提供理论基础和实践架构.

  11. Data Collection Methods. Semi-Structured Interviews and Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    like? P5: I usually study in the library. I can’t study in my dorm room because my roommate is always playing video games or playing guitar . It’s...Study. Can’t in dorm rm - rmmate playing vid. games/ guitar . Distracting. Go 4 quiet. M - Usu. trip/length stay? 8 - Depends. stay betw 10...I can’t study in my dorm room because my roommate is always playing video games or his guitar , so it’s too distracting there. So I go to the

  12. Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FMR Editors

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Walter Kälin, Representative of the UN Secretary- General on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons, co-director of the Brookings-Bern Project on Internal Displacement, and professor of constitutional and international law at Bern University, Switzerland, was interviewed by the FMR Editors in February 2005.

  13. Interview

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    New column in ECHO The editorial team would like to give the â€ワpeople at CERN” the chance to have their say. Through regular interviews, it wishes to highlight the particularities of those who help CERN remain a centre of excellence.

  14. Visual mining of semi-structured data

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Posada, Jorge; Quartulli, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background Vicomtech is visiting CERN to expose their activities and explore possible lines of collaboration. As part of the programme they will be offering a presentation, staged in three parts: Presentation of Vicomtech – Seán Gaines Descriptions of technologies and specialities – Dr. Jorge Posada Details on projects related to the development of visually-based algorithms for intelligent storage, processing, visualization and interaction with Big Data, for massive sources of information. – Dr. Marco Quartulli. The full programme to the visit is here Abstract Mining semi-structured data is fundamental for archive monitoring, understanding and exploitation. Typical analysis systems are based on a three-tiered architecture, in which efficient databases feed highly parallelised application servers that in turn feed client user interfaces. Yet the sharing of analysis, content identification and semantic level summarization tasks among the two bot...

  15. Analysis of influencing factors on the decisions of organ donation among young and adult donor families on the basis of semi-structured interview%基于半结构化访谈法分析未成年及成年器官捐献者家属决策影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢文照; 李翠英

    2016-01-01

    Objective To research the influence factors on the decisions of organ donation among young and adult donor families. Methods On the basis of semi-structured interview, 15 parents of young donors and 15 relatives of adult donors were interviewed for petition of organ donation.Data collection and analysis of the overall study were performed according to grounded theory methodology.Factors that influenced families′decisions were identified and classified.Results We found that the donor families had been affected by various factors throughout the process of deciding to donate.The findings led to the formulation of an empirically based model of interlinking categories that influence families′decision making process in organ donation.These factors were grouped into six main categories:personal factors, conditions of organ request, social factoes, interpersonal factors, ethical factors and traditional views.The funeral tradition influenced the young donor parents′consent to donation, but had less relation with family decision of adult donors.The number of young donor families who had the concept about maintaining the integrity of the bodies was relatively fewer than adult donor families.Conclusions Young donor families who were less influenced by traditional funeral beliefs were easier to consent to organ donation than adult donor families.The results of this study could help government to develop organ donation related policies and provide theoretical basis for organ donation.%目的分析公民逝世后未成年及成年器官捐献者家属决策影响因素。方法采用半结构化访谈法访谈15例未成年捐献者和15例成年捐献者直系亲属,使用扎根理论分析访谈记录,分析归纳器官捐献者家属决策影响因素。结果扎根理论分析访谈结果显示,主要有6大类因素影响器官捐献者家属捐献决定:个人因素、器官捐献条件(微环境因素)、社会环境、人际因

  16. Twelve-months prevalence of mental disorders in the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults - Mental Health Module (DEGS1-MH): a methodological addendum and correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Frank; Höfler, Michael; Strehle, Jens; Mack, Simon; Gerschler, Anja; Scholl, Lucie; Busch, Markus A; Hapke, Ulfert; Maske, Ulrike; Seiffert, Ingeburg; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Maier, Wolfgang; Wagner, Michael; Zielasek, Jürgen; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    We recently published findings in this journal on the prevalence of mental disorders from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults Mental Health Module (DEGS1-MH). The DEGS1-MH paper was also meant to be the major reference publication for this large-scale German study program, allowing future users of the data set to understand how the study was conducted and analyzed. Thus, towards this goal highest standards regarding transparency, consistency and reproducibility should be applied. After publication, unfortunately, the need for an addendum and corrigendum became apparent due to changes in the eligible reference sample, and corresponding corrections of the imputed data. As a consequence the sample description, sample size and some prevalence data needed amendments. Additionally we identified a coding error in the algorithm for major depression that had a significant effect on the prevalence estimates of depression and associated conditions. This addendum and corrigendum highlights all changes and presents the corrected prevalence tables. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Intelligent assistant for extracting semi-structured web data

    OpenAIRE

    Adžič, Nik

    2016-01-01

    In the revised literature we have not identified any existing approach, which could convert data from semi-structured (websites) or unstructured web sources to the RDF form and consequently integrate into a Linked Data cloud. Therefore, our motivation and objective was to develop intelligent assistant for extracting semi-structured web data. This intelligent assistant should automatically identify and select part of web data, some of those web data should be selected by business user without ...

  18. A Semi-Structured Document Model for Text Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建武; 陈晓鸥

    2002-01-01

    A semi-structured document has more structured information compared to anordinary document, and the relation among semi-structured documents can be fully utilized. Inorder to take advantage of the structure and link information in a semi-structured document forbetter mining, a structured link vector model (SLVM) is presented in this paper, where a vectorrepresents a document, and vectors' elements are determined by terms, document structure andneighboring documents. Text mining based on SLVM is described in the procedure of K-meansfor briefness and clarity: calculating document similarity and calculating cluster center. Theclustering based on SLVM performs significantly better than that based on a conventional vectorspace model in the experiments, and its F value increases from 0.65-0.73 to 0.82-0.86.

  19. Semi-structured Data Extraction and Schema Knowledge Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A semi-structured data extraction method to get the us eful information embedded in a group of relevant web pages and store it with OE M(Object Exchange Model) is proposed. Then, the data mining method is adopted t o discover schema k nowledge implicit in the semi-structured data. This knowledge can make users un derstand the information structure on the web more deeply and thourouly. At the same time, it can also provide a kind of effective schema for the querying of we b information.

  20. Towards a Performance Estimate in Semi-Structured Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wombacher, Andreas; Iacob, Maria; Haitsma, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Semi-structured processes are business workflows, where the execution of the workflow is not completely controlled by a workflow engine, i.e., an implementation of a formal workflow model. Examples are workflows where actors potentially have interaction with customers reporting the result of the int

  1. Interviews in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kath; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Interviews are a common method of data collection in nursing research. They are frequently used alone in a qualitative study or combined with other data collection methods in mixed or multi-method research. Semi-structured interviews, where the researcher has some predefined questions or topics but then probes further as the participant responds, can produce powerful data that provide insights into the participants' experiences, perceptions or opinions.

  2. Specification and Verification for Semi-Structured Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Tree logic, inherited from ambient logic, is introduced as the formal foundation of related programming language and type systems. In this paper, we introduce recursion into such logic system, which can describe the tree data more clearly and concisely. By making a distinction between proposition and predicate, a concise semantics interpretation for our modal logic is given. We also develop a model checking algorithm for the logic without  operator. The correctness of the algorithm is shown. Such work can be seen as the basis of the semi-structured data processing language and more flexible type system.

  3. Semi-structured meshes for axial turbomachinery blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbardella, L.; Sayma, A. I.; Imregun, M.

    2000-03-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a novel mesh generator for the flow analysis of turbomachinery blades. The proposed method uses a combination of structured and unstructured meshes, the former in the radial direction and the latter in the axial and tangential directions, in order to exploit the fact that blade-like structures are not strongly three-dimensional since the radial variation is usually small. The proposed semi-structured mesh formulation was found to have a number of advantages over its structured counterparts. There is a significant improvement in the smoothness of the grid spacing and also in capturing particular aspects of the blade passage geometry. It was also found that the leading- and trailing-edge regions could be discretized without generating superfluous points in the far field, and that further refinements of the mesh to capture wake and shock effects were relatively easy to implement. The capability of the method is demonstrated in the case of a transonic fan blade for which the steady state flow is predicted using both structured and semi-structured meshes. A totally unstructured mesh is also generated for the same geometry to illustrate the disadvantages of using such an approach for turbomachinery blades. Copyright

  4. Inter-rater reliability in disability assessment based on a semi-structured interview report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjer, J.; Krol, B.; Brouwer, Silvia; Groothoff, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether physicians are able to perform a disability assessment based on a written report and to assess the inter-rater reliability between physicians in the assessment of work limitations. Method. In total, 12 insurance physicians used written reports to assess work limitatio

  5. Main problems experienced by children with epidermolysis bullosa : A qualitative study with semi-structured interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Scheppingen, Corinne; Lettinga, Ant T.; Duipmans, Jose C.; Maathuis, Care G. B.; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and specify the problems of children with epidermolysis bullosa. The questions explored were: (i) What do children with epidermolysis bullosa experience as the most difficult problems; (it) What is the impact of these problems on their daily life; and (iii

  6. SEMCARE: Multilingual Semantic Search in Semi-Structured Clinical Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Pablo; Kreuzthaler, Markus; Schulz, Stefan; Scherr, Daniel; Daumke, Philipp; Markó, Kornél; Kors, Jan A; van Mulligen, Erik M; Wang, Xinkai; Gonna, Hanney; Behr, Elijah; Honrado, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The vast amount of clinical data in electronic health records constitutes a great potential for secondary use. However, most of this content consists of unstructured or semi-structured texts, which is difficult to process. Several challenges are still pending: medical language idiosyncrasies in different natural languages, and the large variety of medical terminology systems. In this paper we present SEMCARE, a European initiative designed to minimize these problems by providing a multi-lingual platform (English, German, and Dutch) that allows users to express complex queries and obtain relevant search results from clinical texts. SEMCARE is based on a selection of adapted biomedical terminologies, together with Apache UIMA and Apache Solr as open source state-of-the-art natural language pipeline and indexing technologies. SEMCARE has been deployed and is currently being tested at three medical institutions in the UK, Austria, and the Netherlands, showing promising results in a cardiology use case.

  7. Twelve-month prevalence, comorbidity and correlates of mental disorders in Germany: the Mental Health Module of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1-MH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Frank; Höfler, Michael; Siegert, Jens; Mack, Simon; Gerschler, Anja; Scholl, Lucie; Busch, Markus A; Hapke, Ulfert; Maske, Ulrike; Seiffert, Ingeburg; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Maier, Wolfgang; Wagner, Michael; Zielasek, Jürgen; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides up to date prevalence estimates of mental disorders in Germany derived from a national survey (German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults, Mental Health Module [DEGS1-MH]). A nationally representative sample (N = 5318) of the adult (18-79) population was examined by clinically trained interviewers with a modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (DEGS-CIDI) to assess symptoms, syndromes and diagnoses according to DSM-IV-TR (25 diagnoses covered). Of the participants 27.7% met criteria for at least one mental disorder during the past 12 months, among them 44% with more than one disorder and 22% with three or more diagnoses. Most frequent were anxiety (15.3%), mood (9.3%) and substance use disorders (5.7%). Overall rates for mental disorders were substantially higher in women (33% versus 22% in men), younger age group (18-34: 37% versus 20% in age group 65-79), when living without a partner (37% versus 26% with partnership) or with low (38%) versus high socio-economic status (22%). High degree of urbanization (> 500,000 inhabitants versus < 20,000) was associated with elevated rates of psychotic (5.2% versus 2.5%) and mood disorders (13.9% versus 7.8%). The findings confirm that almost one third of the general population is affected by mental disorders and inform about subsets in the population who are particularly affected. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Effects of a training in the Disability Assessment Structured Interview on the interviews of Dutch insurance physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjer, Jerry; Mei, van der Sijrike; Cornelius, Bert; Brouwer, Sandra; Klink, van der Jac

    PURPOSE: The Disability Assessment Structured Interview (DASI) is a semi-structured interview for assessing functional limitations of claimants in a work disability evaluation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a 3-day DASI training course on the quality of assessment interviews of

  9. Effects of a training in the Disability Assessment Structured Interview on the interviews of Dutch insurance physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjer, Jerry; Mei, van der Sijrike; Cornelius, Bert; Brouwer, Sandra; Klink, van der Jac

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Disability Assessment Structured Interview (DASI) is a semi-structured interview for assessing functional limitations of claimants in a work disability evaluation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a 3-day DASI training course on the quality of assessment interviews of

  10. Interviews for the assessment of long-term incapacity for work: a study on adherence to protocols and principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Wout E L; Wind, Haije; van Dijk, Frank J H; Willems, Han H B M

    2009-06-02

    Assessments for long-term incapacity for work are performed by Social Insurance Physicians (SIPs) who rely on interviews with claimants as an important part of the process. These interviews are susceptible to bias. In the Netherlands three protocols have been developed to conduct these interviews. These protocols are expert- and practice-based. We studied to what extent these protocols are adhered to by practitioners. We compared the protocols with one another and with the ICF and the biopsychosocial approach. The protocols describe semi-structured interviews with comparable but not identical topics. All protocols prescribe that the client's opinion on his capacity for work, and his arguments, need to be determined and assessed. We developed a questionnaire to elicit the adherence SIPs have to the protocols, their underlying principles and topics. We conducted a survey among one hundred fifty-five experienced SIPs in the Netherlands. Ninety-eight SIPs responded (64%). All respondents used some form of protocol, either one of the published protocols or their own mix. We found no significant relation between training and the use of a particular protocol. Ninety percent use a semi-structured interview. Ninety-five percent recognise having to verify what the claimant says and eighty-three percent feel the need to establish a good relation (p = 0.019). Twelve topics are basically always addressed by over eighty percent of the respondents. The claimant's opinion of being fit for his own work or other work, and his claim of incapacity and his health arguments for that claim, reach a hundred percent. Description of claimants' previous work reaches ninety-nine percent. Our study shows professional consensus among experienced Dutch SIPs about the principle of assessment on arguments, the principle of conducting a semi-structured interview and the most crucial interview topics. This consensus can be used to further develop a protocol for interviewing in the assessment of

  11. The Twelve Hotel, Barna : Video

    OpenAIRE

    Irish Food Channel

    2014-01-01

    Fergus O'Halloran, Managing Director of The Twelve Hotel in Barna in County Galway, talks about his philosophy in running this unique boutique hotel. Reproduced with kind permission from John & Sally McKenna. 3.35 mins

  12. Conceptual Level Design of Semi-structured Database System: Graph-semantic Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Sarkar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper has proposed a Graph – semantic based conceptual model for semi-structured database system, called GOOSSDM, to conceptualize the different facets of such system in object oriented paradigm. The model defines a set of graph based formal constructs, variety of relationship types with participation constraints and rich set of graphical notations to specify the conceptual level design of semi-structured database system. The proposed design approach facilitates modeling of irregular, heterogeneous, hierarchical and non-hierarchical semi-structured data at the conceptual level. Moreover, the proposed GOOSSDM is capable to model XML document at conceptual level with the facility of document-centric design, ordering and disjunction characteristic. A rule based transformation mechanism of GOOSSDM schema into the equivalent XML Schema Definition (XSD also has been proposed in this paper. The concepts of the proposed conceptual model have been implemented using Generic Modeling Environment (GME.

  13. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitive study using cognitive interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  14. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitative study using cognitive interviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.; Groenewegen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  15. Efficient Frequent Pattern Mining Techniques of Semi Structured data: a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena A Deshpande, R.S. Prasad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Semi-structured data are a huge amount of complexand heterogeneous data sets.Such models capturedata that are not intentionally structured, but arestructured heterogeneously. These databasesevolve so quickly like run time report generated byERPs, World-Wide Web with its HTML pages, textfiles, bibliographies, various logs generated etc.These huge and varied becomedifficultto retrieverelevant information User is often interestedinintegrating various formats (like in biomedical datatext, image or structured that are generally realizedas files, and also wants to access them in anintegrated fashion.Users not only query the data tofind a particular piece ofinformation, but he is alsokeen in knowing better understanding of the query.Because of this variety, semi-structured DBs do notcome with a conceptual schema. To make thesedatabases more accessible to users a rich conceptualmodel is needed. Traditional retrieving techniquesare not directly applied on these databases.Unfortunately the tools and methodologies used forRDBMS do not give efficient results and so fail tobridge the gap. Henceefficient andscalablemethods for mining the semi-structured data isneeded, via discovering rule or patterns from thehuge semi-structured databases. These databasesare modelled by trees and graphs.

  16. Start Time and Duration Distribution Estimation in Semi-Structured Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wombacher, Andreas; Iacob, Maria-Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Semi-structured processes are business workflows, where the execution of the workflow is not completely controlled by a workflow engine, i.e., an implementation of a formal workflow model. Examples are workflows where actors potentially have interaction with customers reporting the result of the int

  17. Start time and duration distribution estimation in semi-structured processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wombacher, Andreas; Iacob, Maria-Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Semi-structured processes are business workflows, where the execution of the workflow is not completely controlled by a workflow engine, i.e., an implementation of a formal workflow model. Examples are workflows where actors potentially have interaction with customers reporting the result of the int

  18. NETMARK: A Schema-less Extension for Relational Databases for Managing Semi-structured Data Dynamically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, David A.; Tran, Peter B.

    2003-01-01

    Object-Relational database management system is an integrated hybrid cooperative approach to combine the best practices of both the relational model utilizing SQL queries and the object-oriented, semantic paradigm for supporting complex data creation. In this paper, a highly scalable, information on demand database framework, called NETMARK, is introduced. NETMARK takes advantages of the Oracle 8i object-relational database using physical addresses data types for very efficient keyword search of records spanning across both context and content. NETMARK was originally developed in early 2000 as a research and development prototype to solve the vast amounts of unstructured and semi-structured documents existing within NASA enterprises. Today, NETMARK is a flexible, high-throughput open database framework for managing, storing, and searching unstructured or semi-structured arbitrary hierarchal models, such as XML and HTML.

  19. Building Large Collections of Chinese and English Medical Terms from Semi-Structured and Encyclopedia Websites

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Xu; Yining Wang; Jian-Tao Sun; Jianwen Zhang; Junichi Tsujii; Eric Chang

    2013-01-01

    To build large collections of medical terms from semi-structured information sources (e.g. tables, lists, etc.) and encyclopedia sites on the web. The terms are classified into the three semantic categories, Medical Problems, Medications, and Medical Tests, which were used in i2b2 challenge tasks. We developed two systems, one for Chinese and another for English terms. The two systems share the same methodology and use the same software with minimum language dependent parts. We produced large...

  20. EURISLAM workpackage 6: integrated report on interviews with Muslim leaders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heelsum, A.; Koomen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In addition to our target Muslim populations, we aim also to gather information on their community leaders, as well as the policy makers whose policies confront them. We aim through a series of semi-structured interviews to gain information on the position of a variety of community

  1. Interview techniques for UX practitioners a user-centered design method

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Chauncey

    2013-01-01

    Much of the work of user-centered design practitioners involves some type of interviewing. While interviewing is an important skill, many colleagues have little or no formal training in interviewing methods and often learn on the job with limited feedback on the quality of their interviews. This book teaches readers about the three basic interview methods: structured interviews, semi-structured interviews, and unstructured interviews. The author discusses the various strengths, weaknesses, issues with each type of interview, and includes best practices and procedures for conducing effective

  2. Timeline interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain and discuss timeline interviews as a method for doing life history research. It is a ‘how to’ article explaining the strengths and weaknesses of using a timeline when conducting qualitative interviews. The method allows the interviewee to participate...... in the reporting of the interview which may give raise to ownership and sharing of the analytical power in the interview situation. Exactly for this reason, it may not be the most appropriate method for interviewing elites or for conducting insider interviews where positionality can be at play. The use...... of the timeline should not lead the nterviewer or the interviewee to assume linearity and coherence; it is an rganising principle for the events. It provides an opportunity for linking the story with the wider social, political and environmental context during the interview. hile the method is very suitable...

  3. Fuzzy Optimum Model of Semi-Structural Decision for Lectotype Optimization of Offshore Platforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈守煜; 伏广涛; 王建明; 刘刚

    2001-01-01

    In the process of concept design of offshore platforms, it is necessary to select the best from feasible alternatives through comparison and filter. The criterion set, used to evaluate and select the satisfying alternative, consists of many qualitative and quantitative factors. Therefore, the selection is a problem of multicriteria and semi-structural decision-making. Different from traditional methods in semi-structural decision-making, a new framework and methodology is presented in this paper for evaluation of offshore platform alternatives. First, the criterion set is established for the evaluation of alternatives. Next, the approach is studied to construct the relative membership degree matrix, in which both qualitative and quantitative factors are consistent with the uniform calculating standard. And then a new weight-assessing method is developed for calculation of the weights based on the relative membership degree matrix.Finally, a multi-hierarchy fuzzy optimum model is adopted to select the satisfying offshore platform alternative. A case study shows that the new framework and methodology are scientific, reasonable and easy to use in practice.

  4. Personal Social Networks and the Cultivation of Expertise in Magic: An Interview Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Olli; Palonen, Tuire; Pitkänen, Petteri; Kuhn, Gustav; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine expertise in magic by interviewing 16 prominent Finnish magicians who were identified earlier through a social network analysis of 120 Finnish magicians. A semi-structured interview was administered that addressed the participants' histories; their relationship to magic, the nature of their…

  5. Reshould I Take More MIS Courses? Implications from Interviews with Business Recruiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun; Guo, Yi Maggie

    2015-01-01

    It is important for MIS educators to have a good understanding of what IT knowledge and skills are required in business. In this study, 103 open job positions in the Midwestern United States were investigated via semi-structured interviews with hiring companies. The interviews with key business recruiters suggest that IT knowledge and skills are…

  6. An interview study of phenotypic characterization of genetically-modified mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thon, R.; Vondeling, H.; Lassen, J.; Hansen, A.K.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.

    2009-01-01

    An interview study was carried out with the aim of clarifying the reasons for the limited use of phenotypic characterization of genetically-modified mice (GMM) and identifying issues hindering its implementation. A total of 15 users of GMM participated in semi-structured face-to-face interviews, whi

  7. Kognitive Interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Prüfer, Peter; Rexroth, Margrit

    2005-01-01

    'In der Umfrageforschung sind kognitive Interviews ein effektives Werkzeug, um potentielle Probleme bei Survey-Fragen zu identifizieren. In diesem Beitrag werden die wichtigsten kognitiven Techniken vorgestellt und Empfehlungen für die Durchführung kognitiver Interviews gegeben.' (Autorenreferat)

  8. A Semi-Structured Tailoring-Driven Approach for ERP Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdou Janati Idrissi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been widely reported that selecting an inappropriate system is a major reason for ERP implementation failures. The selection of an ERP system is therefore critical. While the number of papers related to ERP implementation is substantial, ERP evaluation and selection approaches have received few attention. Motivated by the adaptation concept of the ERP systems, we propose in this paper a semi-structured approach for ERP system selection that has a more holistic focus by simultaneously evaluating candidate products according to both functional and non-functional requirements and considering the anticipated fitness of ERP solutions after the optimal resolution, within limited resources, of a set of the identified mismatches. The approach consists of an iterative selection process and an evaluation methodology that combines a 0-1 linear programming model to determine functional measurement metrics with MACBETH cardinal scales to elaborate multi-criteria performance expressions.

  9. Building large collections of Chinese and English medical terms from semi-structured and encyclopedia websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Yining; Sun, Jian-Tao; Zhang, Jianwen; Tsujii, Junichi; Chang, Eric

    2013-01-01

    To build large collections of medical terms from semi-structured information sources (e.g. tables, lists, etc.) and encyclopedia sites on the web. The terms are classified into the three semantic categories, Medical Problems, Medications, and Medical Tests, which were used in i2b2 challenge tasks. We developed two systems, one for Chinese and another for English terms. The two systems share the same methodology and use the same software with minimum language dependent parts. We produced large collections of terms by exploiting billions of semi-structured information sources and encyclopedia sites on the Web. The standard performance metric of recall (R) is extended to three different types of Recall to take the surface variability of terms into consideration. They are Surface Recall (R(S)), Object Recall (R(O)), and Surface Head recall (R(H)). We use two test sets for Chinese. For English, we use a collection of terms in the 2010 i2b2 text. Two collections of terms, one for English and the other for Chinese, have been created. The terms in these collections are classified as either of Medical Problems, Medications, or Medical Tests in the i2b2 challenge tasks. The English collection contains 49,249 (Problems), 89,591 (Medications) and 25,107 (Tests) terms, while the Chinese one contains 66,780 (Problems), 101,025 (Medications), and 15,032 (Tests) terms. The proposed method of constructing a large collection of medical terms is both efficient and effective, and, most of all, independent of language. The collections will be made publicly available.

  10. Building large collections of Chinese and English medical terms from semi-structured and encyclopedia websites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    Full Text Available To build large collections of medical terms from semi-structured information sources (e.g. tables, lists, etc. and encyclopedia sites on the web. The terms are classified into the three semantic categories, Medical Problems, Medications, and Medical Tests, which were used in i2b2 challenge tasks. We developed two systems, one for Chinese and another for English terms. The two systems share the same methodology and use the same software with minimum language dependent parts. We produced large collections of terms by exploiting billions of semi-structured information sources and encyclopedia sites on the Web. The standard performance metric of recall (R is extended to three different types of Recall to take the surface variability of terms into consideration. They are Surface Recall (R(S, Object Recall (R(O, and Surface Head recall (R(H. We use two test sets for Chinese. For English, we use a collection of terms in the 2010 i2b2 text. Two collections of terms, one for English and the other for Chinese, have been created. The terms in these collections are classified as either of Medical Problems, Medications, or Medical Tests in the i2b2 challenge tasks. The English collection contains 49,249 (Problems, 89,591 (Medications and 25,107 (Tests terms, while the Chinese one contains 66,780 (Problems, 101,025 (Medications, and 15,032 (Tests terms. The proposed method of constructing a large collection of medical terms is both efficient and effective, and, most of all, independent of language. The collections will be made publicly available.

  11. Transanal rectopexy - twelve case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Henrique Oleques Fernandes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study analyzed the results of transanal rectopexy and showed the benefits of this surgical technique. METHOD: Twelve patients were submitted to rectopexy between 1997 and 2011. The surgical technique used was transanal rectopexy, where the mesorectum was fixed to the sacrum with nonabsorbable suture. Three patients had been submitted to previous surgery, two by the Delorme technique and one by the Thiersch technique. RESULTS: Postoperative hospital stay ranged from 1 to 4 days. One patient (8.3% had intraoperative hematoma, which was treated with local compression and antibiotics. One patient (8.3% had residual mucosal prolapse, which was resected. Prolapse recurrence was seen in one case (8.3%. Improved incontinence occurred in 75% of patients and one patient reported obstructed evacuation in the first month after surgery. No death occurred. CONCLUSION: Transanal rectopexy is a simple, low cost technique, which has shown good efficacy in rectal prolapse control.OBJETIVO: O presente estudo analisou os resultados da retopexia pela via transanal e expôs os benefícios desta técnica cirúrgica. MÉTODO: Doze pacientes com prolapso foram operados no período de 1997 a 2011. A técnica cirúrgica usada foi a retopexia transanal, onde o mesorreto foi fixado ao sacro com fio inabsorvível. Três pacientes tinham cirurgia prévia, dois pela técnica de Delorme e um pela técnica de Thiersch. RESULTADOS: A permanência hospitalar pós-operatória variou de 1- 4 dias. Uma paciente (8,3% apresentou hematoma transoperatório que foi tratado com compressão local e antibioticoterapia. Um paciente apresentou prolapso mucoso residual (8,3%, que foi ressecado. Houve recidiva da procidência em um caso (8,3%. A melhora da incontinência ocorreu em 75% dos pacientes e uma paciente apresentou bloqueio evacuatório no primeiro mês após a cirurgia. Não houve mortalidade entre os pacientes operados. CONCLUSÃO: A retopexia transanal é uma t

  12. Motivational interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Kamilla; Humaidan, Peter; Sørensen, Lise H;

    2013-01-01

    This is a retrospective study to investigate whether motivational interviewing increases weight loss among obese or overweight women prior to fertility treatment. Women with body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m(2) approaching the Fertility Clinic, Regional Hospital Skive, were given advice about diet...... and physical activity with the purpose of weight loss. In addition, they were asked if they wanted to receive motivational interviewing. Among other data, age, height and weight were obtained. Main outcomes were weight loss measured in kg and decrease in BMI. We studied 187 women: 110 received sessions...... of motivational interviewing (intervention group, n = 110), 64 received motivational support by phone or e-mail only and 13 women did not wish any motivational support (control group, n = 77). The mean weight loss and decrease in BMI was greater in the intervention group compared with the control group (9.3 kg...

  13. Building and Using Object-Oriented Frameworks for Semi-Structures Domains: The Sales Promotion Domain as Example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Dalebout; J. van Hillegersberg (Jos); B. Wierenga (Berend)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractObject-oriented (00) frameworks are considered an important step forward in developing software applications efficiently. Success of frameworks has however predominantly been limited to structured domains.This paper describes a method for developing 00 domainframeworks for semi-structure

  14. Analysis of qualitative interviews with online language teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin; Meyer, Bente

    technological skills specifically required for live online language teaching define need for qualification of the live online language teacher The Danish team conducted 4 semi-structured interviews with teachers. The interviews were made on the basis of an interview guide discussed by all partners in December...... the basis for live online language teaching, i.e investigate traditional classroom pedagogy of language learning in virtual classroom environment outline particularities of learning processes in live online language teaching outline  advantages and disadvantages of  live online language teaching describe...

  15. Situational awareness for unmanned ground vehicles in semi-structured environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, Thomas G.; Snorrason, Magnus; Stevens, Mark R.

    2002-07-01

    Situational Awareness (SA) is a critical component of effective autonomous vehicles, reducing operator workload and allowing an operator to command multiple vehicles or simultaneously perform other tasks. Our Scene Estimation & Situational Awareness Mapping Engine (SESAME) provides SA for mobile robots in semi-structured scenes, such as parking lots and city streets. SESAME autonomously builds volumetric models for scene analysis. For example, a SES-AME equipped robot can build a low-resolution 3-D model of a row of cars, then approach a specific car and build a high-resolution model from a few stereo snapshots. The model can be used onboard to determine the type of car and locate its license plate, or the model can be segmented out and sent back to an operator who can view it from different viewpoints. As new views of the scene are obtained, the model is updated and changes are tracked (such as cars arriving or departing). Since the robot's position must be accurately known, SESAME also has automated techniques for deter-mining the position and orientation of the camera (and hence, robot) with respect to existing maps. This paper presents an overview of the SESAME architecture and algorithms, including our model generation algorithm.

  16. Autism spectrum disorder detection from semi-structured and unstructured medical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianbo; Holtz, Chester; Smith, Tristram; Luo, Jiebo

    2017-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder that significantly impairs patients' ability to perform normal social interaction and communication. Moreover, the diagnosis procedure of ASD is highly time-consuming, labor-intensive, and requires extensive expertise. Although there exists no known cure for ASD, there is consensus among clinicians regarding the importance of early intervention for the recovery of ASD patients. Therefore, to benefit autism patients by enhancing their access to treatments such as early intervention, we aim to develop a robust machine learning-based system for autism detection by using Natural Language Processing techniques based on information extracted from medical forms of potential ASD patients. Our detecting framework involves converting semi-structured and unstructured medical forms into digital format, preprocessing, learning document representation, and finally, classification. Testing results are evaluated against the ground truth set by expert clinicians and the proposed system achieve a 83.4% accuracy and 91.1% recall, which is very promising. The proposed ASD detection framework could significantly simplify and shorten the procedure of ASD diagnosis.

  17. Positioning identity in clinical interviews with people who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendouzi, Jackie; Williams, Mandy J

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians often rely on ethnographic interviews to make judgments about the effect of stuttering on the lives of people who stutter. This form of interview aids the clinician in assessing specific dimensions of the client's life (e.g. career choice, education, etc.) that might be impacted by dysfluency. Further, the information gathered from ethnographic interviews is used to make professional judgments relating to the client's personality type and behavioral traits. This study used methods associated with discursive psychology to examine data taken from two ethnographic interviews between a clinician and two people who stuttered. The interviews were semi-structured and used probe questions to elicit the participants' viewpoints about the effects of stuttering on their lives. Data taken from the interviews were then examined to investigate the subject positions participants discursively aligned to within their accounts. We discuss the implications of making clinical judgments regarding a client's identity from such interviews.

  18. Interview God

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ "Come in,"God said to me,"so,you would like to interview Me?" "If you have the time."I said. He smiled through His beard and said:"My time is called eternity and is enough to do everything;what questions do you have in mind to ask me?" "None that are new to you.What's the one thing that surprises you most about mankind?"

  19. Joint attention at 10 months of age in infant-mother dyads: contrasting free toy-play with semi-structured toy-play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus, Vera; Martins, Carla; Osório, Ana; Martins, Eva Costa; Soares, Isabel

    2013-02-01

    Fifty-two 10-month-olds and their mothers were observed in free toy-play and semi-structured toy-play for assessing joint attention capabilities. Mothers exhibited more bids for joint attention during semi-structured toy-play. Infants' response to maternal behaviors and their bids for initiating joint attention were higher during free toy-play.

  20. Access to opportunities for bilingualism for individuals with developmental disabilities: Key informant interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherba de Valenzuela, J.; Kay-Raining Bird, E.; Parkington, K.; Mirenda, P.; Cain, K.; MacLeod, A.A.N.; Segers, P.C.J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the results of a thematic analysis of 79 semi-structured interviews collected at six research sites in four countries in relation to the inclusion and exclusion of students with developmental disabilities (DD) in and from special education and bilingual

  1. Access to opportunities for bilingualism for individuals with developmental disabilities: Key informant interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherba de Valenzuela, J.; Kay-Raining Bird, E.; Parkington, K.; Mirenda, P.; Cain, K.; MacLeod, A.A.N.; Segers, P.C.J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the results of a thematic analysis of 79 semi-structured interviews collected at six research sites in four countries in relation to the inclusion and exclusion of students with developmental disabilities (DD) in and from special education and bilingual opp

  2. Sipping Coffee with a Serial Killer: On Conducting Life History Interviews with a Criminal Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    As part of my Ph.D. research on criminal genius, I conducted 44 semi-structured interviews. One of the 44 subjects, in particular, stood out. This noteworthy individual claimed that he had killed 15 people. His story was particularly interesting because--unlike most social research involving serial killers--he claimed that he had never been…

  3. Mythematics Solving the Twelve Labors of Hercules

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Michael

    2009-01-01

    How might Hercules, the most famous of the Greek heroes, have used mathematics to complete his astonishing Twelve Labors? From conquering the Nemean Lion and cleaning out the Augean Stables, to capturing the Erymanthean Boar and entering the Underworld to defeat the three-headed dog Cerberus, Hercules and his legend are the inspiration for this book of fun and original math puzzles. While Hercules relied on superhuman strength to accomplish the Twelve Labors, Mythematics shows how math could have helped during his quest. How does Hercules defeat the Lernean Hydra and stop its heads from multip

  4. Interview: interview with Gisbert Schneider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gisbert

    2012-10-01

    Gisbert Schneider studied biochemistry and computer science at the Free University of Berlin, Germany, where he received his doctoral degree in 1994. After several international post-doctoral research activities he joined F.Hoffmann-La Roche Pharmaceuticals in Basel, Switzerland, where he headed the cheminformatics group until 2001. He received his habilitation and venia legendi in biochemistry and bioinformatics from the University of Freiburg, Germany. From 2002 to 2009 he was Full Professor of Chem- and Bioinformatics (Beilstein Endowed Chair) at Goethe-University Frankfurt, Germany. In 2010 he joined ETH Zurich, Switzerland, as a Full Professor of Computer-Assisted Drug Design. Professor Schneider spoke to Future Medicinal Chemistry about how he became involved in the field, the effects advances in software have had on research and how computational chemistry is becoming more important in the role of a traditional medicinal chemist. Interview conducted by Isaac Bruce, Commissioning Editor.

  5. The psychiatric interview: validity, structure, and subjectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgaard, Julie; Sass, Louis A; Parnas, Josef

    2013-06-01

    There is a glaring gap in the psychiatric literature concerning the nature of psychiatric symptoms and signs, and a corresponding lack of epistemological discussion of psycho-diagnostic interviewing. Contemporary clinical neuroscience heavily relies on the use of fully structured interviews that are historically rooted in logical positivism and behaviorism. These theoretical approaches marked decisively the so-called "operational revolution in psychiatry" leading to the creation of DSM-III. This paper attempts to examine the theoretical assumptions that underlie the use of a fully structured psychiatric interview. We address the ontological status of pathological experience, the notions of symptom, sign, prototype and Gestalt, and the necessary second-person processes which are involved in converting the patient's experience (originally lived in the first-person perspective) into an "objective" (third person), actionable format, used for classification, treatment, and research. Our central thesis is that psychiatry targets the phenomena of consciousness, which, unlike somatic symptoms and signs, cannot be grasped on the analogy with material thing-like objects. We claim that in order to perform faithful distinctions in this particular domain, we need a more adequate approach, that is, an approach that is guided by phenomenologically informed considerations. Our theoretical discussion draws upon clinical examples derived from structured and semi-structured interviews. We conclude that fully structured interview is neither theoretically adequate nor practically valid in obtaining psycho-diagnostic information. Failure to address these basic issues may have contributed to the current state of malaise in the study of psychopathology.

  6. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a New Assessment Method for Childhood Maltreatment Experiences: The Interview for Traumatic Events in Childhood (ITEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Harkema-Schouten, Petra; Bernstein, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a comprehensive assessment of the reliability and validity of the Interview for Traumatic Events in Childhood (ITEC, Lobbestael, Arntz, Kremers, & Sieswerda, 2006), a retrospective, semi-structured interview for childhood maltreatment. The ITEC aims to yield dimensional scores for severity of experiences of different…

  7. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Diagnoses (Kid-SCID): first psychometric evaluation in a Dutch sample of clinically referred youths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, J.; Muris, P.; Braet, C.; Arntz, A.; Beelen, I.

    2015-01-01

    The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Disorders (Kid-SCID) is a semi-structured interview for the classification of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. This study presents a first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Kid-SCID in a Dutch sample of children

  8. Evaluation of the Criterion and Convergent Validity of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders in Young and Low-Functioning Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maljaars, Jarymke; Noens, Ilse; Scholte, Evert; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina

    2012-01-01

    The Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO; Wing, 2006) is a standardized, semi-structured and interviewer-based schedule for diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The objective of this study was to evaluate the criterion and convergent validity of the DISCO-11 ICD-10 algorithm in young and low-functioning…

  9. A Semi-Structured MODFLOW-USG Model to Evaluate Local Water Sources to Wells for Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Daniel T; Fienen, Michael N; Reeves, Howard W; Langevin, Christian D

    2016-07-01

    In order to better represent the configuration of the stream network and simulate local groundwater-surface water interactions, a version of MODFLOW with refined spacing in the topmost layer was applied to a Lake Michigan Basin (LMB) regional groundwater-flow model developed by the U.S. Geological. Regional MODFLOW models commonly use coarse grids over large areas; this coarse spacing precludes model application to local management issues (e.g., surface-water depletion by wells) without recourse to labor-intensive inset models. Implementation of an unstructured formulation within the MODFLOW framework (MODFLOW-USG) allows application of regional models to address local problems. A "semi-structured" approach (uniform lateral spacing within layers, different lateral spacing among layers) was tested using the LMB regional model. The parent 20-layer model with uniform 5000-foot (1524-m) lateral spacing was converted to 4 layers with 500-foot (152-m) spacing in the top glacial (Quaternary) layer, where surface water features are located, overlying coarser resolution layers representing deeper deposits. This semi-structured version of the LMB model reproduces regional flow conditions, whereas the finer resolution in the top layer improves the accuracy of the simulated response of surface water to shallow wells. One application of the semi-structured LMB model is to provide statistical measures of the correlation between modeled inputs and the simulated amount of water that wells derive from local surface water. The relations identified in this paper serve as the basis for metamodels to predict (with uncertainty) surface-water depletion in response to shallow pumping within and potentially beyond the modeled area, see Fienen et al. (2015a).

  10. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  11. Discriminant validity of the adult attachment interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, J A; Waters, E; Treboux, D; O'Connor, E O; Colon-Downs, C; Feider, O; Golby, B; Posada

    1996-10-01

    The Adult Attachment Interview is a semi-structured interview developed to investigate adults' attachment representations. Subjects are asked to describe their parents as caregivers, explain these descriptions, describe how their parents typically responded to distress, and discuss their current relationships with their parents. They are also asked to describe any significant losses and/or instances of abuse during childhood. Scoring focuses on the accessibility of early experiences to memory and the coherence and plausibility of the subject's narrative. Discriminant validity is always an important issue with such measures because IQ and other cognitively loaded variables offer plausible alternative interpretations or represent important correlates that should be treated as covariates when the measure is used. In addition, complex, multifaceted interviews always pose the risk of assessing general social adjustment rather than a more narrowly defined construct. This study examines the discriminant validity of the AAI vis(-)à-vis intelligence, social desirability, discourse style, and general social adjustment in a sample of 53 native-English-speaking, married women with preschool children. They were assessed with the AAI, a written IQ test, the Social Adjustment Scale, the Employment Experience Interview (discourse style), and a measure of social desirability. There were modest but significant correlations with IQ scores and social adjustment. There was no relation between AAI classifications and discourse style or social desirability. These results substantially strengthen the case for interpreting the AAI as an attachment-related measure.

  12. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Schultz-Larsen, Kirsten; Fristrup, Tine

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Those...

  13. Chemistry Teachers' Views on Teaching "Climate Change"--An Interview Case Study from Research-Oriented Learning in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feierabend, Timo; Jokmin, Sebastian; Eilks, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case study from research-oriented learning in chemistry teacher education. The study evaluates the views of twenty experienced German chemistry teachers about the teaching of climate change in chemistry education. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews about the teachers' experiences and their views about…

  14. Chemistry Teachers' Views on Teaching "Climate Change"--An Interview Case Study from Research-Oriented Learning in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feierabend, Timo; Jokmin, Sebastian; Eilks, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case study from research-oriented learning in chemistry teacher education. The study evaluates the views of twenty experienced German chemistry teachers about the teaching of climate change in chemistry education. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews about the teachers' experiences and their views about…

  15. Twelve tips for peer observation of teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Zarrin Seema; Jonas-Dwyer, Diana; Carr, Sandra E

    2007-05-01

    This paper outlines twelve tips for undertaking peer observation of teaching in medical education, using the peer review model and the experiences of the authors. An accurate understanding of teaching effectiveness is required by individuals, medical schools, and universities to evaluate the learning environment and to substantiate academic and institutional performance. Peer Observation of Teaching is one tool that provides rich, qualitative evidence for teachers, quite different from closed-ended student evaluations. When Peer Observation of Teaching is incorporated into university practice and culture, and is conducted in a mutually respectful and supportive way, it has the potential to facilitate reflective change and growth for teachers.

  16. A semi-structured MODFLOW-USG model to evaluate local water sources to wells for decision support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Daniel T.; Fienen, Michael N.; Reeves, Howard W.; Langevin, Christian D.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better represent the configuration of the stream network and simulate local groundwater-surface water interactions, a version of MODFLOW with refined spacing in the topmost layer was applied to a Lake Michigan Basin (LMB) regional groundwater-flow model developed by the U.S. Geological. Regional MODFLOW models commonly use coarse grids over large areas; this coarse spacing precludes model application to local management issues (e.g., surface-water depletion by wells) without recourse to labor-intensive inset models. Implementation of an unstructured formulation within the MODFLOW framework (MODFLOW-USG) allows application of regional models to address local problems. A “semi-structured” approach (uniform lateral spacing within layers, different lateral spacing among layers) was tested using the LMB regional model. The parent 20-layer model with uniform 5000-foot (1524-m) lateral spacing was converted to 4 layers with 500-foot (152-m) spacing in the top glacial (Quaternary) layer, where surface water features are located, overlying coarser resolution layers representing deeper deposits. This semi-structured version of the LMB model reproduces regional flow conditions, whereas the finer resolution in the top layer improves the accuracy of the simulated response of surface water to shallow wells. One application of the semi-structured LMB model is to provide statistical measures of the correlation between modeled inputs and the simulated amount of water that wells derive from local surface water. The relations identified in this paper serve as the basis for metamodels to predict (with uncertainty) surface-water depletion in response to shallow pumping within and potentially beyond the modeled area, see Fienen et al. (2015a).

  17. Elderly people's perceptions of how they want to be cared for: an interview study with healthy elderly couples in Northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrefors, Christina; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2009-06-01

    Many countries encounter a demographic change where the number of elderly people will increase. As a result, the number of very old people needing care, services and medical assistance will increase. Care in the private home is often described as providing the best alternative for many elderly people. The aim of this study was to describe elderly people's perceptions of how they wanted to be cared for, from a perspective of becoming in need of assistance with personal care, in the future. Twelve couples of healthy elderly people living in a couple hood participated in an interview study. They were all 70 years and older and received no kind of professional care or social support. Open individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with the support of written vignettes. The vignettes were formed as scenarios that described three levels of caring needs where the elderly people would become ill. A qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The findings were interpreted in one main theme: maintaining the self and being cared for with dignity to the end. The theme was built from three categories: at home as long as possible, professional care at nursing home when advanced care is needed and fear of being abandoned. The categories reflect the perception that when minimum help was needed, care and support by the partner and nursing staff were preferred. As the scenarios changed to being totally dependent on care, they preferred care in a nursing home. There was a pervading concern of the risk of not being seen as an individual person and becoming a nobody with no meaningful relations. Thus, there must be a singular goal to support old people, in all stages of their lives, through the recognition and affirmation of self, and providing care with dignity to the end.

  18. Combining ability of twelve maize populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacaro Elton

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic progress depends on germplasm quality and breeding methods. Twelve maize populations and their crosses were evaluated to estimate combining ability and potential to be included as source populations in breeding programs. Plant height, point of insertion of the first ear, number of ears per plant, number of grains per ear, root and stalk lodging and grain yield were studied in two locations in Brazil, during the 1997/98 season. Genotype sum of squares was divided into general (GCA and specific (SCA combining ability. Results indicated the existence of genetic divergence for all traits analyzed, where additive effects were predominant. The high heterosis levels observed, mainly in Xanxerê, suggested the environmental influence on the manifestation of this genetic phenomenon. Populations revealed potential to be used in breeding programs; however, those more intensively submitted to selection could provide larger genetic progress, showing the importance of population improvement for the increment of the heterosis in maize.

  19. Interview with Keith Hart

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    One hour interview, filmed and interviewed by Alan Macfarlane, takes the life to 1984... Hopefully to be continued Interview of Keith Hart on 12th April 2006 at the Association of Social Anthropologists Conference at Keele University

  20. Getting added value from using qualitative research with randomized controlled trials: a qualitative interview study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Qualitative research is undertaken with randomized controlled trials of health interventions. Our aim was to explore the perceptions of researchers with experience of this endeavour to understand the added value of qualitative research to the trial in practice. Methods A telephone semi-structured interview study with 18 researchers with experience of undertaking the trial and/or the qualitative research. Results Interviewees described the added value of qualitative research for the...

  1. 'Good' and 'bad' deaths: Narratives and professional identities in interviews with hospice managers

    OpenAIRE

    Semino, E.; Demjén, Z.; Koller, V.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the formal and functional characteristics of narratives of 'good' and 'bad' deaths as they were told by 13 UK-based hospice managers in the course of semi-structured interviews. The interviewees' responses include a variety of remarkably consistent 'narratives of successful/frustrated intervention', which exhibit distinctive formal characteristics in terms of the starting point and core of the action, the choice of personal pronouns and metaphors, and the ways in which p...

  2. Prescribing for personality disorder: qualitative study of interviews with general and forensic consultant psychiatrists

    OpenAIRE

    Martean, Lawrence; Evans, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Aims and method To explore experiences of psychiatrists considering medication for patients with personality disorder by analysis of transcribed, semi-structured interviews with consultants. Results Themes show important relational processes in which not prescribing is expected to be experienced as uncaring rejection, and psychiatrists felt helpless and inadequate as doctors when unable to relieve symptoms by prescribing. Discontinuity in doctor-patient relationships compounds these problems....

  3. Commercializing Government-sponsored Innovations: Twelve Successful Buildings Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. A.; Berry, L. G.; Goel, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    This report examines the commercialization and use of R and D results funded by DOE's Office of Buildings and Community Systems (OBCS), an office that is dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings. Three goals guided the research described in this report: to improve understanding of the factors that hinder or facilitate the transfer of OBCS R and D results, to determine which technology transfer strategies are most effective and under what circumstances each is appropriate, and to document the market penetration and energy savings achieved by successfully-commercialized innovations that have received OBCS support. Twelve successfully-commercialized innovations are discussed here. The methodology employed involved a review of the literature, interviews with innovation program managers and industry personnel, and data collection from secondary sources. Six generic technology transfer strategies are also described. Of these, contracting R and D to industrial partners is found to be the most commonly used strategy in our case studies. The market penetration achieved to date by the innovations studied ranges from less than 1% to 100%. For the three innovations with the highest predicted levels of energy savings (i.e., the flame retention head oil burner, low-E windows, and solid-state ballasts), combined cumulative savings by the year 2000 are likely to approach 2 quads. To date the energy savings for these three innovations have been about 0.2 quads. Our case studies illustrate the important role federal agencies can play in commercializing new technologies.

  4. Twelve tips for getting your manuscript published.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A

    2016-01-01

    The author shares twelve practical tips on how to navigate the process of getting a manuscript published. These tips, which apply to all fields of academic writing, advise that during the initial preparation phase authors should: (1) plan early to get it out the door; (2) address authorship and writing group expectations up front; (3) maintain control of the writing; (4) ensure complete reporting; (5) use electronic reference management software; (6) polish carefully before they submit; (7) select the right journal; and (8) follow journal instructions precisely. Rejection after the first submission is likely, and when this occurs authors should (9) get it back out the door quickly, but first (10) take seriously all reviewer and editor suggestions. Finally, when the invitation comes to revise and resubmit, authors should (11) respond carefully to every reviewer suggestion, even if they disagree, and (12) get input from others as they revise. The author also shares detailed suggestions on the creation of effective tables and figures, and on how to respond to reviewer critiques.

  5. Antifouling activity of twelve demosponges from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM. Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Benthic marine organisms are constantly exposed to fouling, which is harmful to most host species. Thus, the production of secondary metabolites containing antifouling properties is an important ecological advantage for sessile organisms and may also provide leading compounds for the development of antifouling paints. High antifouling potential of sponges has been demonstrated in the Indian and Pacific oceans and in the Caribbean and Mediterranean seas. Brazilian sponges remain understudied concerning antifouling activities. Only two scientific articles reported this activity in sponges of Brazil. The objective of this study was to test crude extracts of twelve species of sponges from Brazil against the attachment of the mussel Perna perna through laboratorial assays, and highlight promising species for future studies. The species Petromica citrina, Amphimedon viridis, Desmapsamma anchorata, Chondrosia sp., Polymastia janeirensis, Tedania ignis, Aplysina fulva, Mycale angulosa, Hymeniacidon heliophila, Dysidea etheria, Tethya rubra, and Tethya maza were frozen and freeze-dried before extraction with acetone or dichloromethane. The crude extract of four species significantly inhibited the attachment of byssus: Tethya rubra (p = 0.0009, Tethya maza (p = 0.0039, Petromica citrina (p = 0.0277, and Hymeniacidon heliophila (p = 0.00003. These species, specially, should be the target of future studies to detail the substances involved in the ability antifouling well as to define its amplitude of action.

  6. Twelve Elastic Constants of Betula platyphylla Suk.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liyu; Lu Zhenyou

    2004-01-01

    Wood elastic constants are needed to describe the elastic behaviors of wood and be taken as an important design parameter for wood-based composite materials and structural materials. This paper clarified the relationships between compliance coefficients and engineering elastic constants combined with orthotropic properties of wood, and twelve elastic constants of Betula platyphylla Suk. were measured by electrical strain gauges. Spreading the adhesive quantity cannot be excessive or too little when the strain flakes were glued. If excessive, the glue layer was too thick which would influence the strain flakes' performance, and if too little, glues plastered were not firm, which could not accurately transmit the strain. Wood as an orthotropic material, its modulus of elasticity and poisson's ratios are related by two formulas:μij /Ei =μji /Ej and μij 0.95) between the reciprocal of elastic modulus MOE-1 and the square of the ratio of depth to length (h/l)2, which indicate that shear modulus values measured were reliable by three point bending experiment.

  7. Postgraduate career intentions of medical students and recent graduates in Malawi: a qualitative interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Nicola

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, the Malawian Ministry of Health declared a human resource crisis and launched a six year Emergency Human Resources Programme. This included salary supplements for key health workers and a tripling of doctors in training. By 2010, the number of medical graduates had doubled and significantly more doctors were working in rural district hospitals. Yet there has been little research into the views of this next generation of doctors in Malawi, who are crucial to the continuing success of the programme. The aim of this study was to explore the factors influencing the career plans of medical students and recent graduates with regard to four policy-relevant aspects: emigration outside Malawi; working at district level; private sector employment and postgraduate specialisation. Methods Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with fourth year medical students and first year graduates, recruited through purposive and snowball sampling. Key informant interviews were also carried out with medical school faculty. Recordings were transcribed and analysed using a framework approach. Results Opportunities for postgraduate training emerged as the most important factor in participants’ career choices, with specialisation seen as vital to career progression. All participants intended to work in Malawi in the long term, after a period of time outside the country. For nearly all participants, this was in the pursuit of postgraduate study rather than higher salaries. In general, medical students and young doctors were enthusiastic about working at district level, although this is curtailed by their desire for specialist training and frustration with resource shortages. There is currently little intention to move into the private sector. Conclusions Future resourcing of postgraduate training opportunities is crucial to preventing emigration as graduate numbers increase. The lesser importance put on salary by younger doctors may

  8. Children with Autism Understand Indirect Speech Acts: Evidence from a Semi-Structured Act-Out Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissine, Mikhail; Cano-Chervel, Julie; Carlier, Sophie; De Brabanter, Philippe; Ducenne, Lesley; Pairon, Marie-Charlotte; Deconinck, Nicolas; Delvenne, Véronique; Leybaert, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are often said to present a global pragmatic impairment. However, there is some observational evidence that context-based comprehension of indirect requests may be preserved in autism. In order to provide experimental confirmation to this hypothesis, indirect speech act comprehension was tested in a group of 15 children with autism between 7 and 12 years and a group of 20 typically developing children between 2:7 and 3:6 years. The aim of the study was to determine whether children with autism can display genuinely contextual understanding of indirect requests. The experiment consisted of a three-pronged semi-structured task involving Mr Potato Head. In the first phase a declarative sentence was uttered by one adult as an instruction to put a garment on a Mr Potato Head toy; in the second the same sentence was uttered as a comment on a picture by another speaker; in the third phase the same sentence was uttered as a comment on a picture by the first speaker. Children with autism complied with the indirect request in the first phase and demonstrated the capacity to inhibit the directive interpretation in phases 2 and 3. TD children had some difficulty in understanding the indirect instruction in phase 1. These results call for a more nuanced view of pragmatic dysfunction in autism.

  9. Hepatic Angiosarcoma: a Review of Twelve Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Li; Xishan Hao

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hepatic angiosarcoma (HAS), a lethal disease, is the most common sarcoma arising in the liver. Little information about the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and management of HAS has been reported. Increased familiarity with this disease will facilitate correct diagnosis and help to improve management of this condition in the future.The objective of this study was to describe cases of hepatic angiosarcoma and to discuss the etiologic, diagnostic, therapeutic features and prognosis of this tumor. This report not only serves to give more evidence of the relationship between hepatic angiosarcoma and carcinogenic exposure, but also demonstrates the key points in different methods of diagnosis and the optimal treatment of hepatic angiosarcoma.METHODS Twelve cases of hepatic angiosareoma were analyzed retrospectively, representing the different character in clinical presentations and laboratory computed tomographical scans; pathological data and treatment are described. Clinical and biologic follow-up was carried out for two years after surgical treatment.RESULTS There were nine men and three women varying in ages from 57 to 71 years with an average of 64.3 years. Ten patientshad a history of exposure to vinyl chloride or thorotrast. Mild or moderate abdominal pain and bloating, abdominal mass and fever were the common clinical presentations. Tumors were visualized by ultrasonography and CT scans in all patients. Biochemical profiles yielded variable results and proved to be of little value in detection or diagnosis. Surgical resection was feasible for each patient who was treated as follows: two wedge resections, six segementectomies and four bisegmentectomies. Five patients received Neoadjuvant chemotherapy postoperatively. The survival rate of those cases was poor. The maximum survival time was fourteen months. The mean survival time for this chemotherapeutic group was 11 months. The difference between the survival time of those treated with an operation

  10. Interview without a subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2010-01-01

    for the accomplishment of interviews. The paper focuses on a discussion of theoretical and methodological considerations of design, approach and research strategy. These discussions are specified in relation to a project on gender and ethnicity in cultural encounters at Universities. In the paper, I introduce a research...... design named Cultural interviewing, present an approach to the design of interviews named Interview without a subject, and offer an analytic strategy directed towards the analysis of interview transcripts named Interview on the level of the signifier. The paper concludes that even though it is relevant...

  11. Interview als Text vs. Interview als Interaktion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnulf Deppermann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Das Interview ist nach wie vor das beliebteste sozialwissenschaftliche Verfahren des Datengewinns. Ökonomie der Erhebung, Vergleichbarkeit und die Möglichkeit, Einsicht in Praxisbereiche und historisch-biografische Dimensionen zu erhalten, die der direkten Beobachtung kaum zugänglich sind, machen seine Attraktivität aus. Zugleich mehren sich Kritiken, die seine Leistungsfähigkeit problematisieren, indem sie auf die begrenzte Reichweite der Explikationsfähigkeiten der Befragten, die Reaktivität der Erhebung oder die Differenz zwischen Handeln und dem Bericht über Handeln verweisen. Im Beitrag wird zwischen Ansätzen, die das Interview als Text, und solchen, die es als Interaktion verstehen, unterschieden. Nach dem Text-Verständnis werden Interviews unter inhaltlichen Gesichtspunkten analysiert und als Zugang zu einer vorgängigen sozialen oder psychischen Wirklichkeit angesehen. Das Interaktions-Verständnis versteht Interviews dagegen als situierte Praxis, in welcher im Hier und Jetzt von InterviewerInnen und Befragten gemeinsam soziale Sinnstrukturen hergestellt werden. Anhand ubiquitärer Phänomene der Interviewinteraktion – Fragen, Antworten und die Selbstpositionierung von InterviewerInnen und Befragten – werden Praktiken des interaktiv-performativen Handelns im Interview dargestellt. Ihre Relevanz für die Interviewkonstitution und ihre Erkenntnispotenziale für die Interviewauswertung werden aufgezeigt. Es wird dafür plädiert, die interaktive Konstitutionsweise von Interviews empirisch zu erforschen und methodisch konsequent zu berücksichtigen. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1303131

  12. Interview with Sandra Thompson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiung-chih

    1994-01-01

    Presents an interview of Sandra Thompson on various topics relating to the Chinese language. The interview touches on conversational data on Chinese, the lack of morphological complexity in Mandarin Chinese, and the development of Chinese functionalism. (12 references) (CK)

  13. Interview with Tony Wrigley

    OpenAIRE

    Wrigley, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Interviewed and filmed by Aslan Macfarlane on 23rd July 2007 at his house, edited by Sarah Harrison, lasts about one hour. Interview with the geographer and historical demography Sir Anthony Wrigley about his life and work

  14. Interview of Richard Keynes

    OpenAIRE

    Keynes, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Interviewed on 26th September 2007 by Alan Macfarlane at his home. Lasts about one hour. Interview of Richard Keynes, retired Professor of physiology at Cambridge and great grandson of Charles Darwin, on his life and work

  15. Interview of Stephen Cleobury

    OpenAIRE

    Cleobury, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Interviewed and filmed by Alan Macfarlane on 4th July 2008 and edited by Sarah Harrison An interview on the life and work of the musician Stephen Cleobury, Director of Music at King's College, Cambridge

  16. Commercializing government-sponsored innovations: Twelve successful buildings case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Goel, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    This report examines the commercialization and use of R and D results funded by DOE's Office of Buildings and Community Systems (OBCS), an office that is dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings. Three goals guided the research described in this report: to improve understanding of the factors that hinder or facilitate the transfer of OBCS R and D results, to determine which technology transfer strategies are most effective and under what circumstances each is appropriate, and to document the market penetration and energy savings achieved by successfully-commercialized innovations that have received OBCS support. Twelve successfully-commercialized innovations are discussed here. The methodology employed involved a review of the literature, interviews with innovation program managers and industry personnel, and data collection from secondary sources. Six generic technology transfer strategies are also described. Of these, contracting R and D to industrial partners is found to be the most commonly used strategy in our case studies. The market penetration achieved to date by the innovations studied ranges from less than 1% to 100%. For the three innovations with the highest predicted levels of energy savings (i.e., the flame retention head oil burner, low-E windows, and solid-state ballasts), combined cumulative savings by the year 2000 are likely to approach 2 quads. To date the energy savings for these three innovations have been about 0.2 quads. Our case studies illustrate the important role federal agencies can play in commercializing new technologies. 27 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Interview with John Milnor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This interview was given by Professor John Milnor in connection to the Abel Prize 2011 ceremony. Originally the interview appeared in the September issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society......This interview was given by Professor John Milnor in connection to the Abel Prize 2011 ceremony. Originally the interview appeared in the September issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society...

  18. Interview of Brian Harrison

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Interviewed on 21 June 2012 in his home by Alan Macfarlane and edited by Sarah Harrison. As well as the interview, there is an explanation of Professor Harrison's indexing system. Interview on the life and work of Professor Sir Brian Harrison

  19. Expertise among professional magicians: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Olli; Pitkänen, Petteri; Juvonen, Antti; Kuhn, Gustav; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to analyse interviews of highly regarded Finnish magicians. Social network analysis (N = 120) was used to identify Finland's most highly regarded magicians (N = 16). The selected participants' careers in professional magic and various aspects of their professional conduct were examined by relying on semi-structured interviews. The results revealed that cultivation of professional level competence in magic usually requires an extensive period of time compared with other domains of expertise. Magic is a unique performing art and it differs from other professions focusing on deceiving the audience. A distinctive feature of magical expertise is that the process takes place entirely through informal training supported by communities of magical practitioners. Three interrelated aspects of magical activity were distinguished: magic tricks, performance, and audience. Although magic tricks constitute a central aspect of magic activity, the participants did not talk about their tricks extensively; this is in accordance with the secretive nature of magic culture. The interviews revealed that a core aspect of the magicians' activity is performance in front of an audience that repeatedly validates competence cultivated through years of practice. The interviewees reported investing a great deal of effort in planning, orchestrating, and reflecting on their performances. Close interaction with the audience plays an important role in most interviewees' activity. Many participants put a great deal of effort in developing novel magic tricks. It is common to borrow magic effects from fellow magicians and develop novel methods of implementation. Because magic tricks or programs are not copyrighted, many interviewees considered "stealing" an unacceptable and unethical aspect of magical activity. The interviewees highlighted the importance of personality and charisma in the successful pursuit of magic activity.

  20. Navigation in Off-Road Environments: Orienteering Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Leslie A; Cuqlock-Knopp, Grayson

    1992-01-01

    Twelve orienteers and four military scouts each described a critical incident requiring navigation skills in off-road terrain. Interview analysis generated a taxonomy of the navigator's cognitive model encompassing perception and use of environmental cues, problem-solving and decision-making strategies, and skill level. Contains 38 references. (SV)

  1. Interview as intraviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kit Stender

    2014-01-01

    In this article I will illustrate how our understanding of the interview situation changes when we rethink it with some of the concepts from Karen Barad’s notion of agential realism. With concepts such as ‘apparatuses’, ‘phenomena‘, ‘intra-action’ and ‘material-discursive’ (Barad, 2007) it becomes...... possible to focus more extensively on how matter matters in the interview situation. Re-thinking the interview as an intraview1, I argue that Barad’s concepts will enhance our awareness not only of how the researcher affects the interview but also of how certain kinds of materiality in interview situations...

  2. The acceptance of the K-SADS-PL - potential predictors for the overall satisfaction of parents and interviewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuschek, Tina; Jaeger, Sonia; Stadelmann, Stephanie; Dölling, Katrin; Weis, Steffi; Von Klitzing, Kai; Grunewald, Madlen; Hiemisch, Andreas; Döhnert, Mirko

    2015-09-01

    The presented study investigated the interviewee (parents) and interviewer acceptance of the semi-structured diagnostic interview Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children Present Lifetime version (KSADS-PL; German version). Seventeen certified interviewers conducted 231 interviews (interviewers conducted several interviews; interviewees were only questioned once). Interviewees and interviewers anonymously rated their acceptance right after the interview was finished. The nested data structure was analysed regarding an individual interviewer bias and potential predictors of overall satisfaction. Therefore, factors improvable by interviewer training were included, as well as fixed factors which cannot be improved by professional training. The overall satisfaction was evaluated as highly positive with significant higher interviewee and interviewer ratings in the research as compared to the clinical recruitment setting. An individual bias of the interviewer on his or her own acceptance over time, but not on the evaluation of the corresponding interviewee was found. Neither the professional background nor the gender of the interviewer had a significant contribution in predicting these differences. The interviewer model showed no significant change over time and only the interview duration and the interviewee acceptance were significant predictors for interviewer overall satisfaction. Regarding the interviewee model, just the interviewer acceptance was a significant predictor. Copyright Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Interview as intraviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kit Stender

    2014-01-01

    In this article I will illustrate how our understanding of the interview situation changes when we rethink it with some of the concepts from Karen Barad’s notion of agential realism. With concepts such as ‘apparatuses’, ‘phenomena‘, ‘intra-action’ and ‘material-discursive’ (Barad, 2007) it becomes...... possible to focus more extensively on how matter matters in the interview situation. Re-thinking the interview as an intraview1, I argue that Barad’s concepts will enhance our awareness not only of how the researcher affects the interview but also of how certain kinds of materiality in interview situations...... do not merely refer to passive entities but must be understood as matter that matters. To illustrate my points I will analyse how bringing a puppet with me to interviews with 4-6 year old children seemed to interfere with the interview situation creating unforeseen diversions in ways that influenced...

  4. Coding interview questions concepts, problems, interview questions

    CERN Document Server

    Karumanchi, Narasimha

    2016-01-01

    Peeling Data Structures and Algorithms: * Programming puzzles for interviews * Campus Preparation * Degree/Masters Course Preparation * Instructor’s * GATE Preparation * Big job hunters: Microsoft, Google, Amazon, Yahoo, Flip Kart, Adobe, IBM Labs, Citrix, Mentor Graphics, NetApp, Oracle, Webaroo, De-Shaw, Success Factors, Face book, McAfee and many more * Reference Manual for working people

  5. Interview of Terry Doyle

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video productions

    2012-01-01

    An Interview with Terry Doyle, Director of Corporate Development, Nokia. This is part of a series of interviews organized by the SMS Interest Group of Strategy Practice, as part of the preparation for the 2013 SMS Special conference at Lake Geneva which is co-sponsored by ATLAS/CERN. For more information: http://geneva.strategicmanagement.net The purpose of the interviews is to provide input for academics, business practitioners and consultants about fundamental questions of strategy in enterprises.

  6. [Motivational interview: supporting change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fond, Guillaume; Ducasse, Déborah

    2015-01-01

    The motivational interview aims to help patients to resolve their ambivalence regarding problematic behaviors and to guide them into change. It differs from other therapeutic approaches mainly through the attitude of the therapist. In motivational interviewing, the therapist defends the statu quo. By reactance, the patient defends the change and enhance her/his motivation. This article provides a summary of the other concepts of motivational interviewing and its applications in the psychiatric daily practice.

  7. Interviewing to detect deception

    OpenAIRE

    Vrij, Aldert

    2014-01-01

    DePaulo et al.’s (2003) meta-analysis of verbal and nonverbal cues to deception showed that cues to deception are faint and unreliable. If liars do not spontaneously display diagnostic cues to deceit, a logical step is to make sure that investigators elicit or enhance such cues in interviews through specific interview technique. Such interview techniques were scarce in the nonverbal and verbal cues to deception domain, but recently researchers have developed alternative protocols that have th...

  8. Das Interview als Beziehungsraum

    OpenAIRE

    Tietel, Erhard

    2000-01-01

    Am Beispiel einer schwierigen Interviewbeziehung wird gezeigt, daß und in welcher Weise das Beziehungsgeschehen im Interview sowie die Verwendung des Beziehungsraums des Interviews durch den Befragten entscheidende heuristische Hinweise zum Aufspüren und Verstehen latenter Aspekte des Forschungsthemas geben können. Die im Interview stattfindende Reduktion des potentiell triadischen Beziehungsraums auf dyadisch-geschlossene Beziehungsebenen und der weitgehende Verlust des eigenen Spielraums un...

  9. How relatives of patients with head and neck cancer experience pain, disease progression and treatment: A qualitative interview study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study of relatives to patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with radiotherapy describes how the relatives experienced the patients situation, especially with respect to pain, and how the relatives themselves experienced the situation. Methods: Semi-structured interviews of 21 relatives to HNC patients who suffered from pain were conducted, and a qualitative content analysis was performed. Results: The relatives experienced that the patients suffered from physical, psy...

  10. Interviewing the moderator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2004-01-01

    of a one-on-one interview with the FG moderator by another member of the research team. The authors argue, with reference to a specific study, that interviewing the moderator adds a new and valuable dimension to group interviews used in research. They describe how this method came about and provide...... a concrete example of its use in a recently completed research project. They discuss several advantages of the interview, among them that it provides information about group interaction and participant behavior, and furnishes additional data on what is discussed when the tape recorder is turned off....

  11. Exploring Content Schemata Influence on L2 Reading: The Hunted Fox and Twelve and Not Stupid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amizura Hanadi Mohd Radzi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss the aspects of content schemata in second language reading among diploma level students who were taking a reading course in Universiti Teknologi MARA Perlis. In this qualitative case study, the researcher had selected two short stories that are categorized as content-familiar texts, i.e. The Hunted Fox and Twelve and Not Stupid. Six participants were asked to write a 150-word entry response on the short story and a grading criteria was used to assess the participants’ level of comprehension. An in-depth interview was also conducted on each participant. The entry responses and the interview patterns were analyzed to determine whether content schemata had contributed to the learners’ understanding of the text. This study discovered that content schemata had contributed to the learners’ understanding of the text because the learners’ comprehension was facilitated by their background knowledge on the content-familiar texts.

  12. Interview with Peggy Papp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Peggy Papp, a faculty member at the Ackerman Institute for the Family, where she is director of the Depression in Context Project. The Interview focuses on Papp's journey to becoming a marriage and family therapist and her role as a leader in field of feminist therapy. (GCP)

  13. Interview of Clifford Geertz

    OpenAIRE

    Geertz, Clifford

    2004-01-01

    Clifford Geertz interviewed by Alan Macfarlane in Cambridge, 6th May 2004, the interview lasts about two hours. Clifford Geertz talks of his childhood and education. He describes various important figures in American anthropology, and the influence of Weber. he describes his fieldwork in Indonesia and Morocco. He discusses what it is to be an anthropologist.

  14. Doing Dirty Interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Tanggaard, Lene

    in the position of a psychologist with past experiences within supervision and consultation/coaching. The framing of the interview was build around the theme “My role in keeping students out from dropping out of the Vocational Educational Training College.” We will discuss how both the interviewer...

  15. Legal Interviewing For Paralegals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statsky, William P.

    One of the training materials prepared for paralegals, or legal assistants, by the National Paralegal Institute under a Federal grant, the document presents legal interviewing techniques by focusing on an analysis of a particular legal interview conducted by a paralegal on a hypothetical case. From the analysis of the case, a number of problems,…

  16. Interview with Octavio Solis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yowell, Bob

    This interview with Mexican-American, Octavio Solis, considers that many facets of his education and experience in the theater. Solis, interviewed by Bob Yowell, Northern Arizona University Theatre Department faculty member and that campus' producer of Solis' play "El Paso Blue," touches on the importance of his acting experience when…

  17. The Dyadic Interview Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincoff, Michael Z.

    2004-01-01

    Interviewing skills are essential for managers and would-be managers. In the interview assignment described in this article, students develop such skills as they also learn communication theories, test those theories in practical applications, think critically, relate new to old information, and have fun. In this assignment, students are required…

  18. Interview of Emmanuel Marx

    OpenAIRE

    Marx, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    Interview of Emmanuel Marx by Dan Rabinowitz and Alan Macfarlane on 7th July 1983, about 20 minutes, poor sound Interview of Emmanuel Marx on his work in Israel, the influence of Emrys Peters and others, and his work among the Bedouin of the Sinai Desert. The future of Israeli anthropology.

  19. Interview, observation og dokumentanalyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maria Duclos

    2014-01-01

    Kapitlet giver et eksempel på hvordan man indenfor en mixed methods-tradition (metodekombination) kan kombinere interviews, dokumentanalyse og etnografiske observationer.......Kapitlet giver et eksempel på hvordan man indenfor en mixed methods-tradition (metodekombination) kan kombinere interviews, dokumentanalyse og etnografiske observationer....

  20. Winning the interviewing game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, M F

    2000-01-01

    Those who don't "interview well" are not likely to receive the job offer, despite their qualifications. A job interview is actually a fierce competitive activity that offers only two grades: an A or F. By nature, physicians are competitive; they like to win. Infrequent interviewees are prone to making easily corrected mistakes, such as showing no enthusiasm or having poor eye contact. The key for interviewing success is preparation--doing research, developing a personal statement, and role-playing practice interviews. View the interview as a sales call whose bottom-line goal is to achieve an offer, or at least to let you leave with the option to return for future discussions.

  1. Interview without a subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2010-01-01

    This article contributes to the rethinking of qualitative interview research into intercultural issues. It suggests that the application of poststructuralist thought should not be limited to the analysis of the interview material itself, but incorporate the choice of interviewees and the modaliti...... for research into intercultural issues to focus on gender and ethnicity, it has to de-center both, gender and ethnicity.......This article contributes to the rethinking of qualitative interview research into intercultural issues. It suggests that the application of poststructuralist thought should not be limited to the analysis of the interview material itself, but incorporate the choice of interviewees and the modalities...... for the accomplishment of interviews. The paper focuses on a discussion of theoretical and methodological considerations of design, approach and research strategy. These discussions are specified in relation to a project on gender and ethnicity in cultural encounters at Universities. In the paper, I introduce a research...

  2. Virtual Team and Trust Relationship: Focus Group Interviews in Multimedia Super Corridor Status Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norizah Aripin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the trust relationship in virtual teams in Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC status companies. The study used qualitative method that is phenomenology approach through focus group interviews. In-depth interview were also used with semi-structured and openended questions. The interviews involved six staffs at different position in virtual team (two team leaders, and four team members. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed according to the thematic analysis. Results showed that dimensions on virtual team trust relationship including interpersonal communication, personality, team members size, face-to-face meeting needs, safety information when discussing face-to-face in public places, and difficulty to recall interaction via video conferencing with other team members.

  3. The Individually Focused Interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Aksel Skovgaard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I argue—with an example—that under certain conditions replacement of audio transcriptions with a combination of simultaneously taken and jointly produced notes can be done without affecting reliability, validity, and transparency. These conditions are: (1) professional or otherwise...... relatively “strong” interviewees (interview persons: IPs) with diverse backgrounds; (2) thorough planning of the interview with well-focused themes; and (3) a thorough and repeated introduction to the interview. The omission of audio transcriptions is an obvious solution to the researcher who wants a breadth...

  4. Philosophical Hermeneutic Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne K. Vandermause PhD, RN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes, exemplifies and discusses the use of the philosophical hermeneutic interview and its distinguishing characteristics. Excerpts of interviews from a philosophical hermeneutic study are used to show how this particular phenomenological tradition is applied to research inquiry. The purpose of the article is to lay out the foundational background for philosophical hermeneutics in a way that clarifies its unique approach to interviewing and its usefulness for advancing health care knowledge. Implications for health care research and practice are addressed.

  5. What do midwives need to know about approaches of women towards labour pain management? A qualitative interview study into expectations of management of labour pain for pregnant women receiving midwife-led care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, T.; Mannien, J.; Jonge, A. de; Hutton, E.K.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to investigate factors important to women receiving midwife-led care with regard to their expectations for management of labour pain. DESIGN: semi-structured ante partum interviews and analyses using constant comparison method. PARTICIPANTS: fifteen pregnant women between 36 and 40 weeks

  6. Tips on writing by interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, S

    1995-01-01

    Personal interviews add spice to publications--a well-written interview can inspire as well as inform. Here are 17 tips on writing by interview that will come in handy whether you are interviewing one person or several.

  7. National Health Interview Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States...

  8. Life-history interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    across cultures and disciplines and for my work as a management consultant. Naturally, I would include the tool for my students in educational psychology when I began teaching a course on qualitative interviews last semester. Large was my surprise when I failed to find any references to the specific time...... line tool. I wondered where I had first read about this type of interview and looked through my old books on development research. While I was sure the inspiration came from Britha Mikkelsen’s Methods for Development Work and Research, I did not succeed in finding to find any instruction to the use......My first encounter with life history research was during my Ph.D. research. This concerned a multi-method study of nomadic mobility in Senegal. One method stood out as yielding the most interesting and in-depth data: life story interviews using a time line. I made interviews with the head...

  9. The twelve dimensional super (2+2)-brane

    CERN Document Server

    Hewson, S F

    1996-01-01

    We discuss supersymmetry in twelve dimensions and present a covariant supersymmetric action for a brane with worldsheet signature (2,2), called a super (2+2)-brane, propagating in the osp(64,12) superspace. This superspace is explicitly constructed, and is trivial in the sense that the spinorial part is a trivial bundle over spacetime, unlike the twisted superspace of usual Poincare supersymmetry. For consistency, it is necessary to take a projection of the superspace. This is the same as the projection required for worldvolume supersymmetry. Upon compactification of this superspace, a torsion is naturally introduced and we produce the membrane and type IIB string actions in 11 and 10 dimensional Minkowski spacetimes. In addition, the compactification of the twelve dimensional supersymmetry algebra produces the correct algebras for these theories, including central charges. These considerations thus give the type IIB string and M-theory a single twelve dimensional origin.

  10. Alcoholics anonymous and other twelve-step programs in recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detar, D Todd

    2011-03-01

    Recovery is a new way of life for many patients; a life without substances to alter their moods but with a major change improving the physical, psychological, and emotional stability with improved overall health outcomes. The Twelve Steps of the Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) are the foundation of the AA, describing both the necessary actions and the spiritual basis for the recovery program of the AA. The Twelve Steps of the AA provide a structure for which a patient with alcoholism may turn for an answer to their problem of alcohol use, abuse, or dependence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Experiences of carrying out talking therapy in general practice: a qualitative interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annette Sofie

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore GPs' experience of carrying out 'talking therapy'. METHODS: Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with 11 Danish GPs sampled purposively. The material was analysed by Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. RESULTS: The participants expressed difficulty...... developed over time, or more active therapeutic use of the relationship; (3) knowledge of the patient's life story, told or written, used to form a model of the patient's problems, thoughts and feelings. The sessions were not offered if the GPs lacked time. CONCLUSION: Participants were mostly self...

  12. The strong coupling regime of twelve flavors QCD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Tiago Nunes da; Pallante, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the results recently reported in Ref.[1] [A. Deuzeman, M.P. Lombardo, T. Nunes da Silva and E. Pallante,"The bulk transition of QCD with twelve flavors and the role of improvement"] for the SU(3) gauge theory with Nf=12 fundamental flavors, and we add some numerical evidence and theoret

  13. EFFORTS Technical annex for the twelve month progress report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Eriksen, Morten; Thomas christensen, Thomas Vennick;

    The present report is documentation for the work carried out at DTU during the second year of project activity. The report describes the work completed by DTU in general as well as on the active sub-tasks within materials properties, friction modelling and physical modelling, over the last twelve...

  14. Human Evolution in Science Textbooks from Twelve Different Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quessada, Marie-Pierre; Clement, Pierre; Oerke, Britta; Valente, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    What kinds of images of human beings illustrate human evolution in school textbooks? A comparison between the textbooks of eighteen different countries (twelve European countries and six non-European countries) was attempted. In six countries (Algeria, Malta, Morocco, Mozambique, Portugal, and Tunisia), we did not find any chapter on the topic of…

  15. Bibliography of Spanish Materials for Students, Grades Seven through Twelve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This annotated bibliography of Spanish materials for students in grades seven through twelve is divided into the following categories: (1) Art, Drama, Music, and Poetry; (2) Books in Series; (3) Culture; (4) Dictionaries and Encyclopedias; (5) Literature; (6) Mathematics; (7) Physical Education, Health, and Recreation; (8) Reading and Language…

  16. Dental Hygienists' Experiences with Motivational Interviewing: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry-Chiu, Margaret E; Catley, Delwyn; Voelker, Marsha A; Bray, Kimberly Krust

    2015-08-01

    The effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI) to change health behaviors is well documented. Previous studies support use of MI to change oral health behaviors in the areas of early childhood caries and periodontal diseases, but research is limited due to the sparse number of oral health care providers with training in MI. The University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) formally integrated MI training into its dental hygiene curriculum five years ago. Summative program evaluation of UMKC's MI training shows that it effectively equips graduates with MI skills. The aim of this qualitative study was to use semi-structured interviews with nine program alumni to provide insight into the experiences of MI-trained dental hygienists in clinical practice. All interviews were captured with a digital voice recorder, were transcribed, and were resubmitted to the interviewees for checking. Five themes emerged from the data analysis: salience, best practices, barriers, facilitators, and lessons learned. These dental hygienists strongly valued and embraced the spirit of MI. They reported feeling strongly that it should be part of all dental hygiene curricula, and they upheld MI as a best practice. The participants approved of their MI instruction as a whole but felt it was difficult and sometimes not viable in practice. They reported that MI training had improved their communication skills and increased treatment acceptance. Time, difficulty, and managing patient resistance were the most often cited barriers, while a supportive climate and creating a routine were the most often cited facilitators.

  17. Interview with Christoph Wulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Lindstrand

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the articles published in Designs for Learning, each issue will also include an interview with a person who is prominent within any of the fields that relate to the themes of the journal. The readers of this issue have already made acquaintance with professor Christoph Wulf through his article on mimetic learning. In the interview that follows we hope to give some further insights regarding interests and influences that form a background to his theoretical work. A further contextualisation of his article, so to speak.

  18. Interview with Hagen Keller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Guglielmotti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this interview addresses the cultural, social and political milieu that shaped Hagen Keller’s education in Germany, the relations with both his mentor Gerd Tellenbach and the other scholars; the approach to prosopography to understand the power structures. Then the interview examines the Roman experience in the Sixties (a scientific and also human one; the book Adelsherrschaft und ständische Gesellschaft and the debate that has attracted; the relationship between local history, regional history and general history; the Ottonian dynasty, the pragmatic use of writing and the symbolic communication; and finally how research is organized and evalueted in Germany.

  19. Everyday life for users of electric wheelchairs – a qualitative interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, Camilla Blach; Sørensen, Bodil; Jochumsen, Bente Würtz;

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore how users of electric wheelchairs experience their everyday life and how their electric wheelchairs influence their daily occupation. Occupation is defined as a personalized dynamic interaction between person, task and environment, and implies the valu...... of occupation and identity are influenced by using a wheelchair. This will assist professionals in supporting the users living an autonomous and meaningful life....... and meaning attached. Method: Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with experienced electric wheelchair users. ValMo was used as the theoretical framework for both interviewing and the analysis. The transcribed interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Findings revealed key elements...... in electric wheelchair users’ experience of how the use of a wheelchair influences everyday life and occupation. Four central themes emerged from the participants’ experiences 1) The functionality of the wheelchair, 2) The wheelchair as an extension of the body, 3) The wheelchair and social life, and 4...

  20. Does motivational interviewing improve retention or outcome in cognitive behaviour therapy for overweight and obese adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Leah

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether motivational interviewing improved retention and/or outcome in cognitive behaviour therapy for overweight and obese adolescents (M=14.4, SD=2.0; 52% female). The first 23 participants were allocated to a standard semi-structure assessment interview, the remaining 19 to a motivational interview, prior to commencing the intervention. The groups did not differ at baseline or on anthropometric (weight, BMI, BMI-z-score, waist circumference, waist-hip or waist-height ratio), body composition (percent body fat, fat mass, lean mass) or attrition measures post-treatment or post-maintenance (p>.01). MI did not improve retention or outcome of cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescent overweight and obesity.

  1. Research Tips: Interview Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffee, Dale T.

    2005-01-01

    Interviewing is a popular way of gathering qualitative research data because it is perceived as "talking," and talking is natural. This column discusses the type of interview most often used in educational evaluation: the semistructured interview. A semistructured interview means questions are predetermined, but the interviewer is free to ask for…

  2. Interview with Gianfranco Giuntoli

    OpenAIRE

    Giuntoli, G; Edwards, A.

    2011-01-01

    On Wednesday 14 December 2011, Gianfranco Giuntoli was interviewed by Andrew Edwards in his ‘drive show’ on BBC Leeds on the results of his study ‘Mental health, resilience and the recession in Bradford’ that was published in July by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

  3. Interviewing media workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Graf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is on the use of Niklas Luhmann’s systems theoretical approach in order to analyse interviews conducted with media workers concerning their experiences of ethnic diversity in newsrooms. Applying systems theory means constructing the interview as a social system and seeing the “data” as observations produced by the observer and not as representations of a reality. The first part of the article describes the interview methodology and the second part provides examples, from the current study, of how systems theory can be applied in order to analyse interviews. Using a difference-theoretical approach means looking at the distinctions the informants make when talking about their experiences. These main guiding distinctions can be summarised as immigrant background/competence as well as advantage/competence. Using the guiding distinction of inclusion/exclusion when interpreting the interviewees’ statements, the interdependencies of mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in newsrooms related to ethnic background can be examined.

  4. TECHNOS Interview: Esther Dyson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Mardell

    1997-01-01

    This interview with Esther Dyson, who is president and owner of EDventure Holdings which focuses on emerging information technology worldwide, discusses personal responsibility for technology; government's role; content ownership and intellectual property; Internet development; education and computers; parents' role in education; teacher…

  5. Interview with Mogens Jacobsen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2016-01-01

    environments, experience time, and develop identities individually and socially. Interviews with working media artists lend further perspectives on these cultural transformations. Drawing on cultural theory, new media art studies, human-computer interaction theory, and software studies, this cutting-edge book...

  6. Interview with Jessica Utts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Allan; Utts, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a transcript of author Allan Rossman's interview with Jessica Utts, Professor and Chair of Statistics at the University of California-Irvine. Utts is also a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and a recipient of a Founders Award from ASA. Additionally, she has been elected as President of ASA for the year 2016. The…

  7. Milton Friedman: "TECHNOS" Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TECHNOS, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This interview with Milton Friedman addresses his economic policies and how they might improve American public education. Highlights include teachers' unions and their negative impact on education, private schools and tax relief, the Edison Project, privatization of educational services, special needs students, California's Educational Freedom…

  8. Interview with Christine Franklin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Allan; Franklin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Chris Franklin is Senior Lecturer, Undergraduate Coordinator, and Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor of Statistics at the University of Georgia. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and received the USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013. This interview took place via email on August 16, 2013-October 9, 2013. Franklin…

  9. The Unstructured Clinical Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2010-01-01

    In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

  10. Interview with Pierre Deligne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Pierre Deligne is the recipient of the 2013 Abel Prize of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. This interview was conducted in May 2013 in conjunction with the Abel Prize celebration. The article originally appeared in the September 2013 issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical...

  11. The psychiatric interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Sass, Louis A; Parnas, Josef

    2012-01-01

    interview. We address the ontological status of pathological experience, the notions of symptom, sign, prototype and Gestalt, and the necessary second-person processes which are involved in converting the patient's experience (originally lived in the first-person perspective) into an "objective" (third...

  12. Forty Years of Forensic Interviewing of Children Suspected of Sexual Abuse, 1974–2014: Historical Benchmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Coulborn Faller

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the evolution of forensic interviewing as a method to determine whether or not a child has been sexually abused, focusing primarily on the United States. It notes that forensic interviewing practices are challenged to successfully identify children who have been sexually abused and successfully exclude children who have not been sexually abused. It describes models for child sexual abuse investigation, early writings and practices related to child interviews, and the development of forensic interview structures from scripted, to semi-structured, to flexible. The article discusses the controversies related appropriate questions and the use of media (e.g., anatomical dolls and drawings. It summarizes the characteristics of four important interview structures and describes their impact of the field of forensic interviewing. The article describes forensic interview training and the challenge of implementing training in forensic practice. The article concludes with a summary of progress and remaining controversies and with future challenges for the field of forensic interviewing.

  13. Scaling Out and Evaluation of OBSecAn, an Automated Section Annotator for Semi-Structured Clinical Documents, on a Large VA Clinical Corpus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Le-Thuy T; Divita, Guy; Redd, Andrew; Carter, Marjorie E; Samore, Matthew; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2015-01-01

    "Identifying and labeling" (annotating) sections improves the effectiveness of extracting information stored in the free text of clinical documents. OBSecAn, an automated ontology-based section annotator, was developed to identify and label sections of semi-structured clinical documents from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In the first step, the algorithm reads and parses the document to obtain and store information regarding sections into a structure that supports the hierarchy of sections. The second stage detects and makes correction to errors in the parsed structure. The third stage produces the section annotation output using the final parsed tree. In this study, we present the OBSecAn method and its scale to a million document corpus and evaluate its performance in identifying family history sections. We identify high yield sections for this use case from note titles such as primary care and demonstrate a median rate of 99% in correctly identifying a family history section.

  14. Twelve Theses on Reactive Rules for the Web

    OpenAIRE

    Bry, François; Eckert, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Reactivity, the ability to detect and react to events, is an essential functionality in many information systems. In particular, Web systems such as online marketplaces, adaptive (e.g., recommender) sys- tems, and Web services, react to events such as Web page updates or data posted to a server. This article investigates issues of relevance in designing high-level programming languages dedicated to reactivity on the Web. It presents twelve theses on features desira...

  15. Creativity in ethnographic interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    2014-01-01

    making drew on ideologies, norms and values central to the field and thereby the strategies employed by the informants as well as by the researcher could be seen as wayfaring strategies; creating the paths in the field as they go along. Such an approach to interviews opens up the creative character...... of knowledge production and points out the role of the researcher as an active participant in the creative process....

  16. Amalia Ballarino s interview

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Interview to Amalia Ballarino (CERN, TE) on the development of new electric power cables based on the superconducting material magnesium diboride (MgB2) for the Hi-Lumi LHC and for the transport of electricity from clean power plants . The development was carried out in collaboration with a team led by prof. Carlo Rubbia at the IASS (Institute for Advanced Sustainable Studies), Potsdam, Germany.

  17. Creativity in ethnographic interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    2014-01-01

    making drew on ideologies, norms and values central to the field and thereby the strategies employed by the informants as well as by the researcher could be seen as wayfaring strategies; creating the paths in the field as they go along. Such an approach to interviews opens up the creative character...... of knowledge production and points out the role of the researcher as an active participant in the creative process....

  18. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The calendar for the 2002/2003 annual interview programme is confirmed as normally from 15 November 2002 to 15 February 2002 as foreseen in Administrative Circular N° 26 (rev. 2). However, where it is preferred to be as close as possible to 12 months since the last interview, supervisors and staff concerned may agree to the interview taking place up to 15 March 2003. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of divisional re-restructurings and detachments this year. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage leads directly to the page with the form. In collaboration with AS Division, the MAPS form including the personal data for the first page can be generated via the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application. For this exercise each staff member can now generate his/her own MAPS form. Information about how to do this is available here. Human Resources Division Tel. ...

  19. 基于半结构特征分割的 Web数据挖掘算法%Web Data Mining Algorithm Based on Semi Structure Feature Segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽萍

    2015-01-01

    提出一种基于半结构特征分割的Web数据挖掘算法。进行Web热点数据的信息流信号模型构建,对Web热点信息流进行包络特征分解,为了提高数据挖掘的纯度和抗干扰性能,采用前馈调制滤波器进行数据干扰滤波,采用半结构特征分割进行Web热点数据的特征提取,实现数据挖掘算法改进。仿真结果表明,采用该算法能提高对Web数据特征的检测性性能,数据挖掘中受到的旁瓣干扰较小,挖掘精度较高,性能优于传统算法。%A Web data mining algorithm based on semi structure feature segmentation is proposed .The information stream signal model of Web hot date is constructed and the characteristic erwelope decomposition of Web hot information stream is finished ,in order to improve the purity of data mining and the anti‐interference performance by feedforward filter modulation data interference filter ,using semi structural feature segmentation for web hot number according to feature extraction . The data mining algorithm is realized . Simulation results show that the new algorithm can improve the detection capability of characteristics of Web data , data mining has little sidelobe interference ,mining precision is high ,performance is better than traditional algorithm .

  20. Students’ views about computer use: Interviews with 8th graders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Şahin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to explore 8th grade students’ computer use in this research. We carried out the research at Yaşar Doğu Elementary School in Kavak, a district of Samsun province in Turkey. We implemented semi-structured interviews to collect the data. We selected our sample from among volunteers of 3 different classes, striving to select students with different characteristics. Our study group consisted of 3 girls and 4 boys. We recorded interviews with a video camera. We found that students have Internet access in the home; they learn to use computers from their family members and relatives; they think computers positively affect their social lives; they mostly use computers on recreational days; they mostly use computers for fun, although they also do homework and online assignments with computers and the Internet; they do not follow any electronic media or publications; and they think that only their mothers lack knowledge about computers among the family members.

  1. Perceptions of clinicians and staff about the use of digital technology in primary care: qualitative interviews prior to implementation of a computer-facilitated 5As intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nápoles, Anna María; Appelle, Nicole; Kalkhoran, Sara; Vijayaraghavan, Maya; Alvarado, Nicholas; Satterfield, Jason

    2016-04-19

    Digital health interventions using hybrid delivery models may offer efficient alternatives to traditional behavioral counseling by addressing obstacles of time, resources, and knowledge. Using a computer-facilitated 5As (ask, advise, assess, assist, arrange) model as an example (CF5As), we aimed to identify factors from the perspectives of primary care providers and clinical staff that were likely to influence introduction of digital technology and a CF5As smoking cessation counseling intervention. In the CF5As model, patients self-administer a tablet intervention that provides 5As smoking cessation counseling, produces patient and provider handouts recommending next steps, and is followed by a patient-provider encounter to reinforce key cessation messages, provide assistance, and arrange follow-up. Semi-structured in-person interviews of administrative and clinical staff and primary care providers from three primary care clinics. Thirty-five interviews were completed (12 administrative staff, ten clinical staff, and 13 primary care providers). Twelve were from an academic internal medicine practice, 12 from a public hospital academic general medicine clinic, and 11 from a public hospital HIV clinic. Most were women (91 %); mean age (SD) was 42 years (11.1). Perceived usefulness of the CF5As focused on its relevance for various health behavior counseling purposes, potential gains in counseling efficiency, confidentiality of data collection, occupying patients while waiting, and serving as a cue to action. Perceived ease of use was viewed to depend on the ability to accommodate: clinic workflow; heavy patient volumes; and patient characterisitics, e.g., low literacy. Social norms potentially affecting implementation included beliefs in the promise/burden of technology, priority of smoking cessation counseling relative to other patient needs, and perception of CF5As as just "one more thing to do" in an overburdened system. The most frequently cited facilitating

  2. Intersubjectivity in video interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddouk, Lise

    2014-01-01

    The concept of relationship has rapidly evolved over the past few years, since the emergence of the internet network and the development of remote communication and exchanges. The emergence of cyberculture with the development of the internet has led to a new representation of the social link, in which communication never stops. In this context, computer mediated intersubjective relationships represent a main line of thinking and research. Thus, can we consider for example that relationship is only composed of an informational exchange? Would there be other dimensions possibly missing in computer mediated relationships? In this case, how could we re-introduce these aspects, "re-humanize" the remote relationships? New practices in psychology emerge with the ICT usage, both in the fields of research and for therapeutic purposes. Some fields like medicine already use remote health platforms that have proven useful in certain situations. In the field of remote clinical psychology, different media are used that contribute to the framework definition of the remote clinical interview, where the concept of relation holds a central place. Videoconference enables the introduction of an important element from the point of view of sensoriality: the body image, which engages the subjects' interaction in a different way than in a written or verbal exchange. But is the use of videoconference sufficient to establish a clinical framework comparable to the traditional one? How can the computer-mediated relationship enable and establish a potential object relation, rather than a mirrored one? Thinking through an online adaptation of the clinical interview framework led to the elaboration of a specific tool dedicated to this purpose and to research into the access to intersubjectivity in clinical video interview. This study's encouraging results have fostered the pursuit of this experience in the form of a platform dedicated to the conduction of clinical interviews through

  3. Interview: Dale Whittaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Sliker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An interview with A. Dale Whittaker, professor in Purdue's College of Agriculture and vice provost for undergraduate academic affairs. At Purdue, he leads undergraduate education, admissions, enrollment management, academic planning, program evaluation, and general academic policy development and implementation. Dr. Whittaker has been involved in numerous college- and university-wide committees. He has worked with the state and other state-supported universities to develop courses that introduce college-bound students to the science of agriculture. And he has collaborated with Ivy Tech, Vincennes University and the Commission for Higher Education to develop associate programs in agriculture that transfer to Purdue or meet work force needs.

  4. Interview: Joseph Agassi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Agassi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Agassi is an Israeli scholar born in Jerusalem on May 7, 1927. He has many books and articles published contributing to the fields of logic, scientific method, foundations of sciences, epistemology and, most importantly for this Journal, in the historiography of science. He studied with Karl Popper, who was definitely his biggest influence. He taught around the world in different universities. He currently lives in Herzliya, Israel. For his important contribution to the historiography of science, we chose to open the first issue of this journal with this interview recognizing his importance for the field, as well as paying our homage to him.

  5. Interview With Jean Laplanche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplanche, Jean; Danon, Gisèle; Lauru, Didier

    2015-10-01

    The starting point for this interview with Jean Laplanche is a question regarding the place of infantile sexuality within psychoanalysis today. Laplanche begins by underscoring the audaciousness of Freud's characterization of infantile sexuality and the significance of the expansion of the field of "the sexual" that this characterization entails. He goes on to outline his celebrated "general theory of seduction." In doing so he explains key terms associated with it, such as the "enigmatic message" and the "fundamental anthropological situation," and clarifies how the theory seeks to account for sexuality in the expanded sense. In particular, Laplanche stresses the intersubjective origins of "drive" sexuality in infancy, its chaotic evolution, its unique economic mode of functioning, and its subsequent conflict with innate "instinctual" sexual impulses that surge forth at puberty. He also positions the general theory of seduction in relation to the important advances made by attachment theory in the field of the adult-child relationship. Throughout the interview, the discussion touches on social contexts, and at points Laplanche outlines positions on topical concerns connected to education, media, and the law, and the importance of rethinking certain psychoanalytic paradigms in an age of new family structures that do not correspond to the nuclear unit.

  6. Interview with Karol Modzelewski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Guglielmotti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The first section of this interview addresses the political and cultural milieu that shaped Karol Modzelewski’s education (in Poland and Italy, too, the relations with both his mentor Aleksander Gieysztor and the historians of the previous generation, the condition of education in Poland especially in the ’60s, his political involvement, the selection of his research interests and the development the latter underwent. Then the interview examines Modzelewski’s relations with scholars belonging to other historiographical schools, with particular attention to the issue of ethnogenesis, the methodology concerning the structure of sources to reconstruct the history of the Barbarian world in the first millennium, the matter of the “Barbaric collectivism”, the reception of his study L’Europa dei barbari (‘The Europe of the Barbarians’, 2004, and finally how research is organized and evaluated in Poland. Quotable as Intervista a Karol Modzelewski, a cura di Paola Guglielmotti e Gian Maria Varanini, "Reti Medievali - Rivista", 11, 1 (2010, p. 509-579, url: .

  7. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For the performance appraisal of reference year 2003, the interview calendar has been fixed between 1 January and 31 March 2004. This new calendar gives a better time schedule to the supervisors to conduct the interviews. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of the new CERN structure as from 2004. With this later time limit, the new departments are invited to strictly respect the target date of 31 March. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage: http://cern.ch/hr-div will lead directly to the page with the form. The personal data for the first page of the form can be generated by each divisional hierarchy, by the Divisional Administrative Officer (DAO) or by the staff member himself via HRT. Following discussions about the first two years of MAPS, and in order to improve the performance appraisal process, some modifications have been brought to section 2 (Assessme...

  8. The twelve theses: a call to a new reformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Shelby Spong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available With every discovery emerging from the world of science over the last 500 years concerning the origins of the universe and of life itself, the traditional explanations offered by the Christian Church appeared to be more and more dated and irrelevant.  Christian leaders, unable to embrace the knowledge revolution seemed to believe  that the only way to save Christianity was not to disturb the old patterns either by listening to, much less by entertaining the new knowledge. I tried to articulate this challenge in a book entitled: Why Christianity Must Change or Die, published in 1998.  In that book I examined in detail the issues that I was convinced Christianity must address. Shortly after that book was published I reduced its content to twelve theses, which I attached in Luther-like fashion to the great doors on the Chapel of Mansfield College at Oxford University in the United Kingdom. I then mailed copies of those Twelve Theses to every acknowledged Christian leader of the world. It was an attempt to call them into a debate on the real issues that I was certain the Christian Church now faced.  I framed my twelve theses in the boldest, most provocative language possible, designed primarily to elicit response and debate. I welcome responses from Christians everywhere.  I claim no expertise or certainty in developing answers, but I am quite confident that I do understand the problems we are facing as Christians who are seeking to relate to the 21st century.

  9. Interview: Drew Feustel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Sliker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An interview with Andrew J. (Drew Feustel, Purdue alum, geophysicist and NASA astronaut. Dr. Feustel's first spaceflight in May 2009 (STS-125 repaired the Hubble Space Telescope. His second spaceflight in May 2011 (STS-134 was the penultimate journey of the Space Shuttle program. At Purdue University, Feustel served as a Residence Hall Counselor for two years at Cary Quadrangle and he was a Research Assistant and Teaching Assistant in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. His MS thesis investigated physical property measurements of rock specimens under elevated hydrostatic pressures simulating Earth’s deep crustal environments. While at Purdue, Feustel served for three years as Grand Prix Chairman and team Kart driver for Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity.

  10. Interviews within experimental frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, CarrieLynn D.

    2010-01-01

    -subjects experimental design served as the framework for the study, while in-depth qualitative interviews were employed alongside surveys and audio and video recording as the data collection methods.  Data collection occurred while participants were engaging with the media products, via talk aloud protocols......As virtual worlds become increasingly utilized for purposes of entertainment, information and retail, how people understand, think, feel, act and make decisions about them likewise become important research considerations.  This essay reports on the methodology and methods used to study these sense......-making processes in relatively inexperienced people as they engage with virtual worlds.  In order to understand the sense-making of virtual worlds, a method to record the interpretive process, as well as physical actions, was required.  In order to understand the sense-making processes involved in new experiences...

  11. Interview with Clive Phillpot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Maroto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Clive Phillpot is an English curator, writer, and librarian. Between 1977 and 1994 he was the Director of the Library at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA in New York, where he founded and curated the Artist Book´s Collection. Previously, he was the librarian at the Chelsea School of Art in London. He has written and edited numerous articles and books on the topic of the artist’s book, whose concept he decisively contributed to define. In the 1960s and 1970s the artist’s book emerged as an accessible art medium by being cheap, portable, and mass distributed. In this interview I try to learn whether those expectations have survived, updated and transformed in the contemporary phenomenon of the artist’s novel.

  12. Motivational Interviewing and Adolescent Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilallo, John J.; Weiss, Gony

    2009-01-01

    The use of motivational interviewing strategies in the practice of adolescent psychopharmacology is described. Motivational interviewing is an efficient and collaborative style of clinical interaction and this helps adolescent patients to integrate their psychiatric difficulties into a more resilient identity.

  13. news interview talk: Organisational properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    language practices that govern the organisation of news interview talk ..... second principle - that of recipient design - stipulates that a descriptive item must be ..... design language activities for South African business-news interviewer trainees.

  14. Planning for the Job Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Elizabeth, Ed.; Ramsey, Katherine, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Offers advice from middle school educators (a principal, a supervisor, and a teacher) on job interviews for teaching positions: how applicants are selected from the stack of applications, what happens during an interview, and what truly makes a difference. (SR)

  15. Facing mortality: a qualitative in-depth interview study on illness perception, lay theories and coping strategies of adult patients with acute leukemia 1 week after diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigsmann, Michael; Koehler, Katharina; Regner, Andreas; Franke, Astrid; Frommer, Jörg

    2006-09-01

    In patients with acute leukemia we investigated the illness perceptions, lay theories and coping strategies 1 week after diagnosis. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 12 patients. The transcribed interviews were analyzed by methods of qualitative research. Dramatic narrations of overwhelming threat in younger patients contrast to rationalization in elderly patients. Feelings of helplessness and efforts of normalization become apparent. Intense descriptions of physical injury due to invasive procedures allow verbalizing the fear of the disease. While coping strategies are complex, the overall importance of trust is recognized. Mortal fears are indirectly indicated. The results have consequences for psycho-oncological training and patient education.

  16. THE WRITTEN DISCOURSE OF INTERVIEWING STYLE FOR A MAGAZINE INTERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Barrot

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper examines the written discourse of interviewing style for the purpose of print publication. Specifically, this paper sought to describe and explain the phases of interviewing procedures, the typology of the questions, and the transitional strategies executed by Oprah Winfrey during her interviews for O Magazine. One hundred and ten (110 response-soliciting statements were subjected to discourse analytic procedure to determine the features of such utterances. The results showed that her interview procedure follows a certain pattern that contributes to her ability to maintain the intimacy, familiarity, and dynamics of conversation. Further, results revealed that the interviewer employs a variety of response-soliciting strategies and transitional strategies that unconsciously put the control and authority in the conversation to the interviewees. Finally, some pedagogical implications were also presented for classroom use. Keywords: discourse analysis, interviewing style, interview questions, written discourse

  17. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Thos...... the findings of this study to a public health message, we have to consider moving the focus of falls prevention strategies from disease control to the domain of health promotion in order to engage older adults in preventive healthcare....

  18. Interview with Peter Jenni

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Newsletter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Jenni, former spokesperson of the ATLAS Collaboration, discusses the challenges and satisfactions from his long-standing career in high-energy physics in this month’s PH Newsletter.   Peter Jenni. Following a long career at CERN that dates back to 1970 (ranging from Summer Student to Fellow and to Staff), Peter Jenni recently retired after about 40 years marked by exciting discoveries (from the first two-photon production of eta-prime at SPEAR to the Higgs boson at the LHC). Peter was involved in the LHC from its very beginnings and was spokesperson of the ATLAS Collaboration until February 2009. Peter Jenni will continue working with ATLAS as a guest scientist with the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, and when he's not travelling he still spends most of his time in his office in Building 40, where he met with interviewer Panos Charitos. Panos Charitos: When did you first arrive to CERN? Peter Jenni: I first came to CERN as a Summer Student in ...

  19. The James Baldwin Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Bobia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available From Rosa Bobia’s The Critical Reception of James Baldwin in France (Peter Lang, 1998; and a special note of thanks to editor Stephen Mazur, Reprise reprints Bobia’s 1985 interview with Baldwin in Atlanta, shortly before his death in France in 1987. Here, as Bobia and Baldwin enter into a brief discussion of his perception of how he was received in France in the 1950s, Baldwin seems to embrace the fact that he was at that time in France largely unknown, an outsider: “I was a maverick.” In light of the fact that in his later years Baldwin came to speak French with great ease and to live comfortably in his home in France, it may seem surprising that his tone in these pages seems to suggest a hint of disinterest in how French critics perceived him—or perhaps it is simply indicative of his deeper affiliations, just as his final burial in the US seems to indicate.

  20. Interview with Benjamin Halligan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Bergamin Conter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin Halligan is Director of the Graduate Programme for the School of Media, Music and Performance at the University of Salford. His publications include Michael Reeves (Manchester University Press, 2003, Mark E. Smith and The Fall: Art, Music and Politics (Ashgate, 2010; co-edited with Michael Goddard, The Music Documentary: Acid Rock to Electropop (Routledge, 2013, co-edited with Rob Edgar and Kirsty Fairclough-Isaacs. He has published on disco music music and and science fiction, The Sarajevo Documentary School, Dušan Makavejev, Frank Zappa, Andrei Tarkovsky and the British Royal Family. Resonances: Noise and Contemporary Music, co-edited with Michael Goddard and Nicola Spelman, has been published by Bloomsbury in 2013, and is the companion volume to Reverberations: The Philsophy, Aesthetics and Politics of Noise (Continuum, 2013; co-edited with Michael Goddard and Paul Hegarty. The following interview occurred at The Cornerhouse, in the city of Manchester, England, in june 2013. Benjamin speaks about topics related to the two books he recently organized with co-workers at the University of Salford, Reverberations: the philosophy, aesthetics and politics of noise, and Resonances: noise and contemporary music.

  1. Segregated Groups or Inclusive Education? An Interview Study with Students Experiencing Failure in Reading and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Eva Heimdahl; Roll-Pettersson, Lise

    2007-01-01

    In this study a group of students with reading and writing difficulties relate their experiences of school to their expressed opinions concerning the possibilities of participation and influence in this setting. Twelve students at upper-level compulsory school or upper secondary school were interviewed. Mostly their reading and writing…

  2. Motivational interviewing and specialty pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Bruce A; Bertram, Carl T

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented in substance abuse and health care literature that motivational interviewing is an evidenced-based and effective intervention for influencing patient behaviors and associated positive health outcomes. The introduction of motivational interviewing training in specialty pharmacy has great potential to increase patient and pharmacist satisfaction, maximize adherence rates, and improve health outcomes. This commentary examines the need for effective approaches for improving patient adherence and outcomes and briefly describes the history and efficacy of motivational interviewing. Case studies using traditional approaches to patient care and motivational interviewing are analysed, and real-world experience using motivational interviewing is presented in the form of a specialty pharmacy case study.

  3. Twelve tips for teaching medical students with dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Sebastian Charles Keith; Anderson, John Leeds

    2017-07-01

    Dyslexia is a common learning difficulty. As a result of SS' own experiences as a medical student with dyslexia, we have been researching and teaching on this topic for the past two years. Here, we present twelve tips for teaching medical students with dyslexia. These are gathered from our personal experiences and research, discussions with other educators, and wider literature on the topic. This article aims to shed some light on dyslexia, and also to make practical suggestions. Teaching students with dyslexia should not be a daunting experience. Small changes to existing methods, at minor effort, can make a difference - for example, adding pastel colors to slide backgrounds or avoiding Serif fonts. These tips can help educators gain more insight into dyslexia and incorporate small, beneficial adaptations into their teaching.

  4. Antibacterial activities of extracts from twelve Centaurea species from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekeli Yener

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Centaurea (Asteraceae have been used in traditional plant-based medicine. The methanol extracts of twelve Centaurea species, of which five are endemic to Turkey flora, were screened for antibacterial activity against four bacteria (Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by the microdilution method and the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC of the extracts were determined. C. cariensis subsp. microlepis exhibited an antimicrobial effect on all tested microorganisms. The extracts from eight Centaurea species (C. balsamita, C. calolepis, C. cariensis subsp. maculiceps, C. cariensis subsp. microlepis, C. kotschyi var. kotschyi, C. solstitialis subsp. solstitialis, C. urvillei subsp. urvillei and C. virgata possessed antibacterial activity against several of the tested microorganisms.

  5. Twelve tips on how to compile a medical educator's portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Claudia Lucy; Wilson, Anthony; Agius, Steven

    2017-09-17

    Medical education is an expanding area of specialist interest for medical professionals. Whilst most doctors will be familiar with the compilation of clinical portfolios for scrutiny of their clinical practice and provision of public accountability, teaching portfolios used specifically to gather and demonstrate medical education activity remain uncommon in many non-academic settings. For aspiring and early career medical educators in particular, their value should not be underestimated. Such a medical educator's portfolio (MEP) is a unique compendium of evidence that is invaluable for appraisal, revalidation, and promotion. It can stimulate and provide direction for professional development, and is a rich source for personal reflection and learning. We recommend that all new and aspiring medical educators prepare an MEP, and suggest twelve tips on how to skillfully compile one.

  6. Spectroscopy of twelve Type Ia supernovae at intermediate redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Balland, C; Pain, R; Walton, N A; Amanullah, R; Astier, Pierre; Ellis, Richard S; Fabbro, S; Goobar, A; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Irwin, M J; McMahon, R M; Mendez, J M; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Sainton, G; Schahmaneche, K; Stanishev, V

    2005-01-01

    We present spectra of twelve Type Ia supernovae obtained in 1999 at the William Herschel Telescope and the Nordic Optical Telescope during a search for Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) at intermediate redshift. The spectra range from z=0.178 to z=0.493, including five high signal-to-noise ratio SN Ia spectra in the still largely unexplored range 0.15 < z < 0.3. Most of the spectra were obtained before or around restframe B-band maximum light. None of them shows the peculiar spectral features found in low-redshift over- or under-luminous SN Ia. Expansion velocities of characteristic spectral absorption features such as SiII at 6355 angs., SII at 5640 angs. and CaII at 3945 angs. are found consistent with their low-z SN Ia counterparts.

  7. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Schultz-Larsen, Kirsten; Fristrup, Tine

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Those...... who refused referral were recruited in relation to a systematic falls screening programme performed by preventive home visitors. Accepters were selected among 72 participants successively completing the falls assessment clinic programme. The time between the interviews was 12 months; different levels...... of knowledge were expected, owing to accepters’ participation in the programme. Interview transcriptions were thematically analysed. The analysis was directed towards identification of barriers to falls assessment. Results: Barriers to participation were categorized as being either within or outside the falls...

  8. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, L.; Schultz-Larsen, K.; Fristrup, T.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Those...... who refused referral were recruited in relation to a systematic falls screening programme performed by preventive home visitors. Accepters were selected among 72 participants successively completing the falls assessment clinic programme. The time between the interviews was 12 months; different levels...... of knowledge were expected, owing to accepters' participation in the programme. Interview transcriptions were thematically analysed. The analysis was directed towards identification of barriers to falls assessment. Results: Barriers to participation were categorized as being either within or outside the falls...

  9. Nutritional rehabilitation after ICU - does it happen: a qualitative interview and observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriweather, Judith; Smith, Pam; Walsh, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    To compare and contrast current nutritional rehabilitation practices against recommendations from National Institute for Health and Excellence guideline Rehabilitation after critical illness (NICE) (2009, http://www.nice.org.uk/cg83). Recovery from critical illness has gained increasing prominence over the last decade but there is remarkably little research relating to nutritional rehabilitation. The study is a qualitative study based on patient interviews and observations of ward practice. Seventeen patients were recruited into the study at discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU) of a large teaching hospital in central Scotland in 2011. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on transfer to the ward and weekly thereafter. Fourteen of these patients were followed up at three months post-ICU discharge, and a semi-structured interview was carried out. Observations of ward practice were carried out twice weekly for the duration of the ward stay. Current nutritional practice for post-intensive care patients did not reflect the recommendations from the NICE guideline. A number of organisational issues were identified as influencing nutritional care. These issues were categorised as ward culture, service-centred delivery of care and disjointed discharge planning. Their influence on nutritional care was compounded by the complex problems associated with critical illness. The NICE guideline provides few nutrition-specific recommendations for rehabilitation; however, current practice does not reflect the nutritional recommendations that are detailed in the rehabilitation care pathway. Nutritional care of post-ICU patients is problematic and strategies to overcome these issues need to be addressed in order to improve nutritional intake. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The Utilisation of Music by Casino Managers: An Interview Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramley, Stephanie; Dibben, Nicola; Rowe, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Music is ubiquitous in retail and commercial environments, with some managers believing that music can enhance the customer experience, increase footfall and sales and improve consumer satisfaction. Casino gambling is popular in the United Kingdom and anecdotal evidence suggests that music is often present. However, little is known about the rationale for music use from the perspective of casino managers. In this study semi-structured interviews were conducted with five casino managers to establish their motivations for utilising music, the factors informing their choice of music and the extent to which music is used with the intention of influencing gambling behaviour. Results showed that casino managers utilised two types of music-recorded background music, often sourced via external music supply companies and live music. Live music was often situated away from the gaming floor and used primarily to accompany participation in non-gambling activities. Recorded background music was not used with the direct aim of influencing customers' gambling behaviour, but to create the right atmosphere for gambling and to promote certain moods within the casinos. To achieve these aims casino managers manipulated the tempo, volume and genre of the recorded background music. Casino managers also reported that some gamblers listen to music via portable music players, possibly with the intention of customising their gambling experience. This study is unique as it has provided a first-hand account of casino managers' implicit theories with regards to why they utilise music and the roles which music is considered to fulfil in casinos.

  11. Adaptive coordination in surgical teams: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Perry, Juliana; Guggenheim, Merlin; Manser, Tanja

    2015-04-01

    Effective teamwork has been recognised as a major contributor to safe patient care in surgery. Previous research has highlighted the importance of adaptive coordination for effective performance in acute care settings. Expanding this line of research this study explores the coordination behaviours and adaptive coordination strategies employed by surgical teams and identifies relevant situational characteristics influencing those coordination processes. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of semi-structured interviews with 33 surgical team members (nurses and physicians) from different specialties and hospitals. We identified coordination behaviours (i.e. task management, information management, teaching and leadership) and adaptive coordination strategies triggered by varying requirements due to non-routine events, intraoperative complications and differing level of experience among operating room staff. Interviewees highlighted the importance of effectively managing challenging moments and the supporting effect of positive climate on teamwork. This study complements previous research on the non-technical skills underpinning safe performance in surgical teams. It highlights the central role of coordination and points out the ways in which situational variability requires the team to behave adaptively.

  12. Potential of semi-structural and non-structural adaptation strategies to reduce future flood risk: case study for the Meuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Poussin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Flood risk throughout Europe has increased in the last few decades, and is projected to increase further owing to continued development in flood-prone areas and climate change. In recent years, studies have shown that adequate undertaking of semi-structural and non-structural measures can considerably decrease the costs of floods for households. However, there is little insight into how such measures can decrease the risk beyond the local level, now and in the future. To gain such insights, a modelling framework using the Damagescanner model with land-use and inundation maps for 2000 and 2030 was developed and applied to the Meuse river basin, in the region of Limburg, in the southeast of the Netherlands. The research suggests that annual flood risk may increase by up to 185% by 2030 compared with 2000, as a result of combined land-use and climate changes. The independent contributions of climate change and land-use change to the simulated increase are 108% and 37%, respectively. The risk-reduction capacity of the implementation of spatial zoning measures, which are meant to limit and regulate developments in flood-prone areas, is between 25% and 45%. Mitigation factors applied to assess the potential impact of three mitigation strategies (dry-proofing, wet-proofing, and the combination of dry- and wet-proofing in residential areas show that these strategies have a risk-reduction capacity of between 21% and 40%, depending on their rate of implementation. Combining spatial zoning and mitigation measures could reduce the total increase in risk by up to 60%. Policy implications of these results are discussed. They focus on the undertaking of effective mitigation measures, and possible ways to increase their implementation by households.

  13. Motivational Interviewing by School Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ane; Bentsen, Peter; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    Interviewing. Second Edition. London. SAGE.Miller, W.R. & Rollnick, S. (1995). What is Motivational interviewing? Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 23(4), 325-34.Miller, W.R. & Rose, G.S. (2009). Toward a Theory of Motivational interviewing. American Psychologist, 64(6), 527-537. Morrison-Sandberg, L......Title: Motivational Interviewing by School Nurses: Spirit, Techniques, and Dilemmas in the Prevention of Child Obesity Introduction : School nurses play a central role in school-based, preventive health services in Denmark (National Board of Health, 2011), and they may play an important role...... a prevention strategy targeting children with a high risk of obesity with an intervention conducted by school nurses using motivational interviewing.Motivational interviewing is a counselling method to bring about behavioural change (Miller and Rollnick 1995). Effect has been documented for a range of problem...

  14. Interviewers' challenging questions in British broadcast debate interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmertsen, Sofie

    2007-01-01

    In recent years some British broadcast panel interviews take a particularly confrontational form. In these debate interviews, news seems to be generated as arguments provided by the interviewees who participate as protagonists of opposite positions. This paper will briefly attempt to show...

  15. Twelve novel Atm mutations identified in Chinese ataxia telangiectasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Lu; Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Fan; Xiao, Ying; Xia, Rongjun; Yuan, Xianhou; Yan, Mingshan

    2013-09-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized mainly by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, and immunodeficiency. This disease is caused by mutations of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) gene. More than 500 Atm mutations that are responsible for A-T have been identified so far. However, there have been very few A-T cases reported in China, and only two Chinese A-T patients have undergone Atm gene analysis. In order to systemically investigate A-T in China and map their Atm mutation spectrum, we recruited eight Chinese A-T patients from six unrelated families nationwide. Using direct sequencing of genomic DNA and the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, we identified twelve pathogenic Atm mutations, including one missense, four nonsense, five frameshift, one splicing, and one large genomic deletion. All the Atm mutations we identified were novel, and no homozygous mutation and founder-effect mutation were found. These results suggest that Atm mutations in Chinese populations are diverse and distinct largely from those in other ethnic areas.

  16. Oral papillary squamous cell carcinoma in twelve dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, A; Murphy, B G; Jordan, R C; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2014-01-01

    Papillary squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) is a distinct histological subtype of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), described in both dogs and man. In dogs, PSCC has long been considered a malignant oral tumour of very young animals, but it has recently been reported to occur in adult dogs as well. The aim of this study was to describe the major clinicopathological characteristics of canine oral PSCC (COPSCC). Twelve dogs diagnosed with COPSCC were included in this retrospective study (1990-2012). The majority (75%) of the dogs were >6 years of age (median age 9 years). All tumours were derived from the gingiva of dentate jaws, with 66.7% affecting the rostral aspects of the jaws. The gross appearance of the lesions varied, with one having an intraosseous component only. The majority (91.7%) of the tumours were advanced lesions (T2 and T3), but no local or distant metastases were noted. Microscopically, two patterns were seen: (1) invasion of bone forming a cup-shaped indentation in the bone or a deeply cavitating cyst within the bone (cavitating pattern), (2) histologically malignant growth, but lack of apparent bone invasion (non-cavitating pattern). The microscopical appearance corresponded to imaging findings in a majority of cases, with cavitating forms presenting with a cyst-like pattern of bone loss or an expansile mass on imaging and non-cavitating forms showing an infiltrative pattern of bone destruction on imaging. These features suggest two distinct biological behaviours of COPSCC.

  17. Sensitivity and growth of twelve Elatior begonia cultivars to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinert, R.A.; Nelson, P.V.

    1979-12-01

    Twelve cultivars of Elatior begonia (Begonia X hiemalis Fotsch.) were exposed to O/sub 3/ at 25 and 50 pphM. The 'Schwabenland' group, 'Whisper 'O' Pink', and 'Improved Krefeld Orange' were the most sensitive, whereas 'Ballerina', 'Mikkell Limelight', and 'Turo' were the least sensitive. 'Rennaisance', 'Heirloom' 'Nixe', and 'Fantasy' were intermediate in sensitivity. The dry weight of foliage (stems plus leaves) of 9 cultivars exposed to O/sub 3/ was significantly less than that of control plants. Ozone at 25 and 50 pphM inhibited flower growth (including peduncles) and development in 4 and 8 of the 12 cultivars, respectively. Differences in flower weight ranged from 43 to 105% of the control at 25 pphM and from 25 to 98% of the control at 50 pphM, depending on cultivar. 1 table.

  18. Twelve tips for designing and running longitudinal integrated clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel; Graves, Lisa; Berry, Sue; Myhre, Doug; Cummings, Beth-Ann; Konkin, Jill

    2013-12-01

    Longitudinal integrated clerkships (LICs) involve learners spending an extended time in a clinical setting (or a variety of interlinked clinical settings) where their clinical learning opportunities are interwoven through continuities of patient contact and care, continuities of assessment and supervision, and continuities of clinical and cultural learning. Our twelve tips are grounded in the lived experiences of designing, implementing, maintaining, and evaluating LICs, and in the extant literature on LICs. We consider: general issues (anticipated benefits and challenges associated with starting and running an LIC); logistical issues (how long each longitudinal experience should last, where it will take place, the number of learners who can be accommodated); and integration issues (how the LIC interfaces with the rest of the program, and the need for evaluation that aligns with the dynamics of the LIC model). Although this paper is primarily aimed at those who are considering setting up an LIC in their own institutions or who are already running an LIC we also offer our recommendations as a reflection on the broader dynamics of medical education and on the priorities and issues we all face in designing and running educational programs.

  19. The strong coupling regime of twelve flavors QCD

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Tiago Nunes

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the results recently reported in Ref.[1] [A. Deuzeman, M.P. Lombardo, T. Nunes da Silva and E. Pallante,"The bulk transition of QCD with twelve flavors and the role of improvement"] for the SU(3) gauge theory with Nf=12 fundamental flavors, and we add some numerical evidence and theoretical discussion. In particular, we study the nature of the bulk transition that separates a chirally broken phase at strong coupling from a chirally restored phase at weak coupling. When a non-improved action is used, a rapid crossover is observed at small bare quark masses. Our results confirm a first order nature for this transition, in agreement with previous results we obtained using an improved action. As shown in Ref.[1], when improvement of the action is used, the transition is preceded by a second rapid crossover at weaker coupling and an exotic phase emerges, where chiral symmetry is not yet broken. This can be explained [1] by the non hermiticity of the improved lattice Transfer matrix, arising from the c...

  20. International health electives: thematic results of student and professional interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosoniak, Andrew; McCarthy, Anne; Varpio, Lara

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the complexities (including harms and benefits) of international health electives (IHEs) involving medical trainees. This exploration contributes to the ongoing debate about the goals and implications of IHEs for medical trainees. This qualitative study used anonymous, one-to-one, semi-structured interviews. All participants had previous international health experiences. Between September 2007 and March 2008, we interviewed a convenience sample of health care professionals (n=10) and medical trainees (n=10). Using a modified grounded theory methodology, we carried out cycles of data analysis in conjunction with data collection in an iterative and constant comparison process. The study's thematic structure was finalised when theme saturation was achieved. Participants described IHEs in both negative and positive terms. IHEs were described as unsustained short-term contributions that lacked clear educational objectives and failed to address local community needs. Ethical dilemmas were described as IHE challenges. Participants reflected that many IHEs included aspects of medical tourism and the majority of participants described the IHE in negative terms. However, a few participants acknowledged the benefits of the IHE. Specifically, it was seen as an introduction to a career in global health and as a potential foundation for more sustainable projects with positive host community impacts. Finally, despite similar understandings among participants, self-awareness of medical tourism was low. International health electives may include potential harms and benefits for both the trainee and the host community. Educational institutions should encourage and support structured IHEs for trainee participation. We recommend that faculties of medicine and global health educators establish pre-departure training courses for trainees and that IHE opportunities have sufficient structures in place to mitigate the negative effects of medical

  1. Metacognition Assessment Interview: Instrument description and factor structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pellecchia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Metacognition is a multi-component psychological construct, characterised by the ability to identify and describe one’s own mental states and those of others. Evidence has been found for an association between deficits in metacognitive abilities and poor social functioning, low quality of life, psychopathology, and symptoms in Personality Disorders (PDs. However, to date, there are few psychometrically validated instruments available for assessing the different components of metacognition. A semi-structured interview, the Metacognition Assessment Interview (MAI, has been developed to evaluate different domains of metacognition. In the present study, we investigated the psychometric properties of the MAI in an outpatient clinical sample. Method: The MAI was administered to a clinical population of 306 outpatients attending a private clinical centre. Exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and correlation with instruments assessing alexithymia and interpersonal problems were carried out to examine the dimensionality and validity of the MAI. Result: Explorative and confirmatory factor analyses revealed a good fit for both a two-factor model and a four-factor model of metacognition. The two-factor model yielded two main dimensions, which we named: Self domain, defined as self-reflection, and Other domain, defined as critical distancing from one’s own mental state and that of others. The four-factor solution is composed of four sub-domains: monitoring, integration, differentiation and decentration. Moreover, the MAI showed good convergent validity, with significant correlations with both alexithymia and interpersonal problems. Conclusions: These results confirm that the MAI is a reliable instrument for measuring metacognition and its different sub-domains. In particular, the MAI represents a useful and flexible instrument for the assessment of metacognition impairments in different psychopathologies and it can provide

  2. Motivational Interviewing in Relational Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R.; Rose, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Responds to M. Stanton's comments on the current author's original article. One of the puzzles of motivational interviewing is why it works at all. How can it be that an individual interview or two yields change in a long-standing problem behavior even without any effort to alter social context? The time involved is such a tiny part of the…

  3. BUSINESS ETIQUETTE IN JOB INTERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    AGEEVA JULIA VICTOROVNA

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the analysis of job interview transcripts from the perspective of dominant communicant’s (HR manager) communicative behavior. The interviewer uses various etiquette forms that facilitate a more productive dialogue and stipulate cooperative strategies and tactics in order to achieve the main goal - to determine whether the job applicant meets the requirements of the employer.

  4. An Interview with Noam Chomsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a transcript of an interview that the author conducted with Noam Chomsky. In this interview, Chomsky talks about language acquisition and his theory of Universal Grammar. He then explains how the USA best exemplifies the individualist national culture. He also cites the challenges researchers should address in intercultural…

  5. An Interview with Noam Chomsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a transcript of an interview that the author conducted with Noam Chomsky. In this interview, Chomsky talks about language acquisition and his theory of Universal Grammar. He then explains how the USA best exemplifies the individualist national culture. He also cites the challenges researchers should address in intercultural…

  6. Interview with Theo van Leeuwen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Lindstrand

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue features an interview with professor Theo van Leeuwen, who is known to most of our readers as one of the main contributors to the field of multimodality and social semiotics. As always, our intention with the interview is to give some further insights regarding interests and influences that form a background to his theoretical work.

  7. An Interview with Stephen Vitiello

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Vitiello is a world-renowned contemporary sound artist whom the author has known as a colleague for several years. This article presents an interview about the overall body of Vitiello's work to date, and his thoughts on teaching at Virginia Commonwealth University. The interview explores the creative and noncreative tensions between…

  8. Aikido Politics in Interview Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Phyllis Ghim Lian

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes how less powerful subjects in an unequal encounter, an admission interview in an educational institution, were able to counter the power directed at them by the more powerful subject through "aikido" strategies. In the context of the interview, harmonizing with the ideological discursive formation of the institution in question…

  9. The Synthesis and Antitumor Activity of Twelve Galloyl Glucosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve galloyl glucosides 1–12, showing diverse substitution patterns with two or three galloyl groups, were synthesized using commercially available, low-cost D-glucose and gallic acid as starting materials. Among them, three compounds, methyl 3,6-di-O-galloyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (9, ethyl 2,3-di-O-galloyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (11 and ethyl 2,3-di-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (12, are new compounds and other six, 1,6-di-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (1, 1,4,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (2, 1,2-di-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (3, 1,3-di-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (4, 1,2,3-tri-O-galloyl-α-D-glucopyranose (6 and methyl 3,4,6-tri-O-galloyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (10, were synthesized for the first time in the present study. In in vitro MTT assay, 1–12 inhibited human cancer K562, HL-60 and HeLa cells with inhibition rates ranging from 64.2% to 92.9% at 100 μg/mL, and their IC50 values were determined to be varied in 17.2–124.7 μM on the tested three human cancer cell lines. In addition, compounds 1–12 inhibited murine sarcoma S180 cells with inhibition rates ranging from 38.7% to 52.8% at 100 μg/mL in the in vitro MTT assay, and in vivo antitumor activity of 1 and 2 was also detected in murine sarcoma S180 tumor-bearing Kunming mice using taxol as positive control.

  10. [Twelve years of working of Brazzaville cancer registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsondé Malanda, Judith; Nkoua Mbon, Jean Bernard; Bambara, Augustin Tozoula; Ibara, Gérard; Minga, Benoît; Nkoua Epala, Brice; Gombé Mbalawa, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The Brazzaville cancer registry was created in 1996 with the support of the International Agency Research against Cancer (IARC) which is located in Lyon, France. The Brazzaville cancer registry is a registry which is based on population which records new cancer cases occurring in Brazzaville by using Canreg 4.0 Software. Its aim is to supply useful information to fight against cancer to physicians and to decision makers. We conducted this study whose target was to determine the incidence of cancer in Brazzaville during twelve years, from January 1st, 1998 to December 31, 2009. During that period 6,048 new cancer cases were recorded: 3,377 women (55.8%), 2,384 men (39.4%), and 287 children (4.8%) from 0 to 14 years old with an annual average of 504 cases. Middle age to the patient's diagnosis was 49.5 years in female sex and 505.5 years old for male sex. The incidence rate of cancers in Brazzaville was 39.8 or 100.000 inhabitants per year and by sex we observed 49 to female sex and 35.2 for male sex. The first cancers localizations observed to women were in order of frequency: breast, cervix uterine, liver ovaries, hematopoietic system, to men : liver, prostate, hematopoietic system, colon and stomach; to children : retina, kidney, hematopoietic system, liver and bones. These rates are the basis to know the burden of cancer among all pathologies of Brazzaville and the achievement of a national cancer control program.

  11. Hyperinsulinism and hyperammonemia syndrome: report of twelve unrelated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lonlay, P; Benelli, C; Fouque, F; Ganguly, A; Aral, B; Dionisi-Vici, C; Touati, G; Heinrichs, C; Rabier, D; Kamoun, P; Robert, J J; Stanley, C; Saudubray, J M

    2001-09-01

    Hyperinsulinism and hyperammonemia syndrome has been reported as a cause of moderately severe hyperinsulinism with diffuse involvement of the pancreas. The disorder is caused by gain of function mutations in the GLUD1 gene, resulting in a decreased inhibitory effect of guanosine triphosphate on the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzyme. Twelve unrelated patients (six males, six females) with hyperinsulinism and hyperammonemia syndrome have been investigated. The phenotypes were clinically heterogeneous, with neonatal and infancy-onset hypoglycemia and variable responsiveness to medical (diazoxide) and dietary (leucine-restricted diet) treatment. Hyperammonemia (90-200 micromol/L, normal carbamylglutamate administration. The patients had mean basal GDH activity (18.3 +/- 0.9 nmol/min/mg protein) not different from controls (17.9 +/- 1.8 nmol/min/mg protein) in cultured lymphoblasts. The sensitivity of GDH activity to inhibition by guanosine triphosphate was reduced in all patient lymphoblast cultures (IC(50), or concentrations required for 50% inhibition of GDH activity, ranging from 140 to 580 nM, compared with control IC(50) value of 83 +/- 1.0 nmol/L). The allosteric effect of ADP was within the normal range. The activating effect of leucine on GDH activity varied among the patients, with a significant decrease of sensitivity that was correlated with the negative clinical response to a leucine-restricted diet in plasma glucose levels in four patients. Molecular studies were performed in 11 patients. Heterozygous mutations were localized in the antenna region (four patients in exon 11, two patients in exon 12) as well as in the guanosine triphosphate binding site (two patients in exon 6, two patients in exon 7) of the GLUD1 gene. No mutation has been found in one patient after sequencing the exons 5-13 of the gene.

  12. Prescribing for personality disorder: qualitative study of interviews with general and forensic consultant psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martean, Lawrence; Evans, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Aims and method To explore experiences of psychiatrists considering medication for patients with personality disorder by analysis of transcribed, semi-structured interviews with consultants. Results Themes show important relational processes in which not prescribing is expected to be experienced as uncaring rejection, and psychiatrists felt helpless and inadequate as doctors when unable to relieve symptoms by prescribing. Discontinuity in doctor-patient relationships compounds these problems. Clinical implications Problems arise from: (a) the psychopathology creating powerful relational effects in consultation; (b) the lack of effective treatments, both actual and secondary to under-resourcing and neglect of non-pharmaceutical interventions; and (c) the professionally constructed role of psychiatrists prioritising healing and cure through provision of technological interventions for specific diagnoses. There is a need for more treatments and services for patients with personality disorder; more support and training for psychiatrists in the relational complexities of prescribing; and a rethink of the trend for psychiatrists to be seen primarily as prescribers.

  13. Perceived Interviewer Expertness and Attractiveness: Effects of Interviewer Behavior and Attire and Interview Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Barbara A.; Dell, Don M.

    1976-01-01

    Students (N=80) rated the interviewers on a counselor rating form. Only counselor role behavior significantly affected students' perceptions of interviewer attractiveness, while perceptions of expertness seemed to have been affected jointly by role and attire. The relative magnitude of expertness as compared to attractiveness ratings was…

  14. Job interviews: tips and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, P G

    1997-10-01

    This paper outlines appropriate preparation for a job interview, including preparing yourself to focus on your own personal assets and on what you can bring to the job. The various kinds of interview questions are examined: the traditional- 'tell me about yourself'; questions you dread because they will home in on 'weaknesses' and the unusual, open-ended questions intended to uncover specific information. Suggestions are given on how to use the experience of an interview to your own advantage, whether your application is successful or not.

  15. A method of phenomenological interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    In this article I propose a method of interviewing for descriptive phenomenological research that offers an explicit, theoretically based approach for researchers. My approach enables application of descriptive phenomenology as a total method for research, and not one just focused on data analysis. This structured phenomenological approach to interviewing applies questions based on themes of experience contextualization, apprehending the phenomenon and its clarification. The method of questioning employs descriptive and structural questioning as well as novel use of imaginative variation to explore experience. The approach will help researchers understand how to undertake descriptive phenomenological research interviews.

  16. "There's a whole different way of working with adolescents": interviews with Australian Genetic Counselors about their experiences with adolescent clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Cheryl; Sahhar, Margaret; Wallace, Jane; Duncan, Rony E

    2013-10-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period marked by unique physical, psychological and social changes. Guidelines about working with adolescents are available to health professionals in other fields, yet few resources are tailored specifically to genetic counselors. The current qualitative study explored the experiences of genetic counselors who work with adolescent clients to determine whether challenges exist and if further training and support are needed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 genetic counselors from Australia. Interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis from which 7 key themes emerged: 1) Adolescents: A distinct client group? 2) Characteristics of adolescents; 3) Strategies for working with adolescents; 4) Confidentiality; 5) Parental involvement and presence in sessions; 6) Benefits of working with adolescents; and 7) The effectiveness of past training and education. The findings hold important implications for clinical practice and may inform future training programs and guidelines for genetic counselors internationally.

  17. An Interview with Jonathan Piel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Diane J.

    1992-01-01

    This transcript of an interview with Jonathan Piel, editor of "Scientific American," discusses communication between scientists and readers; scientific research publications and the publishing industry; universities as research publishers; library budget reductions and purchasing decisions; electronic publishing; NREN (National Research…

  18. BBB Interviews Wallace D. Muhammad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black Books Bulletin, 1979

    1979-01-01

    In this interview, subjects covered include: changes in Islam, the spiritual greatness of America, Muslim businesses, interracial marriage, the World Community of Islam, and opening the doors of Islam to Caucasians. (WI)

  19. Interview with Theo van Leeuwen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ilaria Moschini

    2014-01-01

    This issue of LEA features an interview with Professor Theo van Leeuwen, where – starting from the fundamental role of the Hallidayan socio-semiotic approach to language in the development of Multimodality...

  20. Interview with Martha C. Nussbaum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizia Abbate

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Here's the interview granted by Martha Nussbaum to Fabrizia Abbate about the role of preference in social dynamics. How important are aesthetic preferences in the development of moral attitudes and choices ?

  1. Interviewing College Students in Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Jeffrey B.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a five-step model of a crisis interview and the special considerations in working with the suicidal and assaultive student for use by college counseling professionals. Discusses the special cases of suicidal and homocidal/assaultive potential. (LLL)

  2. Disrupting the habit of interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Honan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the growing domain of ‘post-qualitative’ research and experiments with a new (representational form to move away from traditional and clichéd descriptions of research methods. In this paper, I want to interrogate the category of interview, and the habit of interviewing, to disrupt the clichés, so as to allow thinking of different ways of writing/speaking/representing the interactions between researcher and researched that will breathe new life into qualitative inquiries. I will attempt to flatten and shred, destabilise and disrupt our common-sense ideas about interview, including those held most sacred to the qualitative community, that of anonymity and confidentiality, as well as the privilege of the ‘transcript’ in re-presenting interview data.

  3. The case for interactive interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberley, Christopher; Kenny, Christine

    1994-04-01

    It is reported in the Penguin Book of Interviews ( 1 ) that Marlon Brando recalled an interview with Truman Capote as follows: 'The little bastard spent half the night telling me all his problems, I figured the least I could do was tell him a few of mine.' In sharing experiences with his interviewee, Capote had managed to extract information he would otherwise not have gained.

  4. Interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvale, Steinar; Brinkmann, Svend

    Interviewet spiller en afgørende rolle i en stor del kvalitativ forskning. Men det er samtidig en kompleks disciplin, der rummer mange faldgruber og kræver fintfølende analytiske kompetencer. I denne bog giver Steinar Kvale og Svend Brinkmann en introduktion til de teoretiske og praktiske aspekter...

  5. Interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarauw, Laura Louise; Hollesen, Laika

    2011-01-01

    Det såkaldte humboldtske universitetsideal står i frit fald. Så det burde ikke komme som nogen overraskelse, at det demokratiske fundament slår revner. Det kommer i hvert fald ikke bag på Laura Louise Sarauw fra Københavns Universitet, der i sin ph.d.-afhandling har sat stort spørgsmålstegn ved d...

  6. The development of the Metacognition Assessment interview: instrument description, factor structure and reliability in a non-clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerari, Antonio; Cucchi, Michele; Dimaggio, Giancarlo; Cavadini, Daniele; Carcione, Antonino; Battelli, Vittoria; Nicolò, Giuseppe; Pedone, Roberto; Siccardi, Tomaso; D'Angerio, Stefania; Ronchi, Paolo; Maffei, Cesare; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2012-12-30

    Metacognition is a multi-facet psychological construct; deficits in metacognitive abilities are associated to low social functioning, low quality of life, psychopathology, and symptoms. The aim of this study was to describe and develop a valid and reliable interview for assessing metacognition. The semi-structured interview, based on the author's theory model of the metacognition construct, is described. The Metacognition Assessment Interview (MAI) is an adaptation of the Metacognition Assessment Scale (MAS) and evaluates how the subject is interviewed used metacognition during his own real life experiences elicited by the interviewer. A user manual was developed to assist the interview and scoring procedure. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis revealed preliminary evidence of a two factor-hierarchical structure, with two lower-order scales, representing the two main theoretical domains of the metacognitive function, "the Self" and "the Other", and one single higher-order scale that we labelled metacognition. Contrary to the authors' prediction the existence of the four distinct dimensions under the two domains was not confirmed. The MAI and its two domains demonstrated acceptable levels of inter-rater reliability and internal consistency. The MAI appears to be a promising instrument for assessing metacognition. Future psychometric validation steps and clinical directions are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. HCMR interviews physician administrator leaders. Interview by Michael J. Enright.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, C; Henry, R A; Kiser, W S; Mayberry, W E; Kaufman, R P

    1984-01-01

    This interview departs from HCMR's usual format, interviewing several leaders in health care administration for their ideas on current economic pressures, the impact of competition and joint ventures, attitudes toward equity and capital formation, and competition between the interest of clinical medicine and the cost of care. The physician administrators interviewed hold senior administrative positions: Charles Edwards, President and Chief Executive Officer of Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation; Robert A. Henry, President and Chief Executive Officer of Swedish-American Corporation; William S. Kiser, Chairman of the Board of Governors at Cleveland Clinic Foundation; W. Eugene Mayberry, Chairman of the Board of Governors at Mayo Clinic; and Ronald P. Kaufman, Vice-President for Medical Affairs of George Washington University Hospital. All are members of the Board of Regents or Fellows of the American College of Physician Executives.

  8. An Experiment in Humanistic Management within Community College District Twelve, Centralia/Olympia, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dale A.; Hurley, John A.

    Community College District Twelve, a multi-college district serving a two-county area in southwestern Washington, has attempted to incorporate at administrative levels many of the humanistic, process-oriented principles of management discussed by Maslow and Maccoby. A concept of the ideal leadership style for District Twelve guides the selection…

  9. Experiencing a constructivist museum exhibit: A case study of twelve children and their families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Martha Anne Leech

    2002-04-01

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science and the National Research Council have called for the creation of a scientifically literate populace and introduced science standards and guidelines to direct this process. Science education in traditional school settings plays a key role in reaching this goal, but individuals over their lifetimes will have more exposure to science ideas through informal science experiences such as visits to museums and through diverse media sources. The purpose of this study was to explore the role museums play in this journey to science literacy. This qualitative collective case study examined the experience of 12 children and their families in a children's museum as they interacted with an exhibit designed along the tenets of constructivist theory to introduce children to ideas of science. Twelve children and their families were videotaped interacting with a model of a watershed that included the stream, surrounding land, gravel, and dam building and erosion abatement manipulatives. Children were interviewed to ascertain their stream-related ideas and conceptual understanding prior to and after using the exhibit. Parents completed demographic and post-exhibit experience questionnaires. Two museum staff members who played key roles in the development of the exhibit and surrounding gallery were also interviewed. Individual and cross-case analyses were done to describe the experience of each child and family, and to elucidate the commonalities of these experiences to describe the phenomenon of using a constructivist-based science exhibit. Results of the study indicate (1) the type of experience children and families had at the exhibit depended on child and parent interactions and roles each assumed, and (2) experience with the exhibit encouraged children to think more deeply about water topics, past experiences, and ideas they had previously constructed. Implications of this research include (1) parents should engage children

  10. Co-interviewing across gender and culture: expanding qualitative research methods in Melanesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman-MacLaren, Michelle L; Api, Unia K; Darius, Matupit; Tommbe, Rachael; Mafile'o, Tracie A; MacLaren, David J

    2014-09-06

    The social and cultural positions of both researchers and research participants influence qualitative methods and study findings. In Papua New Guinea (PNG), as in other contexts, gender is a key organising characteristic and needs to be central to the design and conduct of research. The colonial history between researcher and participant is also critical to understanding potential power differences. This is particularly relevant to public health research, much of which has emerged from a positivist paradigm. This paper describes our critical reflection of flexible researcher responses enacted during qualitative research in PNG. Led by a senior male HIV researcher from PNG, a male from a PNG university and a female from an Australian university conducted qualitative interviews about faith-based responses to HIV in PNG. The two researchers planned to conduct one-on-one interviews matching gender of participants and interviewer. However, while conducting the study, four participants explicitly requested to be interviewed by both researchers. This experience led us to critically consider socially and culturally situated ways of understanding semi-structured interviewing for public health research in Melanesia. New understandings about public health research include: (i) a challenge to the convention that the researcher holds more power than the research participant, (ii) the importance of audience in Melanesia, (iii) cultural safety can be provided when two people co-interview and (iv) the effect an esteemed leader heading the research may have on people's willingness to participate. Researchers who occupy insider-outsider roles in PNG may provide participants new possibilities to communicate key ideas. Our recent experience has taught us public health research methods that are gender sensitive and culturally situated are pivotal to successful research in Melanesia. Qualitative research requires adaptability and reflexivity. Public health research methods must continue

  11. An interview with Steve Wilson. Interview by Kathryn Senior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Steve

    2010-05-01

    Stephen Wilson is Professor of Developmental Genetics at University College, London, UK. He was recently awarded the Remedios Caro Almela Prize for Research in Developmental Neurobiology. We interviewed Steve to find out about how he started on the road to developmental biology research, how he got interested in the brain, his achievements and future challenges.

  12. Induction interview form in EDH

    CERN Document Server

    Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group

    2007-01-01

    As part of the efforts to rationalise administrative procedures, the IT and HR Departments have developed a new EDH form for induction interviews, which can be accessed using the link below. In accordance with Administrative Circular No. 2 ('Recruitment, Appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of Staff Members', Rev. 3), the work and training objectives to be achieved during the probation period shall be specified in writing to all new staff members during an induction interview. The interview shall take place between the new staff member and his supervisor within six weeks of his taking up his duties at the latest. https://edh.cern.ch/Document/MAPS/Induction1) (or from the EDH desktop, by clicking on 'Other Tasks' and going to the 'HR & Training' heading) Please note that this form is to be used exclusively for new staff members. A separate EDH form will be developed for fellows.Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group Human Re...

  13. Induction interview form in EDH

    CERN Document Server

    Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group,

    2007-01-01

    As part of the efforts to rationalise administrative procedures, the IT and HR Departments have developed a new EDH form for induction interviews, which can be accessed using the link below. In accordance with Administrative Circular No. 2 ('Recruitment, Appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of Staff Members', Rev. 3), the work and training objectives to be achieved during the probation period shall be specified in writing to all new staff members during an induction interview. The interview shall take place between the new staff member and his supervisor within six weeks of him taking up his duties at the latest. https://edh.cern.ch/Document/MAPS/Induction (or from the EDH desktop, by clicking on 'Other Tasks' and going to the 'HR & Training' heading) Please note that this form is to be used exclusively for new staff members. A separate EDH form will be developed for fellows. Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group Human...

  14. Motivational Interviewing by School Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ane; Bentsen, Peter; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    , and practitioners of school health services. Implications :Motivational interviewing spirit and techniques seem to be adaptable and useful for school nurses in counselling children and parents. However, further research and development should address the issues of adjusting the method to counselling families......Title: Motivational Interviewing by School Nurses: Spirit, Techniques, and Dilemmas in the Prevention of Child Obesity Introduction : School nurses play a central role in school-based, preventive health services in Denmark (National Board of Health, 2011), and they may play an important role...... behaviours related to lifestyle diseases in adults (Rubak et al. 2005; Söderlund et al. 2011). The use of motivational interviewing by school nurses for the prevention of child obesity in a family intervention is still new, and evidence on the potentials and problems is scarce (Resnicow, Davis and Rollnick...

  15. Mental and physical attributes defining world-class Norwegian athletes: content analysis of interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, R; Harung, H S; Travis, F; Pensgaard, A M

    2014-04-01

    This study reports the results of a content analysis of interviews with 28 Norwegian world-class athletes and 28 controls, matched for gender, age, and type of sport. Semi-structured interviews explored their perceptions of their best performance. The interviews were analyzed using the ATLAS.ti and yielded 20 higher-order codes. Nine higher-order codes were categorized as inner-oriented, five were categorized as outer-oriented, and six were a combination of inner- and outer-oriented. Statistical analysis, using the Mann-Whitney test, showed significant group differences for seven higher-order codes: (a) two outer-oriented codes relating to "mastery--achievements" and "training--outer"; and (b) five inner-oriented codes relating to "mental preparation," "self-reliance," "training--inner," "wholeness," "performance--inner," and "growth orientation." These findings highlight the importance of both inner- and outer-oriented development for high-level achievement in sports--the "mental game" is as important as the physical game, both during training and competitions. Previously published quantitative data reported higher levels of brain integration, faster habitation to a loud tone, and higher ego and moral development in these world-class athletes. These findings are interpreted in light of a Unified Theory of Performance, which proposes that higher mind-brain development provides a basis for higher performance in any activity.

  16. The relationship in motivational interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, Theresa B

    2014-09-01

    The therapeutic relationship in motivational interviewing is hypothesized to have both a direct impact on client outcomes as well as facilitating the emergence of client language in favor of change. The nature of this relationship is characterized by empathy, partnership, and support of the client's autonomy commonly called the spirit of the method. This article explores the implications of this spirit on the practice and understanding of motivational interviewing, including common misconceptions attributable to a misunderstanding of the role of the relationship. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Establishing a Global Halal Hub: In-Depth Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Borzooei

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore the requirements needed for a country to establish itself as a global Halal hub. In this regard, this exploratory research paper uses a semi-structured in-depth interview to obtain the perceptions of Halal experts about the requirements for establishing a Halal hub. The results of the study indicate that human capital, media, research and development, events, country’s capability, public and governmental support, marketing strategy, and infrastructure comprise the vital requirements. Furthermore, from the perceptions of the experts, public and governmental support, marketing strategy, and human capital are the three most important requirements. Since this paper is an exploratory study, it provides some insights of the three experts on the establishing of a Halal hub. In addition, a quantitative study is an appropriate approach to implement the findings of this study empirically and to determine the effective components to establish a Halal hub in those countries that desire it. A practical implication of this study is the opening of a new window for any country that aspires to be a Halal hub. In this matter, this paper presents the key considerations in establishing a Halal hub for Halal certification bodies, companies and marketers involved in the Halal business. Moreover, this research attempts to influence the perceptions and attitudes of people of the country on the desirability of becoming a Halal hub, followed by a discussion on the development of a national brand. When the contribution of its people is high, a country stands the best chance of achieving its goal. Finally, this study is one of the first to seek the perceptions of experts about vital requirements that a country should pay more attention to if it wishes to establish a global Halal hub.

  18. GPs' perceptions of workload in England: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxson, Caroline Hd; Ashdown, Helen F; Hobbs, Fd Richard

    2017-02-01

    GPs report the lowest levels of morale among doctors, job satisfaction is low, and the GP workforce is diminishing. Workload is frequently cited as negatively impacting on commitment to a career in general practice, and many GPs report that their workload is unmanageable. To gather an in-depth understanding of GPs' perceptions and attitudes towards workload. All GPs working within NHS England were eligible. Advertisements were circulated via regional GP e-mail lists and national social media networks in June 2015. Of those GPs who responded, a maximum-variation sample was selected until data saturation was reached. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews were conducted. Data were analysed thematically. In total, 171 GPs responded, and 34 were included in this study. GPs described an increase in workload over recent years, with current working days being long and intense, raising concerns over the wellbeing of GPs and patients. Full-time partnership was generally not considered to be possible, and many participants felt workload was unsustainable, particularly given the diminishing workforce. Four major themes emerged to explain increased workload: increased patient needs and expectations; a changing relationship between primary and secondary care; bureaucracy and resources; and the balance of workload within a practice. Continuity of care was perceived as being eroded by changes in contracts and working patterns to deal with workload. This study highlights the urgent need to address perceived lack of investment and clinical capacity in general practice, and suggests that managing patient expectations around what primary care can deliver, and reducing bureaucracy, have become key issues, at least until capacity issues are resolved. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  19. Turning the spotlight: Looking at the interviewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Randi Skovbjerg

    an explanation for variations in interviewer behaviour? The point of departure of the study is two interviewers - a female and a male - who have conducted a range of sociolinguistic interviews for the LANCHART Centre. The studies show clear differences in what the interviewers classify as their best and worst...... worst. It also seems that face-work is carried out more carefully in her best interview than in her worst. Moreover, studying the female interviewer's best and worst interview show clear differences in the number of dispreferred responses to assessments and next turn repair initiators as responses...... interviewers reveal consistencies in the two interviewers' interview style. I conclude that the female interviewer has features which may be characterized as a risky and potentially face-threatening interview style, whereas the male interviewer has a less risky and rather flexible style. I find...

  20. Evidence-informed health policy 3 – Interviews with the directors of organizations that support the use of research evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moynihan Ray

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only a small number of previous efforts to describe the experiences of organizations that produce clinical practice guidelines (CPGs, undertake health technology assessments (HTAs, or directly support the use of research evidence in developing health policy (i.e., government support units, or GSUs have relied on interviews and then only with HTA agencies. Interviews offer the potential for capturing experiences in great depth, particularly the experiences of organizations that may be under-represented in surveys. Methods We purposively sampled organizations from among those who completed a questionnaire in the first phase of our three-phase study, developed and piloted a semi-structured interview guide, and conducted the interviews by telephone, audio-taped them, and took notes simultaneously. Binary or categorical responses to more structured questions were counted when possible. Themes were identified from among responses to semi-structured questions using a constant comparative method of analysis. Illustrative quotations were identified to supplement the narrative description of the themes. Results We interviewed the director (or his or her nominee in 25 organizations, of which 12 were GSUs. Using rigorous methods that are systematic and transparent (sometimes shortened to 'being evidence-based' was the most commonly cited strength among all organizations. GSUs more consistently described their close links with policymakers as a strength, whereas organizations producing CPGs, HTAs, or both had conflicting viewpoints about such close links. With few exceptions, all types of organizations tended to focus largely on weaknesses in implementation, rather than strengths. The advice offered to those trying to establish similar organizations include: 1 collaborate with other organizations; 2 establish strong links with policymakers and stakeholders; 3 be independent and manage conflicts of interest; 4 build capacity; 5 use good

  1. Conducting Successful Interviews: Tips for Intrepid Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    Demonstrates how nonacademic interviewing talents can inform how qualitative researchers perform and produce interviews, outlining key concepts and practices for better qualitative interviewing from journalists and other researchers and examining four elements of interview practice (background information, interview analysis, protocol creation and…

  2. Deaf Young People with Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implants: The Experience of Parents and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Julie; Archbold, Sue; Gregory, Sue

    2011-01-01

    A semi-structured interview format was used to explore the experiences and attitudes of twelve parents and twelve teachers of young people, aged 11-18 years, who had received sequential bilateral cochlear implants. The parents stressed the importance of involving the young person in the decision to go ahead with the second implant. Although all…

  3. An Interview with Lance Olsen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Segal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With over twenty books to his name, as editor or author, Lance Olsen is a cultural force unto himself. His latest book with Trevor Dodge, Architectures of Possibility (Raw Dog Screaming Press, is a writer's guide against transparent language, and predictable patterned literary convention. In this interview Olsen discusses radical pedagogy and experimental narrative theory and its practice.

  4. An Interview with Randy Powell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Don

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Randy Powell, an author who has published several novels about teenagers who are finding their way through unsettled lives. Shares his belief that when you write from the heart, you do not have any choice about the themes and stories you write; they choose you as much as you choose them. (SG)

  5. Mathematical people profiles and interviews

    CERN Document Server

    Albers, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This unique collection contains extensive and in-depth interviews with mathematicians who have shaped the field of mathematics in the twentieth century. Collected by two mathematicians respected in the community for their skill in communicating mathematical topics to a broader audience, the book is also rich with photographs and includes an introduction by Philip J. Davis.

  6. Job Interviews: Keys for Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Donald S.; Catt, Stephen E.; Slocombe, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Many students seem disinterested in learning to handle employment interviews effectively. This article discusses students' motivation to become skilled interviewees and steps educators and counselors can take to increase students' interest in this crucial career activity. The article also discusses mistakes students frequently make during…

  7. Zum Interview mit Arthur Schnitzler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinkert, Ernst-Ullrich

    2015-01-01

    Kommentar til et interview med Schnitzler, som dagbladet Politiken publicerede i 1923 og som E.U.Pinkert oversatte til tysk. Oversættelsen udkom den 28.11.2015 i Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung med titlen "Eine Gefahr für die Jugend?"...

  8. Decision for Southeastern: An Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarter, W. Ronald; Harper, William A.

    1979-01-01

    William Harper interviews W. Ronald McCarter, President of Southeastern Community College, North Carolina, about a suit brought against the college by a hearing-impaired woman who was refused admission to the nursing program resulting in a Supreme Court decision permitting colleges to require reasonable physical qualifications. (AYC)

  9. Interviews with Infopros: Sarah Warner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Melissa

    1997-01-01

    Sarah Warner is manager of content licensing for Amulet, which provides an Internet-based automated research service in information technology (InfoWizard). In this interview, she discusses her work experience as a cataloger and information center manager, carry over skills from past positions, her present responsibilities in content management,…

  10. Interview med avatar Gunhild Soderstrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.; Christensen, Inger-Marie F.

    2009-01-01

    Interview med avatar Gunhild Soderstrom Bag avataren Gunhild Soderstrom gemmer sig lektor i filosofi Cynthia Grund fra SDU, som avataren Inga Miles alias Inger-Marie Christensen i anden optagelse har interviewet i Second Life. Det er blevet til en diskussion om læringspotentialet i virtuelle verd...

  11. Interview with Andrew C. Kadak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabes, D. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    This article is an interview with the president and Chief Executive Officer of the Yankee Atomic Electric Company about a wide variety of aspects of the decommissioning of the Yankee Nuclear Power plant. Included are discussions of political aspects, decommissioning schedules, local impacts, technical issues of decommissioning, personnel management during decommissioning, etc.

  12. The impact of alcoholics anonymous on other substance abuse-related twelve-step programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudet, Alexandre B

    2008-01-01

    This chapter explores the influence of the AA model on self-help fellowships addressing problems of drug dependence. Fellowships that have adapted the twelve-step recovery model to other substances of abuse are reviewed; next similarities and differences between AA and drug-recovery twelve-step organizations are examined; finally, we present empirical findings on patterns of attendance and perceptions of AA and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) among polydrug-dependent populations, many of whom are cross-addicted to alcohol. Future directions in twelve-step research are noted in closing.

  13. “Let’s Take a Look Together”: Walking Interviews in Domestic Spaces as a Means to Examine ICT Experiences of Women 60+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ratzenböck

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although mobile methods are becoming more common within the social sciences (e.g. Ricketts Hein et al., 2008 and Wiederhold, 2015, p. 607, they mostly take place outdoors. This paper examines the potential of walking interviews conducted in small domestic spaces to explore the ICT experiences of women aged 60+ and to discuss the challenges and advantages of this method. This case study of indoor walking interview material is a part of a larger research project on the ICT experiences of women 60+ in the Austrian province of Styria. The advantages and challenges of conducting walking interviews in the homes of interviewees are identified and explored. As this case study demonstrates, walking interviews in homes give the researcher a glimpse into the private areas of everyday life, let the interviewees lead the researcher through the space, allow the participants to conduct the conversation, and thus invite a reflection on the power dynamics inherent in the interview situation. This method also compares the statements provided by participants in semi-structured interviews with the information gathered through an encounter with media and ICTs in the home. These comparisons yield a variety of insights on prior statements through the addition of emphases, “contradictions,” or minimizing the importance of previous interview statements. Moreover, interactions with the objects in the home that are encountered during the walking interview also provide important “prompts” to stimulate a detailed and multifaceted discussion of everyday life experiences with ICTs and other media.

  14. An interview with Angela Nieto. Interviewed by Eva Amsen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Angela

    2012-04-01

    Angela Nieto is Full Professor at the Instituto de Neurociencias (CSIC-UMH) in Alicante, Spain, and Head of the institute's Developmental Neurobiology Unit. She is also the current president of the Spanish Society for Developmental Biology (Sociedad Española de Biología del Desarollo, SEBD). We interviewed her to talk about the plans of the SEBD for the coming years.

  15. Questioning Transcription: The Case for the Systematic and Reflexive Interviewing and Reporting (SRIR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Loubere

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The recording and verbatim transcription of interviews is often considered to be one of the more tedious but necessary aspects of the in-depth qualitative research process. While transcription is undoubtedly a necessary methodological tool for researchers focusing specifically on discourse and language, it has also been widely adopted by researchers across the social sciences, and is sometimes advocated as a means of inherently improving the rigour of qualitative research. Based on recent experience from fieldwork in rural China, where I had initially expected to utilise the verbatim transcription method, in this article I critically assess the role of transcription in the design, implementation, and outcome of cross-cultural multilingual qualitative research. I argue that, in certain cases, verbatim transcription can limit the kind of information that may be considered valuable as data, and delay the processes of data reduction and analysis, thus separating the researcher from the fieldwork event. In response to these critiques, I propose an alternative approach to collecting, categorising, coding, and analysing qualitative data: the systematic and reflexive interviewing and reporting (SRIR method. The SRIR method utilises semi-structured and unstructured interviews conducted by two or more researchers. After completing an interview, researchers engage in reflexive dialogue, and jointly write interview and analysis reports. In this way, the SRIR method begins the process of coding and analysis in situ, thus facilitating critical engagement with emergent themes during fieldwork rather than afterwards. The method is, therefore, ideally suited to research projects that are designed to be open ended and flexible, in order to follow up on new information and potentially even change focus. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1702152

  16. Reliability and validity of the DSM-5 Anxious Distress Specifier Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Clark, Heather; McGonigal, Patrick; Harris, Lauren; Holst, Carolina Guzman; Martin, Jacob

    2017-07-01

    To acknowledge the clinical significance of anxiety in depressed patients, DSM-5 included an anxious distress specifier for major depressive disorder (MDD). In the present report we describe the reliability and validity of a semi-structured interview assessing the features of the anxious distress specifier. Our goal was to develop an instrument that could be used for both diagnostic and outcome measurement purposes. One hundred seventy-three psychiatric patients with MDD were interviewed by a trained diagnostic rater who administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) supplemented with questions from the DSM-5 Anxious Distress Specifier Interview (DADSI). Inter-rater (n=25) and test-retest (n=25) reliability of the DADSI was examined in separate groups of patients. The patients were rated on clinician rating scales of depression, anxiety and irritability, and patients completed self-report measures of these constructs. Sensitivity to change was examined in 16 patients. Approximately three-quarters of the depressed patients met the criteria for the anxious distress specifier (78.0%, n=135). The DADSI had excellent joint-interview reliability and good test-retest reliability. DADSI total scores were more highly correlated with other clinician-rated and self-report measures of anxiety than with measures of depression and anger. DADSI scores were significantly higher in depressed outpatients with a current anxiety disorder than depressed patients without a comorbid anxiety disorder. The DADSI was sensitive to improvement. The DADSI is a reliable and valid measure of the presence of the DSM-5 anxious distress specifier for MDD as well as the severity of the features of the specifier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Delegation: a solution to the workload problem? Observations and interviews with community pharmacists in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Victoria M; Corlett, Sarah A; Rodgers, Ruth M

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to describe how pharmacists utilise and perceive delegation in the community setting. Non-participant observations and semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of community pharmacists working in Kent between July and October 2011. Content analysis was undertaken to determine key themes and the point of theme saturation informed sample size. Findings from observations were also compared against those from interviews. Observations and interviews were undertaken with 11 pharmacists. Observations showed that delegation occurred in four different forms: assumed, active, partial and reverse. It was also employed to varying extents within the different pharmacies. Interviews revealed mixed views on delegation. Some pharmacists presented positive attitudes towards delegation while others were concerned about maintaining accountability for delegated tasks, particularly in terms of accuracy checking of dispensed medication. Other pharmacists noted the ability to delegate was not a skill they found inherently easy. Comparison of observation and interview data highlighted discrepancies between tasks pharmacists perceived they delegated and what they actually delegated. Effective delegation can potentially promote better management of workload to provide pharmacists with additional time to spend on cognitive pharmaceutical services. To do this, pharmacists' reluctance to delegate must be addressed. Lack of insight into own practice might be helped by self-reflection and feedback from staff. Also, a greater understanding of legal accountability in the context of delegation needs to be achieved. Finally, delegation is not just dependent on pharmacists, but also on support staff; ensuring staff are empowered and equipped to take on delegated roles is essential. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF “TWELVE WELL-POINTS” IN EMERGENCY TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段功保

    2000-01-01

    In many years' clinical practice, I used blood-letting method of “Twelve Well-points” to treat emergencies as coma, syncope, acute infantile convulsion, wind-stroke syndrome, hysteria, epilepsy, etc. and have achieved immediate results.

  19. Interview accuracy in partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besocke, Ana Gabriela; Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Valiensi, Stella Maris; Cristiano, Edgardo; Garcia, María del Carmen

    2009-11-01

    The statistical concept of accuracy has never been applied to verify the history data collected on seizure disorders by open format interview. We compared patients'/witnesses' descriptions of epileptic seizures with videotaped seizure characteristics and analyzed the accuracy (ACC), sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), false-positive rate (FPR), and false-negative rate (FNR) of various components of the semiology in patients with partial epilepsy. Language disturbances, complex automatisms, and autonomic signs have high ACC and intermediate FNRs. This means that these manifestations are most obvious to the witness/patient and, therefore, are memorized easily. Dystonic posturing and upper limb automatisms have the highest FNRs, leading to low ACC. These are very subtle signs, not vigorous enough to be paid attention to, but their predictive value in partial epilepsy syndromes is relatively high. We believe these signs need to be directly sought in the interview, because often the patient/witness pays limited attention to them.

  20. An Interview with Roy Ellen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejm Benessaiah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available I decided to undertake this interview with Professor Ellen, simply because I thought such a distinguished career deserved to be marked as he was retiring. Roy was happy to make time for our interviews, in the form of loosely structured conversation which, like the Arabian Nights, Roy pointed out, could have gone on forever, but I decided to draw the line at three sessions. Perhaps it could, and will go on to form part of a more in-depth biography, as I continued to discover other aspects and adventures of Roy’s interesting life in the course of other contexts, much as one does in the field. Much is known about what ethnobiologists and anthropologists say about another people’s lives; less is known about their own, apart from rare reflections, diaries and memoires. I found Roy’s reflections a source of comfort as I embarked on my own PhD fieldwork, reassuring me as I fumbled around, making my own unique but comparable mistakes among the insights I gleaned. The following is an edited version of the original interview. I hope it will be as enjoyable to the reader as it was to me working on it.

  1. 企业员工职业性向三重半结构化测试模式设计分析%The Analysis on Three Kinds of Semi-Structured Test Mode for the Occupational Aptitude of Enterprise Staff

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关娜; 费洋; 丁菲; 张文婷; 贺倩

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of review about occupational aptitude classification and testing theory, this paper, in view of the needs of enterprise staff career management and the problem of the brain drain caused by people post discomfort, divides Occupational Ap⁃titude of Employees ( OAEs) into three categories, that is, professional technique, human management and strategic decision. Ad⁃hering to the existing enterprise staff recruitment examination means, three kinds of semi-structured test mode are put forward for the test mode, including written examination, interview test and scene test. At the same time, the test mode is designed to put forward specific reference points about test form, scores distribution and the mode of test content.%在对现有的职业性向分类和测试理论进行评述的基础上,针对企业员工的职业生涯管理需要及化解因人岗不适所导致的人才流失问题,将员工的职业性向分为专业技术型、人际管理型和战略决策型三类。保持应用现有的企业员工招聘选优功能的考试方式,分析提出具有较强可操作性,即为不增加更多招聘成本的笔试、面试和情景试的三重测试和试题形式为半结构化员工招聘的三重半结构化职业性向测试模式。同时,测试模式对测试题形、分值分配和测试内容的设计提出了具体的参考性要点。

  2. Turning the spotlight: Looking at the interviewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Randi Skovbjerg

    Very often, the speech of the person being interviewed is taken as the outcome of an interview. In this thesis, interviews are approached dialogically with a special focus on the interviewer. Rather than a monologue, the interview is viewed as a dialogue. In the thesis, I address the following qu...... that their charact eristic interactional features are (vaguely) in line with the results in a NEO PI-R personality test; however, the connection is too vague to anticipate or account fully for their special characteristics......Very often, the speech of the person being interviewed is taken as the outcome of an interview. In this thesis, interviews are approached dialogically with a special focus on the interviewer. Rather than a monologue, the interview is viewed as a dialogue. In the thesis, I address the following...... interviewers reveal consistencies in the two interviewers' interview style. I conclude that the female interviewer has features which may be characterized as a risky and potentially face-threatening interview style, whereas the male interviewer has a less risky and rather flexible style. I find...

  3. Interview with Michael Atiyah and Isadore Singer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2004-01-01

    This interview has appeared also in EMS Newsletter no. 53 The interview took place in Oslo on the 24th of May 2004 prior to the Abel prize celebrations.......This interview has appeared also in EMS Newsletter no. 53 The interview took place in Oslo on the 24th of May 2004 prior to the Abel prize celebrations....

  4. Interview with Michael Atiyah and Isadore Singer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2004-01-01

    This interview has appeared also in EMS Newsletter no. 53 The interview took place in Oslo on the 24th of May 2004 prior to the Abel prize celebrations.......This interview has appeared also in EMS Newsletter no. 53 The interview took place in Oslo on the 24th of May 2004 prior to the Abel prize celebrations....

  5. 8 CFR 245.6 - Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interview. 245.6 Section 245.6 Aliens and... ADMITTED FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCE § 245.6 Interview. Each applicant for adjustment of status under this part shall be interviewed by an immigration officer. This interview may be waived in the case of a...

  6. 37 CFR 1.133 - Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interviews. 1.133 Section 1... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Interviews § 1.133 Interviews. (a)(1) Interviews with examiners concerning applications and other matters pending before...

  7. 8 CFR 245a.19 - Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interviews. 245a.19 Section 245a.19 Aliens... Interviews. (a) All aliens filing applications for adjustment of status with the Service under this section must be personally interviewed, except that the adjudicative interview may be waived for a child...

  8. 49 CFR 1018.22 - Personal interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personal interviews. 1018.22 Section 1018.22... § 1018.22 Personal interviews. (a) The Board may seek an interview with the debtor at the offices of the... grant an interview with a debtor upon the debtor's request. The Board will not reimburse a...

  9. 8 CFR 1245.6 - Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interview. 1245.6 Section 1245.6 Aliens and... OF STATUS TO THAT OF PERSON ADMITTED FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCE § 1245.6 Interview. Each applicant for adjustment of status under this part shall be interviewed by an immigration officer. This interview may...

  10. 10 CFR 15.25 - Personal interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal interviews. 15.25 Section 15.25 Energy NUCLEAR... interviews. (a) The NRC may seek an interview with the debtor at the offices of the NRC when— (1) A matter...; or (3) An agreement for payment might be negotiated. (b) The NRC shall grant an interview with...

  11. Use of interviews in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gary

    2015-06-24

    Conducting interviews is one of the most common ways of collecting data in healthcare research. In particular, interviews are associated with qualitative research, where researchers seek to understand participants' experiences through their own words and perspectives. This article will help healthcare researchers prepare to carry out interviews as part of their research. It will also emphasise important skills to consider during the interview process. Consideration will also be given to remedying interviews that do not go according to plan, as well as identifying appropriate debriefing processes post-interview. With this knowledge, healthcare researchers are more likely to conduct effective interviews that will yield better quality data and protect the participant.

  12. The communication of secondary variants: interviews with parents whose children have undergone array-CGH testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenhusz, G M; Devriendt, K; Peeters, H; Van Esch, H; Dierickx, K

    2014-09-01

    Children with unexplained developmental disabilities or congenital anomalies are increasingly being referred for genetic diagnostic testing using array-comparative genomic hybridisation (array-CGH) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Their parents will have to deal with the secondary variants that will inevitably arise. We conducted 16 prospective semi-structured interviews with native Dutch-speaking parents whose children had undergone clinical array-CGH testing. The interviews explored the parents' experiences, expectations and opinions, specifically regarding the communication of results. Concrete examples of 'unexpected results' were provided to help guide the discussion, differing in severity, treatability, time of onset, level of risk, and carrier status. Data was analysed using content and narrative analysis methodologies. Parental motivations for and against the disclosure of unexpected results cluster around four main themes: actionability; knowledge; context; and characteristics of the result. Most parents wished to know all types of results. Disclosure was framed within a holistic, contextual, family-wide view. Genetic counselling should aim to integrate explorations of the motivations of parents surrounding the disclosure of results with good clinical care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Failures in communication and information transfer across the surgical care pathway: interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Kamal; Arora, Sonal; Vats, Amit; Wong, Helen W; Sevdalis, Nick; Vincent, Charles; Moorthy, Krishna

    2012-10-01

    Effective communication is imperative to safe surgical practice. Previous studies have typically focused upon the operating theatre. This study aimed to explore the communication and information transfer failures across the entire surgical care pathway. Using a qualitative approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 members of the multidisciplinary team (seven surgeons, five anaesthetists and six nurses) in an acute National Health Service trust. Participants' views regarding information transfer and communication failures at each phase of care, their causes, effects and potential interventions were explored. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and submitted to emergent theme analysis. Sampling ceased when categorical and theoretical saturation was achieved. Preoperatively, lack of communication between anaesthetists and surgeons was the most common problem (13/18 participants). Incomplete handover from the ward to theatre (12/18) and theatre to recovery (15/18) were other key problems. Work environment, lack of protocols and primitive forms of information transfer were reported as the most common cause of failures. Participants reported that these failures led to increased morbidity and mortality. Healthcare staff were strongly supportive of the view that standardisation and systematisation of communication processes was essential to improve patient safety. This study suggests communication failures occur across the entire continuum of care and the participants opined that it could have a potentially serious impact on patient safety. This data can be used to plan interventions targeted at the entire surgical pathway so as to improve the quality of care at all stages of the patient's journey.

  14. [Polish version of the ADI-R (Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnicka, Izabela; Płoski, Rafał

    2012-01-01

    Childhood autism belongs to pervasive developmental disorders and is characterised by qualitative abnormalities in reciprocal social interactions, communication, and by restricted, repetitive interests and behaviours. Until now there was no standardised tool for a diagnosis of autism in Poland. The paper presents the Polish version of the Autism Diagnostic Interview - Revised (ADI-R), which is the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of autism in Europe, United States and Australia. It describes the translation process and adaptation of the original version into Polish, as well as differences between the two versions. ADI-R is a complex, standardised, semi-structured investigator-based interview for parent or caregiver of person with autism, linked to ICD-10 and DSM-IV-TR criteria and appropriate for both adults and children, who have the minimum mental age of 24 months. Moreover ADI-R consists of, beside diagnostic algorithms, the current behaviour algorithms, which enable to assess and compare various levels of functioning during planning and implementation of treatment and therapy. ADI-R is also a very useful tool in the diagnosis for scientific purposes due to its standardisation.

  15. Students' perspectives on promoting healthful food choices from campus vending machines: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Habiba I; Jarrar, Amjad H; Abo-El-Enen, Mostafa; Al Shamsi, Mariam; Al Ashqar, Huda

    2015-05-28

    Increasing the healthfulness of campus food environments is an important step in promoting healthful food choices among college students. This study explored university students' suggestions on promoting healthful food choices from campus vending machines. It also examined factors influencing students' food choices from vending machines. Peer-led semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 43 undergraduate students (33 females and 10 males) recruited from students enrolled in an introductory nutrition course in a large national university in the United Arab Emirates. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and coded to generate themes using N-Vivo software. Accessibility, peer influence, and busy schedules were the main factors influencing students' food choices from campus vending machines. Participants expressed the need to improve the nutritional quality of the food items sold in the campus vending machines. Recommendations for students' nutrition educational activities included placing nutrition tips on or beside the vending machines and using active learning methods, such as competitions on nutrition knowledge. The results of this study have useful applications in improving the campus food environment and nutrition education opportunities at the university to assist students in making healthful food choices.

  16. New Perspectives From Unstructured Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the early 1980s, Ray Pahl, a sociologist at the University of Kent, and PhD student Claire Wallace conducted interviews examining young people’s experiences of growing up, work, and unemployment on the Isle of Sheppey; these interviews are now deposited at the University of Essex, and this article examines how historians and others might reuse them to interrogate other subjects. The article examines one working-class young woman’s ideas about gender and sexuality in the early 1980s, using the Listening Guide method developed by psychologist Carol Gilligan to probe the individual subjectivity and emotion, as well as the cultural discourses at play in this interview. The interviewee was a young woman who was involved in a culture of casual sex with men “on the ships,” and the article focuses on how she saw the exchanges of money, drink, and gifts between them and herself, and how she avoided seeing her actions as “prostitution.” The analysis shows how in a particular locality in the early 1980s, a particular subculture could allow some young women to sidestep the dominant codes governing young, working-class women’s sexuality and go “on the ships” without seeing this as marking them as “prostitutes”’ or any related category. Thus, the article troubles the ontology of “prostitution” as a category. It also suggests how we can use a single individual’s narrative to offer a broader account of cultures or subcultures, by starting with the individual and examining how one subjectivity navigated and interacted with broader cultural discourses. Finally, this article also offers suggestions about some of the methodological and ethical issues with reusing archived sociological data but argues that it holds rich possibilities.

  17. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  18. Engaging families through motivational interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Adrienne A; Wright, Katherine S

    2014-10-01

    Helping parents change key behaviors may reduce the risk of child maltreatment. However, traditional provider-centered approaches to working with the parents of pediatric patients may increase resistance to behavioral change. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a patient-centered communication technique that helps address problems of provider-centered approaches. In this article, evidence for use of MI to address several risk factors for child maltreatment is reviewed, including parental substance abuse, partner violence, depression treatment, harsh punishment, and parental management of children's health. Fundamental components of MI that may be incorporated into clinical practice are presented.

  19. STS-109 Crew Interviews - Carey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 pilot Duane G. Carey is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, as well as an extended description of his role in the Orbiter's return landing. As its primary objective, this mission has the maintenance of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Following the Columbia Orbiter's rendezvous with the telescope, extravehicular activities (EVA) will focus on repairs to and augmentation of the HST.

  20. STS-109 Crew Interviews - Carey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 pilot Duane G. Carey is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, as well as an extended description of his role in the Orbiter's return landing. As its primary objective, this mission has the maintenance of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Following the Columbia Orbiter's rendezvous with the telescope, extravehicular activities (EVA) will focus on repairs to and augmentation of the HST.

  1. Leaning in to "muddy" interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Tanggaard, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, qualitative research has been acknowledged as a peopled practice in which subjectivities come into play. The main argument presented in this article is that qualitative research involves “muddy,” troublesome, interactional passages, because of a complex interplay between...... subjectivities, situated identities, emotions, and conversational genres. Based on ethnographic fieldwork at a Danish Vocational Educational Training College, we introduce the concept of “leaning in” to provide an analytical grasp of the “muddy” interactional tension field in an interview situation, in which...

  2. An interview with Olivier Pourquie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, James

    2010-02-01

    Olivier Pourquié is the new director of the Institute of Genetics and Molecular and Cellular Biology (IGBMC) in Strasbourg, France, and as of this month takes on another crucially important role in the developmental community - that of Development's new Editor in Chief. Recently, we asked James Briscoe, in his capacity as a director of the Company of Biologists, to interview Olivier and to discover more about his research career and interests and how they will shape the future content and directions of Development.

  3. An Interview with Steven Millhauser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Étienne Février

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Etienne Février : I would like to begin this interview with a question about architecture. Images of architecture appear frequently in your fiction, from Martin Dressler to more recent collections like Dangerous Laughter. In that collection’s “thirteen stories,” we find a tower reaching all the way to heaven, a life-size replica of a town so precise that even the “levels of salt in the saltshakers” match those of the original town, and a series of outwardly expanding domes—covering a house, f...

  4. How to Win a Job Interview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Hong-yu

    2015-01-01

    Taking an interview is an important step in job application. The paper starts from resume preparation and understand⁃ing of the company culture. Common issues are analyzed, generalized and summarized in the interview. It is necessary to conduct a mock interview in advance. Suggestions on applicant’s dressing, eye contact, courtesy and responses are made and a thank-you note should be sent to the interviewer after the interview.

  5. How do health service professionals consider human factors when purchasing interactive medical devices? A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Christopher James; Blandford, Ann

    2017-03-01

    We present findings of a UK study into how those involved in purchasing interactive medical devices go about evaluating usability, the challenges that arise, and opportunities for improvement. The study focused on procurement of infusion devices because these are used by various professionals across healthcare. A semi-structured interview study was carried out involving a range of stakeholders (20 in total) involved in or impacted by medical device procurement. Data was analysed using thematic analysis, a qualitative method designed to support the identification, analysis and reporting of patterns. In principle, health service purchasing was found to accommodate consideration of equipment usability. In practice, the evaluation process was driven primarily by engineering standards; assessment of local needs did not accommodate substantive assessment of usability; and choice was limited by the availability of equipment on the marketplace. We discuss ways in which purchasing could be improved through techniques that account for social circumstances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Situating mental health work in place: Qualitative findings from interviews with Veterans in Southeastern Louisiana and Northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Traci H; Koenig, Christopher J; Zamora, Kara; Hill, Coleen; Uddo, Madeline; Kelly, Adam P; Hamilton, Michelle F; Curran, Geoffrey M; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Seal, Karen H

    2017-09-01

    Most chronic illness management occurs outside clinics and hospitals, in the everyday lives of individuals. We use data from semi-structured interviews with 37 veterans from Southeastern Louisiana and Northern California to illustrate how "health work" for mental health concerns are shaped by place. Using health work as an orienting concept for analysis, we discerned variation between the two study sites in how Veterans used interacting with the natural environment, cultivating time alone, and religious practice to manage their mental health and well-being. Through these findings, we advocate for a situated notion of health work that is mindful of how health-related behaviors are shaped by place and the attributes that constitute place. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Interview with Lisa Shipley. Interviewed by Lisa Parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Lisa

    2013-08-01

    Lisa Shipley is Vice President of Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Drug Metabolism at Merck Research Laboratories. She is responsible for preclinical and clinical ADME activities and molecular biomarker assay development activities at all Merck research sites and support of all programs from discovery through to post-product launch. Prior to joining Merck in 2008, Shipley spent over 20 years at Eli Lilly and Company in roles of increasing responsibility, including the positions of executive director at Lean Six Sigma and vice president of Drug Disposition, PK/PD and Trial Simulations. Shipley obtained her undergraduate degree from McDaniel College and her doctoral degree in Pharmacology and Toxicology from the University of Maryland at Baltimore. This interview was conducted by Lisa Parks, Assistant Commissioning Editor of Bioanalysis.

  8. Chapter Twelve

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    dissemination in Nigeria· Some local jingles from Radio Nigeria Purity F.M. .... Indigenous Language in Advertisement: Problems and Prospects – Thecla ... the rural newspapers from performing their role of rural development· The ..... Sharma Raman, M· and, S (2004), Technical Communication Principle and Practice· India:.

  9. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Ashby

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Commander Jeffrey Ashby is seen during this preflight interview, answering questions about his inspiration in becoming an astronaut and his career path and provides an overview of the mission. Ashby outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S1 truss) and the importance that the S1 truss will have in the development of the International Space Station (ISS). Ashby discusses the delivery and installation of the S1 truss scheduled to be done in the planned EVAs in some detail. He touches on the use and operation of the Canadarm 2 robotic arm in this process and outlines what supplies will be exchanged with the resident crew of the ISS during transfer activities. He ends with his thoughts on the value of the ISS in fostering international cooperation.

  10. STS-112 Crew Interviews - Magnus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Specialist 2 Sandra H. Magnus is seen during a prelaunch interview. She answers questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. She gives details on the mission's goals, the most significant of which will be the installation of the S-1 truss structure on the International Space Station (ISS). The installation, one in a series of truss extending missions, will be complicated and will require the use of the robotic arm as well as extravehicular activity (EVA) by astronauts. Magnus also describes her function in the performance of transfer operations. Brief descriptions are given of experiments on board the ISS as well as on board the Shuttle.

  11. Interview with Theo van Leeuwen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Moschini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of LEA features an interview with Professor Theo van Leeuwen, where – starting from the fundamental role of the Hallidayan socio-semiotic approach to language in the development of Multimodality – he illustrates the background of his theoretical work as social semiotician and critical discourse analyst. Theo van Leeuwen broadly deals with issues such as the new emerging field of Critical Multimodal Studies, the importance of the socio-cultural perspective in Multimodality and the potential encounter between Multimodality and Cognitivism, with special reference to the concept of “social cognition” and to Metaphor Theory. He concludes his conversation with a reflection on the function of Studies in the Humanities in a specialized and digitally mediated world.

  12. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Yurchikhin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A preflight interview with mission specialist Fyodor Yurchikhin is presented. He worked for a long time in Energia in the Russian Mission Control Center (MCC). Yurchikhin discusses the main goal of the STS-112 flight, which is to install the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss) on the International Space Station. He also talks about the three space walks required to install the S1. After the installation of S1, work with the bolts and cameras are performed. Yurchikhin is involved in working with nitrogen and ammonia jumpers. He expresses the complexity of his work, but says that he and the other crew members are ready for the challenge.

  13. 基于关系数据库的半结构化XML数据组织技术%Semi-structured XM L data organization technology based on relational database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹叡; 吴玲达; 崔亮

    2014-01-01

    There are many XML data organization and management technologies .XML data ,data schemata ,and semi-structu-red XML data features were described ,the XML database and XML data storage methods were introduced ,main XML data organiza-tion strategies in the relational database were discussed .The semi-structured XML encoding was divided into the order encoding , the path encoding ,the hybrid encoding and the update-supporting extend encoding based on the encoding mechanism .The semi-structured encoding technology was analyzed and summarized .The XML data organization technology development tendency was prospected ,and the foundation for further XML data organization technology research was provided .%XM L数据的组织和管理存在多种方法。描述XM L数据、模式以及半结构化XM L数据特点,介绍XM L数据库与XM L数据存储方法,讨论XM L数据在关系数据库中的组织策略;基于编码机制,将半结构化XM L 编码分成次序编码、路径编码、混合编码和支持更新的扩展编码,分析总结半结构化XM L数据编码技术,展望XM L数据组织技术的发展趋势,为进一步进行XM L数据组织技术研究提供基础。

  14. An Interview with Hermann Kant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E. Holmes

    1979-08-01

    Full Text Available In an interview with Joan E. Holmes (University of Kansas, Hermann Kant, novelist and current president of the Writers Union of the German Democratic Republic (GDR or East Germany, discusses his own work, literary developments since 1949 in the GDR, and the changing concept of socialist realism. Central to all of these topics is the role of the writer and the function of literature in a socialist system, a question which resulted in a heated controversy during the summer and fall of 1979 in the GDR. The crux of the matter lies in the nature of Marxist theory and is at least as old as the Sickingen debate of 1859, when Marx, Engels and Lassalle discussed the kind of literature that the fledgling socialist movement should encourage in order to promote the building of a future communist society. The question of the role of the author and the function of literature has reappeared since that time in various forms—in the formulation of the concept of socialist realism in the 1930's by Gorki and Soviet Party Secretary Zhadanov, in the formalism debates of the 1950's, in the dictates of the Bitterfelder Way (1960's, and in the liberalizing influence of the proclamations of the Eighth Party Congress in 1971. Since the Ninth Party Congress (May 1976, the controversy has become a critical matter in the cultural policies of the GDR, a country where literature is considered an important political tool. Hermann Kant, in the tradition of the Eighth and Ninth Party Congresses, presents in this interview a broad interpretation of the concept of socialist realism, while at the same time strongly emphasizing the responsibility of the author vis à vis the socialist society. He questions whether too much rapid change can be beneficial for East Germany, and suggests that both tolerance and caution are required.

  15. Motivational Interviewing and Rehabilitation Counseling Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C. C.; McMahon, B. T.

    2004-01-01

    This article explores commonalities between rehabilitation counseling and the counseling approach known as motivational interviewing. Motivational interviewing is an empirically supported, clientcentered, directive counseling approach designed to promote client motivation and reduce motivational conflicts and barriers to change. The underpinnings…

  16. The MLA Interview: The Department's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoff, Dianne F.

    1999-01-01

    Offers advice about interviewing at the Modern Language Association (MLA) convention: practice or rehearse issues; allow enthusiasm about teaching to show; model good teaching practices in the interview; and listen thoughtfully and resist the temptation to talk too much. (RS)

  17. Using Joint Interviews to Add Analytic Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Louisa; Green, Judith

    2016-10-01

    Joint interviewing has been frequently used in health research, and is the subject of a growing methodological literature. We review this literature, and build on it by drawing on a case study of how people make decisions about taking statins. This highlights two ways in which a dyadic approach to joint interviewing can add analytic value compared with individual interviewing. First, the analysis of interaction within joint interviews can help to explicate tacit knowledge and to illuminate the range of often hard-to-access resources that are drawn upon in making decisions. Second, joint interviews mitigate some of the weaknesses of interviewing as a method for studying practices; we offer a cautious defense of the often-tacit assumption that the "naturalness" of joint interviews strengthens their credibility as the basis for analytic inferences. We suggest that joint interviews are a particularly appropriate method for studying complex shared practices such as making health decisions.

  18. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television.......Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television....

  19. An Interview with Paul A. Samuelson

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, William A.; Samuelson, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper consists of the page proofs of W. A. Barnett's interview of Paul A. Samuelson, to appear in print in the journal, Macroeconomic Dynamics, in September 2004. To our knowledge, this is the first and only interview of Paul A. Samuelson published in a professional economics journal. In addition, this is the only interview conducted personally by the Editor of Macroeconomic Dynamics, William A. Barnett. The interview covers Samuelson's views on the economics profession from 1929 to the ...

  20. An Interview with Jose Eustaquio Romao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordao, Clarissa Menezes

    2007-01-01

    In anticipation of the European Union (EU) Year of Intercultural Dialogue, 2008, Clarissa Menezes Jordao interviewed Jose Eustaquio Romao, Director of the Paulo Freire Institute in Brazil. Her edited translation of that interview is presented here. In the interview Romao, guided by the legacy of Brazilian educator, Paulo Freire, discusses the…

  1. Qualitative Interviewing as an Embodied Emotional Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzy, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The article argues that the emotional framing of interviews plays a major role in shaping the content of interviews. Drawing on the psychoanalytic theory of Jessica Benjamin and Luce Irigaray, the article describes how interviews can be experienced as either conquest or communion. Qualitative researchers typically focus on the cognitively…

  2. Interviewing Judges in the Transnational Context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaremba, Urszula; Mak, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the problem of qualitative interviewing in the field of legal studies, and more precisely the practice of interviewing judges. In the last five years the authors of this article conducted two different research projects which involved interviewing judges as a research method.

  3. 14 CFR 1213.105 - Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interviews. 1213.105 Section 1213.105... INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.105 Interviews. (a) Only spokespersons designated by the Assistant Administrator for... regarding NASA policy, programmatic, and budget issues. (b) In response to media interview requests,...

  4. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personal interviews. 540.63 Section 540... WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.63 Personal interviews. (a) An inmate may not receive compensation or anything of value for interviews with the news media. (b) Either an...

  5. The Emotionally Challenging, Open-Ended Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    For most job candidates, the interview experience is "an emotionally challenging endeavor." To succeed in interviews, candidates must understand the emotional labor needed to "manage their feelings" as they "create a publicly observable facial and bodily display." This is particularly true when recruiters use open-ended interviews that are not…

  6. Telephone Interviewing Practices within Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Debra; Robbins, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the use of telephone interviews within academic libraries by surveying the 112 academic institutional members of the Association of Research Libraries to identify how telephone interviews are utilized. By comparing the literature to the research results, the authors conclude with best practices for telephone interviews.…

  7. Video interview with Michael Dell

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Michael Dell, founder and presently Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Office of the DELL computer company visited CERN on Tuesday 26th January 2010. The Bulletin and the Video productions team had the opportunity to meet him. The video interview is transcribed for your convenience.   Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer. What motivated you to come and visit CERN? I obviously heard about the great science and research has going on here, and DELL is very pleased to be a partner and providing a lot of the computers to analyse the data and I really wanted to see for myself in person, some of the great science that is going on here. What is your view on fundamental research in IT, and in general? I think if you look at the field of science in the last hundred years, we have been able to solve a lot of problems, but there are still lots of unsolved problems and unsolved mysteries. And it is only through basic fundamental research that we will address these probl...

  8. The meaning of quality work from the general practitioner's perspective: an interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkansson Anders

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quality of health care and its costs have been a subject of considerable attention and lively discussion. Various methods have been introduced to measure, assess, and improve the quality of health care. Many professionals in health care have criticized quality work and its methods as being unsuitable for health care. The aim of the study was to obtain a deeper understanding of the meaning of quality work from the general practitioner's perspective. Methods Fourteen general practitioners, seven women and seven men, were interviewed with the aid of a semi-structured interview guide about their experience of quality work. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data collection and analysis were guided by a phenomenological approach intended to capture the essence of the statements. Results Two fundamentally different ways to view quality work emerged from the statements: A pronounced top-down perspective with elements of control, and an intra-profession or bottom-up perspective. From the top-down perspective, quality work was described as something that infringes professional freedom. From the bottom-up perspective the statements described quality work as a self-evident duty and as a professional attitude to the medical vocation, guided by the principles of medical ethics. Follow-up with a bottom-up approach is best done in internal processes, with the profession itself designing structures and methods based on its own needs. Conclusions The study indicates that general practitioners view internal follow-up as a professional obligation but external control as an imposition. This opposition entails a difficulty in achieving systematism in follow-up and quality work in health care. If the statutory standards for systematic quality work are to gain a real foothold, they must be packaged in such a way that general practitioners feel that both perspectives can be reconciled.

  9. Pharmacists’ perceptions of their emerging general practice roles in UK primary care: a qualitative interview study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Jo; Sansom, Anna; Sims, Laura; Healey, Mark; Kingsland, Ellie; Campbell, John

    2017-01-01

    Background UK general practice is experiencing a workload crisis. Pharmacists are the third largest healthcare profession in the UK; however, their skills are a currently underutilised and potentially highly valuable resource for primary health care. This study forms part of the evaluation of an innovative training programme for pharmacists who are interested in extended roles in primary care, advocated by a UK collaborative ‘10-point GP workforce action plan’. Aim To explore pharmacists’ perceptions of primary care roles including the potential for greater integration of their profession into general practice. Design and setting A qualitative interview study in UK primary care carried out between October 2015 and July 2016. Method Pharmacists were purposively sampled by level of experience, geographical location, and type of workplace. Two confidential semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted — one before and one after the training programme. A constant comparative, inductive approach to thematic analysis was used. Results Sixteen participants were interviewed. The themes related to: initial expectations of the general practice role, varying by participants’ experience of primary care; the influence of the training course with respect to managing uncertainty, critical appraisal skills, and confidence for the role; and predictions for the future of this role. Conclusion There is enthusiasm and willingness among pharmacists for new, extended roles in primary care, which could effectively relieve GP workload pressures. A definition of the role, with examples of the knowledge, skills, and attributes required, should be made available to pharmacists, primary care teams, and the public. Training should include clinical skills teaching, set in context through exposure to general practice, and delivered motivationally by primary care practitioners. PMID:28673959

  10. Professional Expertise in Magic – Reflecting on professional expertise in magic:An interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olli eRissanen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present investigation was to analyse interviews of highly regarded Finnish magicians. Social network analysis (N=120 was used to identify Finland’s most highly regarded magicians (N=16. The selected participants’ careers in professional magic and various aspects of their professional conduct were examined by relying on semi-structured interviews. The results revealed that cultivation of professional level competence in magic usually requires an extensive period of time compared with other domains of expertise. Magic is a unique performing art and it differs from other professions focusing on deceiving the audience. A distinctive feature of magical expertise is that the process takes place entirely through informal training supported by communities of magical practitioners. Three interrelated aspects of magical activity were distinguished: magic tricks, performance, and audience. Although magic tricks constitute a central aspect of magic activity, the participants did not talk about their tricks extensively; this is in accordance with the secretive nature of magic culture.The interviews revealed that a core aspect of the magicians’ activity is performance in front of an audience that repeatedly validates competence cultivated through years of practice. The interviewees reported investing a great deal of effort in planning, orchestrating, and reflecting on their performances. Close interaction with the audience plays an important role in most interviewees’ activity. Many participants put a great deal of effort in developing novel magic tricks. It is common to borrow magic effects from fellow magicians and develop novel methods of implementation. Because magic tricks or programs are not copyrighted, many interviewees considered stealing an unacceptable and unethical aspect of magical activity. The interviewees highlighted the importance of personality and charisma in the successful pursuit of magic activity.

  11. Factors that impact on the safety of patient handovers: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemsen, Inger Margrete Dyrholm; Madsen, Marlene Dyrløv; Pedersen, Lene Funck; Michaelsen, Lisa; Pedersen, Anette Vesterskov; Andersen, Henning Boje; Østergaard, Doris

    2012-07-01

    Improvement of clinical handover is fundamental to meet the challenges of patient safety. The primary aim of this interview study is to explore healthcare professionals' attitudes and experiences with critical episodes in patient handover in order to elucidate factors that impact on handover from ambulance to hospitals and within and between hospitals. The secondary aim is to identify possible solutions to optimise handovers, defined as "situations where the professional responsibility for some or all aspects of a patient's diagnosis, treatment or care is transferred to another person on a temporary or permanent basis". We conducted 47 semi-structured single-person interviews in a large university hospital in the Capital Region in Denmark in 2008 and 2009 to obtain a comprehensive picture of clinicians' perceptions of self-experienced critical episodes in handovers. We included different types of handover processes that take place within several specialties. A total of 23 nurses, three nurse assistants, 13 physicians, five paramedics, two orderlies, and one radiographer from different departments and units were interviewed. We found eight central factors to have an impact on patient safety in handover situations: communication, information, organisation, infrastructure, professionalism, responsibility, team awareness, and culture. The eight factors identified indicate that handovers are complex situations. The organisation did not see patient handover as a critical safety point of hospitalisation, revealing that the safety culture in regard to handover was immature. Work was done in silos and many of the handover barriers were seen to be related to the fact that only few had a full picture of a patient's complete pathway.

  12. Experiences of care planning in England: interviews with patients with long term conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newbould Jenny

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and impact of long term conditions continues to rise. Care planning for people with long term conditions has been a policy priority in England for chronic disease management. However, it is not clear how care planning is currently understood, translated and implemented in primary care. This study explores experience of care planning in patients with long term conditions in three areas in England. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 predominantly elderly patients with multiple long term conditions. The interviews were designed to explore variations in and emergent experiences of care planning. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts involved reflexively coding and re-coding data into categories and themes. Results No participants reported experiencing explicit care planning discussions or receiving written documentation setting out a negotiated care plan and they were unfamiliar with the term ‘care planning’. However, most described some components of care planning which occurred over a number of contacts with health care professionals which we term”reactive” care planning. Here, key elements of care planning including goal setting and action planning were rare. Additionally, poor continuity and coordination of care, lack of time in consultations, and patient concerns about what was legitimate to discuss with the doctor were described. Conclusions Amongst this population, elements of care planning were present in their accounts, but a structured, comprehensive process and consequent written record (as outlined in English Department of Health policy was not evident. Further research needs to explore the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to care planning for different patient groups.

  13. Clinical decision making in the recognition of dying: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Paul; Dowding, Dawn; Johnson, Miriam

    2017-01-25

    Recognising dying is an essential clinical skill for general and palliative care professionals alike. Despite the high importance, both identification and good clinical care of the dying patient remains extremely difficult and often controversial in clinical practice. This study aimed to answer the question: "What factors influence medical and nursing staff when recognising dying in end-stage cancer and heart failure patients?" This study used a descriptive approach to decision-making theory. Participants were purposively sampled for profession (doctor or nurse), specialty (cardiology or oncology) and grade (senior vs junior). Recruitment continued until data saturation was reached. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with NHS medical and nursing staff in an NHS Trust which contained cancer and cardiology tertiary referral centres. An interview schedule was designed, based on decision-making literature. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed and analysed using thematic framework. Data were managed with Atlas.ti. Saturation was achieved with 19 participants (7 seniors; 8 intermediate level staff; 4 juniors). There were 11 oncologists (6 doctors, 5 nurses) and 8 cardiologists (3 doctors, 5 nurses). Six themes were generated: information used; decision processes; modifying factors; implementation; reflecting on decisions and related decisions. The decision process described was time-dependent, ongoing and iterative, and relies heavily on intuition. This study supports the need to recognise the strengths and weaknesses of expertise and intuition as part of the decision process, and of placing the recognition of dying in a time-dependent context. Clinicians should also be prepared to accept and convey the uncertainty surrounding these decisions, both in practice and in communication with patients and carers.

  14. Isolation and characterization of twelve microsatellite loci for the Japanese Devilray (Mobula japanica)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortvliet, Marloes; Galvan-Magana, Felipe; Bernardi, Giacomo; Croll, Donald A.; Olsen, Jeanine L.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve polymorphic microsatellites loci were characterized for Mobula japanica (Japanese Devilray) using an enrichment protocol. All but two loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with no evidence of linkage disequilibrium or null-alleles for a sample of 40 individuals from two populations. The num

  15. 17 CFR 210.3-06 - Financial statements covering a period of nine to twelve months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ACT OF 1933, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940, AND ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975... to twelve months. Except with respect to registered investment companies, the filing of...

  16. Twelve new species of Triplocania Roesler (Psocodea: 'Psocoptera': Ptiloneuridae), from South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Neto, Alberto Moreira Da; Aldrete, Alfonso N García; Rafael, José Albertino

    2016-05-09

    Twelve species of Triplocania, seven based on male and female specimens and five based on male specimens, are here described and illustrated; nine species are Brazilian, three are Ecuadorian, and one of the latter is shared with Peru. Comments on sexes known and distribution of the species are included.

  17. Portrayal of Life Form in Selected Biographies for Children Eight to Twelve Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Shirley Lois

    This study describes and analyzes, in a critical literary manner, selected biographies for children eight to twelve years of age. Biographies of Jane Addams, Cesar Chavez, Mohandas Gandhi, Toyohiko Kagawa, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Albert Schweitzer are viewed from the perspective of a literary criterion based on the principles of design to…

  18. Premarital sex in the last twelve months and its predictors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Premarital sex in the last twelve months and its predictors among students of ... Statistical significance was determined through a 95% confidence level. ... having comprehensive knowledge of HIV [AOR(95% CI)=1.5(1.01-2.10)], alcohol use ...

  19. Portrayal of Life Form in Selected Biographies for Children Eight to Twelve Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Shirley Lois

    This study describes and analyzes, in a critical literary manner, selected biographies for children eight to twelve years of age. Biographies of Jane Addams, Cesar Chavez, Mohandas Gandhi, Toyohiko Kagawa, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Albert Schweitzer are viewed from the perspective of a literary criterion based on the principles of design to…

  20. A novel double quad-inverter configuration for multilevel twelve-phase open-winding converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padmanaban, Sanjeevi Kumar; Blaabjerg, Frede; Wheeler, Patrick William

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a novel proposal of double quad-inverter configuration for multilevel twelve-phase open-winding ac converter. Modular power units are developed from reconfigured eight classical three-phase voltage source inverters (VSIs). Each VSI has one additional bi-directional switching ...

  1. Sequencing learning experiences to engage different level learners in the workplace: An interview study with excellent clinical teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H Carrie; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Teherani, Arianne; Fogh, Shannon; Kobashi, Brent; ten Cate, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Learning in the clinical workplace can appear to rely on opportunistic teaching. The cognitive apprenticeship model describes assigning tasks based on learner rather than just workplace needs. This study aimed to determine how excellent clinical teachers select clinical learning experiences to support the workplace participation and development of different level learners. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we conducted semi-structured interviews with medical school faculty identified as excellent clinical teachers teaching multiple levels of learners. We explored their approach to teach different level learners and their perceived role in promoting learner development. We performed thematic analysis of the interview transcripts using open and axial coding. We interviewed 19 clinical teachers and identified three themes related to their teaching approach: sequencing of learning experiences, selection of learning activities and teacher responsibilities. All teachers used sequencing as a teaching strategy by varying content, complexity and expectations by learner level. The teachers initially selected learning activities based on learner level and adjusted for individual competencies over time. They identified teacher responsibilities for learner education and patient safety, and used sequencing to promote both. Excellent clinical teachers described strategies for matching available learning opportunities to learners' developmental levels to safely engage learners and improve learning in the clinical workplace.

  2. “More bang for the buck”: exploring optimal approaches for guideline implementation through interviews with international developers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi Anna R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population based studies show that guidelines are underused. Surveys of international guideline developers found that many do not implement their guidelines. The purpose of this research was to interview guideline developers about implementation approaches and resources. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with representatives of guideline development agencies identified in the National Guideline Clearinghouse and sampled by country, type of developer, and guideline clinical indication. Participants were asked to comment on the benefits and resource implications of three approaches for guideline implementation that varied by responsibility: developers, intermediaries, or users. Results Thirty individuals from seven countries were interviewed, representing government (n = 12 and professional (n = 18 organizations that produced guidelines for a variety of clinical indications. Organizations with an implementation mandate featured widely inconsistent funding and staffing models, variable approaches for choosing promotional strategies, and an array of dissemination activities. When asked to choose a preferred approach, most participants selected the option of including information within guidelines that would help users to implement them. Given variable mandate and resources for implementation, it was considered the most feasible approach, and therefore most likely to have impact due to potentially broad use. Conclusions While implementation approaches and strategies need not be standardized across organizations, the findings may be used by health care policy makers and managers, and guideline developers to generate strategic and operational plans that optimize implementation capacity. Further research is needed to examine how to optimize implementation capacity by guideline developers, intermediaries and users.

  3. Transitioning from Clinical to Qualitative Research Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Hunt BSc (PT, PhD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper one aspect of the transition that must be made by experienced clinicians who become involved in conducting qualitative health research is examined, specifically, the differences between clinical and research interviewing. A clinician who is skillful and comfortable carrying out a clinical interview may not initially apprehend the important differences between these categories and contexts of interviewing. This situation can lead to difficulties and diminished quality of data collection because the purpose, techniques and orientation of a qualitative research interview are distinct from those of the clinical interview. Appreciation of these differences between interview contexts and genres, and strategies for addressing challenges associated with these differences, can help clinician researchers to become successful qualitative interviewers.

  4. Current status of health technology reassessment of non-drug technologies: survey and key informant interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leggett Laura E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health Technology Reassessment (HTR is a structured, evidence-based assessment of the clinical, social, ethical and economic effects of a technology currently used in the health care system, to inform optimal use of that technology in comparison to its alternatives. Little is known about current international HTR practices. The objective of this research was to summarize experience-based information gathered from international experts on the development, initiation and implementation of a HTR program. Methods A mixed methods approach, using a survey and in-depth interviews, was adopted. The survey covered 8 concepts: prioritization/identification of potentially obsolete technologies; program development; implementation; mitigation; program championing; stakeholder engagement; monitoring; and reinvestment. Members of Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi and the International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA formed the sampling frame. Participation was solicited via email and the survey was administered online using SurveyMonkey. Survey results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. To gather more in-depth knowledge, semi-structured interviews were conducted among organizations with active HTR programs. Interview questions were developed using the same 8 concepts. The hour-long interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Results Ninety-five individuals responded to the survey: 49 were not discussing HTR, 21 were beginning to discuss HTR, nine were imminently developing a program, and 16 participants had programs and were completing reassessments. The survey results revealed that methods vary widely and that although HTR is a powerful tool, it is currently not being used to its full potential. Of the 16 with active programs, nine agreed to participate in follow-up interviews. Interview participants identified early and extensive stakeholder

  5. Exploratory Assessments of Child Abuse: Children's Responses to Interviewer's Questions across Multiple Interview Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tess; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study extends field research on interviews with young children suspected of having been abused by examining multiple assessment interviews designed to be inquisitory and exploratory, rather than formal evidential or forensic interviews. Methods: Sixty-six interviews with 24 children between the ages of 3 and 6 years who were…

  6. Evaluation of an interviewer as a function of interviewer gaze, reinforcement of subject gaze, and interviewer attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinke, C L; Staneski, R A; Berger, D E

    1975-01-01

    Male subjects were interviewed by female interviewers who gazed constantly, intermittently, or not at all. Experimental subjects were reinforced with green light feedback whenever they gazed at the interviewers and were punished with red light feedback when they averted gaze for more than 6 seconds. Control subjects received noncontingent green and red light feedback. Although gaze of experimental subjects toward the interviewers was increased significantly, their attitudes toward the interviewers remained the same. This was probably because the subjects did not discriminate that their gazing behavior had changed. Subjects gave the most unfavorable reactions to the nongazing interviewers, rating them as least attractive, giving them the shortest answers, and sitting farthest from them during the debriefing session. Subjects did not discriminate between high and low attractive interviewers, except that the latter were rated disproportionately low on attentiveness if they did not gaze. Interviewers with high rates of talking were preferred over interviewers with low rates of talking. It was concluded that interpersonal attraction is related to gaze and physical attractiveness through a number of mediating variables which will have to be isolated more specifically in future research.

  7. 档案管理中半结构化数据智能检索研究%Research on semi-structured data by intelligent retrieval in archives management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金保华; 张兴; 郭小娟

    2015-01-01

    档案数据形式多样、数据量巨大,特别是半结构化数据结构复杂,给档案管理工作造成巨大困难。针对这种情况提出了一种基于本体的智能档案信息检索系统。该系统的处理过程分为两个部分:第一部分是半结构化数据的处理,采用特征数据提取的方法对半结构化数据进行特征提取,进而重组成为结构化数据;第二部分是智能检索的实现,利用基于本体的逻辑推理实现语义层次的智能检索。实验结果表明,该智能检索系统较基于关键字的传统检索在查全率和查准率上都有了较大提高。%The from variely and large volume of archival data especially the complexity of semi-structured data caused great difficulties in management of archives.Considering this,an intelligent information retriev-al system based on ontology was proposed.This process of the system was composed of two parts:the first part was dealing with the semi-structured data.The method of feature data extraction was used to make fea-ture extraction to serni-structure data and then reformed them into structure data.The second part was the implemantation of the intelligence retrieval by using logical reasoning based on ontology to realize intelli-gent retrieval in semantic level.The experimental results showed that compared with the traditional key-word-based retrieval,the intelligent retrieval system greatly improved in the recall and accuracy.

  8. 基于群体智能的半结构化藏文文本聚类算法%A Semi-Structured Tibetan Text Clustering Algorithm Based on Swarm Intelligence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康健; 乔少杰; 格桑多吉; 韩楠; 洪西进; 尼玛扎西; 范小刚

    2014-01-01

    To apply swarm intelligence techniques to cluster semi-structured Tibetan Web texts, a semi-structured Tibetan text clustering algorithm based on swarm Intelligence ( SCAST) is proposed. Taking into a full consideration of accuracy and efficiency of Tibetan text clustering, a vector space model is used to express Tibetan texts, and the Tibetan texts and intelligent ants are randomly put in a two dimensional text vector space. Then, intelligent ants randomly select a Tibetan text, calculate the similarity between this text and others in the local area, and compute the probability of pick-up operation or drop-down operation to determine whether to pick up, move, or drop down the text. Finally, Tibetan texts are accurately clustered according to their similarities by iterative training of the proposed algorithm. The experimental results on real Tibetan Web text datasets show that the proposed algorithm is more accurate than the traditional κ-means clustering algorithm with average increase of 8 . 0%.%将群体智能技术应用于半结构化的藏文Web文本聚类,提出基于群体智能的半结构化藏文Web文本聚类算法( SCAST).充分考虑群体智能技术对藏文文本聚类准确性和时间效率的影响,SCAST算法首先运用向量空间模型表示藏文文本信息,将藏文文本和智能蚁群随机放置于一个文本向量空间中.然后智能蚂蚁随机选择藏文文本,计算藏文文本在当前局部区域内的相似性,获得拾起或者放下文本的概率,进而决定是否“拾起”,“移动”,“放下”藏文文本.最后通过多次迭代训练,将藏文文本按其相似性聚集在一起,得到最终聚类结果.大量真实藏文Web文本数据上的实验结果表明,相较于传统的κ-means聚类算法,基于群体智能的藏文文本聚类算法在聚类准确率上平均提高约8.0%.

  9. Challenges in the care for consanguineous couples: an exploratory interview study among general practitioners and midwives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teeuw Marieke E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is often suggested that an effort must be made to increase awareness among consanguineous couples of their reproductive risk, and to refer them for genetic counseling if needed. Primary care professionals are considered most appropriate for addressing the subject and identifying couples at risk during consultations in their practice. This Dutch study aims to explore the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of such professionals regarding their care for consanguineous couples. Methods Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with midwives and general practitioners. Results Although most primary care professionals considered it their task to inform couples about the risks of consanguinity, during consultations the topic was generally only briefly touched upon and quickly abandoned. Important reasons for this were professionals’ beliefs about religious and social values of couples, their low perception of the couples’ reproductive risk and expected limited feasibility of referral. Feelings of embarrassment regarding addressing consanguinity did not seem to play a significant role. Conclusions Primary care professional beliefs about their clients’ religious and social values, their attitudes toward the risk, and perceived limited options for referral seem to conflict with the professional norm to address the topic of consanguinity.

  10. Experiences of work ability in young workers: an exploratory interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Maria; Holmgren, Kristina; Sluiter, Judith K; Hagberg, Mats; Grimby-Ekman, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of and influences on work ability in young workers related to their work and life situation. In a qualitative study of a strategic sample of 12 young female and 12 young male workers, aged 25-30 years, in work or recently left work, recruited from the 5-year follow-up of a Swedish cohort, semi-structured interviews were performed to explore the experiences of work ability in these young workers. Systematic text condensation inspired by phenomenology was used in the analysis. Work ability was experienced as complex, consisting of four themes, each with three subthemes. To be alert and have energy, to possess sufficient education, skills and working life experience and experience meaningfulness and engagement in work, were perceived to be fundamental for work ability and were seen as the worker's own responsibility. Moreover, work ability can be improved or reduced by the psychosocial work climate, the work organization and the private life. Optimal work ability was experienced when all themes integrated in a positive way. Work ability was experienced as the worker's own responsibility that could be influenced by work circumstances and private life. To promote good work ability among young workers, work ability has to be understood in its specific context. Whether the understanding of work ability found in this study is explicit for the group of young adults needs to be explored in a more general population in further research.

  11. Birth environment facilitation by midwives assisting in non-hospital births: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Toshiko; Wakita, Mariko; Miyazaki, Kikuko; Nakayama, Takeo

    2014-07-01

    midwifery homes (similar to birth centres) are rich in midwifery wisdom and skills that differ from those in hospital obstetrical departments, and a certain percentage of pregnant women prefer birth in these settings. This study aimed to understand the organisation of the perinatal environment considered important by independent midwives in non-hospital settings and to clarify the processes involved. semi-structured qualitative interview study and constant comparative analysis. 14 independent midwives assisting at births in midwifery homes in Japan, and six independent midwives assisting at home births. Osaka, Kyoto, Nara, and Shiga, Japan. midwives assisting at non-hospital births organised the birth environment based on the following four categories: 'an environment where the mother and family are autonomous'; 'a physical environment that facilitates birth'; 'an environment that facilitates the movement of the mother for birth'; and 'scrupulous safety preparation'. These, along with their sub-categories, are presented in this paper. independent midwives considered it important to create a candid relationship between the midwife and the woman/family from the period of pregnancy to facilitate birth in which the woman and her family were autonomous. They also organised a distinctive environment for non-hospital birth, with preparations to guarantee safety. Experiential knowledge and skills played a major part in creating an environment to facilitate birth, and the effectiveness of this needs to be investigated objectively in future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Supervisor descriptions of veterinary student performance in the clinical workplace: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, E J

    2017-06-10

    This qualitative study investigated the qualities of veterinary student performance that inform a supervisor's impression of their competency. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 15 supervisors from different veterinary subdisciplines, to elicit descriptions of excellent, weak and marginal students. Thematic analysis of transcriptions revealed 12 themes, of which engagement was frequently discussed and of stated importance, and trustworthiness was a differentiator of weak and marginal students from excellent students. Other themes were knowledge, application of knowledge, technical and animal handling skills, communication, social interaction, personal functioning, caring for animals, impact, prospects and the difficulty in judging competency. Patterns of association of themes were found, however themes were also used independently in unique combinations for most students described. The findings show the range of abilities, behaviours, attitudes and personal characteristics of students that are considered by supervisors and how these are weighted and balanced. The key contribution of engagement and trustworthiness to the overall impression aligns with research indicating their importance for success in clinical practice, as both contributors to competency and indicators of it. The findings may inform future design and investigation of workplace-based learning and in-training evaluation, as well as conceptions of veterinary competency. British Veterinary Association.

  13. Interviewing the Interpretive Researcher: An Impressionist Tale

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rebecca K Frels; Anthony J Onwuegbuzie

    2012-01-01

    .... We believe that our exemplar of interviewing the interpretive researcher provides evidence of an effective strategy for addressing the crises of representation and legitimation for researchers...

  14. Anatomical studies on twelve clones of Camellia species with reference to their taxonomic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajanna L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical studies of leaf and stem of twelve clones of Camellia were investigated. Cross sections of the stem of all the clones exhibited a typical pattern of arrangement of tissues characteristics of woody plants. Two types of idioblastic sclereids were found in the medullary parenchyma of the taxa studied. While astrosclereids werepresent in 10 of the twelve clones, the vesciculose sclereids were found only in the four clones belonging to C. sinensis. Leaves of the clones show variations in the number of palisade layers. Astro sclereids, brachy sclereids, and dendritic forms were observed in the leaves, their distribution varying in the different clones. A few other micromorphological features are also recorded. Our study forms a basis for answering uncertainties in taxonomic revision in the genus Camellia.

  15. Descriptions of twelve new species of ochyroceratids (Araneae, Ochyroceratidae) from mainland Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupérré, Nadine

    2015-05-12

    Twelve new species in three different genera from the spider family Ochyroceratidae are described from mainland Ecuador: Speocera bioforestae sp. n., Speocera violacea sp. n., Speocera musgo sp. n., Ochyrocera rinocerotos sp. n., Ochyrocera callaina sp. n., Ochyrocera italoi sp. n., Ochyrocera minotaure sp. n., Ochyrocera losrios sp. n., Ochyrocera zabaleta sp. n., Ochyrocera otonga sp. n., Ochyrocera cashcatotoras sp. n. and Psiloochyrocera tortilis sp. n. Speocera machadoi Gertsch 1977 is transferred to Ochyrocera.

  16. A Hidden Twelve-Dimensional SuperPoincare Symmetry In Eleven Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bars, Itzhak; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Pasqua, Andrea; Zumino, Bruno

    2003-12-13

    First, we review a result in our previous paper, of how a ten-dimensional superparticle, taken off-shell, has a hidden eleven-dimensional superPoincare symmetry. Then, we show that the physical sector is defined by three first-class constraints which preserve the full eleven-dimensional symmetry. Applying the same concepts to the eleven dimensional superparticle, taken off-shell, we discover a hidden twelve dimensional superPoincare symmetry that governs the theory.

  17. Premarital Sex in the Last Twelve Months and Its Predictors among Students of Wollega University, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regassa, Tesfaye; Chala, Dereje; Adeba, Emiru

    2016-07-01

    Premarital sex increases the risk of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections including HIV if unprotected and contraception is not used. Thus, the objective of this study was to assess premarital sex in the last twelve months and its predictors among regular undergraduate students of Wollega University. A cross-sectional survey using pretested, structured questionnaire was conducted on a total of 704 regular undergraduate students of Wollega University from February to March, 2014. We used multistage sampling technique to recruit study participants. Binary and multivariable logistic regressions were performed using SPSS version 20 to assess predictors of premarital sex. Statistical significance was determined through a 95% confidence level. Wollega University youths who had premarital sex in the last twelve months were 28.4%; 55.5% of them did not use condom during last sex while 31.3% engaged in multiple sex. Being male [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)(95% Confidence Interval(CI))=2.7(1.58-4.75)], age 20-24 years [AOR(95%CI)=2.8(1.13-7.20)], training on how to use condom [AOR(95%CI)=1.7(1.17-2.46)], being tested for HIV [AOR(95%CI)=2.3(1.48-3.53)], using social media frequently [AOR(95%CI)=1.8(1.14-2.88)], having comprehensive knowledge of HIV [AOR(95% CI)=1.5(1.01-2.10)], alcohol use [AOR (95%CI)=2.2(1.31-3.56)] were associated with increased odds of premarital sex in the last twelve months. Nearly one-third of regular undergraduate students of the university were engaged in premarital sex in the last twelve months. Being male, using social media frequently and alcohol use were associated with increased odds of premarital sex in the stated period. Thus, higher institutions have to deliver abstinence messages alongside information about self-protection.

  18. Hidden twelve-dimensional super Poincaré symmetry in eleven dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Bars, Itzhak; Pasqua, A; Zumino, B; Bars, Itzhak; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Pasqua, Andrea; Zumino, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    First, we review a result in our previous paper, of how a ten-dimensional superparticle, taken off-shell, has a hidden eleven-dimensional superPoincare symmetry. Then, we show that the physical sector is defined by three first-class constraints which preserve the full eleven-dimensional symmetry. Applying the same concepts to the eleven dimensional superparticle, taken off-shell, we discover a hidden twelve dimensional superPoincare symmetry that governs the theory.

  19. Resemblance of symptoms for major depression assessed at interview versus from hospital record review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnostic information for psychiatric research often depends on both clinical interviews and medical records. Although discrepancies between these two sources are well known, there have been few studies into the degree and origins of inconsistencies. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared data from structured interviews and medical records on 1,970 Han Chinese women with recurrent DSM-IV major depression (MD. Correlations were high for age at onset of MD (0.93 and number of episodes (0.70, intermediate for family history (+0.62 and duration of longest episode (+0.43 and variable but generally more modest for individual depressive symptoms (mean kappa = 0.32. Four factors were identified for twelve symptoms from medical records and the same four factors emerged from analysis of structured interviews. Factor congruencies were high but the correlation of factors between interviews and records were modest (i.e. +0.2 to +0.4. CONCLUSIONS: Structured interviews and medical records are highly concordant for age of onset, and the number and length of episodes, but agree more modestly for individual symptoms and symptom factors. The modesty of these correlations probably arises from multiple factors including i inconsistency in the definition of the worst episode, ii inaccuracies in self-report and iii difficulties in coding medical records where symptoms were recorded solely for clinical purposes.

  20. Skype interviewing: The new generation of online synchronous interview in qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roksana Janghorban

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly used method for data collection in qualitative research is interviewing. With technology changes over the last few decades, the online interview has overcome time and financial constraints, geographical dispersion, and physical mobility boundaries, which have adversely affected onsite interviews. Skype as a synchronous online service offers researchers the possibility of conducting individual interviews as well as small focus groups, comparable to onsite types. This commentary presents the characteristics of the Skype interview as an alternative or supplemental choice to investigators who want to change their conventional approach of interviewing.

  1. Skype interviewing: the new generation of online synchronous interview in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janghorban, Roksana; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Taghipour, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly used method for data collection in qualitative research is interviewing. With technology changes over the last few decades, the online interview has overcome time and financial constraints, geographical dispersion, and physical mobility boundaries, which have adversely affected onsite interviews. Skype as a synchronous online service offers researchers the possibility of conducting individual interviews as well as small focus groups, comparable to onsite types. This commentary presents the characteristics of the Skype interview as an alternative or supplemental choice to investigators who want to change their conventional approach of interviewing.

  2. What do IPAQ questions mean to older adults? Lessons from cognitive interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Robert L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most questionnaires used for physical activity (PA surveillance have been developed for adults aged ≤65 years. Given the health benefits of PA for older adults and the aging of the population, it is important to include adults aged 65+ years in PA surveillance. However, few studies have examined how well older adults understand PA surveillance questionnaires. This study aimed to document older adults' understanding of questions from the International PA Questionnaire (IPAQ, which is used worldwide for PA surveillance. Methods Participants were 41 community-dwelling adults aged 65-89 years. They each completed IPAQ in a face-to-face semi-structured interview, using the "think-aloud" method, in which they expressed their thoughts out loud as they answered IPAQ questions. Interviews were transcribed and coded according to a three-stage model: understanding the intent of the question; performing the primary task (conducting the mental operations required to formulate a response; and response formatting (mapping the response into pre-specified response options. Results Most difficulties occurred during the understanding and performing the primary task stages. Errors included recalling PA in an "average" week, not in the previous 7 days; including PA lasting Conclusions These findings indicate a need for caution in administering IPAQ to adults aged ≥65 years. Most errors resulted in over-reporting, although errors resulting in under-reporting were also noted. Given the nature of the errors made by participants, it is possible that similar errors occur when IPAQ is used in younger populations and that the errors identified could be minimized with small modifications to IPAQ.

  3. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  4. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  5. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  6. Interview at the level of the signifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2012-01-01

    The research strategy interview at the level of the signifier was developed in relation to a qualitative interview project into cross-cultural encounters temporarily and spatially framed by academic organizational settings. The research interest is gender and ethnicity. However, neither happens all...

  7. Exploring Space and Place with Walking Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Phil; Bunce, Griff; Evans, James; Gibbs, Hannah; Hein, Jane Ricketts

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the use of walking interviews as a research method. In spite of a wave of interest in methods which take interviewing out of the "safe," stationary environment, there has been limited work critically examining the techniques for undertaking such work. Curiously for a method which takes an explicitly spatial approach, few…

  8. Interview with Michael Atiyah and Isadore Singer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This interview took place in Oslo on May 24, 2004, during the Abel Prize celebrations. It originally appeared in the European Mathematical Society Newsletter, September 2004, pages 24-30.......This interview took place in Oslo on May 24, 2004, during the Abel Prize celebrations. It originally appeared in the European Mathematical Society Newsletter, September 2004, pages 24-30....

  9. Interviewing Techniques Used in Selected Organizations Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Marguerite P.

    2008-01-01

    Businesses continue to use the job interview as a final determinant of the applicant's good fit for the company and its culture. Today, many companies are hiring less and/or are taking longer to find just the right person with the right skills for the right job. If an applicant is asked to come for an interview, the general feeling is that the…

  10. An Interview with Werner F. Leopold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakuta, Kenji

    A 1983 interview with Werner F. Leopold (1896-1984), a key figure in the study of bilingualism and child language, is presented. An introductory section gives some background to the interview. The discussion itself reviews Leopold's personal and professional background, work, and writing, and focuses largely on the linguistic development of…

  11. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  12. Character Interviews Help Bring Literature to Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindall, Vickie; Cantrell, R. Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    Describes "Character Interviews," a class activity that guides children, especially reluctant readers, to the meaning of a story through a thoughtful understanding of character as they consider a character's emotions and motives, to respond to a question as that character would. Describes the interview process. Offers sample interviews…

  13. An Interview with Dr. Maurizio Andolfi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cron, Elyce A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with Maurizio Andolfi, M.D., professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Rome. He currently heads one of the most prestigious centers for training family therapists in Europe. The interview focuses on Andolfi's continuing professional and personal journeys. (GCP)

  14. Does Interviewer Status Matter? An examination of Lay Interviewers and Medical Doctor Interviewers in an Epidemiological Study in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstadter, Ananda B.; Richardson, Lisa; Acierno, Ron; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Gaboury, Mario T.; Tran, Trinh Luong; Trung, Lam Tu; Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Tuan, Tran; Buoi, La Thi; Ha, Tran Thu; Thach, Tran Duc

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, typhoon Xangsane disrupted a large-scale multi-agency mental health study of 4,982 individuals in the DaNang province of Vietnam. Following this disaster, 795 of the original 4,982 participants were randomly assigned to be re-interviewed by either a medical doctor or a lay interviewer using structured clinical interviews to determine prevalence of lifetime and post-typhoon post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder (PD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (APA, 1994). The aim of the present study was to determine if prevalence of disorders differed by interviewer type. Bivariate analyses and multivariable analyses, as well as internal reliability estimates, all indicated no significant differences between the medical doctor interviewers versus the lay interviewers. This held for both lifetime prevalence as well as post-typhoon prevalence of disorders. This study has implications for epidemiologic studies, as it indicates that with adequate training, the use of lay interviewers may be a valid means of data collection. PMID:24683551

  15. Cognitive interviews to test and refine questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alexandra A

    2011-01-01

    Survey data are compromised when respondents do not interpret questions in the way researchers expect. Cognitive interviews are used to detect problems respondents have in understanding survey instructions and items, and in formulating answers. This paper describes methods for conducting cognitive interviews and describes the processes and lessons learned with an illustrative case study. The case study used cognitive interviews to elicit respondents' understanding and perceptions of the format, instructions, items, and responses that make up the Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Inventory (DSSCI), a questionnaire designed to measure Mexican Americans' symptoms of type 2 diabetes and their symptom management strategies. Responses to cognitive interviews formed the basis for revisions in the format, instructions, items, and translation of the DSSCI. All those who develop and revise surveys are urged to incorporate cognitive interviews into their instrumentation methods so that they may produce more reliable and valid measurements.

  16. Fostering sustainability: A qualitative interview study exploring how educators work to cultivate nature awareness in young children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Rebecca A.

    The purpose of this study is to examine how educators are working to foster sustainability through cultivating nature awareness in young children. Data were collected in the form of qualitative semi-structured interviews, which were analyzed using descriptive and deductive coding methods. Findings were viewed through the lens of critical pedagogy and the methods and models of teaching for nature awareness, which included ecological literacy, place based education, and education for sustainable development. There were five major themes and findings that emerged from the interviews with the participants in this study: terms and definitions used, personal stories, strategies for teaching nature awareness and sustainability, barriers, and current issues. This study may benefit those wishing to begin or continue to foster sustainability through teaching nature awareness. The literature review presented in the study aims to address the gap between the practice and pedagogy in teaching for nature awareness and sustainability. Keywords: teaching, nature awareness, sustainability, educators, young children, elementary, preschool, school, natural world, ecological literacy, place-based education, education for sustainable development, critical pedagogy

  17. The Raison D’être for the Community Pharmacy and the Community Pharmacist in Sweden: A Qualitative Interview Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Wisell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Community pharmacies are balancing between business (selling medicines and other products and healthcare (using the pharmacists’ knowledge in order to improve drug utilization. This balance could be affected by regulations decided upon by politicians, but also influenced by others. The aim of this study was to explore important stakeholders’ views on community pharmacy and community pharmacists in Sweden. The method used was that of semi-structured qualitative interviews. Political, professional, and patient organization representatives were interviewed. The results show that informants who are pharmacists or representatives of a professional pharmacist organization generally have a healthcare-centered view on community pharmacy/pharmacists. However, different views on how this orientation should be performed were revealed, ranging from being specialists to dealing with uncomplicated tasks. Political organization representatives generally had a more business-oriented view, where competition in the market was believed to be the main driving force for development. A third dimension in which competition was not stressed also emerged; that community pharmacies should primarily distribute medicines. This dimension was most prevalent among the political and patient organization representatives. One conclusion to be drawn is that no stakeholder seemed to have a clear vision or was willing to take the lead for the development of the community pharmacy sector.

  18. Medical ward round competence in internal medicine - an interview study towards an interprofessional development of an Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfel, Teresa; Beltermann, Esther; Lottspeich, Christian; Vietz, Elisa; Fischer, Martin R; Schmidmaier, Ralf

    2016-07-11

    The medical ward round is a central but complex activity that is of relevance from the first day of work. However, difficulties for young doctors have been reported. Instruction of ward round competence in medical curricula is hampered by the lack of a standardized description of the procedure. This paper aims to identify and describe physicians' tasks and relevant competences for conducting a medical ward round on the first day of professional work. A review of recent literature revealed known important aspects of medical ward rounds. These were used for the development of a semi-structured interview schedule. Medical ward round experts working at different hospitals were interviewed. The sample consisted of 14 ward physicians (M = 8.82 years of work experience) and 12 nurses (M = 14.55 years of work experience) working in different specializations of internal medicine. All interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive-deductive coding scheme. Nine fields of competences with 18 related sub-competences and 62 observable tasks were identified as relevant for conducting a medical ward round. Over 70 % of the experts named communication, collaborative clinical reasoning and organization as essential competences. Deeper analysis further unveiled the importance of self-management, management of difficult situations, error management and teamwork. The study is the first to picture ward round competences and related tasks in detail and to define an EPA "Conducting an internal medicine ward round" based on systematic interprofessional expert interviews. It thus provides a basis for integration of ward round competences in the medical curricula in an evidence based manner and gives a framework for the development of instructional intervention studies and comparative studies in other medical fields.

  19. Exploration of the impacts of distributed-site Research Experiences for Undergraduates using pre-/post- student interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, H.; Hubenthal, M.; Brudzinski, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The benefits for student participants of undergraduate research opportunities have been well documented. However, advancements in information and communications technologies (ICT) and cultural shifts around online education and virtual peer-to-peer interaction have lead to new models in which to structure such experiences. Currently, these ICT-enabled Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) programs connect geographically distributed interns in supportive e-learning communities while maintaining a traditional local mentoring arrangement. To document and explore the effects of distributed REU Sites in more depth, six interns from such a program, the Incorporated Research Institution for Seismology (IRIS) REU, were selected at random and asked to be interviewed about the REU experience. The primary targets of the interviews are to understand the mentor/mentee relationships, feeling of support and development and value of near-peer and far-peer relationships throughout their internship in a distributed REU program, and whether they receive the training necessary to gain confidence as a researcher. We also examine the various communication technologies as well as best practices and strategies that can increase intern connectedness. Pre-internship interviews were conducted in-person at the start of the centralized internship orientation week, while post-internship interviews were virtual (e.g. video chat with Skype or Google Hangout). These semi-structured interviews have full audio recordings and subsequent transcriptions. An additional, virtual follow-up interview will be conducted next spring after the interns have an opportunity to attend and present their research at a national conference (e.g., AGU). Interview material will be analyzed through a process of coding, sorting, local integration, and inclusive integration. Results will also be triangulated with pre- and post- survey data both from participants and other survey data from previous years of the IRIS

  20. Elements of programming interviews the insider's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Aziz, Adnan; Prakash, Amit

    2015-01-01

    This is a larger-format version of Elements of Programming Interviews. The language is C++. Specifically, the font size is larger, and the page size is 7"x10" (the regular format uses 6"x9"). The content is identical. Have you ever... Wanted to work at an exciting futuristic company? Struggled with an interview problem that could have been solved in 15 minutes? Wished you could study real-world computing problems? If so, you need to read Elements of Programming Interviews (EPI). EPI is your comprehensive guide to interviewing for software development roles. The core of EPI is a collection of over 250 problems with detailed solutions. The problems are representative of interview questions asked at leading software companies. The problems are illustrated with 200 figures, 300 tested programs, and 150 additional variants. The book begins with a summary of the nontechnical aspects of interviewing, such as strategies for a great interview, common mistakes, perspectives from the other side of the table,...

  1. Writing Interview Protocols and Conducting Interviews: Tips for Students New to the Field of Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Stacy A.; Furgerson, S. Paige

    2012-01-01

    Students new to doing qualitative research in the ethnographic and oral traditions, often have difficulty creating successful interview protocols. This article offers practical suggestions for students new to qualitative research for both writing interview protocol that elicit useful data and for conducting the interview. This piece was originally…

  2. Initial Evaluations in the Interview: Relationships with Subsequent Interviewer Evaluations and Employment Offers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Murray R.; Swider, Brian W.; Stewart, Greg L.

    2010-01-01

    The authors of this study examine how evaluations made during an early stage of the structured interview (rapport building) influence end of interview scores, subsequent follow-up employment interviews, and actual internship job offers. Candidates making better initial impressions received more internship offers (r = 0.22) and higher interviewer…

  3. Improve Your Interviewing Technique: Team Interviews Help To Reduce Bad Hiring Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Research shows that interviewers make hiring choices based on unconscious motivations and then rationalize the choice. Having three interviewers meet with each candidate separately and then discussing their reactions will assure that a hiring decision is based on objective criteria. Structured interviews and a limited focus on a maximum of six…

  4. Training in motivational interviewing in obstetrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Christina L; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Mogensen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    : The Region of Southern Denmark. METHODS: Eleven obstetric healthcare professionals working with obese pregnant women underwent a three day course in motivational interviewing techniques and were assessed before- and after training to measure the impact on their overall performance as well as the effect......-adherent interventions). Furthermore, the participants asked fewer closed and more open questions before training in motivational interview. In the assessment of proficiency and competency, most of the participants scored higher after the training in motivational interviewing. CONCLUSIONS: Training in motivational...

  5. Definition of a Twelve-Point Polygonal SAA Boundaryfor the GLAST Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; /UC, Santa Cruz /SLAC

    2007-08-29

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), set to launch in early 2008, detects gamma rays within a huge energy range of 100 MeV - 300 GeV. Background cosmic radiation interferes with such detection resulting in confusion over distinguishing cosmic from gamma rays encountered. This quandary is resolved by encasing GLAST's Large Area Telescope (LAT) with an Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD), a device which identifies and vetoes charged particles. The ACD accomplishes this through plastic scintillator tiles; when cosmic rays strike, photons produced induce currents in Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) attached to these tiles. However, as GLAST orbits Earth at altitudes {approx}550km and latitudes between -26 degree and 26 degree, it will confront the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), a region of high particle flux caused by trapped radiation in the geomagnetic field. Since the SAA flux would degrade the sensitivity of the ACD's PMTs over time, a determined boundary enclosing this region need be attained, signaling when to lower the voltage on the PMTs as a protective measure. The operational constraints on such a boundary require a convex SAA polygon with twelve edges, whose area is minimal ensuring GLAST has maximum observation time. The AP8 and PSB97 models describing the behavior of trapped radiation were used in analyzing the SAA and defining a convex SAA boundary of twelve sides. The smallest possible boundary was found to cover 14.58% of GLAST's observation time. Further analysis of defining a boundary safety margin to account for inaccuracies in the models reveals if the total SAA hull area is increased by {approx}20%, the loss of total observational area is < 5%. These twelve coordinates defining the SAA flux region are ready for implementation by the GLAST satellite.

  6. The correlation between reading and mathematics ability at age twelve has a substantial genetic component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Oliver S P; Band, Gavin; Pirinen, Matti; Haworth, Claire M A; Meaburn, Emma L; Kovas, Yulia; Harlaar, Nicole; Docherty, Sophia J; Hanscombe, Ken B; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Curtis, Charles J C; Strange, Amy; Freeman, Colin; Bellenguez, Céline; Su, Zhan; Pearson, Richard; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Edkins, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A; Casas, Juan P; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz A Z; Markus, Hugh S; Mathew, Christopher G; Palmer, Colin N A; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J; Trembath, Richard C; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Wood, Nicholas W; Barroso, Ines; Peltonen, Leena; Dale, Philip S; Petrill, Stephen A; Schalkwyk, Leonard S; Craig, Ian W; Lewis, Cathryn M; Price, Thomas S; Donnelly, Peter; Plomin, Robert; Spencer, Chris C A

    2014-07-08

    Dissecting how genetic and environmental influences impact on learning is helpful for maximizing numeracy and literacy. Here we show, using twin and genome-wide analysis, that there is a substantial genetic component to children's ability in reading and mathematics, and estimate that around one half of the observed correlation in these traits is due to shared genetic effects (so-called Generalist Genes). Thus, our results highlight the potential role of the learning environment in contributing to differences in a child's cognitive abilities at age twelve.

  7. New Eyes on the Universe Twelve Cosmic Mysteries and the Tools We Need to Solve Them

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    "New Eyes on the Universe -- Twelve Cosmic Mysteries and the Tools We Need to Solve Them" gives an up-to-date broad overview of some of the key issues in modern astronomy and cosmology. It describes the vast amount of observational data that the new generation of observatories and telescopes are currently producing, and how that data might solve some of the outstanding puzzles inherent in our emerging world view. Included are questions such as: What is causing the Universe to blow itself apart? What could be powering the luminous gamma-ray bursters? Where is all the matter in the Uni

  8. DETECTION OF CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS IN TWELVE PRIMARY GASTRIC CANCERS BY DIRECT CHROMOSOME ANALYSIS AND FISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Direct chromosome analysis and FISH were performed on twelve primary gastric carcinomas. Two of them had simple chromosome changes: 48,XX, +8, +20, and 49, XY, +2, +8, +9, and the others had complicated chromosome changes, which includes much more numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. Frequent structural changes in the complicated types involved chromosome 7, 3, 1, 5 and 12 etc. The del 7q was noted in eight cases. The del (3p) and del (1p) were noted in six and five cases, respectively. The results provide some important clues for isolation of the genes related to gastric cancer.

  9. Developing a learning culture: twelve tips for individuals, teams and organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Lynn; Pearson, David; Lucas, Beverley

    2006-06-01

    A culture of learning in providing health services and education for health professionals is a constant challenge for individuals, team and organizations. The importance of such a culture was highlighted by the findings of the Bristol Royal Infirmary Inquiry (2001). This was discussed in the context of the literature on the Learning Organization (Senge, 1990) at the 2004 Association of Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) conference, and reviewed a year later at the 2005 AMEE conference. This paper outlines twelve tips for educational and health service organizations in facilitating a culture of learning for their members and also offers specific advice to individual students and professionals.

  10. Being a quantitative interviewer: qualitatively exploring interviewers' experiences in a longitudinal cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrett Sarah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies of health outcomes rely on data collected by interviewers administering highly-structured (quantitative questionnaires to participants. Little appears to be known about the experiences of such interviewers. This paper explores interviewer experiences of working on a longitudinal study in New Zealand (the Prospective Outcomes of injury Study - POIS. Interviewers administer highly-structured questionnaires to participants, usually by telephone, and enter data into a secure computer program. The research team had expectations of interviewers including: consistent questionnaire administration, timeliness, proportions of potential participants recruited and an empathetic communication style. This paper presents results of a focus group to qualitatively explore with the team of interviewers their experiences, problems encountered, strategies, support systems used and training. Methods A focus group with interviewers involved in the POIS interviews was held; it was audio-recorded and transcribed. The analytical method was thematic, with output intended to be descriptive and interpretive. Results Nine interviewers participated in the focus group (average time in interviewer role was 31 months. Key themes were: 1 the positive aspects of the quantitative interviewer role (i.e. relationships and resilience, insights gained, and participants' feedback, 2 difficulties interviewers encountered and solutions identified (i.e. stories lost or incomplete, forgotten appointments, telling the stories, acknowledging distress, stories reflected and debriefing and support, and 3 meeting POIS researcher expectations (i.e. performance standards, time-keeping, dealing exclusively with the participant and maintaining privacy. Conclusions Interviewers demonstrated great skill in the way they negotiated research team expectations whilst managing the relationships with participants. Interviewers found it helpful to have a research protocol in

  11. E-Interview: Norma Fox Mazer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Norma Fox Mazer, a writer of children's books. Describes how she creates a story. Discusses how writing a story, whether a short story or a novel, is an intricate balance of character, event, and voice. (SG)

  12. People Interview: The science behind the 'magic'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    INTERVIEW The science behind the 'magic' Grand Illusions is a website dedicated to science-based phenomena, fun and games, and optical illusions. David Smith speaks to two of its key members—Hendrik Ball and Tim Rowett.

  13. Exploring Space and Place With Walking Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Jones

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the use of walking interviews as a research method. In spite of a wave of interest in methods which take interviewing out of the “safe,” stationary environment, there has been limited work critically examining the techniques for undertaking such work. Curiously for a method which takes an explicitly spatial approach, few projects have attempted to rigorously connect what participants say with where they say it. The article reviews three case studies where the authors have used different techniques, including GPS, for locating the interview in space. The article concludes by arguing that researchers considering using walking interviews need to think carefully about what kinds of data they wish to generate when deciding which approach to adopt.

  14. Reenactment interviewing: a methodology for phenomenological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, N

    1993-01-01

    Reenactment is proposed as an alternative interviewing strategy for phenomenological research. Three techniques borrowed from the psychodramatic method, warming up, scene-setting and soliloquy, are described as they were used in interviews with nurses participating in a study of caregiver/patient relationships. The rationale for and implementation of the techniques are discussed. Indications of successful reenactment during an interview are described and discussed. The data suggest that skillfully directed reenactment can generate intensely vivid recall of memories experiences and emotions, engendering rich descriptions of participants' lived experience and subsequently, produces significant dialogue between interviewer and participant. Parallels are drawn between phenomenological research/philosophy and the philosophy of action upon which psychodramatic techniques are based.

  15. Registered nurse participation in performance appraisal interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Deborah Gail; Wood, Elizabeth E

    2007-01-01

    Performance appraisal interviews have, over the past two decades, become a common phenomenon in nursing. Yet evidence--both anecdotal and those reported in the literature--suggest that these interviews provide minimal satisfaction and are thus not always effective. This article presents the findings of an interpretive study that explored and documented the meaning and impact of participating in performance appraisal interviews. Data gleaned from nine New Zealand registered nurses employed by a single district health board provide evidence that nurses are often disappointed by the process of performance appraisal. Although they believe in the potential value of performance appraisal interviews, they seldom experience the feedback, direction, and encouragement necessary for an effective appraisal process. Changes to the current professional development program and its accompanying performance appraisal will require skilled commitment on the part of nurses, managers, and the employing organization to improve and develop the assessment and promotion of nursing practice.

  16. Interviews with candidates for president transmitted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Gomes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In election years, television interviews with presidential candidates, broadcast live, i.e. without the use of editing, have become an important genre of journalistic representation in Brazilian political campaigns. These interviews are conducted in network studios by well-known Brazilian news anchors. The fact that these interviews are transmitted directly to the electorate in an unedited form is generally offered as a guarantee of a genuine, authentic portrayal of the candidates themselves. The present work proposes that live network candidate interviews, rather than a means of political presentation on television, are actually an arena in which the institution of journalism attempts to use rhetorical and argumentative means to control the candidates’ discourse without relying on the traditional advantages conferred in daily news coverage.

  17. An Interview with Dorry M. Kenyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Nathan; Vongumivitch, Viphavee

    2001-01-01

    Includes an interview with a noted figure in the field of language assessment. Focuses on a range of test development projects, including several related to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) scale. (Author/VWL)

  18. E-Interview: Norma Fox Mazer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Norma Fox Mazer, a writer of children's books. Describes how she creates a story. Discusses how writing a story, whether a short story or a novel, is an intricate balance of character, event, and voice. (SG)

  19. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  20. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  1. Twentyfourth Podcast - Interview with Lars Holmgaard Christensen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Every wednesday the Doctoral School of Human Centred Informatics hosts a small research seminar, where PhD students and senior researchers can share and discuss their ongoing work. Today, we bring an interview from spring 2008. On February 27, Lars Holmgaard Christensen presented his paper "Homo ...... Performans - The Performative Turn". After the seminar, Thomas Ryberg and Anders Albrechtslund made an interview with Lars Holmgaard Christensen which is avaliable as podcast....

  2. Accessing children's perspectives through participatory photo interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgenson, Jane; Sullivan, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Mit diesem Artikel wollen wir zur entstehenden Debatte über Kind-zentrierte Forschungsmethoden beitragen, indem wir die Anwendung von partizipativen Foto-Interviews für das Verstehen kindlicher Erfahrungen mit Haushaltgeräten reflektieren. Mittels Foto-Interviews wird versucht, Kinder als aktive Forschungsteilnehmer/innen einzubeziehen, indem ihnen Kameras gegeben und sie eingeladen werden, unterschiedlichste Aspekte ihres Alltagslebens zu fotografieren. Später werden die Fotos im Rahmen ...

  3. Twentyfourth Podcast - Interview with Lars Holmgaard Christensen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Every wednesday the Doctoral School of Human Centred Informatics hosts a small research seminar, where PhD students and senior researchers can share and discuss their ongoing work. Today, we bring an interview from spring 2008. On February 27, Lars Holmgaard Christensen presented his paper "Homo ...... Performans - The Performative Turn". After the seminar, Thomas Ryberg and Anders Albrechtslund made an interview with Lars Holmgaard Christensen which is avaliable as podcast....

  4. Interview at the level of the signifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2012-01-01

    The research strategy interview at the level of the signifier was developed in relation to a qualitative interview project into cross-cultural encounters temporarily and spatially framed by academic organizational settings. The research interest is gender and ethnicity. However, neither happens all...... the time, nor is it present in all encounters. Therefore, gender and ethnicity are de-centered. Crucial for the research strategy is the focus on the ‘interplay-of-practices’....

  5. Work environment perceptions following relocation to open-plan offices: A twelve-month longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Jessica; Miller, Michael; Horneij, Eva

    2015-01-01

    A workplace's design can have various positive or negative effects on the employees and since the 1970s the advantages and disadvantages of open-plan offices have been discussed. The aim of this study was to investigate perceived health, work environment and self-estimated productivity one month before and at three, six and twelve months after relocation from individual offices to an open-plan office environment. Employees from three departments within the same company group and who worked with relatively similar tasks and who were planned to be relocated from private offices to open-plan offices were invited to participate. Questionnaires comprising items from The Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale, The Work Experience Measurement Scale, the questionnaire by Brennan et al. about perceived performance and one question from the Work Ability Index were sent to participants one month before relocation (baseline) to open-plan offices and then at three, six and twelve months after relocation. At baseline, 82 questionnaires were sent out. The response rate was 85%. At the follow-ups 77-79 questionnaires were sent out and the response-rate was 70%-81%. At follow-ups, perceived health, job satisfaction and performance had generally deteriorated. The results of the study indicate that employees' perception of health, work environment and performance decreased during a 12 month period following relocation from individual offices to open-plan offices.

  6. Approximate analytic method for high-apogee twelve-hour orbits of artificial Earth's satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashkovyaka, M. A.; Zaslavskii, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an approach to the study of the evolution of high-apogee twelve-hour orbits of artificial Earth's satellites. We describe parameters of the motion model used for the artificial Earth's satellite such that the principal gravitational perturbations of the Moon and Sun, nonsphericity of the Earth, and perturbations from the light pressure force are approximately taken into account. To solve the system of averaged equations describing the evolution of the orbit parameters of an artificial satellite, we use both numeric and analytic methods. To select initial parameters of the twelve-hour orbit, we assume that the path of the satellite along the surface of the Earth is stable. Results obtained by the analytic method and by the numerical integration of the evolving system are compared. For intervals of several years, we obtain estimates of oscillation periods and amplitudes for orbital elements. To verify the results and estimate the precision of the method, we use the numerical integration of rigorous (not averaged) equations of motion of the artificial satellite: they take into account forces acting on the satellite substantially more completely and precisely. The described method can be applied not only to the investigation of orbit evolutions of artificial satellites of the Earth; it can be applied to the investigation of the orbit evolution for other planets of the Solar system provided that the corresponding research problem will arise in the future and the considered special class of resonance orbits of satellites will be used for that purpose.

  7. Global surface temperature change analysis based on MODIS data in recent twelve years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, K. B.; Ma, Y.; Tan, X. L.; Shen, X. Y.; Liu, G.; Li, Z. L.; Chen, J. M.; Xia, L.

    2017-01-01

    Global surface temperature change is one of the most important aspects in global climate change research. In this study, in order to overcome shortcomings of traditional observation methods in meteorology, a new method is proposed to calculate global mean surface temperature based on remote sensing data. We found that (1) the global mean surface temperature was close to 14.35 °C from 2001 to 2012, and the warmest and coldest surface temperatures of the global in the recent twelve years occurred in 2005 and 2008, respectively; (2) the warmest and coldest surface temperatures on the global land surface occurred in 2005 and 2001, respectively, and on the global ocean surface in 2010 and 2008, respectively; and (3) in recent twelve years, although most regions (especially the Southern Hemisphere) are warming, global warming is yet controversial because it is cooling in the central and eastern regions of Pacific Ocean, northern regions of the Atlantic Ocean, northern regions of China, Mongolia, southern regions of Russia, western regions of Canada and America, the eastern and northern regions of Australia, and the southern tip of Africa. The analysis of daily and seasonal temperature change indicates that the temperature change is mainly caused by the variation of orbit of celestial body. A big data model based on orbit position and gravitational-magmatic change of celestial body with the solar or the galactic system should be built and taken into account for climate and ecosystems change at a large spatial-temporal scale.

  8. Proficiency as a Variable in Gulf EFL Students' Employment of Reading Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endley, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of the reading strategies used by twelve Arabic-speaking undergraduates at a major Gulf university when reading texts in English. The procedure employed was a think-aloud protocol followed by a semi-structured interview. Three research questions were addressed: (a) What are the primary comprehension problems encountered…

  9. Transformative Learning around Issues of Language and Culture among ESL Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmick, Dara Pachence

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the significant teaching and learning experiences of ESL teachers around the issues of culture and language. The theoretical framework of the study was informed by transformative learning theory. The study began with semi-structured in-depth interviews with twelve teachers who obtained their ESL…

  10. Not Just a Latino Issue: California Community College Undocumented Students and Their Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Chan

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study investigated the experiences of California community college undocumented students and their career development processes and issues. Twelve undocumented students from multiple backgrounds participated in semi-structured interviews. It was evident from the students' backgrounds that being undocumented was not…

  11. EFL Teaching and Learning at a Vietnamese University: What Do Teachers Say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong Thi; Fehring, Heather; Warren, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports part of a study that documents the factors affecting the efficacy of teaching and learning English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in Vietnamese higher education from the teachers' perspectives. Individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve EFL teachers at Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology…

  12. Client Discourses on the Process of Seeking Same-Sex Couple Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Jan; Peel, Elizabeth; Owen-Pugh, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    How same-sex couples manage the process of seeking help for their relationships is an under-researched area. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 people who had engaged in same-sex couple counselling, and were analysed using discourse analysis. The ways in which the couples positioned themselves as part of a "minority…

  13. The Experience of African Students Studying Nursing in the United States in Relation to Their Use of Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Donald Lee

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the critical thinking experiences of African nursing students enrolled in several universities in the U.S. Using a semi-structured interview approach, twelve African students discussed their experiences using and learning a western critical thinking approach, as well as described their educational experiences in…

  14. Comparative assay of fluorescent antibody test results among twelve European National Reference Laboratories using various anti-rabies conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robardet, E.; Andrieu, S.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2013-01-01

    Twelve National Reference Laboratories (NRLs) for rabies have undertaken a comparative assay to assess the comparison of fluorescent antibody test (FAT) results using five coded commercial anti-rabies conjugates (Biorad, Bioveta, Fujirebio, Millipore, and SIFIN conjugates). Homogenized positive...

  15. The cognitive interview method of conducting police interviews: eliciting extensive information and promoting therapeutic jurisprudence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ronald P; Geiselman, R Edward

    2010-01-01

    Police officers receive little or no training to conduct interviews with cooperative witnesses, and as a result they conduct interviews poorly, eliciting less information than is available and providing little support to assist victims overcome psychological problems that may have arisen from the crime. We analyze the components of a typical police interview that limits the amount of information witnesses communicate, and which militate against victims' overcoming psychological problems. We then describe an alternative interviewing protocol, the Cognitive Interview, which enhances witness recollection and also likely contributes to victims' well being. The component elements of the Cognitive Interview are described, with emphasis on those elements that likely promote better witness recollection and also help to assist victims' psychological health. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. So you Really Want to Interview Me?: Navigating “Sensitive” Qualitative Research Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winsome Chunnu Brayda PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the qualitative interviewing techniques that the authors used to conduct their respective dissertation research in Jamaica and South Carolina. (The research in Jamaica examined the implementation of primary education policies. The research in South Carolina delved into the life history of Benner C. Turner, a controversial college president. Most of the literature about interviewing focuses on asking the right questions; in contrast, this article discusses the challenges of interviewing. In this article, selected interviews are used from both studies to examine the difficulties these researchers encountered when conducting “sensitive” interviews, the risks female researchers face in unfamiliar places, and the challenges of working in international settings (which requires interpersonal skills and cultural competency. While the task of research interviewing is complex, the authors provide ideas that can be used to navigate such moments.

  17. Using interviews and focus groups with resource managers to explore risk perceptions and responses to climate scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, K. R.; Travis, W.; Rangwala, I.; Rondeau, R.; Young, L.

    2016-12-01

    Resource managers in the western U.S. are increasingly tasked to incorporate climate change into management decisions and long-term planning, but this task is complicated by multiple challenges, among them the need to bridge between the differing perspectives and prerogatives of scientists and resource managers. As part of a larger, iterative, interdisciplinary, multi-landscape research project that built on a prior climate vulnerability research, we conducted more than 50 semi-structured interviews and four focus groups with resource managers in the Gunnison Basin in western Colorado. The interviews addressed the managers' risk perceptions and knowledge about the resources and landscapes, while the focus groups asked resource managers to reflect on their own resource decision-making in light of three narrative future climate scenarios created by scientists on the research team. While time-intensive, the interviews and focus groups produced important insights into the managers' understanding of both the resources in question and the future climate scenarios. We found that the managers' mental models of their systems, and their conceptions of landscape changes and future threats, were diverse and sometimes in conflict with those held by the research team. The managers' responses to the climate scenarios reflected divergent and nuanced perceptions of risk, adaptation and uncertainty, heavily shaped by personal experience—which could be a constraint under rapidly changing future conditions. Our deployment of social science methodologies facilitated the co-production of climate adaptation strategies and a bridge between and among scientists and managers. The participants found the focus groups helpful since they (1) provided space to focus on decision-making under climate change, rather than fixate on details of the science, and (2) facilitated interaction with colleagues from other agencies. Climate scientists used participant feedback to inform future scenario

  18. Workplace bullying in the UK NHS: a questionnaire and interview study on prevalence, impact and barriers to reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Madeline; Thompson, Neill; Crampton, Paul; Morrow, Gill; Burford, Bryan; Gray, Christopher; Illing, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the prevalence and impact of bullying behaviours between staff in the National Health Service (NHS) workplace, and to explore the barriers to reporting bullying. Design Cross-sectional questionnaire and semi-structured interview. Setting 7 NHS trusts in the North East of England. Participants 2950 NHS staff, of whom 43 took part in a telephone interview. Main outcome measures Prevalence of bullying was measured by the revised Negative Acts Questionnaire (NAQ-R) and the impact of bullying was measured using indicators of psychological distress (General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-12), intentions to leave work, job satisfaction and self-reported sickness absence. Barriers to reporting bullying and sources of bullying were also examined. Results Overall, 20% of staff reported having been bullied by other staff to some degree and 43% reported having witnessed bullying in the last 6 months. Male staff and staff with disabilities reported higher levels of bullying. There were no overall differences due to ethnicity, but some differences were detected on several negative behaviours. Bullying and witnessing bullying were associated with lower levels of psychological health and job satisfaction, and higher levels of intention to leave work. Managers were the most common source of bullying. Main barriers to reporting bullying were the perception that nothing would change, not wanting to be seen as a trouble-maker, the seniority of the bully and uncertainty over how policies would be implemented and bullying cases managed. Data from qualitative interviews supported these findings and identified workload pressures and organisational culture as factors contributing to workplace bullying. Conclusions Bullying is a persistent problem in healthcare organisations which has significant negative outcomes for individuals and organisations.

  19. STS-93 Crew Interview: Jeff Ashby

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Ashby wanted to be an astronaut, how he feels about being the rookie on this launch, and what he expects to feel when he lifts off. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and his responsibilities during the major events of this mission. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) on board Columbia, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  20. Stimulated recall interviews for describing pragmatic epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubert, Christopher W.; Meredith, Dawn C.

    2015-12-01

    Students' epistemologies affect how and what they learn: do they believe physics is a list of equations, or a coherent and sensible description of the physical world? In order to study these epistemologies as part of curricular assessment, we adopt the resources framework, which posits that students have many productive epistemological resources that can be brought to bear as they learn physics. In previous studies, these epistemologies have been either inferred from behavior in learning contexts or probed through surveys or interviews outside of the learning context. We argue that stimulated recall interviews provide a contextually and interpretively valid method to access students' epistemologies that complement existing methods. We develop a stimulated recall interview methodology to assess a curricular intervention and find evidence that epistemological resources aptly describe student epistemologies.

  1. Traces of Traumatizations in Narrative Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Loch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic childhood experiences often lead to the development of dissociation as a defense mechanism, and subsequently to fragmented memories. In narrative interviews this fragmentation is traced in the expressive field of language. In this article a range of case studies are used to illustrate how dissociations, resulting from traumatic experiences in the past as well as the present, may express themselves and how we, as interviewers, can give support to the client in interview situations. Only by understanding the inconsistencies caused by these traumatic experiences, interviewees are able to tell their life histories beyond the collectively effective taboos. By becoming aware of these mechanisms, the researcher can steer clear of reproducing the socially relevant silencing effects, i.e. denial processes, within the context of social scientific research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801544

  2. STS-97 Crew Interviews: Michael J. Bloomfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield is shown. The interview addresses many different questions including why Bloomfield became interested in the space program, the events and people that influence him and ultimately led to his interest, and his vigorous training in the astronaut program. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses are the main goals of the STS-97 mission, its scheduled docking with the new International Space Station (ISS), and its delivery of the first set of U.S.-provided solar arrays, batteries, and radiators. Bloomfield briefly discusses his responsibilities during the much-anticipated docking as well as during the scheduled space-walks.

  3. Analyses of Acceptability Judgments Made Toward the Use of Nanocarrier-Based Targeted Drug Delivery: Interviews with Researchers and Research Trainees in the Field of New Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenel, Vanessa; Boissy, Patrick; Cloarec, Jean-Pierre; Patenaude, Johane

    The assessment of nanotechnology applications such as nanocarrier-based targeted drug delivery (TDD) has historically been based mostly on toxicological and safety aspects. The use of nanocarriers for TDD, a leading-edge nanomedical application, has received little study from the angle of experts' perceptions and acceptability, which may be reflected in how TDD applications are developed. In recent years, numerous authors have maintained that TDD assessment should also take into account impacts on ethical, environmental, economic, legal, and social (E(3)LS) issues in order to lead to socially responsible innovation. Semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were conducted with French and Canadian researchers and research trainees with diverse disciplinary backgrounds and involved in research related to emerging technologies. The interviews focussed on scenarios presenting two types of TDD nanocarriers (carbon, synthetic DNA) in two contexts of use (lung cancer, seasonal flu). Content and inductive analyses of interviews showed how facets of perceived impacts such as health, environment, social cohabitation, economy, life and death, representations of the human being and nature, and technoscience were weighed in acceptability judgments. The analyses also revealed that contextual factors related to device (nature of the treatment), to use (gravity of the disease), and to user (culture) influenced the weighting assigned to perceived impacts and thus contributed to variability in interviewees' judgments of acceptability. Giving consideration to researchers' perspective could accompany first steps of implementation and development of nanomedicine by producing a first, but wide, picture of the acceptability of nanocarrier-based TDD.

  4. Genetic Test Results and Disclosure to Family Members: Qualitative Interviews of Healthcare Professionals' Perceptions of Ethical and Professional Issues in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D' Audiffret Van Haecke, Diane; de Montgolfier, Sandrine

    2016-06-01

    The benefit of disclosing test results to next of kin is to improve prognosis and-in some cases-even prevent death though earlier monitoring or preventive therapies. Research on this subject has explored the question of intra-familial communication from the standpoint of patients and relatives but rarely, from the standpoint of healthcare professionals. The purpose of this study was to interview relevant healthcare professionals in France, where legislation framing the issue was recently passed. A qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews was set up to get a clearer picture of the challenges arising from this issue, its consequences in terms of medical care-service practices, and the positions that frontline professionals have taken in response to this new legal framework. The findings from eight interviews with 7 clinical geneticists and 1 genetic counselor highlight very different patterns of practices among care services and among the genetic diseases involved. It is equally crucial to investigate other issues such as the nature of genetic testing and its consequences in terms of disclosing results to kin, the question of the role of genetic counseling in the disclosure process, the question of prescription by non-geneticist clinicians, and practical questions linked to information content, consent and medical follow-up for patients and their relatives.

  5. Integral Evolution: An Interview with David Loye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russ Volckmann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available David Loye is one of those people that the longer you get to know them the more you begin todiscover a bit of their depth and breadth of perspective and creativity in the world. Hispublications speak for themselves. His network with leading scientists and thinkers around theworld is equally impressive.Actually, my first contact was with David’s wife, Riane Eisler, author of the Chalice and theBlade (among other books written with and without David. Despite the fact that they live overthe hill from me, I did not meet her face to face right away. Rather, I interviewed her over thetelephone for the Integral Leadership Review, which I publish and edit. When I first approachedher about doing the interview she suggested that I should interview David, but I did not knowDavid Loye’s work at all. In that interview I discovered more about Riane’s work and the extentof their partnership. In fact, they are prime movers of a partnership approach to leadership thatthey promote through a nonprofit center and in a Master’s program at the California Institute ofIntegral Studies in San Francisco.My conversation with Riane piqued my curiosity about David’s work and I bought one of hisbooks, Darwin’s Lost Theory of Love. Here I found evidence of the extraordinary scope anddepth of David’s work that made him a natural candidate for an interview. The only questionwas would I use it in Integral Leadership Review or in Integral Review: such is the quality of hisinterests and intellect.Before doing the interview, I borrowed a copy of one of David’s earlier books. When I went totheir house to pick it up I met them both. They are quite a team and I recommend their work toall.

  6. Development and characterization of twelve microsatellite markers for Porphyra linearis Greville.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Álvarez, Elena; Paulino, Cristina; Serrão, Ester A

    2017-02-01

    The genus Porphyra (and its sister genus Pyropia) contains important red algal species that are cultivated and/or harvested for human consumption, sustaining a billion-dollar aquaculture industry. A vast amount of research has been focused on species of this genus, including studies on genetics and genomics among other areas. Twelve novel microsatellite markers were developed here for Porphyra linearis. Markers were characterized using 32 individuals collected from four natural populations of P. linearis with total heterozygosity varying from 0.098 to 0.916. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 18. All markers showed cross amplification with Porphyra umbilicalis and/or Porphyra dioica. These polymorphic microsatellite markers are useful for investigating population genetic diversity and differentiation in P. linearis and may become useful for other genetic research on the reproductive biology of this important species.

  7. Proteomic characterization of human milk whey proteins during a twelve-month lactation period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yalin; Alvarado, Rudy; Phinney, Brett; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2011-04-01

    Human milk is a rich source of bioactive proteins that support the early growth and development of the newborn. Although the major components of the protein fraction in human milk have been studied, the expression and relative abundance of minor components have received limited attention. We examined the expression of low-abundance proteins in the whey fraction of human milk and their dynamic changes over a twelve-month lactation period. The low-abundance proteins were enriched by ProteoMiner beads, and protein identification was performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. One hundred and fifteen proteins were identified, thirty-eight of which have not been previously reported in human colostrum or milk. We also for the first time described differences in protein patterns among the low-abundance proteins during lactation. These results enhance our knowledge about the complexity of the human milk proteome, which constitutes part of the advantages to the breast-fed infant.

  8. Fate of the conformal fixed point with twelve massless fermions and SU(3) gauge group

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Zoltan; Kuti, Julius; Mondal, Santanu; Nogradi, Daniel; Wong, Chik Him

    2016-01-01

    We report new results on the conformal properties of an important strongly coupled gauge theory, a building block of composite Higgs models beyond the Standard Model. With twelve massless fermions in the fundamental representation of the SU(3) color gauge group, an infrared fixed point of the $\\beta$-function was recently reported in the theory (Cheng:2014jba) with uncertainty in the location of the critical gauge coupling inside the narrow $[ 6.0

  9. Twelve Years of Education and Public Outreach with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Cominsky, Lynn; Simonnet, Aurore; Education, the Fermi

    2013-01-01

    During the past twelve years, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has supported a wide range of Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) activities, targeting K-14 students and the general public. The purpose of the Fermi E/PO program is to increase student and public understanding of the science of the high-energy Universe, through inspiring, engaging and educational activities linked to the mission's science objectives. The E/PO program has additional more general goals, including increasing the diversity of students in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) pipeline, and increasing public awareness and understanding of Fermi science and technology. Fermi's multi-faceted E/PO program includes elements in each major outcome category: Higher Education; Elementary and Secondary Education; Informal Education and Public Outreach.

  10. Twelve tips for developing and delivering a massive open online course in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D; Henningsohn, Lars; DeRuiter, Marco C; de Jong, Peter G M; Reinders, Marlies E J

    2017-07-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are a novel mode of online learning. They are typically based on higher education courses and can attract a high number of learners, often in the thousands. They are distinct from on-campus education and deliver the learning objectives through a series of short videos, recommended readings and discussion fora, alongside automated assessments. Within medical education the role of MOOCs remains unclear, with recent proposals including continuing professional development, interprofessional education or integration into campus-based blended learning curricula. In this twelve tips article, we aim to provide a framework for readers to use when developing, delivering and evaluating a MOOC within medical education based on the literature and our own experience. Practical advice is provided on how to design the appropriate curriculum, engage with learners on the platform, select suitable assessments, and comprehensively evaluate the impact of your course.

  11. Hepatoprotective activity of twelve novel 7'-hydroxy lignan glucosides from Arctii Fructus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Nan; Huang, Xiao-Ying; Feng, Zi-Ming; Jiang, Jian-Shuang; Zhang, Pei-Cheng

    2014-09-17

    Twelve novel 7'-hydroxy lignan glucosides (1-12), including two benzofuran-type neolignans, two 8-O-4' neolignans, two dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans, and six tetrahydrofuranoid lignans, together with six known lignan glucosides (13-18), were isolated from the fruit of Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae), commonly known as Arctii Fructus. Their structures were elucidated using spectroscopy (1D and 2D NMR, MS, IR, ORD, and UV) and on the basis of chemical evidence. The absolute configurations of compounds 1-12 were confirmed using rotating frame nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY), the circular dichroic (CD) exciton chirality method, and Rh2(OCOCF3)4-induced CD spectrum analysis. All of the isolated compounds were tested for hepatoprotective effects against D-galactosamine-induced cytotoxicity in HL-7702 hepatic cells. Compounds 1, 2, 7-12, and 17 showed significantly stronger hepatoprotective activity than the positive control bicyclol at a concentration of 1 × 10(-5) M.

  12. Twelve Tips for teaching medical professionalism at all levels of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eraky, Mohamed Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Review of studies published in medical education journals over the last decade reveals that teaching medical professionalism is essential, yet challenging. According to a recent Best Evidence in Medical Education (BEME) guide, there is no consensus on a theoretical or practical model to integrate the teaching of professionalism into medical education. The aim of this article is to outline a practical manual for teaching professionalism at all levels of medical education. Drawing from research literature and author's experience, Twelve Tips are listed and organised in four clusters with relevance to (1) the context, (2) the teachers, (3) the curriculum, and (4) the networking. With a better understanding of the guiding educational principles for teaching medical professionalism, medical educators will be able to teach one of the most challenging constructs in medical education.

  13. An Interview with Dr. Walter Lear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the English version of Social Medicine we are publishing the first of several pamphlets loaned to us by the US Health Activism History Collection. To introduce this collection we travelled to Philadelphia on June 18, 2008 to interview Dr. Walter J. Lear. Dr Lear, born in 1923, is the person responsible for the collection. In a wide-ranging interview in his home Dr. Lear discussed his personal background, the origins and purpose of the collection, the impact of the McCarthy period on the US health left, as well as his vision for the future.

  14. An interview with Dr Barbara A. Carper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Elizabeth R

    2015-01-01

    In 1978, Dr Barbara A. Carper's foundational work, "Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing," arguably created a paradigm shift in nursing. However, her voice has been absent from the nursing literature in recent years. I was privileged to conduct a personal interview with Dr Carper in 2014. The edited interview includes a synopsis of her background, career trajectory, sources of inspiration, and her perspective on the current state of nursing. She reaffirmed her passion for reflective nursing practice, the importance incorporating the arts and humanities into nursing education, and using an integrated approach with the patterns of knowing in nursing.

  15. Resume of Interview with Professor Charles Snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorthe Døjbak Håkonsson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This interview is with Professor Charles Snow. Snow is Professor Emeritus of Strategy and Organization at Penn State University. He was a professor at Penn State from 1974 to 2012. The interview was conducted in 2013 while he was visiting professor at ICOA (Interdisciplinary Center for Organizational Architecture at Aarhus University. Professor Snow is a founding member of the Organizational Design Community and co-editor of the Journal of Organization Design. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Management and is listed in Who’s Who in the Management Sciences and Great Writers on Organizations.

  16. Children's developmental characteristics in the forensic interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Pavšič Mrevlje

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Children can be credible witnesses in court procedures given an adequately conducted forensic interview with them. This paper presents the most important features of a child's development (the cognitive and socioemotional development and the development of language and communication and from these features derives the specific guidelines for forensic interviews of children. Due to the frequent belief that children can be led to false witnessing and that they do not differentiate between reality and fantasy the topics of lying and suggestibility are also discussed. At the end some practical suggestions are given with recommendations for trainings of all professionals working with children that are potential witnesses.

  17. Creativity and Marketing: Interview With Marie Taillard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Taillard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this interview Dr. Taillard discusses her interest and ongoing research in the areas of marketing, consumer behaviour and creativity. She considers how academic training can be applied to a business context and describes the newly formed Creativity Marketing Centre at ESCP Europe. Exploring the multiple intersections between creativity and marketing represents not only a paradigmatic change for those interested in business and consumer behaviour but also for researchers of creativity who can start envisioning and studying consumption as a creative act. This interview will offer valuable points of reflection for all those interested to know more about this approach.

  18. Recommendations to reduce inequalities for LGBT people facing advanced illness: ACCESSCare national qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Hodson, Matthew; Wee, Bee; Almack, Kathryn; Johnson, Katherine; Daveson, Barbara A; Koffman, Jonathan; McEnhill, Linda; Harding, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or trans (LGBT) people have higher risk of certain life-limiting illnesses and unmet needs in advanced illness and bereavement. ACCESSCare is the first national study to examine in depth the experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness. To explore health-care experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness to elicit views regarding sharing identity (sexual orientation/gender history), accessing services, discrimination/exclusion and best-practice examples. Semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews analysed using thematic analysis. In total, 40 LGBT people from across the United Kingdom facing advanced illness: cancer ( n = 21), non-cancer ( n = 16) and both a cancer and a non-cancer conditions ( n = 3). In total, five main themes emerged: (1) person-centred care needs that may require additional/different consideration for LGBT people (including different social support structures and additional legal concerns), (2) service level or interactional (created in the consultation) barriers/stressors (including heteronormative assumptions and homophobic/transphobic behaviours), (3) invisible barriers/stressors (including the historical context of pathology/criminalisation, fears and experiences of discrimination) and (4) service level or interactional facilitators (including acknowledging and including partners in critical discussions). These all shape (5) individuals' preferences for disclosing identity. Prior experiences of discrimination or violence, in response to disclosure, were carried into future care interactions and heightened with the frailty of advanced illness. Despite recent legislative change, experiences of discrimination and exclusion in health care persist for LGBT people. Ten recommendations, for health-care professionals and services/institutions, are made from the data. These are simple, low cost and offer potential gains in access to, and outcomes of, care for LGBT people.

  19. Motivational Interviewing support for a behavioral health internet intervention for drivers with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Ingersoll

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While Internet interventions can improve health behaviors, their impact is limited by program adherence. Supporting program adherence through telephone counseling may be useful, but there have been few direct tests of the impact of support. We describe a Telephone Motivational Interviewing (MI intervention targeting adherence to an Internet intervention for drivers with Type 1 Diabetes, DD.com, and compare completion of intervention benchmarks by those randomized to DD.com plus MI vs. DD.com only. The goal of the pre-intervention MI session was to increase the participant's motivation to complete the Internet intervention and all its assignments, while the goal of the post-treatment MI session was to plan for maintaining changes made during the intervention. Sessions were semi-structured and partially scripted to maximize consistency. MI Fidelity was coded using a standard coding system, the MITI. We examined the effects of MI support vs. no support on number of days from enrollment to program benchmarks. Results show that MI sessions were provided with good fidelity. Users who received MI support completed some program benchmarks such as Core 4 (t176 df = −2.25; p < .03 and 11 of 12 monthly driving diaries significantly sooner, but support did not significantly affect time to intervention completion (t177 df = −1.69; p < .10 or rates of completion. These data suggest that there is little benefit to therapist guidance for Internet interventions including automated email prompts and other automated minimal supports, but that a booster MI session may enhance collection of follow-up data.

  20. Parental knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding fever in children: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Maria; Sahm, Laura J; Shiely, Frances; O'Sullivan, Ronan; McGillicuddy, Aoife; McCarthy, Suzanne

    2016-07-11

    Fever is one of the most common childhood symptoms. It causes significant worry and concern for parents. Every year there are numerous cases of over- and under-dosing with antipyretics. Caregivers seek reassurance from a variety of sources including healthcare practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe parental knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding management of childhood fever in children aged 5 years and under. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 parents at six ante-natal clinics in the south west of Ireland during March and April 2015. The Francis method was used to detect data saturation and thereby identify sample size. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Twenty-three parents participated in the study. Five themes emerged from the data: assessing and managing the fever; parental knowledge and beliefs regarding fever; knowledge source; pharmaceutical products; initiatives. Parents illustrated a good knowledge of fever as a symptom. However, management practices varied between participants. Parents revealed a reluctance to use medication in the form of suppositories. There was a desire for more accessible, consistent information to be made available for use by parents when their child had a fever or febrile illness. Parents indicated that further initiatives are required to provide trustworthy information on the management of fever and febrile illness in children. Healthcare professionals should play a significant role in educating parents in how to manage fever and febrile illnesses in their children. The accessible nature and location of pharmacies could provide useful support for both parents and General Practitioners.

  1. Health-care seeking behaviour among persons with diabetes in Uganda: an interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atwine Fortunate

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare-seeking behaviour in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM has been investigated to a limited extent, and not in developing countries. Switches between different health sectors may interrupt glycaemic control, affecting health. The aim of the study was to explore healthcare-seeking behaviour, including use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM and traditional healers, in Ugandans diagnosed with DM. Further, to study whether gender influenced healthcare-seeking behaviour. Methods This is a descriptive study with a snowball sample from a community in Uganda. Semi-structured interviews were held with 16 women and 8 men, aged 25-70. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Results Healthcare was mainly sought among doctors and nurses in the professional sector because of severe symptoms related to DM and/or glycaemic control. Females more often focused on follow-up of DM and chronic pain in joints, while males described fewer problems. Among those who felt that healthcare had failed, most had turned to traditional healers in the folk sector for prescription of herbs or food supplements, more so in women than men. Males more often turned to private for-profit clinics while females more often used free governmental institutions. Conclusions Healthcare was mainly sought from nurses and physicians in the professional sector and females used more free-of-charge governmental institutions. Perceived failure in health care to manage DM or related complications led many, particularly women, to seek alternative treatment from CAM practitioners in the folk sector. Living conditions, including healthcare organisation and gender, seemed to influence healthcare seeking, but further studies are needed.

  2. General practitioners' perceptions of COPD treatment: thematic analysis of qualitative interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Katrine Rutkær; Egerod, Ingrid; Valentiner, Laura Staun; Lange, Peter; Langberg, Henning

    2016-01-01

    In Denmark, the treatment of COPD is mainly managed by general practitioners (GPs). Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is available to patients with COPD in the local community by GP referral, but in practice, many patients do not participate in rehabilitation. The aim of our study was to explore 1) GPs' perceptions of their role and responsibility in the rehabilitation of patients with COPD, and 2) GPs' perceptions of how patients manage their COPD. The study was based on a qualitative design with semi-structured key-informant interviews with GPs. Investigator triangulation was applied during data generation, and analysis was done using thematic analysis methodology. Our main findings were that GPs relied on patients themselves to take the initiative to make clinic appointments and on professionals at health centers to provide the PR including consultations on lifestyle changes. The GPs experienced that patients chose to come to the clinic when they were in distress and that patients either declined or had poor adherence to rehabilitation when offered. The GPs were relieved that the health centers had taken over the responsibility of rehabilitation as GPs lacked the resources to discuss rehabilitation and follow up on individual plans. Our study suggested a potential self-reinforcing problem with the treatment of COPD being mainly focused on medication rather than on PR. Neither GPs nor patients used a proactive approach. Further, GPs were not fully committed to discuss non-pharmacological treatment and perceived the patients as unmotivated for PR. As such, there is a need for optimizing non-pharmacological treatment of COPD and in particular the referral process to PR.

  3. Comparative analysis and supragenome modeling of twelve Moraxella catarrhalis clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermans Peter WM

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background M. catarrhalis is a gram-negative, gamma-proteobacterium and an opportunistic human pathogen associated with otitis media (OM and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. With direct and indirect costs for treating these conditions annually exceeding $33 billion in the United States alone, and nearly ubiquitous resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics among M. catarrhalis clinical isolates, a greater understanding of this pathogen's genome and its variability among isolates is needed. Results The genomic sequences of ten geographically and phenotypically diverse clinical isolates of M. catarrhalis were determined and analyzed together with two publicly available genomes. These twelve genomes were subjected to detailed comparative and predictive analyses aimed at characterizing the supragenome and understanding the metabolic and pathogenic potential of this species. A total of 2383 gene clusters were identified, of which 1755 are core with the remaining 628 clusters unevenly distributed among the twelve isolates. These findings are consistent with the distributed genome hypothesis (DGH, which posits that the species genome possesses a far greater number of genes than any single isolate. Multiple and pair-wise whole genome alignments highlight limited chromosomal re-arrangement. Conclusions M. catarrhalis gene content and chromosomal organization data, although supportive of the DGH, show modest overall genic diversity. These findings are in stark contrast with the reported heterogeneity of the species as a whole, as wells as to other bacterial pathogens mediating OM and COPD, providing important insight into M. catarrhalis pathogenesis that will aid in the development of novel therapeutic regimens.

  4. What Can Motivational Interviewing Do for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a promising 25-year-old therapeutic approach that integrates relationship-building principles and more directive strategies to move clients toward behavioral change. A large and expanding number of controlled research studies of MI have demonstrated its efficacy for addictive behaviors ranging from use of alcohol,…

  5. Motivational interviewing in the health care setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol use disorders are related to many negative health, emotional, societal, and economic consequences. These disorders are often difficult to treat because individuals suffering from them tend to be ambivalent about and resistant to change. Motivational interviewing (MI) provides healthcare prov...

  6. Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Your Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing, which began as a counseling technique in addiction recovery, is a client-centered tool for making changes, increasing helpful behaviors and decreasing unhelpful behaviors. It relies on an individual's intrinsic motivation and interest in change, using a non-confrontational approach to frame goals in a practical,…

  7. Motivational Interviewing and the Social Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Comments on the article by Miller and Rose (September 2009). As Miller and Rose opened "the black box of treatment to examine linkages between processes of delivery and client outcomes" (p. 529) in motivational interviewing (MI), it is important that their model include factors from the social context that may explain conditions that enhance or…

  8. Toward a Theory of Motivational Interviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R.; Rose, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    The widely disseminated clinical method of motivational interviewing (MI) arose through a convergence of science and practice. Beyond a large base of clinical trials, advances have been made toward "looking under the hood" of MI to understand the underlying mechanisms by which it affects behavior change. Such specification of outcome-relevant…

  9. Cross-Cultural Training in Motivational Interviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. L.; Venner, Kamilla; Bisono, Ani; Daugherty, Mikyta; Yahne, Carolina E.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the cross-cultural transportability of motivational interviewing (MI), an evidence-based addiction treatment method. Free clinical training in MI was offered in separate targeted workshops for 86 African American, Native American, and Spanish-speaking addiction treatment providers. Audiotaped pre- and posttraining clinical…

  10. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Lennart Carleson is the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration i Oslo, Carleson was interviewed by Martin Raussen of Aalborg University and Christian Skau of the Norwegian University of Science...

  11. Philosophy, Rhetoric, Literacy Criticism: (Inter)views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Gary A., Ed.

    In addition to a foreword by Clifford Geertz and an introduction by Patricia Bizzell, this book features 12 essays by rhetoric and composition scholars responding to interviews with prominent scholars outside the discipline. The commentaries in the book entertain a range of topics, including language, rhetoric, philosophy, feminism and literary…

  12. Hotel Nikko Tianjin General Manager Interview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Before the grand opening of Hotel Nikko Tianjin on April 11,Beijing Review conducted an interview with Mr.Hiroshi O’ishi,General Manager of the new hotel,in order to share the operational and management expertise of Nikko Hotels International with our readers.

  13. Interview met professor Joan Wallach Scott

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Greetje; Tijhoff, Esmeralda

    2012-01-01

    Joan Scott, professor at the School of Social Science in the Institute for Avanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey (USA), was the keynote speaker at the conference 'Uitsluitend emancipatie' in de Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam in October 2012. An interview on gender, history, feminism and her book

  14. Bertrand Russell Speaks: The BBC Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Woodrow

    1982-01-01

    Presents excerpts from 13 interviews with Bertrand Russell conducted for British television in 1959. The discussion covers the nature and purpose of philosophy, religion, war and pacifism, communism and capitalism, ethics and morality, personal and economic power, happiness, nationalism, individualism, fanaticism, and tolerance. (AM)

  15. Sideways: five methodological studies of sociolinuistic interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Frans; Møller, Janus Spindler; Pharao, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    Five interlocking case studies of variation in and between situations are reported. In all cases a sociolinguistic interview is contrasted with another speech event. The material is from the LANCHART panel study of variation in the Danish speech community in real time. Contrasting speech events a...

  16. Fascinating mathematical people interviews and memoirs

    CERN Document Server

    Alexanderson, Gerald L.

    2011-01-01

    Fascinating Mathematical People is a collection of informal interviews and memoirs of sixteen prominent members of the mathematical community of the twentieth century, many still active. The candid portraits collected here demonstrate that while these men and women vary widely in terms of their backgrounds, life stories, and worldviews, they all share a deep and abiding sense of wonder about mathematics.

  17. Enhancing Student Experiential Learning with Structured Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Robert M.; Johnson, Carol B.; Schwartz, William C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Learning through experience can be rewarding but intimidating. To maximize the benefits of experiential learning assignments, students need to have confidence in their abilities. The authors report how a structured-interview instrument effectively facilitated experiential learning for accounting students without extensive content-specific…

  18. Coding In-depth Semistructured Interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, John L.; Quincy, Charles; Osserman, Jordan;

    2013-01-01

    Many social science studies are based on coded in-depth semistructured interview transcripts. But researchers rarely report or discuss coding reliability in this work. Nor is there much literature on the subject for this type of data. This article presents a procedure for developing coding schemes...

  19. LIFE-STYLE SEGMENTATION WITH TAILORED INTERVIEWING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMAKURA, WA; WEDEL, M

    1995-01-01

    The authors present a tailored interviewing procedure for life-style segmentation. The procedure assumes that a life-style measurement instrument has been designed. A classification of a sample of consumers into life-style segments is obtained using a latent-class model. With these segments, the tai

  20. Interview to Boaventura de Sousa Santos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Manuela; Dietz, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    In this interview, Professor Boaventura de Sousa Santos addresses, on the one hand, the process of transnationalisation of universities and the neoliberalisation of the classical model of the European university. On the other hand, he stresses that the recognition of difference and internal pluralism of science, which have pervaded the…

  1. Documenting Art Therapy Clinical Knowledge Using Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Dafna

    2017-01-01

    Practicing art therapists have vast stores of knowledge and experience, but in most cases, their work is not documented, and their clinical knowledge does not enter the academic discourse. This article proposes a systematic approach to the collection of practice knowledge about art therapy based on conducting interviews with art therapists who…

  2. Recorded interviews with human and medical geneticists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Peter S

    2017-02-01

    A series of 100 recorded interviews with human and medical geneticists has been carried out and some general results are reported here. Twenty countries across the world are represented, mostly European, with a particular emphasis on the United Kingdom. A priority was given to older workers, many of whom were key founders of human genetics in their own countries and areas of work, and over 20 of whom are now no longer living. The interviews also give valuable information on the previous generation of workers, as teachers and mentors of the interviewees, thus extending the coverage of human genetics back to the 1930s or even earlier. A number of prominent themes emerge from the interview series; notably the beginnings of human cytogenetics from the late 1950s, the development of medical genetics research and its clinical applications in the 1960s and 1970s, and more recently the beginnings and rapid growth of human molecular genetics. The interviews provide vivid personal portraits of those involved, and also show the effects of social and political issues, notably those arising from World War 2 and its aftermath, which affected not only the individuals involved but also broader developments in human genetics, such as research related to risks of irradiation. While this series has made a start in the oral history of this important field, extension and further development of the work is urgently needed to give a fuller picture of how human genetics has developed.

  3. Interview with Abel Laureate John Tate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2011-01-01

    John Tate is the recipient of the 2009 Abel Prize of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. This interview took place on May 25, 2010, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, and originally appeared in the September 2010 issue of the "Newletter of the European Mathematical Society"...

  4. Interview to Boaventura de Sousa Santos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Manuela; Dietz, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    In this interview, Professor Boaventura de Sousa Santos addresses, on the one hand, the process of transnationalisation of universities and the neoliberalisation of the classical model of the European university. On the other hand, he stresses that the recognition of difference and internal pluralism of science, which have pervaded the…

  5. Understanding Infidelity: An Interview with Gerald Weeks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Travis

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, Gerald Weeks shares his expertise on the topic of infidelity and couples counseling. Dr. Weeks defines infidelity, presents assessment strategies for treating the issue of infidelity, and discusses an intersystemic model for infidelity treatment when counseling couples. Dr. Weeks also provides insight into common mistakes made…

  6. How to Survive an Academic Job Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Full, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Career development is an important issue, and there are aspects of finding the right position that are particular to science faculty. This article offers a checklist of questions to ask in an academic job interview. Some queries are more appropriate for the chairperson and other administrators; others are better asked of faculty or students. With…

  7. Interview met professor Joan Wallach Scott

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Greetje; Tijhoff, Esmeralda

    2012-01-01

    Joan Scott, professor at the School of Social Science in the Institute for Avanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey (USA), was the keynote speaker at the conference 'Uitsluitend emancipatie' in de Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam in October 2012. An interview on gender, history, feminism and her book Th

  8. Interview to André Vauchez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Vauchez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The interview focuses on the education, the academic career and the most relevant research fields of the prominent French historian André Vauchez, who contributed to the renewal of the Studies in the History of Medieval Religion and fostered the 'dialogue' between French and Italian historians in the last forty years.

  9. Educator Market Research: In-depth Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    Military Advertising ,” Report to Congress, 2000. 20 Defense Manpower Data Center Educator Market ...2000. d. Preliminary Presentation of Results. The contractor formally briefed results to the Joint Marketing and Advertising Committee (JMAC) on...Educator Market Research: DMDC Report No. 2002-024 November 2001 In-depth Interviews For additional copies of this report, contact: Defense Technical

  10. Phyllis R. Silverman: An Omega Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Presents interview with Phyllis Silverman, who developed concept of Widow-to-Widow Program and directed research project that first demonstrated its effectiveness. Silverman discusses her views on grief, the Widow-to-Widow program, peer support, gender differences in peer support for bereavement, and the Child Bereavement Study. (NB)

  11. Enhancing Student Experiential Learning with Structured Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Robert M.; Johnson, Carol B.; Schwartz, William C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Learning through experience can be rewarding but intimidating. To maximize the benefits of experiential learning assignments, students need to have confidence in their abilities. The authors report how a structured-interview instrument effectively facilitated experiential learning for accounting students without extensive content-specific…

  12. Examining Expertise Using Interviews and Verbal Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wiel, Margje W. J.

    2017-01-01

    To understand expertise and expertise development, interactions between knowledge, cognitive processing and task characteristics must be examined in people at different levels of training, experience, and performance. Interviewing is widely used in the initial exploration of domain expertise. Work and cognitive task analysis chart the knowledge,…

  13. Ten Standard Responses to Qualitative Research Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, Steinar

    Qualitative research evokes rather stereotyped responses from the mainstream of social science. The following 10 standardized responses to the stimulus "qualitative research interview" (QRI) are discussed: (1) it is not scientific, only common sense; (2) it is not objective, but subjective; (3) it is not trustworthy, but biased; (4) it is not…

  14. Unit 2: Application Letters & The Job Interview

    OpenAIRE

    Aleson Carbonell, Marian

    2007-01-01

    Unit 2a_ Letters of Application and the CV: Reading the employment section. Unit 2b_Letters of Application and the CV:Writing Letters and the Job Hunting Process. Unit 2c_ Letters of Application and the CV: The Job Interview.

  15. Cross-Cultural Training in Motivational Interviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. L.; Venner, Kamilla; Bisono, Ani; Daugherty, Mikyta; Yahne, Carolina E.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the cross-cultural transportability of motivational interviewing (MI), an evidence-based addiction treatment method. Free clinical training in MI was offered in separate targeted workshops for 86 African American, Native American, and Spanish-speaking addiction treatment providers. Audiotaped pre- and posttraining clinical…

  16. STS-98 Crew Interview: Bob Curbeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The STS-98 Mission Specialist Bob Curbeam is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his training. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, and the payload and hardware it brings to the International Space Station (ISS). Mr. Curbeam discusses his role in the mission's spacewalks and activities.

  17. STS-98 Crew Interview: Tom Jones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The STS-98 Mission Specialist Tom Jones is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his training. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, and the payload and hardware it brings to the International Space Station (ISS). Mr. Jones discusses his role in the mission's spacewalks and activities.

  18. An interview with Dr Diane Austin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Preston-Roberts

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available For many years Dr Diane Austin has been developing a very special use of the voice in her practice as a music psychotherapist. The transformational aspects of this approach have been witnessed by colleagues who have heard Diane present at conferences or have read of her work in various publications. There are now further opportunities for colleagues to find out more about her work by reading her recent book or participating in her trainings. On behalf of the editors of the series of interviews for Voices I am delighted to be able to introduce this interview with Diane by one of her colleagues Patricia Preston-Roberts. There is also a linked audio example. In the interview Diane explains how her approach evolved and she identifies some of the key features of the work. She provides some links to the theories underpinning her practice and talks very openly about some issues of countertransference that arise as part of this very powerful and profound way of working. Throughout the interview we are aware how all aspects of the voice have an enormous influence on the development of a warm and trusting therapeutic relationship. From the moment a client enters Diane's consulting room it is clear that her deep and empathic listening ability enables her to make connections to every vocal nuance, whether spoken or sung. As she points out "the whole session" can be viewed "as an improvisation."

  19. Interviews: Linking Leadership Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah N.; Roebuck, Deborah B.

    2010-01-01

    Leadership educators use various tools to enable their students to learn about leadership. This article describes the assignment "Interview with a Leader" which the authors have incorporated into several different leadership courses. Grounded in constructivist and social learning theories, the authors have found this assignment to be…

  20. Implementation of Motivational Interviewing in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte; Louise Rasmussen, Line

    with the nurses. Implementation process in 3 phases - Preparation - Implementation (4 selected keypersons) - Follow-up Result The four selected keypersons aroused curiosity and motivation for a patient-centred admission interview. The nurses experienced the interaction with the patient became more dynamic. Data...

  1. active interviewing in childhood research: on children's identity work in interviews

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fernqvist, Stina

    2010-01-01

    ...., Cocks, 2006, Fernqvist, Nasman, & von Gerber, 2008). In this paper, I will argue that research interviews with children, and the interaction that takes place in these settings, are valuable resources when it comes to analyzing children's and adolescents' identity work (cf., Alasuutari, 1995). The interview situation is a setting in which specific ways...

  2. Characteristic Interviews, Different Strategies: Methodological Challenges in Qualitative Interviewing among Respondents with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigstad, Hanne Marie Høybråten

    2014-01-01

    Conducting qualitative research interviews among individuals with intellectual disabilities, including cognitive limitations and difficulties in communication, presents particular research challenges. One question is whether the difficulties that informants encounter affect interviews to such an extent that the validity of the results is weakened.…

  3. Empowering Interviews: Narrative Interviews in the Study of Information Literacy in Everyday Life Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerdal, Johanna Rivano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper presents a way to design and conduct interviews, within a sociocultural perspective, for studying information literacy practices in everyday life. Methods: A framework was developed combining a socio-cultural perspective with a narrative interview was developed. Interviewees were invited to participate by talking and using…

  4. Teacher Interviews, Student Interviews, and Classroom Observations in Combinatorics: Four Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddle, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    This research consists of teacher interviews, student interviews, and classroom observations, all based around the mathematical content area of combinatorics. Combinatorics is a part of discrete mathematics concerning the ordering and grouping of distinct elements. The data are used in four separate analyses. The first provides evidence that…

  5. Hearing as Touch in a Multilingual Film Interview: The Interviewer's Linguistic Incompetence as Aesthetic Key Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimberger, Katja

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the author's embodied experience of linguistic incompetence in the context of an interview-based, short, promotional film production about people's personal connections to their spoken languages in Glasgow, Scotland/UK. The article highlights that people's right to their spoken languages during film interviews and the…

  6. Why did I get chronic fatigue syndrome? A qualitative interview study of causal attributions in women patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, Atle; Malterud, Kirsti

    2005-12-01

    To explore causal attributions among women with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Qualitative study where data from individual semi-structured interviews were analysed according to Malterud's systematic text condensation. Bergen, Norway. A purposeful sample of eight women aged 25-55, recruited among members of a self-help organization. Accounts of causal attribution for CFS among the informants, focusing on gender. The participants agreed that their way of living could have increased the vulnerability of their resistance resources. Pressure they put upon themselves, workload burdens without subsequent relaxation, emotional conflicts, or preparing for assumed problem-solving were mentioned as gendered dimensions. They presented different explanations regarding potential triggers encountering their fragile immune systems, most often a virus infection. The participants thought women might have a weaker immune system than men, or that CFS was caused by a virus that women are more likely to catch. In their experience, their symptoms were activated when people put pressure on them, such that they might be nervous as to whether they could live up to the demands of their surroundings, and in the case of emotional strain related to family and work. More studies are needed exploring hypotheses concerning the complex interplay between molecular predispositions and more or less gendered lifestyle issues in CFS. Doctors need to challenge their strong beliefs regarding medically unexplained conditions, where facts still remain unresolved. Recognizing this, the doctor may provide realistic support and advice, and contribute to the establishment of common ground for understanding and managing the condition.

  7. Prejudice and Health Anxiety about Radiation Exposure from Second-Generation Atomic Bomb Survivors: Results from a Qualitative Interview Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamite, Yuka

    2017-01-01

    The effect of atomic bomb radiation exposure on the survivors and their children has been a worrisome problem since soon after the 1945 Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings. Researchers have examined physical and genetic effects; however, no research has focused on second-generation survivors' (SGS) psychological effects. Consequently, this study shed light on the SGS' experience of discrimination and prejudice and their anxiety concerning the genetic effects of radiation exposure. This study utilized semi-structured interviews with 14 SGS (10 women, mean age = 56 ± 6.25 years, range = 46-68 years). Data were analyzed using a modified version of the grounded theory approach. Three categories were extracted: low awareness as an SGS, no health anxiety regarding the effect of radiation, and health anxiety regarding the effect of radiation. The results did not reveal that SGS who grew up in the bombed areas experienced discrimination or prejudice. They had little health anxiety from childhood to adolescence. In this study, some of the SGS developed health anxiety about their third-generation children, but only among female participants. Perhaps the transgenerational transmission of anxiety concerning the genetic effects of radiation exposure causes stress, particularly among women with children. However, a change was seen in adulthood health anxiety regarding the effects of radiation, suggesting the possibility that changes in the psychological experiences of SGS can be observed throughout their lifetimes and that their own health status, and that of their children, the third-generation survivors, affects their health anxiety regarding radiation.

  8. Discussing End-of-Life Decisions in a Clinical Ethics Committee: An Interview Study of Norwegian Doctors' Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahus, Marianne K; Førde, Reidun

    2016-09-01

    With disagreement, doubts, or ambiguous grounds in end-of-life decisions, doctors are advised to involve a clinical ethics committee (CEC). However, little has been published on doctors' experiences with discussing an end-of-life decision in a CEC. As part of the quality assurance of this work, we wanted to find out if clinicians have benefited from discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs and why. We will disseminate some Norwegian doctors' experiences when discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs, based on semi-structured interviews with fifteen Norwegian physicians who had brought an end-of-life decision case to a CEC. Almost half of the cases involved conflicts with the patients' relatives. In a majority of the cases, there was uncertainty about what would be the ethically preferable solution. Reasons for referring the case to the CEC were to get broader illumination of the case, to get perspective from people outside the team, to get advice, or to get moral backing on a decision already made. A great majority of the clinicians reported an overall positive experience with the CECs' discussions. In cases where there was conflict, the clinicians reported less satisfaction with the CECs' discussions. The study shows that most doctors who have used a CEC in an end-of-life decision find it useful to have ethical and/or legal aspects illuminated, and to have the dilemma scrutinized from a new perspective. A systematic discussion seems to be significant to the clinicians.

  9. Diagrams and Relational Maps: The Use of Graphic Elicitation Techniques with Interviewing for Data Collection, Analysis, and Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J. Copeland PhD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphic elicitation techniques, which ask research participants to provide visual data representing personal understandings of concepts, experiences, beliefs, or behaviors, can be especially useful in helping participants to express complex or abstract ideas or opinions. The benefits and drawbacks of using graphic elicitation techniques for data collection, data analysis, and data display in qualitative research studies are analyzed using examples from a research study that employed data matrices and relational maps in conjunction with semi-structured interviews. Results from this analysis demonstrate that the use of these combined techniques for data collection facilitates triangulation and helps to establish internal consistency of data, thereby increasing the trustworthiness of the interpretation of that data and lending support to validity and reliability claims. Findings support the notion that graphic elicitation techniques can be highly useful in qualitative research studies at the data collection, the data analysis, and the data reporting stages. For example, this study found that graphic elicitation techniques are especially useful for eliciting data related to emotions and emotional experiences.

  10. Prejudice and Health Anxiety about Radiation Exposure from Second-Generation Atomic Bomb Survivors: Results from a Qualitative Interview Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Kamite

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of atomic bomb radiation exposure on the survivors and their children has been a worrisome problem since soon after the 1945 Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings. Researchers have examined physical and genetic effects; however, no research has focused on second-generation survivors’ (SGS psychological effects. Consequently, this study shed light on the SGS’ experience of discrimination and prejudice and their anxiety concerning the genetic effects of radiation exposure. This study utilized semi-structured interviews with 14 SGS (10 women, mean age = 56 ± 6.25 years, range = 46–68 years. Data were analyzed using a modified version of the grounded theory approach. Three categories were extracted: low awareness as an SGS, no health anxiety regarding the effect of radiation, and health anxiety regarding the effect of radiation. The results did not reveal that SGS who grew up in the bombed areas experienced discrimination or prejudice. They had little health anxiety from childhood to adolescence. In this study, some of the SGS developed health anxiety about their third-generation children, but only among female participants. Perhaps the transgenerational transmission of anxiety concerning the genetic effects of radiation exposure causes stress, particularly among women with children. However, a change was seen in adulthood health anxiety regarding the effects of radiation, suggesting the possibility that changes in the psychological experiences of SGS can be observed throughout their lifetimes and that their own health status, and that of their children, the third-generation survivors, affects their health anxiety regarding radiation.

  11. Valuing technology: A qualitative interview study with physicians about insulin pump therapy for children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Rayzel; Miller, Fiona A; Daneman, Denis; Guttmann, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Insulin pumps for children with type 1 diabetes have been broadly adopted despite equivocal evidence about comparative effectiveness. To understand why and inform policy related to public funding for new technologies, we explored how physicians interpret the value of pumps. We conducted open-ended, semi-structured interviews with 16 physicians from a pediatric diabetes network in Ontario, Canada, and analyzed the data using interpretive description. Respondents recognized that pumps fell short of expectations because they required hard work, as well as family and school support. Yet, pumps were valued for their status as new technologies and as a promising step in developing future technology. In addition, they were valued for their role within a therapeutic relationship, given the context of chronic childhood disease. These findings identify the types of beliefs that influence the adoption and diffusion of technologies. Some beliefs bear on hopes for new technology that may inappropriately hasten adoption, creating excess cost with little benefit. On the other hand, some beliefs identify potential benefits that are not captured in effectiveness studies, but may warrant consideration in resource allocation decisions. Still others suggest the need for remediation, such as those bearing on disparity in pump use by socioeconomic status. Understanding how technologies are valued can help stakeholders decide how to address such beliefs and expectations in funding decisions and implementation protocols.

  12. The experience of distress in relation to surgical treatment and care for breast cancer: An interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, L; Garne, J P; Søgaard, M; Laursen, B S

    2015-12-01

    A diagnosis of breast cancer is a key turning point in a woman's life that may lead to her experiencing severe and persistent distress and potentially presaging a psychiatric disorder, such as major depression. In Denmark an increased standardization of care and a short hospital stay policy minimize the time of medical and nursing surveillance. Consequently, there is the potential risk that distress goes unnoticed, and therefore, untreated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the experience of distress in Danish women taking part in surgical continuity of care for breast cancer. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur was conducted to explore the experience of distress in relation to surgical treatment and care for breast cancer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 women who recently had surgery for breast cancer at six departments of breast surgery in Denmark from May 2013 to November 2013. The understanding of the experience of distress in the period of surgical continuity of care for breast cancer is augmented and improved through a discussion related to four identified themes: A time of anxiety, loss of identities, being treated as a person and being part of a system, drawing on theory and other research findings. Distress experienced by women in the period following diagnosis arises from multiple sources. Support and care must be based on the woman's individual experience of distress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding Land Cover Changes in the Italian Alps and Romanian Carpathians Combining Remote Sensing and Stakeholder Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žiga Malek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, socio-economic changes in Europe have had a significant effect on land cover changes, but it is unclear how this has affected mountain areas. We focus on two mountain areas: the eastern Italian Alps and the Romanian Curvature Carpathians. We classified land cover from Earth observation data after 1989 by using applied remote sensing techniques. We also analyzed socio-economic data and conducted semi-structured interviews with local stakeholders. In Italy, most of the land conversion processes followed long-term trends. In Romania, they took off with the sudden political changes after 1989. In both areas, forest expansion was the biggest, but potentially not the most consequential change. More consequential changes were urbanization in Italy and small-scale deforestation in Romania, since both increased the risk of hydro-meteorological hazards. Stakeholders’ views were an added value to the spatial analysis and vice versa. For example, stakeholders’ explanations resolved the seeming contradiction of decreased economic activity and increased urbanization (Italian site, as a consequence of secondary home building. Furthermore, spatial analysis revealed that urbanization in Romania was less significant with regard to consequences for the wider human-environment system than many stakeholders thought.

  14. Twelve-year cyclic surging episode at Donjek Glacier in Yukon, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, M.; Abe, T.; Sakakibara, D.

    2015-12-01

    Surge-type glaciers exhibit several-fold to orders-of-magnitude speed-up during the short active phase, resulting in km-scale terminus advance. Although there are many surge-type glaciers near the border of Alaska and the Yukon, the generation mechanisms remain uncertain because of limited and few continuous observations. To better understand the surge dynamics and predict the next event, it is essential to examine the entire surge cycles. Here we use Landsat optical imageries to reveal the long-term evolutions, and report three surging episodes at Donjek Glacier in Yukon, Canada. Using the Landsat images, we found three surging events in 1989, 2001, and 2013. In the 2001 event, the surface speed significantly increased by up to 4.5 m/d; during the quiescent phases it was ~0.5 m/d at the terminus. While the duration of active phase is about 4~5 and 2~3 year in the 2001 and 2013 events, the period in the 1989 event is unclear because of the lack of high temporal resolution data. Remarkably, the surging area is limited to the ~20-km section from the terminus instead of the entire glacier. Moreover, we examined the terminus area changes from 1975 to 2014. Although the area has been secularly decreasing probably due to the tread of global warming, it has also revealed four significant fluctuations during the nearly forty years. Comparing the speed and the area changes, the three speed-up events correspond to the terminus area fluctuations with a few time lags. It turns out that the surge event has been quite regularly repeating every twelve years. Although the behavior is rather similar to that in Svalbard glaciers in terms of maximum speed and unclear initiation season, the recurrence interval is much shorter than other nearby surges. Considering that the surge events seem to have initiated around significantly narrower area than upstream, the strong valley constriction may control the regularity as well as the twelve-year recurrence time.

  15. Facilitating phenomenological interviewing by means of reflexology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ross

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to show how reflexology could facilitate phenomenological interviewing by probing the lifeworld of individual participants. It presents a hybrid study of phenomenological interviewing and reflexology as a holistic method of health care. In this sense, it is an interparadigmatic study, since it rests on the interface of Western and Oriental thought. This article reports on seven cases which were included in the qualitative, empirical investigation. During the sessions, reflexological readings served as impetus for inquiry into the experiences of the participants, as congestions on reflex points and along meridians were interpreted in terms of physical organs and functions. These readings were related to corresponding emotions as accepted within the reflexology paradigm. It was, however, up to the participants to inform the researcher of events and/or circumstances that caused the emotions. Thus, nonverbal data communicated information that facilitated verbal exchange concerning the life-world of each individual participant.

  16. Lost Visions: An Interview with Julia Thomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Calè

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This interview addresses the methodologies and research questions that underpin 'The Illustration Archive'. The archive, created on an AHRC-funded Big Data project, contains over a million searchable book illustrations from a period roughly spanning the eighteenth to the mid-twentieth century, and taken from works of geography, history, philosophy, literature, and science. The Twitter interview, which was supplemented by fuller responses to the questions, offers an insight into how digital archives are created and the problems involved with this creation, from issues of how to make images searchable to the ways in which this resultant searchability impacts on how they are viewed and analysed. The digital archive is a space where forgotten illustrations are made visible, but the terms of this visibility are far from neutral or straightforward.

  17. INTERVIEW: Knowledge and Terminology Management at Crisplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Margrethe H.; Toft, Birthe

    2012-01-01

    Margrethe H. Møller interviews Lisbeth Kjeldgaard Almsten (translator/coauthor: Birthe Toft) “If you think that terminology work is simply a matter of buying terminology management software and getting started, you are in for trouble” At Crisplant, we have been doing terminology management for th...... management really is, in enterprise practice as well as in education.......Margrethe H. Møller interviews Lisbeth Kjeldgaard Almsten (translator/coauthor: Birthe Toft) “If you think that terminology work is simply a matter of buying terminology management software and getting started, you are in for trouble” At Crisplant, we have been doing terminology management...... for the past 20 years. Today, term bases are used not just for terminology-oriented term management. Recording other types of master data needed by all kinds of professionals in the enterprise is equally important. Within the past year, Crisplant has been acquired by the German BEUMER group, which means...

  18. STS-100 Crew Interview: Jeff Ashby

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Pilot Jeff Ashby is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Ashby then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  19. An interview with Hyeon-Shik Hwang

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    It gives me great pleasure to interview Dr. Hyeon-Shik Hwang, an innovative orthodontist who has developed many creative techniques over his career. Dr. Hwang was born in Korea and received his DDS and PhD degrees from Yonsei University in Seoul. He is professor and chairman of the Department of Orthodontics at Chonnam National University School of Dentistry, Gwangju, Korea. Dr. Hwang, as a faculty at the university hospital, has maintained a successful clinical practice for more than 25 year...

  20. An Interview with Dean Howard Frank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Howard Frank was appointed dean of the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business in 1997. He is widely recognized as a world-class information technology expert whose accomplishments include fundamental contributions to the development of the Intemet. Frank is also a prolific author, having written over 190 articles and chapters in books on technology and the management of technology. CIB had an intensive interview with him in Shanghai recently.