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Sample records for twelve healthy volunteers

  1. Pain perception in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Susanne; Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Werner, Mads U

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to study the relationship between pain perception and cytokine release during systemic inflammation. We present a randomized crossover trial in healthy volunteers (n = 17) in 37 individual trials. Systemic inflammation was induced by an i.v. bolus of Escherichia coli LPS (2 ng/kg) on two...... in healthy human volunteers leads to reduction in pain pressure threshold and an increase in pain perception to heat stimuli, supporting a relationship between acute systemic inflammation and pain perception....

  2. Enantioselective HPLC-DAD method for the determination of etodolac enantiomers in tablets, human plasma and application to comparative pharmacokinetic study of both enantiomers after a single oral dose to twelve healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewala, Ismail I; Moneeb, Marwa S; Elmongy, Hatem A; Wahbi, Abdel-Aziz M

    2014-12-01

    An enantioselective high performance liquid chromatographic method with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) was developed and validated for the determination of etodolac enantiomers in tablets and human plasma. Enantiomeric separation was achieved on a Kromasil Cellucoat chiral column (250 mm × 4.6mm i.d., 5 µm particle size) using a mobile phase consisting of hexane: isopropanol: triflouroacetic acid (90:10:0.1 v/v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1). The chromatographic system enables the separation of the two enantiomers and the internal standard within a cycle time of 8 min. The resolution between the two enantiomers was 4.25 and the resolution between each enantiomer and the internal standard was more than 2.0. Detection was carried out at 274 nm, and the purity assessment was performed using a photodiode array detector. Solid phase extraction technique using C-18 cartridge was applied to extract the analytes from the plasma samples, and the percentage recovery was more than 95% for the lower quantification limit. The method has been validated with respect to selectivity, linearity, accuracy and precision, robustness, limit of detection and limit of quantification. The validation acceptance criteria were met in all cases. The linearity range for the determination of each enantiomer in human plasma was 0.4-30.0 µg mL(-1) and the limits of quantification of R-etodolac and S-etodolac were 0.20 and 0.19 µg mL(-1), respectively. The validated method was successfully applied to the determination of etodolac enantiomers in tablets and to a comparative pharmacokinetic study of the two enantiomers after the administration of 300 mg single oral dose etodolac racemate tablets to twelve healthy volunteers.

  3. Sumatriptan and cerebral perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A K; Grimes, S; Ng, K; Critchley, M; Breckenridge, A M; Thomson, C; Pilgrim, A J

    1992-04-01

    1. The effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral perfusion was studied in healthy volunteers. 2. Intravenous sumatriptan (2 mg) had no detectable effect on regional cerebral perfusion as measured using a SPECT system with 99technetiumm labelled hexemethylpropyleneamineoxime. 3. Sumatriptan had no effect on pulse, blood pressure or ECG indices. 4. All six volunteers experienced minor adverse effects during the intravenous infusion.

  4. Participation of healthy volunteers in research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, F A; Mackay, I R; Fraser, J R

    1989-03-20

    Research that involves healthy normal volunteers frequently is performed. This article examines ethical guide-lines for the recruitment of healthy volunteers in research projects. Ethical decisions on projects that are based on patient-volunteers or healthy normal volunteers should balance the risk to the volunteer and the collective benefit to the community. For healthy normal volunteers that risk should be minimal or trivial. Investigators should follow recruitment practices that avoid approaches to persons who are dependent upon them in some way, and should carry the day-to-day ethical responsibility even after institutional ethical approval has been granted. Pilot studies and self-experimentation readily can transgress ethical guide-lines. Compensation for mishaps or injuries that occur during research in which there is no question of negligence (for example, an unforeseeable reaction in a phase-1 drug trial) is an unresolved issue which should be addressed by the research community. It is recommended that action be taken to ensure that healthy volunteers who participate in approved research have redress in the rare event of an accident, whether this is a result of negligence, chance or misadventure. Hospitals/institutions or other bodies that sponsor research should extend their insurance to cover specifically such unforeseeable events in which there may be liability, and to have the facility for a payment of beneficence in the case of accidents in which liability cannot be established.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous melatonin in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Werner, Mads Utke; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of oral and iv melatonin in healthy volunteers. METHODS: The study was performed as a cohort crossover study. The volunteers received either 10 mg oral melatonin or 10 mg intravenous melatonin on two separate study days. Blood samples were...... collected at different time points following oral administration and short iv infusion, respectively. Plasma melatonin concentrations were determined by RIA technique. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed by "the method of residuals" and compartmental analysis. The pharmacokinetic variables: k a, t 1....../2 absorption, t max, C max, t 1/2 elimination, AUC 0-∞, and bioavailability were determined for oral melatonin. C max, t 1/2 elimination, V d, CL and AUC 0-∞ were determined for intravenous melatonin. RESULTS: Twelve male volunteers completed the study. Baseline melatonin plasma levels did not differ...

  6. LSD enhances suggestibility in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, R L; Kaelen, M; Whalley, M G; Bolstridge, M; Feilding, A; Nutt, D J

    2015-02-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has a history of use as a psychotherapeutic aid in the treatment of mood disorders and addiction, and it was also explored as an enhancer of mind control. The present study sought to test the effect of LSD on suggestibility in a modern research study. Ten healthy volunteers were administered with intravenous (i.v.) LSD (40-80 μg) in a within-subject placebo-controlled design. Suggestibility and cued mental imagery were assessed using the Creative Imagination Scale (CIS) and a mental imagery test (MIT). CIS and MIT items were split into two versions (A and B), balanced for 'efficacy' (i.e. A ≈ B) and counterbalanced across conditions (i.e. 50 % completed version 'A' under LSD). The MIT and CIS were issued 110 and 140 min, respectively, post-infusion, corresponding with the peak drug effects. Volunteers gave significantly higher ratings for the CIS (p = 0.018), but not the MIT (p = 0.11), after LSD than placebo. The magnitude of suggestibility enhancement under LSD was positively correlated with trait conscientiousness measured at baseline (p = 0.0005). These results imply that the influence of suggestion is enhanced by LSD. Enhanced suggestibility under LSD may have implications for its use as an adjunct to psychotherapy, where suggestibility plays a major role. That cued imagery was unaffected by LSD implies that suggestions must be of a sufficient duration and level of detail to be enhanced by the drug. The results also imply that individuals with high trait conscientiousness are especially sensitive to the suggestibility-enhancing effects of LSD.

  7. Pharmacogenetics of healthy volunteers in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio-Campos, Karla; Orengo-Mercado, Carmelo; Renta, Jessicca Y; Peguero, Muriel; García, Ricardo; Hernández, Gabriel; Corey, Susan; Cadilla, Carmen L; Duconge, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    Puerto Ricans are a unique Hispanic population with European, Native American (Taino), and higher West African ancestral contributions than other non-Caribbean Hispanics. In admixed populations, such as Puerto Ricans, genetic variants can be found at different frequencies when compared to parental populations and uniquely combined and distributed. Therefore, in this review, we aimed to collect data from studies conducted in healthy Puerto Ricans and to report the frequencies of genetic polymorphisms with major relevance in drug response. Filtering for healthy volunteers or individuals, we performed a search of pharmacogenetic studies in academic literature databases without limiting the period of the results. The search was limited to Puerto Ricans living in the island, excluding those studies performed in mainland (United States). We found that the genetic markers impacting pharmacological therapy in the areas of cardiovascular, oncology, and neurology are the most frequently investigated. Coincidently, the top causes of mortality in the island are cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke. In addition, polymorphisms in genes that encode for members of the CYP450 family (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) are also available due to their relevance in the metabolism of drugs. The complex genetic background of Puerto Ricans is responsible for the divergence in the reported allele frequencies when compared to parental populations (Africans, East Asians, and Europeans). The importance of reporting the findings of pharmacogenetic studies conducted in Puerto Ricans is to identify genetic variants with potential utility among this genetically complex population and eventually move forward the adoption of personalized medicine in the island.

  8. Prediction of psilocybin response in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Studerus

    Full Text Available Responses to hallucinogenic drugs, such as psilocybin, are believed to be critically dependent on the user's personality, current mood state, drug pre-experiences, expectancies, and social and environmental variables. However, little is known about the order of importance of these variables and their effect sizes in comparison to drug dose. Hence, this study investigated the effects of 24 predictor variables, including age, sex, education, personality traits, drug pre-experience, mental state before drug intake, experimental setting, and drug dose on the acute response to psilocybin. The analysis was based on the pooled data of 23 controlled experimental studies involving 409 psilocybin administrations to 261 healthy volunteers. Multiple linear mixed effects models were fitted for each of 15 response variables. Although drug dose was clearly the most important predictor for all measured response variables, several non-pharmacological variables significantly contributed to the effects of psilocybin. Specifically, having a high score in the personality trait of Absorption, being in an emotionally excitable and active state immediately before drug intake, and having experienced few psychological problems in past weeks were most strongly associated with pleasant and mystical-type experiences, whereas high Emotional Excitability, low age, and an experimental setting involving positron emission tomography most strongly predicted unpleasant and/or anxious reactions to psilocybin. The results confirm that non-pharmacological variables play an important role in the effects of psilocybin.

  9. Prediction of psilocybin response in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studerus, Erich; Gamma, Alex; Kometer, Michael; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2012-01-01

    Responses to hallucinogenic drugs, such as psilocybin, are believed to be critically dependent on the user's personality, current mood state, drug pre-experiences, expectancies, and social and environmental variables. However, little is known about the order of importance of these variables and their effect sizes in comparison to drug dose. Hence, this study investigated the effects of 24 predictor variables, including age, sex, education, personality traits, drug pre-experience, mental state before drug intake, experimental setting, and drug dose on the acute response to psilocybin. The analysis was based on the pooled data of 23 controlled experimental studies involving 409 psilocybin administrations to 261 healthy volunteers. Multiple linear mixed effects models were fitted for each of 15 response variables. Although drug dose was clearly the most important predictor for all measured response variables, several non-pharmacological variables significantly contributed to the effects of psilocybin. Specifically, having a high score in the personality trait of Absorption, being in an emotionally excitable and active state immediately before drug intake, and having experienced few psychological problems in past weeks were most strongly associated with pleasant and mystical-type experiences, whereas high Emotional Excitability, low age, and an experimental setting involving positron emission tomography most strongly predicted unpleasant and/or anxious reactions to psilocybin. The results confirm that non-pharmacological variables play an important role in the effects of psilocybin.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of lorazepam tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-junQIU; Guo-xinHU; Jian-gangWANG; Zong-shunDAI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of lorazepam tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers. METHODS:Twenty Chinese healthy male volunteers were involved in the study. Each subject received a single dose of 3 mg Lorazepam tested formulation (T, Hubei Zhongtian Airbeck Pharmaceutical Limited Company) or Lorazepam reference formulation (R, Thailand Atlatic Pharmaceutical Limited Company) with a random-

  11. Antithrombin III: biodistribution in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knot, E A; de Jong, E; ten Cate, J W; Gie, L K; van Royen, E A

    1987-12-18

    Five healthy volunteers were injected intravenously with 73-90 uCi purified human 131I-Antithrombin III (AT III), specific biological activity 5.6 U/mg. The tracer data were analysed using a three compartment model. The plasma radioactivity half life was 66.2 +/- 1.2 (sem) h, the fractional catabolic rate constant of the plasma pool was 0.025 +/- 0.002 (sem) h-1. These data were comparable with those described in the literature. Because of the difficulty in translating the mathematical analysis of various compartments into the biological model, biodistribution was monitored by a gamma camera linked to a DEC PDP 11/34 computer system. Dynamic and static images were obtained at fixed time intervals following the injection of 131I-AT III. Whole body scanning at intervals between the time of injection (t = 0) and t = 24.5 h showed 131I-AT III distribution over the heart, lungs, liver, spleen and great vessels. Dynamic scanning was performed over the heart, spleen and liver. Overlayed frames in the first ten minutes after the 131I-AT III injection showed the following radioactivity expressed as percentage of the injected dose; 5.9% +/- 0.3 (sem) over the heart, 10.6% +/- 0.9 (sem) over the liver and 1.1% +/- 0.1 (sem) over the spleen. A slower decline of the radioactivity between t = 0 and t = 24 h; (19%) was measured over the liver compared with the radioactivity disappearance over the heart region. This shows, in combination with the fact that the radioactivity disappearance over the heart was identical with the radioactivity decline measured in the plasma samples that retention of 131I-AT III occurred in the liver.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Reactivity of allergy skin test in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supakthanasiri, Phisit; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Chantaphakul, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Healthy individuals may be exposed and sensitised to allergens, and have a positive response to a skin prick test despite being asymptomatic. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of atopic sensitisation and identify the reactivity of healthy volunteers to common aeroallergens. Healthy volunteers with no known allergic symptoms were recruited in this study. All volunteers were scheduled to undergo a skin prick test with 16 common aeroallergens that were previously identified among atopic patients. A total of 100 volunteers (mean age 28 years) were enrolled in this study. 42 volunteers had positive skin prick tests for at least one allergen. The median number of sensitised allergen was 2 (range 1-7). Volunteers with positive skin tests (n = 42) were younger than those with negative skin tests (n = 58) (mean age 25.5 vs. 29.2 years; p mite (n = 33), house dust (n = 23) and American cockroach (n = 20). In this study, up to 42% of healthy volunteers, particularly those with a family history of atopy, were sensitised to allergens. Reactivity of the skin test without allergic symptoms, however, does not indicate allergic disease. Therefore, the skin test should only be indicated in atopic symptomatic individuals.

  13. Physiologic effects of intravenous fluid administration in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Jensen, Peter; Kehlet, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Dose regimens in perioperative fluid management are rarely evidence based. Therefore, we investigated responses to an IV fluid infusion in healthy volunteers to assess basic physiologic effects of a fluid infusion per se. In a prospective, double-blinded, cross-randomized study, 12 healthy volunt...... to a significant decrease in pulmonary function and a significant weight gain for 24 h but without effects on exercise capacity. These findings may serve as basis information for clinical studies of perioperative fluid management.......Dose regimens in perioperative fluid management are rarely evidence based. Therefore, we investigated responses to an IV fluid infusion in healthy volunteers to assess basic physiologic effects of a fluid infusion per se. In a prospective, double-blinded, cross-randomized study, 12 healthy...

  14. Pharmacokinetic studies of antipsychotics in healthy volunteers versus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, N R

    2001-01-01

    In clinical trials of dopamine-blocking antipsychotics, significant adverse events may occur in healthy volunteers at dose levels that are well tolerated by schizophrenic patients. Because of these differences in tolerability, bioequivalence and pharmacokinetic studies of antipsychotics should be performed in schizophrenic patients rather than in healthy volunteers. When clozapine is the drug being investigated, pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies should be carried out in real-life dosage conditions because the half-life of clozapine increases with multiple doses. Under real-life conditions, the evaluation of multiple doses of clozapine in a population of schizophrenic patients can provide direct therapeutic relevance to bioavailability findings. This article discusses patient recruitment and informed consent in pharmacokinetic trials of schizophrenia, issues in studying antipsychotic agents in healthy volunteers versus schizophrenic patients, and a bioequivalency study of Clozaril (Novartis Pharmaceuticals) and generic clozapine (Creighton [Sandoz]) in schizophrenic patients.

  15. Physiologic effects of intravenous fluid administration in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Jensen, Peter; Kehlet, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Dose regimens in perioperative fluid management are rarely evidence based. Therefore, we investigated responses to an IV fluid infusion in healthy volunteers to assess basic physiologic effects of a fluid infusion per se. In a prospective, double-blinded, cross-randomized study, 12 healthy...... volunteers with a median age of 63 yr (range, 59-67 yr) received an infusion of lactated Ringer's solution 40 mL/kg (median, 2820 mL) or 5 mL/kg (median, 353 mL; background infusion) in random order on two separate occasions. The study was designed to mimic the perioperative course with preoperative fasting...... by fluid administration. These findings may serve as a basis for clinical studies applying the same type of fluid in different amounts to determine the optimal amount of perioperative fluid in various surgical procedures. IMPLICATIONS: Infusion of 40 mL/kg of lactated Ringer's solution in volunteers led...

  16. Informed consent in healthy volunteers: Whom does it protect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vliet, A.A.; Wemer, J.; Wilffert, B.; De Vroedt, J.W.P.; Jonkman, J.H.G.

    1999-01-01

    In the next decade, centres for research on the safety, tolerability or bioequivalence of new molecular entities will be confronted with numerous compounds, a narrowing time frame for performing Phase I research activities, and a growing demand for healthy volunteers for participation in non-therape

  17. Cryptosporidium muris: Infectivity and Illness in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Cynthia L.; Okhuysen, Pablo C.; Langer-Curry, Rebecca C.; Lupo, Philip J.; Widmer, Giovanni; Tzipori, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Although Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis cause the majority of human cryptosporidiosis cases, other Cryptosporidium species are also capable of infecting humans, particularly when individuals are immunocompromised. Ten C. muris cases have been reported, primarily in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -positive patients with diarrhea. However, asymptomatic cases were reported in two HIV-negative children, and in another case, age and immune status were not described. This study examines the infectivity of C. muris in six healthy adults. Volunteers were challenged with 105 C. muris oocysts and monitored for 6 weeks for infection and/or illness. All six patients became infected. Two patients experienced a self-limited diarrheal illness. Total oocysts shed during the study ranged from 6.7 × 106 to 4.1 × 108, and the number was slightly higher in volunteers with diarrhea (2.8 × 108) than asymptomatic shedders (4.4 × 107). C. muris-infected subjects shed oocysts longer than occurred with other species studied in healthy volunteers. Three volunteers shed oocysts for 7 months. Physical examinations were normal, with no reported recurrence of diarrhea or other gastrointestinal complaints. Two persistent shedders were treated with nitazoxanide, and the infection was resolved. Thus, healthy adults are susceptible to C. muris, which can cause mild diarrhea and result in persistent, asymptomatic infection. PMID:25311695

  18. Normal range values for thromboelastography in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpelini, S; Rhind, S G; Nascimento, B; Tien, H; Shek, P N; Peng, H T; Huang, H; Pinto, R; Speers, V; Reis, M; Rizoli, S B

    2009-12-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) provides a functional evaluation of coagulation. It has characteristics of an ideal coagulation test for trauma, but is not frequently used, partially due to lack of both standardized techniques and normal values. We determined normal values for our population, compared them to those of the manufacturer and evaluated the effect of gender, age, blood type, and ethnicity. The technique was standardized using citrated blood, kaolin and was performed on a Haemoscope 5000 device. Volunteers were interviewed and excluded if pregnant, on anticoagulants or having a bleeding disorder. The TEG parameters analyzed were R, K, alpha, MA, LY30, and coagulation index. All volunteers outside the manufacturer's normal range underwent extensive coagulation investigations. Reference ranges for 95% for 118 healthy volunteers were R: 3.8-9.8 min, K: 0.7-3.4 min, alpha: 47.8-77.7 degrees, MA: 49.7-72.7 mm, LY30: -2.3-5.77%, coagulation index: -5.1-3.6. Most values were significantly different from those of the manufacturer, which would have diagnosed coagulopathy in 10 volunteers, for whom additional investigation revealed no disease (81% specificity). Healthy women were significantly more hypercoagulable than men. Aging was not associated with hypercoagulability and East Asian ethnicity was not with hypocoagulability. In our population, the manufacturer's normal values for citrated blood-kaolin had a specificity of 81% and would incorrectly identify 8.5% of the healthy volunteers as coagulopathic. This study supports the manufacturer's recommendation that each institution should determine its own normal values before adopting TEG, a procedure which may be impractical. Consideration should be given to a multi-institutional study to establish wide standard values for TEG.

  19. Bioequivalence Study of Donepezil Hydrochloride Tablets in Healthy Male Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Supanimit Teekachunhatean; Sukit Roongapinun; Nutthiya Hanprasertpong; Siriluk Aunmuang; Noppamas Rojanasthien

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the bioequivalence of two formulations of 5 mg donepezil HCL tablets: Tonizep as the test and Aricept as the reference. The two products were administered as a single oral dose according to a randomized two-phase crossover with a 3-week washout period in 20 healthy Thai Male volunteers. After drug administration, serial blood samples were collected over a period of 216 hours. Plasma donepezil concentrations were measured by high performance liqui...

  20. Cardiopulmonary and metabolic effects of yoga in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    T Satheesh Divya; M T Vijayalakshmi; K Mini; Asish, K.; M. PUSHPALATHA; Varun Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Yoga the spiritual union of mind with the divine intelligence of the universe aims to liberate a human being from conflicts of body–mind duality. Beneficial cardiovascular and pulmonary effects of yoga are in par with aerobic exercise, even amounting to replace the exercise model. We conducted an interventional study in healthy volunteers, to analyze the impact of short-term yoga training on cardiovascular, pulmonary, autonomic function tests, lipid profile, and thyroid function t...

  1. Bioequivalence Study of Atorvastatin Tablets in Healthy Pakistani Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Sohail; Arshad, Usman; Abbass, Nasir; Parvez, Irfan; Abbas, Ghulam; Mahmood, Wajahat

    2015-01-01

    A two way, randomized cross-over bioequivalence study was conducted to analyse the rate and extent of absorption of atorvastatin after a single dose of 80 mg atorvastatin as atorvastatin calcium tablets. The study was carried out using healthy male volunteers (N = 24). A high performance liquid chromatography method was employed to determine the level of drug in human plasma. It was concluded that the test and the reference drug exhibited comparable values of pharmacokinetic parameters. It was also concluded that since there was no significant difference between the rate and extent of absorption of the drug from the test and the reference formulations: these two formulations could thus be declared bioequivalent.

  2. Effect of serotonin on small intestinal contractility in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.B.; Arif, F.; Gregersen, H.

    2008-01-01

    -duodeno-jejunal contractility in healthy human volunteers. Manometric recordings were obtained and the effects of either a standard meal, continuous intravenous infusion of serotonin (20 nmol/kg/min) or intraluminal bolus infusions of graded doses of serotonin (2.5, 25 or 250 nmol) were compared. In addition, platelet......-depleted plasma levels of serotonin, blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram were evaluated. All subjects showed similar results. Intravenous serotonin increased migrating motor complex phase In frequency 3-fold and migrating velocity 2-fold. Intraluminal infusion of serotonin did not change contractile...

  3. Safety evaluation of saffron (Crocus sativus) tablets in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Shahabian, Masoud; Esmaeili, Habib-Allah; Rajbai, Omid; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2008-12-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus) stigma tablets were evaluated for short-term safety and tolerability in healthy adult volunteers. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled design consisting of a 1 week treatment of saffron tablets. Volunteers were divided into 3 groups of 10 each (5 males and 5 females). Group I received placebo; groups 2 and 3 received 200 and 400mg saffron tablets, respectively, for 7 days. General measures of health were recorded during the study such as hematological, biochemical and electrocardiographic parameters done in pre- and post-treatment periods. Clinical examination showed no gross changes in all volunteers after intervention. Saffron with higher dose (400mg) decreased standing systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressures significantly. Saffron decreased slightly some hematological parameters such as red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets. Saffron increased sodium, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. This study showed that saffron tablets may change some hematological and biochemical parameters. However, these alterations were in normal ranges and they were not important clinically.

  4. Immediate effects of two relaxation techniques on healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemka, Sushilkumar S; Rao, Nagendra H Rama; Nagarathna, Raghuram

    2009-01-01

    This controlled study compared immediate effects of two relaxation techniques on state anxiety and sustained attention in healthy subjects. 86 volunteers (56 men and 30 women) were divided into two groups: the first 43 volunteers (age range 18 to 64) practiced 20 minutes of yoga-based Deep Relaxation Technique (DRT), while the second group of 43 volunteers (same age range), practiced 20 minutes Supine Rest (SR). State anxiety was assessed using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI A-State), and sustained attention was assessed using the Six Letter Cancellation (SLC) and Digit Letter Substitution (DLS) tests. All tests were administered immediately before, and immediately after, practice. A significant reduction in State Anxiety score (P < 0.001) was observed for the group practicing DRT, but not for the group practicing SR. For the sustained attention tests, however, there were significant increases in scores by both DRT and SR groups (P < 0.001). The results suggest that both interventions improve attention, but that only DRT reduces State Anxiety.

  5. Tympanic displacement analysis in healthy volunteers after indomethacin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsted, Alice; Wagner, Niels; Andersen, Kim Møller

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a tympanic displacement analyser could detect decreases in cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure after administration of indomethacin in healthy volunteers. In a double-blind crossover study involving 14 healthy volunteers all subjects first underwent a test-retest evaluation to investigate reproducibility followed by tests performed in sitting and supine positions to confirm intracranial-cochlear pressure transfer. In two further sessions tests were performed before and 90 min after subjects were blindly administered a suppository containing either 100 mg of indomethacin or placebo. It was found that tympanic membrane analysis performed 90 min after administration of such a suppository did not mirror the induced reduction in cerebral blood flow after administration of active drug. After administration of indomethacin eight of the subjects experienced discomfort and dizziness; after placebo none experienced subjective symptoms. After administration of indomethacin a statistically significant decrease in heart rate was demonstrated. The exponential form of the intracranial pressure-volume curve may explain why a decrease in intracranial pressure was not detected using the tympanic membrane displacement method, because the measurements were made in subjects with normal intracranial pressure. More significant findings may be found in patients with elevated intracranial pressure.

  6. Comparative bioequivalence study of leflunomide tablets in Indian healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S; Das, A; Ghosh, D; Sarkar, A K; Chattaraj, T K; Pal, T K

    2012-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of teriflunomide [CAS No. 163451-81-8], the metabolite of leflunomide [CAS No. 75706-12-6] has been evaluated in adult human volunteers after oral administration of tablet formulation. However, no published data is available regarding the bioavailability of this in the Indian population. In light of the above, a study was designed to carry out a bioequivalence study of 2 preparations of leflunomide 20 mg in healthy Indian male volunteers.24 healthy male volunteers (age, 25±4.1 years; weight, 57.58±7.01 kg) were enrolled in this study. Each subject received a test and reference formulation in a single dose, fasting 2 period, 2 way crossover study with a wash out period of 4 weeks. Analysis of teriflunomide from plasma samples was done by a simple and sensitive HPLC method using UV detection developed in our laboratory. An analysis of variance was performed on the pharmacokinetic parameters Cmax, AUC0-t, AUC0-∞ using GLM procedures in which sources of variation were subject, formulation, and period.The results indicated that there are no statistically significant differences between the 2 products in either the mean concentration-time profiles or in the obtained pharmacokinetic parameters. 90% confidence limits for the log transformed data of Cmax, AUC0-t, AUC0-∞. were within the acceptable range of 0.80-1.25.The results indicate that the 2 products are bioequivalent in terms of rate and extent of drug absorption. Both the preparations were well tolerated with no adverse reactions throughout the study.

  7. Population pharmacokinetics of olprinone in healthy male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunisawa T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Takayuki Kunisawa,1 Hidefumi Kasai,2 Makoto Suda,2 Manabu Yoshimura,3 Ami Sugawara,3 Yuki Izumi,3 Takafumi Iida,3 Atsushi Kurosawa,3 Hiroshi Iwasaki3 1Surgical Operation Department, Asahikawa Medical University Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan; 2Clinical Study Management Division, Bell Medical Solutions Inc, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido, Japan Background: Olprinone decreases the cardiac preload and/or afterload because of its vasodilatory effect and increases myocardial contractility by inhibiting phosphodiesterase III. Purpose: The objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of olprinone after a single continuous infusion in healthy male volunteers. Methods: We used 500 plasma concentration data points collected from nine healthy male volunteers for the study. The population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using the nonlinear mixed effect model (NONMEM® software. Results: The time course of plasma concentration of olprinone was best described using a two-compartment model. The final pharmacokinetic parameters were total clearance (7.37 mL/minute/kg, distribution volume of the central compartment (134 mL/kg, intercompartmental clearance (7.75 mL/minute/kg, and distribution volume of the peripheral compartment (275 mL/kg. The interindividual variability in the total clearance was 12.4%, and the residual error variability (exponential and additive were 22.2% and 0.129 (standard deviation. The final pharmacokinetic model was assessed using a bootstrap method and visual predictive check. Conclusion: We developed a population pharmacokinetic model of olprinone in healthy male adults. The bootstrap method and visual predictive check showed that this model was appropriate. Our results might be used to develop the population pharmacokinetic model in patients. Keywords: phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, men, pharmacokinetic model

  8. Bioavailability of two oral formulas of secnidazole in healthy volunteers

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    Patrícia Andréa Bertuol Montovani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Secnidazole is an antimicrobial agent used primarily in the treatment of amoebiasis. For this bioequivalence study of secnidazole, twenty-eight healthy female volunteers were enrolled in a randomized crossover study. Each volunteer was given a single oral dose of secnidazole test preparation and then the reference preparation, or vice versa, with a wash out interval of two weeks. The plasma concentrations of secnidazole were determined by HPLC, and the samples were extracted with tert-butyl-methyl-ether: dicloromethane (60:40, v/v. Secnidazole and its parent compound metronidazole were separated on a C18 column with water:acetonitrile (85:15, v/v as the mobile phase, and monitored at 310 nm. The ratio of mean Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ values for the test and reference products were within the predetermined range established by ANVISA, demonstrating that the two formulations are bioequivalent in rate and extent of absorption.Secnidazol é um agente antimicrobiano utilizado principalmente no tratamento da amebíase. Para este estudo de bioequivalência de secnidazol em voluntários saudáveis, foram incluídos vinte e oito voluntárias mulheres no estudo randomizado cruzado. Cada voluntária recebeu uma única dose oral de secnidazol do produto teste e referência para comparação, com um intervalo de wash-out de duas semanas. As concentrações plasmáticas de secnidazol foram determinados por CLAE, as amostras foram extraídas com terc-butil-metil-éter: dicloromethano (60:40, v/v. O secnidazol e seu padrão interno metronidazol foram separados em uma coluna (C18 com fase móvel água ultra-pura:acetonitrila (85:15, v/v e monitorado em 310 nm. As razões entre as médias geométricas de Cmáx, ASC0-t e ASC0-∞, encontraram-se dentro do estabelecido pela ANVISA, demonstrando que as formulações são bioequivalentes quanto à taxa e extensão de absorção

  9. A drug interaction study of ceftriaxone and frusemide in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, A; Eichler, H G; Gasic, S

    1986-05-01

    Ceftriaxone, a recently developed cephalosporin significantly reduced the diuretic activity of frusemide in rats. For this reason and because an interaction of unknown mechanism is well established between frusemide and some cephalosporins, we studied the interference of ceftriaxone with the diuretic effect of frusemide in healthy volunteers. Twelve subjects received frusemide (40 mg p.o.) or placebo in combination with ceftriaxone (2 g i.v.) or saline on 4 different days (cross-over, randomized, single-blind study). Urine was collected in small portions during 24 hours after medication and analyzed for volume, osmolality, Na+, K+, Cl- and creatinine concentration. Ceftriaxone had neither an effect on basal urinary output and electrolyte excretion nor on the specific diuretic action of frusemide.

  10. MDMA Impairs Response to Water Intake in Healthy Volunteers

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    Matthew J. Baggott

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is a serious complication of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA use. We investigated potential mechanisms in two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. In Study 1, healthy drug-experienced volunteers received MDMA or placebo alone and in combination with the alpha-1 adrenergic inverse agonist prazosin, used as a positive control to release antidiuretic hormone (ADH. In Study 2, volunteers received MDMA or placebo followed by standardized water intake. MDMA lowered serum sodium but did not increase ADH or copeptin, although the control prazosin did increase ADH. Water loading reduced serum sodium more after MDMA than after placebo. There was a trend for women to have lower baseline serum sodium than men, but there were no significant interactions with drug condition. Combining studies, MDMA potentiated the ability of water to lower serum sodium. Thus, hyponatremia appears to be a significant risk when hypotonic fluids are consumed during MDMA use. Clinical trials and events where MDMA use is common should anticipate and mitigate this risk.

  11. Healthy volunteers can be phenotyped using cutaneous sensitization pain models.

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    Mads U Werner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human experimental pain models leading to development of secondary hyperalgesia are used to estimate efficacy of analgesics and antihyperalgesics. The ability to develop an area of secondary hyperalgesia varies substantially between subjects, but little is known about the agreement following repeated measurements. The aim of this study was to determine if the areas of secondary hyperalgesia were consistently robust to be useful for phenotyping subjects, based on their pattern of sensitization by the heat pain models. METHODS: We performed post-hoc analyses of 10 completed healthy volunteer studies (n = 342 [409 repeated measurements]. Three different models were used to induce secondary hyperalgesia to monofilament stimulation: the heat/capsaicin sensitization (H/C, the brief thermal sensitization (BTS, and the burn injury (BI models. Three studies included both the H/C and BTS models. RESULTS: Within-subject compared to between-subject variability was low, and there was substantial strength of agreement between repeated induction-sessions in most studies. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC improved little with repeated testing beyond two sessions. There was good agreement in categorizing subjects into 'small area' (1(st quartile [75%] responders: 56-76% of subjects consistently fell into same 'small-area' or 'large-area' category on two consecutive study days. There was moderate to substantial agreement between the areas of secondary hyperalgesia induced on the same day using the H/C (forearm and BTS (thigh models. CONCLUSION: Secondary hyperalgesia induced by experimental heat pain models seem a consistent measure of sensitization in pharmacodynamic and physiological research. The analysis indicates that healthy volunteers can be phenotyped based on their pattern of sensitization by the heat [and heat plus capsaicin] pain models.

  12. Shirodhara : A psycho-physiological profile in healthy volunteers

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    Kalpana D Dhuri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shirodhara is a classical and a well-established ayurvedic procedure of slowly and steadily dripping medicated oil or other liquids on the forehead. This procedure induces a relaxed state of awareness that results in a dynamic psycho-somatic balance. Objectives: The objective of the study is to evaluate the psychological and physiological effects of Shirodhara in healthy volunteers by monitoring the rating of mood and levels of stress, electrocardiogram (ECG, electroencephalogram (EEG, and selected biochemical markers of stress. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the human pharmacology laboratory. The study design was open labeled, comparing the baseline variables with values after Shirodhara. The subjects (n = 16 chosen were healthy human volunteers who gave an informed consent. Shirodhara was preceded by Abhyanga - whole body massage. The Shirodhara method was standardized for rate of dripping with peristaltic pump and temperature was controlled with a thermostat. Mood and stress levels were assessed by validated rating scales. The pre- and post-Shirodhara ECG and EEG records were evaluated. Results: Student′s paired "t" test was applied to the means + SE of the variables to calculate statistical significance at P <0.05. There was a significant improvement in mood scores and the level of stress (P <0.001. These changes were accompanied by significant decrease in rate of breathing and reduction in diastolic blood pressure along with reduction in heart rate. The relaxed alert state, after Shirodhara, was co-related with an increase in alfa rhythm in EEG. Conclusion : A standardized Shirodhara leads to a state of alert calmness similar to the relaxation response observed in meditation. The clinical benefits observed with Shirodhara in anxiety neurosis, hypertension, and stress aggravation due to chronic degenerative diseases could be mediated through these adaptive physiological effects.

  13. Exercise increases endostatin in circulation of healthy volunteers

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    Makey Ian

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity increases the risk of atherosclerosis. However, the molecular mechanisms of this relation are poorly understood. A recent report indicates that endostatin, an endogenous angiostatic factor, inhibits the progression of atherosclerosis, and suggests that reducing intimal and atherosclerotic plaque tissue neovascularization can inhibit the progression atherosclerosis in animal models. We hypothesize that exercise can elevate the circulatory endostatin level. Hence, exercise can protect against one of the mechanisms of atherosclerosis. Results We examined treadmill exercise tests in healthy volunteers to determine the effect of exercise on plasma levels of endostatin and other angiogenic regulators. Oxygen consumption (VO2 was calculated. Plasma levels of endostatin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF were determined using ELISA. The total peak VO2 (L in 7 male subjects was 29.5 ± 17.8 over a 4–10 minute interval of exercise. Basal plasma levels of endostatin (immediately before exercise were 20.3 ± 3.2 pg/ml, the plasma levels increased to 29.3 ± 4.2, 35.2 ± 1.8, and 27.1 ± 2.2 ng/ml, at 0.5, 2, and 6 h, respectively, after exercise. There was a strong linear correlation between increased plasma levels of endostatin (% and the total peak VO2 (L related to exercise (R2 = 0.9388; P Conclusions The results suggest that circulating endostatin can be significantly increased by exercise in proportion to the peak oxygen consumption under physiological conditions in healthy volunteers. These findings may provide new insights into the molecular links between physical inactivity and the risk of angiogenesis dependent diseases such as atherosclerosis.

  14. Lowering physical activity impairs glycemic control in healthy volunteers.

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    Mikus, Catherine R; Oberlin, Douglas J; Libla, Jessica L; Taylor, Angelina M; Booth, Frank W; Thyfault, John P

    2012-02-01

    Postprandial glucose (PPG) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and death, regardless of diabetes status. Whereas changes in physical activity produce changes in insulin sensitivity, it is not clear whether changes in daily physical activity directly affect PPG in healthy free-living persons. We used continuous glucose monitors to measure PPG and PPG excursions (ΔPPG, postmeal - premeal blood glucose) at 30-min increments after meals in healthy habitually active volunteers (n = 12, age = 29 ± 1 yr, body mass index = 23.6 ± 0.9 kg·m(-2), VO2max = 53.6 ± 3.0 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) during 3 d of habitual (≥10,000 steps per day) and reduced (physical activity. Diets were standardized across monitoring periods, and fasting-state oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed on the fourth day of each monitoring period. During 3 d of reduced physical activity (12,956 ± 769 to 4319 ± 256 steps per day), PPG increased at 30 and 60 min after a meal (6.31 ± 0.19 to 6.68 ± 0.23 mmol·L(-1) and 5.75 ± 0.16 to 6.26 ± 0.28 mmol·L(-1), P active time point), and ΔPPG increased by 42%, 97%, and 33% at 30, 60, and 90 min after a meal, respectively (P activity (P physical activity in otherwise healthy free-living individuals. These data indicate that daily physical activity is an important mediator of glycemic control, even among healthy individuals, and reinforce the utility of physical activity in preventing pathologies associated with elevated PPG.

  15. Health effects of a subway environment in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepczyńska Nyström, A; Svartengren, M; Grunewald, J; Pousette, C; Rödin, I; Lundin, A; Sköld, C M; Eklund, A; Larsson, B-M

    2010-08-01

    Environmental particle exposure, often estimated as the particulate mass of particles with a diameter environment causes a cellular inflammatory response in the airways of healthy individuals. In the present study, our aim was to investigate potential airway health effects from exposure to a subway environment. 20 healthy volunteers were exposed to a subway and a control environment for 2 h, followed by measurements of lung function and the inflammatory response in the lower airways (bronchoscopy) and in the peripheral blood. No cellular response was found in the airways after exposure to the subway environment. In the blood, we found a statistically significant increase in fibrinogen and regulatory T-cells expressing CD4/CD25/FOXP3. Subway and road tunnel environments have similar levels of PM(10) and PM(2.5), whilst the concentrations of ultrafine particles, nitrogen monoxide and dioxide are lower in the subway. Although no cellular response was detected, the findings indicate a biological response to the subway environment. Our studies show that using gravimetric estimates of ambient particulate air pollution alone may have clear limitations in health-risk assessment.

  16. Influence of Panax ginseng on the steady state pharmacokinetic profile of lopinavir-ritonavir in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Mónica M; Chairez, Cheryl L; Gordon, Lori A; Alfaro, Raul M; Kovacs, Joseph A; Penzak, Scott R

    2014-11-01

    Panax ginseng has been shown in preclinical studies to modulate cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of HIV protease inhibitors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the influence of P. ginseng on the pharmacokinetics of the HIV protease inhibitor combination lopinavir-ritonavir (LPV-r) in healthy volunteers. Single-sequence, open-label, single-center pharmacokinetic investigation. Government health care facility. Twelve healthy human volunteers. Twelve healthy volunteers received LPV-r (400-100 mg) twice/day for 29.5 days. On day 15 of LPV-r administration, serial blood samples were collected over 12 hours for determination of lopinavir and ritonavir concentrations. On study day 16, subjects began taking P. ginseng 500 mg twice/day, which they continued for 2 weeks in combination with LPV-r. On day 30 of LPV-r administration, serial blood samples were again collected over 12 hours for determination of lopinavir and ritonavir concentrations. Lopinavir and ritonavir pharmacokinetic parameter values were determined using noncompartmental methods, and preadministration and postadministration ginseng values were compared using a Student t test, where pginseng administration to healthy human volunteers. Thus, a clinically significant interaction between P. ginseng and LPV-r is unlikely to occur in HIV-infected patients who choose to take these agents concurrently. It is also unlikely that P. ginseng will interact with other ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor combinations, although confirmatory data are necessary. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Transdermal Etofenamate and Diclofenac in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Sara; Imboden, Roger; Schlatter, Philipp; Buylaert, Mirabel; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Drewe, Juergen

    2017-05-31

    Little is known about the course of the plasma concentration and the bioavailability of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) contained in dermal patches. We compared an etofenamate prototype patch (patent EP 1833471) and a commercially available diclofenac epolamine patch regarding the bioavailability of the active ingredients relative to respective i.m. applications and regarding their plasma concentration-time course. Twenty-four healthy human volunteers were treated using a parallel group design (n = 12 per group) with a single dermal patch (removed after 12 hr) followed (after a latency of 48 hr) by eight consecutive dermal patches every 12 hr to reach steady-state conditions. The patches were generally well tolerated, but one volunteer treated with etofenamate developed an allergic contact dermatitis. After the first patch, Cmax was 0.81 ± 0.11 (mean ± S.E.M.) ng/mL (reached 12 hr after patch removal) for diclofenac and 31.3 ± 3.8 ng/mL for flufenamic acid (reached at patch removal), the main metabolite of etofenamate. Etofenamate was not detectable. After repetitive dosing, trough plasma concentrations after the eighth dose were 1.72 ± 0.32 ng/mL for diclofenac and 48.7 ± 6.6 ng/mL for flufenamic acid. Bioavailabilities (single dose) relative to i.m. applications were 0.22 ± 0.04% for diclofenac and 1.15 ± 0.06% for flufenamic acid. In conclusion, the relative bioavailability (compared to the respective i.m. application) of both drugs is low. The maximal plasma concentrations after topical administration of these drugs are well below the IC50 values for COX-1 and COX-2, explaining the absence of dose-dependent toxicities. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  18. The pharmacokinetics of taurolidine metabolites in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Li; Greenberg, Howard E; Perhach, James L; Waldman, Scott A; Kraft, Walter K

    2007-06-01

    Taurolidine is an experimental antibacterial and antiendotoxic compound whose clinical utility as an antitumor agent is being investigated in human clinical trials. Taurolidine in aqueous solution exists in equilibrium with taurultam. Taurultam is subsequently transformed to taurinamide. The pharmacokinetic profiles of these metabolites are not well established. In this study, 18 healthy volunteers were administered 5.0 g of taurolidine in 250 mL of 5% polyvinylpyrrolidone in water over 2, 1, or 0.5 hours by intravenous infusion in a parallel-group design. All subjects noted discomfort at the infusion site, although there were no serious adverse events. t(max) generally occurred at the end of infusion for taurinamide, whereas that of taurultam was reached before completion of infusion. The taurolidine metabolite taurultam demonstrated a shorter half-life and lower systemic exposure than taurinamide. Shortening of infusion duration increased the C(max) and AUC of taurultam. Changes in infusion rate did not substantially change the pharmacokinetic parameters of taurinamide.

  19. Oxygen challenge magnetic resonance imaging in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Krishna A; Moreton, Fiona C; Santosh, Celestine; Lopez, Rosario; Brennan, David; Schwarzbauer, Christian; Goutcher, Colin; O'Hare, Kevin; Macrae, I Mhairi; Muir, Keith W

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen challenge imaging involves transient hyperoxia applied during deoxyhaemoglobin sensitive (T2*-weighted) magnetic resonance imaging and has the potential to detect changes in brain oxygen extraction. In order to develop optimal practical protocols for oxygen challenge imaging, we investigated the influence of oxygen concentration, cerebral blood flow change, pattern of oxygen administration and field strength on T2*-weighted signal. Eight healthy volunteers underwent multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging including oxygen challenge imaging and arterial spin labelling using two oxygen concentrations (target FiO2 of 100 and 60%) administered consecutively (two-stage challenge) at both 1.5T and 3T. There was a greater signal increase in grey matter compared to white matter during oxygen challenge (p challenge imaging. Reductions in cerebral blood flow did not obscure the T2*-weighted signal increases. In conclusion, the optimal protocol for further study should utilise target FiO2 = 100% during a single oxygen challenge. Imaging at both 1.5T and 3T is clinically feasible.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of ebrotidine in healthy volunteers. A summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albet, C; Pérez, J A; Rozman, E; Márquez, M; Herrero, E; Ortiz, J A

    1997-04-01

    Several clinical pharmacokinetic studies of ebrotidine (N-[(E)-[[2-[[[2-[(diaminomethylene)amino]-4-thiazolyl] methyl]thio]ethyl]amino]methylene]-4-bromo-benzenesulfonamide, CAS 100981-43-9, FI-3542) administered by oral route in single and multiple doses to healthy volunteers have been performed. Dosage levels were 150, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 800 mg. Plasma concentrations of unchanged ebrotidine and its major metabolite, ebrotidine sulfoxide, excreted in the urine were determined. The main pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated from the experimental data. Absorption was relatively rapid (Imax = 2 h) and unrelated to dose. Drug behavior was considered as reasonably linear: Cmax = 364-1168 ng/ml and AUC0-12 h = 1427-5997 ng.h/ml (doses from 150 mg to 800 mg). The mean values of terminal elimination half-life (t1/2 beta) ranged from 13.9 to 20.3 h (doses of 400, 600 and 800 mg). After multiple dosing there was no drug accumulation, and no significant changes in the mean values of the main pharmacokinetic parameters were observed. The steady state was reached from the second day of administration, 10-24% of the ebrotidine administered dose was excreted in urine mainly as its major metabolite, ebrotidine sulfoxide, as well as unchanged drug and other minor metabolites. These percentages were constant and independent of the dose administered.

  1. Cardiovascular effects of partial sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettoni, Josilene L; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda Marciano; Drager, Luciano F; Rubira, Marcelo C; Souza, Silvia Beatriz P Cavasin de; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Mostarda, Cristiano; Borile, Suellen; Krieger, Eduardo M; Moreno, Heitor; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2012-07-01

    Sleep deprivation is common in Western societies and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in epidemiological studies. However, the effects of partial sleep deprivation on the cardiovascular system are poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated 13 healthy male volunteers (age: 31 ± 2 yr) monitoring sleep diary and wrist actigraphy during their daily routine for 12 nights. The subjects were randomized and crossover to 5 nights of control sleep (>7 h) or 5 nights of partial sleep deprivation (sleep. At the end of control and partial sleep deprivation periods, heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure variability (BPV), serum norepinephrine, and venous endothelial function (dorsal hand vein technique) were measured at rest in a supine position. The subjects slept 8.0 ± 0.5 and 4.5 ± 0.3 h during control and partial sleep deprivation periods, respectively (P sleep deprivation caused significant increase in sympathetic activity as evidenced by increase in percent low-frequency (50 ± 15 vs. 59 ± 8) and a decrease in percent high-frequency (50 ± 10 vs. 41 ± 8) components of HRV, increase in low-frequency band of BPV, and increase in serum norepinephrine (119 ± 46 vs. 162 ± 58 ng/ml), as well as a reduction in maximum endothelial dependent venodilatation (100 ± 22 vs. 41 ± 20%; P sleep deprivation is sufficient to cause significant increase in sympathetic activity and venous endothelial dysfunction. These results may help to explain the association between short sleep and increased cardiovascular risk in epidemiological studies.

  2. Reassessment of stiripentol pharmacokinetics in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peigné, Sophie; Rey, Elisabeth; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Pons, Gerard; Jullien, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Because children who have been receiving stiripentol for the treatment of Dravet syndrome for more than 10 years are now becoming young adults, it is important to accurately characterize stiripentol pharmacokinetics in this age range. A double-blind placebo-controlled dose ranging study was therefore conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of stiripentol in 12 healthy volunteers. Each subject received 3 single doses of stiripentol (500, 1000, and 2000 mg) separated by a wash-out period of 1 week. Pharmacokinetics of stiripentol was analyzed for each dose by non-compartmental analysis. Median area under the curve (AUC), terminal elimination half-life (t1/2,z) and maximal concentration (Cmax) were calculated for between-dose comparison. Safety was evaluated based on both clinical and biological criteria. Oppositely to previous results, there was no concentration rebounds in the elimination phase, which could be the consequence of the food intake. A more than proportional increase in the AUC was observed, associated with a significant increase in the t1/2,z, for increasing doses (median AUC of 8.3, 31 and 88 mgh/L, and median t1/2,z of 2, 7.7 and 10h for the 500, 1000, and 2000 mg doses respectively), which confirmed the Michaelis-Menten pharmacokinetics of Stiripentol. However, dose-normalized Cmax did not significantly vary between doses. Median Michaelis-Menten parameters were 117 mg/h for Vmax and 1.9 mg/L for Km. No safety concern was observed during the study. The present study allowed a better characterization of the disposition phase of stiripentol and confirmed its non-linear pharmacokinetic behaviour. Further pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies would be useful to determine the optimal dose of stiripentol for the treatment of Dravet patients in adulthood.

  3. BIOAVAILABILITY AND PHARMACOKINETICS OF ANASTROZOLE IN HEALTHY MALE VOLUNTEERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安富荣; 崔岚; 刘晓琰; 王平全; 祝德秋; 曹惠明

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of domestic and imported anastrozole tablets. Methods Twenty Chinese healthy male volunteers were enrolled in a randomized crossover study with a single oral dose of 2mg of the two formulations respectively. The anastrozole in plasma was measured by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. The linear range was 1. 325 ~ 106ng /ml plasma. The extraction recovery rates for plasma concentration of 5.3, 21.2 and 53. Ong/ml were 76.8% ,87.0% and 78.7%, respectively. Inter-day and intra-day precisions of the method were < 9%. Area under concentration-time curve ( AUCo t) , maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and reach peak time (Tmax) were evaluated by variance analysis and two one-side t-test . Results A two-compartment model was adopted in anastrozole plasma concentration-time data analysis. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of domestic and imported anastrozloe tablets such as Cmax , Tmax, AUCo - t and T1/2β were (36.5 ± 6.9)ng/ml and (35.6 ± 9.4)ng/ml, (1.56-±0.41)hand(1.53 ±0.49)h, (1403.6 ± 321.2)ng'h/mland (1371.6±329.4)ng'h/mi, (42.57 ± 10.15)h and (43.41 ± 8.59)h, respectively, and there were no significant differences between the two formulations. Conclusion Domestic and imported anastrozole tablets were of bioequivalence.The relative bioavailability of the domestic tablet was (102.7 ± 5.6)%.

  4. Cardiopulmonary and metabolic effects of yoga in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Satheesh Divya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Yoga the spiritual union of mind with the divine intelligence of the universe aims to liberate a human being from conflicts of body–mind duality. Beneficial cardiovascular and pulmonary effects of yoga are in par with aerobic exercise, even amounting to replace the exercise model. We conducted an interventional study in healthy volunteers, to analyze the impact of short-term yoga training on cardiovascular, pulmonary, autonomic function tests, lipid profile, and thyroid function tests. Materials and Methods: A sample of fifty new recruits attending the district yoga center was subject to 75 min yoga practice a day for 41 days. Basal values of cardiovascular, pulmonary, autonomic function tests, lipid profile, and thyroid function tests were recorded before yoga training and were reassessed for postyoga changes after 41 days. Results: After yoga practice there was a significant reduction in the resting heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and mean blood pressure of the participants. Effects on autonomic function tests were variable and inconclusive. There was a significant increase in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and peak expiratory flow rate after yoga. A significant reduction in body mass index was observed. Effects on metabolic parameters were promising with a significant reduction in fasting blood sugar level, serum total cholesterol, serum triglycerides serum low-density lipoprotein levels, and significant increase in high-density lipoprotein. There was no significant change in thyroid function tests after yoga. Conclusion: Short-term yoga practice has no effect on thyroid functions. Yoga practice was found beneficial in maintaining physiological milieu pertaining to cardiovascular and other metabolic parameters.

  5. Characterization of Physiologic (18)F FSPG Uptake in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosci, Camila; Kumar, Meena; Smolarz, Kamilla; Koglin, Norman; Stephens, Andrew W; Schwaiger, Markus; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Mittra, Erik S

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To evaluate the normal biodistribution and kinetics of (S)-4-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-l-glutamic acid ((18)F FSPG) in healthy volunteers and to compare (18)F FSPG mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmean and SUVmax, respectively) with those of (18)F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) across a variety of organs. Materials and Methods This protocol was reviewed and approved by all appropriate regulatory authorities. An 8-mCi (±10%) dose of (18)F FSPG was given to five subjects (three women, two men), and seven whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, 150, and 240 minutes after injection. Regions of interest were analyzed on the resultant (18)F FSPG images to evaluate the kinetics of this radiotracer. The images obtained 45 minutes after injection were used to measure SUVmean and SUVmax in additional regions of the body. These values were compared with similar values obtained with (18)F FDG PET published previously. Descriptive statistics, including average and standard deviation across the five subjects, were used. (18)F FSPG SUVmean and SUVmax were compared. Results On the (18)F FSPG images obtained 45 minutes after injection, there was only low-grade background activity in the majority of analyzed regions. Prominent activity was seen throughout the pancreas. Clearance of the radiotracer through the kidneys and collection in the bladder also were seen. SUV quantification shows notable differences between (18)F FSPG and (18)F FDG in the pancreas ((18)F FSPG SUVmean, 8.2; (18)F FDG SUVmean, 1.3), stomach ((18)F FSPG SUVmax, 3.6; (18)F FDG SUVmax, 1.6), and brain ((18)F FSPG SUVmean, 0.08; (18)F FDG SUVmean, 7.8). The kinetic data showed rapid clearance of the radiotracer from the blood pool and most organs, except the pancreas. Conclusion (18)F FSPG is a PET radiopharmaceutical characterized by rapid clearance from most healthy tissues, except the pancreas and kidneys. A consistent biodistribution pattern was

  6. Influence of Panax ginseng on the Steady State Pharmacokinetic Profile of Lopinavir/Ritonavir (LPV/r) in Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Mónica M.; Chairez, Cheryl L.; Gordon, Lori A.; Alfaro, Raul M.; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Penzak, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective Panax ginseng has been shown in pre-clinical studies to modulate cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes involved in the metabolism of HIV protease inhibitors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the influence of Panax ginseng on the pharmacokinetics of the HIV protease inhibitor combination lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) in healthy volunteers. Design Single sequence, open-label, single-center pharmacokinetic investigation. Setting Government healthcare facility. Subjects Twelve healthy human volunteers. Measurements and Main Results Thirteen healthy volunteers received LPV/r (400/100 mg) twice daily for 29.5 days. On day 15 of LPV/r administration, serial blood samples were collected over 12 hrs for determination of lopinavir and ritonavir concentrations. On study day 16, subjects began taking Panax ginseng 500 mg twice daily, which they continued for 2 weeks in combination with LPV/r. On day 30 of LPV/r administration, serial blood samples were again collected over 12 hrs for determination of lopinavir and ritonavir concentrations. Lopinavir and ritonavir pharmacokinetic parameter values were determined using noncompartmental methods and compared pre- and post-ginseng administration using a student’s t-test, where P Panax ginseng administration to healthy human volunteers. Thus, a clinically significant interaction between Panax ginseng and LPV/r is unlikely to occur in HIV-infected patients who choose to take these agents concurrently. It is also unlikely that Panax ginseng will interact with other ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor combinations, although confirmatory data are necessary. PMID:25142999

  7. Pharmacokinetics and Comparative Bioavailability of Two Diltiazem Tablet Formulations in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Dadashzadeh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetic parameters and bioavailability of diltiazem following a single oral administration of a generic diltiazem 60 mg tablet (Sobhan Pharmaceuticals, Iran were compared to those of a reference product (Entrydil, Orion Pharmaceuticals, Finland. Twelve healthy male volunteers received a single oral dose of either formulation following overnight fasting in a double blind, randomized, crossover study. Blood samples were collected at selected times during 24 h and diltiazem plasma concentrations were determined with a sensitive HPLC method. Individual pharmacokinetic parameters, t1/2, t1/2(abs, K, Ka, Tmax, Cmax, Vd/F, Cl/F, AUC0-24 and AUC0-∞ were calculated. No significant differences were observed in pharmacokinetic parameters between two formulations. The 90% confidence intervals for the test/reference geometric mean ratios of Cmax, AUC0-24 AUC0-∞ and Cmax/AUC0-∞ were within the conventional bioequivalence range of 0.8 - 1.25. In-vitro parameters of mean dissolution time (MDT and time for 70 % dissolution (T70 were also determined. There was a significant difference between the MDT for two dosage forms (p<0.0001. It was concluded that despite of a higher dissolution rate, the test product of diltiazem is bioequivalent to the reference product with respect to the rate and extent of absorption.

  8. Dose-dependent pharmacokinetics of delavirdine in combination with amprenavir in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik S; Klitgaard, Niels A; Brosen, Kim

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate different dose combinations of amprenavir and delavirdine in order to assess an optimal dose suitable for clinical use. METHODS: This was a prospective, open-label, controlled, three-period, multiple-dose study with nine healthy volunteers. The volunteers received three...

  9. Volunteering

    OpenAIRE

    Hustinx, Lesley; Handy, Femida; Cnaan, Ram A

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been a burgeoning interest in the study of volunteering, and the number of publications devoted to volunteering has grown exponentially. In this chapter, we examine emerging theories and new directions in volunteering research. First, we discuss multi-level perspectives that try to understand volunteering in complex interaction with the organizational and institutional context. Next, we present process-oriented approaches that focus on the experience of volunteeri...

  10. A comparison of the biological activity of 2 formulations of enoxaparin in 12 healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vineeta; Madhu, Sirisha; Natarajan, Parthiban; Muniyandi, Ganesan; Jaiswal, Vijaya; Saxena, Renu

    2010-08-01

    India is one of the few countries where biosimilar enoxaparin is available for clinical use. Despite availability since past 4 to 5 years, there is a paucity of published literature regarding their biological activity. The aim of the current study is to compare the biological activity of an endogenously developed formulation of enoxaparin with the branded formulation. Twelve healthy male volunteers received 1 subcutaneous injection of 2 different formulations of enoxaparin in a randomized, open-label, balanced, 2-treatment, 2-period, 2-sequence, cross-over study. The test formulation was Injection Troynoxa (enoxaparin sodium 40 mg/0.4 mL, Troikaa Pharmaceuticals Ltd., India) and reference formulation was Injection Clexane (enoxaparin sodium 40 mg/ 0.4 mL, Sanofi-Aventis, UK). The plasma anti-Xa activity and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) were estimated on fully automated coagulometer predose and at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 hours following dosing with 40 mg/0.4 mL of enoxaparin. The results of mixed model analysis of repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) for estimating difference between least square means of test and reference formulations, at all time points, showed no significant differences in anti-Xa activity and plasma aPTT levels. Both formulations were well tolerated and there were no bleeding episodes. After a single-dose injection in healthy participants, anti-Xa activities of 2 formulations of LMWH enoxaparin were comparable. No significant difference was observed in the mean plasma aPTT. It remains to be seen whether the 2 formulations would show comparable clinical efficacy.

  11. Motivations, enrollment decisions, and socio-demographic characteristics of healthy volunteers in phase 1 research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Christine; Bedarida, Gabriella; Sinaii, Ninet; Gregorio, Mark Anthony; Emanuel, Ezekiel J

    2017-08-01

    Phase 1 trials with healthy volunteers are an integral step in drug development. Commentators worry about the possible exploitation of healthy volunteers because they are assumed to be disadvantaged, marginalized, and inappropriately influenced by the offer of money for research for which they do not appreciate the inherent risks. Yet there are limited data to support or refute these concerns. This study aims to describe the socio-demographic characteristics, motivations, and enrollment decision-making of a large cohort of healthy volunteers. We used a cross-sectional anonymous survey of 1194 healthy volunteers considering enrollment in phase 1 studies at Pfizer Clinical Research Units in New Haven, CT; Brussels, Belgium; and Singapore. Descriptive statistics describe motivations and socio-demographic characteristics. Comparisons between groups were examined. The majority rated consideration of risks as more important to their enrollment decision than the amount of money, despite reporting that their primary motivation was financial. Risk, time, money, the competence and friendliness of research staff, and contributing to medical research were important factors influencing enrollment decisions for most participants. The majority of healthy volunteers in this cohort were male, single, reported higher than high school education, and 70% had previous research experience. Many reported low annual incomes (50% below USD$25,000) and high rates of unemployment (33% overall). Nonetheless, risk as an important consideration, money, and other reported considerations and motivations, except for time, did not vary by income, employment, education, or previous experience. There were regional differences in both socio-demographic characteristics and factors important to participation decisions. Healthy volunteers in phase 1 studies consider risks as more important to their enrollment decisions than the amount of money offered, although most are motivated to participate by the

  12. Physiologic effects of intravenous fluid administration in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Jensen, Peter; Kehlet, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    , infusion of the fluid over 3 h in the morning, and additionally 24-h hospitalization under standardized conditions. Primary outcome assessments were pulmonary function (spirometry), exercise capacity (submaximal treadmill test), balance function (BalanceMaster), and weight. Infusion of 40 mL/kg of lactated...... by fluid administration. These findings may serve as a basis for clinical studies applying the same type of fluid in different amounts to determine the optimal amount of perioperative fluid in various surgical procedures. IMPLICATIONS: Infusion of 40 mL/kg of lactated Ringer's solution in volunteers led...

  13. Pharmacokinetic interaction between amprenavir and delavirdine after multiple-dose administration in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik S; Klitgaard, Niels A; Brosen, Kim

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the safety and the pharmacokinetic interaction between amprenavir and delavirdine after multiple dose administration in healthy volunteers. METHODS: This was a prospective, open-label, randomized, controlled, two-sequence, two-period multiple dose study with 18 healthy subjects....

  14. Mathematical Model for Hemodynamicand Hormonal Effects of Human Ghrelin in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha.T

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hemodynamicand hormonal effects of human ghrelin in healthy volunteers.To investigate hemodynamic and hormonaleffects of ghrelin, a novel growth hormone (GH-releasing peptide, we gave six healthy men an intravenousbolus of human ghrelin or placebo and vice versa1–2 wk apart in a randomized fashion. Ghrelin elicited amarked increase in circulating GH . The elevation ofGH lasted longer than 60 min after the bolus injection.Injection of ghrelin significantly decreased mean arterialpressure without a significant changein heart rate .In summary, human ghrelin elicited a potent, longlastingGH release and had beneficial hemodynamic effectsvia reducing cardiac afterload and increasing cardiac outputwithout an increase in heart rate. Thus, the purpose of thisstudy was to investigate hemodynamic and hormonaleffects of intravenous ghrelin in healthy volunteers. This paper discussed the constant stress level of healthy volunteers with times to damage of stress effect andrecoveries

  15. Survival function Of Realization process for Hemodynamic and hormonal effects of human GH in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha.T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic and hormonal effects of human ghrelin in healthy volunteers. To investigate hemodynamic and hormonal effects of ghrelin, a novel growth hormone (GH-releasing peptide, we gave six healthy men an intravenous bolus of human ghrelin or placebo and vice versa 1–2 wk apart in a randomized fashion. Ghrelin elicited a marked increase in circulating GH. The elevation of GH lasted longer than 60 min after the bolus injection. Injection of ghrelin significantly decreased mean arterial pressure without a significant change in heart rate .In summary, human ghrelin elicited a potent, long lasting GH release and had beneficial hemodynamic effects via reducing cardiac after load and increasing cardiac output without an increase in heart rate. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate hemodynamic and hormonal effects of intravenous ghrelin in healthy volunteers. This paper discussed the constant stress level of healthy volunteers with times to damage of stress effect and recoveries

  16. Investigation of normal flatus production in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, J; Lowis, C; Read, N W

    1991-01-01

    Flatulence can cause discomfort and distress but there are few published data of normal patterns and volumes. Twenty four hour collections were made using a rectal catheter in 10 normal volunteers taking their normal diet plus 200 g baked beans. Total daily volume ranged from 476 to 1491 ml (median 705 ml). Women and men (both n = 5) expelled equivalent amounts. The median daily flatus hydrogen volume was 361 ml/24 h (range 42-1060) and the carbon dioxide volume 68 ml/24 h (range 25-116), three volunteers produced methane (3, 26, and 120 ml/24 h), and the remaining unidentified gas (presumably nitrogen) or gases contributed a median 213 ml/24 h (range 61-476). Larger volumes of flatus were produced after meals than at other times. Flatus produced at a faster rate tended to contain more fermentation gases. Flatus was produced during the sleeping period, but the rate was significantly lower than the daytime rate (median 16 and 34 ml/h respectively). Ingestion of a 'fibre free' diet (Fortisip) for 48 hours significantly reduced the total volume collected in 24 hours (median 214 ml/24 h), reduced the carbon dioxide volume (median 6 ml/24 h), and practically eradicated hydrogen production. The volume of unidentified gas was not significantly affected (median 207 ml/24 h). Thus fermentation gases make the highest contribution to normal flatus volume. A 'fibre free' diet eliminates these without changing residual gas release of around 200 ml/24 h. PMID:1648028

  17. Diffusion tensor imaging reliably differentiates patients with schizophrenia from healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardekani, Babak A; Tabesh, Ali; Sevy, Serge; Robinson, Delbert G; Bilder, Robert M; Szeszko, Philip R

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine whether fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the brain are able to reliably differentiate patients with schizophrenia from healthy volunteers. DTI and high resolution structural magnetic resonance scans were acquired in 50 patients with schizophrenia and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. FA and MD maps were estimated from the DTI data and spatially normalized to the Montreal Neurologic Institute standard stereotactic space. Individuals were divided randomly into two groups of 50, a training set, and a test set, each comprising 25 patients and 25 healthy volunteers. A pattern classifier was designed using Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based on the training set of images to categorize individuals in the test set as either patients or healthy volunteers. Using the FA maps, the classifier correctly identified 94% of the cases in the test set (96% sensitivity and 92% specificity). The classifier achieved 98% accuracy (96% sensitivity and 100% specificity) when using the MD maps as inputs to distinguish schizophrenia patients from healthy volunteers in the test dataset. Utilizing FA and MD data in combination did not significantly alter the accuracy (96% sensitivity and specificity). Patterns of water self-diffusion in the brain as estimated by DTI can be used in conjunction with automated pattern recognition algorithms to reliably distinguish between patients with schizophrenia and normal control subjects.

  18. Self-consciousness/Awareness and Bladder Sensations: Comparative Study of Overactive Bladder Patients and Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijens, Desiree; Marcelissen, Tom; Drossaerts, Jamie; Heeringa, Rhea; Degaillier, Sam; Leue, Carsten; van Koeveringe, Gommert

    2017-08-31

    To explore differences in bladder sensations between patients with overactive bladder (OAB) and healthy volunteers by evaluating self-consciousness, self-awareness and affective complaints. A prospective, observational study was performed comparing patients with OAB symptoms and healthy volunteers. During 3 days subjects filled out sensation-related bladder diaries (SR-BD), Self-Consciousness Questionnaires (SCS), Self-Awareness Questionnaire (SSAS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The SSAS was filled out at the second void of the first day. In total, 134 participants were included (66 volunteers and 68 patients). Patients had lower voided volumes (193 mL vs 270 mL, P self-awareness than volunteers, indicating that OAB patients may attribute different values to body signals. Future research is required to elaborate our knowledge on the perceived sensations and labeling of emotions in OAB. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Psychological effects of ketamine in healthy volunteers - Phenomenological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomarol-Clotet, E.; Honey, G. D.; Murray, G. K.; Corlett, P. R.; Absalom, A. R.; Lee, M.; McKenna, P. J.; Bullmore, E. T.; Fletcher, P. C.

    Background: The psychosis-inducing effect of ketamine is important evidence supporting the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia. However, the symptoms the drug produces have not been described systematically. Aim: To examine the effects of ketamine in healthy people using a structured psychiatric

  20. Salt sensitivity correlates positively with insulin sensitivity in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; Voordouw, JJ; Bakker, SJL; Gans, ROB

    1999-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between insulin sensitivity and salt sensitivity in healthy subjects who display a wide range of insulin sensitivity. As a secondary objective, we assessed the relationship between salt sensitivity and the other characteristics of the in

  1. Psychological effects of ketamine in healthy volunteers - Phenomenological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomarol-Clotet, E.; Honey, G. D.; Murray, G. K.; Corlett, P. R.; Absalom, A. R.; Lee, M.; McKenna, P. J.; Bullmore, E. T.; Fletcher, P. C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The psychosis-inducing effect of ketamine is important evidence supporting the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia. However, the symptoms the drug produces have not been described systematically. Aim: To examine the effects of ketamine in healthy people using a structured psychiatric i

  2. Safety and feasibility of long-term intravenous sodium nitrite infusion in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard M Pluta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infusion of sodium nitrite could provide sustained therapeutic concentrations of nitric oxide (NO for the treatment of a variety of vascular disorders. The study was developed to determine the safety and feasibility of prolonged sodium nitrite infusion. METHODOLOGY: Healthy volunteers, aged 21 to 60 years old, were candidates for the study performed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH; protocol 05-N-0075 between July 2007 and August 2008. All subjects provided written consent to participate. Twelve subjects (5 males, 7 females; mean age, 38.8±9.2 years (range, 21-56 years were intravenously infused with increasing doses of sodium nitrite for 48 hours (starting dose at 4.2 µg/kg/hr; maximal dose of 533.8 µg/kg/hr. Clinical, physiologic and laboratory data before, during and after infusion were analyzed. FINDINGS: The maximal tolerated dose for intravenous infusion of sodium nitrite was 267 µg/kg/hr. Dose limiting toxicity occurred at 446 µg/kg/hr. Toxicity included a transient asymptomatic decrease of mean arterial blood pressure (more than 15 mmHg and/or an asymptomatic increase of methemoglobin level above 5%. Nitrite, nitrate, S-nitrosothiols concentrations in plasma and whole blood increased in all subjects and returned to preinfusion baseline values within 12 hours after cessation of the infusion. The mean half-life of nitrite estimated at maximal tolerated dose was 45.3 minutes for plasma and 51.4 minutes for whole blood. CONCLUSION: Sodium nitrite can be safely infused intravenously at defined concentrations for prolonged intervals. These results should be valuable for developing studies to investigate new NO treatment paradigms for a variety of clinical disorders, including cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage, and ischemia of the heart, liver, kidney and brain, as well as organ transplants, blood-brain barrier modulation and pulmonary hypertension. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION: http

  3. Exploratory study to evaluate tolerability, safety, and activity of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Raut, Ashwinikumar A.; Rege, Nirmala N.; Tadvi, Firoz M.; Solanki, Punita V.; Kene, Kirti R.; Shirolkar, Sudatta G.; Shefali N Pandey; Vaidya, Rama A.; Ashok B Vaidya

    2012-01-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) (WS), a “rasayana” drug, is recommended for balavardhan and mamsavardhan. The study was intended to evaluate dose-related tolerability, safety, and activity of WS formulation in normal individuals. The design was prospective, open-labeled, variable doses in volunteers. Eighteen apparently healthy volunteers (12M:6F, age:18-30 years, and BMI: 19-30) were enrolled. After baseline investigations, they received WS capsules (Rx) (aqueous extract, 8:1) daily in two ...

  4. The associations between pain sensitivity and knee muscle strength in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate associations between muscle strength and pain sensitivity among healthy volunteers and associations between different pain sensitivity measures. Methods. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (21 females) participated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were obtained from 1...... as covariates. Results. Knee extension strength was associated with computer-controlled PPT on the vastus lateralis muscle. Computer-controlled PPTs were significantly correlated between sites (r > 0.72) and with cuff PPT (r > 0.4). Saline induced pain intensity and duration were correlated between sites (r > 0.......39) and with all PPTs (r...

  5. MODULATION OF SYMPATHOVAGAL BALANCE AFTER CHANDRANADI PRANAYAMA IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintala Kiran Kumar Ch, Bandi Hari Krishna, Mallikarjuna Reddy N

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Regardless of prevailing advances in yoga research, the immediate benefit of chandranadi pranayama (CNP on heart rate variability was not explored. Therefore, in this study, we planned to study the immediate effect of CNP on heart rate, blood pressure and HRV. Methods: One hundred and ten medical students were randomly divided into two groups; control group (n=55 and CNP group (n=55. CNP group participants were individually trained to perform CNP by an experienced yoga instructor with a regularity of 6 breaths/min for five minutes. CG volunteers didn’t undergo CNP, Pre and post intervention HR, BP measurements and spectral analysis of HRV was done in both the groups. The paired student’s t test was used to determine significant differences. Results: There was a significant decrease in HR (p<0.01, BP (p<0.05, LFnu (p<0.05, LF/HF (p<0.001 and increase in HFnu (p<0.01 followed by five minutes of CNP in CNP group. Further, HR, SBP, DBP was reduced by 9.10%, 4.80%, 7.75 % respectively. HRV results showed 7.59% reduction in LFnu, 17.8% reduction in LF/HF and HF was increased by 12.37%. There were no significant changes in CG. Conclusion: It is concluded that CNP is beneficial in reducing HR, BP and to improve Sympathovagal balance. We advise that this effective method be included with the management protocol of hypertension and utilized when immediate reduction of blood pressure is required in day-to-day as well as clinical situations.

  6. Mild Hypothermia Alters Midazolam Pharmacokinetics in Normal Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostler, David; Zhou, Jiangquan; Tortorici, Michael A.; Bies, Robert R.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Empey, Philip E.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Callaway, Clifton W.

    2010-01-01

    The clinical use of therapeutic hypothermia has been rapidly expanding due to evidence of neuroprotection. However, the effect of hypothermia on specific pathways of drug elimination in humans is relatively unknown. To gain insight into the potential effects of hypothermia on drug metabolism and disposition, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics of midazolam as a probe for CYP3A4/5 activity during mild hypothermia in human volunteers. A second objective of this work was to determine whether benzodiazepines and magnesium administered intravenously would facilitate the induction of hypothermia. Subjects were enrolled in a randomized crossover study, which included two mild hypothermia groups (4°C saline infusions and 4°C saline + magnesium) and two normothermia groups (37°C saline infusions and 37°C saline + magnesium). The lowest temperatures achieved in the 4°C saline + magnesium and 4°C saline infusions were 35.4 ± 0.4 and 35.8 ± 0.3°C, respectively. A significant decrease in the formation clearance of the major metabolite 1′-hydroxymidazolam was observed during the 4°C saline + magnesium compared with that in the 37°C saline group (p midazolam. This model predicted that midazolam clearance decreases 11.1% for each degree Celsius reduction in core temperature from 36.5°C. Midazolam with magnesium facilitated the induction of hypothermia, but shivering was minimally suppressed. These data provided proof of concept that even mild and short-duration changes in body temperature significantly affect midazolam metabolism. Future studies in patients who receive lower levels and a longer duration of hypothermia are warranted. PMID:20164112

  7. Effect of ghrelin on autonomic activity in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeki, Takeshi; Koshiba, Kunihiko; Niki, Toshiyuki; Kusunose, Kenya; Yamaguchi, Koji; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Shimabukuro, Michio; Minakuchi, Kazuo; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Kangawa, Kenji; Sata, Masataka

    2014-12-01

    Ghrelin is a novel growth hormone (GH)-releasing peptide originally isolated from the stomach. Recently, we have shown that ghrelin suppresses cardiac sympathetic activity and prevents early left ventricular remodeling in rats with myocardial infarction. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of ghrelin on autonomic nerve activity in healthy human subjects. An intravenous bolus of human synthetic ghrelin (10μg/kg) was administered to 10 healthy men (mean age, 33 years). Holter monitoring assessment was performed before and during 2h after the ghrelin therapy. The standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDNN), square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent RR intervals (rMSSD), high-frequency power (HF), and low-frequency power (LF) were analyzed. Blood samples were also obtained before and after the therapy. A single administration of ghrelin decreased both heart rate and blood pressure. Interestingly, ghrelin significantly decreased the LF and LF/HF ratio of heart rate variability and increased the SDNN, rMSSD, and HF. Ghrelin also elicited a marked increase in circulating GH, but not insulin-like growth factor-1. These data suggest that ghrelin might suppress cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and stimulate cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Increased set shifting costs in fasted healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M Bolton

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of temporary food restriction on a set shifting task requiring participants to judge clusters of pictures against a frequently changing rule. 60 healthy female participants underwent two testing sessions: once after fasting for 16 hours and once in a satiated state. Participants also completed a battery of questionnaires (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]; Persistence, Perseveration and Perfectionism Questionnaire [PPPQ-22]; and Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire [EDE-Q6]. Set shifting costs were significantly increased after fasting; this effect was independent of self-reported mood and perseveration. Furthermore, higher levels of weight concern predicted a general performance decrement under conditions of fasting. We conclude that relatively short periods of fasting can lead to set shifting impairments. This finding may have relevance to studies of development, individual differences, and the interpretation of psychometric tests. It also could have implications for understanding the etiology and maintenance of eating disorders, in which impaired set shifting has been implicated.

  9. Early effects of duloxetine on emotion recognition in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Susan; Penton-Voak, Ian; Pinkney, Verity; Baldwin, David S; Munafò, Marcus R; Garner, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    The serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine is an effective treatment for major depression and generalised anxiety disorder. Neuropsychological models of antidepressant drug action suggest therapeutic effects might be mediated by the early correction of maladaptive biases in emotion processing, including the recognition of emotional expressions. Sub-chronic administration of duloxetine (for two weeks) produces adaptive changes in neural circuitry implicated in emotion processing; however, its effects on emotional expression recognition are unknown. Forty healthy participants were randomised to receive either 14 days of duloxetine (60 mg/day, titrated from 30 mg after three days) or matched placebo (with sham titration) in a double-blind, between-groups, repeated-measures design. On day 0 and day 14 participants completed a computerised emotional expression recognition task that measured sensitivity to the six primary emotions. Thirty-eight participants (19 per group) completed their course of tablets and were included in the analysis. Results provide evidence that duloxetine, compared to placebo, may reduce the accurate recognition of sadness. Drug effects were driven by changes in participants' ability to correctly detect subtle expressions of sadness, with greater change observed in the placebo relative to the duloxetine group. These effects occurred in the absence of changes in mood. Our preliminary findings require replication, but complement recent evidence that sadness recognition is a therapeutic target in major depression, and a mechanism through which SNRIs could resolve negative biases in emotion processing to achieve therapeutic effects.

  10. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of metformin is independent of the OCT1 genotype in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard; Højlund, Kurt; Hother-Nielsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to determine the steady-state pharmacokinetics of metformin in healthy volunteers with different numbers of reduced-function alleles in the organic cation transporter 1 gene (OCT1). METHODS: The study was conducted as part of a randomized cross-over trial. Thirty......-four healthy volunteers with known OCT1 genotypes (12 with two wild-type alleles, 13 with one and 9 with two reduced-function alleles) were included. In one of the study periods, they were titrated to steady-state with 1 g metformin twice daily. RESULTS: Neither AUC(0-12), C(max) nor Cl(renal) were...... volunteers, we found no impact of different OCT1 genotypes on metformin steady-state pharmacokinetics....

  11. A phase I trial of Gynostemma pentaphyllum Makino in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malee Banjob

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a phase I trial of Gynostemma pentaphyllum, grown in northern Thailand, to evaluate its safety in three groups of healthy volunteers. Fourteen, fifteen and fourteen volunteers respectively received the water extract of G. pentaphyllum in capsules at the doses of 50, 200 and 400 mg twice daily for two months. There were no major adverse events reported from any of the three groups throughout the study. Significant changes in hematological parameters, natural killer cell activities and the numbers of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells were not seen during taking the extract. Some biochemical parameters were significantly different from baseline data. Those values were, however, within normal limits and did not result in clinically significant conditions. Our results suggested that the water extract of G. pentaphyllum at the doses of 50, 200 or 400 mg twice daily given to healthy volunteers for two months was safe.

  12. Inhibition of cytokine production by methotrexate. Studies in healthy volunteers and patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, A.H.; Lathouder, de S; Groot, E.R.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Aarden, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse whether the beneficial effects of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) could be due to inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production. METHODS: Cytokine production was studied using whole blood (WB) and mononuclear cells (MNC) of healthy volunteers and RA patients. Cultur

  13. Effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha infusion on the incretin effect in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke;

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with peripheral insulin resistance, impaired incretin effect, and increased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Whereas TNF-α infusion at a dose that induces systemic inflammation in healthy volunteers has been demonstrated to induce...

  14. Correlation between midazolam and lignocaine pharmacokinetics and MEGX formation in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Eleonora L; van der Hoven, Ben; Groeneveld, A B Johan; Touw, Daniel J; Danhof, Meindert

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: The objectives of the present investigation were: (a) to determine the correlation between lignocaine and midazolam pharmacokinetics following intravenous administration in healthy volunteers, (b) to determine the effects of treatment with an inhibitor of CYP3A4 (erythromycin) on this correlat

  15. Water immersion is associated with an increase in aquaporin-2 excretion in healthy volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valenti, G.; Fraszl, W.; Addabbo, F.; Tamma, G.; Procino, G.; Satta, E.; Cirillo, M.; Santo, N.G. De; Drummer, C.; Bellini, L.; Kowoll, R.; Schlemmer, M.; Vogler, S.; Kirsch, K.A.; Svelto, M.; Gunga, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report the alterations in renal water handling in healthy volunteers during a 6 h thermoneutral water immersion at 34 to 36 degrees C. We found that water immersion is associated with a reversible increase in total urinary AQP2 excretion.

  16. Relative bioavailability of three newly developed albendazole formulations : a randomized crossover study with healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rigter, I M; Schipper, H G; Koopmans, R P; van Kan, H J M; Frijlink, H W; Kager, P A; Guchelaar, H-J

    2004-01-01

    This study of healthy volunteers shows that the relative bioavailability of albendazole formulations that use arachis oil-polysorbate 80 or hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin as an excipient was enhanced 4.3- and 9.7-fold compared to the results seen with commercial tablets. Administration of macrogol

  17. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Single- and Multiple-Dose Pitavastatin Calcium Tablets in Healthy Chinese Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Luo, MD

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: In healthy Chinese volunteers, single dosing of 1 mg, 2 mg, and 4 mg pitavastatin resulted in linear plasma pharmacokinetic properties. Compared with single dosing, multiple dosing of pitavastatin showed different distribution and elimination characteristics. Sex did not appear to affect the pharmacokinetic properties of pitavastatin. Chictr.org identifier: ChiCTR-OO-13004294.

  18. Relative bioavailability of three newly developed albendazole formulations : a randomized crossover study with healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rigter, I M; Schipper, H G; Koopmans, R P; van Kan, H J M; Frijlink, H W; Kager, P A; Guchelaar, H-J

    2004-01-01

    This study of healthy volunteers shows that the relative bioavailability of albendazole formulations that use arachis oil-polysorbate 80 or hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin as an excipient was enhanced 4.3- and 9.7-fold compared to the results seen with commercial tablets. Administration of macrogol

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A WEARABLE GLUCOSE SENSOR - STUDIES IN HEALTHY-VOLUNTEERS AND IN DIABETIC-PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AALDERS, AL; SCHMIDT, FJ; SCHOONEN, AJM; BROEK, IR; MAESSEN, AGFM; DOORENBOS, H

    1991-01-01

    A glucose sensor with a subcutaneous dialysis system was tested in six healthy volunteers during an oral glucose tolerance test and in ten diabetic patients with hyperglycemia during rapid decline of blood glucose levels. There was a good correlation between sensor and blood glucose values. During o

  20. The OxyMask™ development and performance in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Paul

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available James E Paul1, Horia Hangan2, Julius Hajgato31Department of Anesthesia, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 2Faculty of Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada; 3Southmedic Inc., Barrie, ON, CanadaBackground: The OxyMask™ is a unique, open-style, oxygen mask that was originally developed in 2005. The original mask was modified, using computational fluid dynamics numerical simulations, with the goal of allowing it to produce a wider range of FiO2. This analysis was used to guide the modification of the mask shell and the location for the oxygen diffuser.Methods: The new OxyMask was attached to 10 healthy subjects and used to deliver escalating levels of oxygen (1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 LPM for 90 seconds at each level and the resulting FiO2 was recorded (at the lips from 5 consecutive measurements at each oxygen flow rate.Results: Mean FiO2 was 25.4% at 1.5 LPM of oxygen, 30.1% at 2 LPM, 36.5% at 2.5 LPM, 41.8% at 3 LPM, 57.6% at 5 LPM, 74.4% at 10 LPM, and 80.1% at 15 LPM. Each FiO2 achieved at these escalating oxygen levels was significantly greater than all the previous levels. The mean FiO2 was 82.8 at 20 LPM, 84.2% at 25 LPM and 84.3% at 30 LPM. All of these values on average were not significantly greater than the FiO2 achieved with 15 LPM. In a few subjects a maximum FiO2 of 90% was reached.Conclusion: The original OxyMask was successfully modified so that the second generation of the mask can provide a wide range of FiO2, from 25% to 90%, while keeping its unique open design.Keywords: oxygen, oxygen masks, oxygen therapy, OxyMask™, OxyArm™, clinical trial, computational fluid dynamics (CFD, equipment design, biomedical engineering

  1. Effects of different sleep deprivation protocols on sleep perception in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Leonardo I; Pinto, Luciano R; Perlis, Michael L; Martins, Raquel; Caboclo, Luis Otavio; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L

    2014-10-01

    To investigate whether different protocols of sleep deprivation modify sleep perception. The effects of total sleep deprivation (TD) and selective rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (RD) on sleep perception were analyzed in normal volunteers. Thirty-one healthy males with normal sleep were randomized to one of three conditions: (i) normal uninterrupted sleep; (ii) four nights of RD; or (iii) two nights of TD. Morning perception of total sleep time was evaluated for each condition. Sleep perception was estimated using total sleep time (in hours) as perceived by the volunteer divided by the total sleep time (in hours) measured by polysomnography (PSG). The final value of this calculation was defined as the perception index (PI). There were no significant differences among the three groups of volunteers in the total sleep time measured by PSG or in the perception of total sleep time at baseline condition. Volunteers submitted to RD exhibited lower sleep PI scores as compared with controls during the sleep deprivation period (P sleep deprivation reduced the ability of healthy young volunteers to perceive their total sleep time when compared with time measured by PSG. The data reinforce the influence of sleep deprivation on sleep perception. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Safety Evaluation of Crocin (a constituent of saffron Tablets in Healthy Volunteers

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    Amir Houshang Mohamadpour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Crocin is the chemical ingredient primarily responsible for the color of saffron. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant, anticancer and memory improving activities. Crocin tablets were evaluated for short-term safety and tolerability in healthy adult volunteers. Materials and Methods: The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design consisting of one month treatment of crocin tablets. Volunteers who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomized into 2 groups of 22 each (males and females and received 20 mg crocin tablets or placebo. General measures of health were recorded during the study such as hematological, biochemical, hormonal and urinary parameters in pre and post-treatment periods. Results: No major adverse events were reported during the trial. Crocin tablets did not change the above parameters except that it decreased amylase, mixed white blood cells and PTT in healthy volunteers after one month. Conclusion: This clinical safety evaluation showed a relatively safe and normal profile for crocin in healthy volunteers at the given doses within the trial period.

  3. Comparison of 24-hour urinary citrate excretion in stone formers and healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Goodarzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low urinary citrate excretion is a risk factor in stone formers (SF. This study aimed to measure the urinary citrate excretion in SF and healthy volunteers at our center from 12 June 2008 to 20 August 2009. There were 28 SF patients (18 males and ten females and 27 (18 males and nine females age-matched healthy adult volunteers who participated in this study. Both groups had a similar living environment, extrinsic factors, diet and genetic descent. After collecting 24-h urine, citrate was measured using an enzymatic kit. Routine urinalysis and 24-h creatinine and uric acid were also performed. There was a significant difference in urinary citrate excretion level among SF (mean 310, SD 260 mg/L and normal volunteer subjects (mean 800, SD 300 mg/L. By applying the previously defined normal values (320 mg/24 h of urinary citrate in the local population, 43% of the SF in our study group was hypocitric, and none among the controls. We conclude that prevalence of hypocitraturia in stone formers was higher than that in healthy volunteers in our population.

  4. Digestive tract microbiota in healthy volunteers Microbiota no trato digestivo em voluntários saudáveis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Zilberstein

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to standardize the methods of sample collection of mucus from the digestive tract and to determine the microbiota in healthy volunteers from Brazil, collecting samples from the mouth, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, and rectum. METHODS: Microbiota of selected healthy volunteers from the oral cavity (n=10, the esophagus (n=10, the upper digestive tract (n=20, and the lower digestive tract (n=24 were evaluated through distinct collection methods. Collection methods took into account the different sites, using basic scraping and swabbing techniques, stimulated saliva from the oral cavity, irrigation-aspiration with sterile catheters especially designed for the esophagus, a probe especially designed for upper digestive tract, and a special catheter for the lower digestive tract. RESULTS: (i Mixed microbiota were identified in the oral cavity, predominantly Gram-positive aerobic and anaerobic cocci; (ii transitional flora mainly in the esophagus; (iii Veillonella sp, Lactobacillus sp, and Clostridium sp in the stomach and duodenum; (iv in the jejunum and upper ileum, we observed Bacteroides sp, Proteus sp, and Staphylococcus sp, in addition to Veillonella sp; (v in the colon, the presence of "nonpathogenic" anaerobic bacteria Veillonella sp (average 10(5 UFC indicates the existence of a low oxidation-reduction potential environment, which suggests the possibility of adoption of these bacteria as biological markers of total digestive tract health. CONCLUSIONS: The collection methods were efficient in obtaining adequate samples from each segment of the total digestive tract to reveal the normal microbiota. These procedures are safe and easily reproducible for microbiological studies.OBJETIVO: Padronizar os métodos de coleta do muco do trato digestivo e determinar a microbiota, em voluntários saudáveis no Brasil, coletando amostras da boca, esôfago, estômago, duodeno, jejunos e íleo, c

  5. Precursors to suicidality and violence on antidepressants: systematic review of trials in adult healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Andreas Ø; Danborg, Pia B; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2016-10-01

    To quantify the risk of suicidality and violence when selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are given to adult healthy volunteers with no signs of a mental disorder. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Harms related to suicidality, hostility, activation events, psychotic events and mood disturbances. Published trials identified by searching PubMed and Embase and clinical study reports obtained from the European and UK drug regulators. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in adult healthy volunteers that reported on suicidality or violence or precursor events to suicidality or violence. A total of 5787 publications were screened and 130 trials fulfilled our inclusion criteria. The trials were generally uninformative; 97 trials did not report the randomisation method, 75 trials did not report any discontinuations and 63 trials did not report any adverse events or lack thereof. Eleven of the 130 published trials and two of 29 clinical study reports we received from the regulatory agencies presented data for our meta-analysis. Treatment of adult healthy volunteers with antidepressants doubled their risk of harms related to suicidality and violence, odds ratio 1.85 (95% confidence interval 1.11 to 3.08, p = 0.02, I(2 )= 18%). The number needed to treat to harm one healthy person was 16 (95% confidence interval 8 to 100; Mantel-Haenszel risk difference 0.06). There can be little doubt that we underestimated the harms of antidepressants, as we only had access to the published articles for 11 of our 13 trials. Antidepressants double the occurrence of events in adult healthy volunteers that can lead to suicide and violence. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  6. Precursors to suicidality and violence on antidepressants: systematic review of trials in adult healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Andreas Ø; Danborg, Pia B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the risk of suicidality and violence when selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are given to adult healthy volunteers with no signs of a mental disorder. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Main outcome measure Harms related to suicidality, hostility, activation events, psychotic events and mood disturbances. Setting Published trials identified by searching PubMed and Embase and clinical study reports obtained from the European and UK drug regulators. Participants Double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in adult healthy volunteers that reported on suicidality or violence or precursor events to suicidality or violence. Results A total of 5787 publications were screened and 130 trials fulfilled our inclusion criteria. The trials were generally uninformative; 97 trials did not report the randomisation method, 75 trials did not report any discontinuations and 63 trials did not report any adverse events or lack thereof. Eleven of the 130 published trials and two of 29 clinical study reports we received from the regulatory agencies presented data for our meta-analysis. Treatment of adult healthy volunteers with antidepressants doubled their risk of harms related to suicidality and violence, odds ratio 1.85 (95% confidence interval 1.11 to 3.08, p = 0.02, I2 = 18%). The number needed to treat to harm one healthy person was 16 (95% confidence interval 8 to 100; Mantel-Haenszel risk difference 0.06). There can be little doubt that we underestimated the harms of antidepressants, as we only had access to the published articles for 11 of our 13 trials. Conclusions Antidepressants double the occurrence of events in adult healthy volunteers that can lead to suicide and violence. PMID:27729596

  7. Differences in gluten metabolism among healthy volunteers, coeliac disease patients and first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, Alberto; Nistal, Esther; Herrán, Alexandra R; Pérez-Andrés, Jénifer; Ferrero, Miguel A; Vaquero Ayala, Luis; Vivas, Santiago; Ruiz de Morales, José M G; Albillos, Silvia M; Casqueiro, Francisco Javier

    2015-10-28

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy resulting from exposure to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Gluten proteins are partially digested by human proteases generating immunogenic peptides that cause inflammation in patients carrying HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genes. Although intestinal dysbiosis has been associated with patients with CD, bacterial metabolism of gluten has not been studied in depth thus far. The aim of this study was to analyse the metabolic activity of intestinal bacteria associated with gluten intake in healthy individuals, CD patients and first-degree relatives of CD patients. Faecal samples belonging to twenty-two untreated CD patients, twenty treated CD patients, sixteen healthy volunteers on normal diet, eleven healthy volunteers on gluten-free diet (GFD), seventy-one relatives of CD patients on normal diet and sixty-nine relatives on GFD were tested for several proteolytic activities, cultivable bacteria involved in gluten metabolism, SCFA and the amount of gluten in faeces. We detected faecal peptidasic activity against the gluten-derived peptide 33-mer. CD patients showed differences in faecal glutenasic activity (FGA), faecal tryptic activity (FTA), SCFA and faecal gluten content with respect to healthy volunteers. Alterations in specific bacterial groups metabolising gluten such as Clostridium or Lactobacillus were reported in CD patients. Relatives showed similar parameters to CD patients (SCFA) and healthy volunteers (FTA and FGA). Our data support the fact that commensal microbial activity is an important factor in the metabolism of gluten proteins and that this activity is altered in CD patients.

  8. 68Ga-NOTA-Aca-BBN(7–14) PET/CT in Healthy Volunteers and Glioma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Li, Deling; Lang, Lixin; Zhu, Zhaohui; Wang, Ling; Wu, Peilin; Niu, Gang; Li, Fang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    This work was designed to study the safety, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry of a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR)– targeting, 68Ga-labeled bombesin (BBN) peptide derivative PET tracer, NOTA-Aca-BBN(7–14) (denoted as 68Ga-BBN) in healthy volunteers and to assess the level of receptor expression in glioma patients. Methods Four healthy volunteers (2 male and 2 female) underwent whole-body PET/CT at multiple time points after a bolus injection of 68Ga-BBN (111 ± 148 MBq). Regions of interest were drawn manually over major organs, and time–activity curves were obtained. Dosimetry was calculated using the OLINDA/EXM software. Twelve patients with glioma diagnosed by contrast-enhanced MRI underwent PET/CT at 30–45 min after 68Ga-BBN injection. Within 1 wk afterward, the tumor was surgically removed and immunohistochemical staining of tumor samples against GRPR was performed and correlated with the PET/CT results. Results 68Ga-BBN was well tolerated in all healthy volunteers, with no adverse symptoms being noticed or reported. 68Ga-BBN cleared rapidly from the circulation and was excreted mainly through the kidneys and urinary tract. The total effective dose equivalent and effective dose were 0.0335 ± 0.0079 and 0.0276 ± 0.0066 mSv/MBq, respectively. In glioma patients, all MRI-identified lesions showed high signal intensity on 68Ga-BBN PET/CT. SUVmax and SUVmean were 2.08 ± 0.58 and 1.32 ± 0.37, respectively. With normal brain tissue as background, tumor-to-background ratios were 24.0 ± 8.85 and 13.4 ± 4.54 based on SUVmax and SUVmean, respectively. The immunohistochemical staining confirmed a positive correlation between SUV and GRPR expression level (r2 = 0.71, P < 0.001). Conclusion 68Ga-BBN is a PET tracer with favorable pharmacokinetics and a favorable dosimetry profile. It has the potential to evaluate GRPR expression in glioma patients and guide GRPR-targeted therapy of glioma. PMID:26449838

  9. In vivo electroporation enhances the immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA vaccine candidate in healthy volunteers.

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    Sandhya Vasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA-based vaccines have been safe but weakly immunogenic in humans to date. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We sought to determine the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of ADVAX, a multigenic HIV-1 DNA vaccine candidate, injected intramuscularly by in vivo electroporation (EP in a Phase-1, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial in healthy volunteers. Eight volunteers each received 0.2 mg, 1 mg, or 4 mg ADVAX or saline placebo via EP, or 4 mg ADVAX via standard intramuscular injection at weeks 0 and 8. A third vaccination was administered to eleven volunteers at week 36. EP was safe, well-tolerated and considered acceptable for a prophylactic vaccine. EP delivery of ADVAX increased the magnitude of HIV-1-specific cell mediated immunity by up to 70-fold over IM injection, as measured by gamma interferon ELISpot. The number of antigens to which the response was detected improved with EP and increasing dosage. Intracellular cytokine staining analysis of ELISpot responders revealed both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, with co-secretion of multiple cytokines. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first demonstration in healthy volunteers that EP is safe, tolerable, and effective in improving the magnitude, breadth and durability of cellular immune responses to a DNA vaccine candidate. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00545987.

  10. The Area of Secondary Hyperalgesia following Heat Stimulation in Healthy Male Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Sejer; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pipper, Christian Bressen;

    2016-01-01

    -individual variation in secondary hyperalgesia elicited by brief thermal sensitization (45°C for 3 min) in healthy volunteers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty healthy volunteers were included. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization were investigated by 2 observers on 4 experimental days......, with a minimum interval of 7 days. Additionally, heat pain detection threshold and pain during thermal stimulation (45°C for 1 min.), and the psychological tests Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score were applied. RESULTS: For areas of secondary hyperalgesia, an intra...... and above the 3rd quartile considering all included participants. Heat pain detection threshold predicted area of secondary hyperalgesia with an adjusted R2 of 0.20 (P = 0.0006). CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated a low intra-individual, and a high inter-individual variation in thermally induced secondary...

  11. Delayed migraine-like headache in healthy volunteers after a combination of acetazolamide and glyceryl trinitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, D.; Thomsen, L. L.; Iversen, H. K.;

    2009-01-01

    Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) is a pro-drug dissociating nitric oxide throughout the body. It dilates cephalic arteries without increasing cerebral blood flow (CBF). GTN induces headache in healthy volunteers and migraine attacks in migraineurs. Acetazolamide (Az) increases CBF but does not dilate...... cerebral arteries. The hypothesis tested here was that Az, by dilating cerebral arterioles but not arteries and thereby decreasing pulsatile stretching of the wall of the large arteries and their perivascular sensory nerves, would reduce or prevent the GTN-induced headache We tested this hypothesis in 14...... healthy volunteers. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study, they were pretreated with Az or placebo followed on both study days by a GTN infusion of 0.5 mu g kg-1 min-1 for 20 min. Headache was scored on a verbal rating scale and a headache diary was kept for 12 h. Mean blood velocity...

  12. Pharmacokinetic interaction between amprenavir and delavirdine after multiple-dose administration in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik S; Klitgaard, Niels A; Brosen, Kim

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the safety and the pharmacokinetic interaction between amprenavir and delavirdine after multiple dose administration in healthy volunteers. METHODS: This was a prospective, open-label, randomized, controlled, two-sequence, two-period multiple dose study with 18 healthy subjects....... Volunteers were randomly assigned to amprenavir, 600 mg twice a day, or delavirdine, 600 mg twice a day, for 10 days, followed by both drugs for another 10 days with pharmacokinetic evaluation on day 10 and day 20. Adverse events were recorded throughout the study. RESULTS: Amprenavir decreased all...... the delavirdine pharmacokinetic parameters apart from tmax. Delavirdine C12h dropped from 7,916 to 933 ng ml-1 (median decrease 5,930 ng ml-1, 95% CI 3,013, 8,955 ng ml-1). A decrease in amprenavir t(1/2) was also seen leading to almost identical median amprenavir C24h values. No serious clinical adverse events...

  13. Acute effects of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol on performance monitoring in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiree eSpronk

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: The error-related negativity (ERN is a negative event-related potential that occurs immediately after an erroneous response and is thought to reflect human performance monitoring. Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC administration in healthy volunteers has been linked to impaired performance monitoring in behavioral studies, but to date no studies have examined the effects of cannabinoids on the ERN. Methods: EEG data from 10 healthy volunteers was recorded during execution of a speeded choice reaction time task (Flankers task after administration of THC or placebo vapor in a double-blind randomized crossover design. Results: The findings of this study show that the ERN was significantly reduced after administration of THC. The behavioral outcomes on the Flankers task showed no indications of drug-induced impairments.Discussion: The diminished ERN reflects impairments in the process of performance monitoring. The task design was not optimized to find behavioral effects. The study shows that cannabinoids impair performance monitoring.

  14. Effects of a short-term intervention with a paleolithic diet in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterdahl, M; Kocturk, T; Koochek, A; Wändell, P E

    2008-05-01

    Prevention of cardiovascular diseases by paleolithic or hunter-gatherer diets has been discussed during recent years. Our aim was to assess the effect of a paleolithic diet in a pilot study on healthy volunteers during 3 weeks. The intention was to include 20 subjects, of whom 14 fulfilled the study. Complete dietary assessment was available for six subjects. Mean weight decreased by 2.3 kg (Pdiet, but further studies, including control group, are needed.

  15. Effect of slow deep breathing (6 breaths/min) on pulmonary function in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Shravya Keerthi G, Hari Krishna Bandi, Suresh M, Mallikarjuna Reddy

    2013-01-01

    We designed this study to test the hypothesis that whether 10 minutes of slow deep breathing have any effect on pulmonary function in healthy volunteers. The main objective was to study the immediate effect of slow deep breathing on Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), Forced expiratory volume percent (FEV1/FVC%), Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), Forced expiratory flow 25-75%(FEF25-75%), Maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV), Slow vital capacity (SV...

  16. Cine MRI of Tracheal Dynamics in Healthy Volunteers and Patients With Tracheobronchomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Boiselle, Phillip M; Heidinger, Benedikt; Andrinopoulou, Eleni-Rosalina; O'Donnel, Carl; Alsop, David C; Litmanovich, Diana E

    2017-10-01

    Bronchoscopy and MDCT are routinely used to assess tracheobronchomalacia (TBM). Recently, dynamic MRI (cine MRI) has been proposed as a radiation-free alternative to MDCT. In this study, we tested cine MRI assessment of airway dynamics during various breathing conditions and compared cine MRI and MDCT measurements in healthy volunteers and patients with suspected TBM. Cine MRI was found to be a technically feasible alternative to MDCT for assessing central airway dynamics.

  17. Effect of tamsulosin on the pharmacokinetics of dutasteride in Chinese male healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huafang; Yang, Jiansong; Zhao, Hongxin; Fossler, Michael J; Wang, Chunrong

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tamsulosin (0.2 mg) on the pharmacokinetics of dutasteride (0.5 mg) in a group of healthy Chinese male volunteers. This was an open-label, single-sequence, 3-period, drug-drug interaction phase 1 study. Twenty-four healthy Chinese male volunteers were enrolled and administered a single dose of 0.5 mg dutasteride and, following a 28- to 30-day washout period, 0.2 mg tamsulosin once daily for 7 days. On day 5, subjects received 0.2 mg tamsulosin coadministered with 0.5 mg dutasteride. Serum dutasteride and tamsulosin concentrations were monitored. In the presence or absence of tamsulosin, there were no apparent changes in dutasteride AUC and Cmax . Adverse events reported were mild to moderate in intensity and resolved by the end of the study. In healthy Chinese male volunteers, tamsulosin 0.2 mg at steady state had no apparent effect on dutasteride pharmacokinetics. Dutasteride and tamsulosin when administered alone or in combination were well tolerated.

  18. Therapeutic effects of ciprofloxacin on the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine in healthy adult male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzadi, Andleeb; Javed, Ijaz; Aslam, Bilal; Muhammad, Faqir; Asi, Muhammad Rafique; Ashraf, Muhammad Yasin; Zia-ur-Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Carbamazepine is a (CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 enzyme inducer) medicine which is used by epileptic patients for a long time. During the course of therapy, patients are generally caught by other diseases like urinary tract infections, upper respiratory tract infection, skin and soft tissue infection etc. To cure them, physicians commonly prescribe fluoroquinolones like Ciprofloxacin (CYP1A2 inhibitor) along with Carbamazepine (CBZ). Interactions may result without recognition which may lead to unforeseen toxicity, untoward effects or even therapeutic failure. Therefore, studies were conducted to investigate the effect of Ciprofloxacin on the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine in healthy adult male volunteers. The main objective of this study was to generate new knowledge regarding CBZ and ciprofloxacin interaction for physicians and research workers dealing with these medicines. Eight healthy adult male volunteers were selected to assess the effect of ciprofloxacin on the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine. After overnight fast the selected male volunteers were given CBZ orally. Blood samples were drawn at different time intervals after medication. Then the same volunteers were given CBZ along with ciprofloxacin. Blood samples were again drawn at the same time intervals as done previously. Plasma was separated from the blood samples. Concentration of CBZ in the plasma samples was determined by using HPLC technique. Results of the present study indicated that ciprofloxacin significantly increased the plasma concentration of CBZ when given concurrently to the healthy adult male volunteers. Ciprofloxacin increased Cmax, AUC and t½ while it decreased the CL and Vd of CBZ when administered concurrently to the adult volunteers. Change in pharmacokinetic parameters was due to slow metabolism or elimination of CBZ when given concurrently with ciprofloxacin to the adult volunteers. This is probably due to the inhibition of CYP3A4 isoenzyme by ciprofloxacin which is responsible for

  19. A Comparison of Selenium Concentrations Between Congestive Heart Failure Patients and Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghaemian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selenium (Se is an essential trace element mainly obtained from seafood, meat, and cereals. Se deficiency has been identified as a major contributing factor in the pathogenesis of certain congestive heart failure (CHF syndromes. Since there is controversy over the prevalence of Se deficiency among patient with CHF, the aim of this study was to assess the serum Se concentrations in patients with CHF and compared them with the Se status of healthy controls.Methods: The study included 77 patients (age, 68.4 ± 10.4 years old; 40.3% female and 73 healthy volunteers (64.9 ± 4.7 years old; 35.6% female. A complete medical/drug history and physical examination were performed for all patients and healthy volunteers. All patients had symptoms and signs of CHF and had a left ventricular ejection fraction (EF of < 40% obtained by echocardiography. The Se concentration was assessed by atomic absorption spectrometer with the Graphite Tube Atomizer. The limit of measurement was 5 μg/L. Results: The Se concentrations in CHF patients did not show a significant difference from those of healthy controls (185.9 ± 781.2 μg/L vs. 123.3 ± 115.5 μg/L, respectively; p value = 0.499. There was no correlation between serum Se concentrations and EF in both the normal group and the patients with heart failure (p value = 0.96 and 0.99; r = 0.006 and 0.002 for patients and healthy volunteers, respectively.Conclusion: In this study, serum Se levels in CHF patients were similar to those of controls and the Se concentrations did not correlate with the degree of left ventricular dysfunction.

  20. Exploratory study to evaluate tolerability, safety, and activity of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwinikumar A Raut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera (WS, a "rasayana" drug, is recommended for balavardhan and mamsavardhan. The study was intended to evaluate dose-related tolerability, safety, and activity of WS formulation in normal individuals. The design was prospective, open-labeled, variable doses in volunteers. Eighteen apparently healthy volunteers (12M:6F, age:18-30 years, and BMI: 19-30 were enrolled. After baseline investigations, they received WS capsules (Rx (aqueous extract, 8:1 daily in two divided doses with increase in daily dosage every 10 days for 30 days (750 mg/day x10 days, 1 000 mg/day x 10 days, 1 250 mg/day x 10 days. Volunteers were assessed for symptoms/signs, vital functions, hematological and biochemical organ function tests. Muscle activity was measured by hand grip strength, quadriceps strength, and back extensor force. Exercise tolerance was determined using cycle ergometry. Lean body weight and fat% were computed from skin fold thickness measurement. Adverse events were recorded, as volunteered by the subjects. Repeated measures ANOVA, McNemar′s test, and paired t test were employed. All but one volunteer tolerated WS without any adverse event. One volunteer showed increased appetite, libido, and hallucinogenic effects with vertigo at the lowest dose and was withdrawn from study. In six subjects, improvement in quality of sleep was found. Organ function tests were in normal range before and after the intervention. Reduction in total- and LDL- cholesterol and increase of strength in muscle activity was significant. Total body fat percentage showed a reduction trend. WS, in escalated dose, was tolerated well. The formulation appeared safe and strengthened muscle activity. In view of its traditional Rasayana use, further studies are planned to evaluate potential of this drug in patients of sarcopenia.

  1. Exploratory study to evaluate tolerability, safety, and activity of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Ashwinikumar A; Rege, Nirmala N; Tadvi, Firoz M; Solanki, Punita V; Kene, Kirti R; Shirolkar, Sudatta G; Pandey, Shefali N; Vaidya, Rama A; Vaidya, Ashok B

    2012-07-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) (WS), a "rasayana" drug, is recommended for balavardhan and mamsavardhan. The study was intended to evaluate dose-related tolerability, safety, and activity of WS formulation in normal individuals. The design was prospective, open-labeled, variable doses in volunteers. Eighteen apparently healthy volunteers (12M:6F, age:18-30 years, and BMI: 19-30) were enrolled. After baseline investigations, they received WS capsules (Rx) (aqueous extract, 8:1) daily in two divided doses with increase in daily dosage every 10 days for 30 days (750 mg/day ×10 days, 1 000 mg/day × 10 days, 1 250 mg/day × 10 days). Volunteers were assessed for symptoms/signs, vital functions, hematological and biochemical organ function tests. Muscle activity was measured by hand grip strength, quadriceps strength, and back extensor force. Exercise tolerance was determined using cycle ergometry. Lean body weight and fat% were computed from skin fold thickness measurement. Adverse events were recorded, as volunteered by the subjects. Repeated measures ANOVA, McNemar's test, and paired t test were employed. All but one volunteer tolerated WS without any adverse event. One volunteer showed increased appetite, libido, and hallucinogenic effects with vertigo at the lowest dose and was withdrawn from study. In six subjects, improvement in quality of sleep was found. Organ function tests were in normal range before and after the intervention. Reduction in total- and LDL- cholesterol and increase of strength in muscle activity was significant. Total body fat percentage showed a reduction trend. WS, in escalated dose, was tolerated well. The formulation appeared safe and strengthened muscle activity. In view of its traditional Rasayana use, further studies are planned to evaluate potential of this drug in patients of sarcopenia.

  2. Psilocybin-Induced Decrease in Amygdala Reactivity Correlates with Enhanced Positive Mood in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehenmann, Rainer; Preller, Katrin H; Scheidegger, Milan; Pokorny, Thomas; Bosch, Oliver G; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2015-10-15

    The amygdala is a key structure in serotonergic emotion-processing circuits. In healthy volunteers, acute administration of the serotonin 1A/2A/2C receptor agonist psilocybin reduces neural responses to negative stimuli and induces mood changes toward positive states. However, it is little-known whether psilocybin reduces amygdala reactivity to negative stimuli and whether any change in amygdala reactivity is related to mood change. This study assessed the effects of acute administration of the hallucinogen psilocybin (.16 mg/kg) versus placebo on amygdala reactivity to negative stimuli in 25 healthy volunteers using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Mood changes were assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A double-blind, randomized, cross-over design was used with volunteers counterbalanced to receive psilocybin and placebo in two separate sessions at least 14 days apart. Amygdala reactivity to negative and neutral stimuli was lower after psilocybin administration than after placebo administration. The psilocybin-induced attenuation of right amygdala reactivity in response to negative stimuli was related to the psilocybin-induced increase in positive mood state. These results demonstrate that acute treatment with psilocybin decreased amygdala reactivity during emotion processing and that this was associated with an increase of positive mood in healthy volunteers. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of amygdala hyperactivity and negative mood states in patients with major depression. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Effect of a dry boldo extract on oro-cecal intestinal transit in healthy volunteers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotteland, M; Espinoza, J; Cassels, B; Speisky, H

    1995-08-01

    Boldo (Peumus boldus Molina) is a widely used medicinal plant. However, its physiological effects are not well known. Recent studies in animals showed that certain components of boldo relax smooth muscle and prolong intestinal transit. To assess the effects of a dry boldo extract on oro cecal transit time in normal humans. Twelve volunteers received 2.5 g of a dry boldo extract or a placebo (glucose) during two successive periods of four days. On the fourth day, 20 g of lactulose were administered and breath hydrogen was collected every 15 min. Oro cecal transit time was defined as the time in which breath hydrogen increased by 20 ppm over the fasting level. Oro cecal transit time was larger after dry boldo extract administration, compared to placebo (112.5 +/- 15.4 and 87 +/- 11.8 min respectively, paired t p < 0.05). Dry boldo extract prolongs oro cecal transit time, a possible explanation for its medicinal use.

  4. No Evidence for Statin-induced Proteinuria in Healthy Volunteers as Assessed by Proteomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Verhulst

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical studies of statins (class of drugs lowering plasma cholesterol levels, transient low-molecular-weight proteinuria was observed. The causes of statin-induced proteinuria in the patient background of those studies (cardiovascular and kidney disease are multifactorial and, therefore, a matter of debate. In light of this, it seemed interesting to investigate the effect of statins on the urinary protein concentration and proteome in healthy volunteers. Six healthy volunteers were randomly treated with rosuvastatin (40 mg/day or pravastatin (80 mg/day in a double-blinded cross-over study. Total urinary protein concentration and the concentration of albumin/retinol-binding protein were analysed, after which the urinary proteome was investigated. From the results described in this study, it was concluded that statins do not induce major changes in the urinary protein concentration/proteome. High variability in the baseline urinary proteome/proteins among volunteers, however, made it very difficult to find subtle (possibly isolated to individuals effects of statins.

  5. Effects of clear liquids on gastric volume and pH in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevde, K; Trivedi, N; Gross, M

    1991-04-01

    The effects of clear liquids on gastric volume and pH were examined in 30 healthy ASA physical status I volunteers. After overnight fasting, a Salem-sump nasogastric tube was inserted and gastric contents were removed for measurement of volume and pH. Gastric contents were then reinserted through the nasogastric tube into the stomach. The volunteers were randomly divided into three groups: group 1 (n = 10) received 240 mL water, group 2 (n = 10) received 240 mL coffee, and group 3 (n = 10) received 240 mL pulp-free orange juice. All liquids were administered orally. Gastric contents were then again aspirated, measured for volume and pH, and reinserted through the nasogastric tube every half hour until gastric volume was less than 25 mL. All volunteers had gastric volumes less than 25 mL with a slight decrease in pH within 2 h of orally taking one of the three 240-mL liquids. These data suggest that if patients have ingested a moderate amount of clear liquids it is safe to conduct general anesthesia after a 2-h fast in healthy surgical patients.

  6. Reference values for cardiopulmonary exercise testing in healthy volunteers: the SHIP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, B; Schäper, C; Ittermann, T; Spielhagen, T; Dörr, M; Völzke, H; Opitz, C F; Ewert, R; Gläser, S

    2009-02-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is a widely applied clinical procedure. The aim of the present study was to acquire a comprehensive set of reference values for cardiopulmonary responses to exercise and to evaluate possible associations with sex, age and body mass index (BMI). A standardised progressive incremental exercise protocol on a cycle ergometer was applied to 1,708 volunteers of a cross-sectional epidemiologic survey, called "Study of Health in Pomerania". Individuals with cardiopulmonary disorders, or echocardiographic or lung function pathologies, were excluded. The influence of potential confounding factors, such as smoking, taking beta-blockers, hypertension, diastolic dysfunction, BMI and physical activity, were analysed for their influencing power. Reference values of CPET parameters were determined by regression analyses. Of the volunteers, 542 current smokers and obese individuals were excluded for not being representative of a healthy population. The final sample size was 534 (253 males), with age 25-80 yrs. The current study provides a representative set of reference values for CPET parameters based on age and weight. Sex and age have a significant influence on exercise parameters. While addressing the problem of a selection bias, the current study provides the first comprehensive set of reference values obtained in a large number of healthy volunteers within a population-based survey.

  7. Initial placement and secondary displacement of a new suture-method catheter for sciatic nerve block in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, T S; Rothe, C; Steen-Hansen, C

    2017-01-01

    We performed a randomised double-blind pilot study in 16 healthy volunteers to investigate the success rate for placing a new suture-method catheter for sciatic nerve block. A catheter was inserted into both legs of volunteers and each was randomly allocated to receive 15 ml lidocaine 2% through...

  8. Effect of Needling at CV-12 (Zhongwan on Blood Glucose Levels in Healthy Volunteers: A Pilot Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriloy Mohanty

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The result of this study suggests that although 20 minutes of needling at CV-12 without stimulation produced a mild reduction in RBG levels in healthy volunteers, it did not produce a statistically significant result.

  9. New Combined Parameter of Liver and Splenic Stiffness as Determined by Elastography in Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassym, Laura; Nounou, Mohammed A.; Zhumadilova, Zauresh; Dajani, Asad I.; Barkibayeva, Nurgul; Myssayev, Ayan; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Abuhammour, Adnan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of chronic liver disease (CLD) leading to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension had witnessed dramatic changes after the introduction of noninvasive figure accessible tools over the past few years. Imaging techniques that are based on evaluation of the liver stiffness was particularly useful in this respect. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) emerged as an interesting figure tool with reliable repute and high precision. Aims: To evaluate liver stiffness measurement (LSM) and splenic stiffness measurement (SSM) in healthy volunteers as concluded by the ARFI technique and to out a numeric calculated ratio that may reflect their correlation in the otherwise healthy liver. Patients and Methods: A ratio (splenic stiffness/liver stiffness in kPa) was determined in 207 consenting healthy subjects and was investigated with respect to age, gender, ethnic origin, body mass index (BMI), liver and spleen sizes healthy volunteers, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), platelet count (PLT), APRI, and FIB-4 scores. Results: Data from this work led to computing an index of 4.72 (3.42–7.33) in healthy persons on an average. Females had a higher index than males 6.37 vs 4.92, P=0.002. There was not any significant difference of the ratio in different age groups; ethnic origins; any correlation between SSM/LSM ratio and BMI; liver and spleen sizes; or ALT, AST, PLT, APRI, and FIB-4 scores. Conclusions: A quantifiable numeric relationship between splenic and liver stiffness in the healthy subjects could be computed to a parameter expressed as SSM/LSM ratio. We believe that this ratio can be a useful reference tool for further researches in CLD. PMID:27488328

  10. Effects of Blueberry and Cranberry Juice Consumption on the Plasma Antioxidant Capacity of Healthy Female Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen(Vægter), Christian Bjerggaard; Kyle, J; Jenkinson, AM

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether consumption of 500 ml of blueberry juice or cranberry juice by healthy female subjects increased plasma phenolic content and antioxidant capacity. DESIGN: Latin square arrangement to eliminate ordering effects. After an overnight fast, nine volunteers consumed 500 ml...... of blueberry juice, cranberry juice or a sucrose solution (control); each volunteer participated on three occasions one week apart, consuming one of the beverages each time. Blood samples were obtained by venipuncture at intervals up to four hours after consumption of the juices. Urine samples were also...... obtained four hours after consuming the juice. RESULTS: Consumption of cranberry juice resulted in a significant increase in the ability of plasma to reduce potassium nitrosodisulphonate and Fe(III)-2,4, 6-Tri(2-pyridyl)-s-triazine, these measures of antioxidant capacity attaining a maximum after 60...

  11. Lower limb ischaemia and reperfusion injury in healthy volunteers measured by oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halladin, N. L.; Busch, Sarah Victoria Ekeløf; Alamili, M.;

    2015-01-01

    antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-6, IL-10, TNF-receptor (TNF-R)I, TNF-RII and YKL-40. RESULTS: We found no significant increase in MDA in the muscle biopsies after reperfusion. Plasma levels of oxidative and pro- and anti-inflammatory parameters showed no significant differences between baseline and after reperfusion...... at any sampling time. CONCLUSION: Twenty minutes of lower limb ischaemia does not result in an ischaemia-reperfusion injury in healthy volunteers, measurable by oxidative and pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers in muscle biopsies and in the systemic circulation....... these interfering factors of surgery is, therefore, useful to test the potential of antioxidant and cytokine-modulatory treatments.The aim of this study was to characterize a human ischaemia-reperfusion model with respect to oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten male volunteers were...

  12. Bioequivalence studies of two brands of meloxicam tablets in healthy Pakistani volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Syed Muhammad Farid; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris; Hassan, Fouzia; Rehman, Inam-Ur

    2009-04-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters of two oral formulations of meloxicam tablets were compared in a randomized, single oral dose; two treatments cross over design in 12 healthy male volunteers belonging to Pakistan under fasting conditions. After an overnight fast, the volunteers received 30 mg meloxicam and the blood samples were collected up to 96 hours and drug concentrations were determined by a validated HPLC method. Various pharmacokinetic parameters were determined from the plasma concentration-time curves of both formulations. The 90% confidence intervals obtained by analysis of variance were 87-94% for C(max) and 88-97% for AUC(0-t), that fell well within the acceptance range of 80-125%. Also, no significant difference (a=0.05, Wilcoxon Signed rank test) were detected between T(max) of both formulations. The two formulations were well tolerated and no adverse effect was reported during the study.

  13. Age dependent white matter lesions and brain volume changes in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, P; Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    The brain of 142 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 80 years were investigated using MR imaging. The number and size of the white matter hyperintensity lesions (WMHL) in the cerebral hemispheres were determined. Furthermore, the volume of the cerebral hemispheres and of the lateral ventricles...... was measured. An almost linear increase in the number of volunteers with WMHL was seen with aging for males and females. With aging a significant decrease in the volume of the cerebral hemispheres was found for males, and a significant increase in the volume of the lateral ventricles was seen for both males...... and females. Our results suggest that with aging central atrophy increases more (relatively) than cortical atrophy. No correlation was found between the decreasing volume of the cerebral hemispheres and the increasing number and size of WMHL, nor between the increasing volume of the lateral ventricles...

  14. The effect of 8 days of strict bed rest on the incretin effect in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Harder-Lauridsen, Nina Majlund; Benatti, Fabiana Braga

    2016-01-01

    Bed rest and physical inactivity are the consequences of hospital admission for many patients. Physical inactivity induces changes in glucose metabolism, but its effect on the incretin effect, which is reduced in, e.g., Type 2 diabetes, is unknown. To investigate how 8 days of strict bed rest...... affects the incretin effect, 10 healthy nonobese male volunteers underwent 8 days of strict bed rest. Before and after the intervention, all volunteers underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) followed by an intravenous glucose infusion (IVGI) on the following day to mimic the blood glucose profile...... difference between the area under the curve for the insulin response during the OGTT and that of the corresponding IVGI, respectively. Concentrations of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and GIP measured during the OGTT were higher after the bed rest intervention (all P

  15. The effect of gluten on intestinal fermentation, gastric and gallbladder emptying in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Michele; Carnevale Maffè, Gabriella; Bergonzi, Manuela; Mengoli, Caterina; Formagnana, Pietro; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between gluten ingestion and gastrointestinal tract function is a matter of debate. We analysed the effect of gluten on gastric and gallbladder emptying and intestinal fermentation in healthy volunteers. Ultrasound measurement of gastric and gallbladder emptying after both gluten-containing and gluten-free meals was performed in 18 volunteers (8 women, age 25.0±2.5 years; BMI 22±1.9). Breath hydrogen excretion after a gluten-containing meal, a gluten-free meal and a gluten-free meal with added gluten powder was measured in 16 volunteers (10 women, age 25.2±2.7 years; BMI 22±1.8). The severity of symptoms was monitored. Gluten presence in the meals was not recognised. Gastric emptying time was 81.6±13.8min after gluten-containing and 73.9±21.6min after gluten-free meals (p=0.11). Percentage ejection fraction after gluten-containing meals was 60±9% and 60.6±6% after gluten-free meals (p=0.68). Peak and cumulative hydrogen excretion were significantly higher after gluten-containing than after gluten-free meals (peak: 12.5±7.3 vs 6.5±5.1 parts-per-million, pgluten powder to the gluten-free meal did not modify fermentation. Symptoms were mild and not different after the meals. In healthy volunteers, gluten may induce gastrointestinal alterations. Further studies are needed to clarify which patients could benefit from dietary modification. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam in healthy Japanese and Caucasian volunteers following intravenous administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toublanc, Nathalie; Okagaki, Takuya; Boyce, Malcolm; Chan, Robert; Mugitani, Ayumi; Watanabe, Shikiko; Yamamoto, Katsumi; Yoshida, Katsumi; Andreas, Jens-Otto

    2015-12-01

    The intravenous (iv) formulation of levetiracetam has been available in clinical practice worldwide for several years, but not in Japan. Two open-label studies were conducted: Study A evaluated the bioequivalence of iv and oral tablet formulations in healthy Japanese volunteers; and Study B subsequently compared the pharmacokinetics of iv levetiracetam in healthy Japanese and Caucasian volunteers. Study A had a randomised, two-way crossover design; a single 1,500 mg levetiracetam dose was administered as a 15-min iv infusion and as 3 × 500 mg oral tablets to Japanese volunteers. In Study B, 1,500 mg levetiracetam was administered as single and repeated 15-min iv infusions to Japanese and Caucasian volunteers. Overall, 26/27 volunteers completed Study A and 32/32 (16 Japanese; 16 Caucasian) completed Study B. In Study A, the point estimate and 90 % confidence interval (CI) for the geometric least squares mean (LSM) ratio (iv vs oral) were fully included within the acceptance range for bioequivalence (0.85-1.25) for the area under plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to last quantifiable observation (AUClast 0.97 [0.95, 0.99]), but not for the maximum plasma concentration (C max 1.64 [1.47, 1.83]). In Study B, after a single iv infusion, the point estimates (90 % CI) for the geometric LSM ratio (Japanese vs Caucasian) for body weight-normalised C max and AUClast were 1.21 (1.07, 1.36) and 0.97 (0.90, 1.04), respectively. Corresponding values after repeated iv infusions were C max,ss 1.01 (0.91, 1.12) and AUCτ,ss 0.89 (0.83, 0.96). Levetiracetam was well tolerated in both studies. Study A did not demonstrate the bioequivalence of single doses of levetiracetam 1,500 mg administered as an iv infusion and as oral tablets in healthy Japanese adults. Study B, however, showed that pharmacokinetic profiles were generally similar between Japanese and Caucasian adults after single and repeated iv infusions of levetiracetam 1,500 mg.

  17. A Single Consumption of High Amounts of the Brazil Nuts Improves Lipid Profile of Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Colpo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study investigates the effects of Brazil nut ingestion on serum lipid profile in healthy volunteers. Methods. Ten healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. Each subject was tested 4 times in a randomized crossover in relation to the ingestion of different serving sizes of the Brazil nut: 0, 5, 20, or 50 g. At each treatment point, peripheral blood was drawn before and at 1, 3, 6, 9, 24, and 48 hours and 5 and 30 days. Blood samples were tested for total cholesterol, high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c and LDL-c, resp., triglycerides, selenium, aspartate and alanine aminotransferases, albumin, total protein, alkaline phosphatase, gamma GT, urea, creatinine, and C-reactive protein. Results. A significant increase of the plasma selenium levels was observed at 6 hours within the groups receiving the nuts. Serum LDL-c was significantly lower, whereas HDL-c was significantly higher 9 hours after the ingestion of 20 or 50 g of nuts. The biochemical parameters of liver and kidney function were not modified by ingestion of nuts. Conclusions. This study shows that the ingestion of a single serving of Brazil nut can acutely improve the serum lipid profile of healthy volunteers.

  18. Paracetamol sharpens reflection and spatial memory: a double-blind randomized controlled study in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Gisèle; Macian, Nicolas; Dubray, Claude; Pereira, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol) mechanism for analgesic and antipyretic outcomes has been largely addressed, but APAP action on cognitive function has not been studied in humans. Animal studies have suggested an improved cognitive performance but the link with analgesic and antipyretic modes of action is incomplete. This study aims at exploring cognitive tests in healthy volunteers in the context of antinociception and temperature regulation. A double-blind randomized controlled study (NCT01390467) was carried out from May 30, 2011 to July 12, 2011. Methods Forty healthy volunteers were included and analyzed. Nociceptive thresholds, core temperature (body temperature), and a battery of cognitive tests were recorded before and after oral APAP (2 g) or placebo: Information sampling task for predecisional processing, Stockings of Cambridge for spatial memory, reaction time, delayed matching of sample, and pattern recognition memory tests. Analysis of variance for repeated measures adapted to crossover design was performed and a two-tailed type I error was fixed at 5%. Results APAP improved information sampling task (diminution of the number of errors, latency to open boxes, and increased number of opened boxes; all P<0.05). Spatial planning and working memory initial thinking time were decreased (P=0.04). All other tests were not modified by APAP. APAP had an antinociceptive effect (P<0.01) and body temperature did not change. Conclusion This study shows for the first time that APAP sharpens decision making and planning strategy in healthy volunteers and that cognitive performance and antinociception are independent of APAP effect on thermogenesis. We suggest that cognitive performance mirrors the analgesic rather than thermic cascade of events, with possibly a central role for serotonergic and cannabinoid systems that need to be explored further in the context of pain and cognition. PMID:27980393

  19. Effects of dexamethasone coadministered with oseltamivir on the pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyungho; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Oh, Jaeseong; Lee, SeungHwan; Cho, Joo-Youn; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Choi, Tai Kiu; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Lim, Kyoung Soo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Oseltamivir is widely used in the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza A and B viral infections. It is ingested as an oral prodrug that is rapidly metabolized by carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) to its active form, oseltamivir carboxylate. Dexamethasone is also used in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, a severe complication of influenza; however, its influence on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of oseltamivir is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of coadministering oseltamivir and dexamethasone on the PK of oseltamivir in healthy volunteers. Methods An open-label, two-period, one-sequence, multiple-dose study was conducted in 19 healthy male volunteers. Oseltamivir (75 mg) was orally administered on Day 1 and Day 8, and dexamethasone (1.5 mg) was administered once daily from Day 3 to Day 8. Serial blood and urine samples were collected for PK analysis of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate on Day 1 and Day 8. Oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate concentrations in plasma and urine were determined using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results Area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate decreased after dexamethasone treatment for 6 days. The geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval) of the metabolic ratio (oseltamivir carboxylate AUC0–48h/oseltamivir AUC0–48h) was 0.92 (0.87–0.97). The amount of unchanged oseltamivir excreted in urine increased by 14% after dexamethasone treatments. Conclusion Coadministration of dexamethasone with oseltamivir slightly decreased systemic exposure to oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate in healthy volunteers. This result suggests that CES1 is inhibited by dexamethasone in humans. However, coadministration of oseltamivir and dexamethasone did not appear to have a clinically relevant effect on the PK of oseltamivir; based on these results, dexamethasone can be coadministered with oseltamivir. PMID

  20. Lower limb ischaemia and reperfusion injury in healthy volunteers measured by oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halladin, N. L.; Busch, Sarah Victoria Ekeløf; Alamili, M.

    2015-01-01

    exposed to 20 minutes of lower limb ischaemia. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken at baseline and 5, 15, 30, 60 and 90 minutes after tourniquet release and analysed for malondialdehyde (MDA), ascorbic acid, dehydroascorbic acid, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1 receptor...... at any sampling time. CONCLUSION: Twenty minutes of lower limb ischaemia does not result in an ischaemia-reperfusion injury in healthy volunteers, measurable by oxidative and pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers in muscle biopsies and in the systemic circulation....

  1. Impact of endoscopy-based research on quality of life in healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander; Link; Gerhard; Treiber; Brigitte; Peters; Thomas; Wex; Peter; Malfertheiner

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the impact of an endoscopy-based long-term study on the quality of life in healthy volunteers(HV).METHODS:Ten HV were included into a long-term prospective endoscopy-based placebo-controlled trial with 15 endoscopic examinations per person in 5 different drug phases.Participants completed short form-36(SF-36) and visual analog scale-based questionnaires(VAS) for different abdominal symptoms at days 0,7 and 14 of each drug phase.Analyses wereperformed according to short-and long-term changes and...

  2. The influence of protein containing meals on the pharmacokinetics of levodopa in healthy volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, D. R.; Higginson, I; MACKLIN, B. S.; Renwick, A G; Waller, D G; George, C F

    1991-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of levodopa and paracetamol after single oral doses have been investigated in eight healthy young volunteers in the fasted state and following isocaloric meals containing either 10.5 g or 30.5 g of protein. 2. The initial peak and maximum plasma drug concentrations and the times at which these occurred were not affected by food. 3. The mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) for paracetamol following an overnight fast did not differ significantly from...

  3. The effect of intravenous PACAP38 on cerebral hemodynamics in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Steffen; Sitarz, John Thomas; Petersen, Kenneth Ahrend

    2007-01-01

    cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is not well understood. We here present the first study of the effect of PACAP38 on cerebral hemodynamics in humans. PACAP (10 pmol kg(-1) min(-1)) or placebo (0.9% saline) was infused for 20 min into 12 healthy young volunteers in a cross over, double blind study. r.......9+/-22.4% (Pvolunteers. The marked increase in heart rate and the reduction in rCBF caused by decreased P(et)CO(2) are important dose-limiting factors to consider in future clinical studies....

  4. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Multiple-Dose Intravenous Nemonoxacin in Healthy Chinese Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiao-jie; Zhang, Jing; Guo, Bei-ning; Zhang, Ying-yuan; Yu, Ji-cheng; Cao, Guo-ying; Chen, Yuan-cheng; Zhu, De-mei; Ye, Xin-yu; Wu, Ju-Fang; Shi, Yao-guo; Chang,Li-Wen; Chang, Yu-Ting; Tsai, Cheng-yuan

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles of nemonoxacin in healthy Chinese volunteers following multiple-dose intravenous infusion once daily for 10 consecutive days. The study was composed of two stages. In the open-label stage, 500 mg or 750 mg of nemonoxacin (n = 12 each) was administered at an infusion rate of 5.56 mg/min. In the second stage, with a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, 500, 650, or 750 mg of nemonoxacin (n = 16 in each co...

  5. Relative bioavailability of carbocysteine from three dosage forms, investigated in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, J

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bioavailability of a new tablet formulation of carbocysteine relative against two other oral carbocysteine containing dosage forms, viz. a syrup and capsules. Plasma levels and urine concentrations of carbocysteine were monitored, following oral administration of all three dosage forms to healthy human volunteers, by direct derivatization of carbocysteine using dabsylchloride and subsequent high performance liquid chromatography. There was no difference in bioavailability of carbocysteine from these dosage forms as expressed by the respective areas under the plasma concentration-time curves and total amounts of unchanged carbocysteine excreted in urine.

  6. Minimal variation in anti-A and -B titers among healthy volunteers over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprogøe, Ulrik; Yazer, Mark; Rasmussen, Mads Hvidkjær

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using potentially out-of-group blood components, like low titer A plasma and O whole blood, in the resuscitation of trauma patients is becoming increasingly popular. However, very little is known whether the donors’ anti-A and/or -B titers change over time and whether repeated titer...... measurements on the same donor are required to ensure that each donation produces a low titer product. METHODS: The anti-A and/or -B titers were measured on 56 healthy adult volunteers (47 blood donors; 9 blood center personnel) every three months for 12 consecutive months using an automated solid phase...

  7. Neural correlates of anxiety in healthy volunteers: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Wood, Jacqueline N; De Simone, Veronica; Grafman, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown that the amygdala, temporal, and prefrontal cortices play a key role in the expression of anxiety. The correlation between gray matter volume of these structures and behavioral anxiety measures was not previously investigated in healthy volunteers. The authors used voxel-based morphometry to assess the relationship between brain regional volume and anxiety. The authors found an inverse correlation between anxiety measures and cortical volume in regions of the limbic system and prefrontal cortex implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. The authors suggest that volumetric variability of these regions may have a correlation with the development of an anxious personality trait.

  8. Effects of isomalt consumption on gastrointestinal and metabolic parameters in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostner, A; Schäffer, V; Theis, S; Menzel, T; Lührs, H; Melcher, R; Schauber, J; Kudlich, T; Dusel, G; Dorbath, D; Kozianowski, G; Scheppach, W

    2005-10-01

    The polyol isomalt (Palatinit) is a well established sugar replacer. The impact of regular isomalt consumption on metabolism and parameters of gut function in nineteen healthy volunteers was examined in a randomised, double-blind, cross-over trial with two 4-week test periods. Volunteers received 30 g isomalt or 30 g sucrose daily as part of a controlled diet. In addition to clinical standard diagnostics, biomarkers and parameters currently discussed as risk factors for CHD, diabetes or obesity were analysed. Urine and stool Ca and phosphate excretions were measured. In addition, mean transit time, defecation frequency, stool consistency and weight were determined. Consumption of test products was affirmed by the urinary excretion of mannitol. Blood lipids were comparable in both phases, especially in volunteers with hyperlipidaemia, apart from lower apo A-1 (P=0.03) for all subjects. Remnant-like particles, oxidised LDL, NEFA, fructosamine and leptin were comparable and not influenced by isomalt. Ca and phosphate homeostasis was not affected. Stool frequency was moderately increased in the isomalt phase (P=0.006) without changes in stool consistency and stool water. This suggests that isomalt is well tolerated and that consumption of isomalt does not impair metabolic function or induce hypercalciuria. In addition, the study data indicate that isomalt could be useful in improving bowel function.

  9. Effect of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) on coagulation and anticoagulation systems in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Hossein; Javan, Atefeh Ordoei; Khajedaluee, Mohammad; Shahroodian, Masood; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-04-01

    Saffron showed some effects on blood coagulation and platelet aggregation in in vitro and in vivo studies. In a clinical trial with a limited number volunteers, saffron tablets influenced on bleeding time. In this study, the effect of saffron on plasma level of fibrinogen, factor VII (as coagulant agent), C and S protein (as anti-coagulant agent), PT and PTT in a larger sample size was evaluated. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study consisting of 1 week treatment with 200 mg and 400 mg saffron tablets. Sixty healthy volunteers (age range 20-50 years) were selected for the study. The volunteers were divided into three groups of 20 each. Group 1 received placebo; Groups 2 and 3 received 200 mg and 400 mg saffron tablets, respectively, for 7 days (1 tablet per day). Before and after 7 days treatment and also 1 month after that, blood samples were taken. The plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, C and S protein, PT and PTT were evaluated. Statistical analysis showed no difference between groups for any of evaluated factors. This study rejected any effect of saffron with dose of 200 and 400 mg for 1 week on coagulant and anticoagulant system.

  10. Effect of probenecid on pharmacokinetics and tolerability of olmesartan in healthy chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun-Yan; Qiu, Yu; Jiang, Yun; Luo, Chen-Hui; Lin, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Jing; Yang, Nong

    2014-12-01

    Olmesartan is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist and is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of arterial hypertension. Probenecid is a well-established hypouricemic agent for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of coadministration of probenecid on the pharmacokinetic parameters and tolerability of olmesartan in healthy volunteers. In a randomized, open-label, 2-way crossover study, 12 volunteers received 2 oral treatments (olmesartan alone or olmesartan plus probenecid) separated by 4 days. Blood samples were obtained for a 48-hour pharmacokinetic evaluation after drug administration. Tolerability was assessed by monitoring vital signs and laboratory tests before and after administration of the study drug. Pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated in 6 male and 6 female healthy volunteers (mean age, 22 [range, 20-25] years]; weight, 56.0 [range, 51.0-60.0] kg). Probenecid coadministration increased olmesartan Css-av, AUC0→∞, and AUC0-48 by 40%, 50%, and 50%, respectively (P = 0.018, 0.000, 0.000, respectively), but there was no statistical significance for Tmax, t1/2, Css-max, and Css-min between olmesartan plus probenecid and olmesartan alone (P = 0.697, 0.053, 0.521, and 0.734, respectively). No serious adverse event (AE) was reported during the study. The proportion of volunteers with AEs in the olmesartan plus probenecid period (5 of 12 [42%]) was higher than that in the olmesartan-alone period (1 of 12 [8%]). All of the AEs during the olmesartan plus probenecid period were abnormal routine urine test results. The AE in olmesartan-alone period was dizziness. All AEs were classified as mild and considered to be at least possibly related to treatment. All volunteers recovered from the AEs by 2 weeks after the end of the study. Probenecid increases the exposure speed of olmesartan by increasing the AUC0-48, AUC0→∞, and Css-av. The combined treatment of olmesartan medoxomil with probenecid

  11. Establishing a normal reference range for thromboelastography in North Indian healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arulselvi Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thromboelastography (TEG is relatively recent assay to analyze the coagulation state of a blood sample, providing a continuous visualization of physical changes occurring during blood coagulation. There is a paucity of published literature on assessment of coagulation status using TEG in Indian population. Aim: The primary aim of the following study is to establish normal reference values for TEG in North Indian healthy volunteers and secondary aim is to compare them with conventional plasma-based routine coagulation tests and the manufacturers reference range. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 healthy volunteers comprised of 100 males and 100 females of age groups between 20 and 50 years, were enrolled over a period of 1 year, i.e., 2011-2012. Thromboelastometry (TEM was performed on TEM-A automated thromboelastometer (Framar Biomedica, Rome, Italy, using whole blood non-additive (360 µl. TEG parameters analyzed were r-time, k-time, α-angle, maximal amplitude (MA. Prothrombin time (PT, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT and platelet count was performed for all volunteers. The 95% reference range was calculated as (mean-1.96 standard deviation [SD] to (mean + 1.96 SD. Results: Our reference values for 95% of 200 volunteers were r-time: 1.8-14.2 min, k-time: 0.7-7.3 min, α-angle: 27.3-72.3° and MA: 32.1-87.9 mm. Maximum clot strength was higher in women compared with men, however statistically insignificant. Overall 14.5% (29/200 of the volunteers had at least one abnormal parameter while 74% (149/200 had deranged TEG values using the manufacturer′s reference range. Statistically significant variation was seen in r-time for 84.8% (P < 0.001, for k-time, in 87.1% (P < 0.001, for α-angle in 83.7% (P < 0.001 and for MA in 84% (P < 0.001, between the manufacturer and our reference range. Conclusion: The efficacy of classical coagulation test has been well-established; on the contrary TEG is a fairly recent assay and

  12. Pharmacokinetics of artesunate alone and in combination with sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine in healthy Sudanese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Kamal M; Awad, Abdelmoneim I; Elamin, Sakina B

    2014-06-01

    Artesunate (AS) in combination with sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) is the first-line therapy for management of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Sudan. The objective of this study was to assess the potential impact of SP on the pharmacokinetics of AS and its active metabolite, dihydroartemisinin (DHA), in healthy adults. A single-dose, randomized, open-label, crossover study design with a washout period of three weeks was performed with 16 volunteers. After oral administration of AS alone or in combination with SP, Tmax values of AS and DHA were significantly prolonged in the combination group (P 0.05). The t1/2 values of AS and DHA were significantly higher in females than in males (P < 0.05). The present findings suggest that co-administration of SP with AS has no clinically relevant impact on the pharmacokinetics of AS or DHA in healthy persons.

  13. Prograf five milligrams versus Tacrolimus medis in healthy volunteers: a bioequivalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, M; Rizk, S; Boujbel, L; Bellahirich, W; Baassoumi, D; Attia, M; Matha, V

    2013-01-01

    For FDA approval, bioequivalence of a generic version of Tacrolimus must be demonstrated in a randomized, two-treatments, two-periods, two-sequences, single-dose crossover study in healthy adult volunteers. Currently there are at least 3 differents generic equivalent for Tacrolimus, that are approved by the EMA and the FDA, with a USA market share of nearly 50%. However, the market share of generic immunosuppressive drugs in the Middle East region is still very low due to the reluctance of the physician to accept Tacrolimus generics, considered to be a narrow therapeutic window drug, that are approved using the standard bioequivalence criteria of 80% to 125%. Herein we present a bioequivalence study of a new Tacrolimus generic, Tacrolimus Medis 5 mg developed by Medis Tunisia batch number 12G3003 compared with Prograf® 5 mg batch number 7202 manufactured by Astellas Toyama Co., Ltd. Japan and HIKMA Pharmaceuticals, Amman-Jordan in healthy adult volunteers using the 90%-111% criteria recommended for drugs with narrow therapeutic window. The study was, balanced, randomized, two-treatments, two-periods, two-sequences, single dose, crossover, comparative oral bioavailability study in healthy adult human volunteers. The study was carried out in accordance with the Basic Principles defined in the U.S. 21 CFR Part 312.20, the principles enunciated in the Declaration of Helsinki (World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki). Thirty six non-smoking healthy, as determined by medical history, volunteers, 18 years and older, were included. Following randomization using a computer software (pharma solution) the volunteers were given a single oral dose of 5 milligrams following a 12 hour fast with a wash out period of 7 days. Pharmacokinetics profile with blood levels at: 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 24 hours were performed following each dose. Tacrolimus plasma level was determined using an HPLC validated method (Transmedical For Life S.A.R.L. Beirut

  14. Caffeine and taurine containing energy drink increases left ventricular contractility in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, Jonas M; Kuetting, Daniel L; Luetkens, Julian A; Naehle, Claas P; Dabir, Darius; Homsi, Rami; Nadal, Jennifer; Schild, Hans H; Thomas, Daniel K

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the impact of a caffeine and taurine containing energy drink (ED) on myocardial contractility in healthy volunteers using cardiac MR and cardiac MR based strain analysis. 32 healthy volunteers (mean age 28 years) were investigated before and 1 h after consumption of a caffeine and taurine containing ED. For assessment of global cardiac functional parameters balanced SSFP-Cine imaging was performed, whereas CSPAMM tagging was used to evaluate global and regional myocardial strain. In addition, ten randomly chosen subjects were investigated once more using a caffeine only protocol to further evaluate the effect of caffeine solely. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded throughout all studies. ED consumption led to a significant increase in peak systolic strain (PSS) and peak systolic strain rate (PSSR) 1 h after consumption (PSS: w/o ED -22.8 ± 2.1%; w ED -24.3 ± 2.4%, P = caffeine only group. In contrast, global left ventricular function was unchanged (P = 0.2076). No significant changes of vital parameters and diastolic filling pattern were detected 1 h after ED consumption. Consumption of a caffeine and taurine containing ED results in a subtle, but significant increase of myocardial contractility 1 h after consumption.

  15. Ascending-dose study of noribogaine in healthy volunteers: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety, and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glue, Paul; Lockhart, Michelle; Lam, Fred; Hung, Noelyn; Hung, Cheung-Tak; Friedhoff, Lawrence

    2015-02-01

    Noribogaine is the active metabolite of the naturally occurring psychoactive substance ibogaine, and may help suppress withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent subjects. The objectives of this Phase I study were to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles of noribogaine. In this ascending single-dose, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study in 36 healthy drug-free male volunteers, 4 cohorts (n = 9) received oral doses of 3, 10, 30, or 60 mg or matching placebo, with intensive safety and pharmacokinetic assessments out to 216 hours, along with pharmacodynamic assessments sensitive to the effects of mu-opioid agonists. Noribogaine was rapidly absorbed, with peak concentrations occurring 2-3 hours after oral dosing, and showed dose-linear increases of area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and Cmax between 3 and 60 mg. The drug was slowly eliminated, with mean half-life estimates of 28-49 hours across dose groups. Apparent volume of distribution was high (mean 1417-3086 L across dose groups). No safety or tolerability issues were identified in any cohort. No mu-opioid agonist pharmacodynamic effects were noted in pupillometry or cold-pressor testing. Single oral doses of noribogaine 3-60 mg were safe and well tolerated in healthy volunteers.

  16. Interplay between the acute inflammatory response and heart rate variability in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kox, Matthijs; Ramakers, Bart P; Pompe, Jan C; van der Hoeven, Johannes G; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W; Pickkers, Peter

    2011-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system and the inflammatory response are intimately linked. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a widely used method to assess cardiac autonomic nervous system activity, and changes in HRV indices may correlate with inflammatory markers. Here, we investigated whether baseline HRV predicts the acute inflammatory response to endotoxin. Second, we investigated whether the magnitude of the inflammatory response correlated with HRV alterations. Forty healthy volunteers received a single intravenous bolus of 2 ng/kg endotoxin (LPS, derived from Escherichia coli O:113). Of these, 12 healthy volunteers were administered LPS again 2 weeks later. Heart rate variability was determined at baseline (just before LPS administration) and hourly thereafter until 8 h after LPS administration. Plasma cytokine levels were determined at various time points. Baseline HRV indices did not correlate with the magnitude of the LPS-induced inflammatory response. Despite large alterations in HRV after LPS administration, the extent of the inflammatory response did not correlate with the magnitude of HRV changes. In subjects who were administered LPS twice, inflammatory cytokines were markedly attenuated after the second LPS administration, whereas LPS-induced HRV alterations were similar. Heart rate variability indices do not predict the acute inflammatory response in a standardized model of systemic inflammation. Although the acute inflammatory response results in HRV changes, no correlations with inflammatory cytokines were observed. Therefore, the magnitude of endotoxemia-related HRV changes does not reflect the extent of the inflammatory response.

  17. The effect of food on the bioavailability of oral gemifloxacin in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A; Bygate, E; Clark, D; Lewis, A; Pay, V

    2000-09-01

    The effect of food on the bioavailability of gemifloxacin was investigated at two doses (320 and 640 mg) in healthy male and female volunteers. A total of 21 subjects entered the open label, four-period crossover study. Each subject received single oral doses of 320 and 640 mg in the fasted state and after a high fat meal, on separate dosing occasions in a randomised fashion. There was on average, a 3% (95% CI (0.88, 1.07)) and 12% (95% CI (0.79, 0.97)) reduction in AUC and a 12% (95% CI (0.76, 1.02) and 14% (0.75, 1.00) reduction in Cmax after the 320- and 640-mg doses, respectively. The results indicate a minor effect of food on bioavailability of gemifloxacin (320 and 640 mg). Such a reduction in systemic exposure would be considered to be not clinically relevant. Tmax data were inconclusive but indicated a possible slight delay in Tmax of, on average, 0.75 and 0.21 h after the 320- and 640-mg doses, respectively. Delays of this magnitude in reaching maximum concentrations are unlikely to be of clinical importance for an antibiotic drug. Both 320 and 640 mg gemifloxacin were well tolerated in fed and fasted states by healthy volunteers. It can be concluded therefore, that gemifloxacin can be taken with and without food.

  18. Comparison between two models of experimental anxiety in healthy volunteers and panic disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, F G; Silva, M; Del Ben, C M; Zuardi, A W; Hetem, L A; Guimarães, F S

    2001-12-01

    To further investigate the role of serotonin (5-HT) in anxiety, two tests were used in human subjects. The first was the conditioning of skin conductance response (CSCR) that associates a tone to a loud noise. The second was simulated public speaking (SPS), which is believed to represent unconditioned fear. In healthy volunteers the 5-HT(2A) receptor blocker and 5-HT reuptake inhibitor nefazodone reduced subjective anxiety and the number of spontaneous fluctuations of skin conductance during CSCR, but enhanced anxiety induced by SPS. Opposite effects had been reported with the 5-HT releasing and uptake-inhibiting agent D-fenfluramine. Panic patients behaved like controls in the CSCR. However, they had a higher level of baseline anxiety and were insensitive to SPS. This profile resembles the reported effect of the non-selective 5-HT receptor blocker metergoline in healthy volunteers. Therefore, panic patients seem to process unconditioned fear abnormally, which may be due to lack of 5-HT inhibition in brain structures commanding flight from proximal danger stimuli.

  19. Effects of unoprostone on diurnal variation of intraocular pressure in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoue K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Kenji Inoue1, Kei Noguchi1, Masato Wakakura1, Goji Tomita21Inouye Eye Hospital, Tokyo; 22nd Department of Ophthalmology, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: To prospectively evaluate the diurnal variation of intraocular pressure (IOP during unoprostone treatment in 13 healthy volunteers.Method: IOP was measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry by the same observer every 3 hours from 9 am to 9 am the next morning. Unoprostone was then instilled at 9 am and 9 pm daily for 1 month. After 1 month, IOP was measured again with unoprostone instilled at 9 am and 9 pm during IOP measurement. We then compared the average daily IOP before and after the treatment (paired t-test.Results: After 1 month of treatment, the average IOP decreased at every time point but one (12 pm, 3 pm, 6 pm, 9 pm, 12 am, 3 am, and 9 am, but not at 6 am. There were no adverse reactions and none of the subjects discontinued unoprostone.Conclusion: The hypotensive effects of unoprostone persist throughout the day, but this study suggests that the effects may be weaker at nighttime and early in the morning.Keywords: unoprostone, intraocular pressure, diurnal variation, healthy volunteer

  20. Comparative bioavailability of two oral formulations of bromazepam in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, F E; Schere, D; Batafarano, N; Casas, F; Glancszpigel, R

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of two bromazepam (CAS 1812-30-2) formulations in 24 healthy volunteers. An open, randomised clinical trial designed as two-period crossover with 14-day washout between doses was employed. Plasma samples for assessments of their bromazepam concentration by HPLC-UV were obtained over 96 h after administration. No adverse effect was reported for any of the formulations administered. The following pharmacokinetics parameters were calculated: AUC(0-96 h), AUCinf, Cmax, Tmax, Ke and T1/2. The 90% confidence intervals (CI) for the mean test/reference individual ratios were 81-109 for AUC and 84-116 for Cmax. Since the 90% CI for both, AUC and Cmax ratios were within the 80-125% interval proposed by the Food and Drug Administration, it is concluded that the new bromazepam slow-release formulation is therapeutic equivalent to the conventional formulation for both, the extent and the rate of absorption after single dose administration in healthy volunteers.

  1. The cerebellum link to neuroticism: a volumetric MRI association study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, Dennis J L G; Koolschijn, P Cédric M P; Peper, Jiska S; Crone, Eveline A

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests an association between reduced cerebellar volumes and symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with mood disorders. However, whether a smaller volume in itself reflects a neuroanatomical correlate for increased susceptibility to develop mood disorders remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between cerebellar volume and neurotic personality traits in a non-clinical subject sample. 3T Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired, and trait depression and anxiety scales of the revised NEO personality inventory were assessed in thirty-eight healthy right-handed volunteers. Results showed that cerebellar volume corrected for total brain volume was inversely associated with depressive and anxiety-related personality traits. Cerebellar gray and white matter contributed equally to the observed associations. Our findings extend earlier clinical observations by showing that cerebellar volume covaries with neurotic personality traits in healthy volunteers. The results may point towards a possible role of the cerebellum in the vulnerability to experience negative affect. In conclusion, cerebellar volumes may constitute a clinico-neuroanatomical correlate for the development of depression- and anxiety-related symptoms.

  2. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis and pharmacokinetics of terazosin in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, B C; Yang, C Q; Rhee, J E; Suh, O K; Shin, W G

    2001-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of terazosin in 1 ml of human plasma was developed using prazosin as an internal standard. The plasma sample was extracted with dichloromethane and ethylether and a 100-microl aliquot was injected onto the reversed-phase column. The mobile phase, 0.02 M sodium phosphate buffer:acetonitrile:tetrahydrofuran = 720:220:60 (v/v/v), was run at a flow rate of 0.8 ml/min and the column effluent was monitored using a florescence detector set at 370 and 250 nm for the emission and excitation wave numbers, respectively. The retention times for terazosin and prazosin were approximately 6.4 and 9.8 min, respectively, and the coefficients of variation of terazosin were generally low, below 6.4%. The present HPLC method was successful for the pharmacokinetic study of terazosin in healthy volunteers. Following oral administration of terazosin, 2 mg, to 20 healthy male volunteers, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to time infinity was 421 +/- 71.8 ng h/ml and terminal half-life was 9.83 +/- 1.29 h.

  3. The cerebellum link to neuroticism: a volumetric MRI association study in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J L G Schutter

    Full Text Available Prior research suggests an association between reduced cerebellar volumes and symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with mood disorders. However, whether a smaller volume in itself reflects a neuroanatomical correlate for increased susceptibility to develop mood disorders remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between cerebellar volume and neurotic personality traits in a non-clinical subject sample. 3T Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired, and trait depression and anxiety scales of the revised NEO personality inventory were assessed in thirty-eight healthy right-handed volunteers. Results showed that cerebellar volume corrected for total brain volume was inversely associated with depressive and anxiety-related personality traits. Cerebellar gray and white matter contributed equally to the observed associations. Our findings extend earlier clinical observations by showing that cerebellar volume covaries with neurotic personality traits in healthy volunteers. The results may point towards a possible role of the cerebellum in the vulnerability to experience negative affect. In conclusion, cerebellar volumes may constitute a clinico-neuroanatomical correlate for the development of depression- and anxiety-related symptoms.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of ivermectin applied topically by whole-body bathing method in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Atsushi; Hirota, Takashi; Tashiro, Mari; Noguchi, Wataru; Kawano, Yayoi; Hanawa, Takehisa; Kigure, Akira; Anata, Taichi; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Yuasa, Nae; Koshino, Machi; Shiraishi, Yumi; Yuzawa, Kaoru; Akagi, Keita; Yoshimasu, Takashi; Makigami, Kuniko; Komoda, Masayo

    2016-10-15

    As a novel administration method of ivermectin (IVM) for scabies treatment, we proposed a "whole-body bathing method (WBBM)". In this method, the patients would bathe themselves in a bathing fluid containing IVM at an effective concentration. Previously, we demonstrated that WBBM could deliver IVM to the skin but not to the plasma in rats. In the present study, to assess the clinical validity of the method an arm bathing examination (first trial) and a whole-body bathing examination (second trial) were conducted in healthy volunteers. In both the first and second trials, after bathing in fluid containing IVM, the exposure in the stratum corneum was higher compared with that after taking IVM p.o. as reported previously. IVM was not detected in plasma at any sampling point after the whole-body bathing in the second trial. Furthermore no serious adverse events were found. These results in both trials suggest that WBBM can deliver IVM to the human stratum corneum without systemic exposure or serious adverse effects in healthy volunteers, and at concentrations that would be adequate for scabies treatment.

  5. Distribution and respiratory activity of mycobacteria in household water system of healthy volunteers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, Tomoaki; Izumi, Yoko; Nakamoto, Sayuri; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The primary infectious source of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), which are known as opportunistic pathogens, appears to be environmental exposure, and it is important to reduce the frequency of exposure from environmental sources for preventing NTM infections. In order to achieve this, the distribution and respiratory activity of NTM in the environments must be clarified. In this study, we determined the abundance of mycobacteria and respiratory active mycobacteria in the household water system of healthy volunteers using quantitative PCR and a fluorescent staining method, because household water has been considered as one of the possible infectious sources. We chose healthy volunteer households in order to lessen the effect of possible residential contamination from an infected patient. We evaluated whether each sampling site (bathroom drain, kitchen drain, bath heater pipe and showerhead) have the potential to be the sources of NTM infections. Our results indicated that drains in the bathroom and kitchen sink are the niche for Mycobacterium spp. and M. avium cells were only detected in the bathtub inlet. Both physicochemical and biologic selective pressures may affect the preferred habitat of Mycobacterium spp. Regional differences also appear to exist as demonstrated by the presence (US) or absence (Japan) of Mycobacterium spp. on showerheads. Understanding of the country specific human activities and water usage will help to elucidate the infectious source and route of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease.

  6. Bioequivalence study of 400 and 100 mg imatinib film-coated tablets in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowicz, Andrzej; Mikołajczak, Przemysław L; Wierzbicka, Marzena; Boguradzki, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the bioavailability of a generic product of 100 mg and 400 mg imatinib film-coated tablets (test) as compared to that of a branded product (reference) at the same strength to determine bioequivalence. The secondary objective of the study was to evaluate tolerability of both products. An open-label, randomized, crossover, two-period, single-dose, comparative study was conducted in 43 (Imatynib-Biofarm 100 mg film-coated tablet) and in 42 (Imatynib-Biofarm 400 mg film-coated tablet), brand name Imatenil, Caucasian healthy volunteers in fed conditions. A single oral dose administration of the test or reference product was separated by 14-day washout period. The imatinib and its metabolite N-desmethyl imatinib concentrations were determined using a validated LC MS/MS method. The results of the single-dose study in healthy volunteers indicated that the film-coated tablets of Imatynib-Biofarm 100 mg and 400 mg film-coated tablets manufactured by Biofarm Sp. z o.o. (test products) are bioequivalent to those of Glivec 100 mg and 400 mg film-coated tablets manufactured by Novartis Pharma GmbH (reference products). Both products in the two doses of imatinib were well tolerated.

  7. Distribution and respiratory activity of mycobacteria in household water system of healthy volunteers in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Ichijo

    Full Text Available The primary infectious source of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM, which are known as opportunistic pathogens, appears to be environmental exposure, and it is important to reduce the frequency of exposure from environmental sources for preventing NTM infections. In order to achieve this, the distribution and respiratory activity of NTM in the environments must be clarified. In this study, we determined the abundance of mycobacteria and respiratory active mycobacteria in the household water system of healthy volunteers using quantitative PCR and a fluorescent staining method, because household water has been considered as one of the possible infectious sources. We chose healthy volunteer households in order to lessen the effect of possible residential contamination from an infected patient. We evaluated whether each sampling site (bathroom drain, kitchen drain, bath heater pipe and showerhead have the potential to be the sources of NTM infections. Our results indicated that drains in the bathroom and kitchen sink are the niche for Mycobacterium spp. and M. avium cells were only detected in the bathtub inlet. Both physicochemical and biologic selective pressures may affect the preferred habitat of Mycobacterium spp. Regional differences also appear to exist as demonstrated by the presence (US or absence (Japan of Mycobacterium spp. on showerheads. Understanding of the country specific human activities and water usage will help to elucidate the infectious source and route of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease.

  8. Recognition of facial emotion and perceived parental bonding styles in healthy volunteers and personality disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Leilei; Chai, Hao; Chen, Wanzhen; Yu, Rongrong; He, Wei; Jiang, Zhengyan; Yu, Shaohua; Li, Huichun; Wang, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Early parental bonding experiences play a role in emotion recognition and expression in later adulthood, and patients with personality disorder frequently experience inappropriate parental bonding styles, therefore the aim of the present study was to explore whether parental bonding style is correlated with recognition of facial emotion in personality disorder patients. The Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) and the Matsumoto and Ekman Japanese and Caucasian Facial Expressions of Emotion (JACFEE) photo set tests were carried out in 289 participants. Patients scored lower on parental Care but higher on parental Freedom Control and Autonomy Denial subscales, and they displayed less accuracy when recognizing contempt, disgust and happiness than the healthy volunteers. In healthy volunteers, maternal Autonomy Denial significantly predicted accuracy when recognizing fear, and maternal Care predicted the accuracy of recognizing sadness. In patients, paternal Care negatively predicted the accuracy of recognizing anger, paternal Freedom Control predicted the perceived intensity of contempt, maternal Care predicted the accuracy of recognizing sadness, and the intensity of disgust. Parenting bonding styles have an impact on the decoding process and sensitivity when recognizing facial emotions, especially in personality disorder patients. © 2011 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2011 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  9. Effects of Danshen Ethanol Extract on the Pharmacokinetics of Fexofenadine in Healthy Volunteers

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    Furong Qiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of multidose administration of danshen ethanol extract on fexofenadine pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers. A sequential, open-label, two-period pharmacokinetic interaction design was used. 12 healthy male volunteers received a single oral dose of fexofenadine (60 mg followed by danshen ethanol extract (1 g orally, three times a day for 10 days, after which they received 1 g of the danshen extract with fexofenadine (60 mg on the last day. The plasma concentrations of fexofenadine was measured by LC-MS/MS. After 10 days of the danshen extract administration, the mean AUC and Cmax⁡ of the fexofenadine was decreased by 37.2% and 27.4% compared with the control, respectively. The mean clearance of fexofenadine was increased by 104.9%. The in vitro study showed that tanshinone IIA and cryptotanshinone could induce MDR1 mRNA. This study showed that multidose administration of danshen ethanol extract could increase oral clearance of fexofenadine. The increased oral clearance of fexofenadine is attributable to induction of intestinal P-glycoprotein.

  10. [18F]FETO for adrenocortical PET imaging: a pilot study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Rendl, Gundula; Schuetz, Matthias; Mien, Leonhard Key; Ettlinger, Dagmar E; Dudczak, Robert; Kletter, Kurt; Karanikas, Georgios

    2006-06-01

    Functional imaging of the adrenal cortex by means of PET may play an important clinical role. Recently, we presented the synthesis and first evaluation of a novel 11beta-hydroxylase inhibitor, [(18)F]FETO, in rats displaying high tracer accumulation in the adrenals. In this study, we aimed to investigate for the first time the potency of [(18)F]FETO as a PET tracer for the adrenal cortex in humans. An average preparation yielded 1-2 GBq of [(18)F]FETO ready to use. Ten healthy volunteers aged 24-57 years (five male and five female) were included in the study. After i.v. administration of 365 MBq [(18)F]FETO (246-391 MBq), dynamic images were acquired in 2D standard mode in 14 frames over 45 min. Afterwards, whole-body scanning was performed. In addition to visual interpretation, semi-quantitative analysis using standardised uptake values (SUVs) was conducted. [(18)F]FETO distribution was similar in all scanned volunteers. Visually, pronounced accumulation of [(18)F]FETO was found in the adrenals, whereas moderate uptake was observed-at least in some of the subjects-for liver, renal calices, gallbladder, stomach walls and pancreas. Kidney and bowels showed only faint uptake. Median SUVs for the right and left adrenal glands were 15.6 (10.0-28.6) and 15.7 (10.3-35.9), respectively. The reference tissue (liver) displayed a median SUV of 2.5 (2.2-4.6). [(18)F]FETO is a valuable tracer for adrenocortical PET imaging, combining the longer half-life of( 18)F with a high 11beta-hydroxylase selectivity. In accordance with our findings in rats, FETO PET revealed very high accumulation in the adrenal glands in healthy volunteers.

  11. Molecular characterization of skin microbiota between cancer cachexia patients and healthy volunteers.

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    Li, Wei; Han, Lei; Yu, Pengbo; Ma, Chaofeng; Wu, Xiaokang; Moore, John E; Xu, Jiru

    2014-04-01

    Systemic inflammation contributes to both the development of cancer and of cachexia. The microenvironment of bacterial habitats might be changed during the progression of cancer cachexia. The aim of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively compare the composition of the skin microbiota between cancer cachexia patients and healthy volunteers. Cutaneous bacteria were swabbed at the axillary fossa of 70 cancer cachexia patients and 34 healthy individuals from China. Nested-PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) with primers specifically targeting V3 region and quantitative PCR (qPCR) for total bacteria, Corynebacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Staphylococcus epidermidis were performed on all samples. Barcoded 454 pyrosequencing of the V3-V4 regions was performed on 30 randomly selected samples. By comparing diversity and richness indices, we found that the skin microbiome of cachectic cancer patients is less diverse than that of healthy participants, though these differences were not significant. The main microbes that reside on human skin were divided into four phyla: Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Staphylococcus spp. and Corynebacterium spp. were the dominant bacteria at the genus level. Significantly fewer Corynebacterium spp. had been observed in cachexia patients compared to healthy subjects. These results suggest that the presence of cancer and cachexia alters human skin bacterial communities. Understanding the changes in microbiota during cancer cachexia may lead to new insights into the syndrome.

  12. Safety and pharmacokinetics of a solid lipid curcumin particle formulation in osteosarcoma patients and healthy volunteers.

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    Gota, Vikram S; Maru, Girish B; Soni, Tejal G; Gandhi, Tejal R; Kochar, Nitin; Agarwal, Manish G

    2010-02-24

    Curcumin is the lipid-soluble antioxidant compound obtained from the rhizome of Curcuma longa Linn, also known as turmeric. Curcumin targets multiple chemotherapeutic and inflammatory pathways and has demonstrated safety and tolerability in humans, supporting its potential as a therapeutic agent; however, the clinical literature lacks conclusive evidence supporting its use as a therapeutic agent due to its low bioavailability in humans. The purpose of this study was to quantify plasma levels of free curcumin after dosing of a solid lipid curcumin particle (SLCP) formulation versus unformulated curcumin in healthy volunteers and to determine its tolerability and dose-plasma concentration relationship in late-stage osteosarcoma patients. Doses of 2, 3, and 4 g of SLCP were evaluated in 11 patients with osteosarcoma. Plasma curcumin levels were measured using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. The limit of detection of the assay was 1 ng/mL of curcumin. In healthy subjects, the mean peak concentration of curcumin achieved from dosing 650 mg of SLCP was 22.43 ng/mL, whereas plasma curcumin from dosing an equal quantity of unformulated 95% curcuminoids extract was not detected. In both healthy individuals and osteosarcoma patients, high interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics and nonlinear dose dependency was observed, suggesting potentially complex absorption kinetics. Overall, good tolerability was noted in both healthy and osteosarcoma groups.

  13. Noninvasive estimation of tissue edema in healthy volunteers and in patients suffering from heart failure

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    Gurfinkel, Yuri I.; Mikhailov, Valery M.; Kudutkina, Marina I.

    2004-06-01

    Capillaries play a critical role in cardiovascular function as the point of exchange of nutrients and waste products between tissues and circulation. A common problem for healthy volunteers examined during isolation, and for the patients suffering from heart failure is a quantitative estimation tissue oedema. Until now, objective assessment body fluids retention in tissues did not exist. Optical imaging of living capillaries is a challenging and medically important scientific problem. Goal of the investigation was to study dynamic of microcriculation parameters including tissue oedema in healthy volunteers during extended isolation and relative hypokinesia as a model of mission to the International Space Station. The other aim was to study dynamic of microcirculation parameters including tissue oedema in patients suffering from heart failure under treatment. Healthy volunteers and patients. We studied four healthy male subjects at the age of 41, 37, 40, and 48 before the experiment (June 1999), and during the 240-d isolation period starting from July3, 1999. Unique hermetic chambers with artidicial environmental parameters allowed performing this study with maximum similarity to real conditions in the International Space Station (ISS). With the regularity of 3 times a week at the same time, each subject recorded three video episodes with the total length of one-minute using the optical computerized capillaroscope for noninvasive measurement of the capillary diameters sizes, capillary blood velocity as well as the size of the perivascular zone. All this parameters of microcirculation determined during three weeks in 15 patients (10 male, 5 female, aged 62,2+/-8,8) suffering from heart failure under Furosemid 40 mg 2 times a week, as diuretic. Results. About 1500 episodes recorded on laser disks and analyzed during this experiment. Every subject had wave-like variations of capillary blood velocity within the minute, week, and month ranges. It was found that the

  14. Pharmacokinetics of diltiazem hydrochloride delay-onset sustained-release pellet capsules in healthy volunteers

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    Xi-Qing Yan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics (PK of ordinary tablets and sustained release capsules of diltiazem hydrochloride in human clinical trials had been studied. The PK of diltiazem hydrochloride delay-onset sustained-release pellet capsules, a new dosage form, has not been reported, although it is very important to clinical use. In this paper, we investigated the PK of diltiazem hydrochloride delay-onset sustained-release pellet capsules and the food influence in Chinese healthy volunteers. The PK parameters indicated that the diltiazem hydrochloride delay-onset sustained-release pellet capsules appeared marked characteristics of delayed and controlled release. An opened-label, randomized and parallel clinical trial was conducted in 36 Chinese healthy volunteers with single oral dose (90 mg, 180 mg or 270 mg and a multiple oral dose (90 mg d-1×6 d administration. The effect of food on the PK of one single oral dose (360 mg was investigated in 24 healthy Chinese volunteers. Plasma diltiazem concentration was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed by PKSolver (Ver 2.0. All clinical studies were conducted in the Clinical Pharmacological Center (No. JDX1999064 of Xiangya Hospital Affiliated Central South University, China. The PK parameters suggested that the new formulation had marked characteristics of delayed and controlled release of diltiazem, and food intake did not alter significantly diltiazem pharmacokinetic parameters.Embora a farmacocinética (PK do cloridrato de diltiazem nas formas de comprimidos de liberação imediata e cápsulas de liberação modificada em ensaios clínicos já tenha sido relatada, a pesquisa da PK do cloridrato de diltiazem na forma de cápsulas com peletes de liberação retardada e sustentada ainda é muito importante. Neste trabalho, propusemos avaliar a farmacocinética do cloridrato de diltiazem administrado através desta nova forma

  15. Diversity of Duodenal and Rectal Microbiota in Biopsy Tissues and Luminal Contents in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gangping; Yang, Min; Zhou, Kan; Zhang, Lei; Tian, Lugao; Lv, Shangze; Jin, Yu; Qian, Wei; Xiong, Hanhua; Lin, Rong; Fu, Yu; Hou, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    The diverse microbial communities that colonize distinct segments of the gastrointestinal tract are intimately related to aspects of physiology and the pathology of human health. However, most recent studies have focused on the rectal or fecal microbiota, and the microbial signature of the duodenum is poorly studied. In this study, we compared the microbiota in duodenal and rectal samples to illustrate the characteristic microbial signatures of the duodenum in healthy adults. Nine healthy volunteers donated biopsies and luminal contents from the duodenum and rectum. To determine the composition and diversity of the microbiota, 454- pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA was performed and multiple bioinformatics analyses were applied. The α-diversity and phylogenetic diversity of the microbiota in the duodenal samples were higher than those of the rectal samples. There was higher biodiversity among the microbiota isolated from rectal biopsies than feces. Proteobacteria were more highly represented in the duodenum than in the rectum, both in the biopsies and in the luminal contents from the healthy volunteers (38.7% versus 12.5%, 33.2% versus 5.0%, respectively). Acinetobacter and Prevotella were dominant in the duodenum, whereas Bacteroides and Prevotella were dominant in the rectum. Additionally, the percentage of OTUs shared in biopsy groups was far higher than in the luminal group (43.0% versus 26.8%) and a greater number of genera was shared among the biopsies than the luminal contents. Duodenal samples demonstrated greater biological diversity and possessed a unique microbial signature compared with the rectum. The mucosa-associated microbiota was more relatively conserved than luminal samples.

  16. Effects of dexamethasone coadministered with oseltamivir on the pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir in healthy volunteers

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    Jang K

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Kyungho Jang,1,2,* Min-Kyoung Kim,3,4,* Jaeseong Oh,1 SeungHwan Lee,1 Joo-Youn Cho,1 Kyung-Sang Yu,1 Tai Kiu Choi,3 Sang-Hyuk Lee,3,4 Kyoung Soo Lim4 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, Seoul, 2Center for Clinical Pharmacology and Biomedical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, 3Department of Psychiatry, 4Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, CHA University School of Medicine and CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Oseltamivir is widely used in the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza A and B viral infections. It is ingested as an oral prodrug that is rapidly metabolized by carboxylesterase 1 (CES1 to its active form, oseltamivir carboxylate. Dexamethasone is also used in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, a severe complication of influenza; however, its influence on the pharmacokinetics (PK of oseltamivir is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of coadministering oseltamivir and dexamethasone on the PK of oseltamivir in healthy volunteers. Methods: An open-label, two-period, one-sequence, multiple-dose study was conducted in 19 healthy male volunteers. Oseltamivir (75 mg was orally administered on Day 1 and Day 8, and dexamethasone (1.5 mg was administered once daily from Day 3 to Day 8. Serial blood and urine samples were collected for PK analysis of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate on Day 1 and Day 8. Oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate concentrations in plasma and urine were determined using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate decreased after dexamethasone treatment for 6 days. The geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval of the metabolic ratio

  17. Bioavalaibility and pharmacokinetic comparison of two formulations of metformin 850 mg tablets in healthy Colombian volunteers

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    Gloria Holguín

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability of two formulations of metformin 850 mg tablets: Glucophage® from Merck Santè laboratories (reference product and Metformin from Winthrop Pharmaceuticals de Colombia SA (test product in healthy Colombian volunteers.Methods: A random, double blind, two-period, two-week wash out period, crossover study was performed in 24 healthy male and female volunteers for a single 850-mg dose of metformin tablets administrated with 240 ml of water after 12 hours of fasting. Once the drug was administrated, blood samples were collected before and within 24 hour, and plasma metformin concentration was determined by using a validated HPLC method. Pharmacokinetic parameters such as Cmax, AUC0-96h, AUC0-∞, and Tmax were determined. The formulations were considered bioequivalent if the logarithmic mean ratios of ln-transformed Cmax and AUC0-∞ values were within the equivalence range of 80%-125%.Results: ANOVA analysis of the ln-transformed Cmax and AUC0-∞ indicated that none of the effects examined (formulation, period, within and between-subjet variances and carry over was statistically significant. The mean (±SD of Cmax 1217.38 (± 251.72 ng/ml vs. 1305.25 (± 301.06 ng/ml, AUC0-96h 1363.49 (± 315.51 ng.h/ml vs. 1584.82 (± 368.75 ng.h/ml, AUC0-∞, 7155.75 (± 1440.74 ng.h/ml vs. 7777.08 (± 1896.49 ng.h/ml, and Tmax 2.57 (± 0.93 h vs. 2.22 (± 0.94 h were obtained with test and reference formulations, respectively. These pharmacokinetic parameters presented differences with the results from other published papers. The 90% confidence interval of the logarithmic ratio of AUC0-∞ and Cmax was within the range of 80-125%.Conclusions: In this study in healthy Colombian volunteers, a single 850-mg dose of metformin tablet test formulation met the criteria for bioequivalence to the reference formulation based on pharmacokinetic parameters AUC0-∞ and Cmax.

  18. Bioavalaibility and pharmacokinetic comparison of two formulations of metformin 850 mg tablets in healthy Colombian volunteers

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    Gloria Holguín

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available urpose: The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability of two formulations of metformin 850 mg tablets: Glucophage® from Merck Santè laboratories (reference product and Metformin from Winthrop Pharmaceuticals de Colombia SA (test product in healthy Colombian volunteers. Methods: A random, double blind, two-period, two-week wash out period, crossover study was performed in 24 healthy male and female volunteers for a single 850-mg dose of metformin tablets administrated with 240 ml of water after 12 hours of fasting. Once the drug was administrated, blood samples were collected before and within 24 hour, and plasma metformin concentration was determined by using a validated HPLC method. Pharmacokinetic parameters such as Cmax, AUC0-96h, AUC0-∞, and Tmax were determined. The formulations were considered bioequivalent if the logarithmic mean ratios of ln-transformed Cmax and AUC0-∞ values were within the equivalence range of 80%-125%. Results: ANOVA analysis of the ln-transformed Cmax and AUC0-∞ indicated that none of the effects examined (formulation, period, within and between-subjet variances and carry over was statistically significant. The mean (±SD of Cmax 1217.38 (± 251.72 ng/ml vs. 1305.25 (± 301.06 ng/ml, AUC0-96h 1363.49 (± 315.51 ng.h/ml vs. 1584.82 (± 368.75 ng.h/ml, AUC0-∞, 7155.75 (± 1440.74 ng.h/ml vs. 7777.08 (± 1896.49 ng.h/ml, and Tmax 2.57 (± 0.93 h vs. 2.22 (± 0.94 h were obtained with test and reference formulations, respectively. These pharmacokinetic parameters presented differences with the results from other published papers. The 90% confidence interval of the logarithmic ratio of AUC0-∞ and Cmax was within the range of 80-125%. Conclusions: In this study in healthy Colombian volunteers, a single 850-mg dose of metformin tablet test formulation met the criteria for bioequivalence to the reference formulation based on pharmacokinetic parameters AUC0-∞ and Cmax.

  19. Quantification of serotonin O-sulphate by LC-MS method in plasma of healthy volunteers.

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    Raimond eLozda

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that serotonin O-sulphate (5 -HT-SO4 could be quantified in human plasma using modern liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS method as well as develop and validate that method. First, a suitable LC-MS method for detection of 5-HT-SO4 in human plasma samples was developed and validated. Second, a Pilot phase involving four healthy volunteers was executed, where a basal plasma level of 5-HT-SO4 was measured for all subjects and for one after the intake of 100 mg of a 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP -containing food supplement used to promote serotonergic stimulation of the central nervous system. The basal level of 0.9 – 2.8 ng/mL of 5-HT-SO4 was observed. The changes of plasma 5HT-O-SO4 showed 1.2 ng/mL before and 22.6 ng/mL 1 h after stimulation. Finally, nine healthy volunteers were selected for the Study phase, where a basal plasma level of 5-HT-SO4 was measured before and after the intake of 5-HTP. One hour after stimulation, six study subjects showed a decrease in 5-HT-SO4 levels while three subjects showed an increase. The changes of plasma 5HT-O-SO4 from the Study phase showed an average 5-HT-SO4 level of 19.2 ng/mL before and 15.7 ng/mL 1 h after stimulation indicating ability of method to emphasise quantitative changes. This was the first study in which naturally occurring 5-HT-SO4 was detected in the samples of human plasma obtained from healthy volunteers. The method developed herein is specific to the measurement of 5-HT-SO4, sensitive enough to quantify intra-individual changes in the samples of plasma and opens up new possibilities to evaluate pathways of serotonin metabolism by minimally invasive methods. The discovery of novel biomarkers using such approaches is increasingly required to expedite development of mechanism-based therapeutics and patient stratification.

  20. Paracetamol sharpens reflection and spatial memory: a double-blind randomized controlled study in healthy volunteers

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    Pickering G

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gisèle Pickering,1–3 Nicolas Macian,1,2 Claude Dubray,1–3 Bruno Pereira4 1University Hospital, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Centre de Pharmacologie Clinique, 2Inserm, CIC 1405, UMR Neurodol 1107, 3Clermont Université, Laboratoire de Pharmacologie, Faculté de médecine, 4CHU de Clermont-Ferrand, Délégation Recherche Clinique Innovation, Clermont-Ferrand, France Background: Acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol mechanism for analgesic and antipyretic outcomes has been largely addressed, but APAP action on cognitive function has not been studied in humans. Animal studies have suggested an improved cognitive performance but the link with analgesic and antipyretic modes of action is incomplete. This study aims at exploring cognitive tests in healthy volunteers in the context of antinociception and temperature regulation. A double-blind randomized controlled study (NCT01390467 was carried out from May 30, 2011 to July 12, 2011. Methods: Forty healthy volunteers were included and analyzed. Nociceptive thresholds, core temperature (body temperature, and a battery of cognitive tests were recorded before and after oral APAP (2 g or placebo: Information sampling task for predecisional processing, Stockings of Cambridge for spatial memory, reaction time, delayed matching of sample, and pattern recognition memory tests. Analysis of variance for repeated measures adapted to crossover design was performed and a two-tailed type I error was fixed at 5%. Results: APAP improved information sampling task (diminution of the number of errors, latency to open boxes, and increased number of opened boxes; all P<0.05. Spatial planning and working memory initial thinking time were decreased (P=0.04. All other tests were not modified by APAP. APAP had an antinociceptive effect (P<0.01 and body temperature did not change. Conclusion: This study shows for the first time that APAP sharpens decision making and planning strategy in healthy volunteers and that cognitive performance

  1. Evaluation of the functional efficacy of an antioxidative probiotic in healthy volunteers

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    Hütt Pirje

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In persons without clinical symptom it is difficult to assess an impact of probiotics regarding its effect on health. We evaluated the functional efficacy of the probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum ME-3 in healthy volunteers by measuring the influence of two different formulations on intestinal lactoflora, fecal recovery of the probiotic strain and oxidative stress markers of blood and urine after 3 weeks consumption. Methods Two 3-week healthy volunteer trials were performed. Open placebo controlled (OPC study participants (n = 21 consumed either goat milk or by L. fermentum ME-3 fermented goat milk (daily dose 11.8 log CFU (Colony Forming Units. Double blind randomised placebo controlled (DBRP study participants (n = 24 received either capsules with L. fermentum ME-3 (daily of dose 9.2 CFU or placebo capsules. The faecal lactoflora composition, faecal ME-3 recovery, effect of the consumption on intestinal lactoflora, and oxidative stress markers of blood (total antioxidative activity; total antioxidative status and glutathione red-ox ratio was measured. Results ME-3 was well tolerated and a significant increase in total faecal lactobacilli yet no predominance of ME-3 was detected in all study groups. Faecal recovery of ME-3 was documented by molecular methods only in fermented milk group, however the significant improvement of blood TAA (Total Antioxidative Activity and TAS (Total Antioxidative Status indices was seen both in case of fermented goat milk and capsules", yet glutathione re-ox ratio values decreased only in case of fermented by ME-3 goat milk. Conclusion The functional efficacy of both consumed formulations of an antioxidative probiotic L. fermentum ME-3 is proved by the increase of the intestinal lactobacilli counts providing putative defence against enteric infections and by reduction of the oxidative stress indices of blood and urine of healthy volunteers. In non-diseased host the probiotic health claims can

  2. Buccal acetaminophen provides fast analgesia: two randomized clinical trials in healthy volunteers

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    Pickering G

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gisèle Pickering,1–3 Nicolas Macian,1 Frédéric Libert,2,4 J Michel Cardot,1 Séverine Coissard,1 Philippe Perovitch,5 Marc Maury,5 Claude Dubray1–3 1CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Centre de Pharmacologie Clinique, Clermont-Ferrand, France; 2Inserm, Clermont-Ferrand, France; 3Clermont Université, Laboratoire de Pharmacologie, Faculté de Médecine, Clermont-Ferrand, France; 4Laboratoire de Pharmacologie, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, France; 5Unither Pharamceuticals, Paris, France Background: Acetaminophen (APAP by oral or intravenous (iv routes is used for mild to moderate pain but may take time to be effective. When fast relief is required and/or oral or iv routes are not available because of the patient's condition, the transmucosal route may be an alternative. Methodology: A new transmucosal/buccal (b pharmaceutical form of APAP dissolved in 50% wt alcohol is compared with other routes of administration. Two consecutive randomized, crossover, double-blind clinical trials (CT1: NCT00982215 and CT2: NCT01206985 included 16 healthy volunteers. CT1 compared the pharmacology of 250 mg bAPAP with 1 g iv APAP. CT2 compared the pharmacodynamics of 125 mg bAPAP with 1 g iv and 125 mg sublingual (s APAP. Mechanical pain thresholds are recorded in response to mechanical stimuli applied on the forearm several times during 120 minutes. The objective is to compare the time of onset of antinociception and the antinociception (area under the curve between the routes of administration with analysis of variance (significance P<0.05. Results: bAPAP has a faster time of antinociception onset (15 minutes, P<0.01 and greater antinociception at 50 minutes (P<0.01, CT1 and 30 minutes (P<0.01, CT2 than ivAPAP and sAPAP. All routes are similar after 50 minutes. Conclusion: bAPAP has a faster antinociceptive action in healthy volunteers. This attractive alternative to other routes would be useful in situations where oral or iv routes are not available. This finding must now be

  3. Characterization of renal biomarkers for use in clinical trials: biomarker evaluation in healthy volunteers

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    Brott DA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available David A Brott,1 Scott H Adler,1 Ramin Arani,2 Susan C Lovick,3 Mark Pinches,4 Stephen T Furlong1 1Translational Patient Safety and Enabling Sciences, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, 2AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, DE, USA; 3AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, 4Global Safety Assessment, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Macclesfield, Cheshire, UK Background: Several preclinical urinary biomarkers have been qualified and accepted by the health authorities (US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency for detecting drug-induced kidney injury during preclinical toxicologic testing. Validated human assays for many of these biomarkers have become commercially available, and this study was designed to characterize some of the novel clinical renal biomarkers. The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical renal biomarkers in a typical Phase I healthy volunteer population to determine confidence intervals (pilot reference intervals, intersubject and intrasubject variability, effects of food intake, effect of sex, and vendor assay comparisons. Methods: Spot urine samples from 20 male and 19 female healthy volunteers collected on multiple days were analyzed using single analyte and multiplex assays. The following analytes were measured: α-1-microglobulin, β-2-microglobulin, calbindin, clusterin, connective tissue growth factor, creatinine, cystatin C, glutathione S-transferase-α, kidney injury marker-1, microalbumin, N-acetyl-β-(D glucosaminidase, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, osteopontin, Tamm-Horsfall urinary glycoprotein, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1, trefoil factor 3, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Results: Confidence intervals were determined from the single analyte and multiplex assays. Intersubject and intrasubject variability ranged from 38% to 299% and from 29% to 82% for biomarker concentration, and from 24% to 331% and from 10% to 67% for

  4. Placebo-controlled comparison of three dose-regimens of 5-hydroxytryptophan challenge test in healthy volunteers.

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    Gijsman, Harm J; van Gerven, Joop M A; de Kam, Marieke L; Schoemaker, Rik C; Pieters, Monique S M; Weemaes, Margo; de Rijk, Roel; van der Post, Jeroen; Cohen, Adam F

    2002-04-01

    Single-dose administration of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) is regularly used as a challenge test of the serotonergic system. The use of 5-HTP has been limited by an apparent small window between the occurrence of neuroendocrine endpoints and the occurrence of side effects. Therefore, many dosing strategies have been tried with and without concurrent administration of carbidopa, a peripheral inhibitor of the decarboxylation from 5-HTP to serotonin. The aim of the current study was to assess the relation between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 5-HTP. Twelve healthy male volunteers were included in a placebo-controlled, randomized, four-way crossover, double-blind, single-dose investigation of oral 5-HTP with or without coadministration of carbidopa. The four dose regimens were placebo, 5-HTP 100 mg, 5-HTP 200 mg, and 5-HTP 100 mg with coadministration of carbidopa 100 mg and 50 mg at 3 hours before and 3 hours after the administration of 5-HTP, respectively. The last regimen resulted in a doubling of the elimination half-life, an apparent clearance at least 14 times smaller, and a 15.4 times greater area under the curve compared with 5-HTP 100 mg without carbidopa. Furthermore, it was the only regimen to induce a significant change in cortisol and prolactin. It did not induce any change in subjective psychologic symptoms or cardiovascular parameters, but it was the only regimen to induce some nausea in three participants. The authors conclude that this regimen of 5-HTP 100 mg plus carbidopa is a relatively simple, effective, and tolerable challenge of the presynaptic serotonergic system. Further increase of the dose of 5-HTP might improve the size of the effect on endpoints as long as the tolerability remains good.

  5. Respiratory Effects of the Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Peptide and Opioid Receptor Agonist, Cebranopadol, in Healthy Human Volunteers.

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    Dahan, Albert; Boom, Merel; Sarton, Elise; Hay, Justin; Groeneveld, Geert Jan; Neukirchen, Meike; Bothmer, John; Aarts, Leon; Olofsen, Erik

    2017-04-01

    Cebranopadol is a novel strong analgesic that coactivates the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor and classical opioid receptors. There are indications that activation of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor is related to ceiling in respiratory depression. In this phase 1 clinical trial, we performed a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study to quantify cebranopadol's respiratory effects. Twelve healthy male volunteers received 600 μg oral cebranopadol as a single dose. The following main endpoints were obtained at regular time intervals for 10 to 11 h after drug intake: ventilation at an elevated clamped end-tidal pressure of carbon dioxide, pain threshold and tolerance to a transcutaneous electrical stimulus train, and plasma cebranopadol concentrations. The data were analyzed using sigmoid Emax (respiration) and power (antinociception) models. Cebranopadol displayed typical opioid-like effects including miosis, analgesia, and respiratory depression. The blood-effect-site equilibration half-life for respiratory depression and analgesia was 1.2 ± 0.4 h (median ± standard error of the estimate) and 8.1 ± 2.5 h, respectively. The effect-site concentration causing 50% respiratory depression was 62 ± 4 pg/ml; the effect-site concentration causing 25% increase in currents to obtain pain threshold and tolerance was 97 ± 29 pg/ml. The model estimate for minimum ventilation was greater than zero at 4.9 ± 0.7 l/min (95% CI, 3.5 to 6.6 l/min). At the dose tested, cebranopadol produced respiratory depression with an estimate for minimum ventilation greater than 0 l/min. This is a major advantage over full μ-opioid receptor agonists that will produce apnea at high concentrations. Further clinical studies are needed to assess whether such behavior persists at higher doses.

  6. Pharmacokinetic study of a new oral buffered acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) formulation in comparison with plain ASA in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, G; Garagiola, U; Gaspari, F

    1991-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized, crossover pharmacokinetic study was carried out to investigate the bioavailability of a new oral buffered 325 mg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) formulation (ASPIRINA 03) in comparison with a 325 mg plain tablet. Twelve healthy volunteers of both sexes, aged between 20 and 37 years, received buffered or plain ASA on two separate occasions with a wash-out interval of at least two weeks. ASA and salicylic acid (SA) plasma levels were determined by a chromatographic method. The results showed no difference between the area under concentration time curve (AUC0-infinity) ASA values of both formulations (p = 0.19), and buffered ASA relative bioavailability was 102.49% (= bioequivalence). A significant difference was found between the AUC0-30 min ASA values: 90.5 micrograms. min/ml with buffered and 67.7 micrograms. min/ml with the plain tablet (p less than 0.05). The buffered ASA time of maximum concentration was shorter (28 +/- 8 min) than the plain one (38 +/- 19 min, p less than 0.05). The plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters of SA were not significantly different after the administration of the two ASA formulations. The plain ASA tablet had a significantly lower (p less than 0.05) dissolution rate than buffered ASA tablet. Moreover, the buffered ASA tablet significantly (p less than 0.01) increased the pH by 0.5 units. In conclusion, the bioavailability of the new oral buffered ASA was equivalent to that of plain ASA, but the plasma concentration peak was reached in a shorter time.

  7. The effect of phentolamine on basal and pethidine-induced inhibition of gastric emptying in healthy volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Petring, O U

    1989-01-01

    1. The effect of phentolamine 5 mg i.v. on basal and pethidine-induced inhibition of gastric emptying of semisolid TC-99m labelled Chelex-100 resin/oatmeal was studied in ten healthy volunteers. 2. Each volunteer acted as his/her own control. 3. Basal gastric emptying remained unchanged after administration of phentolamine. 4. Administration of phentolamine reversed the pethidine-induced inhibition of gastric emptying.

  8. In vivo evaluation of limonene-based transdermal therapeutic system of nicorandil in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaiah, Y S R; Chandrasekhar, D V; Rama, B; Jayaram, B; Satyanarayana, V; Al-Saidan, S M

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) gel drug reservoir system prepared with 70:30 v/v ethanol-water solvent system containing 6% w/w of limonene was effective in promoting the in vitro transdermal delivery of nicorandil. The objective of the present study was to fabricate and evaluate a limonene-based transdermal therapeutic system (TTS) for its ability to provide the desired steady-state plasma concentration of nicorandil in human volunteers. The in vitro permeation of nicorandil from a limonene-based HPMC gel drug reservoir was studied across excised rat skin (control), EVA2825 membrane, adhesive-coated EVA2825 membrane and adhesive-coated EVA2825 membrane-excised rat skin composite to account for their effect on the desired flux of nicorandil. The flux of nicorandil from the limonene-based HMPC drug reservoir across EVA2825 membrane decreased to 215.8 +/- 9.7 microg/cm(2).h when compared to that obtained from control, indicating that EVA2825 was effective as a rate-controlling membrane. The further decrease in nicorandil flux across adhesive-coated EVA2825 membrane and adhesive-coated EVA2825 membrane-excised rat skin composite showed that the adhesive coat and skin also controlled the in vitro transdermal delivery. The limonene-based drug reservoir was sandwiched between adhesive-coated EVA2825-release liner composite and a backing membrane. The resultant sandwich was heat-sealed as circle-shaped patch (20 cm(2)), trimmed and subjected to in vivo evaluation in human volunteers against immediate-release tablets of nicorandil (reference formulation). The fabricated limonene-based TTS of nicorandil provided a steady-state plasma concentration of 21.3 ng/ml up to 24 h in healthy human volunteers. It was concluded that the limonene-based TTS of nicorandil provided the desired plasma concentration of the drug for the predetermined period of time with minimal fluctuations and improved bioavailability.

  9. Disposition kinetics of selenium in healthy volunteers following therapeutic shampoo treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noisel, Nolwenn; Bouchard, Michèle; Carrier, Gaétan

    2010-05-01

    This study was aimed at documenting the kinetic time courses of selenium (Se) in accessible biological matrices of volunteers following controlled applications of therapeutic shampoo containing Se, to better elucidate the mechanisms by which shampoo-Se accumulates in hair and hence estimate the contribution of this source to total Se body burden. Ten healthy volunteers were exposed to Se-shampoo three times a week over a month. Blood, hair and toenail concentrations along with daily urinary excretions were repeatedly measured over an 18-month period following the onset of application. Over the entire study period, blood concentrations of Se (range: 127-233μg/l) and daily urinary excretions (range: 11.9-150μg/d) remained within baseline range of the general population. Conversely, during shampoo application, mean Se concentrations in hair reached transitional levels of 89μg/g while, following cessation of treatment, a mono-exponential decrease was observed with a mean half-life of 4.5 weeks. Two of the volunteers also exhibited an increase in toenail concentrations of Se during the study period. Results show that Se-shampoo does not contribute significantly to total Se body burden, as assessed from blood and urine levels. Differences observed between blood and urine time courses as compared to hair profiles and the presence of Se on hair grown before treatment indicates an adsorption on hair; however, the gradual decrease in Se concentrations in successive centimeters of hair grown following the application period suggests a concomitant absorption from the scalp during treatment with subsequent excretion in hair.

  10. Impact of Surotomycin on the Gut Microbiota of Healthy Volunteers in a Phase 1 Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Dale, Suzanne E; Chesnel, Laurent; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea has been associated with disruption of the normal intestinal microbiota, particularly theBacteroides fragilisgroup andPrevotellaspecies. Surotomycin is a bactericidal cyclic lipopeptide in development for treatment ofClostridium difficile-associated diarrhea that has selective and potent activity againstC. difficileand other Gram-positive bacteria and a minimal impact on intestinal Gram-negative organisms. The impacts of ascending doses of surotomycin on major organism groups in the gut microbiota of healthy volunteers were evaluated during a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose phase 1 study. Thirty volunteers were randomized into 3 cohorts, using a 4:1 ratio, to receive 250 mg, 500 mg, or 1,000 mg of surotomycin, or placebo, twice daily for 14 days. Stool samples collected at baseline (days 0 and 1) and at the end of treatment (days 13 to 15) were cultured quantitatively. TheB. fragilisgroup, theBacteroides/Prevotellagroup, andEnterobacteriaceaewere also quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. Baseline and end-of-treatment stool samples showed 1- to 2-log10CFU/g reductions in total bacterial counts for most volunteers. Various decreases in clostridial,Lactobacillus-Bifidobacteriumgroup, and enterococcus-streptococcus group counts occurred while patients were receiving surotomycin, whereas the enterobacteria and theB. fragilisgroup persisted at the end of treatment. There was no change in enterococcus MICs of surotomycin, nor was vancomycin-resistantEnterococcusdetected after exposure. Surotomycin at doses of up to 1,000 mg twice daily had only modest disruptive effects on the gut microbiota. The potential sparing of the gut microbiota by surotomycin may decrease the risk of disease recurrence.

  11. Single dose bioequivalence study of two brands of olanzapine 10 mg tablets in Iranian healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri-Milani, P; Islambulchilar, Z; Ghanbarzadeh, S; Valizadeh, H

    2013-07-01

    This single dose, randomized, open label, 2-period and crossover study in healthy Iranian adult volunteers was conducted to compare the bioavailability of 2 branded formulations of olanzapine 10 mg tablets. 24 volunteers received one tablet of each olanzapine 10 mg formulation. Drugs were administered after a 12 h overnight fast in each of 2 treatment days which separated by a 2-week washout period. Serial blood samples were collected over a period of 72 h. Plasma was analyzed using a validated high performance liquid chromatography method with ultraviolet detection in the range of 2-24 ng/mL with a lower limit of quantitation of 1.25 ng/mL. A non-compartmental method was employed to determine the pharmacokinetic properties (Cmax, Tmax, AUC0-t, AUC0-∞ and T1/2) to test to bioequivalence. Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ were used to test the bioequivalence after log-transformation of plasma data. The mean (SD) Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ for the test formulation were 15.82 (3.15) ng/mL, 447.19 (100.64) ng.h/L and 570.75 (130.55) ng.h/L respectively. Corresponding values for the test formulation were 15.72 (4.25) ng/mL, 440.37 (98.75) ng.h/mL and 558.66 (129.57) ng.h/mL. For test formulation vs. the reference formulation, the 90% CIs of the least squares mean test/reference ratios of Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ were 97.6-110.0%, 96.4-109.4% and 97.3-109.2%. In these volunteers, based on the FDA regulatory definition, results from the pharmacokinetic analysis suggested that the test and reference formulations of olanzapine 10 mg tablets were bioequivalent.

  12. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of biomarker response to sunitinib in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindauer, A; Di Gion, P; Kanefendt, F; Tomalik-Scharte, D; Kinzig, M; Rodamer, M; Dodos, F; Sörgel, F; Fuhr, U; Jaehde, U

    2010-05-01

    A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) study of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib was conducted in 12 healthy volunteers using blood pressure and circulating biomarker levels as PD markers. Blood pressure was measured, and plasma concentration-time courses of sunitinib, its major metabolite SU12662, vascular endothelial growth factors VEGF-A and VEGF-C, and soluble VEGF receptor-2 (sVEGFR-2) were studied in healthy subjects receiving 50 mg of sunitinib orally for 3-5 consecutive days. Using NONMEM, PK/PD models were established that predicted changes (expressed as multiples relative to baseline values) in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, VEGF-A level, and sVEGFR-2 level, of 1.10, 1.18, 2.24, and 0.76, respectively, for a typical subject after 4 weeks of treatment with 50 mg/day. Simulated blood pressure-time courses compare excellently with published data in patients, whereas changes in circulating biomarkers were greater in patients than simulations suggest for healthy subjects. In conclusion, the tumor-independent pharmacological response to sunitinib could be described by PK/PD models, thereby facilitating model-based investigations with antiangiogenic drugs, using blood pressure and circulating proteins as biomarkers.

  13. Cervical spine segmental vertebral motion in healthy volunteers feigning restriction of neck flexion and extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Filadelfio; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Papathanasiou, Matthildi; Kapreli, Eleni; Bonelli, Aurelio; Sgambetterra, Sergio; Ferrari, Robert

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain comparative data concerning the percentage contribution of segmental cervical vertebral motion to the cervical range of motion (ROM) in healthy volunteers under two conditions: (1) normal, voluntary neck flexion and extension and (2) feigned restriction of neck flexion and extension. Each healthy subject's angular motion over forward cervical flexion and extension was measured first by X-ray analysis during normal, voluntary motion. Then the subjects were asked to pretend that they had a 50% restricted neck range due to pain or stiffness and thus to move in both flexion and extension only as far as about 50% of their normal range. A total of 26 healthy subjects (ten males and sixteen females, age 28.7+/-7.7 years) participated. The total angular motion from C2 to C7 was normal in the unrestricted condition and was significantly reduced in the feigned restriction condition (prange. A greater percentage contribution was made by C2-C3 and C3-C4 than under normal conditions (Prange (pcervical segments and less contribution to the angular rotation by the lowest cervical segment. Feigners of restricted neck range thus produce a pattern different from nonfeigning subjects.

  14. No pharmacokinetic interaction between lacosamide and valproic acid in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawello, Willi; Bonn, Rainer

    2012-11-01

    Two open-label, randomized, multiple-dose clinical studies evaluated the potential for pharmacokinetic interaction between the antiepileptic drugs lacosamide and valproic acid. The influence of lacosamide on valproic acid pharmacokinetics (trial A) and valproic acid on lacosamide pharmacokinetics (trial B) was investigated in 32 healthy male volunteers, 16 in each trial. Volunteers in trial A received valproic acid (300 mg bid) with randomization to either early or late addition of lacosamide (200 mg bid). Those in trial B received lacosamide (200 mg bid) with randomization to either early or late addition of valproic acid (300 mg bid). Area under the concentration-time curve during a 12-hour dosing interval at steady state (AUC(τ,ss)) and maximum steady-state plasma drug concentration (C(max,ss)) were measured for each drug alone and together and tested for equivalence. The point estimates (90% confidence intervals) for AUC(τ,ss) and C(max,ss) were 104% (99%-109%) and 101% (97%-107%), respectively, for valproic acid and 100% (98%-103%) and 101% (96%-107%), respectively, for lacosamide, which were within the generally accepted equivalence range of 80% to 125%. No changes in the rate or extent of absorption, terminal half-life, or time to maximum concentration were observed. These results suggest that lacosamide and valproic acid have no relevant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction.

  15. The effect of titrated fentanyl on suppressed cough reflex in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, H E; Shaw, G M; Brett, C N; Greenwood, F M; Huckabee, M L

    2016-05-01

    Cough suppression is part of the pharmacodynamic profile of opioids. We investigated the impact of clinical doses of fentanyl on suppressing the cough reflex. Thirteen volunteers received 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl in a divided administration protocol. Three minutes after each administration and at 10 min intervals during washout, suppressed cough reflex testing with nebulised citric acid was performed and compared with fentanyl effect-site concentration. Mean (SD) citric acid concentration provoking cough increased from 0.5 (0.28) mol.l(-1) at baseline to 1.2 (0.50) mol.l(-1) after 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl (p = 0.01). Mean (SD) fentanyl effect-site concentration after the final dose of fentanyl was 1.89 (0.05) ng.ml(-1) . A strong positive correlation was found between suppressed cough reflex thresholds and fentanyl effect-site concentrations during both fentanyl administration and washout phases of the study (r(2) = 0.79, p = 0.01). The mean (SD) length of time for return of suppressed cough response was 44.6 (18.8) min. Clinically relevant doses of fentanyl produced cough reflex suppression in healthy volunteers.

  16. Piroxicam immediate release formulations: A fasting randomized open-label crossover bioequivalence study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Sally A; El-Bedaiwy, Heba M

    2014-11-01

    Piroxicam is a NSAID with analgesic and antipyretic properties, used for the treatment of rheumatoid diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence of two brands of piroxicam capsules (20 mg) in 24 Egyptian volunteers. The in vivo study was established according to a single-center, randomized, single-dose, laboratory-blinded, 2-period, 2-sequence, crossover study with a washout period of 3 weeks. Under fasting conditions, 24 healthy male volunteers were randomly selected to receive a single oral dose of one capsule (20 mg) of either test or reference product. Plasma samples were obtained over a 144-hour interval and analyzed for piroxicam by HPLC with UV detection. The pharmacokinetic parameters Cmax , tmax , AUC0-t , AUC0-∞ , Vd /F, Cl/F, and t1/2 were determined from plasma concentration-time profiles. The 90% confidence intervals for the ratio of log transformed values of Cmax , AUC0-t , and AUC0-∞ of the two treatments were within the acceptable range (0.8-1.25) for bioequivalence. From PK perspectives, the two piroxicam formulations were considered bioequivalent, based on the rate and extent of absorption. No adverse events occurred or were reported after a single 20-mg piroxicam and both formulations were well-tolerated.

  17. Effect of Tamarindus indica. L on the bioavailability of ibuprofen in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garba, M; Yakasai, I A; Bakare, M T; Munir, H Y

    2003-01-01

    The influence of Tamarindus indica L fruit extract incorporated in a traditional meal on the bioavailability of Ibuprofen tablets 400 mg dose when given concurrently was studied in 6 healthy human volunteers. There was a statistically significant increase in the plasma levels of Ibuprofen and its metabolites hydroxy-ibuprofen and carboxy-ibuprofen respectively, when the meal containing Tamarindus indica fruit extract was administered with the ibuprofen tablets than when taken under fasting state or with the meal without the fruit extract. The C(max), AUC(0-6 hr) and Ka for ibuprofen increased from 38 +/- 0.70 microg/ml to 42 +/- 0.98 microg/ml (p > 0.05); and 28.03 +/- 2.40 microg/ml x hr to 56.51 +/- 0.16 microg/ml x hr (p Tamarindus indica L. fruit extract significantly increased the bioavailability of Ibuprofen.

  18. Effect of Tamarindus indica L. on the bioavailability of aspirin in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, A; Yakasai, I A; Aguye, I A

    1996-01-01

    The influence of Tamarindus indica L. fruit extract incorporated in a traditional meal on the bioavailability of aspirin tablets 600 mg dose was studied in 6 healthy volunteers. There was a statistically significant increase in the plasma levels of aspirin and salicylic acid, respectively, when the meal containing Tamarindus indica fruit extract was administered with the aspirin tablets than when taken under fasting state or with the meal without the fruit extract. The Cmax, AUC0-6h and t1/2 for aspirin increased from 10.04 +/- 0.1 mg/ml to 28.62 +/- 0.21 mg/ml (P Tamarindus indica L. fruit extract significantly increased the bioavailability of aspirin.

  19. The relation between methyl aminolevulinate concentration and inflammation after photodynamic therapy in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Susanne; Lerche, Catharina Margrethe; Philipsen, Peter Alshede;

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and pain are well known adverse-effects in photodynamic therapy (PDT). There is currently a tendency towards introducing lower concentrations of the photosensitizer than used in the standard treatment for various indications. The aim of this study was to investigate whether reduced...... concentrations of methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) can reduce inflammation (erythema) during PDT treatment. We measured the formation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) using fluorescence and monitored both erythema and pain during and after PDT treatment with conventional 16% MAL and threee reduced concentrations of 2, 0.......75, and 0.25% in twenty-four healthy volunteers. We found that lowering the MAL concentration reduced PpIX fluorescence and erythema after PDT treatment. There was a strong correlation (R(2) = 0.70) between the PpIX fluorescence and erythema after treatment. A further increase in erythema after PDT...

  20. Percutaneous absorption of diclofenac in healthy volunteers after single and repeated topical application of diclofenac Emulgel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioufi, A; Pommier, F; Boschet, F; Godbillon, J; Lavoignat, D; Salliere, D

    1994-08-01

    The percutaneous absorption of diclofenac was studied in ten healthy volunteers treated with Emulgel containing 1.16% diclofenac diethylammonium for 8 d as follows: a single application of 5 g Emulgel on days 1 and 8, and two applications d-1 on days 2-7. Plasma concentration profiles of unchanged diclofenac and urinary concentrations of total diclofenac and metabolites (sum of free and conjugated) were determined. High inter-individual variations in plasma and urine data were recorded, due probably to the permeability and the hydration of the skin. Steady state was reached after 2 d of twice-daily administration. Plasma concentrations were low but remained in the range 10-50 nmol L-1 over the full day for most of the subjects, indicating prolonged absorption from the application site.

  1. Gender differences in pain and secondary hyperalgesia after heat/capsaicin sensitization in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Petersen, Karin Lottrup

    2006-01-01

    In most published studies women are more sensitive to experimental pain than men. Enhanced central pain processing in women has been suggested, but psychosocial factors might also have affected the findings. Data from five completed healthy volunteer studies were analyzed to investigate gender...... differences in development of secondary hyperalgesia. Cutaneous hyperalgesia was induced with the heat/capsaicin sensitization model. Outcome measures were areas of secondary hyperalgesia to brush and von Frey hair stimulation after heat and capsaicin sensitization, rating of pain during heat....../capsaicin sensitization, and heat pain detection thresholds. There was a trend toward smaller areas of secondary hyperalgesia in women. After adjusting for estimated gender differences in forearm surface area, areas to brush but not von Frey hair stimulation after capsaicin sensitization were larger in women. Peak pain...

  2. Reproducibility of resting state spinal cord networks in healthy volunteers at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Robert L; Rogers, Baxter P; Conrad, Benjamin N; Smith, Seth A; Gore, John C

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported our findings of resting state functional connectivity in the human spinal cord: in a cohort of healthy volunteers we observed robust functional connectivity between left and right ventral (motor) horns and between left and right dorsal (sensory) horns (Barry et al., 2014). Building upon these results, we now quantify the within-subject reproducibility of bilateral motor and sensory networks (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.54-0.56) and explore the impact of including frequencies up to 0.13Hz. Our results suggest that frequencies above 0.08Hz may enhance the detectability of these resting state networks, which would be beneficial for practical studies of spinal cord functional connectivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-lasting patch reactions to gold sodium thiosulfate occurs frequently in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus E; Jensen, Charlotte D

    2007-01-01

    with a contact allergic reaction, and the crescendo type of the response speaks in favour of an allergic nature. Further, 8 of the 31 (26%) developed long-lasting test reactions. A follow-up interview among 28/31 participants 10 years later showed that none had experienced long-term consequences in the form......In a skin irritancy study in healthy volunteers with 3 metal salts, aqueous gold sodium thiosulfate (GSTS) in a dilution series caused unexpectedly frequent and strong patch test reactions on volar forearm skin in 22 of 31 participants (71%). The reactions showed morphological features consistent...... of skin and/or mucosal complaints related to exposure to gold items. The results indicate that inclusion of GSTS in routine patch testing may cause problems regarding interpretation and clinical relevance of positive GSTS patch tests, which fulfil the clinical criteria of a contact allergy....

  4. PREVALENCE OF METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS FROM HEALTHY COMMUNITY INDIVIDUALS VOLUNTEERS IN JOS SOUTH, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyetunji I. Ajoke

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the prevalence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA from the nasal swabs of healthy community individual volunteers in Jos South, Nigeria and its susceptibility pattern to seven other antibiotics. Standard procedures were employed for isolation, screening, and susceptibility testing. The result of this study reveal that 98 (49 % S. aureus were isolated from 200 nasal swab samples collected. The prevalence rate for male and female group was 48 % and 50 % respectively. Sixty two isolates (63.3 % were found to be methicillin resistant. The MRSA isolated were highly resistant to Ampicillin (88.7 %, Amoxicillin (85.5 %, Tetracycline (80.6 %, Cotrimoxazole (80.6 % but had low resistance to Erythromycin (35.5%. The MRSA isolated showed high susceptibility to Ofloxacin (98.4 % and Gentamicin (83.9 %. While 55 (88.7 % of the MRSA isolated showed multidrug resistance and only 3 (4.8 % were susceptible to all other tested antibiotics.

  5. The effect of experimentally induced sleep disturbance on the pharmacokinetics of lorazepam in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotegawa, Tsutomu; Tsutsumi, Kimiko; Imai, Hiromitsu; Ohashi, Kyoichi; Nakano, Shigeyuki

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sleep disturbance on the pharmacokinetics, especially on the absorption, of lorazepam in humans. Eight healthy male volunteers received a single oral dose of lorazepam 1 mg before sleep on two occasions in a cross-over design. In either of the two doses, subjects were intermittently exposed to noise for 1.5 hours after oral lorazepam administration. Plasma lorazepam concentrations were measured by HPLC. The exposure to noise significantly prolonged tmax (control vs. noise: 2.0 vs. 3.0 hours) and significantly decreased AUC of lorazepam in the absorption phase. The reduction was 54% (95% CI, 15 - 75%) and 24% (3 - 40%) for AUC (0 - 1 hours) and AUC (0 - 3 hours), respectively. No significant changes were observed in other pharmacokinetic parameters. The results of this study suggest that the onset of drug action after oral lorazepam administration can be altered by sleep disturbance.

  6. Renal effects of the non-ionic contrast medium iopentol after intravenous injection in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobsen, J.A.; Berg, K.J.; Waaler, A.; Andrew, E. (Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Radiology Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway). Renal Section Nycomed A/S, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Clinical Research and Development)

    1990-01-01

    Renal effects of the new non-ionic contrast medium iopentol in increasing doses were assessed and compared with the effects of physiologic saline. Twenty-four healthy male volunteers, allocated to three dose groups, were given iopentol intravenously in doses of 0.3, 0.6, and 1.2 g I/kg body weight, respectively. The highest dose group was also given physiologic saline separately as a control. The diuresis increased in all groups, most in the highest dose group, and with a concomitant fall of urine osmolality and increase in osmolar clearance. A slight decrease of serum osmolality, creatinine and urea occurred at 3 hours due to hemodilution. The glomerular filtration rate was unaffected by iopentol. The urinary excretion of albumin and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin was unchanged. However, urinary N-acetyl-{beta}-glucosaminidase and alkaline phosphatase increased significantly, most in the highest dose group. All changes were reversible. (orig.).

  7. Effect of an acidic beverage (Coca-Cola) on the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, S; Dixit, R K; Garg, S K

    2002-01-01

    The effect of an acidic beverage (Coca-Cola) on the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of carbamazepine was studied. In a two-way cross-over design with a 1 week washout period, 10 healthy volunteers were randomized to received 200 mg carbamazepine orally with 300 ml of Coca-Cola or water. Blood samples were collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after drug administration. Plasma carbamazepine levels were higher with Coca-Cola as compared to water. The AUC0-infinity and Cmax of carbamazepine were significantly enhanced after Coca-Cola while tmax was achieved earlier with Coca-Cola. The results of the study indicate that concomitant administration of Coca-Cola enhances the rate and extent of absorption of carbamazepine.

  8. Cassava Flour Substitution Modulates Glycemic Responses and Glycemic Index of Wheat Breads in Apparent Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Ebelechukwu N; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Ozumba, Augusta U; Adewale, Chris O; Kayode, Funmi O; Asieba, Godfrey O; Adesegha, Olubukola I; Elemo, Gloria N

    2017-07-04

    Different carbohydrate foods produce different glycemic responses even with little or no difference in macronutrient composition. Cassava constitutes one of the major staples in Nigeria. Four blends of cassava-wheat bread samples with 0, 10, 15, and 20% cassava flour inclusion were fed individually to groups of healthy human volunteers. Subjects were studied on separate occasions in the morning after a 10-12-hr overnight fast. Blood glucose responses were measured at intervals of 30 min over a period of 2 hr. Glucose was used as a reference food. There were normal glucose responses to the bread samples studied. Increase in cassava incorporation led to less significant glycemic responses. The glycemic index values ranged from 91-94. Results from this study indicate that the inclusion of cassava flour in bread production might not pose a threat to blood glucose response of individuals.

  9. Pharmacokinetic study of inosiplex tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers by hyphenated HPLC and tandem MS techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mo Chen; Yuan Zhang; Xiao-Ting Que; Ya Ding; Lin Yang; Ai-Dong Wen; Tai-Jun Hang

    2013-01-01

    Inosiplex is a compound formulation composed of inosine and p-acetaminobenzoic acid (PABA) salt of N,N-dimethylamino-2-propanol (DIP). This study was to investigate the clinical plasma pharmacokinetic properties of DIP and PABA after single and multiple oral doses of inosiplex tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers. The established LC/MS/MS method for plasma DIP determination had a linear range of 0.02-10 mg/mL, and the HPLC method for plasma PABA determination had a linear range of 0.05-40 mg/mL. Linear pharmacokinetic characteristics were found with single oral doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g. No obvious accumulation effects were observed for DIP and PABA.

  10. Bioequivalence study of 2 orodispersible formulations of zolmitriptan 5 mg in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas, M; Canals, M; Polonio, F; Cabré, F

    2012-10-01

    A bioequivalence study of 2 zolmitriptan (CAS 139264-17-8) orodispersible tablet formulations was carried out in 26 healthy volunteers according to an open label, randomized, 2-period, 2-sequence, crossover, single dose and fasting conditions design. The test and reference formulations were administered in 2 treatment days, separated by a washout period of 7 days. Plasma concentrations of zolmitriptan and its active metabolite (N-desmethyl-zolmitriptan) were obtained by LC/MS/MS method. Log-transformed AUCs and Cmax values were tested for bioequivalence based on the ratios of the geometric means (test/reference). Tmax was analysed nonparametrically. The 90% confidence intervals of the geometric mean values for the test/reference ratios for AUC0-t and Cmax were within the bioequivalence acceptance range of 80-125%. According to the European Guideline 1 it may be therefore concluded that test formulation of zolmitriptan 5 mg orodispersible tablet is bioequivalent to the reference formulation.

  11. [The enantioselective pharmacokinetic study of desvenlafaxine sustained release tablet in Chinese healthy male volunteers after oral administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-xia; Du, Jiang-bo; Zhang, Yi-fan; Chen, Xiao-yan; Zhong, Da-fang

    2015-04-01

    A chiral LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous analysis of desvenlafaxine (DVS) enantiomers in human plasma was developed and applied to a pharmacokinetic study on 12 Chinese healthy volunteers. d6-Desvenlafaxine was used as internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on the Astec Chirobiotic V chiral column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 μm). The assay was linear over the concentration range of 0.500-150 ng x mL(-1) for both enantiomers (r2 > 0.99). The method was successfully applied to a stereoselective pharmacokinetic study of 100 mg desvenlafaxine sustained release tablets on 12 Chinese healthy volunteers under fasting conditions. The results showed that the pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to both enantiomers in Chinese healthy volunteers. The AUC(0-t), and C(max) of the two enantiomers were about 1.5 times higher than those of blacks and whites reported in the literature.

  12. Comparative bioavailability study of two ibuprofen preparations after oral administration in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Agnieszka; Szkutnik-Fiedler, Danuta; Dyderski, Stanisław; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Drobnik, Leon; Wolc, Anna; Slawińiska, Urszula

    2006-01-01

    The bioavailability of a new ibuprofen (2-(p-isobutylphenyl)propionic acid, CAS 15687-27-1) preparation was compared with a reference preparation of the drug in 23 healthy male volunteers, aged between 19 and 27. A single dose of 400 mg was given orally in the fasted state, using a randomized two-way crossover study. A washout period of two weeks separated both treatment periods. Ibuprofen plasma levels were determined by means of a validated HPLC method (UV detector). Values of 154.48 +/- 53.27 microg x h/ml (95 % confidence interval CI: 133.50-177.03) for the test, and 140.86 +/- 44.82 microg x h/ml (95% CI: 122.53-159.16) for the reference preparation AUC(0-infinity) demonstrate a nearly identical extent of drug absorption. Maximum plasma concentrations Cmax of 39.53 +/- 7.11 microg/ml (95 % CI: 35.97-41.78) and 37.71 +/- 8.67 microg/ml (95% CI: 33.37-40.46) achieved for the test and reference preparations did not differ significantly. AUC(0-infinity) and Cmax ratios (90% CI) were within the 80-125% interval required for bioequivalence as stipulated in the current international regulations of the European Agency for the Evalution of Medicinal Products and the Food and Drug Administration. Therefore it is concluded that the new ibuprofen preparation is therapeutically equivalent to the reference preparation for both, the extent and the rate of absorption, after single dose administration in healthy volunteers.

  13. Immunomodulatory consequences of oral administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Michael; Linde, Hans-Jörg; Lehn, Norbert; Zimmermann, Kurt; Grossmann, Johannes; Falk, Werner; Schölmerich, Jürgen

    2003-05-01

    Probiotic microorganisms, especially lactic acid bacteria, are effective in the treatment of infectious diarrhoeal diseases and experimental colitis. Although the mechanisms by which these organisms exert their anti-inflammatory effects are largely unknown, immunomodulating effects are suggested. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of a 5-week oral administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus subspecies GG (Lb. GG) on the cellular immune response to intestinal microorganisms in ten healthy volunteers. Peripheral blood cells (PB) were stimulated with either 'self' or 'non-self' preparations of faecal samples and isolated Bacteroides fragilis group-organisms (Bfg) or Escherichia coli (Esch. coli), and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-4, IL-6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha) were measured in the culture supernatant. CD4+ T-lymphocyte activation was determined by measurement of intracellular ATP following lysis of the cells. The activational response of CD4+ T-lymphocytes towards isolated and heat-inactivated intestinal organisms was increased after the probiotic treatment. Additionally, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and in part IFN-gamma cytokine secretion by PB cells following stimulation with whole stool preparations and single members of the flora was significantly decreased, whereas the IL-10 and in part IL-4 cytokine secretion was increased at the end of the study. In contrast, the activational response of CD4+ T-lymphocytes following stimulation with whole 'non-self' intestinal flora was higher than by 'self' intestinal flora, but both responses showed a trend towards a reduction at the end of the study. This study documents a direct effect by Lb. GG on the cellular immune system of healthy volunteers and offers a promising tool to investigate systemic immunomodulation due to oral administration of probiotic microorganisms.

  14. Doppler Ultrasound Triggering for Cardiovascular MRI at 3T in a Healthy Volunteer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kording, Fabian; Yamamura, Jin; Lund, Gunnar; Ueberle, Friedrich; Jung, Caroline; Adam, Gerhard; Schoennagel, Bjoern Philip

    2017-04-10

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) triggering for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may be influenced by electromagnetic interferences with increasing magnetic field strength. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of Doppler ultrasound (DUS) as an alternative trigger technique for CMR in comparison to ECG and pulse oximetry (POX) at 3T and using different sequence types. Balanced turbo field echo two-dimensional (2D) short axis cine CMR and 2D phase-contrast angiography of the ascending aorta was performed in 11 healthy volunteers at 3T using ECG, DUS, and POX for cardiac triggering. DUS and POX triggering were compared to the reference standard of ECG in terms of trigger quality (trigger detection and temporal variability), image quality [endocardial blurring (EB)], and functional measurements [left ventricular (LV) volumetry and aortic blood flow velocimetry]. Trigger signal detection and temporal variability did not differ significantly between ECG/DUS (I = 0.6) and ECG/POX (P = 0.4). Averaged EB was similar for ECG, DUS, and POX (pECG/DUS = 0.4, pECG/POX = 0.9). Diastolic EB was significantly decreased for DUS in comparison to ECG (P = 0.02) and POX (P = 0.04). The LV function assessment and aortic blood flow were not significantly different. This study demonstrated the feasibility of DUS for gating human CMR at 3T. The magnetohydrodynamic effect did not significantly disturb ECG triggering in this small healthy volunteer study. DUS showed a significant improvement in diastolic EB but could not be identified as a superior trigger method. The potential benefit of DUS has to be evaluated in a larger clinical patient population.

  15. Objective measurement of cough in otherwise healthy volunteers with acute cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunger, Kanchan; Powley, William; Kelsall, Angela; Sumner, Helen; Murdoch, Robert; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2013-02-01

    Cough is one of the commonest reasons for medical consultation and acute cough associated with upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) is a global problem. In otherwise healthy volunteers complaining of cough associated with symptoms of URTI, we aimed to assess objective and subjective measures of cough and their repeatability and perform power calculations for the design of future studies to test therapies. We studied 54 otherwise healthy volunteers with acute cough (<3 weeks) (median age 22 yrs (interquartile range 21-26 yrs), 64% female, mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s 97.6±10.5% predicted). All subjects performed 24-h ambulatory cough monitoring and reported cough frequency and severity using visual analogue scales (VAS) on 2 consecutive days. Sample size calculations were performed for crossover and parallel group study designs. Objective cough frequency was high (session 1: geometric mean 12.1 coughs·h(-1) (95%CI 9.7-15.2)) and fell significantly (session 2: 9.0 coughs·h(-1) (95%CI 6.9-11.6); p<0.001). Repeatability was higher for objective cough frequency (intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.94, p<0.001) than reported cough frequency (daytime VAS ICC=0.784, p<0.001). Crossover/parallel studies require <15 and <41 subjects per arm to detect a 50% reduction in cough frequency with 90% power, respectively. Acute cough frequency is highly repeatable over any 48-h period, allowing small sample sizes to be used when investigating the effectiveness of novel anti-tussives.

  16. Comparative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of branded and generic formulations of meloxicam in healthy male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Tacca M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mario Del Tacca,1,2 Giuseppe Pasqualetti,3 Giovanni Gori,1 Pasquale Pepe,1 Antonello Di Paolo,2 Marianna Lastella,2 Ferdinando De Negri,1 Corrado Blandizzi2 1Clinical Pharmacology Centre for Drug Experimentation, Pisa University Hospital, 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, 3Geriatrics Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Purpose: The primary aim of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetic bioequivalence between a generic formulation of meloxicam 15 mg tablets (Meloxicam Hexal and its respective brand product (Mobic, in order to verify whether the generic product conforms to the regulatory standards of bioequivalence in the postmarketing setting. As a secondary exploratory aim, the pharmacodynamic effects of the two formulations were also evaluated by means of rating scales following hyperalgesia induced by cutaneous freeze injury. Subjects and methods: A single 15 mg dose of generic or branded meloxicam tablets was administered to 24 healthy male volunteers in a crossover fashion. Plasma samples, collected for 24 hours after dosing, were assayed for meloxicam concentration by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. Results: The analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters did not show any significant difference between the two meloxicam formulations: the 90% confidence intervals fell within the acceptance range of 80%–125% (0.84–1.16 for area under the curve [0–24], and 0.89–1.23 for peak concentration. No difference in the pharmacodynamic end point was observed between the two groups. Conclusion: The pharmacokinetic profiles of the two meloxicam formulations confirm the regulatory criteria for bioequivalence; pharmacodynamic data indicate a similar antihyperalgesic effect. The two formulations can be used interchangeably in the clinical setting. Keywords: meloxicam, pharmacokinetics, healthy volunteers, generic drug, bioequivalence, postmarketing

  17. Variability of morphology and signal intensity of alar ligaments in healthy volunteers using MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lummel, N; Zeif, C; Kloetzer, A; Linn, J; Brückmann, H; Bitterling, H

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of alar traumatic injuries by using MR imaging is frequently performed. This study investigates the variability of morphology and signal intensity of alar ligaments in healthy volunteers so that pathology can be more accurately defined. Fifty healthy volunteers were examined on a 1.5T MR imaging scanner with 2-mm PD-weighted sequences in 3 planes. Delineation of the alar ligaments in 3 planes and signal-intensity characteristics on sagittal planes were analyzed by using a 4-point grading scale. Variability of courses and morphologic characteristics were described. Delineation of alar ligaments was best viewed in the coronal plane, followed by the sagittal and axial planes. In the sagittal view, 6.5% of alar ligaments appeared homogeneously dark. Hyperintense signal intensity in up to one-third of the cross-sectional area was present in 33% of cases; in up to two-thirds of the cross-sectional area, in 45% of cases; and in more than two-thirds of the cross-sectional area, in 15% of cases. Of alar ligaments, 58.5% ascended laterally, 40.5% ran horizontally, and 1% descended laterally. The cross-sectional area was round in 41.5%, oval in 51.5%, and winglike in 6.5%. On 1.5T MR imaging, the alar ligaments can be delineated best in the coronal and sagittal planes. Our data indicate a remarkable variability of morphology and course as well as signal intensity. This finding is contradictory to former publications assigning such alterations exclusively to patients with trauma.

  18. PHARMACOKINETICS OF PARACETAMOL ORALLY DISINTEGRATING AND GENERAL TABLETS IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU De-qiu; CUI Lan; HUANG Sai-jie; TAO Da-ren; SUN Li; SHEN Jin-fang

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare the pharmacokinetics and relative biological availability of Paracetamol orally disintegrating tablets and general tablets in healthy volunteers. Methods In a random two periods crossover study, 19 healthy male Chinses volunteers received a single dose of Paracetamol500mg of two formularies respectively. The plasma concentration of paracetamol was determined by HPLC method. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the two preparation and the relative biological availability of Paracetamol orally disintegrating tablets and general tablets were caculated with statistical analysis. Results The main pharmacokinetic parameters of paracetamol orally disintegrating tablets and general tablets were (31436. 70 ± 7062. 80) μg · h-1 · L-1 and (29871.40±7965.04)μg·h-1·L-1 for AUC0~1 (33295.7 ± 7663.10) μg·h -1 ·L-1 and(31845.20±8830.83)μg·h-1·L-1 for A UC0~∞; ( 9.71±2.78 )μg/ml and ( 10.36±3.86 ) μg/ml for Cmax; ( 0.82±0.45 ) h and ( 0.74± 0.67) h for Tmax ; ( 2.90±0.42 ) h and ( 3.13±0.67 ) h for T1/2ke ; ( 0.24±0.04 ) and ( 0.23±0.04 ) for Ke;(4.1481±0.4492 ) and (4.0771±0.8131 ) for mean residence time ( MRT) , respectively. Variance analysis showed that there was significant difference in AUC0~12 and Cmax between the two preparations. Conclusion The paracetamol orally disintegrating tablets and general tablets are bioequivalent and the relative biological availability of Paracetamol orally disintegrating tablets is (108±19)%.

  19. Immediate effect of ice bag application to head and spine on cardiovascular changes in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mooventhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives: Ice application is one of the treatment procedures used in hydrotherapy. Though its various physiological/therapeutic effects were reported, ice bag application (IBA to head and spine on cardiovascular changes were not reported. Hence, this study aims at evaluating the immediate effect of IBA to head and spine on cardiovascular changes in healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight subjects were randomized into three sessions ([i] IBA [ii] tap water bag application [TWBA] and [iii] control and intervention was given in one of the 3-different orders. Systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, and pulse rate (PR was assessed before and after 20-min of each intervention. Pulse pressure, mean pressure (MP, rate pressure product (RPP, and double product (Do-P were derived by standard formula. Statistical analysis was performed by repeated measures of analysis of variance and post-hoc analysis with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons with the use of Statistical Package for Social Sciences version-16. Results: The results showed no significant difference between sessions in all variables. Within-group analysis showed significant reductions in SBP, PR, RPP, Do-P in IBA and TWBA sessions; Significant reduction in DBP, MP in IBA unlike TWBA; and no significant changes in all the variables of control session. Conclusions: Result of our study suggest that though both IBA and TWBA to head and spine might be considered as having effect on improving cardiovascular function in healthy volunteers, IBA to head and spine could be considered as a better choice than TWBA.

  20. Rapid response to lipids profile and leukocyte gene expression after rosuvastatin administration in Chinese healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Cong-xiao; LI Yi-shi; LIU Yu-qing; LIU Hong; LI Na; WU Ying; XU Li; HUANG Yi-ling

    2008-01-01

    Background Statins are potent lipid-lowering agents widely used in medicaI practice.There has been growing evidence suggesting the pleiotropic effects of statins In addition to the lipid-lowering effect.However,it is still unclear how rapidly the beneficial effects of statins occur.The transcriptome of peripheral blood cells can be used as a sensor to drug therapy.The purpose of the study was to investigate the acute effects of rosuvastatin both on lipids profile and gene expression of peripheral leukocytes following therapy with a single dose of rosuvastatin.Methods Thirty healthy Chinese male volunteers were enrolled.The serum lipids,high-sensitivity C-reactive protein,and plasma fibrinogen were determined before and 72 hours after administration of 20 mg of rosuvastatin.The differentially expressed genes of peripheral leukocytes after administration of rosuvastatin were screened using human oligonucleotide microarray gene expression chips.Then four of the differentially expressed genes including ATM,CASP8,IL8RB and S100B were verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction(PCR).Results Rosuvastatin decreased both serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol significantly 72 hours after administration of a single dose of 20 mg rosuvastatin.However,no significant changes occurred in blood high-density lipoprotein cholesterol,triglycerides,C-reactive protein and fibrinogen after the treatment.A total of 24 genes were differentially expressed after the treatment.They were involved in important cell biological processes such as cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction,apoptosis signaling,etc.Conclusions Rosuvastatin rapidly modulates the serum lipids and affects the gene expression of peripheral leukocytes in healthy volunteers.This finding provides some new clues for further studies on its potential pleiotropic effects.

  1. Carbon dioxide-induced emotion and respiratory symptoms in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasanti, Alessandro; Salamon, Ewa; Schruers, Koen; van Diest, Rob; van Duinen, Marlies; Griez, Eric J

    2008-12-01

    A number of evidences have established that panic and respiration are closely related. Clinical studies indicated that respiratory sensations constitute a discrete cluster of panic symptoms and play a major role in the pathophysiology of panic. The aim of the present study was to explore the phenomenology of an experimental model of panic in healthy volunteers based on the hypothesis that: (1) we can isolate discrete clusters of panic symptoms, (2) respiratory symptoms represent a distinct cluster of panic symptoms, and (3) respiratory symptoms are the best predictor of the subjective feeling of panic, as defined in the DSM IV criteria.Sixty-four healthy volunteers received a double inhalation of four mixtures containing 0, 9, 17.5 and 35% CO(2,) respectively, in a double-blind, cross-over, random design. An electronic visual analog scale and the Panic Symptom List (PSL) were used to assess subjective 'fear/discomfort' and panic symptoms, respectively. Statistical analyses consisted of Spearman's correlations, a principal component factor analysis of the 13 PSL symptoms, and linear regressions analyses.The factor analysis extracted three clusters of panic symptoms: respiratory, cognitive, and neurovegetative (r(2)=0.65). Respiratory symptoms were highly related to subjective feeling of fear/discomfort specifically in the CO(2)-enriched condition. Moreover, the respiratory component was the most important predictor of the subjective feeling of 'fear/discomfort' (beta=0.54).The discrete clusters of symptoms observed in this study were similar to those elicited in panic attacks naturally occurring in patients affected by panic disorder. Consistent with the idea that respiration plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of panic, we found that respiratory symptoms were the best predictors the subjective state defined in the DSM IV criteria for panic.

  2. Hyperoxia Improves Hemodynamic Status During Head-up Tilt Testing in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromonot, Julien; Chaumet, Guillaume; Gavarry, Olivier; Rostain, Jean-Claude; Lucciano, Michel; Joulia, Fabrice; Brignole, Michele; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Guieu, Regis; Boussuges, Alain

    2016-02-01

    Head-up tilt test is useful for exploring neurally mediated syncope. Adenosine is an ATP derivative implicated in cardiovascular disturbances that occur during head-up tilt test. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperoxia on adenosine plasma level and on hemodynamic changes induced by head-up tilt testing.Seventeen healthy male volunteers (mean age 35 ± 11 years) were included in the study. The experiment consisted of 2 head-up tilt tests, 1 session with subjects breathing, through a mask, medical air (FiO2 = 21%) and 1 session with administration of pure oxygen (FiO2 = 100%) in double-blind manner. Investigations included continuous monitoring of hemodynamic data and measurement of plasma adenosine levels.No presyncope or syncope was found in 15 of the 17 volunteers. In these subjects, a slight decrease in systolic blood pressure was recorded during orthostatic stress performed under medical air exposure. In contrast, hyperoxia led to increased systolic blood pressure during orthostatic stress when compared with medical air. Furthermore, mean adenosine plasma levels decreased during hyperoxic exposure before (0.31 ± 0.08 μM) and during head-up tilt test (0.33 ± 0.09 μM) when compared with baseline (0.6 ± 0.1 μM). Adenosine plasma level was unchanged during medical air exposure at rest (0.6 ± 0.1 μM), and slightly decreased during orthostatic stress. In 2 volunteers, the head-up tilt test induced a loss of consciousness when breathing air. In these subjects, adenosine plasma level increased during orthostatic stress. In contrast, during hyperoxic exposure, the head-up tilt test did not induce presyncope or syncope. In these 2 volunteers, biological study demonstrated a decrease in adenosine plasma level at both baseline and during orthostatic stress for hyperoxic exposure compared with medical air.These results suggest that hyperoxia was able to increase blood pressure during head-up tilt

  3. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Canagliflozin in Healthy Volunteers and Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, Eef; De Winter, Willem; Neyens, Martine; Devineni, Damayanthi; Vermeulen, An; Dunne, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Canagliflozin is an orally active, reversible, selective sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitor. A population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model of canagliflozin, including relevant covariates as sources of inter-individual variability, was developed to describe phase I, II, and III data in healthy volunteers and in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The final analysis included 9061 pharmacokinetic (PK) samples from 1616 volunteers enrolled in nine phase I, two phase II, and three phase III studies and was performed using NONMEM(®) 7.1. Inter-individual variability was evaluated using an exponential model and the residual error model was additive in the log domain. The first-order conditional estimation method with interaction was applied and the model was parameterized in terms of rate constants. Covariate effects were explored graphically on empirical Bayes estimates of PK parameters, as shrinkage was low. Clinical relevance of statistically significant covariates was evaluated. The predictive properties of the model were illustrated by prediction-corrected visual predictive checks. A two-compartment PK model with lag-time and sequential zero- and first-order absorption and first-order elimination best described the observed data. Sex, age, and weight on apparent volume of distribution of the central compartment, body mass index on first-order absorption rate constant, and body mass index and over-encapsulation on lag-time, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, by MDRD equation), dose, and genetic polymorphism (carriers of UGT1A9*3 allele) on elimination rate constant were identified as statistically significant covariates. The prediction-corrected visual predictive checks revealed acceptable predictive performance of the model. The popPK model adequately described canagliflozin PK in healthy volunteers and in patients with T2DM. Because of the small magnitude of statistically significant covariates, they were not considered clinically

  4. Single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of inhaled indacaterol in healthy Chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ji; Li, Lilly; Yin, Hequn; Woessner, Ralph; Emotte, Corinne; Li, Ruobing; Khindri, Sanjeev; Pei, Hu

    2015-06-01

    Indacaterol is an inhaled, ultra-long-acting β2-agonist that provides 24-h bronchodilation with once-daily dosing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of multiple daily inhaled doses of indacaterol 150 or 300 μg once daily in healthy Chinese volunteers. This was a single-center, randomized, double-blind, multiple-dose, parallel-group study, placebo-controlled trial including two doses of indacaterol: 150 and 300 μg. Serum indacaterol was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with a lower limit of quantification of 0.01 ng/mL. The pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed using non-compartmental analysis and included C max, T max, and AUC0-24h on Day 1 and AUC0-24h,ss, C max,ss, C min,ss, C av,ss, T max,ss, T 1/2, T 1/2,acc, CL/F, V z/F, and R acc on Day 14 (after repeated once-daily doses). Safety analyses were recorded using physical examination, biochemical tests, and ECG. Indacaterol steady state was achieved after 12-14 days of daily dosing. The mean effective half-life of indacaterol (based on drug accumulation at steady state) was 33.9 and 35.8 h for 150 and 300 μg, respectively. Systemic exposure to indacaterol increased 1.27 and 1.34-fold between the 150- and 300-μg doses on Day 1 (first dose) and Day 14 (repeated dose), respectively. Indacaterol 150 and 300 μg were safe and well tolerated in these volunteers. The pharmacokinetics of multiple inhaled doses of indacaterol 150 and 300 μg (for 14 days) were consistent with moderate systemic accumulation at steady state after repeated once-daily inhalation in healthy Chinese volunteers.

  5. Safety and pharmacokinetics of dicloxacillin in healthy Chinese volunteers following single and multiple oral doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu GL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Guolan Wu, Yunliang Zheng, Huili Zhou, Xingjiang Hu, Jian Liu, You Zhai, Meixiang Zhu, Lihua Wu, Jianzhong Shentu Research Center for Clinical Pharmacy, State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Disease, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: Dicloxacillin, a semisynthetic isoxazolyl penicillin antibiotic, has antimicrobial activity against a wide variety of gram-positive bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumonia, Streptococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus viridans, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Neisseria meningitidis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of dicloxacillin after single and multiple oral dose in healthy Chinese volunteers.Methods: A single-center, open-label, randomized, two-phase study was conducted in 16 subjects. In the single-dose phase, subjects were randomly assigned to receive single doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g of dicloxacillin sodium capsule in a 4-way crossover design with a 5-day washout period between administrations. In the multiple-dose phase, subjects were assigned to receive 0.25 or 0.5 g every 6 hours for 3 days in a 2-way crossover design. Plasma and urine pharmacokinetic samples were assayed by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and analyzed statistically. Safety assessments were conducted throughout the study.Results: Following a single oral dose of 0.25–2.0 g dicloxacillin sodium, the maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax and the corresponding values for the area under the concentration–time curve from 0 to 10 hours (AUC0–10 h increased in a dose-proportional manner. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2 was in the range of 1.38–1.71 hours. Dicloxacillin was excreted in its unchanged form via the kidney, with no

  6. Dietary Supplement with a Combination of Rhodiola Crenulata and Ginkgo Biloba Enhances the Endurance Performance in Healthy Volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张樟进; 童瑶; 邹军; 陈佩杰; 虞定海

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To determine whether the ingestion of a herbal supplement called Rhodiola-Gingko Capsule(RGC) would enhance the endurance performance of healthy volunteers and change relevant hormones in a favorable manner.Methods:Seventy healthy male volunteers(age ranges from 18 to 22 years old) were randomly assigned to RGC group(35 cases,each capsule containing 270 mg herbal extracts,4 capsules per day) or placebo group(35 cases,equivalent placebo preparation) for 7 weeks using computerproduced digital ran...

  7. Disassociation of Static and Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulatory Performance in Healthy Volunteers After Lipopolysaccharide Infusion and in Patients with Sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan Martin Griffin; Plovsing, Ronni R.; Ronit, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    autoregulatory performance after LPS infusion and in patients with sepsis was similar to values in healthy volunteers at baseline. In contrast, TFA showed decreased gain and an increased phase difference between blood pressure and cerebral artery blood flow velocity after LPS (both p ...-experimental model of the systemic inflammatory response during early sepsis, and (ii) in patients with advanced clinical sepsis. Cerebral autoregulation was tested using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (i) before and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion in healthy volunteers (n=9), and (ii) in patients......); patients exhibited similar gain but lower phase difference values (p

  8. Using “Clinical Trial Diaries” to Track Patterns of Participation for Serial Healthy Volunteers in U.S. Phase I Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Edelblute, Heather B.; Fisher, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Phase I testing of investigational drugs relies on healthy volunteers as research participants. Many U.S. healthy volunteers enroll repeatedly in clinical trials for the financial compensation. Serial participants are incentivized to ignore restrictions on their participation, and no centralized clinical trial registry prevents dual enrollment. Little is currently known about how healthy volunteers participate in studies over time, hampering the development of policies to protect this group. ...

  9. Comparison of spinal alignment, muscular strength, and quality of life between women with postmenopausal osteoporosis and healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakoshi, N; Kudo, D; Hongo, M; Kasukawa, Y; Ishikawa, Y; Shimada, Y

    2017-08-07

    This study compared spinal alignment, muscular strength, and quality of life (QOL) between women with postmenopausal osteoporosis and healthy volunteers. The results indicated that lower QOL in osteoporosis patients may be associated with increased thoracic kyphosis, reduced lean muscle mass, and generalized muscle weakness. Increased spinal kyphosis is common in patients with osteoporosis and negatively impacts quality of life (QOL). Muscular strength is also important for QOL in patients with osteoporosis. However, spinal kyphosis and muscle weakness also occur in healthy individuals with advancing age. The purposes of this study were thus to compare spinal alignment, muscular strength, and QOL between women with postmenopausal osteoporosis and healthy volunteers. Participants comprised 236 female patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis (mean age, 68.7 years) and 93 healthy volunteer women (mean age, 71.0 years). Body mass index (BMI), angles of spinal kyphosis, back extensor strength, grip strength, and QOL were compared between groups. BMI, back extensor strength, and grip strength were significantly higher in the volunteer group than in the osteoporosis group (p < 0.01). Both thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis were significantly greater in the osteoporosis group than in the volunteer group (p < 0.01). With regard to QOL, the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) subscale scores of role physical, bodily pain, general health, and role emotional were all significantly lower in the osteoporosis group than in the volunteer group (p < 0.05 each). SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) score was significantly lower in the osteoporosis group than in the volunteer group (p < 0.001). SF-36 PCS score correlated positively with thoracic kyphosis and negatively with BMI only in the osteoporosis group (p < 0.05 each). These results indicated that lower QOL in osteoporosis patients may be associated with increased thoracic kyphosis, reduced lean muscle

  10. Abdominal wall muscle elasticity and abdomen local stiffness on healthy volunteers during various physiological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, D; Podwojewski, F; Beillas, P; Ottenio, M; Voirin, D; Turquier, F; Mitton, D

    2016-07-01

    The performance of hernia treatment could benefit from more extensive knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the abdominal wall in a healthy state. To supply this knowledge, the antero-lateral abdominal wall was characterized in vivo on 11 healthy volunteers during 4 activities: rest, pullback loading, abdominal breathing and the "Valsalva maneuver". The elasticity of the abdominal muscles (rectus abdominis, obliquus externus, obliquus internus and transversus abdominis) was assessed using ultrasound shear wave elastography. In addition, the abdomen was subjected to a low external load at three locations: on the midline (linea alba), on the rectus abdominis region and on lateral muscles region in order to evaluate the local stiffness of the abdomen, at rest and during "Valsalva maneuver". The results showed that the "Valsalva maneuver" leads to a statistically significant increase of the muscle shear modulus compared to the other activities. This study also showed that the local stiffness of the abdomen was related to the activity. At rest, a significant difference has been observed between the anterior (0.5N/mm) and the lateral abdomen locations (1N/mm). Then, during the Valsalva maneuver, the local stiffness values were similar for all locations (ranging from 1.6 to 2.2N/mm). This work focuses on the in vivo characterization of the mechanical response of the human abdominal wall and abdomen during several activities. In the future, this protocol could be helpful for investigation on herniated patients.

  11. Effect of isomalt consumption on faecal microflora and colonic metabolism in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostner, A; Blaut, M; Schäffer, V; Kozianowski, G; Theis, S; Klingeberg, M; Dombrowski, Y; Martin, D; Ehrhardt, S; Taras, D; Schwiertz, A; Kleessen, B; Lührs, H; Schauber, J; Dorbath, D; Menzel, T; Scheppach, W

    2006-01-01

    Due to its low digestibility in the small intestine, a major fraction of the polyol isomalt reaches the colon. However, little is known about effects on the intestinal microflora. During two 4-week periods in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design, nineteen healthy volunteers consumed a controlled basal diet enriched with either 30 g isomalt or 30 g sucrose daily. Stools were collected at the end of each test phase and various microbiological and luminal markers were analysed. Fermentation characteristics of isomalt were also investigated in vitro. Microbiological analyses of faecal samples indicated a shift of the gut flora towards an increase of bifidobacteria following consumption of the isomalt diet compared with the sucrose diet (Pisomalt phase, the activity of bacterial beta-glucosidase decreased (Pisomalt (P=0.055). Faecal SCFA, lactate, bile acids, neutral sterols, N, NH3, phenol and p-cresol were not affected by isomalt consumption. In vitro, isomalt was metabolized in several bifidobacteria strains and yielded high butyrate concentrations. Isomalt, which is used widely as a low-glycaemic and low-energy sweetener, has to be considered a prebiotic carbohydrate that might contribute to a healthy luminal environment of the colonic mucosa.

  12. CLITORAL ANATOMY IN NULLIPAROUS, HEALTHY, PREMENOPAUSAL VOLUNTEERS USING UNENHANCED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’CONNELL, HELEN E.; DeLANCEY, JOHN O. L.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose We determined the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of normal clitoral anatomy. Materials and Methods A series of MRI studies of 10 healthy, nulliparous volunteers with no prior surgery and normal pelvic examination was studied and the key characteristics of clitoral anatomy were determined. A range of different magnetic resonance sequences was used without any contrast agent. Results The axial plane best revealed the clitoral body and its proximal continuation as the paired crura. The glans was seen more caudal than the body of the clitoris. The bulbs of the clitoris had the same signal as the rest of the clitoris in the axial plane and they related consistently to the other erectile structures. The bulbs, body and crura formed an erectile tissue cluster, namely the clitoris. In turn, the clitoris partially surrounded the urethra and vagina, forming a consistently observed tissue complex. Midline sagittal section revealed the shape of the body, although in this plane the rest of the clitoris was poorly displayed. The coronal plane revealed the relationship between the clitoral body and labia. The axial section cephalad to the clitoral body best revealed the vascular component of the neurovascular bundle to the clitoris. The fat saturation sequence particularly highlighted clitoral anatomy in healthy, premenopausal, nulliparous women. Conclusions Normal clitoral anatomy has been clearly demonstrated using noncontrast pelvic MRI. PMID:15879834

  13. Characterization of left and right atrial function in healthy volunteers by cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceira, Alicia M; Cosin-Sales, Juan; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pennell, Dudley J

    2016-10-10

    Left and right atrial function show a different pattern in advanced age in order to maintain adequate ventricular filling. It has been shown that left atrial (LA) function has a prognostic value in a number of heart conditions. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides high quality images of the left and right atria using high temporal resolution steady state free precession (SSFP) cine sequences. We used SSFP cines to characterize atrial function in healthy, normotensive, volunteers. We measured maximum, preatrial contraction and minimum left and right atrial volumes in 120 healthy subjects after careful exclusion of cardiovascular abnormality (60 men, 60 women; 20 subjects per age decile from 20 to 80 years). Data were generated from 3-dimensional modeling, including tracking of the atrioventricular ring motion and time-volume curves analysis. With those measurements, all the usual parameters for left and right atrial function were calculated. Gender had significant influence on some parameters of left and right atrial conduit and booster pump function. Age significantly influenced the majority of parameters of both left and right atrial function, with typically lower reservoir and conduit functions and higher booster pump function, both in males and females belonging to older age groups. CMR normal ranges were modelled for clinical use with normalization, where appropriate, for body surface area and gender, displaying parameters with respect to age. CMR normal reference ranges for components of left and right atrial function are provided for males and females for a wide age range.

  14. Tolerance and pharmacokinetics of single-dose intravenous hemoporfin in healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-hong SUN; Xia ZHAO; Ying ZHOU; Yan LIANG; Hui-lin ZHANG; Yi-min CUI; Ji-ning TAO

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the safety,tolerability and pharmacokinetics of intravenous hemoporfin,a novel photosensitive drug for the treatment of port-wine stain (PWS),in healthy Chinese volunteers following single-dose administration.Methods:Thirty-six healthy Chinese subjects were enrolled.The subjects were administered hemoporfin (2.5,5,7.5 or 10 mg/kg) via single-dose intravenous infusion.Pharmacokinetics of the drug were studied in the groups with doses of 2.5,5 and 7.5 mg/kg,and tolerability was studied in all the 4 groups.Safety and tolerance were evaluated by monitoring adverse events and laboratory parameters,and pharmacokinetics were assessed by determining hemoporfin content with a validated high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC/FLD) method.Results:Mild and transient adverse events occurred in the trial (n=1O),but none were serious,and no subjects were withdrawn from the trial.The gastrointestinal tract adverse events,such as nausea,stomach upset,abdominal pain and vomiting,were observed in the groups with doses of 7.5 and 10 mg/kg.Increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentration was found in 3 subjects,and increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentration in one subject.The half-life of hemoporfin for doses of 2.5,5,and 7.5 mg/kg was 1.26 h,1.31 h,and 1.70 h,respectively.Cmax and AUC increased with dose for intravenous single-dose administration of hemoporfin in the 2.5,5,and 7.5 mg/kg groups.Urinary excretion of hemoporfin within 12 h was less than 0.2%.Conclusion:Hemoporfin is safe and well-tolerated in healthy Chinese volunteers at a single intravenous dose of up to 10 mg/kg.It was rapidly cleared from the blood and had a short half-life,which insures a short light-avoidance period.

  15. Effect of St. John's wort supplementation on the pharmacokinetics of bupropion in healthy male Chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, H-P; Yu, X-Y; Xie, H-T; Li, H-H; Fan, L; Dai, L-L; Chen, Y; Zhou, H-H

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of continuous St. John's wort administration on single-dose pharmacokinetics of bupropion, a substrate of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B6, in healthy Chinese volunteers. Eighteen unrelated healthy male subjects participated in this study. The single-dose pharmacokinetics of bupropion and hydroxybupropion were determined before (control) and after a long-term period of St. John's wort intake (325 mg, three times a day for 14 days). Plasma concentrations of bupropion and hydroxybupropion were determined before and at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72 h after dosing. St. John's wort treatment decreased the area under the concentration versus time curve extrapolated to infinity of bupropion in healthy volunteers from 1.4 microg.h ml(-1) (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-1.6 microg.h ml(-1)) after bupropion alone to 1.2 microg.h ml(-1) (95% CI = 1.1-1.3 microg.h ml(-1)) during St. John's wort treatment. St. John's wort treatment increased the oral clearance of bupropion from 108.3 l h(-1) (95% CI = 95.4-123.0 l h(-1)) to 130.0 l h(-1) (95% CI = 118.4-142.7 l h(-1)). No change in the time to peak concentration (t(max)) and the blood elimination half-life (t(1/2)) of bupropion was observed between the control and St. John's wort-treated phases. However, the half-life of hydroxybupropion between two phases had a significant difference by a Student's t test after logarithmic transformation. St. John's wort treatment decreased the half-life of hydroxybupropion from 26.7 h (95% CI = 23.8-29.9 h) to 24.4 h (95% CI = 21.9-27.3 h). St. John's wort decreased, to a statistically significant extent, the plasma concentrations of bupropion, probably mainly by increasing the clearance of bupropion.

  16. Centella asiatica Improves Physical Performance and Health-Related Quality of Life in Healthy Elderly Volunteer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lugkana Mato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, oxidative stress has been reported to contribute an important role in the decline of physical function as age advances. Numerous antioxidants can improve both physical and psychological performances resulting in the increase of health-related quality of life (HQOL. Therefore, we hypothesized that Centella asiatica, a medicinal plant reputed for nerve tonic, strength improvement and antioxidant activity, could improve the physical performance and HQOL especially in the physical satisfaction aspect, of the healthy elderly volunteer. To test this hypothesis, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was performed. Eighty healthy elderly were randomly assigned to receive placebo or standardized extract of C. asiatica at doses of 250, 500 and 750 mg once daily for 90 days. The subjects were evaluated to establish baseline data of physical performance using 30-s chair stand test, hand grip test and 6-min walk test. The health-related quality of life was assessed using SF-36. These assessments were repeated every month throughout the 3-month experimental period using the aforementioned parameters. Moreover, 1 month after the cessation of C. asiatica treatment, all subjects were also evaluated using these parameters again. The results showed that after 2 months of treatment, C. asiatica at doses of 500 and 750 mg per day increased lower extremity strength assessed via the 30-s chair stand test. In addition, the higher doses of C. asiatica could improve the life satisfaction subscale within the physical function subscale. Therefore, the results from this study appear to support the traditional reputation of C. asiatica on strength improvement, especially in the lower extremities of the elderly. C. asiatica also possesses the potential to be a natural resource for vigor and strength increase, in healthy elderly persons. However, further research is essential.

  17. Physiological {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the ovaries and uterus of healthy female volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Inubushi, Masayuki; Okada, Hiroyuki [Hamamatsu Medical Photonics Foundation, Hamamatsu Medical Imaging Center, Hamakita, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    Good knowledge of physiological {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake in the healthy population is of great importance for the correct interpretation of {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) images of pathological processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the ovaries and uterus of healthy female volunteers. One hundred and 33 healthy females, 78 of whom were premenopausal (age 37.2{+-}6.9 years) and 55 postmenopausal (age 55.0{+-}2.7 years), were examined using whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET and pelvic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Focal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the ovaries and uterus was evaluated visually and using standardised uptake value (SUVs). Anatomical and morphological information was obtained from MR images. Distinct ovarian {sup 18}F-FDG uptake with an SUV of 3.9{+-}0.7 was observed in 26 premenopausal women out of 32 examined during the late follicular to early luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Eighteen of the 32 women also showed focal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the endometrium, with an SUV of 3.3{+-}0.3. On the other hand, all nine women in the first 3 days of the menstrual cycle demonstrated intense {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the endometrium, with an SUV of 4.6{+-}1.0. No physiological {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was observed in the ovaries or uterus of any postmenopausal women. In women of reproductive age, {sup 18}F-FDG imaging should preferably be done within a week before or a few days after the menstrual flow phase to avoid any misinterpretation of pelvic {sup 18}F-FDG PET images. (orig.)

  18. (3)He MRI in healthy volunteers: preliminary correlation with smoking history and lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, D; Eberle, B; Hast, J; Lill, J; Markstaller, K; Puderbach, M; Schreiber, W G; Hanisch, G; Heussel, C P; Surkau, R; Grossmann, T; Weiler, N; Thelen, M; Kauczor, H U

    2000-06-01

    MRI with hyperpolarized helium-3 ((3)He) provides high-resolution imaging of ventilated airspaces. The first aim of this (3)He-study was to compare observations of localized signal defects in healthy smokers and non-smokers. A second aim was to describe relationships between parameters of lung function, volume of inspired (3)He and signal-to-noise ratio. With Ethics Committee approval and informed consent, 12 healthy volunteers (seven smokers and five non-smokers) were studied. Imaging was performed in a 1.5 T scanner using a two-dimensional FLASH sequence at 30V transmitter amplitude (TR/TE/alpha = 11 ms/4.2 ms/microprocessor-controlled delivery device and imaged during single breath-holds. Images were evaluated visually, and scored using a prospectively defined 'defect-index'. Signal-to-noise ratio of the images were correlated with localization, (3)He volumes and static lung volumes. Due to poor image quality studies of two smokers were not eligible for the evaluation. Smokers differed from non-smokers in total number and size of defects: the 'defect-index' of smokers ranged between 0.8 and 6.0 (median = 1.1), that of non-smokers between 0.1 and 0.8 (median = 0.4). Intraindividually, an anteroposterior gradient of signal-to-noise ratio was apparent. Signal-to-noise ratio correlated with the estimated amount of hyperpolarization administered (r = 0. 77), but not with static lung volumes. We conclude that (3)He MRI is a sensitive measure to detect regional abnormalities in the distribution of ventilation in clinically healthy persons with normal pulmonary function tests.

  19. Breath isoprene concentrations in persons undergoing general anesthesia and in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornuss, Cyrill; Zagler, Armin; Dolch, Michael E; Wiepcke, Dirk; Praun, Siegfried; Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Weis, Florian; Apfel, Christian C; Schelling, Gustav

    2012-12-01

    Human breath contains an abundance of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Analysis of breath VOC may be used for diagnosis of various diseases or for on-line monitoring in anesthesia and intensive care. However, VOC concentrations largely depend on the breath sampling method and have a large inter-individual variability. For the development of breath tests, the influence of breath sampling methods and study subject characteristics on VOC concentrations has to be known. Therefore, we investigated the VOC isoprene in 62 study subjects during anesthesia and 16 spontaneously breathing healthy volunteers to determine (a) the influence of artificial and spontaneous ventilation and (b) the influence of study subject characteristics on breath isoprene concentrations. We used ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry for high-resolution breath-by-breath analysis of isoprene. We found that persons during anesthesia had significantly increased inspiratory and end-expiratory isoprene breath concentrations. Measured isoprene concentrations (median [first quartile-third quartile]) were in the anesthesia group: 54 [40-79] ppb (inspiratory) and 224 [171-309] ppb (end-expiratory), volunteer group: 14 [11-17] ppb (inspiratory) and 174 [124-202] ppb (end-expiratory). Higher end-tidal CO(2) concentrations in ventilated subjects were associated with higher expiratory isoprene levels. Furthermore, inspiratory and end-expiratory isoprene concentrations were correlated during anesthesia (r = 0.603, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that men had significantly higher end-expiratory isoprene concentrations than women. Rebreathing of isoprene from the anesthesia machine possibly accounts for the observed increase in isoprene in the anesthesia group.

  20. Reinforcing, subjective, and psychomotor effects of sevoflurane and nitrous oxide in moderate-drinking healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacny, J P; Janiszewski, D; Sadeghi, P; Black, M L

    1999-12-01

    To characterize the reinforcing, subjective and psychomotor effects of sevoflurane, a volatile anesthetic, across a range of subanesthetic concentrations in non-drug-abusing humans. In addition, a concentration of nitrous oxide was included in the design in order to compare and contrast behavioral effects of a gaseous to a volatile anesthesic. Repeated measures, double-blind, placebo control experiment. Human psychopharmacology laboratory. Fourteen moderate-drinking healthy volunteers. In each of four sessions, subjects first sampled placebo-oxygen and an active drug (end-tidal concentrations of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6% sevoflurane and 30% nitrous oxide in oxygen) and then chose between the two Mood and psychomotor performance during the sampling trials, and choice of drug or placebo-oxygen during choice trial. Nitrous oxide was chosen by 71% of the subjects, and 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6% sevoflurane were chosen by 50%, 57% and 50% of the subjects, respectively. Neither drug was chosen at levels that exceeded that of chance. Sevoflurane and nitrous oxide both impaired psychomotor performance and produced changes in mood. There were several differences in subjective effects between sevoflurane and nitrous oxide at concentrations which were considered to be equivalent in anesthetic effect. Finally, although sevoflurane did not function as a reinforcer in the majority of individuals tested, there was evidence that sevoflurane functioned as a reinforcer in some volunteers: subjects who chose to inhale sevoflurane over placebo-oxygen tended to report a positive spectrum of subjective effects during the sevoflurane sampling trial, relative to those subjects who chose placebo-oxygen over sevoflurane. Although sevoflurane did not function as a reinforcer in the majority of subjects tested, the correspondence between positive subjective effects of sevoflurane and subsequent sevoflurane choice suggests that the volatile anesthetic drug can function as a reinforcer in some moderate drinkers.

  1. Pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies of immediate release diclofenac potassium tablets (50mg) in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Huma; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris; Zafar, Farya; Hanif, Muhammad; Bushra, Rabia; Naz, Asia; Khursheed, Raheela

    2016-09-01

    This study was conducted with the aim to determine the pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence of diclofenac potassium 50 mg test (F4) tablet formulation with reference product (Caflam). Present study was single dose, randomized, two phase cross over design, conducted in 12 healthy Pakistani volunteers and planned in accordance with FDA guidelines. In this study a simple, selective, sensitive and reproducible HPLC procedure was developed and validated for the estimation of diclofenac potassium in plasma. The process was validated in the range of 50 - 0.05 µg.mL-1 and used in bioequivalence trial of two products. Multiple blood samples were collected at various time points (0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14 hr after treating volunteers with test (F4) and marketed reference brand. Plasma separation and deproteination were carried out with acetonitrile; samples (20µL) were injected using the validated HPLC method. Various pharmacokinetic parameters (compartmental and noncompartmental) were estimated using KineticaTM 4.4.1 (Thermo Electron Corp. USA). Bioequivalence among the products was established by calculating the 90% CI with log and non log transformed data for Cmaxcalc, Tmaxcalc, AUC0-∞, AUCtot and AUClast using two way ANOVA and Schirmann's Two one sided t- test. No significant difference was found between log and non-log data. The 90% confidence interval values using log transformed data for AUC0-∞ (0.997-1.024), AUCtot (1.004-1.031), AUClast (0.997 -1.024), Cmaxcalc (0.994-1.007) and Tmaxcalc (0.996-1.013) for the trial and reference products were found within the FDA acceptable limits of 0.8-1.25. Results were further verified by the Schirmann's one-sided t test. Results showed the bioequivalence of test and reference formulations. Both the products were well tolerated.

  2. [{sup 18}F]FETO for adrenocortical PET imaging: a pilot study in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsak, Wolfgang [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); University of Vienna, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Vienna (Austria); Mitterhauser, Markus [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); University of Vienna, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Vienna (Austria); Hospital Pharmacy of the General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Rendl, Gundula; Schuetz, Matthias; Ettlinger, Dagmar E.; Kletter, Kurt; Karanikas, Georgios [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Mien, Leonhard K. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); University of Vienna, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Psychiatry, Vienna (Austria); Dudczak, Robert [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-06-15

    Functional imaging of the adrenal cortex by means of PET may play an important clinical role. Recently, we presented the synthesis and first evaluation of a novel 11{beta}-hydroxylase inhibitor, [{sup 18}F]FETO, in rats displaying high tracer accumulation in the adrenals. In this study, we aimed to investigate for the first time the potency of [{sup 18}F]FETO as a PET tracer for the adrenal cortex in humans. An average preparation yielded 1-2 GBq of [{sup 18}F]FETO ready to use. Ten healthy volunteers aged 24-57 years (five male and five female) were included in the study. After i.v. administration of 365 MBq [{sup 18}F]FETO (246-391 MBq), dynamic images were acquired in 2D standard mode in 14 frames over 45 min. Afterwards, whole-body scanning was performed. In addition to visual interpretation, semi-quantitative analysis using standardised uptake values (SUVs) was conducted. [{sup 18}F]FETO distribution was similar in all scanned volunteers. Visually, pronounced accumulation of [{sup 18}F]FETO was found in the adrenals, whereas moderate uptake was observed - at least in some of the subjects - for liver, renal calices, gallbladder, stomach walls and pancreas. Kidney and bowels showed only faint uptake. Median SUVs for the right and left adrenal glands were 15.6 (10.0-28.6) and 15.7 (10.3-35.9), respectively. The reference tissue (liver) displayed a median SUV of 2.5 (2.2-4.6). (orig.)

  3. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence studies of galantamine hydrobromide dispersible tablet in healthy male Chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-jun; Fang, Xiao-ling; Li, Xue-ning; Wang, Qing-song; Han, Li-mei; Zhang, Zhi-wen; Sha, Xian-yi

    2007-03-01

    A randomized, two-way, crossover study was conducted in 18 healthy male Chinese volunteers to compare pharmacokinetics profiles of galantamine hydrobromide dispersible tablet with that of conventional tablet. A single oral dose of 10 mg galantamine was administrated to each volunteer. Plasma concentrations of galantamine were determined by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with fluorescence detection, which allowed 1 ng/mL to be assayed as the lowest quantifiable concentration. From plasma concentrations, AUC(0-->t) (the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to the last sampling time, 32 hr), AUC(0-->infinity) (the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity), t((1/2)) (elimination of half-life of the terminal log linear phase), C(max) (maximum plasma drug concentration) and T(max) (time to reach C(max)) were evaluated through noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. AUC(0-->t) and AUC(0-->infinity) were calculated by the linear-log trapezoidal rule method. C(max) and T(max) were obtained directly from the plasma concentration-time curve. Analysis of variance was carried out using logarithmically transformed AUC(0-->t), AUC(0-->infinity) and C(max). As far as AUC(0-->t), AUC(0-->infinity) and C(max) were concerned, there was no statistically significant difference between the test and reference formulations. Ninety percent confidence intervals (90% CI) for the ratio of AUC(0-->t), AUC(0-->infinity) and C(max) values for the test and reference formulations were 100.4-107.8%, 99.0-107.2% and 87.5-111.3%, respectively. As the 90% CIs of AUC(0-->t), AUC(0-->infinity) and C(max) were entirely within 80-125%, two formulations were considered bioequivalent.

  4. Stopped hearts, amputated toes and NASA: contemporary legends among healthy volunteers in US phase I clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    The first stage of testing new pharmaceuticals in humans is referred to as a phase I clinical trial. The purpose of these studies is to test the safety of the drugs and to establish appropriate doses that can later be given to patients. Most of these studies are conducted under controlled, in-patient conditions using healthy volunteers who are paid for their participation. To explore healthy volunteers’ experiences in clinical trials, an ethnographic study was conducted at six in-patient phas...

  5. [Characteristics of PET cerebral functional imaging during "Deqi" of acupuncture in healthy volunteers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gui-Feng; Huang, Yong; Tang, Chun-Zhi; Wang, Shu-Xia; Yang, Jun-Jun; Shan, Bao-Ci

    2011-02-01

    To observe the characteristics of needling sensation of "Deqi" (feelings of soreness, numbness, distending and heaviness, SNDH) by using positron emission tomography (PET) based on changes of glucose metabolism in different functional brain areas. Eighteen normal volunteers [9 men and 9 women, mean age (23.23-1- 3. 32) years] were randomly divided into control, Waiguan (SJ 5) and non-acupoint groups (n=6 in each group). SJ 5 and non-acupoint (the midpoint between SJ 5 and the running course of the Small Intestine Meridian on the right forearm) were punctured by using a sterilized filiform needle. PET scan of the brain began 40 min after intravenous 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) injection (0. 11 mCi/kg body weight, left opisthenar vein). Needling sensations including "Deqi"(n= 5), tingling (n 5) and no-apparently-specific-feeling (NASF) were acquired by acupuncture stimulation and grouped. The needling sensations were evaluated by using Visual Analog Scale(VAS). The acquired image data of different needling-sensation groups were analyzed using SPM 2. 0 software in the Matlab Platform. After receiving acupuncture stimulation of SJ 5, 5 volunteers in the Waiguan (SJ 5) group experienced fee- lings of SNDH, with the mean VAS score being 4.23 +/- 1. 50, and 5 volunteers of the non-acupoint group had a tingling feeling, with the mean VAS score being 5.73 2.40. The VAS score of the tingling group was significantly higher than that of SNDH group (P10 voxels). The activated cerebral areas in the tingling group were BA 18, 19, 22, 24, 25, 32, 36, 40 and BA 45, predominantly involving the left limbic lobe, hippocampal gyrus, etc. and being apparently different to those of the control group (P 10 voxels). Acupuncture of Waiguan (SJ 5) mainly produces feelings of soreness, numbness, distending and heaviness, and the activated cerebral areas mainly involve the left temporal lobe, superior temporal gyrus, etc. ; while acupuncture of its neighboring non-acupoint chiefly induces a

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels during glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-induced headache in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, C; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Jansen-Olesen, I

    2010-01-01

    calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). CGRP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin plasma levels were measured before and after placebo/sumatriptan injection and during GTN-induced headache. Following a double-blind randomized cross-over design, 10 healthy volunteers...

  7. Safety of a New Compact Male Intermittent Catheter: Randomized, Cross-Over, Single-Blind Study in Healthy Male Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagi, Per; Hannibalsen, Jane; Permild, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A new compact male intermittent catheter was compared with a regular intermittent male catheter in terms of safety and acceptability. Methods: In this randomized, single-blind, cross-over study, healthy male volunteers were catheterized twice with a compact catheter and twice with a...

  8. Pharmacokinetics of IL-18 binding protein in healthy volunteers and subjects with rheumatoid arthritis or plaque psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Tak; M. Bacchi; M. Bertolino

    2006-01-01

    IL-18 binding protein (BP) neutralizes the activity of IL-18, a cytokine implicated in psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of recombinant human IL-18 BP (r-hIL-18 BP) in healthy volunteers and subjects with psoriasis or RA in fou

  9. Sumatriptan does not change calcitonin gene-related peptide in the cephalic and extracephalic circulation in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Petersen, Jesper; Wienecke, Troels;

    2009-01-01

    not differ between the four vascular compartments (P=0.49). It was found that Sumatriptan did not change the levels of circulating CGRP in the intra or extracerebral circulation in healthy volunteers. This speaks against a direct CGRP-reducing effect of sumatriptan in vivo in humans when the trigemino...

  10. The Pharmacokinetics of Enalapril in Relation to CES1 Genotype in Healthy Danish Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Claus; Jürgens, Gesche; Guski, Louise Schow

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of variations in the carboxylesterase 1 gene (CES1) on the pharmacokinetics of enalapril. Forty-three healthy, Danish, Caucasian volunteers representing different pre-defined genotypes each received 10 mg of enalapril. At specified time points, plasma...

  11. Stopped hearts, amputated toes and NASA: contemporary legends among healthy volunteers in US phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jill A

    2015-01-01

    The first stage of testing new pharmaceuticals in humans is referred to as a phase I clinical trial. The purpose of these studies is to test the safety of the drugs and to establish appropriate doses that can later be given to patients. Most of these studies are conducted under controlled, in-patient conditions using healthy volunteers who are paid for their participation. To explore healthy volunteers' experiences in clinical trials, an ethnographic study was conducted at six in-patient phase I clinics in the USA. In addition to the observation of clinic activities (from informed consent procedures to dosing to blood draws), 268 semi-structured interviews were conducted, 33 with clinic staff and 235 with healthy volunteers. Drawing on this dataset, this article explores healthy volunteers' exchange of contemporary legends about phase I clinical trials. In addition to potentially scaring the listener and communicating distrust in the medical community, these incredible stories help participants cope with perceived stigma and establish a gradient of risk of trial participation, creating potential boundaries to their participation in medical research. The article argues that contemporary legends play a productive role in society, shaping how people view themselves and others and influencing their decisions about risky activities.

  12. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, cross over study to evaluate the analgesic activity of Boswellia serrata in healthy volunteers using mechanical pain model

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    K Prabhavathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Experimental pain models in human healthy volunteers are advantageous for early evaluation of analgesics. All efforts to develop nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs which are devoid of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular system effects are still far from achieving a breakthrough. Hence we evaluated the analgesic activity of an ayurvedic drug, Boswellia serrata by using validated human pain models which has shown its analgesic activity both in-vitro and preclinical studies to evaluate the analgesic activity of single oral dose (125 mg, 2 capsules of Boswellia serrata compared to placebo using mechanical pain model in healthy human subjects. Materials and Methods: After taking written informed consent, twelve healthy subjects were randomized (1:1 to receive single oral dose of Boswellia serrata (Shallaki® 125 mg, 2 capsules or identical placebo in a crossover design. Mechanical pain was assessed using Ugo basile analgesymeter (by Randall Selitto test at baseline and at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs after test drug administration. Pain Threshold force and time and Pain Tolerance force and time were evaluated. Statistical analysis was done by paired t-test. Results : Twelve healthy volunteers have completed the study. Mean percentage change from baseline in Pain Threshold force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly increased [Force: 9.7 ± 11.0 vs 2.9 ± 3.4 (P = 0.05 and time: 9.7 ± 10.7 vs 2.8 ± 3.4 (P = 0.04] at third hr. Mean Percentage change from baseline in Pain Tolerance force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly (P ≤ 0.01 increased at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs. Conclusion : In the present study, Boswellia serrata significantly increased the Pain Threshold and Pain Tolerance force and time compared to placebo. Both study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug.

  13. The differential effects of chlorpromazine and haloperidol on latent inhibition in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartan, D; Bell, R; Green, J F; Campbell, C; Trimble, K; Pickering, A; King, D J

    2001-06-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) is a measure of reduced learning about a stimulus to which there has been prior exposure without any consequence. It therefore requires a comparison between a pre-exposed (PE) and a non-pre-exposed (NPE) condition. Since, in animals, LI is disrupted by amphetamines and enhanced by antipsychotics, LI disruption has been proposed as a measure of the characteristic attentional deficit in schizophrenia: the inability to ignore irrelevant stimuli. The findings in humans are, however, inconsistent. In particular, a recent investigation suggested that since haloperidol disrupted LI in healthy volunteers, and LI was normal in non-medicated patients with schizophrenia, the previous findings in schizophrenic patients were entirely due to the negative effects of their medication on LI (Williams et al., 1998). We conducted two studies of antipsychotic drug effects on auditory LI using a within-subject, parallel group design in healthy volunteers. In the first of these, single doses of haloperidol (1 mg. i.v.) were compared with paroxetine (20 mg p.o.) and placebo, and in the second, chlorpromazine (100 mg p.o.) was compared with lorazepam (2 mg. p.o.) and placebo. Eye movements, neuropsychological test performance (spatial working memory (SWM), Tower of London and intra/extra dimensional shift, from the CANTAB test battery) and visual analogue rating scales, were also included as other measures of attention and frontal lobe function. Haloperidol was associated with a non-significant reduction in LI scores, and dysphoria/akathisia (Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale) in three-quarters of the subjects. The LI finding may be explained by increased distractibility which was indicated by an increase in antisaccade directional errors in this group. In contrast, LI was significantly increased by chlorpromazine but not by an equally sedative dose of lorazepam (both drugs causing marked decreases in peak saccadic velocity). Paroxetine had no effect on LI, eye

  14. Bioavailability study of drotaverine from capsule and tablet preparations in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyderski, Stanisław; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Drobnik, Leon; Szałek, Edyta; Balcerkiewicz, Monika; Dubai, Vitali

    2004-01-01

    The bioavailability of drotaverine (CAS 14009-24-6) was investigated after oral administration of a drotaverine capsule preparation (20 mg Droxa mite) and compared to that of a reference tablet preparation. The preparations were investigated in 23 healthy volunteers, aged between 20 and 27 years, according to a randomised two-way, cross-over design in the fasted state. Blood samples for determination of drotaverine plasma concentrations were collected at pre-defined time points up to 30 h following drug administration. A washout period of two weeks separated both treatment periods. Drotaverine plasma concentrations were determined by means of a validated HPLC method (UV detector, imipramine HCl salt as an internal standard). The limit of detection was 6 ng/ml. Values of 1593.92 +/- 949.70 ng x h/l (95% confidence interval (CI): 1183.20-2004.60) for the test and 1705.48 +/- 737.78 ng x h/l (95% CI: 1386.40-2024.50) for the reference preparation AUC(0-infinity) demonstrate a nearly identical extent of drug absorption. Maximum concentrations--Cmax of 121.89 +/- 37.03 ng/ml (95% CI: 104.05-139.80) and 121.85 +/- 37.97 ng/ml (95% CI: 107.09-135.74) and time to reach maximum plasma concentration--Tmax of 1.29 +/- 0.42 h (95% CI: 1.11-1.48) and 1.14 +/- 0.34 h (95% CI: 0.99-1.29) achieved for the test and reference preparations did not differ significantly. The relative bioavailability (AUC(0-infinity) ratio test/reference) and Cmax ratio test/reference were 103.15% (90% CI: 81.68-124.60) and 103.74% (90% CI: 94.10-113.38), respectively. AUC was calculated using two different methods. There were no significant differences between the obtained values. Since the 90% CI for both, AUC and Cmax ratios were within the 80-125% interval proposed by the European Agency for the Evalution of Medicinal Products (CPMP) and the Food and Drug Administration, it is concluded that the new drotaverine capsule formulation is therapeutically equivalent to the conventional formulation for

  15. A pilot study assessing pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oral and intravenous baclofen in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Suresh K; Kriel, Robert L; Cloyd, James C; Coles, Lisa D; Scherkenbach, Lisa A; Tobin, Michael H; Krach, Linda E

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to characterize baclofen pharmacokinetics and safety given orally and intravenously. Twelve healthy subjects were enrolled in a randomized, open-label, crossover study and received single doses of baclofen: 3 or 5 mg given intravenously and 5 or 10 mg taken orally with a 48-hour washout. Blood samples for baclofen analysis were collected pre-dose and at regular intervals up to 24 hours post-dose. Clinical response was assessed by sedation scores, ataxia, and nystagmus. Mean absolute bioavailability of oral baclofen was 74%. Dose-adjusted areas under the curve between the oral and intravenous arms were statistically different (P = .0024), whereas area under the curve variability was similar (coefficient of variation: 18%-24%). Adverse effects were mild in severity and not related to either dose or route of administration. Three- and 5-mg intravenous doses of baclofen were well tolerated. Seventy-four percent oral bioavailability indicates that smaller doses of intravenous baclofen are needed to attain comparable total drug exposures.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of sugammadex 16 mg/kg in healthy Chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kam, Pieter-Jan; Hou, Jie; Wang, Zaiqi; Lin, Wen Hong; van den Heuvel, Michiel

    2015-06-01

    Elimination of sugammadex occurs predominantly via the kidneys, with the majority of the drug excreted unchanged in the urine. To date, most studies with sugammadex have been performed in non-Asian populations. The objectives of this open-label study were to determine the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of single-dose sugammadex (16 mg/kg) in healthy Chinese adult volunteers. 12 Chinese subjects (6 male; 6 female) received intravenous sugammadex (16 mg/kg) as a 10-second bolus infusion. Blood samples were collected pre-sugammadex and at regular intervals up to 24 hours post-sugammadex for PK assessment. Safety was assessed via AEs, vital signs, electrocardiogram, and laboratory parameters. Following sugammadex 16 mg/kg infusion, peak sugammadex concentration was 197 μg/mL, clearance was 99.7 mL/min, and apparent volume of distribution at equilibrium was 10.5 L. Plasma sugammadex concentrations showed a polyexponential decline over time, with an overall geometric mean (CV%) terminal half-life of 145 minutes (17.9%) (139 minutes (17.7%) for males; 152 minutes (18.6%) for females). No influence of gender on the PK of sugammadex was observed. Three subjects experienced an adverse events (AE) (dysgeusia of mild intensity), which was considered possibly or probably related to sugammadex. There were no clinically significant changes in vital signs, electrocardiography or laboratory parameters. PK of sugammadex (16 mg/kg) was characterized in healthy Chinese subjects. Overall between-subject variability on clearance and apparent volume of distribution was ~ 10%. Sugammadex was generally well tolerated.

  17. Various Oscillation Patterns of Serum Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Concentrations in Healthy Volunteers

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    Sang Ah Lee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 was originally identified as a paroxysm proliferator activated receptor-α target gene product and is a hormone involved in metabolic regulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diurnal variation of serum FGF21 concentration in obese and non-obese healthy volunteers.MethodsBlood samples were collected from five non-obese (body mass index [BMI] ≤23 kg/m2 and five obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m2 healthy young men every 30 to 60 minutes over 24 hours. Serum FGF21 concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. Anthropometric parameters, glucose, free fatty acid, insulin, leptin, and cortisol concentrations were also measured.ResultsThe serum FGF21 concentrations displayed various individual oscillation patterns. The oscillation frequency ranged between 6 and 12 times per day. The average duration of oscillation was 2.52 hours (range, 1.9 to 3.0 hours. The peaks and troughs of FGF21 oscillation showed no circadian rhythm. However, the oscillation frequency had a diurnal variation and was lower during the light-off period than during the light-on period (2.4 vs. 7.3 times, P<0.001. There was no difference in the total frequency or duration of oscillations between non-obese and obese subjects, but obese individuals had increased numbers of larger oscillations (amplitude ≥0.19 ng/mL.ConclusionVarious oscillation patterns in serum FGF21 concentration were observed, and reduced oscillation frequencies were seen during sleep. The oscillation patterns of serum FGF21 concentration suggest that FGF21 may be secreted into systemic circulation in a pulsatile manner. Obesity appeared to affect the amplitude of oscillations of serum FGF21.

  18. A comparative bioavailability study of two ibuprofen formulations after single-dose administration in healthy volunteers

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    Metta S.S. Wiria

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the bioequivalence of ibuprofen 125 mg suppository formulation (Ibukal®, test formulation from PT. Kalbe Farma, Tbk., Jakarta and the ibuprofen suppository comparative formulation (Proris®, from PT. Pharos Indonesia, Jakarta in 12 healthy volunteers. The pharmacokinetic parameters used in this study were the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to hour 10 (AUC0-t, the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinite (AUC0-inf, the maximum concentration (Cmax, and the time needed to reach the maximum concentration (tmax. The study was designed as a random cross-over fashion, single-blinded which included 12 healthy adult volunteers. The volunteers were fasted overnight and in the morning they received a suppository of the test drug (Ibukal® or a suppository of the comparative drug (Proris®. Blood samples were withdrawn on hour 0 (control, 20 min; 40 min; 1; 1.5; 2; 2.5; 3; 4; 6; 8; and 10 time points after the administration of the drug. Following a wash-out period of 1 week, this procedure was repeated using the other drug. The serum concentration of the drug was determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. The results of the study showed that, the mean (SD of AUC0-t, AUC0-inf, Cmax and tmax of the test drug were, respectively, 28.59(3.37 μg.h.mL-1, 30.47(3.56 μg.h.mL-1, 8.24(1.44 μg/mL, and 1.33(0.44 h. The mean (SD of AUC0-t, AUC0-inf, Cmax and tmax of the comparative drug were, respectively, 28.13(8.14 μg.h.mL-1, 30.56(8.05 μg.h.mL-1, 8.27(2.88 μg/mL, and 1.79(0.33 h. The geometric means ratio of the test to the comparative drug were 104.38% (CI 90%: 90.38-120.54% for AUC0-t, 101.97% (CI 90%: 89.51-116.16% for AUC0-inf, and 104.02% (CI 90%: 85.73-126.16% for Cmax. There was no side effect of the drug detected in this study. From the results we can conclude that the 125 mg of ibuprofen suppository of PT Kalbe Farma

  19. Scintigraphic evaluation of colon targeting pectin-HPMC tablets in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, L A; Connolly, S M; Band, J; O'Mahony, B; Ugurlu, T; Turkoglu, M; Wilson, C G; Stevens, H N E

    2009-03-31

    The in vivo evaluation of colon-targeting tablets was conducted in six healthy male volunteers. A pectin-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose coating was compressed onto core tablets labelled with 4MBq (99m)Tc-DTPA. The tablets released in the colon in all subjects; three in the ascending colon (AC) and three in the transverse colon (TC). Tablets that released in the TC had reached the AC before or just after food (Group A). The other three tablets released immediately upon AC entry at least 1.5h post-meal (Group B). Release onset for Group B was earlier than Group A (343min vs 448min). Group B tablets exhibited a clear residence period at the ileocaecal junction (ICJ) which was not observed in Group A. Prolonged residence at the ICJ is assumed to have increased hydration of the hydrogel layer surrounding the core tablet. Forces applied as the tablets progressed through the ICJ may have disrupted the hydrogel layer sufficiently to initiate radiolabel release. Conversely, Group A tablets moved rapidly through the AC to the TC, possibly minimising contact times with water pockets. Inadequate prior hydration of the hydrogel layer preventing access of pectinolytic enzymes and reduced fluid availability in the TC may have retarded tablet disintegration and radiolabel diffusion.

  20. Bioequivalence Study of Two Orodispersible Rizatriptan Formulations of 10 mg in Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas, Mercè; Polonio, Francisco; Cabré, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the bioequivalence and tolerability of two different oral formulations of rizatriptan. A bioequivalence study was carried out in 40 healthy volunteers according to an open label, randomized, two-period, two-sequence, crossover, single dose, and fasting conditions design. The test and reference formulations were administered in two treatment days, separated by a washout period of seven days. Plasma concentrations of rizatriptan were obtained by the LC/MS/MS (Liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry) method. Log-transformed AUC0-t (area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to the last measurable concentration) and Cmax (maximum plasma concentration) values were tested for bioequivalence based on the ratios of the geometric means (test/reference). The tmax (time to reach maximum plasma concentration) was analysed nonparametrically. The 90% confidence intervals of the geometric mean values for the test/reference ratios for AUC0-t and Cmax were within the bioequivalence acceptance range of 80%–125%. According to the European Guideline, it may therefore be concluded that the test formulation of rizatriptan 10 mg orodispersible tablet is bioequivalent to the reference formulation (Maxalt® Max 10 mg oral lyophilisate). The safety profile of both formulations was consistent with the summary of the product characteristics.

  1. Bioavailability of an R-α-Lipoic Acid/γ-Cyclodextrin Complex in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Naoko; Okamoto, Hinako; Furune, Takahiro; Uekaji, Yukiko; Terao, Keiji; Uchida, Ryota; Iwamoto, Kosuke; Miyajima, Atsushi; Hirota, Takashi; Sakamoto, Norihiro

    2016-06-15

    R-α-lipoic acid (R-LA) is a cofactor of mitochondrial enzymes and a very strong antioxidant. R-LA is available as a functional food ingredient but is unstable against heat or acid. Stabilized R-LA was prepared through complexation with γ-cyclodextrin (CD), yielding R-LA/CD. R-LA/CD was orally administered to six healthy volunteers and showed higher plasma levels with an area under the plasma concentration-time curve that was 2.5 times higher than that after oral administration of non-complexed R-LA, although the time to reach the maximum plasma concentration and half-life did not differ. Furthermore, the plasma glucose level after a single oral administration of R-LA/CD or R-LA was not affected and no side effects were observed. These results indicate that R-LA/CD could be easily absorbed in the intestine. In conclusion, γ-CD complexation is a promising technology for delivering functional but unstable ingredients like R-LA.

  2. Hydroxyl-platelet-activating factor exists in blood of healthy volunteers and periodontal patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaragdi Antonopoulou

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal diseases are localized chronic inflammatory conditions of the gingival and underlying bone and connective tissue. Platelet-activating factor (PAF, a potent inflammatory phospholipid mediator that has been previously detected in elevated levels in inflamed gingival tissues, in gingival crevicular fluid and in saliva, is implicated in periodontal disease. Our results from previous studies showed that the biologically active phospholipid detected in gingival crevicular fluid is a hydroxyl-PAF analogue. In this study, hydroxyl-PAF analogue was detected for the first time in human blood derived from patients with chronic periodontitis as well as from periodontally healthy volunteers. The hydroxyl-PAF analogue was purified by high-performance liquid chromatography, detected by biological assays and identified by electrospray analysis. In addition, the quantitative determination of PAF and hydroxyl-PAF analogue (expressed as PAF-like activity showed a statistically significant increase in the ratio of hydroxyl-PAF analogue levels to PAF levels in periodontal patients, suggesting that this bioactive lipid may play a role in oral inflammation.

  3. Effects of acute hypoventilation and hyperventilation on exhaled carbon monoxide measurement in healthy volunteers

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    Di Donato Michele

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High levels of exhaled carbon monoxide (eCO are a marker of airway or lung inflammation. We investigated whether hypo- or hyperventilation can affect measured values. Methods Ten healthy volunteers were trained to achieve sustained end-tidal CO2 (etCO2 concentrations of 30 (hyperventilation, 40 (normoventilation, and 50 mmHg (hypoventilation. As soon as target etCO2 values were achieved for 120 sec, exhaled breath was analyzed for eCO with a photoacoustic spectrometer. At etCO2 values of 30 and 40 mmHg exhaled breath was sampled both after a deep inspiration and after a normal one. All measurements were performed in two different environmental conditions: A ambient CO concentration = 0.8 ppm and B ambient CO concentration = 1.7 ppm. Results During normoventilation, eCO mean (standard deviation was 11.5 (0.8 ppm; it decreased to 10.3 (0.8 ppm during hyperventilation (p 2 changes (hyperventilation: 10% Vs 25% decrease; hypoventilation 3% Vs 25% increase. Taking a deep inspiration before breath sampling was associated with lower eCO values (p Conclusions eCO measurements should not be performed during marked acute hyperventilation, like that induced in this study, but the influence of less pronounced hyperventilation or of hypoventilation is probably negligible in clinical practice

  4. Emission rates of selected volatile organic compounds from skin of healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalski, Paweł; King, Julian; Unterkofler, Karl; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2014-05-15

    Gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) coupled with solid phase micro-extraction as pre-concentration method (SPME) was applied to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by human skin. A total of 64 C4-C10 compounds were quantified in skin emanation of 31 healthy volunteers. Amongst them aldehydes and hydrocarbons were the predominant chemical families with eighteen and seventeen species, respectively. Apart from these, there were eight ketones, six heterocyclic compounds, six terpenes, four esters, two alcohols, two volatile sulphur compounds, and one nitrile. The observed median emission rates ranged from 0.55 to 4,790 fmol cm(-2)min(-1). Within this set of analytes three volatiles; acetone, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and acetaldehyde exhibited especially high emission rates exceeding 100 fmol cm(-2)min(-1). Thirty-three volatiles were highly present in skin emanation with incidence rates over 80%. These species can be considered as potential markers of human presence, which could be used for early location of entrapped victims during Urban Search and Rescue Operations (USaR).

  5. Accuracy of the Lifebox pulse oximeter during hypoxia in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowitz, G; Breyer, K; Lipnick, M; Sall, J W; Feiner, J; Ikeda, K; MacLeod, D B; Bickler, P E

    2013-12-01

    Pulse oximetry is a standard of care during anaesthesia in high-income countries. However, 70% of operating environments in low- and middle-income countries have no pulse oximeter. The 'Lifebox' oximetry project set out to bridge this gap with an inexpensive oximeter meeting CE (European Conformity) and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standards. To date, there are no performance-specific accuracy data on this instrument. The aim of this study was to establish whether the Lifebox pulse oximeter provides clinically reliable haemoglobin oxygen saturation (Sp O2 ) readings meeting USA Food and Drug Administration 510(k) standards. Using healthy volunteers, inspired oxygen fraction was adjusted to produce arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation (Sa O2 ) readings between 71% and 100% measured with a multi-wavelength oximeter. Lifebox accuracy was expressed using bias (Sp O2 - Sa O2 ), precision (SD of the bias) and the root mean square error (Arms). Simultaneous readings of Sa O2 and Sp O2 in 57 subjects showed a mean (SD) bias of -0.41% (2.28%) and Arms 2.31%. The Lifebox pulse oximeter meets current USA Food and Drug Administration standards for accuracy, thus representing an inexpensive solution for patient monitoring without compromising standards.

  6. Comparative bioavailability of two tablet formulations of ranitidine hydrochloride in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawazir, S A; Gouda, M W; El-Sayed, Y M; Al-Khamis, K I; Al-Yamani, M J; Niazy, E M; Al-Rashood, K A

    1998-05-01

    This investigation was carried out to evaluate the bioavailability of a new tablet formulation of ranitidine HCl (300 mg), Ranid, relative to the reference product, Zantac, (300 mg) tablets. The bioavailability was carried out on 24 healthy male volunteers who received a single dose (300 mg) of the test (T) and the reference (R) products in the fasting state, in a randomized balanced 2-way crossover design. After dosing, serial blood samples were collected for a period of 16 hours. Plasma harvested from blood was analyzed for ranitidine by a sensitive and validated high-performance liquid chromatographic assay. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), area under the plasma concentration time curve up to the last measurable concentration (AUC0-t), and to infinity (AUC0-infinity) and the absorption rate (Cmax/AUC0-infinity) were analyzed statistically under the assumption of a multiplicative model. The time to maximum concentration (Tmax) was analyzed assuming an additive model. The parametric confidence intervals (90%) of the mean values of the pharmacokinetic characteristics (AUC0-t, AUC0-infinity), Cmax and Cmax/AUC0-infinity) for T/R ratio were in each case well within the bioequivalence acceptable range of 80-125%. The test formulation was found bioequivalent to the reference formulation by the Schuirmann's two one-sided t-tests and by Wilcoxon Mann Whitney two one-sided tests procedure. Therefore, the 2 formulations were considered to be bioequivalent.

  7. Effects of Different Therapeutic Ultrasound Waveforms on Endothelial Function in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jeferson Mendes; Hauck, Melina; Cardoso Pereira, Ana Paula; Moraes, Maicon Borges; Martins, Cassio Noronha; da Silva Paulitsch, Felipe; Plentz, Rodrigo Della Méa; Peres, William; Vargas da Silva, Antônio Marcos; Signori, Luis Ulisses

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different therapeutic 1-MHz ultrasound waveforms on endothelial function before and after cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. Forty-two healthy volunteers aged 27.2 ± 3.8 y underwent interventions and an evaluation for endothelial function (n = 15; with COX inhibition, n = 15; duration of the vasodilator effect, n = 12) by technique flow-mediated dilation. Continuous ultrasound therapy (0.4 W/cm(2 SATA)), pulsed ultrasound therapy (20% duty cycle, 0.08 W/cm(2 SATA)) or placebo (equipment power off) was randomly applied over the brachial artery for 5 min. COX inhibition (aspirin) was carried out 30 min before treatments. In relation to the placebo, flow-mediated dilation increased by 4.8% using continuous ultrasound and by 3.4% using pulsed ultrasound. After COX, flow-mediated dilation was enhanced by 2.1% by continuous ultrasound and 2.6% by pulsed ultrasound. This vasodilation persisted for 20 min. Continuous and pulsed therapeutic 1-MHz ultrasound waveforms improved endothelial function in humans, which provided them with anti-inflammatory vascular effects.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of tucaresol, an antisickling agent, in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolan, P E; Mercer, A J; Wootton, R; Posner, J

    1995-01-01

    1. Tucaresol is an orally administered antisickling agent which increases the oxygen affinity of haemoglobin. 2. The pharmacokinetics, effects on moderate graded exercise and psychometric performance of tucaresol were examined in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups study in 12 healthy men. 3. Three doses of tucaresol were given at 48 h intervals intended to modify 15, 25 and 32.5% of a subject's haemoglobin to a high affinity form (%MOD). 4. Mean peak %MOD was 34%. Mean Cmax values in plasma and erythrocytes were 81.4 and 1459 micrograms ml-1, respectively. 5. Heart rate, compared with baseline, increased in the tucaresol group with the greatest changes at the highest %MOD and workload. There were no differences between groups in psychometric test performance. 6. Three volunteers on active drug developed fever, rash and tender cervical lymphadenopathy with onset 7-10 days from the start of dosing, suggesting an immune mechanism. 7. The acute increase in oxygen affinity with tucaresol is physiologically well-tolerated, but the utility of tucaresol in the management of sickle cell disease will depend on the identification of a dosing regimen with a lower incidence of drug allergy. PMID:7640143

  9. The effect of ferrous sulphate and sucralfate on the bioavailability of oral gemifloxacin in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A; Bygate, E; Faessel, H; Isaac, L; Lewis, A

    2000-08-01

    Sucralfate is a cytoprotectant with antacid properties and ferrous sulphate is commonly prescribed for iron-deficiency anaemia. This open, randomized, single-dose, five-way crossover study investigated the effect of sucralfate and ferrous sulphate on the bioavailability of gemifloxacin, a novel fluoroquinolone antimicrobial. Twenty-seven healthy male volunteers received gemifloxacin, 320 mg p.o., alone, 3 h after sucralfate (2 g) or ferrous sulphate (325 mg), or 2 h before sucralfate or ferrous sulphate. Each subject received all five dosing regimens in random order with at least 6 days between regimens. Plasma samples collected up to 48 h after dosing with gemifloxacin, were assayed for gemifloxacin to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. Administration of gemifloxacin 3 h after sucralfate produced a marked decrease of 53% in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero extrapolated to infinity (AUC0-infinity), and a decrease of 69% in the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax). Administration of gemifloxacin 3 h after ferrous sulphate resulted in only a modest reduction of 11% in AUC0-infinity and of 20% in Cmax, which was not considered to be clinically significant. In contrast, at the doses used neither sucralfate nor ferrous sulphate altered gemifloxacin bioavailability when it was administered 2 h before either of these agents. Gemifloxacin was well tolerated in all the regimens. The results of this study support the dosing recommendation that gemifloxacin can be safely administered at least 2 h before sucralfate or ferrous sulphate, or at least 3 h after ferrous sulphate.

  10. Bioavailability of an R-α-Lipoic Acid/γ-Cyclodextrin Complex in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Ikuta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available R-α-lipoic acid (R-LA is a cofactor of mitochondrial enzymes and a very strong antioxidant. R-LA is available as a functional food ingredient but is unstable against heat or acid. Stabilized R-LA was prepared through complexation with γ-cyclodextrin (CD, yielding R-LA/CD. R-LA/CD was orally administered to six healthy volunteers and showed higher plasma levels with an area under the plasma concentration-time curve that was 2.5 times higher than that after oral administration of non-complexed R-LA, although the time to reach the maximum plasma concentration and half-life did not differ. Furthermore, the plasma glucose level after a single oral administration of R-LA/CD or R-LA was not affected and no side effects were observed. These results indicate that R-LA/CD could be easily absorbed in the intestine. In conclusion, γ-CD complexation is a promising technology for delivering functional but unstable ingredients like R-LA.

  11. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of oral and intravenous meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsman, H J; Van Gerven, J M; Tieleman, M C; Schoemaker, R C; Pieters, M S; Ferrari, M D; Cohen, A F; Van Kempen, G M

    1998-08-01

    meta-Chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) is a compound that is frequently used in challenge tests of the serotonergic system. Its human pharmacology is largely unexplored. The objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of mCPP. Eight female and six male healthy volunteers were included in a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, three-way crossover design of single-dose intravenous (0.1 mg/kg), oral (0.5 mg/kg), and placebo treatment, with 24-hour follow-up. mCPP showed a large variability in clearance (11-92 mL/hr) and bioavailability (14-108%). Two female subjects dropped out because of headache and dysphoria. During the 27 occasions in which mCPP was administered, autonomic physical symptoms were observed in 23 subjects and disturbances of mood in 6 subjects. Oral and intravenous mCPP caused sudden increases in cortisol levels, prolactin levels, and total scores of the Body Sensation Questionnaire. Administration of mCPP also led to concentration-dependent increases of saccadic peak velocity and adaptive tracking performance and to a decrease of electroencephalographic occipital theta activity. No clinically relevant effects on electrocardiogram, temperature, and blood pressure were found. In conclusion, it is doubtful whether mCPP is a useful compound for challenge tests in view of the large pharmacokinetic variability after intravenous and oral administration. The effects of mCPP are consistent with disinhibition of the central nervous system.

  12. Bioequiwalence of clavulanate Potassium and Amoxicillin(1:7) dispersible tablets in healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡国新; 代宗顺; 龙利红; 韩颖; 侯淑贤; 吴立

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To study the bioequivalence of Clavulanate Potassium and Amoxicillin (1: 7) dispersible tablets, a randomized cross - over study was conducted in 18 healthy volunteers. A single oral dose of 1000 mg Clavulanate Potassium and Amoxicillin (1:7) dispersible tablets (Tested formulation, T) or Augmentin syrup (Reference formulation, R). Concentrations in plasma were determined with high-performance liquid chromatography. The main paramaters of T were: for Clavu lanate Potassium and Amoxicillin, Cmax: 2. 46±1.11 μg/ml and 18. 81±7. 26 μg/ml, Tmax 1. 12±0. 23h and 1. 30±0. 34h, AUC(0- 6h): 5. 18±2.24 μg * h/ml and 45. 09±14. 53 μg * h/ml, t1/2:1.43±0. 44 h and 1. 09±0.22 h. , respectively. The relative bioavailability of T to R were 96. 5±19. 2 % and 98. 4±26. 1 % , respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the two formulations were bioequivalent.

  13. Bowel MR imaging with oral Gastrografin: an experimental study with healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borthne, A.S.; Dormagen, J.B. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Ullevaal University Hospital, Kirkeveien 166, 0407 Oslo (Norway); Gjesdal, K.I.; Storaas, T. [Department of Medical Physics, Ullevaal University Hospital, Kirkeveien 166, 0407 Oslo (Norway); Lygren, I. [Department of Gastroenterology, Ullevaal University Hospital, Kirkeveien 166, 0407 Oslo (Norway); Geitung, J.T. [Department of Central Radiology, Ullevaal University Hospital, Kirkeveien 166, 0407 Oslo (Norway)

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate Gastrografin for MR bowel imaging. Twenty-three healthy volunteers in two randomised groups received 300 or 400 ml 50% Gastrografin, drunk continuously during 2 and 3 h, respectively. Images were applied during breath-hold in three orthogonal orientations. The balanced fast-field echo (BFFE) and balanced turbo field-echo (BTFE) sequences, with acquisition times from 13 to 25 s, were used before gadolinium (Gd) DTPA implying 1- to 2-mm-thick slices locally or 6-mm-thick slices through the entire gastrointestinal tract. The Gd-enhanced images were performed using a 3D T1-weighted FFE sequence with water selective excitation (Proset). Image quality, including bowel distention, homogeneity of opacification and wall conspicuity, were evaluated by two experienced reviewers, and the adverse reactions were recorded. Very good or excellent distention, homogeneity and wall conspicuity were achieved in the central segments from the ileum to the left colon flexure in 83-96% of cases, due to the adequate contrast media supply in these regions. Distention, homogeneity and delineation were good in the central segments of the remaining bowels. Diarrhoea was a major problem affecting all participants, followed by nausea. Provided that there is modern fast sequential technology, excellent MR imaging of the bowel can be achieved by the oral administration 50% diluted Gastrografin. Further studies are needed to refine the technique and optimise the quantity and concentration of Gastrografin in order to avoid or reduce adverse reactions. (orig.)

  14. PET studies of {sup 18}F-memantine in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ametamey, S.M. E-mail: simon-mensah.ametamey@psi.ch; Bruehlmeier, M.; Kneifel, S.; Kokic, M.; Honer, M.; Arigoni, M.; Buck, A.; Burger, C.; Samnick, S.; Quack, G.; Schubiger, P.A

    2002-02-01

    Previous studies in mice and PET investigations in a Rhesus monkey showed that the regional uptake of {sup 18}F-memantine could be blocked by pharmacological doses of memantine and (+)-MK-801. In the present study, the binding characteristics of {sup 18}F-memantine was examined in five healthy volunteers. In humans, {sup 18}F-memantine was homogeneously distributed in gray matter i.e. cortex and basal ganglia regions, as well as the cerebellum. No radioactive metabolites were detected in plasma during the time-frame of the PET studies. The uptake of {sup 18}F-memantine in receptor-rich regions such as striatum and frontal cortex could be well described by a 1-tissue compartment model. The DV'' values of all gray matter regions were similar and ranged from 15 to 20 ml/ml. The white matter showed lower DV'' values of 15 {+-} 1.4 ml/ml. These results suggest that {sup 18}F-memantine distribution in human brain does not reflect the regional NMDA receptor concentration, and therefore, this radioligand is not suitable for the PET imaging of the NMDA receptors.

  15. Single-dose and steady-state pharmacokinetics of fentanyl buccal tablet in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Kirby, Mary; Robertson, Philmore; Hellriegel, Edward; Jiang, John G

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the single-dose and steady-state pharmacokinetics of fentanyl buccal tablet 400 microg in healthy adult volunteers. After receiving naltrexone 50 mg to block opioid receptor-mediated effects of fentanyl, subjects received fentanyl buccal tablet 400 microg on day 1, then every 6 hours from day 4 to day 9 (21 doses). Naltrexone 50 mg was administered every 12 hours throughout the study. Plasma fentanyl concentrations were determined for 72 hours after administration of fentanyl buccal tablet 400 microg on day 1 and the last dose of fentanyl buccal tablet 400 microg on day 9. Following single- and multiple-dose administration of fentanyl buccal tablet, the median time to maximum concentration (tmax) was 52.2 and 49.8 minutes, respectively. Peak plasma concentration of fentanyl (Cmax) was 0.88 ng/mL for the single-dose regimen and 1.77 ng/mL for the multiple-dose regimen. Steady state was reached within 5 days, consistent with the observed median half-life of approximately 22 hours following multiple doses. Observed accumulation of fentanyl after multiple doses of fentanyl buccal tablet was slightly greater than would be expected based on the single-dose data. This was attributed to the redistribution of fentanyl from a deep tissue compartment into the plasma. This study indicates that fentanyl buccal tablet has predictable pharmacokinetics following multiple-dose administration.

  16. Relationships between food consumption and dietary intake among healthy volunteers and implications for meeting dietary goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, A; Hebert, J R; Reddy, B S

    1990-04-01

    Quantitative food frequency questionnaires and 5-day food records were used to explore relationships between food consumption and nutrient intake among 65 healthy volunteers who were willing to participate in a dietary fiber intervention study. Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated between the nutrient intake and the frequency of consumption of each food item, as well as the amount consumed per month. Percentage of calories from fat was related to frequency of consumption and amount of consumption, respectively, of bacon (r = .48, .49), frankfurters and sausage (r = .45, .45), and french fries and fried potatoes (r = .43, .39). Frequency and amount, respectively, of consumption of fruits were most highly correlated with intake of vitamin A (r = .45, .46), vitamin C (r = .44, .48), and dietary fiber (r = .43, .43). We conclude that specific food consumption amounts and/or frequency of eating foods such as legumes, fruits, and whole-grain or bran-rich cereals should be recommended to assist individuals in meeting dietary goals.

  17. Bioequivalence study of two oral formulations of irbesartan 300 mg in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas, M; Cabré, F; Polonio, F

    2014-01-01

    A bioequivalence study of 2 irbesartan (CAS 138402-11-6) film-coated tablet formulations was carried out in 40 healthy volunteers according to an open label, randomized, 2-period, 2-sequence, crossover, single dose and fasting conditions design. The test and reference formulations were administered in 2 treatment days, separated by a washout period of 7 days. Blood samples were drawn up to 96 h following drug administration. Plasma concentrations of irbesartan were obtained by a validated HPLC method using MS/MS detection. Log-transformed AUC0-t and Cmax values were tested for bioequivalence based on the ratios of the geometric LSmeans (test/reference). tmax was analysed nonparametrically. The 90% confidence intervals of the geometric LSmean values for the test/reference ratios for AUC0-t (98.06-109.48%, point estimator 103.61%) and Cmax (88.93-100.87%, point estimator 94.72%) were within the bioequivalence acceptance range of 80-125%. According to the European Guideline on the Investigation of Bioequivalence it may be therefore concluded that test formulation of irbesartan 300 mg film-coated tablet is bioequivalent to the reference formulation. Overall, it was judged that the study was conducted with a good tolerance of the subjects to both study drugs.

  18. Bioequivalence Study of Two Orodispersible Rizatriptan Formulations of 10 mg in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas, Mercè; Polonio, Francisco; Cabré, Francesc

    2016-06-13

    The aim of the study was to assess the bioequivalence and tolerability of two different oral formulations of rizatriptan. A bioequivalence study was carried out in 40 healthy volunteers according to an open label, randomized, two-period, two-sequence, crossover, single dose, and fasting conditions design. The test and reference formulations were administered in two treatment days, separated by a washout period of seven days. Plasma concentrations of rizatriptan were obtained by the LC/MS/MS (Liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry) method. Log-transformed AUC0-t (area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to the last measurable concentration) and Cmax (maximum plasma concentration) values were tested for bioequivalence based on the ratios of the geometric means (test/reference). The tmax (time to reach maximum plasma concentration) was analysed nonparametrically. The 90% confidence intervals of the geometric mean values for the test/reference ratios for AUC0-t and Cmax were within the bioequivalence acceptance range of 80%-125%. According to the European Guideline, it may therefore be concluded that the test formulation of rizatriptan 10 mg orodispersible tablet is bioequivalent to the reference formulation (Maxalt(®) Max 10 mg oral lyophilisate). The safety profile of both formulations was consistent with the summary of the product characteristics.

  19. [Effects of zopiclone on sleep, daytime somnolence and nocturnal and daytime performance in healthy volunteers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billiard, M; Besset, A; de Lustrac, C; Brissaud, L; Cadilhac, J

    1989-05-01

    Ten healthy volunteers, aged 20 to 39, underwent 2 adaptation nights and 3 sessions of 2 consecutive experimental nights and days at 1 week intervals. In the 3 sessions, subjects received under double blind conditions either Zopiclone 3.75 mg or 7.5 mg or placebo, according to a latin-square design. On nights 1 and 2 of each session, subjects were continuously polygraphically monitored, except for a 45 min provoked wake episode 135 min after sleep onset on night 2. Sleep continuity and architecture were evaluated during night 1, degree of daytime somnolence during day 1 and residual effects during night 2 (0 h 00) and day 2 (8 h 00 and 12 h 00). Sleep continuity was not modified, except for a reduction of the number of night awakenings. NREM sleep stage 1 was reduced and stage 2 was increased (in duration but not in percentage) with Zopiclone 3.75 and 7.5 mg. NREM sleep stages 3 and 4 were increased with Zopiclone 3.75 mg only. REM sleep was reduced (in percentage only) with Zopiclone 3.75 and 7.5 mg. Daytime somnolence varied according to the time but not with the 3 different conditions. One performance test only (choice reaction time test) showed a significant impairment at 0 h 00 with Zopiclone 7.5 mg. From a subjective point of view, sleep quality was improved and night time awakening was reduced with Zopiclone 7.5 mg.

  20. Robot-assisted femoral fracture reduction: preliminary study in patients and healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuki; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Saito, Masanobu; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Sakuma, Ichiro; Nakajima, Yoshikazu; Warisawa, Shin'ichi; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2008-05-01

    We developed a robot-assisted fracture reduction system (FRAC-Robo) to assist anatomical reduction and to maintain reduction during internal fixation while recording the procedure in a log. We conducted two experiments before using FRAC-Robo clinically. In the first experiment using the FRAC-Robo system, we measured the maximum force and torque required to pull and rotate the limbs of healthy conscious volunteers until they felt pain or abnormality. The average maximum traction force applied to the lower limb was 250.7 N, and the average maximum torque was 5.6 Nm in internal rotation and 7.6 Nm in external rotation for 30 degrees of abduction of hip. In the second experiment, we measured the traction force and rotation torque during the reduction of proximal femoral fractures. The average traction force and rotation torque needed for reduction were 215.9 N and 3.2 Nm, respectively. On the basis of these results, we consider that FRAC-Robo can generate sufficient force and torque to reduce femoral fractures safely.

  1. Effect of fast and slow pranayama practice on cognitive functions in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vivek Kumar; M, Rajajeyakumar; S, Velkumary; Subramanian, Senthil Kumar; Bhavanani, Ananda B; Madanmohan; Sahai, Ajit; Thangavel, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    To compare the cumulative effect of commonly practised slow and fast pranayama on cognitive functions in healthy volunteers. 84 participants who were in self-reported good health, who were in the age group of 18-25 years, who were randomized to fast pranayama, slow pranayama and control group with 28 participants in each group. Fast pranayama included kapalabhati, bhastrika and kukkuriya. Slow pranayama included nadishodhana, Pranav and Savitri. Respective pranayama training was given for 35 minutes, three times per week, for a duration of 12 weeks under the supervision of a certified yoga trainer. Parameters were recorded before and after 12 weeks of intervention: Perceived stress scale (PSS), BMI, waist to hip ratio and cognitive parameters-letter cancellation test, trail making tests A and B, forward and reverse digit spans and auditory and visual reaction times for red light and green light. Inter-group comparison was done by one way ANOVA and intra-group comparison was done by paired t-test. Executive functions, PSS and reaction time improved significantly in both fast and slow pranayama groups, except reverse digit span, which showed an improvement only in fast pranayama group. In addition, percentage reduction in reaction time was significantly more in the fast pranayama group as compared to that in slow pranayama group. Both types of pranayamas are beneficial for cognitive functions, but fast pranayama has additional effects on executive function of manipulation in auditory working memory, central neural processing and sensory-motor performance.

  2. Brain-Modulated Effects of Auricular Acupressure on the Regulation of Autonomic Function in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Yan Gao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular acupuncture has been described in ancient China as well as Egypt, Greece, and Rome. At the end of the 1950s, ear acupuncture was further developed by the French physician Dr. Paul Nogier. The goal of this study was to develop a new system for ear acupressure (vibration stimulation and to perform pilot investigations on the possible acute effects of vibration and manual ear acupressure on heart rate (HR, heart rate variability (HRV, pulse wave velocity (PWV, and the augmentation index (AIx using new noninvasive recording methods. Investigations were performed in 14 healthy volunteers (mean age ± SD: 26.3±4.3 years; 9 females, 5 males before, during, and after acupressure vibration and manual acupressure stimulation at the “heart” auricular acupuncture point. The results showed a significant decrease in HR (≤0.001 and a significant increase in HRV total (=0.008 after manual ear acupressure. The PWV decreased markedly (yet insignificantly whereas the AIx increased immediately after both methods of stimulation. The increase in the low-frequency band of HRV was mainly based on the intensification of the related mechanism of blood pressure regulation (10-s-rhythm. Further studies in Beijing using animal models and investigations in Graz using human subjects are already in progress.

  3. The Northwick Park tragedy--protecting healthy volunteers in future first-in-man trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsing, T; Kendall, M J

    2007-06-01

    The development of potentially powerful drugs which may become effective in the treatment for disorders currently difficult to manage presents the pharmaceutical industry and the scientific community with a major challenge. Such drugs with novel modes of action and the capacity to modify the body's immune system could also be very toxic. The possibility became a tragic reality on March 13th 2006 when TGN1412 was given to six healthy volunteers at Northwick Park hospital. All six became seriously ill. Fortunately none died but some were left with serious residual defects. The British Secretary of State for Health set up an Expert Scientific Group to investigate this tragic event. The report had to make recommendations designed to prevent a recurrence whilst not unduly delaying or discouraging the development of new drugs designed to treat cancers and other serious disorders. They made 22 recommendations. The drug TGN1412 had been shown to be well tolerated by non-human primates. A recent report on non-human primates in research recommended their continued use in some forms of research, for example on brain disorders. However, they also recommended that non-human primates should be used sparingly and only when justified scientifically. Their treatment should be optimal and research on them should be restricted to selected centres of expertise. The tragedy at Northwick Park should encourage the Pharmaceutical Industry to rethink their use of non-human primates in drug toxicity testing and hopefully to reduce their use and treat them better.

  4. A single high dose of escitalopram disrupts sensory gating and habituation, but not sensorimotor gating in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oranje, Bob; Wienberg, Malene; Glenthøj, Birte Yding

    2011-01-01

    Early mechanisms to limit the input of sensory information to higher brain areas are important for a healthy individual. In previous studies, we found that a low dose of 10mg escitalopram (SSRI) disrupts habituation, without affecting sensory and sensorimotor gating in healthy volunteers. In the ......Early mechanisms to limit the input of sensory information to higher brain areas are important for a healthy individual. In previous studies, we found that a low dose of 10mg escitalopram (SSRI) disrupts habituation, without affecting sensory and sensorimotor gating in healthy volunteers....... In the current study a higher dose of 15mg was used. The hypothesis was that this higher dose of escitalopram would not only disrupt habituation, but also sensory and sensorimotor gating. Twenty healthy male volunteers received either placebo or 15mg escitalopram, after which they were tested in a P50...... suppression, and a habituation and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex paradigm. Escitalopram significantly decreased P50 suppression and habituation, but had no effect on PPI. The results indicate that habituation and sensory gating are disrupted by increased serotonergic activity, while...

  5. Twelve-Month Effects of the COPE Healthy Lifestyles TEEN Program on Overweight and Depressive Symptoms in High School Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette M.; Jacobson, Diana; Kelly, Stephanie A.; Belyea, Michael J.; Shaibi, Gabriel Q.; Small, Leigh; O'Haver, Judith A.; Marsiglia, Flavio F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the 12-month effects of the COPE (Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment) Healthy Lifestyles TEEN (Thinking, Emotions, Exercise, Nutrition) program versus an attention control program (Healthy Teens) on overweight/obesity and depressive symptoms in high school adolescents. Methods: A cluster randomized controlled…

  6. Reproducibility of the heat/capsaicin skin sensitization model in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavallone LF

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Laura F Cavallone,1 Karen Frey,1 Michael C Montana,1 Jeremy Joyal,1 Karen J Regina,1 Karin L Petersen,2 Robert W Gereau IV11Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St Louis, School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA; 2California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA, USAIntroduction: Heat/capsaicin skin sensitization is a well-characterized human experimental model to induce hyperalgesia and allodynia. Using this model, gabapentin, among other drugs, was shown to significantly reduce cutaneous hyperalgesia compared to placebo. Since the larger thermal probes used in the original studies to produce heat sensitization are now commercially unavailable, we decided to assess whether previous findings could be replicated with a currently available smaller probe (heated area 9 cm2 versus 12.5–15.7 cm2.Study design and methods: After Institutional Review Board approval, 15 adult healthy volunteers participated in two study sessions, scheduled 1 week apart (Part A. In both sessions, subjects were exposed to the heat/capsaicin cutaneous sensitization model. Areas of hypersensitivity to brush stroke and von Frey (VF filament stimulation were measured at baseline and after rekindling of skin sensitization. Another group of 15 volunteers was exposed to an identical schedule and set of sensitization procedures, but, in each session, received either gabapentin or placebo (Part B.Results: Unlike previous reports, a similar reduction of areas of hyperalgesia was observed in all groups/sessions. Fading of areas of hyperalgesia over time was observed in Part A. In Part B, there was no difference in area reduction after gabapentin compared to placebo.Conclusion: When using smaller thermal probes than originally proposed, modifications of other parameters of sensitization and/or rekindling process may be needed to allow the heat/capsaicin sensitization protocol to be used as initially intended. Standardization and validation of

  7. Cutaneous Respirometry as Novel Technique to Monitor Mitochondrial Function: A Feasibility Study in Healthy Volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floor Harms

    Full Text Available The protoporphyrin IX-triplet state lifetime technique (PpIX-TSLT is proposed as a potential clinical non-invasive tool to monitor mitochondrial function. This technique has been evaluated in several animal studies. Mitochondrial respirometry allows measurement in vivo of mitochondrial oxygen tension (mitoPO2 and mitochondrial oxygen consumption (mitoVO2 in skin. This study describes the first use of a clinical prototype in skin of humans.The clinical prototype was tested in 30 healthy volunteers. A self-adhesive patch containing 2 mg 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA was applied on the skin of the anterior chest wall (sternal for induction of mitochondrial protoporphyrin IX and was protected from light for 5 h. MitoPO2 was measured by means of oxygen-dependent delayed fluorescence of protoporphyrin IX. MitoVO2 was determined by dynamic mitoPO2 measurements on the primed skin, while locally blocking oxygen supply by applying local pressure with the measurement probe. MitoPO2 was recorded before and during a 60-s period of compression of the microcirculation, at an interval of 1 Hz. Oxygen consumption (i.e. the local oxygen disappearance rate was calculated from the decay of the mitoPO2 slope.Oxygen-dependent delayed fluorescence measurements were successfully performed in the skin of 27 volunteers. The average value (± SD of mitoPO2 was 44 ± 17 mmHg and mean mitoVO2 values were 5.8 ± 2.3 and 6.1 ± 1.6 mmHg s-1 at a skin temperature of 34°C and 40°C, respectively. No major discomfort during measurement and no long-term dermatological abnormalities were reported in a survey performed 1 month after measurements.These results show that the clinical prototype allows measurement of mitochondrial oxygenation and oxygen consumption in humans. The development of this clinically applicable device offers opportunities for further evaluation of the technique in humans and the start of first clinical studies.

  8. Optimal Fasting Time before Measurement of Serum Triglyceride Levels in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongsuthana, Surapun; Tivatunsakul, Naris

    2016-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is a major public health problem. Elevated triglyceride levels are a risk factor for atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Food intake interferes with the measurement of serum triglyceride levels, and in previous studies, fasting for 12 hours was recommended before blood sampling. In real-world practice, long fasting times cause patient discomfort and poor compliance, and the present study was, therefore, designed to determine the appropriate fasting time prior to measuring serum triglyceride levels. To determine the appropriate fasting time before measuring serum triglyceride levels. This was a pilot study performed using healthy volunteers aged between 20 and 30 years old from November 2013 to December 2013 at Rajavithi Hospital. The first blood sample was measured in the morning after fasting over 12 hours. The subjects then took their regular breakfast, after which they fasted for 8 hours. Blood samples were taken 6 and 8 hours later and sent to the laboratory for measurement of serum triglyceride levels. 40 volunteers, of whom 25 were female, were enrolled. Their mean age was 25.9 ± 2.81 years old, and their mean weight, height, and body mass index were 61.5 ± 12.5 kg, 167.2 ± 8.3 cm and 21.84 ± 3.1 kg/m2, respectively. Mean fasting serum triglyceride level at 12 hours was 80.23 ± 36.33 mg/dl, at 6 hours it was 110.65 ± 73.45 mg/dl, and at 8 hours it was 75.62 ± 46.81 mg/dl. The group fasting for 12 hours had significantly lower serum triglyceride levels than the group fasting for 6 hours (p-value = 0.003), but no significant difference was found between the group fasting for 12 hours and the one fasting for 8 hours (p-value = 0.493). The present study showed no significant difference in triglyceride levels in patients who had fasted or 8 hours and those who had done so for 12 hours. Fasting for only 8 hours before measurement of serum triglyceride may be sufficient.

  9. Bioequivalence study of two commercial amoxicillin suspension formulations in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gilson C N; Baglie, Sinvaldo; Ruenis, Ana P B; Franco, Luiz M; Cogo, Karina; Oshima-Franco, Yoko; Silva, Paulo; Groppo, Francisco C; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2014-05-01

    To compare the pharmacokinetic profiles and to evaluate the bioequivalence of two commercial amoxicillin suspension formulations (500 mg/5 mL AMOXIL®, reference formulation and AMOXI-PED®, test formulation) in healthy Brazilian volunteers. Under fasting condition, 25 volunteers (13 males and 12 females) were included in this randomized, open-label, two-period crossover (1-week washout interval) bioequivalence study. Blood samples were collected at pre-dose (0 hour) and 0.5, 1, 1.33, 1.66, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours after drug ingestion. Pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax, tmax, t1/2, AUC0-tlast, and AUC0-∞) were calculated from plasma concentrations for both formulations in each subject. Arithmetic mean values of the pharmacokinetic parameters were: Cmax = 12.004 (± 2.824) μg×mL-1; tmax = 1.118 (± 0.396) h; t1/2 = 1.226 (± 0.179) h; AUC0-tlast = 29.297 (± 6.007) μg×h×mL-1; and AUC0-∞ = 29.299 (± 6.007) μg×h×mL-1 for reference formulation and Cmax = 11.456 (± 2.825) μg×mL-1; tmax = 1.331 (± 0.509) h; t1/2 = 1.141 (± 0.133) h; AUC0-tlast = 28.672 (± 5.778) μg×h×mL-1; and AUC0-∞ = 28.693 (± 5.796) μg×h×mL-1 for test formulation. The confidence intervals (90% CI) for reference and test formulations were, respectively, 90.74 - 100.46% for Cmax and 93.62 - 103.61% for AUC0-t. Based on the results, both formulations of amoxicillin evaluated in this study were considered bioequivalent according to FDA and ANVISA/Brazil criteria.

  10. Effect of Misoprostol on the Pharmacokinetics of Sustained Release Diclofenac in Myanmar Healthy Male Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Htet Htet Aung

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sustained release diclofenac (diclofenac SR is the commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug for chronic inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Misoprostol, prostaglandin analogue, is the agent that enhances gastrointestinal mucosal defense. Concomitant administration of misoprostol with diclofenac SR can prevent the gastrointestinal side effects of diclofenac SR. Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore the effect of misoprostol on the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac SR in healthy volunteers. Methods: Crossover study was evaluated in 14 male volunteers. Single oral dose of 100 mg diclofenac SR was concomitantly administered with 200 μg misoprostol with one-week wash out period. Plasma concentrations at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 6 and 10 hrs were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Pharmacokinetic parameters such as area under concentration-time curve (AUC0-α, peak plasma concentration (Cmax, time to achieve peak plasma concentration (Tmax, absorption half-life (T½(ab, elimination half-life (T1/2(el, absorption rate constant (Kab, and elimination rate constant (Kel were determined. Results: With misoprostol, the mean AUC0-α of diclofenac SR was significantly reduced from 12.11±5.25μg/ mL×hr to 4.17±2.72μg/mL×hr (p0.05. The mean T½(ab was decreased from 0.56±0.23hr to 0.54±0.19hr (p>0.05. The mean Kab were almost the same 1.43±0.54hr-1 and 1.43±0.48hr-1. The mean T1/2(el was decreased from 3.68±1.64hr to 3.03±1.08hr (p>0.05. The mean Kel was increased from 0.21±0.09hr-1 to 0.25±0.09hr-1 (p>0.05. Conclusion: There was a significant reduction in the extent of absorption of diclofenac SR when concomitantly administered with misoprostol. Therefore, the dose of diclofenac SR may need to be increased to avoid therapeutic failure of diclofenac SR or concurrent use with misoprostol may need to be changed to other gastroprotective agents.

  11. The human plasma-metabolome: Reference values in 800 French healthy volunteers; impact of cholesterol, gender and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabado, Séverine; Al-Salameh, Abdallah; Croixmarie, Vincent; Masson, Perrine; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Fève, Bruno; Colle, Romain; Ripoll, Laurent; Walther, Bernard; Boursier-Neyret, Claire; Werner, Erwan; Becquemont, Laurent; Chanson, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomic approaches are increasingly used to identify new disease biomarkers, yet normal values of many plasma metabolites remain poorly defined. The aim of this study was to define the "normal" metabolome in healthy volunteers. We included 800 French volunteers aged between 18 and 86, equally distributed according to sex, free of any medication and considered healthy on the basis of their medical history, clinical examination and standard laboratory tests. We quantified 185 plasma metabolites, including amino acids, biogenic amines, acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and hexose, using tandem mass spectrometry with the Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ p180 kit. Principal components analysis was applied to identify the main factors responsible for metabolome variability and orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis was employed to confirm the observed patterns and identify pattern-related metabolites. We established a plasma metabolite reference dataset for 144/185 metabolites. Total blood cholesterol, gender and age were identified as the principal factors explaining metabolome variability. High total blood cholesterol levels were associated with higher plasma sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines concentrations. Compared to women, men had higher concentrations of creatinine, branched-chain amino acids and lysophosphatidylcholines, and lower concentrations of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines. Elderly healthy subjects had higher sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines plasma levels than young subjects. We established reference human metabolome values in a large and well-defined population of French healthy volunteers. This study provides an essential baseline for defining the "normal" metabolome and its main sources of variation.

  12. Safety and tolerability of Panax ginseng root extract: a randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial in healthy Korean volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Hun; Yoo, Sa-Ra; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Cho, Jung-Hyo; Son, Chang Gue

    2012-11-01

    Panax ginseng has been extensively used as an adaptogen and is among the top 10 selling herbal supplements in the United States over the past decade. However, there have been few reports about the toxicity of P. ginseng in human studies. Given the lack of toxicological studies in human, this study investigated whether P. ginseng administration causes any noticeable toxic effects in healthy volunteers. This study was designed as a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and parallel group trial in healthy volunteers. The subjects were required to be healthy, free from any significant disease, as assessed at screening by physical examination, medical history, and laboratory (hematological and biochemical) tests. Eligible subjects received P. ginseng extract (1 g/day or 2 g/day) or placebo over a 4-week period. Although mild adverse events, such as dyspepsia, hot flash, insomnia, and constipation, were reported in both P. ginseng and placebo group, no serious untoward reactions were reported following P. ginseng administration. Nonsignificant changes were observed in hematological and biochemical tests. P. ginseng administration for 4 weeks was shown to be safe, tolerable, and free of any untoward toxic effect in healthy male and female volunteers. Future results from ongoing multicenter collaborative efforts to evaluate short- and long-term effects of P. ginseng may contribute to our current understanding of safety and tolerability of this herbal product.

  13. Safety and Tolerability of Panax ginseng Root Extract: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Clinical Trial in Healthy Korean Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Hun; Yoo, Sa-Ra; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Cho, Jung-Hyo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Panax ginseng has been extensively used as an adaptogen and is among the top 10 selling herbal supplements in the United States over the past decade. However, there have been few reports about the toxicity of P. ginseng in human studies. Given the lack of toxicological studies in human, this study investigated whether P. ginseng administration causes any noticeable toxic effects in healthy volunteers. Methods This study was designed as a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and parallel group trial in healthy volunteers. The subjects were required to be healthy, free from any significant disease, as assessed at screening by physical examination, medical history, and laboratory (hematological and biochemical) tests. Eligible subjects received P. ginseng extract (1 g/day or 2 g/day) or placebo over a 4-week period. Results Although mild adverse events, such as dyspepsia, hot flash, insomnia, and constipation, were reported in both P. ginseng and placebo group, no serious untoward reactions were reported following P. ginseng administration. Nonsignificant changes were observed in hematological and biochemical tests. Conclusions P. ginseng administration for 4 weeks was shown to be safe, tolerable, and free of any untoward toxic effect in healthy male and female volunteers. Future results from ongoing multicenter collaborative efforts to evaluate short- and long-term effects of P. ginseng may contribute to our current understanding of safety and tolerability of this herbal product. PMID:22909282

  14. EFFECT OF INTRAMUSCULAR CEFTRIAXONE ON AEROBIC ORAL AND FECAL FLORA OF 11 HEALTHY-VOLUNTEERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIESHOSPERS, HG; TONK, RHJ; VANDERWAAIJ, D

    1991-01-01

    11 volunteers received 1 g ceftriaxone i.m. every 24 h for 5 consecutive days. Volunteers were selected on the basis of the "ceftriaxone inactivating capacity" of their faeces, which should be 250 mg/kg faeces. The effect of treatment on the aerobic oral and faecal flora was studied. In the oral

  15. Effects of GUASHA on Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Male Volunteers under Normal Condition and Weightlifters after Weightlifting Training Sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingze Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This paper aims at exploring the effects of GUASHA on heart rate variability between healthy volunteers under normal condition and weightlifters after training sessions. Methods. Ten healthy male volunteers under normal condition and 15 male weightlifters after weightlifting training sessions were recruited into two groups. Electrocardiography was recorded before and immediately after 20-minute GUASHA. HRV was calculated in both the time domain and the frequency domain. Results. Stress index was reduced, while standard deviation of N-N intervals (SDNN, proportion derived by dividing the number of interval differences of successive N-N intervals greater than 50 ms, and root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD were enhanced after GUASHA therapy in the two groups. The changes in SDNN and RMSSD were higher in the healthy men group than in the weightlifters group. In addition, low frequency was decreased whereas high frequency was significantly increased in healthy men after the GUASHA session. Conclusions. GUASHA therapy facilitates the parasympathetic nervous activity and modulates the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic activities in both healthy men under normal condition and weightlifters after training sessions as indicated. Although the changes of the HRV parameters were similar in both groups, the responsiveness was more pronounced in healthy men than in male weightlifters.

  16. Immediate effect of suryanadi pranayama on pulmonary function (ventilatory volumes and capacities in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shravya Keerthi G, Hari Krishna Bandi, Suresh M, Mallikarjuna Reddy N

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: we found only effects of at least a short term practice extended over a period of a few days to weeks of pranayama (alternate nostril breathing rather than acute effects of unilateral right nostril breathing (suryanadi pranayama. Keeping this in mind the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that 10 min. of right nostril breathing have any immediate effect on ventilatory volumes and capacities in healthy volunteers. Methodology: Forced vital capacity (FVC, Forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1, Forced expiratory volume percent (FEV1/FVC%, Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR, Forced expiratory flow25-75% (FEF25-75%, Maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV, Slow vital capacity (SVC, Expiratory reserve volume (ERV, Inspiratory reserve volume (IRV and Tidal volume (TV were recorded before and after Surya Nadi Pranayama. Results & Conclusion: There was a significant increase in FVC (p<0.0001, FEV1 (p<0.0007, PEFR (p<0.0001, FEF25-75% (p<0.0001, MVV (p<0.0001, SVC (p<0.0001, ERV (0.0006, IRV (p<0.0001 and TV (0.0055 after suryanadi pranayama. The immediate effect of suryanadi pranayama practice showed alleviation of ventilatory capacities and volumes. Any practice that increases PEFR and FEF25–75% is expected to retard the development of COPD’s. The increase in PEFR, vital capacities and flow rates by suryanadi pranayama practice obviously offers an increment in respiratory efficiency and it can be advocated to the patients of early bronchitis and as a preventive measure for COPD.

  17. Intragastric infusion of denatonium benzoate attenuates interdigestive gastric motility and hunger scores in healthy female volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloose, Eveline; Janssen, Pieter; Corsetti, Maura; Biesiekierski, Jessica; Masuy, Imke; Rotondo, Alessandra; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Depoortere, Inge; Tack, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Background: Denatonium benzoate (DB) has been shown to influence ongoing ingestive behavior and gut peptide secretion.Objective: We studied how the intragastric administration of DB affects interdigestive motility, motilin and ghrelin plasma concentrations, hunger and satiety ratings, and food intake in healthy volunteers.Design: Lingual bitter taste sensitivity was tested with the use of 6 concentrations of DB in 65 subjects. A placebo or 1 μmol DB/kg was given intragastrically to assess its effect on fasting gastrointestinal motility and hunger ratings, motilin and ghrelin plasma concentrations, satiety, and caloric intake.Results: Women (n = 39) were more sensitive toward a lingual bitter stimulus (P = 0.005) than men (n = 26). In women (n = 10), intragastric DB switched the origin of phase III contractions from the stomach to the duodenum (P = 0.001) and decreased hunger ratings (P = 0.04). These effects were not observed in men (n = 10). In women (n = 12), motilin (P = 0.04) plasma concentrations decreased after intragastric DB administration, whereas total and octanoylated ghrelin were not affected. The intragastric administration of DB decreased hunger (P = 0.008) and increased satiety ratings (P = 0.01) after a meal (500 kcal) in 13 women without affecting gastric emptying in 6 women. Caloric intake tended to decrease after DB administration compared with the placebo (mean ± SEM: 720 ± 58 compared with 796 ± 45 kcal; P = 0.08) in 20 women.Conclusions: Intragastric DB administration decreases both antral motility and hunger ratings during the fasting state, possibly because of a decrease in motilin release. Moreover, DB decreases hunger and increases satiety ratings after a meal and shows potential for decreasing caloric intake. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02759926.

  18. Daytime Ayahuasca administration modulates REM and slow-wave sleep in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanoj, Manel J; Riba, Jordi; Clos, S; Giménez, S; Grasa, E; Romero, S

    2008-02-01

    Ayahuasca is a traditional South American psychoactive beverage and the central sacrament of Brazilian-based religious groups, with followers in Europe and the United States. The tea contains the psychedelic indole N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and beta-carboline alkaloids with monoamine oxidase-inhibiting properties that render DMT orally active. DMT interacts with serotonergic neurotransmission acting as a partial agonist at 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor sites. Given the role played by serotonin in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle, we investigated the effects of daytime ayahuasca consumption in sleep parameters. Subjective sleep quality, polysomnography (PSG), and spectral analysis were assessed in a group of 22 healthy male volunteers after the administration of a placebo, an ayahuasca dose equivalent to 1 mg DMT kg(-1) body weight, and 20 mg d-amphetamine, a proaminergic drug, as a positive control. Results show that ayahuasca did not induce any subjectively perceived deterioration of sleep quality or PSG-measured disruptions of sleep initiation or maintenance, in contrast with d-amphetamine, which delayed sleep initiation, disrupted sleep maintenance, induced a predominance of 'light' vs 'deep' sleep and significantly impaired subjective sleep quality. PSG analysis also showed that similarly to d-amphetamine, ayahuasca inhibits rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, decreasing its duration, both in absolute values and as a percentage of total sleep time, and shows a trend increase in its onset latency. Spectral analysis showed that d-amphetamine and ayahuasca increased power in the high frequency range, mainly during stage 2. Remarkably, whereas slow-wave sleep (SWS) power in the first night cycle, an indicator of sleep pressure, was decreased by d-amphetamine, ayahuasca enhanced power in this frequency band. Results show that daytime serotonergic psychedelic drug administration leads to measurable changes in PSG and sleep power spectrum and suggest an

  19. EFFECTS OF FOOD ON THE PHARMACOKINETICS OF AMODIAQUINE IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOYINKA J O, ODUNFA O. ADEMISOYE AA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Amodiaquine (AQ is a 4-aminoquinoline derivative whichis intrinsically more active than the other 4-aminoquinoline, chloroquine, against Plasmodiumfalciparum parasites. The pharmacokinetic parameters ofamodiaquine and its active metabolite following theadministration of amodiaquine to healthy volunteers underfasted conditionS were compared with those when it wasco-administered with food.In an open, two-way crossover study, 16 healthyvolunteers fasted overnight and were randomized toreceive a single oral administration of 600 mg (3 tabletsof amodiaquine in the absence or presence of astandardized high-fat breakfast, administered 30 minbefore drug administration. Blood samples were collectedup to 192 h and amodiaquine and desethyl amodiaquinewere assayed by a validated HPLC method.Relative to the fasting state, the administration of a singledose of amodiaquine after a high-fat breakfast resulted indelayed median Tmax values (20 min for amodiaquine and3 h for desethylamodiaquine. The geometric mean ratios(GMR of fed to fasting conditions indicated increasedCmax values for amodiaquine (GMR 1.40 (90% CI: 1.12-1.48 and desethylamodiaquine (GMR 1.48 (90% CI: 1.09-1.52 and increased AUC0-t values for amodiaquine (GMR1.62 (90% CI: 1.42-1.86 and for desethylamodiaquine(GMR 1.26 (90% CI: 1.12-1.36.Intake of AQ with a high fat meal resulted in a statisticallysignificant increase in blood levels of amodiaquine anddesethylamodiaquine which may affect its safety andtolerability. The findings of this study suggest thatamodiaquine should not be administered with a high-fatmeal.

  20. Gastroduodenal tolerance of 75 mg clopidogrel versus 325 mg aspirin in healthy volunteers. A gastroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fork, F T; Lafolie, P; Tóth, E; Lindgärde, F

    2000-05-01

    Clopidogrel is a new antiplatelet agent that offers increased protection over aspirin in preventing vascular ischaemic events in patients with symptomatic atherosclerosis. In a large, randomized, international study of clopidogrel and aspirin (n = 19,185 patients) clopidogrel was associated with a lower incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events, including gastrointestinal haemorrhage and hospitalizations because of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The aim of the study was to determine whether macroscopic differences in the gastric mucosa between aspirin- and clopidogrel-treated subjects could be detected by gastroscopy after short-term treatment. Thirty-six healthy volunteers were randomized in a double-blind, double-dummy, parallel design, to 75 mg/day of clopidogrel or 325 mg/day of aspirin for 8 days. Gastroscopy was performed at base line before administration of study drug and directly after treatment completion. Gastroduodenal effects were measured in accordance with a modified Lanza scale. At base line no difference between the groups was detected (median Lanza score, 0.0 in both groups). At the end of treatment the aspirin group showed a median score of 7.5, and the clopidogrel group showed an unchanged median score of 0.0 (P < 0.001). In the aspirin group 13 individuals reported 19 adverse events versus 8 individuals and 13 adverse events for clopidogrel, with approximately half of the adverse events being gastrointestinal in each group. No serious adverse events were reported. In contrast to aspirin, short-term treatment with clopidogrel does not induce macroscopic changes in the gastroduodenal mucosa. The study results show that in patients without gastroduodenal disease clopidogrel, but not aspirin, does not induce any gastroscopically evident erosions during short-term treatment.

  1. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]raclopride in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Maria-Joao; Bourgeois, Sandrine; Lievre, Marie-Angele; Bottlaender, Michel; Gervais, Philippe; Dolle, Frederic; Syrota, Andre [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Departement de Recherche Medicale, Orsay (France); Ricard, Marcel [Institut Gustave Roussy, Service de Physique, Villejuif (France)

    2005-08-01

    This study reports on the whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]raclopride, a dopamine D{sub 2} receptor antagonist. In three healthy male volunteers, whole-body scans were performed up to 2 h following i.v. injection of 320{+-}65 MBq [{sup 11}C]raclopride. Transmission scans (3 min per step, eight or nine steps according to the height of the subject) in 2D mode were used for subsequent attenuation correction of emission scans. Emission scans (1 min per step, eight or nine steps) were acquired over 2 h. Venous blood samples and urine were collected up to 2 h after injection of the radiotracer. For each subject, the percentage of injected activity measured in regions of interest over brain, intestine, lungs, kidneys and liver was fitted to a mono-exponential model, as an uptake phase followed by a mono-exponential washout, for urinary bladder to generate time-activity curves. Using the MIRD method, several source organs were considered in estimating residence time and mean effective radiation absorbed doses. Blood pressure and ECG findings remained unchanged after tracer injection. The analysed blood and urine pharmacological parameters did not change significantly after [{sup 11}C]raclopride injection. The primary routes of clearance were renal and intestinal. Ten minutes after injection, high activities were observed in the gall-bladder, kidneys and liver. High activity was observed in the gall-bladder during the whole study. The kidneys, urinary bladder wall, liver and gall-bladder received the highest absorbed doses. The average effective dose of [{sup 11}C]raclopride was estimated to be 6.7{+-}0.4 {mu}Sv/MBq. The amount of [{sup 11}C]raclopride required for adequate dopamine D{sub 2} receptor imaging results in an acceptable effective dose equivalent, permitting two or three repeated clinical PET imaging studies, with the injection of 222 MBq for each study. (orig.)

  2. Pharmacokinetics of iron(III)-hydroxide sucrose complex after a single intravenous dose in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, B G; Salmonson, T; Derendorf, H; Geisser, P

    1996-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of iron were investigated after intravenous administration to 12 healthy volunteers of iron(III)-hydroxide sucrose complex (Venofer) as a single i.v. dose containing 100 mg Fe. The average predose concentration was 35.7 +/- 12.5 mumol/l. There was no statistically significant difference between the serum iron level before injection (0 h) and the level at 24 h after the injection. The compartment model used includes a Michaelis-Menten term and is in excellent agreement with the observed exchange of iron to transferrin and with the daily iron turnover by transferrin. The intravenously injected iron(III)-hydroxide sucrose complex led rapidly to high serum iron levels. Maximum measured levels averaged 538 mumol/l (30.0 mg/l) at 10 min after the injection. The terminal half-life of the injected iron was calculated to be 5.3 h. Mean total area under the curve (AUC) was 1491 mumol/l h, the mean residence time (MRT) was 5.5 h. The total body clearance was 20.5 ml/min. The volume of distribution of the central compartment (Vc) was 3.21, hence close to the volume of the serum; the volume of distribution at steady state (Vdss) was 7.31; and the volume of distribution during elimination (Vdarea) was 9.21. The calculated amount of iron transported by transferrin was 31.0 +/- 6.6 mg Fe/ 24h. In summary, the data show that the injected iron(III)-hydroxide sucrose complex is quickly cleared from the serum with a terminal half-life of approximately 5-6 h. Renal elimination of iron contributed very little to the overall elimination (in average sucrose averaged about 68 +/- 10% and 75 +/- 11% of the administered dose after 4 h and 24 h, respectively.

  3. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of gemifloxacin (SB-265805) after administration of single oral doses to healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A; Bygate, E; Oliver, S; Johnson, M; Ward, C; Cheon, A J; Choo, Y S; Kim, I C

    2000-06-01

    Gemifloxacin (known as SB-265805 or LB-20304) is a potent, novel fluoroquinolone compound with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. The pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oral gemifloxacin were characterized in healthy male volunteers after a single dose of 20, 40, 80, 160, 320, 600, or 800 mg. Multiple serum and urine samples were collected and analyzed for gemifloxacin using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Safety assessments included vital signs, 12-lead electrocardiogram readings, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, and adverse-experience monitoring. Gemifloxacin was rapidly absorbed after all doses. Maximum concentrations of gemifloxacin in serum (C(max)) were achieved approximately 1 h after dosing, after which concentrations in serum declined in a biexponential manner. Values of C(max) and the area under the concentration-time curve in serum from 0 h to infinity (serum AUC(0-infinity)) increased linearly with dose. Serum AUC(0-infinity) values (mean +/- standard deviation) were 0.65+/-0.01, 1.28+/-0.22, 2.54+/-0.31, 5.48+/-1.24, 9.82+/-2.70, 24.4+/-7.1, and 31.4+/-7.6 microg. h/ml following 20-, 40-, 80-, 160-, 320-, 600-, and 800-mg doses, respectively. The terminal phase elimination half-life was independent of dose, with an overall mean of 7.4+/-2.0 h. The profiles indicated that the pharmacokinetic profile is suitable for a once-daily dosing regimen. Approximately 25 to 40% of the administered dose was excreted unchanged in the urine, and renal clearance (ca. 150 ml/min) was independent of dose. There were no significant changes in clinical chemistry, hematology, or urinalysis parameters, vital signs, or 12-lead electrocardiogram readings in subjects, irrespective of dose. The results of these studies support the further investigation of once-daily administration of gemifloxacin.

  4. The effect of itraconazole on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of bromazepam in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Manami; Kotegawa, Tsutomu; Tsutsumi, Kimiko; Ohtani, Yasukiyo; Kuwatani, Keiji; Nakano, Shigeyuki

    2003-11-01

    Bromazepam, an anti-anxiety agent, has been reported to be metabolized by cytochrome P(450) (CYP). However, the enzyme responsible for the metabolism of bromazepam has yet to be determined. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the inhibition of CYP3A4 produced by itraconazole alters the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of bromazepam. Eight healthy male volunteers participated in this randomized double-blind crossover study. The subjects received a 6-day treatment of itraconazole (200 mg daily) or its placebo. On day 4 of the treatment, each subject received a single oral dose of bromazepam (3 mg). Blood samplings for drug assay were performed up to 70 h after bromazepam administration. The time course of the pharmacodynamic effects of bromazepam on the central nervous system was assessed using a subjective rating of sedation, continuous number addition test and electroencephalography up to 21.5 h after bromazepam administration. Itraconazole caused no significant changes in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of bromazepam. The mean (+/-SD) values of area under the plasma concentration-time curve and elimination half-life for placebo versus itraconazole were 1328+/-330 ng h/ml versus 1445+/-419 ng h/ml and 32.1+/-9.3 h versus 31.1+/-8.4 h, respectively. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of bromazepam were not affected by itraconazole, suggesting that CYP3A4 is not involved in the metabolism of bromazepam to a major extent. It is likely that bromazepam can be used in the usual doses for patients receiving itraconazole or other CYP3A4 inhibitors.

  5. Microbiome Changes in Healthy Volunteers Treated with GSK1322322, a Novel Antibiotic Targeting Bacterial Peptide Deformylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arat, Seda; Spivak, Aaron; Van Horn, Stephanie; Thomas, Elizabeth; Traini, Christopher; Sathe, Ganesh; Livi, George P.; Ingraham, Karen; Jones, Lori; Aubart, Kelly; Holmes, David J.; Naderer, Odin

    2014-01-01

    GSK1322322 is a novel antibacterial agent under development, and it has known antibacterial activities against multidrug-resistant respiratory and skin pathogens through its inhibition of the bacterial peptide deformylase. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes from stool samples collected from 61 healthy volunteers at the predosing and end-of-study time points to determine the effects of GSK1322322 on the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota in a phase I, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study. GSK1322322 was administered either intravenously (i.v.) only or in an oral-i.v. combination in single- and repeat-dose-escalation infusions. Analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence data found no significant changes in the relative abundances of GI operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the prestudy and end-of-study samples for either the placebo- or i.v.-only-treated subjects. However, oral-i.v. treatment resulted in significant decreases in some bacterial taxa, the Firmicutes and Bacteroidales, and increases in others, the Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bifidobacteriaceae. Microbiome diversity plots clearly differentiated the end-of-study oral-i.v.-dosed samples from all others collected. The changes in genome function as inferred from species composition suggest an increase in bacterial transporter and xenobiotic metabolism pathways in these samples. A phylogenetic analysis of the peptide deformylase protein sequences collected from the published genomes of clinical isolates previously tested for GSK1322322 in vitro susceptibility and GI bacterial reference genomes suggests that antibiotic target homology is one of several factors that influences the response of GI microbiota to this antibiotic. Our study shows that dosing regimen and target class are important factors when considering the impact of antibiotic usage on GI microbiota. (This clinical trial was registered at the GlaxoSmithKline Clinical Study

  6. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence studies of cefteram pivoxil in healthy Chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fangmi; Zhu, Rong; Zhao, Wenhui; Yang, Jing; Cai, Zheng; Hu, Qin

    2009-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and specific method has been developed for the determination of cefteram in human plasma. Sample preparation was accomplished through protein precipitation with 20% trichloroacetic acid (v/v) and chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column at 25 degrees C. The mobile phase consisted of methanol-aqueous 20 mM ammonium acetate (18:82, v/v) at flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Wavelength was set at 235 nm. The lower limit of quantification was 0.04 microg/mL and the assay exhibited a linear range of 0.04-3.2 microg/mL (r=0.9996). The relative recoveries of cefteram from human plasma at three different concentrations were more than 90%. The method was successfully applied to investigate the bioequivalence between two kinds of cefteram pivoxil preparations (test vs reference) in 24 healthy Chinese volunteers. After a single 100 mg dose for the test and reference product, the resulting means of major pharmacokinetic parameters such as AUC(0-t), AUC(0-infinity), Cmax and Tmax of cefteram pivoxil were 4.75 +/- 1.35 vs 4.76 +/- 1.29 microg h/mL, 4.89 +/- 1.36 vs 4.91 +/- 1.29 microg h/mL, 1.65 +/- 0.45 vs 1.73 +/- 0.45 microg/mL and 1.48 +/- 0.59 vs 1.73 +/- 0.45 h, respectively, indicating that these two kinds of preparations were bioequivalent.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of fluticasone furoate, umeclidinium, and vilanterol as a triple therapy in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brealey, Noushin; Gupta, Ashutosh; Renaux, Jessica; Mehta, Rashmi; Allen, Ann; Henderson, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Two single-center, four-way, single-dose, crossover studies assessed the systemic exposure, systemic pharmacodynamics (PD), and safety profile of the closed triple fluticasone furoate/umeclidinium/vilanterol (FF/UMEC/VI) therapy compared with dual therapies. These are the first studies where pharmacokinetic (PK) profile assessment was possible for this inhaled triple fixed-dose combination product. Methods: Healthy volunteers were randomized to receive 4 consecutive inhalations (each administered as a single dose) via a single ELLIPTA® dry powder inhaler: in study 1 (CTT116415/NCT01691547), FF/UMEC/VI at total doses of 400/500/100 μg, FF/UMEC 400/500 μg, UMEC/VI 500/100 μg, or FF/VI 400/100 μg; in study 2 (200587/NCT01894386), FF/UMEC/VI at total doses of 400/500/100 μg or 400/250/100 μg, FF/VI 400/100 μg, or UMEC/VI 250/100 μg. PK and PD parameters and safety were assessed. Results: Of 88 subjects, 95% completed both studies and received all planned treatments. Total systemic exposure was similar for FF, UMEC, and VI when administered as a triple therapy compared with FF/VI and UMEC/VI. No clinically significant systemic PD findings were detected. The incidence of adverse events was low and similar across treatment arms. Conclusions: Systemic exposure to all three components of the closed triple therapy, following single-dose delivery, was similar to that seen with the dual therapies FF/VI and UMEC/VI. The delivered lung dose and safety profile of all three agents, delivered via a single inhaler, are expected to be similar to those of the dual therapies. PMID:26227101

  8. Soft-tissue penetration of ceftobiprole in healthy volunteers determined by in vivo microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, April; Schmidt, Stephan; Sabarinath, Sreedharan Nair; Grant, Maria; Seubert, Christoph; Skee, Donna; Murthy, Bindu; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2009-07-01

    Ceftobiprole is a promising new broad-spectrum cephalosporin with activity against several multidrug-resistant gram-positive and gram-negative species, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In order to make efficacy predications against these resistant bacteria in soft-tissue infections, i.e., skin and skin structure infections, ceftobiprole's ability to reach the site of action should be explored. Therefore, a microdialysis study was conducted in 12 healthy volunteers to determine the penetration of ceftobiprole into skeletal muscle and subcutaneous (s.c.) adipose tissue after a single intravenous dose of 500 mg. Plasma and tissue interstitial space fluid (ISF) drug concentrations were measured for 24 h from the start of the 2-h intravenous infusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using noncompartmental analysis. The penetration of ceftobiprole into the ISF of tissues was assessed by comparing the ratios between tissue and plasma of the free drug area under the concentration-time curve (fAUC). It was found that ceftobiprole distributes into the muscle (fAUC(muscle)/fAUC(plasma) of 0.69 +/- 0.13) and s.c. adipose tissue (fAUC(s.c.adipose)/fAUC(plasma) of 0.49 +/- 0.28). The concentrations in both skeletal muscle and s.c. adipose tissue met the efficacy breakpoint (percentage of the time that free drug concentrations remained above the MIC) for at least 40% of the 8-h dosing interval for organisms with a MIC of 2 mg/liter. Therefore, ceftobiprole qualifies as a potential agent with drug penetration capabilities to treat complicated skin and skin structure infections due to both gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens with MICs equal to or below 2 mg/liter.

  9. Brain targeted transcranial administration of diazepam and shortening of sleep latency in healthy human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Pathirana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of medicated oils on scalp had been practiced for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine in diseases associated with the central nervous system. It is possible that the effectiveness of the therapy may be a result of targeted delivery of active compounds to the brain transcranially. Evidence also comes from two previous studies with positive results on brain targeted transcranial delivery of methadone base and diazepam on rat models. Possibility of transcranial drug delivery was investigated in healthy human volunteers using electroencephalography techniques by assessing the ability of transcranially administered diazepam in bringing about β activity in the electroencephalographic wave patterns and shortening of the sleep latency period. Non polar drug molecules dissolved in a non-aqueous sesame oil based vehicle is a significant feature in the transcranial dosage design. The study was under taken in two phases. In the Phase-I study scalp application of a single dose of 2 mg/3 ml of the oil was employed and in the Phase-II study repeat application of three doses 24 h apart were employed. Sleep latency changes were monitored with Multiple Sleep Latency Tests with 5 naps employing the standard electroencephalography, electroocculography and electromyography electrodes. Sleep onset was identified with the first epoch of any sleep stage non rapid eye movement 1, 2, 3, 4 or rapid eye movement using electroencephalography, electroocculography and electromyography criteria. In both phases of the study there was significant reduction in the sleep latencies. It was much more pronounced in the Phase-II study. None of the subjects however displayed beta activity in the electroencephalography. Sleep latency reduction following scalp application in both the phases are suggestive of transcranial migration of diazepam molecules to the receptor sites of the nerve tissue of the brain eliciting its pharmacological effect of sedation

  10. Effect of ginkgo biloba on the pharmacokinetics of raltegravir in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonk, Maren; Colbers, Angela; Poirters, Anne; Schouwenberg, Bas; Burger, David

    2012-10-01

    Medicinal herbs may cause clinically relevant drug interactions with antiretroviral agents. Ginkgo biloba extract is a popular herbal product among HIV-infected patients because of its positive effects on cognitive function. Raltegravir, an HIV integrase inhibitor, is increasingly being used as part of combined antiretroviral therapy. Clinical data on the potential inhibitory or inductive effect of ginkgo biloba on the pharmacokinetics of raltegravir were lacking, and concomitant use was not recommended. We studied the effect of ginkgo biloba extract on the pharmacokinetics of raltegravir in an open-label, randomized, two-period, crossover phase I trial in 18 healthy volunteers. Subjects were randomly assigned to a regimen of 120 mg of ginkgo biloba twice daily for 15 days plus a single dose of raltegravir (400 mg) on day 15, a washout period, and 400 mg of raltegravir on day 36 or the test and reference treatments in reverse order. Pharmacokinetic sampling of raltegravir was performed up to 12 h after intake on an empty stomach. All subjects (9 male) completed the trial, and no serious adverse events were reported. Geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals) of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from dosing to infinity (AUC(0-∞)) and the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of raltegravir with ginkgo biloba versus raltegravir alone were 1.21 (0.93 to 1.58) and 1.44 (1.03 to 2.02). Ginkgo biloba did not reduce raltegravir exposure. The potential increase in the C(max) of raltegravir is probably of minor importance, given the large intersubject variability of raltegravir pharmacokinetics and its reported safety profile.

  11. Breathing guidance in radiation oncology and radiology: A systematic review of patient and healthy volunteer studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Sean, E-mail: sean.pollock@sydney.edu.au; Keall, Paul [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, Sydney 2050 (Australia); Keall, Robyn [Central School of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney 2050, Australia and Hammond Care, Palliative Care and Supportive Care Service, Greenwich 2065 (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The advent of image-guided radiation therapy has led to dramatic improvements in the accuracy of treatment delivery in radiotherapy. Such advancements have highlighted the deleterious impact tumor motion can have on both image quality and radiation treatment delivery. One approach to reducing tumor motion irregularities is the use of breathing guidance systems during imaging and treatment. These systems aim to facilitate regular respiratory motion which in turn improves image quality and radiation treatment accuracy. A review of such research has yet to be performed; it was therefore their aim to perform a systematic review of breathing guidance interventions within the fields of radiation oncology and radiology. Methods: From August 1–14, 2014, the following online databases were searched: Medline, Embase, PubMed, and Web of Science. Results of these searches were filtered in accordance to a set of eligibility criteria. The search, filtration, and analysis of articles were conducted in accordance with preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Reference lists of included articles, and repeat authors of included articles, were hand-searched. Results: The systematic search yielded a total of 480 articles, which were filtered down to 27 relevant articles in accordance to the eligibility criteria. These 27 articles detailed the intervention of breathing guidance strategies in controlled studies assessing its impact on such outcomes as breathing regularity, image quality, target coverage, and treatment margins, recruiting either healthy adult volunteers or patients with thoracic or abdominal lesions. In 21/27 studies, significant (p < 0.05) improvements from the use of breathing guidance were observed. Conclusions: There is a trend toward the number of breathing guidance studies increasing with time, indicating a growing clinical interest. The results found here indicate that further clinical studies are warranted that quantify the

  12. Neurophysiologic Correlates of Ketamine Sedation and Anesthesia: A High-density Electroencephalography Study in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlisides, Phillip E; Bel-Bahar, Tarik; Lee, UnCheol; Li, Duan; Kim, Hyoungkyu; Janke, Ellen; Tarnal, Vijay; Pichurko, Adrian B; McKinney, Amy M; Kunkler, Bryan S; Picton, Paul; Mashour, George A

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated inconsistent neurophysiologic effects of ketamine, although discrepant findings might relate to differences in doses studied, brain regions analyzed, coadministration of other anesthetic medications, and resolution of the electroencephalograph. The objective of this study was to characterize the dose-dependent effects of ketamine on cortical oscillations and functional connectivity. Ten healthy human volunteers were recruited for study participation. The data were recorded using a 128-channel electroencephalograph during baseline consciousness, subanesthetic dosing (0.5 mg/kg over 40 min), anesthetic dosing (1.5 mg/kg bolus), and recovery. No other sedative or anesthetic medications were administered. Spectrograms, topomaps, and functional connectivity (weighted and directed phase lag index) were computed and analyzed. Frontal theta bandwidth power increased most dramatically during ketamine anesthesia (mean power ± SD, 4.25 ± 1.90 dB) compared to the baseline (0.64 ± 0.28 dB), subanesthetic (0.60 ± 0.30 dB), and recovery (0.68 ± 0.41 dB) states; P ketamine anesthesia. Weighted phase lag index demonstrated theta phase locking within anterior regions (0.2349 ± 0.1170, P ketamine anesthesia. Alpha power gradually decreased with subanesthetic ketamine, and anterior-to-posterior directed connectivity was maximally reduced (0.0282 ± 0.0772) during ketamine anesthesia compared to all other states (P Ketamine anesthesia correlates most clearly with distinct changes in the theta bandwidth, including increased power and functional connectivity. Anterior-to-posterior connectivity in the alpha bandwidth becomes maximally depressed with anesthetic ketamine administration, suggesting a dose-dependent effect.

  13. Characterization of intraluminal impedance patterns associated with gas reflux in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, M P; Sifrim, D; Rommel, N; Benninga, M A; Davidson, G P; Omari, T I

    2009-08-01

    Multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) recording allows assessment of flow through the oesophagus and differentiation between liquid and gas contents. Existing MII criteria for recognition of gas gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) have not been validated during known gas GOR in humans. (i) Characterize MII patterns of known gas GOR and optimize criteria. (ii) Clarify interrelationships between magnitude of maximal impedance change, luminal diameter and electrode-mucosa contact. Ten healthy volunteers (six male, 21-37 years) were studied using an oesophageal MII-manometry catheter. After catheter placement, subjects were asked to drink 600 mL of carbonated soft drink. Recordings were made for 20 min and the protocol repeated. Reported belches confirmed manometrically (triggered by transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations) were included for analysis. Those episodes were compared against commonly used criteria. Another five subjects (three male, 26-52 years) underwent simultaneous MII and videofluoroscopy using the same protocol. Videofluoroscopic images were analyzed for luminal diameter and the presence of electrode-mucosa contact. All analyzed gas GOR episodes (n = 88) were associated with a pattern of impedance rise which was either retrograde (62.5%), synchronous (19.3%) or antegrade (18.2%). Depending on the exact criteria used, sensitivity ranged from 33% to 75%. A multivariate regression model including luminal diameter and the presence of electrode-mucosa contact as independent factors accounted for 53% of all variation in impedance changes. In conclusion, a significant number of gas GOR episodes does not meet criteria for their recognition. New criteria are proposed to include specific antegrade patterns of impedance rise. Luminal diameter and the extent of contact between the oesophageal mucosa and MII-electrodes influence the magnitude and patterning of impedance change.

  14. BIOEQUIVALENCE STUDY OF TWO ORAL FORMULATIONS OF METAMIZOLE 500 MG IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS

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    Dhaneshwar Shep *, Rakesh Ojha , Rajeshwari Rathod , Sweta Patel , Manish Nivsarkar , Sanjay Maroo and Harish Padh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metamizole (Dipyrone is widely used and has effective analgesic, antipyretic, and antispasmodic properties. After oral or intravenous administration, dipyrone is rapidly hydrolyzed to the active moiety 4-methylaminoantipyrine. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the bioequivalence of 2 oral formulations of Metamizole 500 mg. Methods: This double blind, randomized, single-dose, 2-period crossover study in healthy Indian adult volunteers was conducted at PERD Centre, Ahmedabad. Subjects received Metamizole 500 mg of either test or reference formulation with a washout period of 7 days. After study drug administration, serial blood samples were collected over a period of 24 hours. Plasma concentration of 4-methylaminoantipyrine was measured by pre-validated LC-MS method. Pharmacokinetic (PK parameters Cmax, Tmax, t1/2, AUC0-t, AUC0-∞, and kel, were determined for test and reference formulations. The formulations were to be considered bioequivalent if the log-transformed ratios of Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-∞ were within the predetermined bioequivalence range of 80% to 125%. Results: A total of 14 subjects were enrolled. No significant differences were found based on analysis of variance, with mean values and 90% confidence intervals of test/reference ratios for these parameters as follows: Cmax, 18.24 versus 18.44 μg/mL (92.68 - 106.61; AUC0-t, 92.97 Versus 91.37 μg.hr/mL (89.49 - 113.09; and AUC0-∞, 96.64 Versus 94.65 μg.hr/mL (92.31 - 111.63. Conclusion: Since the 90% confidence intervals for Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0−∞ were within the interval of 80-125%, it was concluded that both formulations were bioequivalent, according to both the rate and extent of absorption.

  15. Reproducibility of the serum lipid response to coffee oil in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katan Martijn B

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Humans and animals show a certain consistency in the response of their serum lipids to fat-modified diets. This may indicate a genetic basis underlying this response. Coffee oil might be used as a model substance to investigate which genes determine differences in the serum lipid response. Before carrying out such studies our objective was to investigate to what extent the effect of coffee oil on serum lipid concentrations is reproducible within subjects. Methods The serum lipid response of 32 healthy volunteers was measured twice in separate five-week periods in which coffee oil was administered (69 mg cafestol / day. Results Total cholesterol levels increased by 24% in period 1 (range:0;52% and 18% in period 2 (1;48%, LDL cholesterol by 29 % (-9;71% and 20% (-12;57%, triglycerides by 66% (16;175% and 58% (-13;202%, and HDL cholesterol did not change significantly: The range of the HDL response was -19;25% in period 1 and -20;33% in period 2. The correlation between the two responses was 0.20 (95%CI -0.16, 0.51 for total cholesterol, 0.16 (95%CI -0.20, 0.48 for LDL, 0.67 (95%CI 0.42, 0.83 for HDL, and 0.77 (95%CI 0.56, 0.88 for triglycerides. Conclusions The responses of total and LDL cholesterol to coffee oil were poorly reproducible within subjects. The responses of HDL and triglycerides, however, appeared to be highly reproducible. Therefore, investigating the genetic sources of the variation in the serum-lipid response to coffee oil is more promising for HDL and triglycerides.

  16. Neural underpinnings of nocebo hyperalgesia in visceral pain: A fMRI study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Julia; Bingel, Ulrike; Ritter, Christoph; Benson, Sven; Schedlowski, Manfred; Gramsch, Carolin; Forsting, Michael; Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2015-10-15

    Despite the clinical relevance of nocebo effects, few studies have addressed their underlying neural mechanisms in clinically-relevant pain models. We aimed to address the contribution of nocebo effects and their underlying neural circuitry to central pain amplification in visceral pain, as it may develop over repeated painful experiences due to negative pain-related expectations. Healthy volunteers received verbal suggestions of pain sensitization (nocebo group, N=28) or neutral instructions (control group, N=16). fMRI was used to investigate changes in neural responses during cued pain anticipation and painful rectal distensions delivered in successive fMRI sessions. Pain intensity was rated trial-by-trial, and expected pain intensity, state anxiety and tension were assessed prior to each session. Behavioral analyses demonstrated significantly greater increases in both expected and perceived pain in the nocebo group. The fMRI analysis performed on nocebo-responders only (N=14) revealed that these behavioral changes were associated with increased activation within the secondary somatosensory cortex and amygdala during pain anticipation and within the thalamus, insula and amygdala during painful stimulation when compared to controls. A subsequent psycho-physiological interaction analysis of the pain phase showed increased functional connectivity between the anterior insula, which was set-up as seed region based on group results, and midcingulate cortex as a function of negative expectations. These findings support that negative pain-related expectations can play a crucial role in pain amplification of visceral pain, which is mediated, at least in part, by a neural up-regulation of pain-associated areas and their connectivity. These findings may have implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of chronic abdominal pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of adrenergic agonists on coronary blood flow: a laboratory study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Pelaez, Alvaro F; Gao, Zhaohui; Ahmad, Tariq A; Leuenberger, Urs A; Proctor, David N; Maman, Stephan R; Muller, Matthew D

    2016-05-01

    Myocardial oxygen supply and demand mismatch is fundamental to the pathophysiology of ischemia and infarction. The sympathetic nervous system, through α-adrenergic receptors and β-adrenergic receptors, influences both myocardial oxygen supply and demand. In animal models, mechanistic studies have established that adrenergic receptors contribute to coronary vascular tone. The purpose of this laboratory study was to noninvasively quantify coronary responses to adrenergic receptor stimulation in humans. Fourteen healthy volunteers (11 men and 3 women) performed isometric handgrip exercise to fatigue followed by intravenous infusion of isoproterenol. A subset of individuals also received infusions of phenylephrine (n = 6), terbutaline (n = 10), and epinephrine (n = 4); all dosages were based on fat-free mass and were infused slowly to achieve steady-state. The left anterior descending coronary artery was visualized using Doppler echocardiography. Beat-by-beat heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), peak diastolic coronary velocity (CBVpeak), and coronary velocity time integral were calculated. Data are presented as M ± SD Isometric handgrip elicited significant increases in BP, HR, and CBVpeak (from 23.3 ± 5.3 to 34.5 ± 9.9 cm/sec). Isoproterenol raised HR and CBVpeak (from 22.6 ± 4.8 to 43.9 ± 12.4 cm/sec). Terbutaline and epinephrine evoked coronary hyperemia whereas phenylephrine did not significantly alter CBVpeak. Different indices of coronary hyperemia (changes in CBVpeak and velocity time integral) were significantly correlated (R = 0.803). The current data indicate that coronary hyperemia occurs in healthy humans in response to isometric handgrip exercise and low-dose, steady-state infusions of isoproterenol, terbutaline, and epinephrine. The contribution of β1 versus β2 receptors to coronary hyperemia remains to be determined. In this echocardiographic study, we demonstrate that coronary blood flow increases when

  18. Short term comparative study of topical 2% carteolol with and without benzalkonium chloride in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin, C.; de Lunardo, C.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—A crossover, randomised double blind study was undertaken in 30 healthy volunteers, in order to compare the tolerance of 2% carteolol with and without preservative in short term use.
METHODS—Complete ophthalmic examinations were performed before and 30, 60, and 180 minutes after instillation of one drop of the solution, and after 3 days of preservative treatment. After a 5 day washout, the same examinations were done with the second drug.
RESULTS—Results showed good general tolerance for both formulations. No significant difference in subjective tolerance, corneal aesthesiometry, punctuate keratitis, Schirmer's test, intraocular pressure (IOP) decrease (about 25% in the two groups at 3 hours, 10% after 3 days of treatment), resting cardiac frequency, or blood pressure was observed. However, break up time was significantly reduced from baseline by preserved carteolol both at 3 hours (10.40 (5.9) seconds to 6.15 (3.9) seconds, p=0.001) and after 3 days (7.72 (5.5) seconds, p=0.04). Preservative free carteolol did not significantly change the break up time (baseline 9.08 (5.7) seconds; 3 hours = 7.88 (5.5) seconds, not significant; day 3 = 8.35 (5.8), non-significant).
CONCLUSIONS—These results confirm that carteolol is well tolerated, either with or without preservative. The preservative free group showed better stability of the tear film, without loss of effect on IOP. This difference, although mild in the healthy young subjects in the present study could be much more relevant in those patients treated long term, older patients, and/or those suffering from ocular surface disorders. In such instances, preservative free drugs could be of potential benefit to protect the lacrimal fluid integrity and corneoconjunctival surface.

 Keywords: glaucoma; carteolol; benzalkonium; preservatives; β blockers PMID:9536878

  19. Pramipexole Increases Go Timeouts but Not No-go Errors in Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue Qing; Glizer, Daniel; Vo, Andrew; Seergobin, Ken N.; MacDonald, Penny A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by motor symptoms, such as resting tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity, but also features non-motor complications. PD patients taking dopaminergic therapy, such as levodopa but especially dopamine agonists (DAs), evidence an increase in impulse control disorders (ICDs), suggesting a link between dopaminergic therapy and impulsive pursuit of pleasurable activities. However, impulsivity is a multifaceted construct. Motor impulsivity refers to the inability to overcome automatic responses or cancel pre-potent responses. Previous research has suggested that PD patients, on dopaminergic medications, have decreased motor impulsivity. Whether effects on impulsivity are main effects of dopaminergic therapies or are specific to PD is unclear. Using a Go No-go task, we investigated the effect of a single dose of the DA pramipexole on motor impulsivity in healthy participants. The Go No-go task consisted of Go trials, for which keystroke responses were made as quickly as possible, and lesser frequency No-go trials, on which motor responses were to be inhibited. We hypothesized that pramipexole would decrease motor impulsivity. This would manifest as: (a) fewer No-go errors (i.e., fewer responses on trials in which a response ought to have been inhibited); and (b) more timed-out Go trials (i.e., more trials on which the deadline elapsed before a decision to make a keystroke occurred). Healthy volunteers were treated with either 0.5 mg of pramipexole or a standard placebo (randomly determined). During the 2-h wait period, they completed demographic, cognitive, physiological and affective measures. The pramipexole group had significantly more Go timeouts (p pramipexole did not increase motor impulsivity. In fact, in line with findings in PD and addiction, dopaminergic therapy might increase motor impulse control. In these patient groups, by enhancing function of the dorsal striatum (DS) of the basal ganglia in contrast to its effect on

  20. Bioequivalence study of two imatinib formulations after single-dose administration in healthy Korean male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, J A; Kim, N; Yang, J-S; Kim, T-e; Kim, J-R; Song, G-S; Kim, H; Ko, J W; Huh, W

    2014-12-01

    Imatinib mesylate is effective for chronic myeloid leukaemia and gastrointestinal tumours. We aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of a 200-mg imatinib tablet compared to 2×100-mg imatinib tablets in order to meet the regulatory requirements for marketing in Korea.An open-label, randomized, single-dose, 2-period, 2-treatment cross-over study was conducted in 28 healthy Korean male volunteers. Subjects were administered a 200-mg imatinib tablet and 2×100-mg imatinib tablets under a fasting state according to a randomly assigned order with a 2-week wash-out period. Serial blood samples were collected up to 72 h post-dose. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using non-compartmental methods.A total of 28 subjects were enrolled and 23 subjects completed the study. There were no serious adverse events during the study. 23 mild to moderate adverse events were reported (11 events with 200-mg imatinib vs. 12 events with 2×100-mg imatinib) and subjects recovered without sequelae. The Cmax value was 922.8±318.8 μg/L at 3.15 h for 200-mg imatinib tablet, and 986.3±266.0 μg/L at 2.91 h for the 2×100-mg imatinib tablet. The AUClast of 200-mg and 2×100-mg tablets were 13 084.3±39.1 and 14 131.7±3 826.2 h · μg/L, respectively. The geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals) for Cmax and AUClast were 0.9121 (0.8188, 1.0161) and 0.9558 (0.8685, 1.0519), respectively.A newly developed 200-mg imatinib tablet was bioequivalent to 2×100-mg imatinib tablets in healthy Korean subjects. A single-dose of either of the 2 formulations was generally well tolerated.

  1. Gender differences in pharmacokinetics of a combination tablet of niacin extended-release/simvastatin in healthy Chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-lin; Liu, Man; Yang, Man; Zhang, Ya-nan; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Li-na; Han, Jing; Liu, Hui-chen

    2014-12-01

    The gender differences in pharmacokinetics of a combination tablet of niacin extended-release/simvastatin were evaluated in healthy Chinese volunteers. Thirty-six healthy male and female volunteers were enrolled in the study receiving a single oral dose of niacin extended-release/simvastatin 1,000/20 mg. The results indicated that the systemic exposure of simvastatin hydroxy acid and the total urine excretion of niacin were significantly higher for females compared with those for males, and the T max of niacin in plasma was significantly shorter for males than that for females. There were no significant differences in the systemic exposure of simvastatin, niacin, and NUA in plasma between males and females.

  2. The pharmacokinetic characters of simvastatin after co-administration with Shexiang Baoxin Pill in healthy volunteers' plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianfei; Jiang, Peng; Peng, Chengcheng; Li, Min; Liu, Runhui; Zhang, Weidong

    2016-07-15

    To investigate the effect of Shexiang Baoxin Pill (SBP), a tranditional Chinese medicine, on the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of simvastatin in healthy volunteers' plasma, a quantitative method was developed using an Agilent G6410A rapid performance liquid chromatography (RPLC) coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry system. The established method was rapid with high extraction recovery and successfully applied for the determination of simvastatin in plasma of 16 healthy volunteers. The results demonstrated that the MRT(0-∞), T1/2 and Tmax value of simvastatin were significantly decreased, while the AUC(0-t) and Cmax values of smivastatin were increased by SBP. The pharmacokinetic study demonstrated that the metabolism parameters of simvastatin could be affected by SBP and the potential drug-drug interaction should be noted in the future clinical practice.

  3. Comparison of Quantitative Cartilage T2 Measurements and Qualitative MR Imaging between Professional Ballet Dancers and Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jang Gyu; Yi, Ji Sook; Han, Jong Kyu; Lee, Young Koo

    2015-07-01

    To compare qualitative magnetic resonance (MR) images and quantitative T2 measurements of the tibiotalar cartilage between ballerinas and healthy volunteers. Institutional review board approval for this study and informed consent (from all participants) were obtained. MR examinations were performed by using a 3-T MR imaging system with 21 professional female ballet dancers and 20 healthy female volunteers. Two musculoskeletal radiologists qualitatively measured tibiotalar cartilage T2 values in the anterior zones, middle zones, and posterior zones of cartilage. MR findings were also qualitatively analyzed in both groups. The tibial cartilage T2 values measured in the anterior and posterior zones and the talar cartilage T2 values measured in all three zones were significantly higher in the ballerina group than in the control group (P quantitative T2 measurement may potentially be used as a noninvasive imaging tool for early detection of cartilage lesions in the tibiotalar joint.

  4. Effects of sulpiride on true and false memories of thematically related pictures and associated words in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina V Guarnieri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory, working memory, emotional memory and attention are subject to dopaminergic modulation. However, the potential role of dopamine on the generation of false memories is unknown. This study defined the role of the dopamine D2 receptor on true and false memories. Twenty-four young, healthy volunteers ingested a single dose of placebo or 400 mg oral sulpiride, a dopamine D2-receptor antagonist, just before starting the recognition memory task in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The sulpiride group made more false recognitions during visual and verbal processing than the placebo group although both groups had the same indices of true memory. These findings demonstrate that dopamine blockade in healthy volunteers can specifically increase the rate of false recognitions.

  5. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha infusion produced insulin resistance but no change in the incretin effect in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Solomon, Thomas P J; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Lars; Holst, Jens Juul; Møller, Kirsten

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with peripheral insulin resistance, impaired incretin effect, and increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Although TNF-α infusion at a dose that induces systemic inflammation in healthy volunteers has been demonstrated to induce peripheral insulin resistance, the influence of this cytokine on the incretin effect is unknown. We investigated whether systemic inflammation induced by TNF-α infusion in healthy volunteers alters the incretin hormone response to oral and intravenous glucose loads in a crossover study design with ten healthy male volunteers (mean age 24 years, mean body mass index 23.7 kg/m(2) ). The study consisted of four study days: days 1 and 2, 6-h infusion of saline; days 3 and 4, 6-h infusion of TNF-α; days 1 and 3, 4-h oral glucose tolerance test; and days 2 and 4, 4-h corresponding intravenous isoglycaemic glucose tolerance test. Glucose tolerance tests were initiated after 2 h of saline/TNF-α infusion. Plasma concentrations of TNF-α, interleukin 6, glucose, incretin hormones, and cortisol, and serum concentrations of C-peptide and insulin were measured throughout the study days. Insulin sensitivity was estimated by the Matsuda index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Prehepatic insulin secretion rates were calculated. TNF-α infusion induced symptoms of systemic inflammation; increased plasma levels of cortisol, TNF-α, and interleukin 6; and increased the HOMA-IR. The secretion of incretin hormones as well as the incretin effect remained unchanged. In healthy young male volunteers, acute systemic inflammation induced by infusion of TNF-α is associated with insulin resistance with no change in the incretin effect. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The Area of Secondary Hyperalgesia following Heat Stimulation in Healthy Male Volunteers: Inter- and Intra-Individual Variance and Reproducibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Sejer Hansen

    Full Text Available Clinical pain models can be applied when investigating basic physiologic pain responses in healthy volunteers. Several pain models exist; however, only few have been adequately validated. Our primary aim with this prospective study was to investigate the intra- and inter-individual variation in secondary hyperalgesia elicited by brief thermal sensitization (45°C for 3 min in healthy volunteers.Fifty healthy volunteers were included. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization were investigated by 2 observers on 4 experimental days, with a minimum interval of 7 days. Additionally, heat pain detection threshold and pain during thermal stimulation (45°C for 1 min., and the psychological tests Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score were applied.For areas of secondary hyperalgesia, an intra-observer intra-person correlation of 0.85, 95% CI [0.78, 0.90], an intra-observer inter-person correlation of 0.03, 95% CI [0.00, 0.16], and a coefficient of variation of 0.17, 95% CI [0.14, 0.21] was demonstrated. Four percent of the study population had areas of secondary hyperalgesia both below the 1st and above the 3rd quartile considering all included participants. Heat pain detection threshold predicted area of secondary hyperalgesia with an adjusted R2 of 0.20 (P = 0.0006.We have demonstrated a low intra-individual, and a high inter-individual variation in thermally induced secondary hyperalgesia. We conclude that brief thermal sensitization produce secondary hyperalgesia with a high level of reproducibility, which can be applied to investigate different phenotypes related to secondary hyperalgesia in healthy volunteers.clinicaltrials.gov NCT02166164.

  7. Electromyographic activity of trunk and hip muscles during stabilization exercises in four-point kneeling in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Veerle K.; Vleeming, Andry; Bouche, Katie G.; Mahieu, Nele N; Vanderstraeten, Guy G.; Danneels, Lieven A

    2006-01-01

    Stabilization exercises are intended to optimize function of the muscles that are believed to govern trunk stability. Debate exists whether certain muscles are more important than others in optimally performing these exercises. Thirty healthy volunteers were asked to perform three frequently prescribed stabilization exercises in four-point kneeling. The electromyographic activity of different trunk and hip muscles was evaluated. Average amplitudes obtained during the exercises were normalized...

  8. Application of rapid and simple liquid chromatography method for determination of bioequivalence of generic lamotrigine tablets in healthy Iranian volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Samira Sadat Abolmaali; Ali Mohammad Tamaddon; Soliman Mohammadi Samani

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid chromatography method was developed for determination of lamotrigine in human plasma. The method was used to compare the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of 50 mg generic and the reference lamotrigine (Lamictal) tablets in healthy Iranian volunteers. High performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method was developed and validated to determine lamotrigine concentration in plasma samples. The method was linear over the range of 0.1 to 15 μg/ml. The accuracy and precision ...

  9. Pharmacokinetics of the H(2) blocker roxatidine acetate hydrochloride in pediatric patients, in comparison with healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hidefumi; Kawashima, Hisashi; Azuma, Rieko; Sato, Ikuya; Nagao, Koji; Miyazawa, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies were conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics of roxatidine acetate hydrochloride capsules (ALTAT(®) CAPSULES) in children. In a single-dose pharmacokinetic (PK) study in pediatric patients aged between 6 and 14 years with acid-related diseases, 37.5 mg or 75 mg roxatidine capsules were given orally, and blood samples were collected to determine the plasma roxatidine concentrations. Meanwhile, a single-dose PK study in healthy adult volunteers was newly conducted; subjects were given 37.5 mg, 75 mg or 150 mg roxatidine capsules. Differences were present between the PK parameters in pediatric patients and those in healthy adult volunteers. However, the CL/F and Vd/F adjusted by body surface area (BSA) or body weight (BW) were comparable. A close correlation of the C(max) and AUC(0-∞) to the dose per unit BSA (mg/m(2)) or BW (mg/kg) was also shown. In the multiple-dose study in pediatric patients, no roxatidine accumulation in plasma was observed, as was the case with a previous study in adults. These data show that the PK profile of roxatidine in pediatric patients is similar to the profile in healthy adult volunteers when adjusted by BSA or BW.

  10. Peak oxygen uptake in relation to total heart volume discriminates heart failure patients from healthy volunteers and athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buhre Torsten

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An early sign of heart failure (HF is a decreased cardiac reserve or inability to adequately increase cardiac output during exercise. Under normal circumstances maximal cardiac output is closely related to peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak which has previously been shown to be closely related to total heart volume (THV. Thus, the aim of this study was to derive a VO2peak/THV ratio and to test the hypothesis that this ratio can be used to distinguish patients with HF from healthy volunteers and endurance athletes. Thirty-one patients with HF of different etiologies were retrospectively included and 131 control subjects (60 healthy volunteers and 71 athletes were prospectively enrolled. Peak oxygen uptake was determined by maximal exercise test and THV was determined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. The VO2peak/THV ratio was then derived and tested. Results Peak oxygen uptake was strongly correlated to THV (r2 = 0.74, p 2 = 0.0002, p = 0.95. The VO2peak/THV ratio differed significantly between control subjects and patients, even in patients with normal ejection fraction and after normalizing for hemoglobin levels (p 2peak/THV ratio was the only independent predictor of presence of HF (p Conclusions The VO2peak/THV ratio can be used to distinguish patients with clinically diagnosed HF from healthy volunteers and athletes, even in patients with preserved systolic left ventricular function and after normalizing for hemoglobin levels.

  11. Nasal PMN response to repeated challenge with endotoxin in healthy volunteers**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Rationale: We have employed nasal challenge with Iipopolysaccharid (lPS) followed by nasal lavage (NU to experimentally induce and examine upper airway inflammation in human volunteers.It is unclear however whether adaptation within individuals occurs following repeated ...

  12. Hyperpolarized 3He apparent diffusion coefficient MRI of the lung: reproducibility and volume dependency in healthy volunteers and patients with emphysema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz, S.; Casselbrant, I.; Piitulainen, E.;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of hyperpolarized (HP) (3)He gas using diffusion weighted MRI in healthy volunteers and patients with emphysema and examine the reproducibility and volume dependency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of eight healthy volunteers and 16...... days was good in both healthy volunteers and patients (SD range of 0.003-0.013 cm(2)/second and 0.001-0.009 cm(2)/second at 6% and 15% of TLC for healthy volunteers, and a SD range of 0.001-0.041 cm(2)/second and 0.001-0.011 cm(2)/second, respectively, for patients). A minor but significant increase...... in mean ADC with increased inhaled gas volume was observed in both groups. CONCLUSION: Mean ADC and SD of HP (3)He MRI is reproducible and discriminates well between healthy controls and patients with emphysema at the higher gas volume. This method is robust and may be useful to gain new insights...

  13. Bioequivalence study of two losartan formulations administered orally in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Agnieszka; Brzezińiski, Rafał; Szałek, Edyta; Dubai, Vitali; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Dyderski, Stanisław; Drobnik, Leon; Wolc, Anna; Olejniczak-Rabinek, Magdalena

    2006-01-01

    The bioavailability of a new losartan preparation (2-butyl-4-chloro-1-[p-(o-1H-tetrazol-5-ylphenyl)benzyl]imidazole-5-methanol monopotassium salt, CAS 114798-26-4) was compared with the reference preparation of the drug in 24 healthy male volunteers, aged between 19 and 32. The open, randomized, single-blind two-sequence, two-period crossover study design was performed. Under fasting conditions, each subject received a single oral dose of 100 mg losartan as a test or reference formulation. The plasma concentrations of losartan and its active metabolite were analyzed by a rapid and sensitive HPLC method with UV detection. The pharmacokinetic parameters included AUC0-36h, AUC0-infinity, Cmax, t1/2, and Ke. Values of AUC0-infinity demonstrate nearly identical bioavailability of losartan from the examined formulations. The AUC0-infinity of losartan was 2019.92+/-1002.90 and 2028.58+/-837.45 ng x h/ml for the test and reference formulation, respectively. The AUC0-infinity of the metabolite was 10851.52+/-4438.66 and 11041.18 +/-5015.81 ng x h/ml for test and reference formulation, respectively. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of losartan was 745.94+/-419.75 ng/ml for the test and 745.74+/-329.99 ng/ml for the reference product and the Cmax of the metabolite was 1805.77+/-765.39 and 1606.22 +/-977.22 ng/ml for the test and reference product, respectively. No statistical differences were observed for Cmax and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve for both losartan and its active metabolite. 90 % confidence limits calculated for Cmax and AUC from zero to infinity (AUC0-infinity) of losartan and its metabolite were included in the bioequivalence range (0.8-1.25 for AUC). This study shows that the test formulation is bioequivalent to the reference formulation for losartan and its main active metabolite.

  14. Brain areas activated by uncertain reward-based decision-making in healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongjun Guo; Juan Chen; Shien Liu; Yuhuan Li; Bo Sun; Zhenbo Gao

    2013-01-01

    Reward-based decision-making has been found to activate several brain areas, including the ven-trolateral prefrontal lobe, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum, and meso-limbic dopaminergic system. In this study, we observed brain areas activated under three degrees of uncertainty in a reward-based decision-making task (certain, risky, and ambiguous). The tasks were presented using a brain function audiovisual stimulation system. We conducted brain scans of 15 healthy volunteers using a 3.0T magnetic resonance scanner. We used SPM8 to analyze the location and intensity of activation during the reward-based decision-making task, with respect to the three conditions. We found that the orbitofrontal cortex was activated in the certain reward con-dition, while the prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, occipital visual cortex, inferior parietal lobe, ce-rebel ar posterior lobe, middle temporal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, limbic lobe, and midbrain were activated during the ‘risk’ condition. The prefrontal cortex, temporal pole, inferior temporal gyrus, occipital visual cortex, and cerebel ar posterior lobe were activated during ambiguous deci-sion-making. The ventrolateral prefrontal lobe, frontal pole of the prefrontal lobe, orbitofrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lo-bule, and cerebel ar posterior lobe exhibited greater activation in the‘risk’ than in the‘certain’ con-dition (P<0.05). The frontal pole and dorsolateral region of the prefrontal lobe, as wel as the ce-rebel ar posterior lobe, showed significantly greater activation in the ‘ambiguous’ condition com-pared to the ‘risk’ condition (P < 0.05). The prefrontal lobe, occipital lobe, parietal lobe, temporal lobe, limbic lobe, midbrain, and posterior lobe of the cerebel um were activated during deci-sion-making about uncertain rewards. Thus, we observed different levels and regions of

  15. Gastrointestinal dissolution, supersaturation and precipitation of the weak base indinavir in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbens, Jari; Brouwers, Joachim; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the impact of relevant gastrointestinal conditions on the intraluminal dissolution, supersaturation and precipitation behavior of the weakly basic drug indinavir. The influence of (i) concomitant PPI intake and (ii) the nutritional state on the gastrointestinal behavior of indinavir was assessed in order to identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for previously reported interactions. Five healthy volunteers were recruited into a crossover study containing the following arms: fasted state, fed state and fasted state with concomitant proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use. In each condition, one Crixivan® capsule (400mg indinavir) was orally administered with 240mL of water. Gastric and duodenal fluids, aspirated as a function of time, were monitored for total and dissolved indinavir concentrations on a UPLC-MS/MS system. Indinavir's thermodynamic solubility was determined in individual aspirates to evaluate supersaturation. The bioaccessible fraction of indinavir in aspirated duodenal fluids was determined in an ex vivo permeation experiment through an artificial membrane. A nearly complete dissolution of indinavir in the fasted stomach was observed (90±3%). Regardless of dosing conditions, less indinavir was in solution in the duodenum compared to the stomach. Duodenal supersaturation was observed in all three testing conditions. The highest degrees of duodenal supersaturation (6.5±5.9) were observed in the fasted state. Concomitant PPI use resulted in an increased gastric pH and a smaller fraction of indinavir being dissolved (58±24%), eventually resulting in lower intestinal concentrations. In fed state conditions, drug release from the capsule was delayed and more gradually, although a similar fraction of the intragastric indinavir dissolved compared to the fasted state (83±12%). Indinavir was still present in the lumen of the duodenum three hours after oral administration, although it already reached 70% (on average) of the fasted

  16. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and tolerability of gemifloxacin administered orally to healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A; Bygate, E; Vousden, M; Oliver, S; Johnson, M; Ward, C; Cheon, A; Choo, Y S; Kim, I

    2001-02-01

    Gemifloxacin mesylate (SB-265805-S, LB-20304a) is a potent, novel fluoroquinolone agent with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. The pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oral gemifloxacin were characterized in two parallel group studies in healthy male volunteers after doses of 160, 320, 480, and 640 mg once daily for 7 days. Multiple serum or plasma and urine samples were collected on days 1 and 7 and were analyzed for gemifloxacin by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence (study 1) or HPLC-mass spectrometry (study 2). Safety assessments included vital signs, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) readings, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, and adverse experience monitoring. Gemifloxacin was rapidly absorbed, with a time to maximum concentration of approximately 1 h after dosing followed by a biexponential decline in concentration. Generally, maximum concentration and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) increased linearly with dose after either single or repeat doses. Mean +/- standard deviation values of AUC(0-tau) on day 7 were 4.92 +/- 1.08, 9.06 +/- 2.20, 12.2 +/- 3.69, and 20.1 +/- 3.67 microg x h/ml following 160-, 320-, 480-, and 640-mg doses, respectively. The terminal-phase half-life was approximately 7 to 8 h, independent of dose, and was similar following single and repeated administrations. There was minimal accumulation of gemifloxacin after multiple dosing. Approximately 20 to 30% of the administered dose was excreted unchanged in the urine. The renal clearance was 160 ml/min on average after single and multiple doses, which was slightly greater than the accepted glomerular filtration rate (approximately 120 ml/min). These data show that the pharmacokinetics of gemifloxacin are linear and independent of dose. Gemifloxacin was generally well tolerated, although one subject was withdrawn from the study after 6 days at 640 mg for mild, transient elevations of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate

  17. The brain signature of paracetamol in healthy volunteers: a double-blind randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickering G

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gisèle Pickering,1–3 Adrian Kastler,4 Nicolas Macian,1,2 Bruno Pereira,5 Romain Valabrègue,6 Stéphane Lehericy,6 Louis Boyer,4,7 Claude Dubray,1–3 Betty Jean4 1CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Centre de Pharmacologie Clinique, 2Centre d’Investigation Clinique – Inserm 1405, 3Clermont Université, Laboratoire de Pharmacologie, Faculté de médecine, 4CHU Gabriel Montpied, Clermont-Ferrand, Service d’Imagerie Ostéo-articulaire thoracique et neurologique, 5CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Délégation Recherche Clinique et à l’Innovation, Clermont-Ferrand, France; 6Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle epiniere – ICM, Centre de NeuroImagerie de Recherche CENIR, Inserm U1127, CNRS UMR 7225, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC University Paris, Paris, France, Department of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France; 7UMR CNRS UdA 6284, Clemont-Ferrand, France Background: Paracetamol’s (APAP mechanism of action suggests the implication of supraspinal structures but no neuroimaging study has been performed in humans.Methods and results: This randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial in 17 healthy volunteers (NCT01562704 aimed to evaluate how APAP modulates pain-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. We used behavioral measures and functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the response to experimental thermal stimuli with APAP or placebo administration. Region-of-interest analysis revealed that activity in response to noxious stimulation diminished with APAP compared to placebo in prefrontal cortices, insula, thalami, anterior cingulate cortex, and periaqueductal gray matter.Conclusion: These findings suggest an inhibitory effect of APAP on spinothalamic tracts leading to a decreased activation of higher structures, and a top-down influence on descending inhibition. Further binding and connectivity studies are needed to evaluate how APAP modulates pain, especially in the context of repeated

  18. Bioequivalence of two oral formulations of triflusal capsules in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quetglas, Emilio García; Campanero, Miguel Angel; Sádaba, Belén; Escolar, Manuel; Azanza, Jose Ramón

    2008-01-01

    Triflusal (CAS 322-79-2) is an antiplatelet agent related to salicylates used in several European and Latin American countries in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the bioequivalence of triflusal derived from two preparations using both parent drug and metabolite pharmacokinetic data. The bioavailabolity was measured in 24 healthy male Caucasian volunteers following a single oral dose (600 mg) of the test or reference products in the fasting state. Blood samples were collected for 120 h. Plasma concentrations of triflusal and its metabolite 3-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethylbenzoic acid (HTB) were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV and fluorescence detection, respectively. The non-compartmental method was used for pharmacokinetic analysis. Log-transformed Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-infinity were tested for bioequivalence using ANOVA and Schuirmann's two-one sided t-test. Tmax was analyzed by nonparametric pharmacokinetic parameters of triflusal and HTB derived from the two formulations were nearly consistent with previous observations. Triflusal parameters derived from the test and reference drug were as follows: Cmax (16.85 +/- 11.41 vs 14.48 +/- 7.22 mg/l), AUC0-t (18.43 +/- 10.91 vs 16.22 +/- 7.58 mg/l per hour), Tmax (1 range 0.25-2h vs 0.875 range 0.25-1.5 h), and t(1/2) (0.49 +/- 00.27 vs 0.76 +/- 0.64). HTB parameters after test and reference formulation administration were as follows: Cmax (68.13 +/- 23.05 vs 65.51 +/- 19.44 mg/l), AUC0-t (2748.18 +/- 971.91 vs 2877.97 +/- 881.2 h x mg/l), AUC0-infinity (3350.15 +/- 1182.62 vs 3372.49 +/- 1110.35 h x mg/l), Tmax (2 range 1-10 h vs 2 range 0.75-12 h), and t(1/2) (42.19 +/- 7.82 vs 43.13 +/- 6.56 h). 90% of confidence intervals for the test/reference ratio of Cmax AUC0-t and AUC0-infinity derived from both triflusal and HTB were found within the range of 80%-125% acceptable for bioequivalence. No significant difference was found between the Tmax values

  19. Anti-inflammatory effect of white wine in CKD patients and healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, Massimiliano; Panichi, Vincenzo; de la Torre, Rafael; Fitó, Montserrat; Covas, Maribel; Bertelli, Alberto; Muñoz-Aguayo, Daniel; Scatena, Alessia; Paoletti, Sabrina; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean-style diet has been considered for its important beneficial effects on the progression of CV disease. Wine is an important component of the Mediterranean diet, and moderate wine drinkers have lower mortality rates than nondrinkers and heavy drinkers in epidemiologic studies. The beneficial effects of red wine are thought to be dependent on the polyphenol compounds such as resveratrol that exhibit potent antioxidant activity. However, white wine, although lacking polyphenols, contains simple phenols, such as tyrosol (Tyr) and hydroxytyrosol (OH-Tyr), characteristic also of extra-virgin olive oil, which may share similar antioxidant and inflammatory properties. The effect of white wine and extra-virgin olive oil on inflammatory markers was evaluated in 10 healthy volunteers and in 10 patients with CKD (chronic kidney disease) K-DOQI stage III-IV in a prospective, single blind, randomized, cross-over trial. After two weeks of wash-out from alcoholic beverages, subjects were randomized to a cross-over design A-B or B-A of a 2-week treatment with white wine (4 ml/kg body weight, 0.48 g/kg of alcohol 12%, corresponding to 2-3 glasses/daily) and extra-virgin olive oil (treatment A) or extra-virgin olive oil alone (treatment B). The two study periods were separated by a two-week wash-out period. At baseline and at the end of each treatment, plasma levels of inflammatory markers C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) concentration were determined. Urinary levels of Tyr, OH-Tyr, and their metabolites were measured at the same time. During combined consumption of white wine and extra-virgin olive oil (treatment A), plasma levels of CRP and IL-6 decreased from 4.1 ± 1.8 to 2.4 ± 1.9 mg/l (p patients. CRP decreased from 2.6 ± 1.2 to 1.9 ± 0.9 mg/l (p chronic inflammation were significantly reduced in CKD patients during the combined consumption of white wine and olive oil, suggesting a

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of acetylsalicylic acid after intravenous and oral administration to healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagelschmitz J

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available J Nagelschmitz,1 M Blunck,1 J Kraetzschmar,1 M Ludwig,1 G Wensing,1 T Hohlfeld2 1Bayer HealthCare AG, Clinical Pharmacology, Wuppertal, Germany; 2Institut für Pharmakologie und Klinische Pharmakologie, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany Background: The pharmacology of single doses of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA administered intravenously (250 or 500 mg or orally (100, 300, or 500 mg was evaluated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Methods: Blood and urine samples were collected before and up to 24 hours after administration of ASA in 22 healthy volunteers. Pharmacokinetic parameters and measurements of platelet aggregation were determined using validated techniques. Results: A comparison between administration routes showed that the geometric mean dose-corrected peak concentrations (Cmax/D and the geometric mean dose-corrected area under the curve (AUC0–∞/D were higher following intravenous administration of ASA 500 mg compared with oral administration (estimated ratios were 11.23 and 2.03, respectively. Complete inhibition of platelet aggregation was achieved within 5 minutes with both intravenous ASA doses, reflecting a rapid onset of inhibition that was not observed with oral dosing. At 5 minutes after administration, the mean reduction in arachidonic acid-induced thromboxane B2 synthesis ex vivo was 99.3% with ASA 250 mg intravenously and 99.7% with ASA 500 mg intravenously. In exploratory analyses, thromboxane B2 synthesis was significantly lower after intravenous versus oral ASA 500 mg (P<0.0001 at each observed time point up to the first hour after administration. Concentrations of 6-keto-prostaglandin1α at 5 and 20 minutes after dosing were also significantly lower with ASA 500 mg intravenously than with ASA 500 mg orally. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that intravenous ASA provides more rapid and consistent platelet inhibition than oral ASA within the first hour after dosing

  1. Doppler ultrasonography measuement of hepatic hemodynamics during Valsalva maneuver: healthy volunteers study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Dong Ho; Son, Young Jin; Lee, Young Hwan; Yoon, Kwon Ha [Dept. of Radiology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The aim of our study was to assess the hemodynamic change of liver during the Valsalva maneuver using Doppler ultrasonography. Thirty healthy men volunteers were enrolled (mean age, 25.5±3.64 years). The diameter, minimal and maximal velocities, and volume flow of intrahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC), middle hepatic vein (MHV), and right main portal vein (RMPV) was measured during both rest and Valsalva maneuver. These changes were compared using paired t-test. The mean diameters (cm) of the intrahepatic IVC at rest and Valsalva maneuver were 1.94±0.40 versus 0.56±0.66 (P<0.001). The mean diameter (cm), minimal velocity (cm/sec), maximal velocity (cm/sec), and volume flow (mL/min) of MHV at rest and Valsalva maneuver were 0.60±0.15 versus 0.38±0.20 (P<0.001), -7.98±5.47 versus 25.74±13.13 (P<0.001), 21.34±6.89 versus 35.12±19.95 (P=0.002), and 106.94±97.65 versus 153.90±151.80 (P=0.014), respectively. Those of RMPV at rest and Valsalva maneuver were 0.78±0.21 versus 0.76±0.20 (P=0.485), 20.21±8.22 versus 18.73±7.43 (P=0.351), 26.79±8.85 versus 24.93±9.91 (P=0.275), and 391.52±265.63 versus 378.43±239.36 (P=0.315), respectively. The blood flow velocity and volume flow of MHV increased significantly during Valsalva maneuver. These findings suggest that hepatic vein might play an important role to maintain venous return to the heart during the maneuver.

  2. Bioavailability study of dronabinol oral solution versus dronabinol capsules in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neha Parikh,1 William G Kramer,2 Varun Khurana,1 Christina Cognata Smith,1 Santosh Vetticaden,1 1INSYS Therapeutics, Inc., Chandler, AZ, USA; 2Kramer Consulting LLC, North Potomac, MD, USA Background: Dronabinol, a pharmaceutical Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was originally developed as an oral capsule. This study evaluated the bioavailability of a new formulation, dronabinol oral solution, versus a dronabinol capsule formulation. Methods: In an open-label, four-period, single-dose, crossover study, healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two treatment sequences (T-R-T-R and R-T-R-T; T = dronabinol 4.25 mg oral solution and R = dronabinol 5 mg capsule under fasted conditions, with a minimum 7-day washout period between doses. Analyses were performed on venous blood samples drawn 15 minutes to 48 hours postdose, and dronabinol concentrations were assayed by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Fifty-one of 52 individuals had pharmacokinetic data for analysis. The 90% confidence interval of the geometric mean ratio (oral solution/capsule for dronabinol was within the 80%–125% bioequivalence range for area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC from time zero to last measurable concentration (AUC0–t and AUC from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞. Maximum plasma concentration was also bioequivalent for the two dronabinol formulations. Intraindividual variability in AUC0–∞ was >60% lower for dronabinol oral solution 4.25 mg versus dronabinol capsule 5 mg. Plasma dronabinol concentrations were detected within 15 minutes postdose in 100% of patients when receiving oral solution and in <25% of patients when receiving capsules. Conclusion: Single-dose dronabinol oral solution 4.25 mg was bioequivalent to dronabinol capsule 5 mg under fasted conditions. Dronabinol oral solution formulation may provide an easy-to-swallow administration option with lower intraindividual variability as well as

  3. Bioequivalence study of a generic Risperidone (Iperdal® in healthy Thai male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werawath Mahatthanatrakul

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the rate and extent of absorption of a generic risperidone (Iperdal® with a reference formulation (Risperdal® when given orally. The study was an open label, randomized, two-period, two-sequence,single dose cross-over design with a 2 weeks washout period in 16 healthy Thai male volunteers. Single oral dose of two 2-mg tablets of risperidone were administered and serial blood samples were collected from the antecubital vein before and at0.17, 0.33, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, 12, 24 and 48 hours post dose. Risperidone plasma concentrations were assayed using a validated High Performance Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC-UV method modified from Avenosoet al. (2000. Pharamcokinetic parameters i.e. Cmax, AUC0à48 and Tmax were analyzed by noncompartment analysis. Variations of the data were analyzed by “Two Way Analysis of Variance” (ANOVA. Statistics were tested as stated in USP 28 guidelinefor bioequivalence study. The maximum concentration (Cmax, ng/ml of risperidone for the innovator and the generic product were 31.11±17.24 (range 5.64-56.78 and 32.58±19.77 (range 5.29-84.56 ng/ml, respectively. The area under theplasma concentration-time curve (AUC0®48 of the innovator and the generic product were 160.64±152.89 (range 18.57- 550.32 and 144.03±127.37 (range 16.27-456.0 ng.hr/ml, respectively. The time to maximum concentration (Tmax of theinnovator and the generic product were 0.97±0.41(range 0.5-2 and 1.02±0.32 (range 0.5-1.5 hr, respectively. The 90% confidence interval of the ratio of the ln-transformed of Cmax and AUC0à48 of both preparations were 89.39-112.99% and80.02-107.28% respectively which were within the acceptance range of 80.00-125.00%. Therefore, it can be concluded that both preparations used in this study are bioequivalent in terms of both the rate and extent of absorption.

  4. Bioavailability of a new generic formulation of mycophenolate mofetil MMF 500 versus CellCept in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, M A; Rizk, S; Attia, M L E; Barbouch, H; Rost, M

    2007-05-01

    Several studies have revealed a decreased incidence of early graft rejection with the use of mycophenate mofetil (MMF). The cost of the drug is, however, prohibitive especially in developing countries with limited resources. We compared the pharmacokinetic profile of a new MMF generic formulation (MMF 500 batch number: 06T3001; Medis Tunis) with those of Cellcept, (batch number: M1427; Hoffmann La Roche, Switzerland) in healthy volunteers. The study was double-blinded to investigator and volunteers. It had a balanced randomized, two-treatment, two-period, two-sequence, single-dose, crossover, comparative oral bioavailability design in adult healthy human volunteers. The study was designed, performed, and monitored by CRO Transmedical s.a.l International (Beirut, Lebanon) in accordance with the Basic Principals defined in the US 21 CFR Part 312.20, and the principals enunciated in the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki. We included nonsmoking healthy volunteers between the ages of 22 and 45 years. The subjects were admitted to the hospital one night prior to blood sampling. After volunteers received the same dinner, they were fasted overnight and for 2 hours postdosing. At 8 am each person received a single oral dose of 500 mg of either formulation. Blood samples were collected to construct the pharmacokinetic profiles as follows: 0, 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 minutes and 1, 1.15, 1.30, 2, 4, 6, 10, 12, and 24 hours. Water and food intake were the same for all volunteers during the whole study period. Following an 8-day washout period, the subjects were crossed over. Plasma mycophenolic acid concentrations were determined using a high-performance liquid chromatography validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based method (TransMedical, Beirut Lebanon). Physical examinations, hematology, urinanalysis, serum chemistry tests, and liver enzymes were performed at screening and at the end of each period. Subjects were monitored for safety and adverse events

  5. The Vaccine Candidate Vibrio cholerae 638 Is Protective against Cholera in Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Luis; Jidy, Manuel Díaz; García, Hilda; Rodríguez, Boris L.; Fernández, Roberto; Año, Gemma; Cedré, Bárbara; Valmaseda, Tania; Suzarte, Edith; Ramírez, Margarita; Pino, Yadira; Campos, Javier; Menéndez, Jorge; Valera, Rodrigo; González, Daniel; González, Irma; Pérez, Oliver; Serrano, Teresita; Lastre, Miriam; Miralles, Fernando; del Campo, Judith; Maestre, Jorge Luis; Pérez, José Luis; Talavera, Arturo; Pérez, Antonio; Marrero, Karen; Ledón, Talena; Fando, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae 638 is a living candidate cholera vaccine strain attenuated by deletion of the CTXΦ prophage from C7258 (O1, El Tor Ogawa) and by insertion of the Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase A gene into the hemagglutinin/protease coding sequence. This vaccine candidate was previously found to be well tolerated and immunogenic in volunteers. This article reports a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted to test short-term protection conferred by 638 against subsequent V. cholerae infection and disease in volunteers in Cuba. A total of 45 subjects were enrolled and assigned to receive vaccine or placebo. The vaccine contained 109 CFU of freshly harvested 638 buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3, while the placebo was buffer alone. After vaccine but not after placebo intake, 96% of volunteers had at least a fourfold increase in vibriocidal antibody titers, and 50% showed a doubling of at least the lipopolysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin A titers in serum. At 1 month after vaccination, five volunteers from the vaccine group and five from the placebo group underwent an exploratory challenge study with 109 CFU of ΔCTXΦ attenuated mutant strain V. cholerae 81. Only two volunteers from the vaccine group shed strain 81 in their feces, but none of them experienced diarrhea; in the placebo group, all volunteers excreted the challenge strain, and three had reactogenic diarrhea. An additional 12 vaccinees and 9 placebo recipients underwent challenge with 7 × 105 CFU of virulent strain V. cholerae 3008 freshly harvested from a brain heart infusion agar plate and buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3. Three volunteers (25%) from the vaccine group and all from the placebo group shed the challenge agent in their feces. None of the 12 vaccinees but 7 volunteers from the placebo group had diarrhea, and 2 of the latter exhibited severe cholera (>5,000 g of diarrheal stool). These results indicate that at 1 month after ingestion of a single oral dose (109 CFU) of strain

  6. COMPARISON OF LISINOPRIL AND BISOPROLOL INFLUENCES ON REGULATORY SYSTEMS OF THE ORGANISM IN BIOFEEDBACK SERIES IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O. Nazarenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In 15 conditionally healthy volunteers aged from 18 to 22 years influence of Lisinopril and Bisoprolol on the biofeedback in the loop of paced breathing under control of heart rate variability parameters was compared. Every volunteer underwent 3 everyday biofeedback series with 5 session in each with a 5 months gap between the series, adding oral drugs application to the 2nd and 3rd series. During the 2nd series biofeedback sessions was conducted one hour after oral application of 2,5 mg Lisinopril. During the 3rd series biofeedback sessions was conducted one hour after oral application of 2,5 mg Bisoprolol. In used protocol, it was found that Bisoprolol promotes earlier and more substantial optimization of regulatory systems in comparison with Lisinopril.

  7. SPIRONOLACTONE IN BIOFEEDBACK SESSIONS IN THE LOOP OF PACED BREATHING AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nazarenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 7 conditionally healthy volunteers, aged from 19 to 21 years (average age is 19,53 ± 1,55 years, influence of spironolactone on alterations of regulatory systems state of the organism combined with biofeedback (BFB sessions in the loop of paced breathing (PB and heart rate variability (HRV parameters was evaluated. All volunteers were conducted 2 series of everyday BFB sessions in analyzed loop for 5 days with a 3 months interval between them, 2nd series of sessions were conducted 6 hours after oral application of 25 mg spironolactone. The data was analyzed using non-parametric statistical methods. Optimization of regulatory systems state under influence of BFB sessions in the loop of PB and HRV parameters was found. Spironolactone in studied dose had no significant effect on optimization of regulatory systems state.

  8. Growth hormone administration increases glucose production by preventing the expected decrease in glycogenolysis seen with fasting in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanaat, Farhad; Tayek, John A

    2005-05-01

    Twelve volunteers were fasted overnight and infused with [ 13 C]glucose (ul) to measure glucose production (GP), gluconeogenesis, and by subtraction, glycogenolysis. Glucose production, gluconeogenesis, and glycogenolysis were measured after a 3-hour baseline infusion and two 4-hour infusions. The first 4 hours of the pituitary-pancreatic clamp study (PPCS) with replacement insulin, cortisol, and glucagon was without growth hormone (GH) administration. The second 4 hours of the PPCS was with high-dose GH administration. Six fasting volunteers acted as controls over the 11-hour study period. Overnight 12-hour fasting measurements of hormones, glucose, GP, gluconeogenesis, and glycogenolysis were similar in both groups. The PPCS had no significant effect on GP (2.43 +/- 0.19 vs 2.07 +/- 0.11 mg/kg per minute, PPCS vs controls, mean +/- SEM). Glycogenolysis, as a percent of GP (43%-49%), was similar between PPCS and controls (43% +/- 3% vs 49% +/- 4%). High-dose GH for 4 hours increased GH (20.8 +/- 3.8 vs 2.0 +/- 0.9 ng/mL), blood glucose (127 +/- 28 vs 86 +/- 4 mg/dL, P glycogenolysis as compared to the observed fall in glycogenolysis seen with fasting alone (0.94 +/- 0.21 vs 0.53 +/- 0.07 mg/kg per minute, P Glycogenolysis, as a percent of GP, was significantly increased with high-dose GH (43 +/- 5% vs 29 +/- 3%, P glycogenolysis observed with fasting alone.

  9. An anatomical study of the parasacral block using magnetic resonance imaging of healthy volunteers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Maeve

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The parasacral approach to sciatic blockade is reported to be easy to learn and perform, with a high success rate and few complications. METHODS: Using magnetic resonance imaging, we evaluated the accuracy of a simulated needle (perpendicular to skin) in contacting the sacral plexus with this approach in 10 volunteers. Intrapelvic structures encountered during the simulated parasacral blocks were also recorded. RESULTS: The sacral plexus was contacted by the simulated needle in 4 of the 10 volunteers, and the sciatic nerve itself in one volunteer. The plexus was accurately located adjacent to a variety of visceral structures, including small bowel, blood vessels, and ovary. In the remaining five volunteers (in whom the plexus was not contacted on first needle pass), small bowel, rectum, blood vessels, seminal vesicles, and bony structures were encountered. Historically, when plexus is not encountered, readjustment of the needle insertion point more caudally has been recommended. We found that such an adjustment resulted in simulated perforation of intrapelvic organs or the perianal fossa. CONCLUSIONS: These findings question the reliability of the anatomical landmarks of the parasacral block and raise the possibility of frequent visceral puncture using this technique.

  10. Noninvasive Assessment of the Effect of Position and Exercise on Pulse Arrival to Peripheral Vascular Beds in Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Yurie; Ong, Qi J.; Magruder, J. T.; Grichkevitch, Helen; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Nyhan, Daniel; Steppan, Jochen; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2017-01-01

    Background: The effects of position and exercise on pulse wave distribution across a healthy, compliant arterial tree are not fully understood. We studied the effects of exercise and position on the pattern of pulse arrival times (PATs) in healthy volunteers. Moreover, we compared the pulse arrival time ratios to the respective distance ratios between different locations. Methods: Thirteen young healthy volunteers were studied, using an electrocardiogram and plethysmograph to simultaneously record pulse wave arrival at the ear lobe, index finger and big toe. We compared the differences in PAT between each location at rest and post-exercise in the supine, sitting, and standing position. We also compared the PAT ratio (toe/ear, toe/finger, and finger/ear) to the corresponding pulse path distance ratios. Results: PAT was shortest at the ear then finger and longest at the toe regardless of position or exercise status. PATs were shorter post-exercise compared to rest. When transitioning from a standing to sitting or supine position, PAT to the ear decreased, while the PAT to the toe increased, and PAT to the finger didn't significantly change. PAT ratios were significantly smaller than predicted by the path distance ratios regardless of position or exercise status. Conclusions: Exercise makes PATs shorter. Standing position decrease PAT to the toe and increase to the ear. We conclude that PAT and PAT ratio represent the arterial vascular tree properties as surely as pulse transit time and pulse wave velocity. PMID:28220077

  11. Immediate hematological toxicity of linezolid in healthy volunteers with different body weight: a phase I clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yun; Chai, Dong; Falagas, Matthew E; Vouloumanou, Evridiki K; Wang, Rui; Guo, Daihong; Bai, Nan; Liang, Beibei; Liu, Youning

    2012-04-01

    Linezolid is an important therapeutic option for infections from multi-drug resistant Gram-positive pathogens. However, prolonged linezolid treatment (>14 days) is considered to increase the risk of hematological adverse events. We aimed to evaluate the hematological safety profile of an i.v. single dose of linezolid in healthy volunteers of different body weight. We conducted a phase I clinical trial involving 20 healthy male Chinese volunteers that received an i.v. single dose of linezolid (600 mg). The study participants were assigned to two groups: low-weight (LW) group: 50 kg weight ≤55 kg and high-weight (HW) group: ≥80 kg. A significant decrease in the hemoglobin (Hb) levels and red blood cell (RBC) count was observed at the end of administration of the study drug in both groups. White blood cell (WBC) count was simultaneously decreased in the HW group. In the LW group, Hb levels and RBC count were also significantly decreased at 5, 7 and 24 h. In the HW group, both values were significantly decreased at 5 h. At 48 h all values were normal. The observed decreases were numerically higher in the LW group compared with the HW group. Yet, no statistical significance was noted. No difference was observed in the platelet count in both the groups. Our findings suggest that linezolid-associated hematological toxicity may also occur shortly after the i.v. administration of the drug in both LW and HW healthy volunteers. Early initiated continuous monitoring of hematological values and linezolid dosage adjustment for body weight are recommended.

  12. A gamma scintigraphy study to investigate lung deposition and clearance of inhaled amikacin-loaded liposomes in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weers, Jeffry; Metzheiser, Beth; Taylor, Glyn; Warren, Simon; Meers, Paul; Perkins, Walter R

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhalation of a liposomal formulation of amikacin in healthy male volunteers in terms of pulmonary deposition, clearance, and safety following nebulization with a commercial jet nebulizer. Amikacin was encapsulated in liposomes comprised of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and cholesterol via a proprietary manufacturing process (20 mg/mL final amikacin concentration). The liposomes were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc using the tin chloride labeling method. A nominal dose of 120 mg of drug product was loaded into a PARI LC STAR nebulizer, aerosolized using a PARI Boy compressor where subjects inhaled for 20 min. Lung deposition was determined by gamma scintigraphy in three healthy male volunteers at the following time points (0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post-administration). Total lung deposition, expressed as a percentage of the emitted dose, was 32.3 +/- 3.4%. The time-dependent retention of radiolabeled liposomes was biphasic with an initial rapid reduction in counts, followed by a slower phase to 48 h. The overall mean retention at 24 and 48 h was 60.4 and 38.3% of the initial dose deposited, respectively. The observed clearance of radiolabel is consistent with clearance of amikacin following aerosol delivery to rats. There were no clinically significant changes in laboratory parameters, vital signs, or ECG. No adverse events including cough or bronchospasm were reported. Inhalation of a single nominal dose of 120 mg liposomal amikacin results in prolonged retention of drug-loaded liposomes in the lungs of healthy volunteers. The treatment was well tolerated.

  13. Clinical evaluation of Humira® biosimilar ONS-3010 in healthy volunteers: focus on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlous Dillingh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ONS-3010 is being developed by Oncobiologics Inc. (Cranbury, NJ, USA as a biosimilar of Humira®. This randomized, double blind, single-center phase I study (EudraCT registration # 2013-003551-38 was performed to demonstrate pharmacokinetic biosimilarity between two reference products (Humira® EU and US and ONS-3010 in healthy volunteers, and to compare the safety and immunogenicity profiles. In addition, the intended pharmacological activity was assessed and compared by application of a whole blood challenge. Hundred-ninety-eight (198 healthy volunteers received a single 40 mg subcutaneous dose of ONS-3010, Humira® EU or US. The pharmacodynamic effects were assessed by LPS/aluminium hydroxide whole blood challenges (n=36; n=12 per treatment arm; male:female, 1:1. Equivalence was demonstrated on the pharmacokinetic endpoints (AUC0-inf, Cmax and AUC0-last based on bounds of 80-125% for the ratio of the geometric means (ONS-3010/Humira®. The immunogenicity profiles were comparable between treatment groups and there were no indications for differences in routine safety parameters. Administration of adalimumab resulted in the observation of dramatically reduced TNFα levels upon stimulation with LPS/aluminium hydroxide (> 99%, with no differences between the three treatment groups in terms of magnitude or duration Adalimumab also resulted in a reduction of LPS/aluminium hydroxide-induced IL-8 release (maximally 30%, suggested to have a causal relationship with the anti-TNFα treatment. LPS/aluminium hydroxide-induced release of IL-1β and IL-6 was not inhibited by anti-TNFα treatment.Taken together, these data are promising for the further clinical development of ONS-3010, demonstrate the relevance of the LPS/aluminium challenge to monitor Humira® effects, and emphasize the value of whole blood challenges for monitoring of proximal drug effects in healthy volunteers, and potentially in the target population.

  14. Short echo time proton spectroscopy of the brain in healthy volunteers using an insert gradient head coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Danielsen, E R; Schneider, M;

    1995-01-01

    An insert gradient head coil with built-in X, Y, and Z gradients was used for localized proton spectroscopy in the brain of healthy volunteers, using short echo time stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequences. Volume of interest size was 3.4 ml, repetition time was 6.0 s, and echo times...... were 10 and 20 ms, respectively. Good quality proton spectra with practically no eddy current artefacts were acquired allowing observation of strongly coupled compounds, and compounds with short T2 relaxation times. The gradient head coil thus permits further studies of compounds such as glutamine...

  15. A placebo controlled comparison of the effects of pirenzepine and amitriptyline on the tyramine pressor test in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, M R; Wynne, R D; Kendall, M J

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of an interaction between pirenzepine, an antimuscarinic drug structurally similar to the tricyclic antidepressants, and sympathomimetic agents was investigated in a group of healthy volunteers. The effect of pirenzepine on response to intravenous tyramine was compared with that of placebo and amitriptyline. The mean dose of tyramine required to elevate systolic blood pressure by 30 mm Hg was 5.0 mg (+/- s.d. 0.8) after placebo, 5.1 mg (+/- 1.0) after pirenzepine and 11.3 mg (+/- 1.8) after amitriptyline. These results suggest that pirenzepine will not potentiate the effects of concurrently administered sympathomimetic drugs. PMID:3839679

  16. Short echo time proton spectroscopy of the brain in healthy volunteers using an insert gradient head coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Danielsen, E R; Schneider, M

    1995-01-01

    An insert gradient head coil with built-in X, Y, and Z gradients was used for localized proton spectroscopy in the brain of healthy volunteers, using short echo time stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequences. Volume of interest size was 3.4 ml, repetition time was 6.0 s, and echo times w....../glutamate and myo-inositols. These compounds were more prominent within grey matter than within white matter. Rough estimations of metabolite concentrations using water as an internal standard were in good agreement with previous reports....

  17. Effect of nonabsorbed amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture on small intestinal transit in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L; Linnet, Jan; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    transit rate. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind crossover investigation. In random order, the subjects ingested 30 g glucose or a mixture of 25 g fructose and 5 g sorbitol as 10% solutions. As a radiolabeled marker, (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was added to each test...... solution. Breath hydrogen and methane concentrations and gastrointestinal progress of the radiolabeled marker were followed for the next 6-hr period. Malabsorption of small amounts of the fructose-sorbitol mixture was evident in all subjects. The area under the gastric radioactivity-time curve after...

  18. Absence of a memory effect for the insulinotropic action of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, S; Hücking, K; Ritzel, R

    2003-01-01

    . SUBJECTS/METHODS: Eight healthy young volunteers were studied on four occasions in the fasting state. In one experiment, placebo was administered (a). in three more experiments (random order), synthetic GLP-1 (7 - 36 amide) at 1.2 pmol/kg/min was administered over a period of three hours. At 0 min, a bolus...... appears to exist for insulinotropic actions of GLP-1, in line with clinical data. 2). Reactive hypoglycemia causes a prompt rise in glucagon despite pharmacological circulating concentrations of GLP-1. 3). Similar studies should be performed in Type 2-diabetic patients, because exposure to GLP-1 might...

  19. Oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetic study of cetrizine HCl in Iranian healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Derakhshandeh, K.; M. Mohebbi

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters and bioavailability of a selective histamine (H1)-receptor antagonist, cetirizine hydrochloride (CTZ), following administration of a single oral dose of the drug. The properties of a test compound were compared with those of a reference product in a randomized cross-over study in 12 volunteers. Blood samples were collected at selected time intervals up to 24 h and plasma concentrations of CTZ were determined usi...

  20. PHARMACOKINETICS OF MAGNESIUM ISOGLYCYRRHIZINATE AFTER SINGLE INTRAVENOUS DOSE IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xiao-yun; SUN Li; SHEN Jin-fang

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the pharmacokinetics of intravenous magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate injection in health volunteers with HPLC-UV. Methods Single doses of 200mg magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate were administrated to 10 health volunteers by i. v. infusion. The concentrations of magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate in plasma were assayed by HPLC-UV method. The pharmacokinetic parameters of magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate injection were calculated by program 3P87. Results The main pharmacokinetic parameters of intravenous magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate were as follows: cmax(67.58±8.84) mg/L, T1/2α(1.46±0.35) h, T1/2β(23. 95 ±4. 72) h, Vd(2.921± 0.382) L, CL (0.186±0.048) L/h,k10 ( 0.064±0.016) h-1 , AUC0-T( 1015.29±225.14) mg·h-1 ·L-1 ,respectively. Conclusion We have successfully used the analytical method for magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate to study its pharmacokinetical properties of health volunteers after i. v. infusion. The method is found to be simple, accurate,stable and sensitive for application in clinical pharmacokinetics study. The concentration-time plot was fitted to a two-compartment open model with first-order elimination.

  1. Effects of melatonin on prepulse inhibition, habituation and sensitization of the human startle reflex in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtinen, Emilia K; Ucar, Ebru; Glenthøj, Birte Y

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex (PPI) is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating, which is demonstrated to be impaired in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, a disruption of the circadian rhythm together with blunted melatonin secretion is regularly found in patients...... with schizophrenia and it is theorized that these may contribute to their attentional deficits. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acute melatonin on healthy human sensorimotor gating. Twenty-one healthy male volunteers were administered melatonin or placebo after which their levels of PPI were...... assessed. Melatonin significantly reduced startle magnitude and ratings of alertness, but did not influence PPI, nor sensitization and habituation. However, when taking baseline scores in consideration, melatonin significantly increased PPI in low scoring individuals while significantly decreasing...

  2. Effect of nonabsorbed amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture on small intestinal transit in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L; Linnet, Jan; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    transit rate. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind crossover investigation. In random order, the subjects ingested 30 g glucose or a mixture of 25 g fructose and 5 g sorbitol as 10% solutions. As a radiolabeled marker, (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was added to each test...... solution. Breath hydrogen and methane concentrations and gastrointestinal progress of the radiolabeled marker were followed for the next 6-hr period. Malabsorption of small amounts of the fructose-sorbitol mixture was evident in all subjects. The area under the gastric radioactivity-time curve after......Although malabsorption of small amounts of fructose-sorbitol mixtures occurs frequently in healthy humans, insights into their effects on gastrointestinal motility are poor. The present study addresses the hypothesis that malabsorption of a fructose-sorbitol challenge changes the small intestinal...

  3. Preliminary study of relationships between hypnotic susceptibility and personality disorder functioning styles in healthy volunteers and personality disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wei

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypnotic susceptibility is one of the stable characteristics of individuals, but not closely related to the personality traits such as those measured by the five-factor model in the general population. Whether it is related to the personality disorder functioning styles remains unanswered. Methods In 77 patients with personality disorders and 154 healthy volunteers, we administered the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSSC and the Parker Personality Measure (PERM tests. Results Patients with personality disorders showed higher passing rates on SHSSC Dream and Posthypnotic Amnesia items. No significant correlation was found in healthy volunteers. In the patients however, SHSSC Taste hallucination (β = 0.26 and Anosmia to Ammonia (β = -0.23 were significantly correlated with the PERM Borderline style; SHSSC Posthypnotic Amnesia was correlated with the PERM Schizoid style (β = 0.25 but negatively the PERM Narcissistic style (β = -0.23. Conclusions Our results provide limited evidence that could help to understand the abnormal cognitions in personality disorders, such as their hallucination and memory distortions.

  4. The Associations between Pain Sensitivity and Knee Muscle Strength in Healthy Volunteers: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Henriksen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate associations between muscle strength and pain sensitivity among healthy volunteers and associations between different pain sensitivity measures. Methods. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (21 females participated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs were obtained from 1 computer-controlled pressure algometry on the vastus lateralis and deltoid muscles and on the infrapatellar fat pad and 2 computerized cuff pressure algometry applied on the lower leg. Deep-tissue pain sensitivity (intensity and duration was assessed by hypertonic saline injections into the vastus lateralis, deltoid, and infrapatellar fat pad. Quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength was assessed isometrically at 60-degree knee flexion using a dynamometer. Associations between pain sensitivity and muscle strength were investigated using multiple regressions including age, gender, and body mass index as covariates. Results. Knee extension strength was associated with computer-controlled PPT on the vastus lateralis muscle. Computer-controlled PPTs were significantly correlated between sites (r>0.72 and with cuff PPT (r>0.4. Saline induced pain intensity and duration were correlated between sites (r>0.39 and with all PPTs (r<-0.41. Conclusions. Pressure pain thresholds at the vastus lateralis are positively associated with knee extensor muscle strength. Different pain sensitivity assessment methods are generally correlated. The cuff PPT and evoked infrapatellar pain seem to reflect the general pain sensitivity. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01351558.

  5. The ADRA2B gene in the production of false memories for affective information in healthy female volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, Beth; Mammarella, Nicola; Di Domenico, Alberto; D'Aurora, Marco; Stuppia, Liborio; Gatta, Valentina

    2017-08-30

    False memories are common memory distortions in everyday life and seem to increase with affectively connoted complex information. In line with recent studies showing a significant interaction between the noradrenergic system and emotional memory, we investigated whether healthy volunteer carriers of the deletion variant of the ADRA2B gene that codes for the α2b-adrenergic receptor are more prone to false memories than non-carriers. In this study, we collected genotype data from 212 healthy female volunteers; 91 ADRA2B carriers and 121 non-carriers. To assess gene effects on false memories for affective information, factorial mixed model analysis of variances (ANOVAs) were conducted with genotype as the between-subjects factor and type of memory error as the within-subjects factor. We found that although carriers and non-carriers made comparable numbers of false memory errors, they showed differences in the direction of valence biases, especially for inferential causal errors. Specifically, carriers produced fewer causal false memory errors for scripts with a negative outcome, whereas non-carriers showed a more general emotional effect and made fewer causal errors with both positive and negative outcomes. These findings suggest that putatively higher levels of noradrenaline in deletion carriers may enhance short-term consolidation of negative information and lead to fewer memory distortions when facing negative events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Integrated Safety Assessment of 2'-O-Methoxyethyl Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotides in NonHuman Primates and Healthy Human Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T; Baker, Brenda F; Kwoh, T Jesse; Cheng, Wei; Schulz, Dan J; Xia, Shuting; Salgado, Nelson; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Hart, Christopher E; Burel, Sebastien A; Younis, Husam S; Geary, Richard S; Henry, Scott P; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    The common chemical and biological properties of antisense oligonucleotides provide the opportunity to identify and characterize chemical class effects across species. The chemical class that has proven to be the most versatile and best characterized is the 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotides. In this report we present an integrated safety assessment of data obtained from controlled dose-ranging studies in nonhuman primates (macaques) and healthy human volunteers for 12 unique 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotides. Safety was assessed by the incidence of safety signals in standardized laboratory tests for kidney and liver function, hematology, and complement activation; as well as by the mean test results as a function of dose level over time. At high doses a number of toxicities were observed in nonhuman primates. However, no class safety effects were identified in healthy human volunteers from this integrated data analysis. Effects on complement in nonhuman primates were not observed in humans. Nonhuman primates predicted safe doses in humans, but over predicted risk of complement activation and effects on platelets. Although limited to a single chemical class, comparisons from this analysis are considered valid and accurate based on the carefully controlled setting for the specified study populations and within the total exposures studied.

  7. Short-term serotonergic but not noradrenergic antidepressant administration reduces attentional vigilance to threat in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Susannah E; Yiend, Jenny; Lester, Kathryn J; Cowen, Philip J; Harmer, Catherine J

    2009-03-01

    Anxiety is associated with threat-related biases in information processing such as heightened attentional vigilance to potential threat. Such biases are an important focus of psychological treatments for anxiety disorders. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are effective in the treatment of a range of anxiety disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an SSRI on the processing of threat in healthy volunteers. A selective noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), which is not generally used in the treatment of anxiety, was used as a contrast to assess the specificity of SSRI effects on threat processing. Forty-two healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to 7 d double-blind intervention with the SSRI citalopram (20 mg/d), the SNRI reboxetine (8 mg/d), or placebo. On the final day, attentional and interpretative bias to threat was assessed using the attentional probe and the homograph primed lexical decision tasks. Citalopram reduced attentional vigilance towards fearful faces but did not affect the interpretation of ambiguous homographs as threatening. Reboxetine had no significant effect on either of these measures. Citalopram reduces attentional orienting to threatening stimuli, which is potentially relevant to its clinical use in the treatment of anxiety disorders. This finding supports a growing literature suggesting that an important mechanism through which pharmacological agents may exert their effects on mood is by reversing the cognitive biases that characterize the disorders that they treat. Future studies are needed to clarify the neural mechanisms through which these effects on threat processing are mediated.

  8. The effects of food on the bioavailability of fenofibrate administered orally in healthy volunteers via sustained-release capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Joo Lee, Eun; Youn Chung, Soo; Choi, Sun-Ok; Kee Kim, Hyung; Kwon, Jun-Tack; Kang, Wonku; Kwon, Kwang-Il

    2006-01-01

    To examine the effects of food on plasma concentration and bioavailability of fenofibrate administered as a sustained-release capsule. Twenty-four healthy Korean volunteers were enrolled in a randomised, open-label, balanced, three-treatment, three-period, three-sequence, single oral dose, crossover pharmacokinetic study. A single dose of fenofibrate (250 mg sustained-release capsule) was administered on three occasions -- after overnight fasting, after consumption of a standard breakfast and after a high-fat breakfast. Serial blood samples were collected for the next 72 hours. Plasma fenofibric acid concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The pharmacokinetic parameters were significantly affected by food intake. The high-fat breakfast affected the rate of absorption of fenofibrate more than the standard breakfast and fasted conditions. Specifically, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC(infinity)) and peak plasma concentration (C(max)) increased 2.45-fold and 2.89-fold, respectively, between the fasted and standard-fed conditions (p fenofibric acid. In healthy volunteers, AUC(infinity) and C(max) of fenofibrate, when administered via sustained-release capsules immediately after the consumption of food, was increased significantly from the fasting conditions (p < 0.01). The greatest AUC(infinity) and C(max) occurred when the capsules were taken after a high-fat breakfast.

  9. Steady-state pharmacokinetics and tolerability of modafinil given alone or in combination with methylphenidate in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellriegel, E T; Arora, S; Nelson, M; Robertson, P

    2001-08-01

    The potential for a pharmacokinetic (PK) drug-drug interaction between modafinil and methylphenidate, each at steady state, was investigated in an open-label, randomized, single-period study in 32 healthy male and female volunteers. All subjects received modafinil once daily orally for 28 days (200 mg on Days 1-7 and 400 mg on Days 8-28). On Days 22 to 28, half of the subjects also received 20 mg of methylphenidate orally 8 hours after their modafinil dose. PK profiles of modafinil were obtained on Days 21 and 28 and compared between the two groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups in the mean changes in PK parameters for modafinil. Parameters for its metabolites were also similar between the groups, and all treatments were well tolerated. The results indicate that administration of low-dose methylphenidate 8 hours after treatment with modafinil does not appear to alter the steady-state pharmacokinetics of modafinil in healthy volunteers.

  10. Preliminary study of relationships between hypnotic susceptibility and personality disorder functioning styles in healthy volunteers and personality disorder patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypnotic susceptibility is one of the stable characteristics of individuals, but not closely related to the personality traits such as those measured by the five-factor model in the general population. Whether it is related to the personality disorder functioning styles remains unanswered. Methods In 77 patients with personality disorders and 154 healthy volunteers, we administered the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSSC) and the Parker Personality Measure (PERM) tests. Results Patients with personality disorders showed higher passing rates on SHSSC Dream and Posthypnotic Amnesia items. No significant correlation was found in healthy volunteers. In the patients however, SHSSC Taste hallucination (β = 0.26) and Anosmia to Ammonia (β = -0.23) were significantly correlated with the PERM Borderline style; SHSSC Posthypnotic Amnesia was correlated with the PERM Schizoid style (β = 0.25) but negatively the PERM Narcissistic style (β = -0.23). Conclusions Our results provide limited evidence that could help to understand the abnormal cognitions in personality disorders, such as their hallucination and memory distortions. PMID:21801440

  11. Waveform Analysis of the Brachial-ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients and Healthy Volunteers: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Huh, Yong; Kim, Junghwan

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV), which has been reported as an index of arterial stiffness, is very closely related to cardiovascular risk factors. A high BaPWV indicates high cardiovascular risk. However, BaPWV and pressure waveforms after stroke are not fully understood. [Methods] BaPWV was measured in thirty-two subjects (twenty-two healthy volunteers and ten stroke patients) while they were in the supine position. It was measured in their bilateral upper and lower extremities. [Results] BaPWV was significantly increased in the stroke group compared with the healthy volunteers. It was also significantly increased on both the affected and non-affected sides of stroke patients in the stroke group. Furthermore, analysis of the pressure waveforms showed that the peak pressure was significantly increased in the stroke group compared with the control group. The peak pressure on both the affected and non-affected sides was also significantly greater than in the control group. However, the rise and decay times were significantly decreased in the stroke group compared with the control group. The rise and decay time on both the affected and non-affected sides were also significantly more decreased than in the control group. [Conclusion] The results demonstrated that increased BaPWV and changed pulse waves are closely associated with the pathologic states of hemiplegic stroke patients.

  12. Relative indexes of cutaneous blood perfusion measured by real-time laser Doppler imaging (LDI) in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Jafari, S Morteza; Schawkat, Megir; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Shafighi, Maziar

    2014-07-01

    We used real-time LDI to study regional variations in microcirculatory perfusion in healthy candidates to establish a new methodology for global perfusion body mapping that is based on intra-individual perfusion index ratios. Our study included 74 (37 female) healthy volunteers aged between 22 and 30 years (mean 24.49). Imaging was performed using a recent microcirculation-imaging camera (EasyLDI) for different body regions of each volunteer. The perfusion values were reported in Arbitrary Perfusion Units (APU). The relative perfusion indexes for each candidate's body region were then obtained by normalization with the perfusion value of the forehead. Basic parameters such as weight, height, and blood pressure were also measured and analyzed. The highest mean perfusion value was reported in the forehead area (259.21APU). Mean perfusion in the measured parts of the body correlated positively with mean forehead value, while there was no significant correlation between forehead blood perfusion values and room temperature, BMI, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (p=0.420, 0.623, 0.488, 0.099, respectively). Analysis of the data showed that perfusion indexes were not significantly different between male and female volunteers except for the ventral upper arm area (p=.001). LDI is a non-invasive, fast technique that opens several avenues for clinical applications. The mean perfusion indexes are useful in clinical practice for monitoring patients before and after surgical interventions. Perfusion values can be predicted for different body parts for patients only by taking the forehead perfusion value and using the perfusion index ratios to obtain expected normative perfusion values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Right coronary MR angiography at 7 T: a direct quantitative and qualitative comparison with 3 T in young healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elderen, Saskia G C; Versluis, Maarten J; Westenberg, Jos J M; Agarwal, Harsh; Smith, Nadine B; Stuber, Matthias; de Roos, Albert; Webb, Andrew G

    2010-10-01

    To objectively compare quantitative parameters related to image quality attained at coronary magnetic resonance (MR) angiography of the right coronary artery (RCA) performed at 7 T and 3 T. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and volunteers provided signed informed consent. Ten healthy adult volunteers (mean age ± standard deviation, 25 years ± 4; seven men, three women) underwent navigator-gated three-dimensional MR angiography of the RCA at 7 T and 3 T. For 7 T, a custom-built quadrature radiofrequency transmit-receive surface coil was used. At 3 T, a commercial body radiofrequency transmit coil and a cardiac coil array for signal reception were used. Segmented k-space gradient-echo imaging with spectrally selective adiabatic fat suppression was performed, and imaging parameters were similar at both field strengths. Contrast-to-noise ratio between blood and epicardial fat; signal-to-noise ratio of the blood pool; RCA vessel sharpness, diameter, and length; and navigator efficiency were quantified at both field strengths and compared by using a Mann-Whitney U test. The contrast-to-noise ratio between blood and epicardial fat was significantly improved at 7 T when compared with that at 3 T (87 ± 34 versus 52 ± 13; P = .01). Signal-to-noise ratio of the blood pool was increased at 7 T (109 ± 47 versus 67 ± 19; P = .02). Vessel sharpness obtained at 7 T was also higher (58% ± 9 versus 50% ± 5; P = .04). At the same time, RCA vessel diameter and length and navigator efficiency showed no significant field strength-dependent difference. In our quantitative and qualitative study comparing in vivo human imaging of the RCA at 7 T and 3 T in young healthy volunteers, parameters related to image quality attained at 7 T equal or surpass those from 3 T.

  14. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Plasma Lipoprotein Distribution of Eritoran (E5564) during Continuous Intravenous Infusion into Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Daniel P.; Wasan, Kishor M.; Choo, Eugene; Yau, Edwin; Wong, Nancy; Rose, Jeffrey; Moran, Jeffrey; Lynn, Melvyn

    2004-01-01

    Eritoran, a structural analogue of the lipid A portion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is an antagonist of LPS in animal and human endotoxemia models. Previous studies have shown that low doses (350 to 3,500 μg) of eritoran have demonstrated a long pharmacokinetic half-life but a short pharmacodynamic half-life. The present study describes the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and lipid distribution profile of eritoran during and after a 72-h intravenous infusion of 500, 2,000, or 3,500 μg/h into healthy volunteers. Except for the occurrence of phlebitis, eritoran administration over 72 h was safe and well tolerated. Eritoran demonstrated a slow plasma clearance (0.679 to 0.930 ml/h/kg of body weight), a small volume of distribution (45.6 to 49.8 ml/kg), and a relatively long half-life (50.4 to 62.7 h). In plasma, the majority (∼55%) of eritoran was bound to high-density lipoproteins. During infusion and for up to 72 h thereafter, ex vivo response of blood to 1- or 10-ng/ml LPS was inhibited by ≥85%, even when the lowest dose of eritoran (500 μg/h) was infused. Inhibition of response was dependent on eritoran dose and the concentration of LPS used as an agonist. Finally, in vitro analysis with purified lipoprotein and protein fractions from plasma obtained from healthy volunteers indicated that eritoran is inactivated by high-density but not low-density lipoproteins, very-low-density lipoproteins, or albumin. From these results, we conclude that up to 252 mg of eritoran can be safely infused into normal volunteers over 72 h and even though it associates extensively with high-density lipoproteins, antagonistic activity is maintained, even after infusion ceases. PMID:15328078

  15. Evaluation of the effect of pregabalin on simulated driving ability using a driving simulator in healthy male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tujii T

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomoaki Tujii, Win Thiri Kyaw, Hirotaka Iwaki, Noriko Nishikawa, Masahiro Nagai, Madoka Kubo, Masahiro Nomoto Department of Neurology and Clinical Pharmacology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Tohon Ehime, Japan Abstract: Pregabalin, a novel agent for treating partial epilepsy and peripheral neuropathic and central pain, was studied for its effect on driving performance in healthy volunteers. Sixteen healthy male volunteers who drove regularly were enrolled in a double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study assessing the effect of pregabalin on driving performance. Subjects received an oral dose of pregabalin 75 mg or placebo, and a second dose 12 hours later. A driving simulator was used to test simple and complicated braking reaction time, and simple and complicated steering-wheel techniques before the first dose, and 1 hour and 3 hours after the second dose of pregabalin or placebo. The effect of training during the driving test on the driving performance of each group was also evaluated. There were no statistically significant differences in driving performance between the pregabalin and the placebo groups. However, the pregabalin group showed no significant improvement in steering-wheel skills with training, whereas the placebo group showed a significant (P<0.05 improvement with training. In this study using a driving simulator, pregabalin did not impair driving performance but mildly reduced the training effects of driving experiments. Although pregabalin caused sleepiness, it had no severe effect on driving ability after a second dose of 75 mg after the initial introduction of pregabalin. Keywords: pregabalin, driving, volunteers

  16. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of midazolam administered as a concentrated intranasal spray. A study in healthy volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoester, P.D.; Jonker, D.M.; Hoeven, R.T. van der; Vermeij, T.A.; Edelbroek, P.M.; Brekelmans, G.J.; Haan, G.J. de

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of midazolam administered as a concentrated intranasal spray, compared with intravenous midazolam, in healthy adult subjects. METHODS: Subjects were administered single doses of 5 mg midazolam intranasally and intravenously in a cr

  17. The role of somatostatin (octreotide) in the regulation of melatonin secretion in healthy volunteers and in patients with primary hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, J; Wetterberg, L; Röjdmark, S

    1999-01-01

    Somatostatin has been found in the pineal gland of several animal species, which suggests that it may be involved in the regulation of melatonin secretion. Whether somatostatin has regulatory influence on melatonin secretion in man has never been unequivocally shown. We studied the nocturnal melatonin secretion in 8 healthy volunteers, and 6 women with untreated primary hypothyroidism, a disease state that is associated with increased nocturnal secretion of melatonin. The participants were given subcutaneous injections at 18:00 h and 23:00 h of either saline or octreotide (Sandostatin; each injection 50 microg). During the nights when the healthy volunteers were given octreotide, melatonin secretion was similar to that recorded during administration of saline. Also the urinary excretion of melatonin was of similar magnitude at these two occasions. By contrast, the GH secretion was significantly lower the nights the healthy controls were given octreotide (GH AUC 22.6+/-5.4 mU/l x h during octreotide and 126.6+/-21.9 mU/l x h during saline; p<0.01). The patients with hypothyroidism also showed similar nocturnal melatonin secretion during octreotide and saline. Urinary excretion of melatonin also remained unchanged, as did GH secretion. The total nocturnal secretion of TSH was, however, significantly reduced by octreotide (TSH AUC 562+/-136 mU/l x h during octreotide and 851+/-185 mU/l x h during saline; p<0.05), thus suggesting that 100 microg of octreotide should be sufficient to inhibit also the pinealocytes if their function were regulated by somatostatin. Since exogenous somatostatin--in the form of octreotide--fails to influence nocturnal secretion and urinary excretion of melatonin in normal subjects and in patients with primary hypothyroidism, it is reasonable to assume that endogenous somatostatin may not be an important regulator of melatonin secretion in man.

  18. The Relationship between T1 Sagittal Angle and Sagittal Balance: A Retrospective Study of 119 Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingyuan; Yang, Changwei; Ni, Haijian; Zhao, Yuechao; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    T1 sagittal angle has been reported to be used as a parameter for assessing sagittal balance and cervical lordosis. However, no study has been performed to explore the relationship between T1 sagittal angle and sagittal balance, and whether T1 sagittal angle could be used for osteotomy guidelines remains unknown. The aim of our study is to explore the relationship between T1 sagittal angle and sagittal balance, determine the predictors for T1 sagittal angle, and determine whether T1 sagittal angle could be used for osteotomy guidelines to restore sagittal balance. Medical records of healthy volunteers in our outpatient clinic from January 2014 to August 2015 were reviewed, and their standing full-spine lateral radiographs were evaluated. Demographic and radiological parameters were collected and analyzed, including age, gender, T1 sagittal angle, maxTK, maxLL, SS, PT, and PI. Correlation coefficients between T1 sagittal angle and other spinopelvic parameters were determined. In addition, multiple regression analysis was performed to establish predictive radiographic parameters for T1 sagittal angle as the primary contributors. A total of 119 healthy volunteers were recruited in our study with a mean age of 34.7 years. It was found that T1 sagittal angle was correlated with maxTK with very good significance (r = 0.697, Psagittal angle could be predicted by using the following regression equation: T1 sagittal angle = 0.6 * maxTK-0.2 * maxLL + 8. In the healthy population, T1 sagittal angle could be considered as a useful parameter for sagittal balance; however, it could not be thoroughly replaced for SVA. maxTK was the primary contributor to T1 sagittal angle. According to this equation, we could restore sagittal balance by surgically changing thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis, which could serve as a guideline for osteotomy.

  19. The CYP2C19*1/*2 Genotype Does Not Adequately Predict Clopidogrel Response in Healthy Malaysian Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanti Nasyuhana Sani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The CYP2C19*2 allele may be associated with a reduced antiplatelet effect for clopidogrel. Here, we assessed whether CYP2C19*2 alleles correlate with clopidogrel responsiveness following the administration of clopidogrel in healthy Malaysian volunteers. Methods. Ninety volunteers were genotyped for CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 alleles. Forty-five of 90 volunteers were included in the clopidogrel response studies and triaged into three genotypes, namely, CYP2C19*1/*1 (n=17, CYP2C19*1/*2 (n=21, and CYP2C19*2/*2 (n=7. All subjects received 300 mg of clopidogrel, and platelet reactivity was assessed after a four-hour loading utilizing the VerifyNow-P2Y12 assay. Platelet activity was reported using P2Y12 reaction units (PRUs, and nonresponder status was prespecified at PRU ≥ 230. Results. Following clopidogrel intake, CYP2C19*2/*2 carriers had a significantly higher mean PRU compared to the CYP2C19*1/*2 and CYP2C19*1/*1 (291.0 ± 62.1 versus 232.5 ± 81.4 versus 147.4 ± 87.2 PRU, P<0.001 carriers. Almost half of the participants (46.7% were found to be nonresponders (3 were CYP2C19*1/*1, 11 were CYP2C19*1/*2, and 7 were CYP2C19*2/*2. Conclusion. In healthy Malaysian volunteers, CYP2C19*2 allele was associated with a decrease in platelet responsiveness to clopidogrel. However, clopidogrel nonresponders can be found not only in the carriers of CYP2C19*2/*2, but also in the carriers of CYP2C19*1/*2 and CYP2C19*1/*1. The present paper demonstrated that genotype information does not correlate with clopidogrel response, and genotyping may represent a less robust approach compared to platelet activity testing in guiding clopidogrel therapy.

  20. Circadian profile of QT interval and QT interval variability in 172 healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Wiegand, Uwe K H; Braasch, Wiebke

    2003-01-01

    of sleep. QT and R-R intervals revealed a characteristic day-night-pattern. Diurnal profiles of QT interval variability exhibited a significant increase in the morning hours (6-9 AM; P ...-to-beat QT interval duration (QT, QTapex [QTa], Tend [Te]), variability (QTSD, QTaSD), and the mean R-R interval were determined from 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiograms after exclusion of artifacts and premature beats. All volunteers were fully active, awoke at approximately 7:00 AM, and had 6-8 hours...... alterations mainly at daytime with normal aging. Furthermore, the diurnal course of the QT interval variability strongly suggests that it is related to cardiac sympathetic activity and to the reported diurnal pattern of malignant ventricular arrhythmias....

  1. The lipolytic effect of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor activation in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, C A; Kendall, M J; Maxwell, S; Hughes, B

    1993-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of activation beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors on the process of lipolysis in human volunteers. Ten male subjects underwent a single-blind randomized cross-over trial using infusions of terbutaline (a specific beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist), xamoterol (a partial beta 1-agonist with beta 2-adrenoceptor blocking activity) and saline (placebo control). The effect of these infusions on plasma potassium, glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) (total and individual) and insulin levels was studied. 2. Terbutaline infusion induced a significant rise in plasma glucose and a fall in plasma potassium in keeping with its beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulant properties. Xamoterol infusion had no significant effect on these values. Terbutaline infusion caused a greater rise in total and individual FFA than xamoterol, but both effects were significantly different from placebo. 3. The possible reasons for these results and their implications on the beta-adrenergic control of lipolysis are discussed. PMID:8383517

  2. Characterization of a novel model of tonic heat pain stimulation in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naert, A.L.; Kehlet, H.; Kupers, R.

    2008-01-01

    The vast majority of the experimental pain studies have used acute, phasic heat stimuli to investigate the neurobiological mechanisms of pain. However, the validity of these models for understanding clinical forms of pain is questionable. We here describe the characteristics of a model of prolonged...... tonic heat pain stimulation and compared the responses on this test with other measures of pain. In 58 normal volunteers, we applied a 7-min lasting contact heat stimulation of 47 degrees C to the upper leg while participants constantly rated their pain. Average pain rating during the 7-min period was 6.......2+/-0.4, females scoring higher than men (7.4+/-0.5 vs. 5.2+/-0.5; pPain ratings showed a steady increase during the first half of the stimulation period after which they stabilized. A strong interindividual variability was observed in the time profiles of the pain ratings over the course of the 7-min...

  3. Effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the lipidic profile of healthy Mexican volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARVAJAL OCTAVIO

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the serum lipid profile in a Mexican population was evaluated. Material and methods. Three g of salmon oil was the daily intake during four weeks. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins, high density lipoproteins and erythrocyte fatty acid composition were analyzed. Results. The hypertriglyceridemic group showed a statistically significant (p< 0.05 reduction of triglycerides and significant (p< 0.01 elevation of high density lipoproteins. The hypercholesterolemic group reduced significantly the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides; high density lipoproteins were augmented by 11.6%. Conclusions. The hipolipidemic effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was manifest in the Mexican volunteers under the conditions here evaluated.

  4. Clinical Evaluation of Humira® Biosimilar ONS-3010 in Healthy Volunteers: Focus on Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillingh, Marlous R.; Reijers, Joannes A. A.; Malone, Karen E.; Burggraaf, Jacobus; Bahrt, Kenneth; Yamashita, Liz; Rehrig, Claudia; Moerland, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    ONS-3010 is being developed by Oncobiologics Inc. (Cranbury, NJ, USA) as a biosimilar of Humira®. This randomized, double blind, single-center phase I study (EudraCT registration # 2013-003551-38) was performed to demonstrate pharmacokinetic (PK) biosimilarity between two reference products (Humira® EU and US) and ONS-3010 in healthy volunteers, and to compare the safety and immunogenicity profiles. In addition, the intended pharmacological activity was assessed and compared by application of a whole blood challenge. Hundred ninety-eight healthy volunteers received a single 40 mg subcutaneous dose of ONS-3010, Humira® EU, or US. The pharmacodynamic effects were assessed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/aluminum hydroxide whole blood challenges (n = 36; n = 12 per treatment arm; male:female, 1:1). Equivalence was demonstrated on the PK endpoints (AUC0–inf, Cmax, and AUC0–last) based on bounds of 80–125% for the ratio of the geometric means (ONS-3010/Humira®). The immunogenicity profiles were comparable between treatment groups, and there were no indications for differences in routine safety parameters. Administration of adalimumab resulted in the observation of dramatically reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) levels upon stimulation with LPS/aluminum hydroxide (>99%), with no differences between the three treatment groups in terms of magnitude or duration. Adalimumab also resulted in a reduction of LPS/aluminum hydroxide-induced interleukin (IL)-8 release (maximally 30%), suggested to have a causal relationship with the anti-TNFα treatment. LPS/aluminum hydroxide-induced release of IL-1β and IL-6 was not inhibited by anti-TNFα treatment. Taken together, these data are promising for the further clinical development of ONS-3010, demonstrate the relevance of the LPS/aluminum challenge to monitor Humira® effects, and emphasize the value of whole blood challenges for monitoring of proximal drug effects in healthy volunteers, and potentially in the

  5. Lack of effect of norepinephrine on cranial haemodynamics and headache in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, M; Petersen, K A; Tvedskov, J F

    2009-01-01

    Stress is a provoking factor for both tension-type headache and migraine attacks. In the present single-blind study, we investigated if stress induced by norepinephrine (NE) could elicit delayed headache in 10 healthy subjects and recorded the cranial arterial responses. NE at a dose of 0.025 mic...

  6. Effects of a Ginkgo biloba extract on forearm haemodynamics in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Drabaek, H; Wiinberg, N

    2002-01-01

    The aim was to validate possible vasodilating effects of a Ginkgo biloba extract with a secondary aim of finding a pharmacodynamic signal relating to the active component of these extracts. We studied the effect of G. biloba extract on forearm haemodynamics in 16 healthy subjects (nine females, s...

  7. Pulse-wave morphology and pulse-wave velocity in healthy human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, M; Nielsen, A H; Kamper, A-L

    2006-01-01

    and of the brachial and aortic PWV on the right and left side of the body were recorded in 23 healthy subjects by two trained observers. Measurements were performed in the fasting state and 3 h after a high-calorie meal, and before and 1 h after smoking a cigarette. RESULTS: Intake of a high-calorie meal as well...

  8. Cardiovascular And Etectrocardiographic Effects Of Lidocaine And Mepivacaine With And Without Adrenaline Using Mandibular Nerve Block Anesthesia Technique In Healthy Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Manuel; Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Ex Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Ramón Rosales, Arturo; Ex Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Aguirre Siancas, Ernesto; Ex Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Zegarra Cuya, Manuel; Ex Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Cabrejos Álvarez, José; Ex Docente del Departamento Académico de Estomatologia Médico-Quirúrgica FO UNMSM

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate and compare the effect of Iidocaine and mepivacaine alone and associated with epinephrine on the cardiovascular and electrocardiographic parameters,60 healthy volunteers were assigned in 4 groups: A (2% lidocaine), B (2% lidocaine with epinephrine 1: 100,000); C (3% mepivacaine), D (mepivacaine 2% with epinephrine 1: 100,000). Therefore of assigned, it was injected ldental cartridge of correspondent anesthetic to each volunteer, using the ner...

  9. The effect of topical anal captopril on resting anal pressure in healthy volunteers: the first human pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaikin, M; Bashankaev, B; Sands, D; Weiss, E G; Zbar, A; Wexner, S D

    2014-01-01

    Previous laboratory studies have shown that angiotensin II is produced locally in the rat internal anal sphincter causing potent contraction. The aim of this first human study was to evaluate the safety and manometric effects of topical application of captopril (an ACE inhibitor) on the resting anal pressure in healthy adult volunteers. Ten volunteers, mean age 32.5 years (range, 19-48 years), underwent anorectal manometric evaluation of the mean anal resting pressure (MRAP) and the length of the high-pressure zone (HPZ) before 20 and 60 min after topical application of captopril (0.28 %) cream. Cardiovascular variables (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and pulse) were measured before and for up to 1 h after cream application. Side effects were recorded. Adverse events and patient comfort after the cream application were evaluated within a 24-h period by completing a questionnaire. There was no significant change overall in MRAP following captopril administration, although in half the patients, there were reductions in MRAP after treatment. Half the patients had a reduction in the mean resting HPZ length; however, there was no overall difference between pre- and post-treatment values. There was no effect on basic cardiovascular parameters and no correlation between manometric and cardiovascular variables. Topical application of captopril cream may result in a reduction in MRAP in volunteers without anorectal disease. Its use is associated with minimal side effects. It may be a new potential therapeutic option in the treatment of anal fissure. Further studies are required to determine the optimal concentration, dose and frequency of application.

  10. Greater Resting Lumbar Extensor Myofascial Stiffness in Younger Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Than Age-Comparable Healthy Volunteers Quantified by Myotonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonian, Brian J; Masi, Alfonse T; Aldag, Jean C; Barry, Alexander J; Coates, Brandon A; Emrich, Katherine; Henderson, Jacqueline; Kelly, Joseph; Nair, Kalyani

    2015-11-01

    To quantify resting lumbar erector myofascial stiffness in younger patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and age-comparable healthy control subjects using a handheld mechanical impulse-based myotonometric device. A case-control study of 24 patients with AS and 24 age-comparable healthy control subjects. University physical therapy department. Patients with AS (men: n=19; women: n=5; total: N=24) and healthy volunteers (men: n=19; women: n=5; total: N=24) without low back pain (age range, 18-46y). Not applicable. Lumbar myofascial stiffness. At the initial measurements, median stiffness (Nm) of the averaged right- and left-sided values was greater (P=.021) in 24 patients with AS than 24 control subjects (268.9 vs 238.9, respectively). Repeated measurements after a 10-minute prone resting period were also greater (P=.007) in patients with AS than control subjects (281.0 vs 241.4, respectively). The 48 averaged right- and left-sided values from baseline and 10-minute measurements were compared in each subject group. The patients with AS more frequently (P=.012) had stiffness values >250 Nm (35 [72.9%] vs 22 [45.8%] in control subjects). Lumbar myofascial stiffness was greater in 24 patients with AS than in the control subjects. A hypothesized biomechanical concept of increased resting lumbar myofascial stiffness in AS may be supported by this preliminary controlled study. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Electromyographic activity of the diaphragm during neostigmine or sugammadex-enhanced recovery after neuromuscular blockade with rocuronium: a randomised controlled study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepens, Tom; Cammu, Guy; Saldien, Vera; De Neve, Nikolaas; Jorens, Philippe G; Foubert, Luc; Vercauteren, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    The use of neuromuscular blocking agents has been associated with severe postoperative respiratory morbidity. Complications can be attributed to inadequate reversal, and reversal agents may themselves have adverse effects. To compare the electromyographic activity of the diaphragm (EMGdi) during recovery from neuromuscular blockade using neostigmine and sugammadex. The hypothesis was that there would be better neuromuscular coupling of the diaphragm when sugammadex was used. A randomised, controlled, parallel-group, single-centre, double-blinded study. District general hospital in Belgium. Twelve healthy male volunteers. Individuals were anaesthetised with propofol and remifentanil. After rocuronium 0.6 mg kg, a transoesophageal electromyography (EMG) recorder was inserted. For reversal of neuromuscular blockade, volunteers received sugammadex 2 mg kg (n = 6) or neostigmine 70 μg kg (n = 6). EMGdi, airway pressure and flow were continuously measured during weaning from the ventilator until tracheal extubation. Arterial blood gas samples were obtained for PaO2 and PaCO2 analysis at the first spontaneous breathing attempt and after tracheal extubation. During weaning, 560 breaths were retained for analysis. The median (95% CI) peak EMGdi was 1.1 (0.9 to 1.5) μV in the neostigmine group and 1.6 (1.3 to 1.9) μV in the sugammadex group (P sugammadex group (P = 0.008). The median (95% CI) tidal volume was 287 (256 to 335) ml after neostigmine and 359 (313 to 398) ml after sugammadex (P = 0.013). The median (95% CI) PaO2 immediately after extubation was 30.5 (22.8 to 37.1) kPa after sugammadex vs. 20.7 (12.9 to 27.5) kPa after neostigmine (P = 0.03). EMGdi, tidal volume and PaO2 following tracheal extubation were increased after sugammadex compared with neostigmine, reflecting diaphragm-driven inspiration after sugammadex administration. Sugammadex may free more diaphragmatic acetylcholine receptors than neostigmine, which has an

  12. Medium light and medium roast paper-filtered coffee increased antioxidant capacity in healthy volunteers: results of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Telma Angelina Faraldo; Monteiro, Marcela Piedade; Mendes, Thaíse Maria Nogueira; Oliveira, Daniela Moura de; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Benites, Cibelem Iribarrem; Vinagre, Carmen Guilherme Christiano de Matos; Mioto, Bruno Mahler; Tarasoutchi, Daniela; Tuda, Vera Lúcia; César, Luiz Antonio Machado; Torres, Elizabeth Aparecida Ferraz da Silva

    2012-09-01

    We compared the effects of medium light roast (MLR) and medium roast (MR) paper-filtered coffee on antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation in healthy volunteers. In a randomized crossover study, 20 volunteers consumed 482 ± 61 ml/day of MLR or MR for four weeks. Plasma total antioxidant status (TAS), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), oxidized LDL and 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activity were measured at baseline and after the interventions. MLR had higher chlorogenic acids-(CGA; 334 mg/150 mL) and less caffeine (231 mg/150 ml) than MR had (210 and 244 mg/150 ml, respectively). MLR also had fewer Maillard reaction products (MRP) than MR had. Compared with baseline, subjects had an increase of 21 and 26 % in TAS, 13 and 13 % in CAT, 52 and 75 % in SOD, and 62 and 49 % in GPx after MLR and MR consumption (P < 0.001), respectively. ORAC increased after MLR (P = 0.004). No significant alteration in lipid peroxidation biomarkers was observed. Both coffees had antioxidant effects. Although MLR contained more CGA, there were similar antioxidant effects between the treatments. MRP may have contributed as an antioxidant. These effects may be important in protecting biological systems and reducing the risk of diseases related to oxidative stress.

  13. Assessment of Combined Ascorbyl Palmitate (AP) and Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate (SAP) on Facial Skin Sebum Control in Female Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, H; Akhtar, N; Ali, A

    2017-01-01

    The skin is fortified with a setup of lipophilic and hydrophilic, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems. Ascorbyl palmitate (AP) and sodium ascorbyl phosphate (SAP) are reported as lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants, respectively used for skin care. Present study was aimed to assess the combined AP (in oil phase) and SAP (in aqueous phase) via multiple emulsion (ME1) for controlling sebum secretions in healthy human females. FTIR analysis of AP and SAP was performed for identification. Multiple emulsions (ME1 and control) were prepared and analyzed for physical stability. Antioxidant activities of AP, SAP as well as ME1 (with combination of these compounds) were determined by DPPH method. 11 female volunteers were included in a single-blinded, placebo-controlled, split-face comparative study. Volunteers were instructed to apply ME1 on left cheek while control (without AP and SAP) on right cheek, for a period of 90 days. A non-invasive photometric device (Sebumeter(®)) was used for the measurement of sebum secretions on both sides of the face with subsequent time intervals. A good antioxidant activity of ME1 was observed. ME1 treatments reduced significant facial sebum secretions as compared with control/placebo treatments. It was concluded that combined AP and SAP supplementations to skin proved a promising choice for controlling facial sebum secretions and could be evaluated for undesired oily skin and acne reductions for beautifying the facial appearance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Heart rate variability and circulating catecholamine concentrations during steady state exercise in healthy volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Breuer, H W; Skyschally, A; SCHULZ R.; Martin, C.; Wehr, M.; Heusch, G.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess whether exercise induced suppression of heart rate variability in the low frequency domain (0.06-0.15 Hz) is related to the increase in circulating catecholamine concentrations. DESIGN--Randomised crossover trial of three exercise tests characterised by different workloads. Pharmacological simulation of exercise-induced changes in vagal and sympathetic activity. PARTICIPANTS--Six healthy men with a mean age of 31.2 (SD 3.0) years. INTERVENTIONS--Three different workloads...

  15. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of fesoterodine sustained-release in healthy Korean volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongseong; Shin, Kwang-Hee; Lee, SeungHwan; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Cho, Joo-Youn; Jang, In-Jin; Shin, Sang-Goo; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2012-10-01

    Fesoterodine is a pro-drug of the active metabolite 5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine (5-HMT), a muscarinic receptor antagonist. This study aimed to evaluate the safety profile and pharmacokinetic characteristics of multiple oral doses of sustained-release fesoterodine (fesoterodine SR) in healthy Korean males. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose study with two oral doses (4 mg and 8 mg) was conducted in healthy Korean male participants. The study drug was administered once daily for 5 days. The plasma concentration of 5-HMT was measured up to 72 hours after the last drug administration. The CYP2D6 genotype was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods to assess the effect of genetic polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetic parameters. 20 participants completed the study. The mean (SD) areas under the plasma concentration-time curves during the dosing interval (AUCτ) of the 4 mg and 8 mg dose groups were 26.1 (8.0) and 64.2 (30.5) μg·h/ml and the mean peak concentrations (Cmax) were 2.6 (0.7) and 6.0 (2.0) μg/ml, respectively, at steady-state. The mean AUCτ and Cmax of 5-HMT increased in approximately the same proportion as the dose increased. Fesoterodine SR was well tolerated without any serious adverse events or abnormal clinical laboratory findings. Systemic 5-HMT exposure showed dose-proportional characteristics in the 4 mg to 8 mg dose range in healthy Korean males. Thus, 4 mg or 8 mg doses of fesoterodine SR taken once-daily were tolerable in healthy Korean males.

  16. Drug-Drug Interaction Analysis of Pyronaridine/Artesunate and Ritonavir in Healthy Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Carrie A.; Lopez-Lazaro, Luis; Jung, Donald; Methaneethorn, Janthima; Duparc, Stephan; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Pokorny, Rolf; Shin, Chang-Sik; Fleckenstein, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    A multiple dose, parallel group study was conducted to assess for a drug-drug interaction between the pyronaridine/artesunate (PA) combination antimalarial and ritonavir. Thirty-four healthy adults were randomized (1:1) to receive PA for 3 days or PA with ritonavir (100 mg twice daily for 17 days, PA administered on Days 8–10). Pharmacokinetic parameters for pyronaridine, artesunate, and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA) were obtained after the last PA dose and for ritonavir on D...

  17. A single high dose of escitalopram increases mismatch negativity without affecting processing negativity or P300 amplitude in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienberg, M; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Jensen, K S

    2009-01-01

    processing. The present study was designed to replicate and further extent the results of our initial study on the effects of a low dose of escitalopram (10 mg) on MMN, PN and P300 amplitude. In a randomised, double-blind, cross-over experiment, 20 healthy male volunteers received either a single, orally...... administered dose of 15 mg escitalopram (a highly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)) or placebo, after which their PN, MMN and P300 amplitude were assessed. Similar to our initial study with 10 mg escitalopram, 15 mg escitalopram significantly increased MMN, while it did not affect P300 amplitude....... In contrast to our initial study, however, the currently higher dose of escitalopram did not increase PN. Results support the view that a broad range of increased serotonergic activity enhances MMN, while the relationship between serotonin and PN seems more complex. The current study does not support...

  18. The effect of whisky and wine consumption on total phenol content and antioxidant capacity of plasma from healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duthie, GG; Pedersen, M W; PC, Morrice

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether consumption of 100 ml of whisky or red wine by healthy male subjects increasedplasma total phenol content and antioxidant capacity. DESIGN: A Latin square arrangement to eliminate ordering effectswhereby, after an overnight fast, nine volunteers consumed 100 ml of red....... RESULTS: Within 30 min of consumption of the wine and whisky, there was a similar andsignificant increase in plasma total phenol content and antioxidant capacity as determined by the ferric reducing capacityof plasma (FRAP). No changes were observed following consumption of 'new make' spirit. CONCLUSIONS......:Consumption of phenolic-containing alcoholic beverages transiently raises total phenol concentration and enhances theantioxidant capacity of plasma. This is compatible with suggestions that moderate alcohol usage and increasedantioxidant intake decrease the risk of coronary heart disease....

  19. Misoprostol inhibits gastric mucosal release of endogenous prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2 in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Eskerod, O; Bukhave, K

    1995-01-01

    Prostaglandin analogues of the E-series theoretically offer the ideal antiulcer drugs. Peptic ulcer healing with prostaglandin analogues is, however, no better than would be predicted from their ability to inhibit gastric acid secretion and they are less effective than histamine H2 receptor...... antagonists in preventing ulcer relapse. It could be that prostaglandin analogues inhibit gastric mucosal synthesis or release of endogenous eicosanoids, thereby abrogating their own effects. This study, therefore, examined how a single therapeutic dose (200 micrograms) of misoprostol, a synthetic analogue...... of prostaglandin E1, influences gastric mucosal release of endogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxane B2 (TXB2), and chemotactic leukotriene B4 (LTB4) during basal conditions and in response to gastric luminal acidification (0.1 M HCl; 5 ml/min for 10 minutes). Nine healthy volunteers were studied in a single...

  20. The profile of free amino acids in latent fingerprint of healthy and beta-thalassemic volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedr, Alaa

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to apply a non-invasive test, using thumb fingerprint residue analysis, for detection of beta-thalassemia (beta-Thal). The relative percentages of free amino acids (AA) in the latent fingerprint of beta-Thal patients and healthy subjects were compared. The sample included 24 beta-Thal patient and 24 healthy subjects, aged 5-10 years old. Twenty-three AA plus ammonia were analyzed by a sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic method with fluorescence detection. The profile of AA was calculated based on the percentage of relative amount of each AA to serine (Ser) as it found to be the predominant peak. The statistical and chromatographic profiles of beta-Thal patients were characterized by significant decrease of ornithine, lysine, and zero tyrosine, with significant increase of ammonia, and proline. Other amino acids that exist in low ratios were estimated statistically for significance changes. The relative percentages of each AA of healthy subjects were approximately constant. For this reason, these mentioned AA were assigned as major fingerprint markers of beta-Thal.

  1. Study on Yang-Xu Using Body Constitution Questionnaire and Blood Variables in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Jhang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM formulates treatment according to body constitution (BC differentiation. Different constitutions have specific metabolic characteristics and different susceptibility to certain diseases. This study aimed to assess the Yang-Xu constitution using a body constitution questionnaire (BCQ and clinical blood variables. A BCQ was employed to assess the clinical manifestation of Yang-Xu. The logistic regression model was conducted to explore the relationship between BC scores and biomarkers. Leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV and K-fold cross-validation were performed to evaluate the accuracy of a predictive model in practice. Decision trees (DTs were conducted to determine the possible relationships between blood biomarkers and BC scores. According to the BCQ analysis, 49% participants without any BC were classified as healthy subjects. Among them, 130 samples were selected for further analysis and divided into two groups. One group comprised healthy subjects without any BC (68%, while subjects of the other group, named as the sub-healthy group, had three BCs (32%. Six biomarkers, CRE, TSH, HB, MONO, RBC, and LH, were found to have the greatest impact on BCQ outcomes in Yang-Xu subjects. This study indicated significant biochemical differences in Yang-Xu subjects, which may provide a connection between blood variables and the Yang-Xu BC.

  2. Does forward head posture affect postural control in human healthy volunteers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anabela G; Johnson, Mark I

    2013-06-01

    Proprioceptive afferent input from neck muscles plays an important role in postural control. Forward head posture has the potential to impair proprioceptive information from neck muscles and contribute to postural control deficits in patients with neck pain. This study investigated whether induced forward head posture affects postural control in healthy participants when compared to natural head posture. Centre of pressure sway area, distance covered and mean velocity were measured during 30s of static standing using a force platform with 25 healthy individuals (mean age ± SD = 20.76 ± 2.19 years) in 8 different conditions. Base of support, eyes open or closed and natural or forward head posture varied within these testing conditions. The majority of comparisons between natural and forward head posture were not statistically significant (p>0.05). This suggests that induced forward head posture in young healthy adults does not challenge them enough to impair postural control. Future studies should evaluate whether forward head posture affects postural control of individuals with chronic neck pain.

  3. Near-infrared spectroscopy extended with indocyanine green dye dilution for cerebral blood flow measurement: Median values in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudra, R.; Muroi, C.; Niederer, P.; Keller, E.

    2008-09-01

    The cerebral blood flow (CBF) is an important vital parameter in neurointensive care. Currently, there is no non-invasive method for its measurement that can easily be applied at the bedside. A new tool to determine CBF is based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) applied together with indocyanine green (ICG) dye dilution. From a bilateral measurement on selected regions on the head of infrared (IR) absorption at various wavelengths during the dilution maneuver, the vascular perfusion characteristics of the two brain hemispheres can be determined in terms of mean transit time (mtt) of ICG, cerebral blood volume (CBV) and CBF. So far, on nine healthy volunteers, NIRS ICG dye dilution bihemispheric measurements were performed, which yielded to mtt given as median (range) of 9.3 s (5.1-16.3 s), CBV of 3.5 ml/100 g (1.7-4.1 ml/100 g), and CBF of 18.2 ml/(100 g×min) [11.1-48.6 ml/(100 g×min)]. Additionally, the blood flow index (BFI) was calculated with BFI= 13.8 mg/(100 g×s) [6.6-15.2 mg/(100 g×s)]. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient between CBF and BFI was RS = 0.76. However, as the Bland & Altman plot between CBFNIRS and the CBFBFI documents, the limits of agreement are rather wide (21.9±6.7). Under physiological conditions in healthy volunteers, no differences could be detected between the hemispheres.

  4. Effects of oral lycopene supplementation on vascular function in patients with cardiovascular disease and healthy volunteers: a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag R Gajendragadkar

    Full Text Available AIMS: The mechanisms by which a 'Mediterranean diet' reduces cardiovascular disease (CVD burden remain poorly understood. Lycopene is a potent antioxidant found in such diets with evidence suggesting beneficial effects. We wished to investigate the effects of lycopene on the vasculature in CVD patients and separately, in healthy volunteers (HV. METHODS AND RESULTS: We randomised 36 statin treated CVD patients and 36 healthy volunteers in a 2∶1 treatment allocation ratio to either 7 mg lycopene or placebo daily for 2 months in a double-blind trial. Forearm responses to intra-arterial infusions of acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent vasodilatation; EDV, sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent vasodilatation; EIDV, and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (basal nitric oxide (NO synthase activity were measured using venous plethysmography. A range of vascular and biochemical secondary endpoints were also explored. EDV in CVD patients post-lycopene improved by 53% (95% CI: +9% to +93%, P = 0.03 vs. placebo without changes to EIDV, or basal NO responses. HVs did not show changes in EDV after lycopene treatment. Blood pressure, arterial stiffness, lipids and hsCRP levels were unchanged for lycopene vs. placebo treatment groups in the CVD arm as well as the HV arm. At baseline, CVD patients had impaired EDV compared with HV (30% lower; 95% CI: -45% to -10%, P = 0.008, despite lower LDL cholesterol (1.2 mmol/L lower, 95% CI: -1.6 to -0.9 mmol/L, P<0.001. Post-therapy EDV responses for lycopene-treated CVD patients were similar to HVs at baseline (2% lower, 95% CI: -30% to +30%, P = 0.85, also suggesting lycopene improved endothelial function. CONCLUSIONS: Lycopene supplementation improves endothelial function in CVD patients on optimal secondary prevention, but not in HVs. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01100385.

  5. Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 stimulates immunoglobulin production and innate immunity after influenza vaccination in healthy adult volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Nishihira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lactobacillus gasseri strain SBT2055 (LG2055 is a human intestine-originating probiotic bacterium and potent probiotic known to exert various health promotion effects, including prevention of abdominal adiposity in rats and humans. A recent finding in mice has suggested that oral administration of LG2055 induces a protective effect against influenza A virus infection. In this context, evidence for the efficacy of LG2055 using a human clinical trial was imminently required. Methods: To confirm this in humans, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel- group study in healthy adult volunteers was conducted to examine the effect of drinkable yogurt (DY containing LG2055 on influenza, with vaccine-specific antibody responses as the primary objective and innate immune responses as the secondary objective. Subjects were asked to consume 100 g/day of DY with LG2055 (LG2055 group; n = 94 or without LG2055 (placebo group; n = 94 for 16 weeks. After 4 weeks, all subjects received a trivalent influenza vaccine. Results: We found that the intake of LG2055 DY increased hemagglutination inhibition titers against influenza viruses A/H1N1 and B and the rate of seroprotection against influenza B after vaccination as compared with the intake of placebo DY by healthy volunteers. In support of this result, we confirmed that total IgG and IgA levels in plasma and sIgA production in saliva were also higher in the LG2055 group than in the placebo group. Furthermore, the intake of LG2055 DY enhanced natural killer cell activity and myxovirus resistance A gene expression, which is one of the antiviral genes stimulated by type I or type III Interferons in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Conclusions: These results strongly indicate that LG2055 activates both the innate and adaptive human immune responses, suggesting the potential to prevent influenza virus infections by providing specific probiotics as complementary foods.

  6. Quantification of cerebral blood flow by flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery exempting separate T1 measurement in healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jiang-xi; ZHANG Xue-hui; XIE Sheng; ZOU Run-lei

    2006-01-01

    Background The feasibility of the mapping of quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) named flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery exempting separate T1 measurement (FAIREST) is still controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the reliability of FAIREST in the measurement of regional CBF (rCBF) in healthy volunteers.Methods Eighteen healthy volunteers underwent magnetic resonance (MR) scanning with the sequence of FAIREST. While they were at rest, rCBF values were obtained in various brain regions of interest (ROIs). The same scheme was repeated on every subject after two weeks. Statistical analysis was made to determine the effect of location, scan and side on the measurement of rCBF.Results The mean CBF values were (122 ± 28) ml · (100 g)-1 · min-1 and (43 ±10) ml · (100 g)-1 · min-1 in the gray and white matter respectively. There was significant main effect of location (t=-12.5, P<0.01), but no significant effect of side. Paired t-test of ROIs in the same slice showed no significant difference in most sites between two scans, except in the gray matter of the bilateral frontal lobes (t=2.18-2.34, P <0.05). However, the rCBF values of the same structure obtained from different slices showed a significant difference (t=-3.49,P<0.01).Conclusion FAIREST is a reliable technique in the measurement of rCBF, but different imaging slice may affect the agreement of rCBF across the scans.

  7. Reproducibility, and age, body-weight and gender dependency of candidate skeletal muscle MRI outcome measures in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Reilly, Mary M.; Hanna, Michael G. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Medical Research Council Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Thornton, John S. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Medical Research Council Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, Neuroradiological Academic Unit, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); Fischmann, Arne [University of Basel Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can potentially meet the pressing need for objective, sensitive, reproducible outcome measures in neuromuscular disease trials. We tested, in healthy volunteers, the consistency, reliability and sensitivity to normal inter-subject variation of MRI methods targeted to lower limb muscle pathology to inform the design of practical but comprehensive MRI outcome measure protocols for use in imminent patient studies. Forty-seven healthy volunteers, age 21-81 years, were subject at 3T to three-point Dixon fat-fraction measurement, T{sub 1}-relaxometry, T{sub 2}-relaxometry and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) imaging at mid-thigh and mid-calf level bilaterally. Fifteen subjects underwent repeat imaging at 2 weeks. Mean between-muscle fat fraction and T{sub 2} differences were small, but significant (p < 0.001). Fat fraction and T{sub 2} correlated positively, and MTR negatively with subject age in both the thigh and calf, with similar significant correlations with weight at thigh level only (p < 0.001 to p < 0.05). Scan-rescan and inter-observer intra-class correlation coefficients ranged between 0.62-0.84 and 0.79-0.99 respectively. Quantitative lower-limb muscle MRI using readily implementable methods was sensitive enough to demonstrate inter-muscle differences (small in health), and correlations with subject age and weight. In combination with high reliability, this strongly supports the suitability of these methods to provide longitudinal outcome measures in neuromuscular disease treatment trials. (orig.)

  8. Effects on sleep stages and microarchitecture of caffeine and its combination with zolpidem or trazodone in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, L M; Nutt, D J; Ivarsson, M; Hutson, P H; Wilson, S J

    2009-07-01

    Caffeine is the world's most popular stimulant and is known to disrupt sleep. Administration of caffeine can therefore be used in healthy volunteers to mimic the effects of insomnia and thus to test the hypnotic effects of medication. This study assessed the effects of caffeine on sleep architecture and electroencephalography (EEG) spectrum alone and in combination with two different sleep-promoting medications. Home polysomnography was performed in 12 healthy male volunteers in a double-blind study whereby subjects received placebo, caffeine (150 mg), caffeine plus zolpidem (10 mg) and caffeine plus trazodone (100 mg) at bedtime in a randomised crossover design. In addition to delaying sleep onset, caffeine decreased total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE) and stage 2 sleep without significantly altering wake after sleep onset or the number of awakenings. Zolpidem attenuated the caffeine-induced decrease in SE and increased spindle density in the caffeine plus zolpidem combination compared with placebo. Trazodone attenuated the decrease in SE and TST, and it also increased stage 3 sleep, decreased the number of awakenings and decreased the spindle density. No significant changes in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were observed, neither was any significant alteration in slow wave activity nor other EEG spectral measures, although the direction of change was similar to that previously reported for caffeine and appeared to 'normalise' after trazodone. These data suggest that caffeine mimics some, but not all of the sleep disruption seen in insomnia and that its disruptive effects are differentially attenuated by the actions of sleep-promoting compounds with distinct mechanisms of action.

  9. Determination of plasma topiramate concentration using LC-MS/MS for pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in healthy Korean volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hee; Park, Yoo-Sin; Lee, Min-Ho; Rhim, Si-Youn; Song, Jae-Chul; Lee, Soo-Jin; Kim, Jung-Mogg; Shaw, Leslie M; Kang, Ju-Seop

    2008-08-01

    A rapid, simple and validated liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometric method (LC-MS/MS) for topiramate analysis in human plasma has been applied to pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in 24 healthy male Korean volunteers. The procedure involves a simple liquid extraction of topiramate and prednisone (internal standard) with acetonitrile and separation by HPLC equipped with a Capcell Pak C18 column using acetonitrile-0.1% triethylamine (80:20, v/v) as a mobile phase. Detection was carried out on an API 2000 MS system by multiple reactions monitoring mode. The ionization was optimized using ESI(-) and selectivity was achieved by MS/MS analysis, m/z 338.0 --> 77.5 and m/z 357.1 --> 327.2 for topiramate and prednisone, respectively. The method had a total run time of 2.5 min and showed good linearity over a working range of 20-5000 ng/mL in human plasma with a lower limit of quantification of 20 ng/mL. No metabolic compounds were found to interfere with the analysis. The inter-day and intra-day accuracy were in the ranges of 99.24-116.63 and 93.45-108.68%, respectively, and inter-day and intra-day precisions were below 6.24 and 5.25%, respectively. This method was successfully applied for pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies by analysis of blood samples taken up to 96 h after an oral administration of 100 mg of topiramate in 24 healthy Korean volunteers.

  10. Evaluation of performance, safety, subject acceptance, and compliance of a disposable autoinjector for subcutaneous injections in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteau, Cecile; Schwarzenbach, Florence; Donazzolo, Yves; Latreille, Mathilde; Berube, Julie; Abry, Herve; Cotten, Joël; Feger, Celine; Laurent, Philippe E

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A disposable autoinjector was developed for subcutaneous (SC) self-injection by patients with chronic diseases. To verify its performance and evaluate its acceptance, a clinical study was conducted in healthy volunteers, comparing SC injections performed by subjects using the autoinjector with SC injections performed by nurses using a syringe. Methods: This was a randomized, single-center, crossover study comparing SC self-injection using an autoinjector with SC nurse-administered injection using a syringe. Two volumes (0.2 mL and 1 mL) were injected into healthy volunteers. Study objectives included assessment of the accuracy and consistency of the volume injected by the injection systems, and skin reaction and pain associated with the injection. The fluid depot in the SC tissue layer was evaluated by ultrasound. Subject acceptance was evaluated using questionnaires on attitudes and emotions towards the injection technique, and challenged by seeking the subjects’ preferred system for a final study injection or future treatment. Results: A total of 960 injections (480 with autoinjector, 480 with syringe) were performed in 40 subjects. There were no significant differences in mean fluid leakage and injected volumes between the systems. Pain associated with the injection was significantly lower with the auto-injector than with the syringe. Local skin reaction at the injection site was overall satisfactory. Injections were appropriately performed by all subjects. At study end, all 40 subjects preferred the autoinjector for a final study injection and for future treatment. Conclusion: This study indicated that the autoinjector used by the subject was similar to a syringe used by a nurse in terms of performance and safety in administering the injections, and better in terms of pain, overall acceptance, and preference. PMID:21049090

  11. A pilot study assessing the bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of diazepam after intranasal and intravenous administration in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Suresh K; Kriel, Robert L; Brundage, Richard C; Ivaturi, Vijay D; Cloyd, James C

    2013-08-01

    Diazepam rectal gel (Diastat(®)) is the only FDA-approved product indicated for acute repetitive seizures. Despite its proven efficacy, most older children and adults object to this route of administration. As a result, many patients do not realize the benefit of a therapy that can improve outcomes and decrease healthcare costs. Intranasal administration of benzodiazepines offers a potential alternative. The primary objective of this study was to compare the bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of two novel intranasal (IN) diazepam (DZP) formulations versus intravenous (IV) administration in healthy volunteers. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were randomized into an open-label, three-way crossover study. 10mg doses of two investigational intranasal DZP formulations (solution, suspension) and a 5mg IV dose of commercially available DZP injectable, USP were given. A two-week washout period separated treatments. Plasma samples for DZP analysis were collected pre-dose and at regular intervals up to 240 h post-dose. DZP concentration-time data were analyzed using a non-compartmental pharmacokinetics approach. Exposure following administration of DZP IN solution (absolute bioavailability - 97%) was greater than the IN suspension (absolute bioavailability - 67%). Mean Cmaxvalues for the suspension and solution formulations were 221 ng/mL and 272 ng/mL, respectively. Median time to maximum concentration (Tmax) was 1h and 1.5h for suspension and solution formulation, respectively. Both investigational intranasal formulations were well tolerated. The results of this pilot study indicate that development of an intranasal diazepam formulation with high bioavailability, reasonable variability, and good tolerability is feasible.

  12. A phase I trial of PRN1008, a novel reversible covalent inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase, in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick F; Krishnarajah, Janakan; Nunn, Philip A; Hill, Ron J; Karr, Dane; Tam, D; Masjedizadeh, Mohammad; Funk, Jens O; Gourlay, Steve G

    2017-06-21

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of PRN1008, a novel Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor, in healthy volunteers, and thus determine the dose range for future clinical studies. This was a two-part randomized, placebo controlled study in healthy volunteers using a liquid formulation. Part I was a single ascending dose design with dose levels of 50-1200 mg (n = 6 active, two placebos per cohort); Part II was a multiple ascending dose design, with dose regimens ranging from 300 to 900 mg daily, either four times or twice daily for 10 days. Plasma pharmacokinetics, adverse events, vital signs, electrocardiograms and laboratory parameters were assessed. BTK occupancy in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was evaluated as a marker of target engagement. PRN1008 was rapidly absorbed following oral administration, and was safe and well tolerated in all dose regimens evaluated in both single and multiple doses. PRN1008 demonstrated a large volume of distribution, and a half-life of approximately 3-4 h. BTK occupancy of >90% was observed within 4 h after dosing in both single and multiple dose regimens, and was closely linked to maximum plasma concentration. BTK occupancy decay was slow (-1.6% h(-1) ), and occupancy was sustained despite drug concentrations being undetectable. No severe or serious adverse events occurred, and the most common adverse events were gastrointestinal in nature. PRN1008 was safe and well-tolerated following oral administration, and achieved high, sustained levels of BTK occupancy in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Pulse wave velocity and digital volume pulse as indirect estimators of blood pressure: pilot study on healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Juan M; Berjano, Enrique J; Sáiz, Javier; Rodriguez, Rafael; Fácila, Lorenzo

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to asses the potential use of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and digital volume pulse (DVP) as estimators of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DPB) blood pressure. Single and multiple correlation studies were conducted, including biometric parameters and risk factors. Brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) and DVP signals were obtained from a Pulse Trace PWV and Pulse Trace PCA (pulse contour analysis), respectively. The DVP (obtained by photoplethysmography), allowed stiffness (SI) and reflection indexes (RI) to be derived. The first study on 47 healthy volunteers showed that both SBP and DPB correlated significantly both with baPWV and SI. Multiple regression models of the baPWV and the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) allowed SBP and DBP to be modeled with r = 0.838 and r = 0.673, respectively. SI results also employed WHR and modeled SBP and DBP with r = 0.852 and r = 0.663, respectively. RI did not correlate either with SBP or DBP. In order to avoid the use of ultrasound techniques to measure PWV, we then developed a custom-built system to measure PWV by photoplethysmography and validated it against the Pulse Trace. With the same equipment we conducted a second pilot study with ten healthy volunteers. The best SBP multiple regression model for SBP achieved r = 0.997 by considering the heart-finger PWV (hfPWV measured between R-wave and index finger), WHR and heart rate. Only WHR was significant in the DBP model. Our findings suggest that the hfPWV photoplethysmography signal could be a reliable estimator of approximate SBP and could be used, for example, to monitor cardiac patients during physical exercise sessions in cardiac rehabilitation.

  14. Oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetic study of cetrizine HCl in Iranian healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshandeh, K; Mohebbi, M

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters and bioavailability of a selective histamine (H1)-receptor antagonist, cetirizine hydrochloride (CTZ), following administration of a single oral dose of the drug. The properties of a test compound were compared with those of a reference product in a randomized cross-over study in 12 volunteers. Blood samples were collected at selected time intervals up to 24 h and plasma concentrations of CTZ were determined using a validated HPLC method. Pharmacokinetic parameters including T(1/2), T(1/2)(abs), K, K(a), T(max), C(max), V(d)/F, Cl/F, AUC(0-24), AUC (0-∞) and MRT were determined from plasma concentration-time profiles for tested products and found to be in good agreement with previous reports. The analysis of variance did not show any significant differences between the test and reference products. The confidence intervals for the ratio of C(max) (95-110%), AUC(0-24) (91-112%) and AUC(0-∞) (92-109%) for the test and reference products were within the acceptable interval of 80-125%. ANOVA assessment of logarithmically transformed data did not reveal any significant subject, period or sequence effects. It was, therefore, concluded that the two products were bioequivalent and could be used interchangeably.

  15. Global Methylation and Hydroxymethylation in DNA from Blood and Saliva in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godderis, Lode; Schouteden, Caroline; Tabish, Ali; Poels, Katrien; Hoet, Peter; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Van Landuyt, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We describe a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to quantify and compare simultaneously global methylation and hydroxymethylation in human DNA of different tissues. Materials and Methods. Blood and saliva DNA from fourteen volunteers was processed for epigenetic endpoints using LC-MS/MS and PCR-pyrosequencing technology. Results. Global DNA methylation was significantly lower in saliva (mean 4.61% ±  0.80%), compared to blood samples (5.70% ± 0.22%). In contrast, saliva (0.036% ± 0.011%) revealed significantly higher hydroxymethylation compared to blood samples (mean 0.027% ± 0.004%). Whereas we did not find significant correlations for both epigenetic measures between the tissues, a significant association was observed between global methylation and global hydroxymethylation in saliva DNA. Neither LINE-1 nor Alu elements of blood and saliva correlated, nor were they correlated with the DNA hydroxymethylation of blood or saliva, respectively. Conclusion. Global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation of cytosine can be quantified simultaneously by LC-MS/MS. Saliva DNA cannot be considered as a surrogate for blood DNA to study epigenetic endpoints.

  16. Effect of food on the bioavailability of bromazepam following oral administration in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, J; Inotsume, N; Nakano, M

    1990-05-01

    The effect of food on the rate and extent of bioavailability of bromazepam was examined in seven normal volunteers following a single oral dose of 10 mg bromazepam with 200 ml of water in the fasting and non-fasting states. Plasma concentrations of bromazepam were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. A tmax value in a non-fasting state was prolonged from 2.3 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- S.E.M.) to 2.8 +/- 0.6 h but not significantly different (p greater than 0.05) whereas a Cmax value was significantly (p less than 0.05) decreased from 259 +/- 12.7 (mean +/- S.E.M.) to 169 +/- 13.9 ng/ml. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve in the non-fasting state was also significantly (p less than 0.05) decreased from 1844 +/- 145 (mean +/- S.E.M.) to 1233 +/- 98.1 ng.h/ml after oral administration of bromazepam.

  17. The clinical pharmacology of single doses of otilonium bromide in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, J A; Kilminster, S G; Mould, G P

    1997-01-01

    Otilonium is a smooth muscle spasmolytic with greater affinity for receptors in the smooth muscle of distal than proximal gut in rats. This study was the first to compare distal and proximal GI transit effects in human subjects. Using an increasing dose design for the safe exploration of clinical and supraclinical single dose levels, two groups of eight volunteers received either 40, 120 and 200 mg or 80, 160 and 240 mg otilonium. Gastric emptying of 400 ml 10% glucose solution was assessed by epigastric impedance (EI), orocaecal transit time (OCTT) by the lactulose breath-hydrogen method and whole gut transit time (WGTT) by the method of Hinton et al. [1]. Potential anticholinergic effects were assessed via visual accommodation using the RAF rule and saliva flow in response to sucking a sweet. Median WGTT after 120 mg significantly increased by 4.1 h relative to placebo, but at higher doses median changes relative to placebo were not significant due to wide increases in group variance. The EI t50% was delayed by 1.4 min when results from the two highest doses were combined and compared with placebo; this small difference was statistically significant but seems unlikely to achieve physiological or clinical significance. OCTT, visual accommodation and saliva flow were unaltered. Otilonium bromide was well tolerated at all doses, due mainly to low systemic absorption.

  18. Evaluating automated dynamic contrast enhanced wrist 3 T MRI in healthy volunteers: One-year longitudinal observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Anshul, E-mail: anshul.rastogi@bartshealth.nhs.uk [Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Kubassova, Olga, E-mail: olga@imageanalysis.org.uk [Image Analysis, Leeds (United Kingdom); Krasnosselskaia, Lada V., E-mail: solaguz@yahoo.com [Imaging Sciences Department, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Lim, Adrian K.P., E-mail: a.lim@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Radiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Satchithananda, Keshthra, E-mail: keshthra.satchithananda@imperial.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Boesen, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.boesen@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and the Parker Institute, Frederiksberg and Bispebjerg Hospitals (Denmark); Binks, Michael, E-mail: michael.h.binks@gsk.com [GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage, SG1 2NY (United Kingdom); Hajnal, Joseph V., E-mail: jo.hajnal@kcl.ac.uk [Imaging Sciences Department, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Peter C., E-mail: peter.taylor@kennedy.ox.ac.uk [Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Rational and Objective: Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has great potential to provide quantitative measure of inflammatory activity in rheumatoid arthritis. There is no current benchmark to establish the stability of signal in the joints of healthy subjects when imaged with DCE-MRI longitudinally, which is crucial so as to differentiate changes induced by treatment from the inherent variability of perfusion measures. The objective of this study was to test a pixel-by-pixel parametric map based approach for analysis of DCE-MRI (Dynamika) and to investigate the variability in signal characteristics over time in healthy controls using longitudinally acquired images. Materials and Methods: 10 healthy volunteers enrolled, dominant wrists were imaged with contrast enhanced 3T MRI at baseline, week 12, 24 and 52 and scored with RAMRIS, DCE-MRI was analysed using a novel quantification parametric map based approach. Radiographs were obtained at baseline and week 52 and scored using modified Sharp van der Heidje method. RAMRIS scores and dynamic MRI measures were correlated. Results: No erosions were seen on radiographs, whereas MRI showed erosion-like changes, low grade bone marrow oedema and low-moderate synovial enhancement. The DCE-MRI parameters were stable (baseline scores, variability) (mean ± st.dev); in whole wrist analysis, ME{sub mean} (1.3 ± 0.07, −0.08 ± 0.1 at week 24) and IRE{sub mean} (0.008 ± 0.004, −0.002 ± 0.005 at week 12 and 24). In the rough wrist ROI, ME{sub mean} (1.2 ± 0.07, 0.04 ± 0.02 at week 52) and IRE{sub mean} (0.001 ± 0.0008, 0.0006 ± 0.0009 at week 52) and precise wrist ROI, ME{sub mean} (1.2 ± 0.09, 0.04 ± 0.04 at week 52) and IRE{sub mean} (0.001 ± 0.0008, 0.0008 ± 0.001 at week 24 and 52). The Dynamic parameters obtained using fully automated analysis demonstrated strong, statistically significant correlations with RAMRIS synovitis scores. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that contrast enhancement does occur in

  19. Tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint 3D-kinematics in patients with posterior cruciate ligament deficiency compared to healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Eisenhart-Rothe Ruediger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL plays an important role in maintaining physiological kinematics and function of the knee joint. To date mainly in-vitro models or combined magnetic resonance and fluoroscopic systems have been used for quantifying the importance of the PCL. We hypothesized, that both tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematic patterns are changed in PCL-deficient knees, which is increased by isometric muscle flexion. Therefore the aim of this study was to simultaneously investigate tibiofemoral and patellofemoral 3D kinematics in patients suffering from PCL deficiency during different knee flexion angles and under neuromuscular activation. Methods We enrolled 12 patients with isolated PCL-insufficiency as well as 20 healthy volunteers. Sagittal MR-images of the knee joint were acquired in different positions of the knee joint (0°, 30°, 90° flexion, with and without flexing isometric muscle activity on a 0.2 Tesla open MR-scanner. After segmentation of the patella, femur and tibia local coordinate systems were established to define the spatial position of these structures in relation to each other. Results At full extension and 30° flexion no significant difference was observed in PCL-deficient knee joints neither for tibiofemoral nor for patellofemoral kinematics. At 90° flexion the femur of PCL-deficient patients was positioned significantly more anteriorly in relation to the tibia and both, the patellar tilt and the patellar shift to the lateral side, significantly increased compared to healthy knee joints. While no significant effect of isometric flexing muscle activity was observed in healthy individuals, in PCL-deficient knee joints an increased paradoxical anterior translation of the femur was observed at 90° flexion compared to the status of muscle relaxation. Conclusions Significant changes in tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint kinematics occur in patients with isolated PCL

  20. Measuring tongue volumes and visualizing the chewing and swallowing process using real-time TrueFISP imaging - initial clinical experience in healthy volunteers and patients with acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajaj, W.; Goyen, M.; Herrmann, B.; Massing, S.; Goehde, S.; Lauenstein, T.; Ruehm, S.G. [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Essen (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    This study assessed both two-dimensional (2D) TrueFISP imaging for quantifying tongue volume and real-time TrueFISP imaging for evaluating chewing and swallowing in healthy volunteers and patients with acromegaly. In 50 healthy volunteers, tongue volumes were measured using a 2D TrueFISP sequence. Chewing and swallowing were visualized using a real-time TrueFISP sequence. Ten patients with acromegaly were examined twice with the same magnetic resonance imaging protocol: once prior to therapy and a second time 6 months after therapy. Prior to therapy, healthy volunteers had an average tongue volume of 140 ml for men and 90 ml for women, and patients with acromegaly had an average tongue volume of 180 ml for men and 145 ml for women. However, 6 months after therapy the mean tongue volumes in patients with acromegaly had decreased to 154 ml in the men and to 125 ml in the women. The chewing and swallowing process was normal in all volunteers. Prior to therapy, just two patients showed a chewing and swallowing pathology, which disappeared after therapy. Patients with acromegaly had larger tongue volumes than healthy volunteers, and TrueFISP imaging proved feasible for visualizing chewing and swallowing in real time and is capable of detecting possible pathologies. Furthermore, TrueFISP imaging can be used to monitor therapeutic approaches in patients with acromegaly. (orig.)

  1. Cooking Healthy, Eating Smart (CHES): Evaluating the feasibility of using volunteers to deliver nutrition and food safety education to rural older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Morgan

    Due to their limited resources, rural, older adults in the United States are at risk for poor diet-related health outcomes. Nutrition education is a key component in improving health outcomes in older adults. Cooking Healthy, Eating Smart (CHES) is a nine-lesson curriculum designed to teach rural, older adults culturally appropriate nutrition and food safety information. Funding to hire health professionals to deliver such a curriculum is limited, presenting the need to explore a less expensive mode of dissemination. In this community-based, participatory research study, a formative evaluation and feasibility study were conducted to examine the use of volunteers to deliver a nutrition and food safety curriculum to rural, older adults in South Carolina. Seven focus groups were conducted with members of the South Carolina Family and Community Leaders (SCFCL) and members of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) in the four regions of South Carolina to explore barriers and facilitators of volunteers delivering CHES (N=65 participants). The focus group findings informed the development of the volunteer training manual. A comparative case study method was used to examine the feasibility of a volunteer-based approach by observing and describing the delivery of CHES by two groups of volunteers in SC. The case study findings, including volunteer knowledge change, self-efficacy change, curriculum experience, program experience, and project team observations of volunteers indicated that using volunteers to deliver CHES is a plausible approach with the assistance of paid staff or project team members.

  2. Evaluation of Pulmonary Hypertension with CMR: Pulmonary Hypertension 
Patients and Healthy Volunteers Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng WANG

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The clinical course of pulmonary hypertension (PH is one of progressive deterioration interspersed with episodes of acute decompensation. It is difficult to predict when patients will die because death may come either suddenly or slowly due to progressive heart failure. The aim of this study is to investigate morphology, function and hemodynamics in PH, compared with healthy people, and to investigate the clinical value of detection of PH by use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR parameters. Methods CMR was performed in 56 PH patients collected from Tianjin Medical University General Hospital from January 2012 to December 2014 and 22 healthy controls. The following parameters were calculated: right ventricle (RV end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-systolic volume (ESV, ejection fraction (EF, myocardial mass (MM, RV fractional area change (RVFAC, interventricular septal curvature (CIVS, left ventricular free wall curvature (CFW, and CIVS/CFW, main pulmonary artery (MPA positive peak velocity, maximal area, minimal area and distensibility. Comparisons of CMR measurements between PH patients and controls were analyzed by using the student t-tests. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis was used to compare the PH diagnostic abilities for four parameters (MPA positive peak velocity, distensibility, curvature ratio, and RVFAC and combined CMR parameter. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results Compared with healthy controls, RV morphology, function and hemodynamics of PH group declined and deteriorate obviously. The ROC curve analysis showed that among the four parameters distensibility of MPA had the highest AUC value (AUC=0.95. Additionally, combined CMR parameter (positive peak velocity+distensibility+curvature ratio+RVFAC had even higher AUC (AUC=0.988. Conclusion Comprehensive CMR parameters is conducive to accurately reflect the overall state RV-pulmonary circulation in patients with PH.

  3. Single dose pharmacokinetics of the novel transdermal donepezil patch in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Yo Han Kim,1 Hee Youn Choi,1 Hyeong-Seok Lim,1 Shi Hyang Lee,1 Hae Sun Jeon,1 Donghyun Hong,2 Seong Su Kim,2 Young Kweon Choi,2 Kyun-Seop Bae1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2iCure Pharmaceutical lncorporated, Anseong, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea Background: Donepezil is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor indicated for Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of this randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, dose-escalation study was to investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of the donepezil patch in healthy male subjects. Methods: Each healthy male subject received a single transdermal donepezil patch (72 hours patch-on periods of 43.75 mg/12.5 cm2, 87.5 mg/25 cm2, or 175 mg/50 cm2. Serial blood samples were collected up to 312 hours after patch application. The plasma concentrations of donepezil were determined by using a validated liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by noncompartmental analysis. Tolerability of the patches and performance of the patches (adhesion, skin irritation, residual donepezil content in the patch were assessed throughout the study. Results: The study was completed by 36 healthy subjects. After patch application, the maximal plasma donepezil concentration (Cmax and the area under the curve (AUC increased in a dose-proportional manner. Median time to Cmax was ~74–76 hours (~2–4 hours after patch removal, and mean t1/2ß was ~63.77–93.07 hours. The average donepezil residue in the patch after 72 hours was ~73.9%–86.7% of the loading dose. There were neither serious adverse events nor adverse events that lead to discontinuation. Skin adhesion of the patch was good in 97.2% of the subjects. All skin irritations after patch removal were mild and were resolved during the study period. Conclusion: The donepezil patch

  4. Effect of dairy fat on plasma phytanic acid in healthy volunteers - a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Louise B.; Hellgren, Lars; Raff, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    . DESIGN: In a double-blind, randomized, 4 wk, parallel intervention study 14 healthy young subjects were given 45 g milk fat/d from test butter and cheese with 0.24 wt% phytanic acid or a control diet with 0.13 wt% phytanic acid. Difference in phytanic acid was obtained by feeding roughage with low......BACKGROUND: Phytanic acid produced in ruminants from chlorophyll may have preventive effects on the metabolic syndrome, partly due to its reported RXR and PPAR- α agonist activity. Milk from cows fed increased levels of green plant material, contains increased phytanic acid concentrations...

  5. Effect of modafinil on the pharmacokinetics of ethinyl estradiol and triazolam in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Philmore; Hellriegel, Edward T; Arora, Sanjay; Nelson, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Modafinil has been reported to produce a concentration-related induction of CYP3A4/5 activity in vitro in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. Our objective was to determine whether the pharmacokinetics of steady-state ethinyl estradiol (INN, ethinylestradiol) and single-dose triazolam were altered after 4 weeks of modafinil treatment in volunteers. This was a placebo-controlled, single-blind, single-period study in 41 female subjects who were receiving long-term treatment with an oral contraceptive that contained ethinyl estradiol (0.035 mg) and norgestimate (0.180-0.250 mg). Pharmacokinetic profiles for ethinyl estradiol and for a single oral dose of triazolam (0.125 mg) were obtained the day before initiation of treatment with modafinil (200 mg for 7 days, followed by 400 mg for 21 days) or placebo (28 days). A second dose of triazolam was administered with the final dose of modafinil, and pharmacokinetic profiling was repeated. The modafinil treatment group had a marked decrease in maximum observed plasma concentrations and areas under the plasma concentration-time curve for triazolam relative to placebo, with a much smaller decrease in these parameters for ethinyl estradiol. The half-life of triazolam was also decreased, but the half-life of ethinyl estradiol did not appear to be affected by treatment with modafinil. Modafinil induced CYP3A4/5 activity in humans in vivo, suggesting that there is potential for metabolic drug-drug interactions between modafinil and substrates of CYP3A4/5. However, the induction appeared to be more gastrointestinal than hepatic in nature. Therefore significant metabolic drug-drug interactions are most likely to occur with compounds (such as triazolam) that undergo significant gastrointestinal CYP3A4/5-mediated first-pass metabolism.

  6. LPS infusion suppresses serum FGF21 levels in healthy adult volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittig, Nikolaj; Bach, Ermina; Møller, Niels; Bjerre, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Context During the inflammatory acute phase response, plasma glucose and serum triglycerides are increased in humans. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21 has plasma glucose and lipid-reducing actions, but its role in the acute inflammatory response in human is unknown. Objective To investigate circulating levels of FGF21 after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion. Design Two randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled crossover trials were used. Setting The studies were performed at a university hospital clinical research center. Patients and interventions Study 1 (LPS bolus): Eight young, healthy, lean males were investigated two times: (1) after isotonic saline injection and (2) after LPS injection (bolus of 1 ng/kg). Each study day lasted 4 h. Study 2 (continuous LPS infusion): Eight, healthy males were investigated two times: (1) during continuously isotonic saline infusion and (2) during continuous LPS infusion (0.06 ng/kg/h). Each study day lasted 4 h. Circulating FGF21 levels were quantified every second hour by an immunoassay. Results A LPS bolus resulted in a late suppression (t = 240 min) of serum FGF21 (P = 0.035). Continuous LPS infusion revealed no significant effects on FGF21 levels (P = 0.82). Conclusions Our studies show that a bolus of LPS results in decreased FGF21 levels 4 h from exposure. PMID:28069899

  7. Effects of fesoterodine on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of warfarin in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Bimal; Alvey, Christine; Gong, Jason; Li, Xiaoxi; Duczynski, Gregory; Gandelman, Kuan

    2011-08-01

    Drug-drug interactions with warfarin are common with potentially harmful consequences. Preclinical in vitro studies suggest that fesoterodine or 5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine are not likely to affect warfarin metabolism, but a lack of interaction has not been demonstrated in a clinical study. This study shows that the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of warfarin 25 mg in healthy adults are unaffected by fesoterodine 8 mg, and that co-administration of warfarin 25 mg and fesoterodine 8 mg is safe and well tolerated. To confirm the lack of an interaction of fesoterodine 8 mg with warfarin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in healthy adults. In this open-label, two-treatment, crossover study, subjects (n= 14) aged 20-41 years with normal prothrombin time (PT) and International Normalized Ratio (INR) were randomized to receive a single dose of warfarin 25 mg alone in one period and fesoterodine 8 mg once daily on days 1-9 with a single dose of warfarin 25 mg co-administered on day 3 in the other period. There was a 10-day washout between treatments. Pharmacokinetic endpoints were area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC(0,∞)), maximum plasma concentration (C(max)), AUC from time 0 to the time of the last quantifiable concentration (AUC(0,last)), time to C(max) (t(max) ), and half-life (t(1/2)) for S- and R-warfarin. Pharmacodynamic endpoints were area under the INR-time curve (AUC(INR) ), maximum INR (INR(max)), area under the PT-time curve (AUC(PT)) and maximum PT (PT(max)). Across all pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic comparisons, the point estimates of treatment ratio (warfarin co-administered with fesoterodine vs. warfarin alone) were 92-100%. The 90% confidence intervals for the ratios of the adjusted geometric means were contained within (80%, 125%). There were no clinically relevant changes in laboratory tests, vital signs or ECG recordings. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of warfarin 25 mg in healthy

  8. Metabolism of [3H]pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS) in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M; McClanahan, R H; Shah, J F; Repko, T; Modi, N B

    2005-08-01

    Pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS) is the active ingredient in ELMIRON, a drug approved for the relief of bladder pain associated with interstitial cystitis. The study objective was to characterize the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profiles of PPS following oral dosing of [3H]PPS. As specific assays for PPS do not exist, metabolic profiling was accomplished through multiple fraction collections and radiochromatographic techniques. Two groups of eight healthy female subjects sequentially received a single oral dose of 200 microCi [3H]PPS supplemented with 300 mg unlabelled PPS or 300 microCi [3H]PPS supplemented with 450 mg unlabelled PPS. Most of the administered dose (84%) was excreted in faeces as intact PPS, and a smaller percentage (6%) was excreted in urine. In summary, orally administered PPS was very poorly absorbed, with the majority of the drug being excreted in faeces as intact PPS and in urine as low molecular weight and desulfated PPS.

  9. Impact of Integrated Amrita Meditation Technique on Adrenaline and Cortisol Levels in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan Vandana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to find out the effect of Integrated Amrita Meditation Technique (IAM on the stress hormones: adrenaline and cortisol. One hundred and fifty healthy subjects were randomized into three groups. Blood was collected at 0 hour, 48 hours, 2 months, and 8 months after the first visit. Adrenaline was analyzed by ELISA and cortisol by Chemiluminescent method. In the IAM, PMR and control groups 44, 44, and 36 came, respectively, for the baseline visit. Within group, cortisol and adrenaline levels reduced in the IAM 48 hours onwards and the fall sustained until 8 months (P<.05. ANCOVA (Repeated measures on adrenaline taking the four levels of observation showed a highly significant (P=.001 drop in the IAM group. The mean cortisol values between groups were not statistically significant (P=.138. IAM Technique was effective in reducing adrenaline and cortisol levels within group comparisons.

  10. Day-night variation in heart rate variability changes induced by endotoxaemia in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, M.; Rosenberg, J; Gögenur, I

    2015-01-01

    /night variation in endotoxaemia-induced changes in HRV. METHODS: A randomized, crossover study with 12 healthy men (age 18-31) was conducted. Endotoxaemia were induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin 0.3 ng/kg b.w. in two visits (day visit and night visit). At the day visit, endotoxaemia were induced at 12...... and parasympathetic activity can be estimated by measuring heart rate variability (HRV). Based on the intimate link between ANS and the inflammatory response, we hypothesized, that HRV changes seen during endotoxaemia would be different based on time of the day the endotoxaemia is initiated. We investigated day...... at both night and day resulted in a significant depression in HRV parameters high-frequency power (HF), low-frequency power (LF), standard deviation of normal-to-normal (NN) intervals, root mean square of successive differences and proportion of NN50 divided by total number of NNs (P

  11. Microdosing of a Carbon-14 Labeled Protein in Healthy Volunteers Accurately Predicts Its Pharmacokinetics at Therapeutic Dosages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaming, M L H; van Duijn, E; Dillingh, M R; Brands, R; Windhorst, A D; Hendrikse, N H; Bosgra, S; Burggraaf, J; de Koning, M C; Fidder, A; Mocking, J A J; Sandman, H; de Ligt, R A F; Fabriek, B O; Pasman, W J; Seinen, W; Alves, T; Carrondo, M; Peixoto, C; Peeters, P A M; Vaes, W H J

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical development of new biological entities (NBEs), such as human protein therapeutics, requires considerable expenditure of time and costs. Poor prediction of pharmacokinetics in humans further reduces net efficiency. In this study, we show for the first time that pharmacokinetic data of NBEs in humans can be successfully obtained early in the drug development process by the use of microdosing in a small group of healthy subjects combined with ultrasensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). After only minimal preclinical testing, we performed a first-in-human phase 0/phase 1 trial with a human recombinant therapeutic protein (RESCuing Alkaline Phosphatase, human recombinant placental alkaline phosphatase [hRESCAP]) to assess its safety and kinetics. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed dose linearity from microdose (53 μg) [(14) C]-hRESCAP to therapeutic doses (up to 5.3 mg) of the protein in healthy volunteers. This study demonstrates the value of a microdosing approach in a very small cohort for accelerating the clinical development of NBEs.

  12. Effect of a selective chloride channel activator, lubiprostone, on gastrointestinal transit, gastric sensory, and motor functions in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E; Ueno, Ryuji; Burton, Duane; Thomforde, George M; Baxter, Kari; McKinzie, Sanna; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2006-05-01

    Chloride channels modulate gastrointestinal neuromuscular functions in vitro. Lubiprostone, a selective type 2 chloride channel (ClC-2) activator, induces intestinal secretion and has been shown to relieve constipation in clinical trials; however, the effects of lubiprostone on gastric function and whole gut transit in humans are unclear. Our aim was to compare the effects of the selective ClC-2 activator lubiprostone on maximum tolerated volume (MTV) of a meal, postprandial symptoms, gastric volumes, and gastrointestinal and colonic transit in humans. We performed a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating the effects of lubiprostone (24 microg bid) in 30 healthy volunteers. Validated methods were used: scintigraphic gastrointestinal and colonic transit, SPECT to measure gastric volumes, and the nutrient drink ("satiation") test to measure MTV and postprandial symptoms. Lubiprostone accelerated small bowel and colonic transit, increased fasting gastric volume, and retarded gastric emptying. MTV values were reduced compared with placebo; however, the MTV was within the normal range for healthy adults in 13 of 14 participants, and there was no significant change compared with baseline measurements. Lubiprostone had no significant effect on postprandial gastric volume or aggregate symptoms but did decrease fullness 30 min after the fully satiating meal. Thus the ClC-2 activator lubiprostone accelerates small intestinal and colonic transit, which confers potential in the treatment of constipation.

  13. Expectation-induced placebo responses fail to accelerate wound healing in healthy volunteers: results from a prospective controlled experimental trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vits, Sabine; Dissemond, Joachim; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kriegler, Lisa; Körber, Andreas; Schedlowski, Manfred; Cesko, Elvir

    2015-12-01

    Placebo responses have been shown to affect the symptomatology of skin diseases. However, expectation-induced placebo effects on wound healing processes have not been investigated yet. We analysed whether subjects' expectation of receiving an active drug accelerates the healing process of experimentally induced wounds. In 22 healthy men (experimental group, n = 11; control group, n = 11) wounds were induced by ablative laser on both thighs. Using a deceptive paradigm, participants in the experimental group were informed that an innovative 'wound gel' was applied on one of the two wounds, whereas a 'non-active gel' was applied on the wound of the other thigh. In fact, both gels were identical hydrogels without any active components. A control group was informed to receive a non-active gel on both wounds. Progress in wound healing was documented via planimetry on days 1, 4 and 7 after wound induction. From day 9 onwards wound inspections were performed daily accompanied by a change of the dressing and a new application of the gel. No significant differences could be observed with regard to duration or process of wound healing, either by intraindividual or by interindividual comparisons. These data document no expectation-induced placebo effect on the healing process of experimentally induced wounds in healthy volunteers.

  14. Payments to normal healthy volunteers in phase 1 trials: avoiding undue influence while distributing fairly the burdens of research participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltis, Ana S

    2009-02-01

    Clinical investigators must engage in just subject recruitment and selection and avoid unduly influencing research participation. There may be tension between the practice of keeping payments to participants low to avoid undue influence and the requirements of justice when recruiting normal healthy volunteers for phase 1 drug studies. By intentionally keeping payments low to avoid unduly influenced participation, investigators, on the recommendation or insistence of institutional review boards, may be targeting or systematically recruiting healthy adult members of lower socio-economic groups for participation in phase 1 studies. Investigators are at risk of routinely failing to fulfill the obligation of justice, which prohibits the systematic targeting and recruiting of subjects for reasons unrelated to the nature of the study. Insofar as we take seriously the obligation to engage in just subject recruitment and selection, I argue that we must acknowledge the implications low payments might have for subject recruitment and selection and examine the effect of low payments. If low payments de facto target the less well-off for phase 1 studies, we must defend the priority ranking of the obligation to avoid undue influence over the obligation of justice or adopt an alternative recruitment approach. This paper identifies a number of alternatives to the current system of low-value payments to research participants.

  15. The Effects of Smoking on Levels of Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Microparticles in the Blood of Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarrez, Fariborz; Antoniewicz, Lukasz; Bosson, Jenny A.; Kuhl, Jeanette; Pisetsky, David S.; Lundbäck, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking, both active and passive, is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease. To assess the impact of brief smoking on the vasculature, we determined levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating microparticles (MPs) following the smoking of one cigarette by young, healthy intermittent smokers. Materials and Methods 12 healthy volunteers were randomized to either smoking or not smoking in a crossover fashion. Blood sampling was performed at baseline, 1, 4 and 24 hours following smoking/not smoking. The numbers of EPCs and MPs were determined by flow cytometry. MPs were measured from platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells. Moreover, MPs were also labelled with anti-HMGB1 and SYTO 13 to assess the content of nuclear molecules. Results Active smoking of one cigarette caused an immediate and significant increase in the numbers of circulating EPCs and MPs of platelet-, endothelial- and leukocyte origin. Levels of MPs containing nuclear molecules were increased, of which the majority were positive for CD41 and CD45 (platelet- and leukocyte origin). CD144 (VE-cadherin) or HMGB1 release did not significantly change during active smoking. Conclusion Brief active smoking of one cigarette generated an acute release of EPC and MPs, of which the latter contained nuclear matter. Together, these results demonstrate acute effects of cigarette smoke on endothelial, platelet and leukocyte function as well as injury to the vascular wall. PMID:24587320

  16. Population plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of ivabradine and its active metabolite S18982 in healthy Korean volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Youn; Bae, Kyun-Seop; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ghim, Jong-Lyul; Choe, Sangmin; Jung, Jin Ah; Lim, Hyeong-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Ivabradine, a selective inhibitor of the pacemaker current (If ), is used for heart failure and coronary heart disease and is mainly metabolized to S18982. The purpose of this study was to explore the pharmacokinetics (PK) of ivabradine and S18982 in healthy Korean volunteers. Subjects in a phase I study were randomized to receive 2.5, 5, or 10 mg of ivabradine administered every 12 hours for 4.5 days, and serial plasma and urine concentrations of ivabradine and S18982 were measured. The plasma PK of ivabradine was best described by a 2-compartment model with mixed 0- and first-order absorption, linked to a 2-compartment model for S18982. The introduction of interoccasional variabilities and period as covariate into absorption-related parameters improved the model fit. Urine data have been applied to estimate renal and nonrenal clearance, enabling a more detailed description of the elimination process. We developed a population PK model describing the plasma and urine PK of ivabradine and S18982 in healthy Korean adult males. This model might be useful for predicting the plasma and urine PK of ivabradine, potentially helping to identify the optimal dosing regimens in various clinical situations.

  17. The effects of smoking on levels of endothelial progenitor cells and microparticles in the blood of healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Mobarrez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking, both active and passive, is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease. To assess the impact of brief smoking on the vasculature, we determined levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and circulating microparticles (MPs following the smoking of one cigarette by young, healthy intermittent smokers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 12 healthy volunteers were randomized to either smoking or not smoking in a crossover fashion. Blood sampling was performed at baseline, 1, 4 and 24 hours following smoking/not smoking. The numbers of EPCs and MPs were determined by flow cytometry. MPs were measured from platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells. Moreover, MPs were also labelled with anti-HMGB1 and SYTO 13 to assess the content of nuclear molecules. RESULTS: Active smoking of one cigarette caused an immediate and significant increase in the numbers of circulating EPCs and MPs of platelet-, endothelial- and leukocyte origin. Levels of MPs containing nuclear molecules were increased, of which the majority were positive for CD41 and CD45 (platelet- and leukocyte origin. CD144 (VE-cadherin or HMGB1 release did not significantly change during active smoking. CONCLUSION: Brief active smoking of one cigarette generated an acute release of EPC and MPs, of which the latter contained nuclear matter. Together, these results demonstrate acute effects of cigarette smoke on endothelial, platelet and leukocyte function as well as injury to the vascular wall.

  18. Dissociation of motor task-induced cortical excitability and pain perception changes in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena S Volz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is evidence that interventions aiming at modulation of the motor cortex activity lead to pain reduction. In order to understand further the role of the motor cortex on pain modulation, we aimed to compare the behavioral (pressure pain threshold and neurophysiological effects (transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS induced cortical excitability across three different motor tasks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fifteen healthy male subjects were enrolled in this randomized, controlled, blinded, cross-over designed study. Three different tasks were tested including motor learning with and without visual feedback, and simple hand movements. Cortical excitability was assessed using single and paired-pulse TMS measures such as resting motor threshold (RMT, motor-evoked potential (MEP, intracortical facilitation (ICF, short intracortical inhibition (SICI, and cortical silent period (CSP. All tasks showed significant reduction in pain perception represented by an increase in pressure pain threshold compared to the control condition (untrained hand. ANOVA indicated a difference among the three tasks regarding motor cortex excitability change. There was a significant increase in motor cortex excitability (as indexed by MEP increase and CSP shortening for the simple hand movements. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although different motor tasks involving motor learning with and without visual feedback and simple hand movements appear to change pain perception similarly, it is likely that the neural mechanisms might not be the same as evidenced by differential effects in motor cortex excitability induced by these tasks. In addition, TMS-indexed motor excitability measures are not likely good markers to index the effects of motor-based tasks on pain perception in healthy subjects as other neural networks besides primary motor cortex might be involved with pain modulation during motor training.

  19. Dysesthesia symptoms produced by sensorimotor incongruence in healthy volunteers: an electroencephalogram study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayama O

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Osamu Katayama,1,2 Michihiro Osumi,3 Takayuki Kodama,4 Shu Morioka,1,3 1Department of Neurorehabilitation, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kio University, Nara, 2Department of Rehabilitation, Watanabe Hospital, Aichi, 3Department of Neurorehabilitation Research Center, Kio University, Nara, 4Department of Physical Therapy, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kyoto Tachibana University, Kyoto, Japan Objectives: Pathological pain such as phantom limb pain is caused by sensorimotor incongruence. Several studies with healthy participants have clearly indicated that dysesthesia, which is similar to pathological pain, is caused by incongruence between proprioception and/or motor intention and visual feedback. It is not clear to what extent dysesthesia may be caused by incongruence between motor intention and visual feedback or by incongruence between proprioception and visual feedback. The aim of this study was to clarify the neurophysiology of these factors by analyzing electroencephalograms (EEGs.Methods: In total, 18 healthy participants were recruited for this study. Participants were asked to perform repetitive flexion/extension exercises with their elbows in a congruent/incongruent position while viewing the activity in a mirror. EEGs were performed to determine cortical activation during sensorimotor congruence and incongruence.Results: In the high-frequency alpha band (10–12 Hz, numeric rating scale scores of a feeling of peculiarity were significantly correlated with event-related desynchronization/synchronization under the incongruence and proprioception conditions associated with motor intention and visual feedback (right inferior parietal region; r=−0.63, P<0.01 and between proprioception and visual feedback (right temporoparietal region; r=−0.49 and r=−0.50, P<0.05. In these brain regions, there was a region in which incongruence between proprioception and visual feedback and between motor intention and visual feedback caused

  20. Catechol-O-methyltransferase val158met genotype determines effect of reboxetine on emotional memory in healthy male volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Ayana A.; Bautista, Carla E.; Mowlem, Florence D.; Naudts, Kris H.; Duka, Dora T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholamines in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). A common polymorphism in the COMT gene (COMT val158met) has pleiotropic effects on cognitive and emotional processing. The met allele has been associated with enhanced cognitive processing but impaired emotional processing relative to the val allele. Methods We genotyped healthy, white men in relation to the COMT val158met polymorphism. They were given a single 4 mg dose of the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (NRI) reboxetine or placebo in a randomized, double-blind between-subjects model and then completed an emotional memory task 2 hours later. Results We included 75 men in the study; 41 received reboxetine and 34 received placebo. In the placebo group, met/met carriers did not demonstrate the usual memory advantage for emotional stimuli that was observed in val carriers. Reboxetine restored this emotional enhancement of memory in met/met carriers, but had no significant effect in val carriers. Limitations We studied only men, thus limiting the generalizability of our findings. We also relied on self-reported responses to screening questions to establish healthy volunteer status, and in spite of the double-blind design, participants were significantly better than chance at identifying their intervention allocation. Conclusion Emotional memory is impaired in healthy met homozygotes and selectively improved in this group by reboxetine. This has potential translational implications for the use of reboxetine, which is currently licensed as an antidepressant in several countries, and edivoxetine, a new selective NRI currently in development. PMID:24467942

  1. Comparison of salivary and calculated free cortisol levels during low and standard dose of ACTH stimulation tests in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbuken, Gulsah; Tanriverdi, Fatih; Karaca, Zuleyha; Kula, Mustafa; Gokahmetoglu, Selma; Unluhizarci, Kursad; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2015-03-01

    Salivary cortisol (SC) has been increasingly used as a surrogate biomarker of free cortisol (FC) for the assessment of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, but there are not enough data regarding its use during ACTH stimulation tests. Therefore, we aimed to determine the responses of SC, calculated free cortisol (cFC) and free cortisol index (FCI) to ACTH stimulation tests in healthy adults. Forty-four healthy volunteers (24 men and 20 women) were included in the study. Low-dose (1 µg) and standard-dose (250 µg) ACTH stimulation tests were performed on two consecutive days. Basal and stimulated total cortisol (TC) and cortisol-binding globulin (CBG) levels and SC levels were measured during both doses of ACTH stimulation tests. cFC (by Coolens' equation) and FCI levels were calculated from simultaneously measured TC and CBG levels. The minimum SC, cFC, FCI levels after low-dose ACTH stimulation test were 0.21, 0.33, 16.06 µg/dL, and after standard-dose ACTH were 0.85, 0.46, 26.11 µg/dL, respectively, in healthy individuals who all had TC responses higher than 20 µg/dL. Peak CBG levels after both doses of ACTH stimulation tests were found to be higher in women than in men. So, by its effect, peak cFC and FCI levels were found to be lower in female than in male group. Neither TC nor SC levels were affected by gender. cFC and FCI levels depend on CBG levels and they are affected by gender. Cut-off levels for SC, cFC, FCI levels after both low- and standard-dose ACTH stimulation are presented. Studies including patients with adrenal insufficiency would be helpful to see the diagnostic value of these suggested cut-off levels.

  2. Effect of maraviroc on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, lamivudine/ zidovudine, and ethinyloestradiol/ levonorgestrel in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Samantha; Russell, Deborah; Whitlock, Lyndsey A; Ridgway, Caroline E; Muirhead, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    Aims To assess the effect of maraviroc on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a sensitive probe CYP3A4 substrate; lamivudine/zidovudine, a combination of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs); and ethinyloestradiol/levonorgestrel, a combination oral contraceptive. Methods Three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies were conducted in healthy subjects to assess the effect of maraviroc on pharmacokinetics of other drugs. Two, two-period crossover studies were conducted to assess (i) the effect of steady-state maraviroc (300 mg b.i.d.) on pharmacokinetics of midazolam; and (ii) the effect of steady-state maraviroc (300 mg b.i.d.) on the pharmacokinetics of lamivudine/zidovudine. A third two-way crossover study was conducted to evaluate the effect of steady-state maraviroc (100 mg b.i.d.) on the pharmacokinetics of 30 μg ethinyloestradiol/150 μg levonorgestrel (Microgynon®). Results The geometric mean ratios for Cmax and AUC for each of the compounds tested in the presence and absence of maraviroc were between 92% and 121%. There were no notable differences in Tmax, t1/2 or CLR (where measured) for any of the compounds. Conclusions Maraviroc had no clinically relevant effects on the pharmacokinetics of the CYP3A4 substrate midazolam, the NRTIs zidovudine/lamivudine, or the oral contraceptive steroids ethinyloestradiol and levonorgestrel. PMID:18333862

  3. Hypoglycemic effect of Lupinus mutabilis in healthy volunteers and subjects with dysglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasini, M; Castro, J; Villacrés, E; Narváez, L; Villamar, M P; Baldeón, M E

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes are increasing health problems that negatively affect health care systems worldwide. There is a constant urge to develop new therapies with better effects, lower side effects at lower prices to treat these diseases. Lupinus species and their derivates are good candidates to be used as hypoglycaemic agents. A phase II clinical trial was conducted to assess the role of raw Lupinus mutabilis on blood glucose and insulin in normoglycemic and dysglycemic subjects. Results show that consumption of L. mutabilis by normal weight healthy young individuals did not change importantly blood glucose and insulin levels. On the other hand, consumption of similar doses of lupinus by dysglycemic individuals (fasting glucose > 100 mg/dL) decreased significantly blood glucose. Lupinus effects were greater in those subjects with higher basal glucose levels. Glucose lowering effects of lupinus were not observed after soy intake that was used as control. A statistically significant reduction in insulin levels was also observed in the lupinus group compared with the soy group after 60 minutes of treatment. Furthermore, only treatment with lupinus improved insulin resistance in dysglycemic subjects. These data demonstrate that lupinus consumption could be a feasible and low cost alternative to treat chronic hyperglycemic diseases.

  4. Influence of exercise on visceral pain: an explorative study in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weerdenburg, Laura JGM; Brock, Christina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; van Goor, Harry; de Vries, Marjan; Wilder-Smith, Oliver HG

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Contradictory results have been found about the effect of different exercise modalities on pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the early effects of aerobic and isometric exercise on different types of experimental pain, including visceral pain, compared to an active control condition. Methods Fifteen healthy subjects (6 women, mean [standard deviation] age 25 [6.5] years) completed 3 interventions consisting of 20 minutes of aerobic cycling, 12 minutes of isometric knee extension and a deep breathing procedure as active control. At baseline and after each intervention, psychophysical tests were performed, including electrical stimulation of the esophagus, pressure pain thresholds and the cold pressor test as a measure for conditioned pain modulation. Participants completed the Medical Outcome Study Short-Form 36 and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory prior to the experiments. Data were analyzed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Results No significant differences were found for the psychophysical tests after the interventions, compared to baseline pain tests and the control condition. Conclusion No hypoalgesic effect of aerobic and isometric exercise was found. The evidence for exercise-induced hypoalgesia appears to be not as consistent as initially thought, and caution is recommended when interpreting the effects of exercise on pain.

  5. Tolerability of intramuscular and intradermal delivery by CELLECTRA® adaptive constant current electroporation device in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Malissa C; Lee, Jessica C; Daniels, Stephen E; Tebas, Pablo; Khan, Amir S; Giffear, Mary; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccines are being developed as a potentially safe and effective immunization platform. However, translation of DNA vaccines into a clinical setting has produced results that have fallen short of those generated in a preclinical setting. Various strategies are being developed to address this lack of potency, including improvements in delivery methods. Electroporation (EP) creates transient increases in cell membrane permeability, thus enhancing DNA uptake and leading to a more robust immune response. Here, we report on the safety and tolerability of delivering sterile saline via intramuscular (IM) or intradermal (ID) injection followed by in vivo electroporation using the CELLECTRA® adaptive constant current device in healthy adults from two open-label studies. Pain, as assessed by VAS, was highest immediately after EP but diminishes by about 50% within 5 min. Mean VAS scores appear to correlate with the amount of energy delivered and depth of needle insertion, especially for intramuscular EP. Mean scores did not exceed 7 out of 10 or 3 out of 10 for IM and ID EP, respectively. The majority of adverse events included mild to moderate injection site reactions that resolved within one day. No deaths or serious adverse events were reported during the course of either study. Overall, injection followed by EP with the CELLECTRA® device was well-tolerated and no significant safety concerns were identified. These studies support the further development of electroporation as a vaccine delivery method to enhance immunogenicity, particularly for diseases in which traditional vaccination approaches are ineffective. PMID:24051434

  6. The effect of focused attention and open monitoring meditation on attention network function in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Ben; Eddershaw, Rachael; Meron, Daniel; Baldwin, David S; Garner, Matthew

    2013-12-30

    Mindfulness meditation techniques are increasingly popular both as a life-style choice and therapeutic adjunct for a range of mental and physical health conditions. However, little is known about the mechanisms through which mindfulness meditation and its constituent practices might produce positive change in cognition and emotion. Our study directly compared the effects of Focused Attention (FA) and Open-Monitoring (OM) meditation on alerting, orienting and executive attention network function in healthy individuals. Participants were randomized to three intervention groups: open-focused meditation, focused attention, and relaxation control. Participants completed an emotional variant of the Attention Network Test (ANT) at baseline and post-intervention. OM and FA practice improved executive attention, with no change observed in the relaxation control group. Improvements in executive attention occurred in the absence of change in subjective/self-report mood and cognitive function. Baseline levels of dispositional/trait mindfulness were positively correlated with executive control in the ANT at baseline. Our results suggest that mindfulness meditation might usefully target deficits in executive attention that characterise mood and anxiety disorders.

  7. Drug-drug interaction analysis of pyronaridine/artesunate and ritonavir in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carrie A; Lopez-Lazaro, Luis; Jung, Donald; Methaneethorn, Janthima; Duparc, Stephan; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Pokorny, Rolf; Shin, Chang-Sik; Fleckenstein, Lawrence

    2012-03-01

    A multiple dose, parallel group study was conducted to assess for a drug-drug interaction between the pyronaridine/artesunate (PA) combination antimalarial and ritonavir. Thirty-four healthy adults were randomized (1:1) to receive PA for 3 days or PA with ritonavir (100 mg twice daily for 17 days, PA administered on Days 8-10). Pharmacokinetic parameters for pyronaridine, artesunate, and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA) were obtained after the last PA dose and for ritonavir on Days 1 and 10. Ritonavir coadministration did not markedly change pyronaridine pharmacokinetics but resulted in a 27% increase in artesunate area under the curve (AUC) and a 38% decrease in DHA AUC. Ritonavir exposure was increased 3.2-fold in the presence of PA. The only relevant safety observations were increases in liver enzymes, only reaching a clinically significant grade in the PA + ritonavir arm. It was concluded that coadministered ritonavir and PA interact to alter exposure to artesunate, DHA, and ritonavir itself.

  8. [Central effects of five beta-adrenergic receptor blockers in healthy volunteers: a quantitative EEG study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabot, C; Pechadre, J C; Beudin, P; Lauxerois, M; Trolese, J F; Kantelip, J P; Ducher, J L; Gibert, J

    1989-03-01

    The effects of five beta blockers on the central nervous system of healthy subjects was studied by computerized EEG analysis. All subjects underwent continuous recording with a Holter magnetic type recorder during the experimental period. For 10 consecutive days, five groups of subjects received alternately placebo and the beta blockers acebutolol 600 mg, carteolol 20 mg, metoprolol 200 mg, pindolol 30 mg and sotalol 320 mg. EEG recordings (C4/P4, P4/02 and C3/P3, P3/01) lasting 5 min were made between 8.30 and 9.30 a.m. Subjects were at rest with eyes closed and there was no vigilance control. The signal was recorded on a magnetic tape recorder and then processed by Nicolet MED 80 system. Comparisons of absolute and relative powers and of average frequencies were then made between the different sequences and groups. The possible correlations between the changes observed in the power spectrum and the clinical, pharmacological and pharmacokinetic specific properties of each beta blocker are discussed.

  9. [Duplex scanning of hemodynamic parameters of the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery in healthy volunteers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntsevich, G I; Shilenok, D V

    1993-07-01

    The possibility of studying the hemodynamics in the visceral arteries of the abdominal aorta by duplex scanning was demonstrated. The results of examination of 30 healthy persons are discussed. Characteristic features of the blood flow spectrogram of the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery were revealed. According to the spectrogram, the flow of blood in the celiac trunk is characterized by rapidly increasing peak systolic rate and slowly diminishing diastolic rate to approximately 1/3 of the maximal value of systole. The character of the blood flow in the superior mesenteric artery is distinguished by a lesser peak systolic rate and the presence of a short-lived reverse rate before the sloping diastolic curve. Normal values of the blood flow volume rate were determined, it was 649 +/- 25.4 ml/min in the celiac trunk and 395 +/- 20.5 ml/min in the superior mesenteric artery. Among the advantages of the duplex scanning method are noninvasiveness and safety and the possibility of dynamic study of the hemodynamic parameters.

  10. Pomegranate extract induces ellagitannin metabolite formation and changes stool microbiota in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoping; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Lu, Qing-Yi; Summanen, Paula H; Thames, Gail; Corbett, Karen; Downes, Julia; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Finegold, Sydney M; Heber, David

    2015-08-01

    The health benefits of pomegranate (POM) consumption are attributed to ellagitannins and their metabolites, formed and absorbed in the intestine by the microbiota. In this study twenty healthy participants consumed 1000 mg of POM extract daily for four weeks. Based on urinary and fecal content of the POM metabolite urolithin A (UA), we observed three distinct groups: (1) individuals with no baseline UA presence but induction of UA formation by POM extract consumption (n = 9); (2) baseline UA formation which was enhanced by POM extract consumption (N = 5) and (3) no baseline UA production, which was not inducible (N = 6). Compared to baseline the phylum Actinobacteria was increased and Firmicutes decreased significantly in individuals forming UA (producers). Verrucomicrobia (Akkermansia muciniphila) was 33 and 47-fold higher in stool samples of UA producers compared to non-producers at baseline and after 4 weeks, respectively. In UA producers, the genera Butyrivibrio, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Lactobacillus, Prevotella, Serratia and Veillonella were increased and Collinsella decreased significantly at week 4 compared to baseline. The consumption of pomegranate resulted in the formation of its metabolites in some but not all participants. POM extract consumption may induce health benefits secondary to changes in the microbiota.

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of blonanserin in Chinese healthy volunteers and the effect of the food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yu-Guan; Shang, De-Wei; Xie, He-Zhi; Wang, Xi-Pei; Ni, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Ming; Lu, Wei; Qiu, Chang; Liu, Xia; Li, Fang-Fang; Li, Xuan; Luo, Fu-Tian

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to better understand blonanserin population pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics in Chinese healthy subjects. Data from two studies with 50 subjects were analyzed to investigate the population PK characteristics of blonanserin at single dose (4, 8, and 12 mg) under fasting, multidose (4 mg bid or 8 mg qd for 7 days) and under food intake condition (single dose, 8 mg). Blonanserin plasma concentrations were detected using the high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). A nonlinear mixed-effects model was developed to describe the blonanserin concentration-time profiles. A two compartment model with first-order absorption was built to describe the time-course of blonanserin. The population-predicted system apparent clearance (CL/F), volume of apparent distribution in center (V(1)/F), and the first-order absorption rate constant (Ka) of blonanserin under fasting was 1230 L/h, 9500 L, and 3.02 h(-1), respectively. Food intake decreased Ka of blonanserin to 0.78 h(-1). The relative bioavailability between fasting and food intake estimated by the final model was 55%. No clinically significant safety issues were identified. This is the first study assessing the PK profile of blonanserin with population PKs method. The results can be used for simulation in further clinical trial and optimize individual dosage regimens using a Bayesian methodology in patients. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Oral T4-like phage cocktail application to healthy adult volunteers from Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam, E-mail: sasarker@icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); McCallin, Shawna; Barretto, Caroline [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Berger, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.berger@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Pittet, Anne-Cecile [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Sultana, Shamima, E-mail: shamima@icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Krause, Lutz, E-mail: ltz.krause@gmail.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Huq, Sayeda, E-mail: sayeeda@mail.icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Bibiloni, Rodrigo, E-mail: Rodrigo.Bibiloni@agresearch.co.nz [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Bruttin, Anne, E-mail: anne.bruttin@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Reuteler, Gloria, E-mail: gloria.reuteler@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Bruessow, Harald, E-mail: harald.bruessow@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland)

    2012-12-20

    The genomic diversity of 99 T4-like coliphages was investigated by sequencing an equimolar mixture with Illumina technology and screening them against different databases for horizontal gene transfer and undesired genes. A 9-phage cocktail was given to 15 healthy adults from Bangladesh at a dose of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} plaque-forming units and placebo respectively. Phages were detected in 64% of the stool samples when subjects were treated with higher titer phage, compared to 30% and 28% with lower-titer phage and placebo, respectively. No Escherichia coli was present in initial stool samples, and no amplification of phage was observed. One percent of the administered oral phage was recovered from the feces. No adverse events were observed by self-report, clinical examination, or from laboratory tests for liver, kidney, and hematology function. No impact of oral phage was seen on the fecal microbiota composition with respect to bacterial 16S rRNA from stool.

  13. Intermittent Hypoxia Alters Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Punjabi, Naresh M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Intermittent hypoxia of obstructive sleep apnea is implicated in the development and progression of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, which have been attributed to systemic inflammation. Intermittent hypoxia leads to pro-inflammatory gene up-regulation in cell culture, but the effects of intermittent hypoxia on gene expression in humans have not been elucidated. A cross-over study was performed exposing eight healthy men to intermittent hypoxia or control conditions for five hours with peripheral blood mononuclear cell isolation before and after exposures. Total RNA was isolated followed by gene microarrays and confirmatory real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Intermittent hypoxia led to greater than two fold up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory gene toll receptor 2 (TLR2), which was not increased in the control exposure. We hypothesize that up-regulation of TLR2 by intermittent hypoxia may lead to systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  14. Remote Effects of Electromagnetic Millimeter Waves on Experimentally Induced Cold Pain: A Double-Blinded Crossover Investigation in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyla, Tomasz; Hacker, Henriette; Edinger, Hardy; Leutzow, Bianca; Lange, Joern; Usichenko, Taras

    2017-03-01

    The hypoalgesic effect of electromagnetic millimeter waves (MW) is well studied in animal model; however, the results of human research are controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various frequency ranges of MW on hypoalgesia using the cold pressor test (CPT). Experimental pain was induced using standardized CPT protocols in 20 healthy male volunteers. The skin of the lower part of sternum was exposed to MW with a frequency of 42.25 GHz (active generator); MW within 50-75 GHz frequency range (noise generator); or an inactive MW device (placebo generator) in a random crossover double-blinded manner. Pain threshold, measured using the CPT, was the primary outcome. Other CPT parameters, heart rate, blood pressure, incidence of subjective sensations (paresthesia) during exposure, as well as quality of volunteers' blinding were also recorded. The end points of the condition with exposure to 42.25 GHz, were compared with baseline; exposure to noise 50-75 GHz; and placebo generators. Pain threshold increased during exposure to the 42.25 GHz generator when compared with baseline: median difference (MD), 1.97 seconds (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35-3.73) and noise generator: MD, 1.27 seconds (95% CI, 0.05-2.33) but not compared with the placebo generator. Time to onset of cold and increasing pain sensations as well as diastolic blood pressure increased under the exposure to the 42.25 GHz generator when compared with baseline and noise generator. Other outcome measures were comparable among the study conditions. We were able to partially confirm the previously suggested hypoalgesic effects of low-intensity electromagnetic MW. However, the effect was indistinguishable from the placebo condition in our investigation.

  15. [Electroacupuncture at Guanyuan (CV 4) and Zhongwan (CV 12) modulates functional connectivity of the brain network in healthy volunteers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ji-liang; Hong, Yang; Wang, Xiao-ling; Liu, He-sheng; Wang, Yin; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lei; Xue, Chao; Zhou, Ke-hua; Song, Ming; Liu, Bao-yan; Zhu, Bing

    2011-10-01

    To observe the specific brain effects of electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation of Guanyuan (CV 4) and Zhongwan (CV 12). Twenty-one healthy volunteers were recruited in the present study. Two silver filiform needles were separately inserted into Guanyuan (OV 4) or Zhongwan (CV 12), and manipulated with uniform reducing-reinforcing method to induce "Deqi". fMRI scan was performed before needling, during needle retention, EA stimulation, and post-EA. Data of fMRI was analyzed by using software SPM 2. The volunteer subjective needling sensations were recorded. The activation, deactivation, short-distance and long-distance functional connectivity maps of different cerebral regions were analyzed by using whole brain correlation analysis. Comparison between the two acupoints showed that fullness feeling was stronger in CV 4 than in CV 12. EA at CV 4 and CV 12 induced a similar stronger and prevalent deactivation in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulated cortex (ACO). The deactivation of the ACC was stronger in the CV 4 group than in the CV 12 group. The default BOLD mode of the brain at rest was modified by needle retention and EA, respectively. The short-distance functional connection brain network was significantly changed after EA. Interestingly, the ventral medial prefrontal cortex and anteroinferior portion of the anterior cingulate cortex in the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN) were involved in the instant post-effects of EA. Relatively smaller differences in the brain functional activity and short-distance functional connectivity were found between these two acupoints. EA of CV 4 and CV 12 can modulate short-distance functional connectivity of the LPNN, and have fewer differences in inducing needling sensation and deactivation of ACC, etc.

  16. Sex differences in itch perception and modulation by distraction--an FMRI pilot study in healthy volunteers.

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    Astrid Stumpf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Even though itch is a common syndrome of many diseases there is only little knowledge about sex and gender differences in pruritus, especially in central itch perception and modulation. To our knowledge, this is the first fMRI study examining sex differences in perception and its modulation by distraction. METHODS: Experimental itch was induced by application of histamine (0.1 mM via microdialysis fibers twice at the left forearm and twice at the left lower leg in 33 healthy volunteers (17 females, 16 males. The brain activation patterns were assessed by fMRI during itch without and with distraction (Stroop task. Between the various conditions, subjects were asked to rate itch intensity, desire to scratch and pain intensity. In a second experiment in 10 of the 33 volunteers histamine was replaced by saline solution to serve as control for the 'Stroop' condition. RESULTS: Women generally presented higher itch intensities compared to men during itch over the course of the experiment. A more specific analysis revealed higher itch intensities and desire to scratch in women during experimental induced itch that can be reduced by distraction at the lower legs when itch is followed by 'Stroop'. In contrast, men depicted significant reduction of 'itch' by 'Stroop' at the forearms. Women depicted higher brain activation of structures responsible for integration of sensory, affective information and motor integration/planning during 'itch' and 'Stroop' condition when compared to men. No sex differences were seen in the saline control condition. CONCLUSION: Women and men exhibited localisation dependent differences in their itch perception with women presenting higher itch intensities and desire to scratch. Our findings parallel clinical observations of women reporting higher itch intensities depending on itch localisation and suffering more from itch as compared to men.

  17. Urinary Concentrations and Antibacterial Activities of Nitroxoline at 250 Milligrams versus Trimethoprim at 200 Milligrams against Uropathogens in Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Fabian; Pilatz, Adrian; Bärmann, Birte; Weidner, Wolfgang; Wagenlehner, Christine M.; Straubinger, Marion; Blenk, Holger; Pfister, Wolfgang; Kresken, Michael; Naber, Kurt G.

    2014-01-01

    Because of the increasing bacterial resistance of uropathogens against standard antibiotics, such as trimethoprim (TMP), older antimicrobial drugs, such as nitroxoline (NTX), should be reevaluated. This randomized crossover study investigated the urinary concentrations of parent drugs and their metabolites and their antibacterial activities (urinary inhibitory titers [UITs] and urinary bactericidal titers [UBTs]) against uropathogens at three different urinary pH values within 24 h in six healthy volunteers after a single oral dose of NTX at 250 mg versus TMP at 200 mg. In three additional volunteers, urinary bactericidal kinetics (UBK) were studied after oral administration of NTX at 250 mg three times a day. The mean urinary concentrations of NTX and NTX sulfate in 24 h were 0.012 to 0.507 mg/liter and 0.28 to 27.83 mg/liter, respectively. The mean urinary concentrations of TMP were 18.79 to 41.59 mg/liter. The antibacterial activity of NTX was higher in acidic urine than in alkaline urine, and that of TMP was higher in alkaline urine than in acidic urine. The UITs and UBTs of NTX were generally lower than those of TMP except for a TMP-resistant Escherichia coli strain, for which NTX showed higher UITs/UBTs than did TMP. UBK showed mainly bacteriostatic activity of NTX in urine. NTX exhibits mainly bacteriostatic activity and TMP also shows bactericidal activity in urine against susceptible strains. NTX is a more active antibacterial in acidic urine, and TMP is more active in alkaline urine. The cumulative effects of multiple doses or inhibition of bacterial adherence could not be evaluated. (This study has been registered at EudraCT under registration no. 2009-015631-32.) PMID:24217699

  18. Effect of a herbal extract containing curcumin and piperine on midazolam, flurbiprofen and paracetamol (acetaminophen) pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volak, Laurie P; Hanley, Michael J; Masse, Gina; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Harmatz, Jerold S; Badmaev, Vladimir; Majeed, Muhammed; Greenblatt, David J; Court, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    Aims Turmeric extract derived curcuminoids (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin) are currently being evaluated for the treatment of cancer and Alzheimer's dementia. Previous in vitro studies indicate that curcuminoids and piperine (a black pepper derivative that enhances curcuminoid bioavailability) could inhibit human CYP3A, CYP2C9, UGT and SULT dependent drug metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine whether a commercially available curcuminoid/piperine extract alters the pharmacokinetic disposition of probe drugs for these enzymes in human volunteers. Methods A randomized placebo-controlled six way crossover study was conducted in eight healthy volunteers. A standardized curcuminoid/piperine preparation (4 g curcuminoids plus 24 mg piperine) or matched placebo was given orally four times over 2 days before oral administration of midazolam (CYP3A probe), flurbiprofen (CYP2C9 probe) or paracetamol (acetaminophen) (dual UGT and SULT probe). Plasma and urine concentrations of drugs, metabolites and herbals were measured by HPLC. Subject sedation and electroencephalograph effects were also measured following midazolam dosing. Results Compared with placebo, the curcuminoid/piperine treatment produced no meaningful changes in plasma Cmax, AUC, clearance, elimination half-life or metabolite levels of midazolam, flurbiprofen or paracetamol (α = 0.05, paired t-tests). There was also no effect of curcuminoid/piperine treatment on the pharmacodynamics of midazolam. Although curcuminoid and piperine concentrations were readily measured in plasma following glucuronidase/sulfatase treatment, unconjugated concentrations were consistently below the assay thresholds (0.05–0.08 μm and 0.6 μm, respectively). Conclusion The results indicate that short term use of this piperine-enhanced curcuminoid preparation is unlikely to result in a clinically significant interaction involving CYP3A, CYP2C9 or the paracetamol conjugation enzymes. PMID:22725836

  19. Evaluation of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of canagliflozin and teneligliptin in Japanese healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Shuji; Kondo, Kazuoki

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic interactions of the antidiabetic agents canagliflozin (a sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor) and teneligliptin (a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor) in Japanese healthy adult men. Open-label, one-way crossover study used canagliflozin (200 mg/day p.o.) and teneligliptin (40mg/day p.o). A single dose of object drug (either canagliflozin or teneligliptin) was administered on day 1 followed by washout and continuous administration of precipitant drug (days 1 - 9). Both drugs were concomitantly administered on day 7. No changes in AUC0 - 72h and Cmax were observed for canagliflozin+teneligliptin versus monotherapy; geometric mean ratios for AUC0 - 72h and Cmax were 0.982 and 0.982 for the plasma concentration of canagliflozin and 0.983 and 0.976 for the plasma concentration of teneligliptin, respectively. Plasma concentrations of active and total glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increased with canagliflozin+teneligliptin versus teneligliptin alone. Mean AUC0.5 - 4h increased post-meal, on combination therapy, from 9.6 to 12.5 pmol·h/l (active GLP-1) and from 21.5 to 32.3 pmol·h/l (total GLP-1). Adverse events developed in four subjects; all were mild and resolved but one subject withdrew due to generalized erythema. GLP-1 levels increased with the canagliflozin+teneligliptin combination, and no PK interaction was observed. This combination may show favorable antidiabetic effects without increasing systemic exposure.

  20. Effect of hydration status on atrial and ventricular volumes and function in healthy adult volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schantz, Daryl I. [The Hospital for Sick Children, The Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Manitoba, Variety Children' s Heart Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Dragulescu, Andreea [The Hospital for Sick Children, The Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); Memauri, Brett [University of Manitoba, Department of Radiology, St. Boniface General Hospital, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Grotenhuis, Heynric B. [The Hospital for Sick Children, The Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars [The Hospital for Sick Children, The Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    Assessment of cardiac chamber volumes is a fundamental part of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. While the effects of inter- and intraobserver variability have been studied and have a recognized effect on the comparability of serial cardiac MR imaging studies, the effect of differences in hydration status has not been evaluated. To evaluate the effects of volume administration on cardiac chamber volumes. Thirteen healthy adults underwent a baseline cardiac MR to evaluate cardiac chamber volumes after an overnight fast. They were then given two saline boluses of 10 ml/kg of body weight and the cardiac MR was repeated immediately after each bolus. From the baseline scan to the final scan there was a significant increase in all four cardiac chamber end-diastolic volumes. Right atrial volumes increased 8.0%, from 61.1 to 66.0 ml/m2 (P<0.001), and left atrial volumes increased 10.0%, from 50.0 to 55.0 ml/m2 (P<0.001). Right ventricular volumes increased 6.0%, from 91.1 to 96.5 ml/m2 (P<0.001), and left ventricular volumes increased 3.2%, from 87.0 to 89.8 ml/m2 (P<0.001). Hydration status has a significant effect on the end-diastolic volumes of all cardiac chambers assessed by cardiac MR. Thus, hydration represents a ''variable'' that should be taken into account when assessing cardiac chamber volumes, especially when performing serial imaging studies in a patient. (orig.)

  1. Multiple dose bioequivalence study with josamycin propionate, a drug with highly variable kinetics, in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoogdalem, E J; Terpstra, I J; Krauwinkel, W J; Volkers-Kamermans, N J; Baven, A L; Verschoor, J S

    1996-05-01

    Josamycin is a macrolide antibiotic with considerable intra- and interindividual variability in kinetics. In the present study bioequivalence of an intact and dispersed josamycin Solutab tablet, containing 1,000 mg of josamycin in the form of josamycin propionate ester, was tested versus a Josacine 1,000 mg reference sachet. The design of this bioequivalence study was adapted to the drug's pharmacokinetic variability, comprising testing in steady-state, testing the reference in replicate, and maintaining a widened bioequivalence margin. The study was performed in a group of 24 male and 12 female healthy subjects, according to a 3-treatment 4-period crossover design. Blood sampling for establishing josamycin propionate and josamycin base serum level profiles were collected during the 12 h dosing interval on day 4. Steady-state serum levels were reached on day 4. With the reference sachet mean peak levels of 1.02 micrograms/ml and 0.36 microgram/ml were observed for parent drug and metabolite, respectively, reached at peak times of 1.5 h and 1.8 h. Comparable profiles were observed with the intact and dispersed Solutab tablets, both tending towards higher serum levels than the sachet. In terms of josamycin propionate levels as well as josamycin base levels, the intact and dispersed Solutab tablet was bioequivalent with the referent sachet within the preset 0.70-1.43 margins. Variability in josamycin kinetics proved to be substantial, maximum differences in peak levels and AUC values being about 10-fold between individuals, and 3-fold within individuals. Retrospectively, the multiple dosing regimen appeared not to result in a clear reduction of intrasubject variability.

  2. Effect of dairy fat on plasma phytanic acid in healthy volunteers - a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drachmann Tue

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytanic acid produced in ruminants from chlorophyll may have preventive effects on the metabolic syndrome, partly due to its reported RXR and PPAR- α agonist activity. Milk from cows fed increased levels of green plant material, contains increased phytanic acid concentrations, but it is unknown to what extent minor increases in phytanic acid content in dairy fat leads to higher circulating levels of phytanic acid in plasma of the consumers. Objective To investigate if cow feeding regimes affects concentration of plasma phytanic acid and risk markers of the metabolic syndrome in human. Design In a double-blind, randomized, 4 wk, parallel intervention study 14 healthy young subjects were given 45 g milk fat/d from test butter and cheese with 0.24 wt% phytanic acid or a control diet with 0.13 wt% phytanic acid. Difference in phytanic acid was obtained by feeding roughage with low or high content of chlorophyll. Results There tended to be a difference in plasma phytanic acid (P = 0.0730 concentration after the dietary intervention. Plasma phytanic acid increased significantly within both groups with the highest increase in control group (24% compared to phytanic acid group (15%. There were no significant effects of phytanic acid on risk markers for the metabolic syndrome. Conclusions The results indicate that increased intake of dairy fat modify the plasma phytanic acid concentration, regardless of cows feeding regime and the minor difference in dietary phytanic acid. Whether the phytanic acid has potential to affects the risk markers of the metabolic syndrome in human still remain to be elucidated. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01343576

  3. Single-dose oral pharmacokinetics of three formulations of thalidomide in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, S K; Colburn, W A; Thomas, S D

    1999-11-01

    Thalidomide was recently approved in the United States for the treatment of erythema nodosum leprosum, a complication of leprosy. The present study determined the bioequivalence and pharmacokinetics of Celgene's commercial and clinical trial thalidomide formulations and the Brazilian Tortuga formulation in an open-label, single-dose, three-way crossover design. Seventeen healthy subjects were given 200 mg of thalidomide on three occasions, and blood samples were collected over 48 hours. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using compartmental methods for the two Celgene formulations and using noncompartmental methods for all three formulations. All subjects reported adverse events, none of which was serious or unexpected. Celgene formulations were bioequivalent when comparing Cmax, tmax, and AUC. There was significant variability in plasma levels from the Tortuga formulation, giving a mean profile that was distinctly different from the two Celgene formulations with a lower Cmax value and a longer terminal phase. The lower Cmax was probably due to slower absorption. The terminal rate constant for the Tortuga formulation was significantly less, giving rise to a terminal half-life of 15 hours compared to about 5 to 6 hours for the Celgene formulations. Confidence intervals for Cmax between the Tortuga and the Celgene formulations were outside the 80% to 125% range, indicating a lack of bioequivalence. Extent of absorption, as measured by AUC0-infinity, was approximately equal for all three formulations. Terminal half-life for Tortuga was two to three times longer compared to the Celgene formulations and is clear evidence for absorption rate limitations. The two Celgene formulations showed similar pharmacokinetic parameters with profiles that were best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. The authors conclude that Celgene's clinical trial and commercial thalidomide formulations are similar to each other and distinctly

  4. Neuroendocrine responses of healthy volunteers to 'techno-music': relationships with personality traits and emotional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerra, G; Zaimovic, A; Franchini, D; Palladino, M; Giucastro, G; Reali, N; Maestri, D; Caccavari, R; Delsignore, R; Brambilla, F

    1998-01-01

    A variety of studies reported psychological and physiological effects of music. Different types of music have been found to induce different neuroendocrine changes. The aim of the present experiment was to investigate the possible combination of emotional and endocrine changes in response to techno-music and to define personality variables as predictors of respective changes. Sixteen psychosomatically healthy subjects (18- to 19-year-olds, eight males and eight females) were exposed, in random order, to techno-music or to classical music (30 min each). Plasma norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EPI), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) cortisol (CORT), beta-endorphin (beta-EP) concentrations and changes of emotional state were measured in basal conditions and after the experimental trials with two different types of music. Techno-music was associated with a significant increase in heart rate, systolic blood pressure and significant changes in self-rated emotional states. A significant increase was observed in beta-EP, ACTH, NE, GH and CORT after listening to techno-music. Classical music induced an improvement in emotional state, but no significant changes in hormonal concentrations. No differences between male and female subjects' responses to music have been found. Plasma levels of PRL and EPI were unaffected by techno- and classical music. Changes in emotional state and NE, beta-EP and GH responses to techno-music correlated negatively with harm avoidance scores and positively with the novelty-seeking temperament score on the Cloninger scale. Listening to techno-music induces changes in neurotransmitters, peptides and hormonal reactions, related to mental state and emotional involvement: personality traits and temperament may influence the wide inter-individual variability in response to music.

  5. The effects of glycine on subjective daytime performance in partially sleep-restricted healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto eBannai

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 30% of the general population suffers from insomnia. Given that insomnia causes many problems, amelioration of the symptoms is crucial. Recently, we found that a nonessential amino acid, glycine subjectively and objectively improves sleep quality in humans who have difficulty sleeping. We evaluated the effects of glycine on daytime sleepiness, fatigue and performances in sleep-restricted healthy subjects. Sleep was restricted to 25% less than the usual sleep time for three consecutive nights. Before bedtime, 3 g of glycine or placebo were ingested, sleepiness and fatigue were evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS and a questionnaire, and performance were estimated by personal computer (PC performance test program on the following day. In subjects given glycine, the VAS data showed a significant reduction in fatigue and a tendency toward reduced sleepiness. These observations were also found via the questionnaire, indicating that glycine improves daytime sleepiness and fatigue induced by acute sleep restriction. PC performance test revealed significant improvement in psychomotor vigilance test. We also measured plasma melatonin and the expression of circadian-modulated genes expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN to evaluate the effects of glycine on circadian rhythms. Glycine did not show significant effects on plasma melatonin concentrations during either the dark or light period. Moreover, the expression levels of clock genes such as Bmal1 and Per2 remained unchanged. However, we observed a glycine-induced increase in the neuropeptides arginine vasopressin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in the light period. Although no alterations in the circadian clock itself were observed, our results indicate that glycine modulated SCN function. Thus, glycine modulates certain neuropeptides in the SCN and this phenomenon may indirectly contribute to improving the occasional sleepiness and fatigue induced by sleep

  6. Cefotaxime resistant Escherichia coli collected from a healthy volunteer; characterisation and the effect of plasmid loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Kirchner

    Full Text Available In this study 6 CTX-M positive E. coli isolates collected during a clinical study examining the effect of antibiotic use in a human trial were analysed. The aim of the study was to analyse these isolates and assess the effect of full or partial loss of plasmid genes on bacterial fitness and pathogenicity. A DNA array was utilised to assess resistance and virulence gene carriage. Plasmids were characterised by PCR-based replicon typing and addiction system multiplex PCR. A phenotypic array and insect virulence model were utilised to assess the effect of plasmid-loss in E. coli of a large multi-resistance plasmid. All six E. coli carrying bla CTX-M-14 were detected from a single participant and were identical by pulse field gel electrophoresis and MLST. Plasmid profiling and arrays indicated absence of a large multi-drug resistance (MDR F-replicon plasmid carrying blaTEM, aadA4, strA, strB, dfrA17/19, sul1, and tetB from one isolate. Although this isolate partially retained the plasmid it showed altered fitness characteristics e.g. inability to respire in presence of antiseptics, similar to a plasmid-cured strain. However, unlike the plasmid-cured or plasmid harbouring strains, the survival rate for Galleria mellonella infected by the former strain was approximately 5-times lower, indicating other possible changes accompanying partial plasmid loss. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that an apparently healthy individual can harbour bla CTX-M-14 E. coli strains. In one such strain, isolated from the same individual, partial absence of a large MDR plasmid resulted in altered fitness and virulence characteristics, which may have implications in the ability of this strain to infect and any subsequent treatment.

  7. Experimental orofacial pain and sensory deprivation lead to perceptual distortion of the face in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsdóttir, Lilja Kristín; Skyt, Ina; Vase, Lene; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Castrillon, Eduardo; Svensson, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Patients suffering from persistent orofacial pain may sporadically report that the painful area feels "swollen" or "differently," a phenomenon that may be conceptualized as a perceptual distortion because there are no clinical signs of swelling present. Our aim was to investigate whether standardized experimental pain and sensory deprivation of specific orofacial test sites would lead to changes in the size perception of these face areas. Twenty-four healthy participants received either 0.2 mL hypertonic saline (HS) or local anesthetics (LA) into six regions (buccal, mental, lingual, masseter muscle, infraorbital and auriculotemporal nerve regions). Participants estimated the perceived size changes in percentage (0 % = no change, -100 % = half the size or +100 % = double the size), and somatosensory function was checked with tactile stimuli. The pain intensity was rated on a 0-10 Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (VNRS), and sets of psychological questionnaires were completed. HS and LA were associated with significant self-reported perceptual distortions as indicated by consistent increases in perceived size of the adjacent face areas (P ≤ 0.050). Perceptual distortion was most pronounced in the buccal region, and the smallest increase was observed in the auriculotemporal region. HS was associated with moderate levels of pain VNRS = 7.3 ± 0.6. Weak correlations were found between HS-evoked perceptual distortion and level of dissociation in two regions (P sensory deprivation evoked perceptual distortions in all face regions and overall demonstrated the importance of afferent inputs for the perception of the face. We propose that perceptual distortion may be an important phenomenon to consider in persistent orofacial pain conditions.

  8. Cefotaxime resistant Escherichia coli collected from a healthy volunteer; characterisation and the effect of plasmid loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Miranda; Abuoun, Manal; Mafura, Muriel; Bagnall, Mary; Hunt, Theresa; Thomas, Christopher; Weile, Jan; Anjum, Muna F

    2013-01-01

    In this study 6 CTX-M positive E. coli isolates collected during a clinical study examining the effect of antibiotic use in a human trial were analysed. The aim of the study was to analyse these isolates and assess the effect of full or partial loss of plasmid genes on bacterial fitness and pathogenicity. A DNA array was utilised to assess resistance and virulence gene carriage. Plasmids were characterised by PCR-based replicon typing and addiction system multiplex PCR. A phenotypic array and insect virulence model were utilised to assess the effect of plasmid-loss in E. coli of a large multi-resistance plasmid. All six E. coli carrying bla CTX-M-14 were detected from a single participant and were identical by pulse field gel electrophoresis and MLST. Plasmid profiling and arrays indicated absence of a large multi-drug resistance (MDR) F-replicon plasmid carrying blaTEM, aadA4, strA, strB, dfrA17/19, sul1, and tetB from one isolate. Although this isolate partially retained the plasmid it showed altered fitness characteristics e.g. inability to respire in presence of antiseptics, similar to a plasmid-cured strain. However, unlike the plasmid-cured or plasmid harbouring strains, the survival rate for Galleria mellonella infected by the former strain was approximately 5-times lower, indicating other possible changes accompanying partial plasmid loss. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that an apparently healthy individual can harbour bla CTX-M-14 E. coli strains. In one such strain, isolated from the same individual, partial absence of a large MDR plasmid resulted in altered fitness and virulence characteristics, which may have implications in the ability of this strain to infect and any subsequent treatment.

  9. The Influence of Enterococcus faecalis on the Morphology and the Antibody-Binding Capacity of the Intestinal Bacteria of Ten Healthy Human Volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G.; Deddens, B.; Wilkinson, M.; Waaij, D. van der

    1995-01-01

    The influence of Enterococcus faecalis on the morphology of the bacterial cells which make up the gut microflora and on the levels of circulating IgG bound to the gut microflora was assessed. After 29 days of pretreatment monitoring, ten healthy human volunteers ingested 10^7 viable cells of E. faec

  10. Predictive performance of the Domino, Hijazi, and Clements models during low-dose target-controlled ketamine infusions in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Absalom, A. R.; Lee, M.; Menon, D. K.; Sharar, S. R.; De Smet, T.; Halliday, J.; Ogden, M.; Corlett, P.; Honey, G. D.; Fletcher, P. C.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Healthy volunteers received low-dose target-controlled infusions (TCI) of ketamine controlled by the Domino model while cognitive function tests and functional neuroimaging were performed. The aim of the current study was to assess the predictive performance of the Domino model during th

  11. Relationships between gastric accommodation and gastrointestinal sensations in healthy volunteers. A study using the barostat technique and two- and three-dimensional ultrasonography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mundt, MW; Hausken, T; Smout, AJPM; Samsom, M

    2005-01-01

    The origin of postprandial gastrointestinal sensations and their relation to gastric accommodation remain unclear. Our aim was to investigate the relation between antral and fundal accommodation and sensations. (A) In eight healthy volunteers fundus accommodation was measured using a barostat after

  12. Immune responses and parasitological observations induced during probiotic treatment with medicinal Trichuris suis ova in a healthy volunteer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Andrew R.; Dige, Anders; Rasmussen, Tue Kruse

    2017-01-01

    of the local immune responses in humans. Here, we used colonoscopy to investigate the development of T. suis and related mucosal and systemic immune responses during TSO treatment in an intestinally healthy male volunteer. TSO treatment induced T. suis-specific serum antibodies, a transient blood eosinophilia...

  13. comparison of various cholesterol lowering diets in young healthy volunteers : effects on serum lipoproteins and on other risk indicators for cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussaard, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis deals with the effect of type and amount of dietary fat on the concentration and composition of serum lipoproteins, colonic function, plasma glucose and serum insulin levels and blood pressure in healthy human volunteers.

    Two experiments were carried out. In the first experiment

  14. Interethnic variability of pharmacogenetic biomarkers in Mexican healthy volunteers: a report from the RIBEF (Ibero-American Network of Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke-Galindo, Ingrid; Jung-Cook, Helgi; LLerena, Adrián; López-López, Marisol

    2016-06-01

    Mexico presents a complex population diversity integrated by Mexican indigenous (MI) (7% of Mexico's population) and Mexican mestizos (MMs). This composition highlights the importance of pharmacogenetic studies in Mexican populations. The aims of this study were to analyze the reported frequencies of the most relevant pharmacogenetic biomarkers and metabolic phenotypes in healthy volunteers from Mexican populations and to assess its interethnic variability across MI and MM populations. After a literature search in PubMed, and according to previously defined inclusion criteria, 63 pharmacogenetic studies performed in Mexican healthy volunteers up to date were selected. These reports comprised 56,292 healthy volunteers (71.58% MM). Allele frequencies in 31 pharmacogenetic biomarkers, from 121 searched, are described. Nine of these biomarkers presented variation within MM and MI groups. The frequencies of CYP2D6*3, *4, *5, *10, *17, *35 and *41 alleles in the MM group were different from those reported in the MI group. CYP2C9*2 and *3 alleles were more frequent in MM than in MI populations (χ2 test, pMexican healthy volunteers; therefore, further studies are warranted. The frequency variation of biomarkers in MM and MI populations could be important for the clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics in Mexico.

  15. The impact of selective and non-selective non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs on secondary hemostasis in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjerning, Ole; Larsen, Torben B; Damkier, Per

    2009-01-01

    inhibitors could affect the secondary hemostasis and by that increase the risk of cardiovascular events in a population at high risk. METHODS: An open-label randomized cross-over study was performed in 20 healthy male volunteers. The study consisted of two periods of each 21 days with medication, either...

  16. A prospective, double-blind, split-subject study on local skin reactions after administration of human menopausal gonadotrophin preparations to healthy female volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odink, J.; Zuiderwijk, P.B.M.; Schoen, E.D.; Gan, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate local reactions after the intracutaneous (i.c.) administration of two human menopausal gonadotrophin preparations. For this purpose, 20 healthy female volunteers received six i.c. injections simultaneously, viz. three different batches of both Humegon (Organon,

  17. A comparison of various cholesterol lowering diets in young healthy volunteers; effects on serum lipoproteins and on other risk indicators for card. diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussaard, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis deals with the effect of type and amount of dietary fat on the concentration and composition of serum lipoproteins, colonic function, plasma glucose and serum insulin levels and blood pressure in healthy human volunteers.Two experiments were carried out. In the first experiment with 60 v

  18. Evaluation of metabolite profiles as biomarkers for the pharmacological effects of thiazolidinediones in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, M. van; Vogels, J.; Tas, A.; Hoogdalem, E.J. van; Burggraaf, J.; Cohen, A.; Greef, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To explore the usefulness of metabolomics as a method to obtain a broad array of biomarkers for the pharmacological effects of rosiglitazone (RSG) in plasma and urine samples from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and healthy volunteers (HVs). Additionally, we explored the differen

  19. Predictive performance of the Domino, Hijazi, and Clements models during low-dose target-controlled ketamine infusions in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Absalom, A. R.; Lee, M.; Menon, D. K.; Sharar, S. R.; De Smet, T.; Halliday, J.; Ogden, M.; Corlett, P.; Honey, G. D.; Fletcher, P. C.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Healthy volunteers received low-dose target-controlled infusions (TCI) of ketamine controlled by the Domino model while cognitive function tests and functional neuroimaging were performed. The aim of the current study was to assess the predictive performance of the Domino model during th

  20. Biosimilar G-CSF versus filgrastim and lenograstim in healthy unrelated volunteer hematopoietic stem cell donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Roiya; Urbanowska, Elżbieta; Zborowska, Hanna; Król, Małgorzata; Król, Maria; Torosian, Tigran; Piotrowska, Iwona; Bogusz, Krzysztof; Skwierawska, Kamila; Wiktor-Jędrzejczak, Wiesław; Snarski, Emilian

    2017-08-11

    The World Marrow Donor Organization recommends original granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for the mobilization of stem cells in healthy unrelated hematopoietic stem cell donors. We report the comparison of a biosimilar G-CSF (Zarzio) with two original G-CSFs (filgrastim and lenograstim) in mobilization in unrelated donors. We included data of 313 consecutive donors who were mobilized during the period from October 2014 to March 2016 at the Medical University of Warsaw. The primary endpoints of this study were the efficiency of CD34+ cell mobilization to the circulation and results of the first apheresis. The mean daily dose of G-CSF was 9.1 μg/kg for lenograstim, 9.8 μg/kg for biosimilar filgrastim, and 9.3 μg/kg for filgrastim (p G-CSF per kilogram (p = 0.787). Target doses of CD34+ cells were reached with one apheresis in 87% donors mobilized with lenograstim and in 93% donors mobilized with original and biosimilar filgrastim (p = 0.005). The mobilized apheresis outcomes (mean number of CD34+ cells/kg of donor collected during the first apheresis) was similar with lenograstim, biosimilar filgrastim, and filgrastim: 6.2 × 10(6), 7.6 × 10(6), and 7.3 × 10(6), respectively, p = 0.06. There was no mobilization failure in any of the donors. Biosimilar G-CSF is as effective in the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells in unrelated donors as original G-CSFs. Small and clinically irrelevant differences seen in the study can be attributed to differences in G-CSF dose and collection-related factors. Active safety surveillance concurrent to clinical use and reporting to donor outcome registry (e.g., EBMT donor outcome registry or WMDA SEAR/SPEAR) might help to evaluate the possible short- and long-term complications of biosimilar G-CSF.

  1. Kinetic Modeling of the Tau PET Tracer (18)F-AV-1451 in Human Healthy Volunteers and Alzheimer Disease Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Olivier; Alagille, David; Sanabria, Sandra; Comley, Robert A; Weimer, Robby M; Borroni, Edilio; Mintun, Mark; Seneca, Nicholas; Papin, Caroline; Morley, Thomas; Marek, Ken; Seibyl, John P; Tamagnan, Gilles D; Jennings, Danna

    2017-07-01

    (18)F-AV-1451 is currently the most widely used of several experimental tau PET tracers. The objective of this study was to evaluate (18)F-AV-1451 binding with full kinetic analysis using a metabolite-corrected arterial input function and to compare parameters derived from kinetic analysis with SUV ratio (SUVR) calculated over different imaging time intervals. Methods:(18)F-AV-1451 PET brain imaging was completed in 16 subjects: 4 young healthy volunteers (YHV), 4 aged healthy volunteers (AHV), and 8 Alzheimer disease (AD) subjects. Subjects were imaged for 3.5 h, with arterial blood samples obtained throughout. PET data were analyzed using plasma and reference tissue-based methods to estimate the distribution volume, binding potential (BPND), and SUVR. BPND and SUVR were calculated using the cerebellar cortex as a reference region and were compared across the different methods and across the 3 groups (YHV, AHV, and AD). Results: AD demonstrated increased (18)F-AV-1451 retention compared with YHV and AHV based on both invasive and noninvasive analyses in cortical regions in which paired helical filament tau accumulation is expected in AD. A correlation of R(2) > 0.93 was found between BPND (130 min) and SUVR-1 at all time intervals. Cortical SUVR curves reached a relative plateau around 1.0-1.2 for YHV and AHV by approximately 50 min, but increased in AD by up to approximately 20% at 110-130 min and approximately 30% at 160-180 min relative to 80-100 min. Distribution volume (130 min) was lower by 30%-35% in the YHV than AHV. Conclusion: Our data suggest that although (18)F-AV-1451 SUVR curves do not reach a plateau and are still increasing in AD, an SUVR calculated over an imaging window of 80-100 min (as currently used in clinical studies) provides estimates of paired helical filament tau burden in goo