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Sample records for tweezers ii laser

  1. How safe is gamete micromanipulation by laser tweezers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Tadir, Yona; Berns, Michael W.

    1998-04-01

    Laser tweezers, used as novel sterile micromanipulation tools of living cells, are employed in laser-assisted in vitro fertilization (IVF). For example, controlled spermatozoa transport with 1064 nm tweezers to human egg cells has been performed in European clinics in cases of male infertility. The interaction of approximately 100 mW near infrared (NIR) trapping beams at MW/cm2 intensity with human gametes results in low mean less than 2 K temperature increases and less than 100 pN trapping forces. Therefore, photothermal or photomechanical induced destructive effects appear unlikely. However, the high photon flux densities may induce simultaneous absorption of two NIR photons resulting in nonlinear interactions. These nonlinear interactions imply non-resonant two-photon excitation of endogenous cellular chromophores. In the case of less than 800 nm tweezers, UV- like damage effects may occur. The destructive effect is amplified when multimode cw lasers are used as tweezer sources due to longitudinal mode-beating effects and partial mode- locking. Spermatozoa damage within seconds using 760 nm traps due to formation of unstable ps pulses in a cw Ti:Sa ring laser is demonstrated. We recommend the use of greater than or equal to 800 nm traps for optical gamete micromanipulation. To our opinion, further basic studies on the influence of nonlinear effects of laser tweezers on human gamete are necessary.

  2. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and laser tweezers based experiments to understand dentine-bacteria interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sum Chee; Mohanty, Samarendra; Gupta, P. K.; Kishen, Anil

    2007-02-01

    Failure of endodontic treatment is commonly due to Enterococcal infection. In this study influence of chemical treatments of type-I collagen membrane by chemical agents commonly used in endodontic treatment on Enterococcus faecalis cell adherence was evaluated. In order to determine the change in number of adhering bacteria after chemical treatment, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used. For this, overnight culture of E faecalis in All Culture broth was applied to chemically treated type-I collagen membrane. It was found that Ca(OH) II treated groups had statistically significant (p value=0.05) increase in population of bacteria adherence. The change in adhesion force between bacteria and collagen was determined by using optical tweezers (1064 nm). For this experiment, Type-I collagen membrane was soaked for 5 mins in a media that contained 50% all culture media and 50% saturated Ca(OH) II . The membrane was spread on the coverslip, on which diluted bacterial suspension was added. The force of laser tweezers on the bacteria was estimated at different trap power levels using viscous drag method and trapping stiffness was calculated using Equipartition theorem method. Presence of Ca(OH) II was found to increase the cell-substrate adherence force from 0.38pN to >2.1pN. Together, these experiments show that it was highly probable that the increase in adherence to collagen was due to a stronger adhesion in the presence of Ca (OH) II.

  3. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    produces less torque under the radiation pressure resulting in slower rotation at the same laser power. Keywords. Rotation of red blood cell; optical tweezers, dual optical trap. PACS Nos 87.80.Cc; 87.83.+a; 87.80.Fe; 89.20.-a. 1. Introduction. The application of optical tweezers in trapping and manipulating single cells [1].

  4. Laser Tweezer Controlled Solid Immersion Lens for High Resolution Imaging in Microfluidic and Biological Samples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Birkbeck, Aaron L; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Esener, Sadik C

    2005-01-01

    A novel technique is presented which integrates the capacity of a laser tweezer to optically trap and manipulate objects in three-dimensions with the resolution-enhanced imaging capabilities of a solid immersion lens (SIL...

  5. Numerical study of the properties of optical vortex array laser tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun-Fu; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2013-11-04

    Chu et al. constructed a kind of Ince-Gaussian modes (IGM)-based vortex array laser beams consisting of p x p embedded optical vortexes from Ince-Gaussian modes, IG(e)(p,p) modes [Opt. Express 16, 19934 (2008)]. Such an IGM-based vortex array laser beams maintains its vortex array profile during both propagation and focusing, and is applicable to optical tweezers. This study uses the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method to study the properties of the IGM-based vortex array laser tweezers while it traps dielectric particles. This study calculates the resultant force exerted on the spherical dielectric particles of different sizes situated at the IGM-based vortex array laser beam waist. Numerical results show that the number of trapping spots of a structure light (i.e. IGM-based vortex laser beam), is depended on the relation between the trapped particle size and the structure light beam size. While the trapped particle is small comparing to the beam size of the IGM-based vortex array laser beams, the IGM-based vortex array laser beams tweezers are suitable for multiple traps. Conversely, the tweezers is suitable for single traps. The results of this study is useful to the future development of the vortex array laser tweezers applications.

  6. Red blood cell micromanipulation with elliptical laser beam profile optical tweezers in different osmolarity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2011-07-01

    In this work optical tweezers with elliptical beam profiles have been developed in order to examine the effect of optical force on fresh red blood cells (RBC) in isotonic, hypertonic and hypotonic buffer solutions. Considering that the optical force depends essentially on the cell surface and the cytoplasmic refractive index, it is obvious that biochemical modifications associated with different states of the cell will influence its behaviour in the optical trap. Line optical tweezers were used to manipulate simultaneously more than one red blood cell. After we have been manipulated a RBC with an elliptical laser beam profile in an isotonic or hypertonic buffer, we noticed that it rotates by itself when gets trapped by optical tweezers and undergoes folding. Further shape deformations can be observed attributed to the competition between alignment and rotational torque which are transferred by laser light to the cell. In hypotonic buffer RBCs become spherical and do not rotate or fold since the resultant force due to rays emerging from diametrically opposite points of the cell leads to zero torque. Manipulation of fresh red blood cells in isotonic solution by line optical tweezers leads to folding and elongation of trapped RBCs. Membrane elasticity properties such as bending modulus can be estimated by measuring RBC's folding time in function with laser power.

  7. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuxun; Cheng, Jinping; Kong, Chi-Wing; Wang, Xiaolin; Han Cheng, Shuk; Li, Ronald A.; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  8. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shuxun; Wang Xiaolin; Sun Dong [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Cheng Jinping; Han Cheng, Shuk [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Kong, Chi-Wing [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Li, Ronald A. [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Center of Cardiovascular Research, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  9. Application of optical tweezers and excimer laser to study protoplast fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantawang, Titirat; Samipak, Sompid; Limtrakul, Jumras; Chattham, Nattaporn

    2015-07-01

    Protoplast fusion is a physical phenomenon that two protoplasts come in contact and fuse together. Doing so, it is possible to combine specific genes from one protoplast to another during fusion such as drought resistance and disease resistance. There are a few possible methods to induce protoplast fusion, for example, electrofusion and chemical fusion. In this study, chemical fusion was performed with laser applied as an external force to enhance rate of fusion and observed under a microscope. Optical tweezers (1064 nm with 100X objective N.A. 1.3) and excimer laser (308 nm LMU-40X-UVB objective) were set with a Nikon Ti-U inverted microscope. Samples were prepared by soaking in hypertonic solution in order to induce cell plasmolysis. Elodea Canadensis and Allium cepa plasmolysed leaves were cut and observed under microscope. Concentration of solution was varied to induce difference turgor pressures on protoplasts pushing at cell wall. Free protoplasts in solution were trapped by optical tweezers to study the effect of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution. PEG was diluted by Ca+ solution during the process to induced protoplast cell contact and fusion. Possibility of protoplast fusion by excimer laser was investigated and found possible. Here we report a novel tool for plant cell fusion using excimer laser. Plant growth after cell fusion is currently conducted.

  10. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  11. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.; Livett, M.K.; Nugent, K.W. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have constructed a dual trap optical tweezers set-up around an inverted microscope where both the traps can be independently controlled and manipulated in all the three dimensions. Here we report our observations on rotation of red blood cells (RBCs) in a linearly polarized optical trap. Red blood cells deform and ...

  13. CELLULAR AND SUBCELLULAR LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF BIOLOGICAL OBJECTS BY MEANS OF FEMTOSECOND LASER OPTICAL TWEEZERS-SCALPEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rakityansky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was developing of elements of the precise three-dimensional positioning technology of one or several micron and submicron size biological objects. Thereto a laboratory unit of hardware-software complex of optical femtosecond laser tweezers-scalpel was developed and constructed in the Joint institute for high temperatures RAS using material resources of Russia. Experimental data concerning a maximal manipulation speed of CHO and cells, produced from mammalian spinal ganglia (using protocols for producing pure culture of Schwann cells was received. Besides facts of interaction of laser radiation with intracellular structures that lead to unexpected behavior of cell in the zone of optical trap and change of maximal speed of cell manipulation were determined. 

  14. Holographic Raman Tweezers Controlled by Hand Gestures and Voice Commands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomori, Z.; Antalík, M.; Kesa, P.; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, 2B (2013), s. 331-336 ISSN 2160-8881 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Holographic Optical Tweezers * Raman Tweezers * Natural User Interface * Leap Motion * Gesture Camera Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  15. Construction of Discrete Pentanuclear Platinum(II) Stacks with Extended Metal-Metal Interactions by Using Phosphorescent Platinum(II) Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fred Ka-Wai; Chan, Alan Kwun-Wa; Ng, Maggie; Low, Kam-Hung; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2017-11-20

    Discrete pentanuclear Pt II stacks were prepared by the host-guest adduct formation between multinuclear tweezer-type Pt II complexes. The formation of the Pt II stacks in solution was accompanied by color changes and the turning on of near-infrared emission resulting from Pt⋅⋅⋅Pt and π-π interactions. The X-ray crystal structure revealed the formation of a discrete 1:1 adduct, in which a linear stack of five Pt II centers with extended Pt⋅⋅⋅Pt interactions was observed. Additional binding affinity and stability have been achieved through a multinuclear host-guest system. The binding behaviors can be fine-tuned by varying the spacer between the two Pt II moieties in the guests. This work provides important insights for the construction of discrete higher-order supramolecular metal-ligand aggregates using a tweezer-directed approach. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Physics of optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Timo A; Knöner, Gregor; Heckenberg, Norman R; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2007-01-01

    We outline the basic principles of optical tweezers as well as the fundamental theory underlying optical tweezers. The optical forces responsible for trapping result from the transfer of momentum from the trapping beam to the particle and are explained in terms of the momenta of incoming and reflected or refracted rays. We also consider the angular momentum flux of the beam in order to understand and explain optical torques. In order to provide a qualitative picture of the trapping, we treat the particle as a weak positive lens and the forces on the lens are shown. However, this representation does not provide quantitative results for the force. We, therefore, present results of applying exact electromagnetic theory to optical trapping. First, we consider a tightly focused laser beam. We give results for trapping of spherical particles and examine the limits of trappability in terms of type and size of the particles. We also study the effect of a particle on the beam. This exact solution reproduces the same qualitative effect as when treating the particle as a lens where changes in the convergence or divergence and in the direction of the trapping beam result in restoring forces acting on the particle. Finally, we review the fundamental theory of optical tweezers.

  17. Nanostructure-enhanced laser tweezers for efficient trapping and alignment of particles

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Benjamin K.; Mentele, Tim; Bachar, Stephanie; Knouf, Emily; Bendoraite, Ausra; Tewari, Muneesh; Pun, Suzie H.; Lin, Lih Y.

    2010-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a purely optical approach to trap and align particles using the interaction of polarized light with periodic nanostructures to generate enhanced trapping force. With a weakly focused laser beam, we observed efficient trapping and transportation of polystyrene beads with sizes ranging from 10 μm down to 190 nm as well as cancer cell nuclei. In addition, alignment of non-spherical dielectric particles to a 1-D periodic nanostructure was achieved with low laser intensi...

  18. Characterization of hydrogel microstructure using laser tweezers particle tracking and confocal reflection imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlarchyk, M. A.; Botvinick, E. L.; Putnam, A. J.

    2010-05-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used as extracellular matrix mimetics for applications in tissue engineering and increasingly as cell culture platforms with which to study the influence of biophysical and biochemical cues on cell function in 3D. In recent years, a significant number of studies have focused on linking substrate mechanical properties to cell function using standard methodologies to characterize the bulk mechanical properties of the hydrogel substrates. However, current understanding of the correlations between the microstructural mechanical properties of hydrogels and cell function in 3D is poor, in part because of a lack of appropriate techniques. Here we have utilized a laser tracking system, based on passive optical microrheology instrumentation, to characterize the microstructure of viscoelastic fibrin clots. Trajectories and mean square displacements were observed as bioinert PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol) microspheres (1, 2 or 4.7 µm in diameter) diffused within confined pores created by the protein phase of fibrin hydrogels. Complementary confocal reflection imaging revealed microstructures comprised of a highly heterogeneous fibrin network with a wide range of pore sizes. As the protein concentration of fibrin gels was increased, our quantitative laser tracking measurements showed a corresponding decrease in particle mean square displacements with greater resolution and sensitivity than conventional imaging techniques. This platform-independent method will enable a more complete understanding of how changes in substrate mechanical properties simultaneously influence other microenvironmental parameters in 3D cultures.

  19. Optical tweezers for the micromanipulation of plant cytoplasm and organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawes, C.; Osterrieder, A.; Sparkes, I.A.; Ketelaar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Laser tweezers, often known as optical tweezers or optical traps, permit the capturing and micromanipulation of microscopic particles along X, Y and Z axes using the radiation pressure generated by a focused laser beam, normally in the infrared region of the spectrum. For trapping to be successful,

  20. Laser microtreatment for genetic manipulations and DNA diagnostics by a combination of microbeam and photonic tweezers (laser microbeam trap)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Karl-Otto; Monajembashi, Shamci; Celeda, D.; Endlich, N.; Eickhoff, Holger; Hoyer, Carsten; Leitz, G.; Weber, Gerd; Scheef, J.; Rueterjans, H.

    1994-12-01

    Genomes of higher organisms are larger than one typically expects. For example, the DNA of a single human cell is almost two meters long, the DNA in the human body covers the distance Earth-Sun approximately 140 times. This is often not considered in typical molecular biological approaches for DNA diagnostics, where usually only DNA of the length of a gene is investigated. Also, one basic aspect of sequencing the human genome is not really solved: the problem how to prepare the huge amounts of DNA required. Approaches from biomedical optics combined with new developments in single molecule biotechnology may at least contribute some parts of the puzzle. A large genome can be partitioned into portions comprising approximately 1% of the whole DNA using a laser microbeam. The single DNA fragment can be amplified by the polymerase chain reaction in order to obtain a sufficient amount of molecules for conventional DNA diagnostics or for analysis by octanucleotide hybridization. When not amplified by biotechnological processes, the individual DNA molecule can be visualized in the light microscope and can be manipulated and dissected with the laser microbeam trap. The DNA probes obtained by single molecule biotechnology can be employed for fluorescence in situ introduced into plant cells and subcellular structures even when other techniques fail. Since the laser microbeam trap allows to work in the interior of a cell without opening it, subcellular structures can be manipulated. For example, in algae, such structures can be moved out of their original position and used to study intracellular viscosities.

  1. Biaxial crystal-based optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.

    2010-01-01

    We suggest an optical tweezer setup based on an optically biaxial crystal. To control movements of opaque particles, we use shifts. The results of experimental studies are reported which are concerned with this laser tweezer setup. We demonstrate a movement of microparticles of toner using a sing...... a singular-optical trap, rotation of particles due to orbital angular momentum of the field, and converging or diverging of two different traps when changing transmission plane of polariser at the input of our polarisation interferometer....

  2. Optical tweezers: wideband microrheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preece, Daryl; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J; Warren, Rebecca; Cooper, Jonathan M; Tassieri, Manlio; Evans, R M L

    2011-01-01

    Microrheology is a branch of rheology having the same principles as conventional bulk rheology, but working on micron length scales and microlitre volumes. Optical tweezers have been successfully used with Newtonian fluids for rheological purposes such as determining fluid viscosity. Conversely, when optical tweezers are used to measure the viscoelastic properties of complex fluids the results are either limited to the material's high-frequency response, discarding important information related to the low-frequency behaviour, or they are supplemented by low-frequency measurements performed with different techniques, often without presenting an overlapping region of clear agreement between the sets of results. We present a simple experimental procedure to perform microrheological measurements over the widest frequency range possible with optical tweezers. A generalized Langevin equation is used to relate the frequency-dependent moduli of the complex fluid to the time-dependent trajectory of a probe particle as it flips between two optical traps that alternately switch on and off

  3. Fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy of motile sperm cells and CHO cells in an optical trap (laser tweezers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Liu, Yagang; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Patrizio, Pasquale; Tadir, Yona; Sonek, Gregory J.; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-05-01

    We describe fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging studies of optically trapped single Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and motile human sperm cells. The NIR trapping beam was provided by a tunable, multimode continuous wave Ti:Sapphire laser. The beam was introduced into an inverted confocal laser scanning microscope. Fluorescence of cells in the single- beam gradient force optical trap was excited with a 488 nm microbeam (laser scanning microscopy) or with 365 nm radiation from a high- pressure mercury lamp. Modifications to NADH-attributed autofluorescence and Rhodamine- and Propidium Iodide-attributed xenofluorescence indicate a significant cell-damaging effect of 760 nm trapping beams. 760 nm effects produce a biological response comparable to UVA-induced oxidative stress and appear to be a consequence to two-photon absorption.

  4. Inducing trauma into neuroblastoma cells and synthetic neural networks using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Patrick William

    The laser tweezers have become a very useful tool in the fields of physics, chemistry, and biology. My intent is to use the laser tweezers to induce trauma into neuroblastoma cells, cells that resemble neural cells when treated with retinoic acid, to try to surmise what happens when neural cells and networks are disrupted or destroyed. The issues presented will deal with the obtaining, maintenance, and differentiation of the cells, as well as the inner operations of the laser tweezers themselves, and what kind of applications it has been applied to, as well as to my work in this project.

  5. Comparison of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation as energy sources for mammalian sperm motility, using the combination of fluorescence imaging, laser tweezers, and real-time automated tracking and trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Jaclyn M; Shi, Linda Z; Tam, James; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Durrant, Barbara; Botvinick, Elliot L; Berns, Michael W

    2008-12-01

    The combination of laser tweezers, fluorescent imaging, and real-time automated tracking and trapping (RATTS) can measure sperm swimming speed and swimming force simultaneously with mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). This approach is used to study the roles of two sources of ATP in sperm motility: oxidative phosphorylation, which occurs in the mitochondria located in the sperm midpiece and glycolysis, which occurs along the length of the sperm tail (flagellum). The relationships between (a) swimming speed and MMP and (b) swimming force and MMP are studied in dog and human sperm. The effects of glucose, oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors and glycolytic inhibitors on human sperm motility are examined. The results indicate that oxidative phosphorylation does contribute some ATP for human sperm motility, but not enough to sustain high motility. The glycolytic pathway is shown to be a primary source of energy for human sperm motility.

  6. Control and manipulation of cold atoms in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldoon, Cecilia; Brandt, Lukas; Dong Jian; Stuart, Dustin; Brainis, Edouard; Himsworth, Matthew; Kuhn, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped by laser light are among the most promising candidates for storing and processing information in a quantum computer or simulator. The application certainly calls for a scalable and flexible scheme for addressing and manipulating the atoms. We have now made this a reality by implementing a fast and versatile method to dynamically control the position of neutral atoms trapped in optical tweezers. The tweezers result from a spatial light modulator (SLM) controlling and shaping a large number of optical dipole-force traps. Trapped atoms adapt to any change in the potential landscape, such that one can rearrange and randomly access individual sites within atom-trap arrays. (paper)

  7. Theory of optical-tweezers forces near a plane interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutra, Rafael de Sousa; Neto, P. A. Maia; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Optical-tweezers experiments in molecular and cell biology often take place near the surface of the microscope slide that defines the bottom of the sample chamber. There, as elsewhere, force measurements require forcecalibrated tweezers. In bulk, one can calculate the tweezers force from first...... principles, as recently demonstrated. Near the surface of the microscope slide, this absolute calibration method fails because it does not account for reverberations from the slide of the laser beam scattered by the trapped microsphere. Nor does it account for evanescent waves arising from total internal...... that describes the reverberations, including also evanescent waves. Numerical simulations for typical setup parameters evaluate these effects on the optical force and trap stiffness, with emphasis on axial trapping. Results are in good agreement with available experimental data. Thus, absolute calibration now...

  8. Optical tweezers principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Philip; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Combining state-of-the-art research with a strong pedagogic approach, this text provides a detailed and complete guide to the theory, practice and applications of optical tweezers. In-depth derivation of the theory of optical trapping and numerical modelling of optical forces are supported by a complete step-by-step design and construction guide for building optical tweezers, with detailed tutorials on collecting and analysing data. Also included are comprehensive reviews of optical tweezers research in fields ranging from cell biology to quantum physics. Featuring numerous exercises and problems throughout, this is an ideal self-contained learning package for advanced lecture and laboratory courses, and an invaluable guide to practitioners wanting to enter the field of optical manipulation. The text is supplemented by www.opticaltweezers.org, a forum for discussion and a source of additional material including free-to-download, customisable research-grade software (OTS) for calculation of optical forces, dig...

  9. an optical tweezer based study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shankar Ghosh

    2006-11-12

    Nov 12, 2006 ... Liquid-Solid interface. Liquid-liquid interface. Shankar Ghosh. Motion of a sphere in an .... Bare mass of a colloidal sphere ∼ 10^15Kg. Note : The effective mass scales with viscosity and not with the density. Shankar Ghosh. Motion of a sphere in an oscillatory boundary layer: an optical tweezer based study ...

  10. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  11. Investigation of shape memory of red blood cells using optical tweezers and quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2012-03-01

    RBC has been shown to possess shape memory subsequent to shear-induced shape transformation. However, this property of RBC may not be generalized to all kinds of stresses. Here, we report our observation on the action of radiation pressure forces on RBC's shape memory using optical manipulation and quantitative phase microscopy (OMQPM). QPM, based on Mach-Zehnder interferrometry, allowed measurement of dynamic changes of shape of RBC in optical tweezers at different trapping laser powers. In high power near-infrared optical tweezers (>200mW), the RBC was found to deform significantly due to optical forces. Upon removal of the tweezers, hysteresis in recovering its original resting shape was observed. In very high power tweezers or long-term stretching events, shape memory was almost erased. This irreversibility of the deformation may be due to temperature rise or stress-induced phase transformation of lipids in RBC membrane.

  12. Synthesis, structure, and properties of a series of chiral tweezer-diamine complexes consisting of an achiral zinc(II) bisporphyrin host and chiral diamine guest: induction and rationalization of supramolecular chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Sanfaori; Ikbal, Sk Asif; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2014-01-06

    We report here the synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic properties of a series of supramolecular chiral 1:1 tweezer-diamine complexes consisting of an achiral Zn(II) bisporphyrin (Zn2DPO) host and five different chiral diamine guests, namely, (R)-diaminopropane (DAP), (1S,2S)-diaminocyclohexane (CHDA), (S)-phenylpropane diamine (PPDA), (S)-phenyl ethylenediamine (PEDA), and (1R,2R)-diphenylethylene diamine (DPEA). The solid-state structures are preserved in solution, as reflected in their (1)H NMR spectra, which also revealed the remarkably large upfield shifts of the NH2 guest protons with the order Zn2DPO·DAP > Zn2DPO·CHDA > Zn2DPO·PPDA> Zn2DPO·PEDA ≫ Zn2DPO·DPEA, which happens to be the order of binding constants of the respective diamines with Zn2DPO. As the bulk of the substituent at the chiral center of the guest ligand increases, the Zn-Nax distance of the tweezer-diamine complex also increases, which eventually lowers the binding of the guest ligand toward the host. Also, the angle between the two porphyrin rings gradually increases with increasing bulk of the guest in order to accommodate the guest within the bisporphyrin cavity with minimal steric clash. The notably high amplitude bisignate CD signal response by Zn2DPO·DAP, Zn2DPO·CHDA, and Zn2DPO·PPDA can be ascribed to the complex's high stability and the formation of a unidirectional screw as observed in the X-ray structures of the complexes. A relatively lower value of CD amplitude shown by Zn2DPO·PEDA is due to the lower stability of the complex. The projection of the diamine binding sites of the chiral guest would make the two porphyrin macrocycles oriented in either a clockwise or anticlockwise direction in order to minimize host-guest steric clash. In sharp contrast, Zn2DPO·DPEA shows a very low amplitude bisignate CD signal due to the presence of both left- (dictated by the pre-existing chirality of (1R,2R)-DPEA) and right-handed screws (dictated by the steric differentiation at

  13. Optical tweezers for studying taxis in parasites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Thomaz, A A; Pozzo, L Y; Almeida, D B; Cesar, C L; Fontes, A; Farias, P M A; Stahl, C V; Santos-Mallet, J; Gomes, S A O; Ayres, D C; Giorgio, S; Santos, B S; Feder, D

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a methodology to measure force strengths and directions of living parasites with an optical tweezers setup. These measurements were used to study the parasites chemotaxis in real time. We observed behavior and measured the force of: (i) Leishmania amazonensis in the presence of two glucose gradients; (ii) Trypanosoma cruzi in the vicinity of the digestive system walls, and (iii) Trypanosoma rangeli in the vicinity of salivary glands as a function of distance. Our results clearly show a chemotactic behavior in every case. This methodology can be used to study any type of taxis, such as chemotaxis, osmotaxis, thermotaxis, phototaxis, of any kind of living microorganisms. These studies can help us to understand the microorganism sensory systems and their response function to these gradients

  14. Keck II Laser Guide Star AO System and Performance with the TOPTICA/MPBC Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Jason C. Y.; Wizinowich, Peter; Wetherell, Ed; Lilley, Scott; Cetre, Sylvain; Ragland, Sam; Medeiros, Drew; Tsubota, Kevin; Doppmann, Greg; Otarola, Angel; Wei, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The Keck II Laser Guide Star (LGS) Adaptive Optics (AO) System was upgraded from a dye laser to a TOPTICA/MPBC Raman-Fibre Amplification (RFA) laser in December 2015. The W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO) has been operating its AO system with a LGS for science since 2004 using a first generation 15 W dye laser. Using the latest diode pump laser technology, Raman amplification, and a well-tuned second harmonic generator (SHG), this Next Generation Laser (NGL) is able to produce a highly stable 589...

  15. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science II

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Agostini, Pierre; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    This book series addresses a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field, Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. Its progress is being stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Highlights of this second volume include Coulomb explosion and fragmentation of molecules, control of chemical dynamics, high-order harmonic generation, propagation and filamentation, and laser-plasma interaction. All chapters are authored by foremost experts in their fields and the texts are written at a level accessible to newcomers and graduate students, each chapter beginning with an introductory overview.

  16. Compact 2 Micron Seed Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of innovative compact, high power and extremely reliable 2 micron seed laser using newly developed Tm3+ doped germanate glass...

  17. Miniature Laser Magnetometer (MLM), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This 2009 NASA SBIR Phase 2 proposal for an innovative Miniature Laser Magnetometer (MLM) is a response to subtopic S1.06 Particles and Field Sensors and Instrument...

  18. Optoelectronic tweezers for medical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Clemens; Neale, Steven; Menachery, Anoop; Barrett, Mike; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) allows the spatial patterning of electric fields through selected illumination of a photoconductive surface. This enables the manipulation of micro particles and cells by creating non-uniform electrical fields that then produce dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. The DEP responses of cells differ and can produce negative or positive (repelled or attracted to areas of high electric field) forces. Therefore OET can be used to manipulate individual cells and separate different cell types from each other. Thus OET has many applications for medical diagnostics, demonstrated here with work towards diagnosing Human African Trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness.

  19. Holographic Raman tweezers controlled by multi-modal natural user interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomori, Z.; Keša, P.; Nikorovič, M.; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Valušová, E.; Antalík, M.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2016), 015602:1-9 ISSN 2040-8978 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14069 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : holographic optical tweezers * Raman microspectroscopy * human-computer interface Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.741, year: 2016

  20. Optical tweezers in concentrated colloidal dispersions : Manipulating and imaging individual particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Dirk Leo Joep

    2004-01-01

    Using a laser beam that is focused down to a diffraction-limited spot, particles with a size ranging from several nanometers up to tens of micrometers can be trapped and manipulated. This technique, known as "optical tweezers" or "optical trapping", has been used in a wide variety of

  1. Optical alignment and confinement of an ellipsoidal nanorod in optical tweezers: a theoretical study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Zemánek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 7 (2012), s. 1224-1236 ISSN 1084-7529 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0348; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ellipsoidal nanorod * optical tweezers * Rayleigh approximation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.665, year: 2012

  2. Application of CO II laser for removal of oral mucocele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, J.; Moriya, K.; Hirai, Y.

    2006-02-01

    Mucocele is an oral soft tissue cyst caused by the disturbance of saliva flow. Mucocele is widely observed in child patients and recurrence is high. The objective of this study was to clarify the effect of CO II laser irradiation in the case of mucocele. A CO II laser was used on 45 subjects, aged between 0 to 15 years, having mucocele on lip, lingual, or buccal mucosa. Our procedure in using CO II laser was not to vaporize the mucocele but to remove the whole mucocele mass. The border of mucocele was firstly incised by laser following defocusly ablating the root or body of mucocele separating from sorrounding tissue. As a result, mucocele was easily and completely removed without breaking the wall of mucocele. None of the cases required suturing. The results were as follows. 1. The mucocele of lip or lingual mucosa with a rich blood supply, was efficiently removed, without bleeding, giving a clear operative field during the operation. 2. The surgery itself was simple and less time-consuming. 3. After two or three weeks the wound was completely healed without almost any discomfort in all patients 4. Wound contraction and scarring were decreased or eliminated. 5. The reoccurrence of mucocele was not seen, except only in one case of lingual mucocele. In conclusion the use of CO II laser proved to be a very safe and effective mode for the removal of mucocele, especially in small children.

  3. CO II laser free-form processing of hard tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin; Klasing, Manfred; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-07-01

    Drilling and surface processing of bone and tooth tissue belongs to standard medical procedures (bores and embeddings for implants, trepanation etc.). Small circular bores can be generally quickly produced with mechanical drills. However problems arise at angled drilling, the need to execute drilling procedures without damaging of sensitive soft tissue structures underneath the bone or the attempt to mill small non-circular cavities in hard tissue with high precision. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The processing of bone is done with a CO II laser (10.6 μm) with pulse durations of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled fast galvanic laser beam scanner and a fine water-spray, which helps keeping the ablation process effective and without thermal side-effects. Laser "milling" of non-circular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth can be especially interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser processing of these cavities without thermal damage and with minimised tapering. It included the exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines, etc.), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, and optimal water spray position. The optimised results give evidence for the applicability of pulsed CO II lasers for biologically tolerable effective processing of deep cavities in hard tissue.

  4. Keck II laser guide star AO system and performance with the TOPTICA/MPBC laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason C. Y.; Wizinowich, Peter; Wetherell, Ed; Lilley, Scott; Cetre, Sylvain; Ragland, Sam; Medeiros, Drew; Tsubota, Kevin; Doppmann, Greg; Otarola, Angel; Wei, Kai

    2016-07-01

    The Keck II Laser Guide Star (LGS) Adaptive Optics (AO) System was upgraded from a dye laser to a TOPTICA/MPBC Raman-Fibre Amplification (RFA) laser in December 2015. The W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO) has been operating its AO system with a LGS for science since 2004 using a first generation 15 W dye laser. Using the latest diode pump laser technology, Raman amplification, and a well-tuned second harmonic generator (SHG), this Next Generation Laser (NGL) is able to produce a highly stable 589 nm laser beam with the required power, wavelength and mode quality. The beam's linear polarization and continuous wave format along with optical back pumping are designed to improve the sodium atom coupling efficiency over previously operated sodium-wavelength lasers. The efficiency and operability of the new laser has also been improved by reducing its required input power and cooling, size, and the manpower to operate and maintain it. The new laser has been implemented on the telescope's elevation ring with its electronics installed on a new Nasmyth sub-platform, with the capacity to support up to three laser systems for future upgrades. The laser is projected from behind the telescope's secondary mirror using the recently implemented center launch system (CLS) to reduce LGS spot size. We will present the new laser system and its performance with respect to power, stability, wavelength, spot size, optical repumping, polarization, efficiency, and its return with respect to pointing alignment to the magnetic field. Preliminary LGSAO performance is presented with the system returning to science operations. We will also provide an update on current and future upgrades at the WMKO.

  5. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  6. II International Conference on Plasma and Laser Research and Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurnaev, V A; Dodulad, E I

    2016-01-01

    II Conference on Plasma and Laser Research and Technologies took place on January 25 th until January 27 th , 2016 at National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI” (NRNU MEPhI). It was organized by the Institute of Laser and Plasma Technologies and was supported by the Competitiveness Program of NRNU MEPhI. The Conference consisted of four sections: Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion, Laser physics, Modern aspects of solid state matter physics and Charged particle accelerators. The Conference provided participants an opportunity to present their research results for the consideration of a wide audience from the sidelines of science. The main topics of the Conference were: • Controlled nuclear fusion with magnetic and inertial confinement; • Low-temperature plasma and its application in modern technology; • Laser physics and technologies for industry, environmental control and precise measurements; • Optical information control, holography, spintronics and photonics; • Modern aspects of solid state matter physics and nanophysics; • Charged particle accelerators. More than 200 specialists on plasma, laser and solid state physics took part in the II Conference. They represented leading Russian scientific research centres and universities (such as Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, Institute of Crystallography, National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry and others) and universities from Belarus, Ukraine, Germany, USA, Canada, Belgium, and Sweden. All report presentations were broadcasted online on the NRNU MEPhI official site. The translation was watched by viewers from Moscow, Prague, St. Petersburgh and other cities, who could not attend the Conference. We would like to thank heartily all of the speakers, participants and organizing committee members for their contribution to the conference. (paper)

  7. Electro-Optic Laser Scanners for Space-Based Lidar, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this phase II SBIR is to design and build new non-mechanical, electro-optic (EO) laser scanners that will be suitable for space based laser ranging,...

  8. Identification of individual biofilm-forming bacterial cells using Raman tweezers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šiler, Martin; Šerý, Mojmír; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Hrubanová, Kamila; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, V.; Růžička, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 5 (2015), 051038:1-6 ISSN 1083-3668 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/1687; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman tweezers * Staphylococcus epidermidis * biofilm Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.556, year: 2015

  9. Twisting biological objects by optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormos, P.; Amerongen, van H.; Bottka, S.; Galaja, P.; Garab, G.; Kirei, H.; Oroszi, L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a novel method by which it is possible to apply and measure torque directly on particles grabbed in optical tweezers. It can be used to orient particles of micron size or even on single molecules, biopolymers by the use of test particles.The procedure is based on the observation that

  10. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Mølmer, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits...... quantum computing....

  11. Single Chromatin Fibre Assembly Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, Martin L.; Pope, L.H.; Leuba, S.H.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Here we observe the formation of a single chromatin fibre using optical tweezers. A single -DNA molecule was suspended between two micron-sized beads, one held by a micropipette and the other in an optical trap. The constrained DNA molecule was incubated with Xenopus laevis egg extract in order to

  12. Power Scaling Feasibility or Chromium-Doped II-VI Laser Sources and the Demonstration of a Chromium-Doped Zinc Selenide Face-Cooled Disk Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKay, Jason

    2002-01-01

    ...+:ZnSe disk laser design that can produce sufficient output power. Cr2+:II-VI laser materials are found to be susceptible to overheating and thermal lensing, but are otherwise satisfactory laser materials...

  13. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  14. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Matthew; /Auburn U.

    2015-08-19

    This presentation covers data collected on two commercial laser stabilization systems, Guidestar-II and MRC, and two optical imaging systems. Additionally, general information about LCLS-II and how to go about continuing-testing is covered.

  15. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  16. Compact, Low-Cost, Frequency-Locked Semiconductor Laser for Injection Seeding High Power Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project will develop a compact, low-cost, wavelength locked seed laser for injection locking high powered...

  17. Accurate measurement of microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Forbes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that matter may be trapped by optical fields with high intensity gradients. Once trapped, it is then possible to manipulate microscopic particles using such optical fields, in so-called optical tweezers. Such optical trapping and tweezing systems have found widespread application across diverse fields in science, from applied biology to fundamental physics. In this article we outline the design and construction of an optical trapping and tweezing system, and show how the resulting interaction of the laser light with microscopic particles may be understood in terms of the transfer of linear and angular momentum of light. We demonstrate experimentally the use of our optical tweezing configuration for the measurement of microscopic forces and torques. In particular, we make use of digital holography to create so-called vortex laser beams, capable of transferring orbital angular momentum to particles. The use of such novel laser beams in an optical trapping and tweezing set-up allows for the control of biological species at the single-cell level.

  18. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, Charles R. P.; Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Cochran, Sandy; Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-μm-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers

  19. Low-Power-Consumption Integrated PPM Laser Transmitter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Conventional PPM laser transmitters, a CW laser followed by a modulator, are inherently inefficient since the data must be carved from the laser's steady output. 95%...

  20. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tweezer-type epilator. 878.5360 Section 878.5360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED.... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The...

  1. Investigation on a TEA-CO II laser with surface corona pre-ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behjat, A.; Aram, M.; Soltanmoradi, F.; Shabanzadeh, M.

    2006-05-01

    The construction of a surface corona UV pre-ionized TEA CO II laser is described and dependence of its average output energy of the laser to gas mixture, discharge voltage and repetition rate is investigated. The electric circuit diagram and geometry of the pre-ionization system are presented. Configuration of circuit has been designed to produce only impulsive voltage difference between the laser electrodes. Also, the triggering configuration of trigatron is prepared for fast operation to minimize the arc occurrence as much as possible. Some data of current, voltage, laser pulses and average output energy versus gas mixture and applied voltages are given. IR spectrometer is used for measurements of central output wavelength of the laser. Operation of the laser on two adjacent vibrational-rotational transitions of CO II molecule has been observed that shows the ability of this laser for working on multi-line in a same time for special applications.

  2. Performance of the ATLAS Tile LaserII Calibration System

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00124895; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The new laser calibration system of the ATLAS Tile hadron calorimeter is presented. The perfomances of the calibration and monitor tools internal to the laser system are given in terms of operation time stability. The use of the laser system in the normal Tile calibration procedures is also described.

  3. Laser Sources for Methane and Ozone Sensing for Earth Observation Science, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II program will build and deliver a tunable single-frequency laser operating in the 1.645 micron region on optimum CH4 absorption line features. Under...

  4. High Energy Single Frequency Fiber Laser at Low Repetition Rate, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase II project proposes a single frequency high energy fiber laser system operating at low repetition rate of 10 Hz to 1 kHz for coherent Lidar systems...

  5. A High Energy and High Efficiency Spectral Shaping Single Frequency Fiber Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase II project proposes a single frequency high energy fiber laser system for coherent Lidar systems for remote sensing. Current state-of-art...

  6. Non-Mechanical, Electro-Optic Beamsteerers for Space Based Laser Communications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this phase II SBIR we will design, build, test, and deliver extremely low Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) non-mechanical, electro-optic (EO) laser beamsteerers...

  7. Novel Solid State Lasers for Space-Based Water Vapor DIAL, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II program will develop novel laser transmitters needed for planned airborne and space-based active remote sensing missions. This program will build on...

  8. Efficient Tm-Fiber-Pumped Ho:YLF Laser System for Coherent LIDAR Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary objective of the proposed Phase II program is to develop and deliver a ruggedized, compact single-frequency 2050-nm-laser system suitable for coherent...

  9. Single-atom trapping and transport in DMD-controlled optical tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Dustin; Kuhn, Axel

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the trapping and manipulation of single neutral atoms in reconfigurable arrays of optical tweezers. Our approach offers unparalleled speed by using a Texas Instruments Digital Micro-mirror Device (DMD) as a holographic amplitude modulator with a frame rate of 20,000 per second. We show the trapping of static arrays of up to 20 atoms, as well as transport of individually selected atoms over a distance of 25{\\mu}m with laser cooling and 4{\\mu}m without. We discuss the limitations...

  10. Single-atom trapping and transport in DMD-controlled optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Dustin; Kuhn, Axel

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the trapping and manipulation of single neutral atoms in reconfigurable arrays of optical tweezers. Our approach offers unparalleled speed by using a Texas instruments digital micro-mirror device as a holographic amplitude modulator with a frame rate of 20 000 per second. We show the trapping of static arrays of up to 20 atoms, as well as transport of individually selected atoms over a distance of 25 μm with laser cooling and 4 μm without. We discuss the limitations of the technique and the scope for technical improvements.

  11. A novel single fiber optical tweezers based on light-induced thermal effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhihai; Liang, Peibo; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2015-07-01

    We present and demonstrate a novel single fiber optical tweezers which can trap and launch (clean) a target polystyrene (PS) microsphere (diameter~10μm) with independent control by using two wavelengths beams: 980nm and 1480nm. We employ 980nm laser beam to trap the target PS microsphere by molding the fiber tip into a special tapered-shape; and we employ 1480nm laser beam to launch the trapped PS microsphere with a certain velocity by using the thermophoresis force generated from the thermal effect due to the high absorption of the 1480nm laser beams in water. When the launching force is smaller than the trapping force, the PS microsphere will be trapped near the fiber tip, and the launching force will blow away other PS microspheres in the workspace realizing the cleaning function; When the launching force is larger than the trapping force, the trapped PS microsphere will be launched away from the fiber tip with a certain velocity and towards a certain direction, realizing the launching function. This PS microsphere launching and cleaning functions expanded new features of single fiber optical tweezers, providing for the possibility of more practical applications in the micro manipulation research fields.

  12. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  13. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC 6 (3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC 6 (3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC 6 (3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC 6 (3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics

  14. Dispersive light-matter interaction in programmable optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Bianca J.; Horvath, Milena S. J.; Deb, Amita B.; Kjørgaard, Niels

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a robust interrogation system using frequency modulation spectroscopy to measure the quantum state-dependent phase shift incurred on an off-resonant optical probe when transmitted by an atomic medium. Recently, our focus has been on extending this technique for the detection of Feshbach resonances in 87Rb atoms. Feshbach resonance is a mechanism which allows the atomic interaction strength to be precisely tuned via an external magnetic field. To access a Feshbach resonance atoms must be independently prepared in certain internal states, during which we utilize programmable optical tweezers to perform precise spatial micro-manipulation of the ensemble in laser "test-tubes." We use our dispersive probing system to identify the resonant magnetic field value in a sample with a dense "ball" geometry. An important design consideration for such a probing scheme is the three-dimensional mode-matching at the interface between light and the atomic sample when coupled by the dispersive interaction. We discuss challenges which dealing with this new geometry compared to the previously used prolate geometry, and consider the possibility of dipole-dipole interactions in our sample leading to cooperative light scattering processes.

  15. Rapid feedback control and stabilization of an optical tweezers with a budget microcontroller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nino, Daniel; Wang, Haowei; N Milstein, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Laboratories ranging the scientific disciplines employ feedback control to regulate variables within their experiments, from the flow of liquids within a microfluidic device to the temperature within a cell incubator. We have built an inexpensive, yet fast and rapidly deployed, feedback control system that is straightforward and flexible to implement from a commercially available Arduino Due microcontroller. This is in comparison with the complex, time-consuming and often expensive electronics that are commonly implemented. As an example of its utility, we apply our feedback controller to the task of stabilizing the main trapping laser of an optical tweezers. The feedback controller, which is inexpensive yet fast and rapidly deployed, was implemented from hacking an open source Arduino Due microcontroller. Our microcontroller based feedback system can stabilize the laser intensity to a few tenths of a per cent at 200 kHz, which is an order of magnitude better than the laser's base specifications, illustrating the utility of these devices. (paper)

  16. Rapid feedback control and stabilization of an optical tweezers with a budget microcontroller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nino, Daniel; Wang, Haowei; Milstein, Joshua N.

    2014-09-01

    Laboratories ranging the scientific disciplines employ feedback control to regulate variables within their experiments, from the flow of liquids within a microfluidic device to the temperature within a cell incubator. We have built an inexpensive, yet fast and rapidly deployed, feedback control system that is straightforward and flexible to implement from a commercially available Arduino Due microcontroller. This is in comparison with the complex, time-consuming and often expensive electronics that are commonly implemented. As an example of its utility, we apply our feedback controller to the task of stabilizing the main trapping laser of an optical tweezers. The feedback controller, which is inexpensive yet fast and rapidly deployed, was implemented from hacking an open source Arduino Due microcontroller. Our microcontroller based feedback system can stabilize the laser intensity to a few tenths of a per cent at 200 kHz, which is an order of magnitude better than the laser's base specifications, illustrating the utility of these devices.

  17. LMM Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOT) Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to expand the capabilities of the LMM for colloidal and other research by developing a holographic optical tweezers (HOT) module, allowing solid-state...

  18. Power spectrum analysis for optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, K.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted by an optical trap on a dielectric bead in a fluid is often found by fitting a Lorentzian to the power spectrum of Brownian motion of the bead in the trap. We present explicit functions of the experimental power spectrum that give the values of the parameters fitted, including...... error bars and correlations, for the best such chi(2) fit in a given frequency range. We use these functions to determine the information content of various parts of the power spectrum, and find, at odds with lore, much information at relatively high frequencies. Applying the method to real data, we...... obtain perfect fits and calibrate tweezers with less than 1% error when the trapping force is not too strong. Relatively strong traps have power spectra that cannot be fitted properly with any Lorentzian, we find. This underscores the need for better understanding of the power spectrum than...

  19. Miniaturized Optical Tweezers Through Fiber-End Microfabrication

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo

    2014-07-30

    Optical tweezers represent a powerful tool for a variety of applications both in biology and in physics, and their miniaturization and full integration is of great interest so as to reduce size (towards portable systems), and to minimize the required intervention from the operator. Optical fibers represent a natural solution to achieve this goal, and here we review the realization of single-fiber optical tweezers able to create a purely optical three-dimensional trap. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.

  20. Monolithic Rare Earth Doped PTR Glass Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a monolithic solid state laser on the basis of PTR glass co-doped with luminescent rare earth ions....

  1. 1.26 Single Frequency Fiber Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of an innovative compact, high power, and extremely reliable 1.26 micron Ho-doped single frequency fiber laser. The proposed...

  2. High Power, Thermally Optimized Blue Laser for Lidar, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enable widespread and rapid airborne bathymetric lidar to adequate depths in many ocean regions a low-cost, rugged, and high energy pulsed laser source must be...

  3. A modular assembling platform for manufacturing of microsystems by optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksouri, Sarah Isabelle; Aumann, Andreas; Ghadiri, Reza; Prüfer, Michael; Baer, Sebastian; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Due to the increased complexity in terms of materials and geometries for microsystems new assembling techniques are required. Assembling techniques from the semiconductor industry are often very specific and cannot fulfill all specifications in more complex microsystems. Therefore, holographic optical tweezers are applied to manipulate structures in micrometer range with highest flexibility and precision. As is well known non-spherical assemblies can be trapped and controlled by laser light and assembled with an additional light modulator application, where the incident laser beam is rearranged into flexible light patterns in order to generate multiple spots. The complementary building blocks are generated by a two-photon-polymerization process. The possibilities of manufacturing arbitrary microstructures and the potential of optical tweezers lead to the idea of combining manufacturing techniques with manipulation processes to "microrobotic" processes. This work presents the manipulation of generated complex microstructures with optical tools as well as a storage solution for 2PP assemblies. A sample holder has been developed for the manual feeding of 2PP building blocks. Furthermore, a modular assembling platform has been constructed for an `all-in-one' 2PP manufacturing process as a dedicated storage system. The long-term objective is the automation process of feeding and storage of several different 2PP micro-assemblies to realize an automated assembly process.

  4. Optical macro-tweezers: trapping of highly motile micro-organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhammer, G; Steiger, R; Bernet, S; Ritsch-Marte, M

    2011-01-01

    Optical micromanipulation stands for contact-free handling of microscopic particles by light. Optical forces can manipulate non-absorbing objects in a large range of sizes, e.g., from biological cells down to cold atoms. Recently much progress has been made going from the micro- down to the nanoscale. Less attention has been paid to going the other way, trapping increasingly large particles. Optical tweezers typically employ a single laser beam tightly focused by a microscope objective of high numerical aperture to stably trap a particle in three dimensions (3D). As the particle size increases, stable 3D trapping in a single-beam trap requires scaling up the optical power, which eventually induces adverse biological effects. Moreover, the restricted field of view of standard optical tweezers, dictated by the use of high NA objectives, is particularly unfavorable for catching actively moving specimens. Both problems can be overcome by traps with counter-propagating beams. Our 'macro-tweezers' are especially designed to trap highly motile organisms, as they enable three-dimensional all-optical trapping and guiding in a volume of 2 × 1 × 2 mm 3 . Here we report for the first time the optical trapping of large actively swimming organisms, such as for instance Euglena protists and dinoflagellates of up to 70 µm length. Adverse bio-effects are kept low since trapping occurs outside high intensity regions, e.g., focal spots. We expect our approach to open various possibilities in the contact-free handling of 50–100 µm sized objects that could hitherto not be envisaged, for instance all-optical holding of individual micro-organisms for taxonomic identification, selective collecting or tagging

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of iron-doped II-VI compounds for laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alan

    The middle Infrared (mid-IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum between 2 and 15 ?m has many features which are of interest to a variety of fields such as molecular spectroscopy, biomedical applications, industrial process control, oil prospecting, free-space communication and defense-related applications. Because of this, there is a demand for broadly tunable, laser sources operating over this spectral region which can be easily and inexpensively produced. II-VI semiconductor materials doped with transition metals (TM) such as Co 2+, Cr2+, or Fe2+ exhibit highly favorable spectroscopic characteristics for mid-IR laser applications. Among these TM dopants, Fe2+ has absorption and emission which extend the farthest into the longer wavelength portion of the mid-IR. Fe2+:II-VI crystals have been utilized as gain elements in laser systems broadly tunable over the 3-5.5 microm range [1] and as saturable absorbers to Q -switch [2] and mode-lock [3] laser cavities operating over the 2.7-3 microm. TM:II-VI laser gain elements can be fabricated inexpensively by means of post-growth thermal diffusion with large homogeneous dopant concentration and good optical quality[4,5]. The work outlined in this dissertation will focus on the spectroscopic characterization of TM-doped II-VI semiconductors. This work can be categorized into three major thrusts: 1) the development of novel laser materials, 2) improving and extending applications of TM:II-VI crystals as saturable absorbers, and 3) fabrication of laser active bulk crystals. Because current laser sources based on TM:II-VI materials do not cover the entire mid-IR spectral region, it is necessary to explore novel laser sources to extend available emissions toward longer wavelengths. The first objective of this dissertation is the spectroscopic characterization of novel ternary host crystals doped with Fe2+ ions. Using crystal field engineering, laser materials can be prepared with emissions placed in spectral regions not

  6. A Plasma Tweezer Concept to De-spin an Asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereen, Keon; Datta, Iman; You, Setthivoine

    2014-10-01

    The Plasma Tweezer is a new concept for controlled de-spinning and deflection of space bodies without mechanical contact. The method shoots plasma jets or beams at the target from a pair of plasma thrusters located at the end of each lever arm of a ``tweezer'' structure. The main spacecraft body is at the fulcrum point of the tweezer and the target is located between the thrusters. This arrangement cancels out the impulse of two plasma jets on the spacecraft and applies forces on opposite sides of the target. Careful timing and orientation of the jets can then provide the necessary forces to despin and redirect the target. This concept is more efficient than the Ion Beam Shepherd method [C. Bombardelli and J. Pelaez, J. Guid. Control Dyn. (2011)] because it does not require a secondary thruster to cancel momentum and can benefit from angular momentum stored in the spacecraft's initial spin stabilization.

  7. Optical tweezers force measurements to study parasites chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Fontes, A.; Almeida, D. B.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Ayres, D. C.; Giorgio, S.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we propose a methodology to study microorganisms chemotaxis in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. Forces involved in the movement of unicellular parasites are very small, in the femto-pico-Newton range, about the same order of magnitude of the forces generated in an Optical Tweezers. We applied this methodology to investigate the Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) and Trypanossoma cruzi (T. cruzi) under distinct situations.

  8. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Matthew [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2015-08-20

    By combining the top performing commercial laser beam stabilization system with the most ideal optical imaging configuration, the beamline for the Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will deliver the highest quality and most stable beam to the cathode. To determine the optimal combination, LCLS-II beamline conditions were replicated and the systems tested with a He-Ne laser. The Guidestar-II and MRC active laser beam stabilization systems were evaluated for their ideal positioning and stability. Both a two and four lens optical imaging configuration was then evaluated for beam imaging quality, magnification properties, and natural stability. In their best performances when tested over fifteen hours, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable over approximately 70-110um while the MRC system kept it stable over approximately 90-100um. During short periods of time, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable between 10-20um, but was more susceptible to drift over time, while the MRC system maintained the beam between 30-50um with less overall drift. The best optical imaging configuration proved to be a four lens system that images to the iris located in the cathode room and from there, imaged to the cathode. The magnification from the iris to the cathode was 2:1, within an acceptable tolerance to the expected 2.1:1 magnification. The two lens configuration was slightly more stable in small periods of time (less than 10 minutes) without the assistance of a stability system, approximately 55um compared to approximately 70um, but the four lens configurations beam image had a significantly flatter intensity distribution compared to the two lens configuration which had a Gaussian distribution. A final test still needs to be run with both stability systems running at the same time through the four lens system. With this data, the optimal laser beam stabilization system can be determined for the beamline of LCLS-II.

  9. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future

  10. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  11. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  12. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  13. Magneto-optical tweezers built around an inverted microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudet, Cyril; Bednar, Jan

    2005-01-01

    We present a simple experimental setup of magneto-optical tweezers built around an inverted microscope. Two pairs of coils placed around the focal point of the objective generate a planar-rotating magnetic field that is perpendicular to the stretching direction. This configuration allows us to control the rotary movement of a paramagnetic bead trapped in the optical tweezers. The mechanical design is universal and can be simply adapted to any inverted microscope and objective. The mechanical configuration permits the use of a rather large experimental cell and the simple assembly and disassembly of the magnetic attachment

  14. Active-passive calibration of optical tweezers in viscoelastic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Mario; Richardson, Andrew C; S Reihani, S Nader

    2010-01-01

    In order to use optical tweezers as a force measuring tool inside a viscoelastic medium such as the cytoplasm of a living cell, it is crucial to perform an exact force calibration within the complex medium. This is a nontrivial task, as many of the physical characteristics of the medium and probe......, e.g., viscosity, elasticity, shape, and density, are often unknown. Here, we suggest how to calibrate single beam optical tweezers in a complex viscoelastic environment. At the same time, we determine viscoelastic characteristics such as friction retardation spectrum and elastic moduli of the medium...

  15. Lasers in modern caries management--part II: CAMBRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Douglas A

    2005-01-01

    Part two of this series discussed the key strategies that each practice should focus on for caries management. History has proven that oral hygiene and "drilling and filling" alone will not eliminate dental caries. Chemical treatments to prevent and reverse early lesions and conservative, tooth-preserving restorative procedures when surgical intervention is necessary should be the new standard of care. Caries management by risk assessment (CAMBRA), where risk factors are "re-balanced" to that of health, is a sound strategy that is one step closer to "curative" dentistry and improving the quality of life of dental patients. The final article in this series will discuss the role that glass-ionomer materials and hard tissue lasers play in the minimally invasive restorative procedures for dental caries.

  16. Pulsed laser deposition of II-VI and III-V semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mele, A.; Di Palma, T.M.; Flamini, C.; Giardini Guidoni, A. [Rome, Univ. `La Sapienza` (Italy). Dep. di Chimica

    1998-12-01

    Pulsed laser irradiation of a solid target involves electronic excitation and heating, followed by expansion from the target of the elliptical gas cloud (plume) which can be eventually condensed on a suitable substrate. Pulsed laser ablation has been found to be a valuable technique to prepare II-VI and III-V thin films of semiconductor materials. Pulsed laser ablation deposition is discussed in the light of the results of an investigation on CdS, CdSe, CdTe and CdSe/CdTe multilayers and AIN, GaN and InN together with Al-Ga-In-N heterostructures. [Italiano] L`irradiazione di un target solido, mediante un fascio laser impulsato, genera una serie di processi che possono essere schematizzati come segue: riscaldamento ed eccitazione elettronica del target, da cui consegue l`espulsione di materiale sotto forma di una nube gassosa di forma ellissoidale (plume), che espande e puo` essere fatta depositare su un opportuno substrato. L`ablazione lasersi e` rivelata una tecnica valida per preparare film sottili di composti di elementi del II-VI e del III-V gruppo della tavola periodica. La deposizione via ablazione laser viene discussa alla luce dei risultati ottenuti nella preparazione di film di CdS, CdSe, CdTe e di film multistrato di CdSe/CdTe, di film di AIN, GaN, InN e di eterostrutture di Al-Ga-In-N.

  17. Accurate measurement of microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McLaren, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that matter may be trapped by optical fields with high intensity gradients. Once trapped, it is then possible to manipulate microscopic particles using such optical fields, in so-called optical tweezers. Such optical trapping...

  18. Construction of an optical tweezer for nanometer scale rheology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The optical tweezer is a versatile set-up that can be employed in a wide variety of studies investigating the microscopic properties of materials. In particular, this set-up has in recent times been gainfully employed in probing rheological properties of materials that exhibit viscoelasticity. These measurements can ...

  19. 3D Manipulation of Protein Microcrystals with Optical Tweezers for X-ray Crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikima, T; Hashimoto, K; Murakami, H; Ueno, G; Kawano, Y; Hirata, K; Hasegawa, K; Kumasaka, T; Yamamoto, M

    2013-01-01

    In some synchrotron facilities such as SPring-8, X-ray microbeams have been utilized for protein crystallography, allowing users to collect diffraction data from a protein microcrystal. Usually, a protein crystal is picked up manually from a crystallization droplet. However it is very difficult to manipulate the protein microcrystals which are very small and fragile against a shock and changes of temperature and solvent condition. We have been developing an automatic system applying the optical tweezers with two lensed fiber probes to manipulate the fragile protein microcrystal. The system succeeded in trapping a crystal and levitating it onto the cryoloop in the solvent. X-ray diffraction measurement for the manipulated protein microcrystals indicated that laser irradiation and trap with 1064nm wavelength hardly affected the result of X-ray structural analysis.

  20. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of COOH-Functionalized SWCNTs Trapped with Optoelectronic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OETs were used to trap and deposit aqueous dispersions of carboxylic-acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. Dark-field video microscopy was used to visualize the dynamics of the bundles both with and without virtual electrodes, showing rapid accumulation of carbon nanotubes when optical virtual electrodes are actuated. Raman microscopy was used to probe SWCNT materials following deposition onto metallic fiducial markers as well as during trapping. The local carbon nanotube concentration was observed to increase rapidly during trapping by more than an order of magnitude in less than one second due to localized optical dielectrophoresis forces. This combination of enrichment and spectroscopy with a single laser spot suggests a broad range of applications in physical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  1. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy; Probabilidades de transicion de algunos niveles de Cr II, Na II y Sb I medediante espectroscopia de plasma producidos por laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A. M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-07-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities ({approx}{approx} 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs.

  2. 'Lissajous-like' trajectories in optical tweezers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hay, R. F.; Gibson, G. M.; Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Padgett, M. J.; Phillips, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 25 (2015), s. 31716-31727 ISSN 1094-4087 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : low Reynolds number * particles * force Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.148, year: 2015

  3. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A. M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-01-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities (∼∼ 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs

  4. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-09-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. The plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. The light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 to 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0.2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sb alloys. To avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000K), electron densities (approx 10 ''16 cm''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained

  5. Transition probabilities of some Si II lines obtained by laser produced plasma emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.; Botho, B.; Campos, J.

    1995-01-01

    The absolute transition probabilities for 28 Si II spectral lines have been determined by measurement of emission line intensities from laser-produced plasmas of Si in Ar and Kr atmospheres. The studied plasma has a temperature of about 2 . 10 4 K and 10 17 cm -3 electron density. The local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions and plasma homogeneity have been checked. The results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and with present Hartree-Fock calculations in LS coupling. (orig.)

  6. Photoacoustic monitoring of steam bubble cavitation in water superheated by TEA CO II laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Lyon, Kevin; Allen, Susan D.

    2006-02-01

    Using a TEA CO II laser for explosive surface boiling of bulk water, oscillatory acoustic transients from steam bubbles were recorded using a contact photoacoustic technique. Multiple well-resolved, high-amplitude multi-MHz spectral features representing high-order combination acoustic oscillations of steam bubbles were revealed in spectra obtained by means of numerical Fast Fourier Transformation of these transients. A potential parametric generation mechanism for these high-order combination oscillation modes of steam bubbles is discussed.

  7. Laser operation by dissociation of metal complexes. II - New transitions in Cd, Fe, Ni, Se, Sn, Te, V, and Zn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, M. S.; Cool, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    The reported investigation is a continuation of a study conducted by Chou and Cool (1976). The experimental results discussed are partly related to laser transitions in Cd(I), Cd(II), and Zn(II). Laser transitions in Fe(I), Ni(I), Sn(I), Te(I), and V(I) are also considered along with the observation of a laser pulse with two peaks in connection with the study of laser transitions in Se(I). Experiments related to prospective visible laser operation in thallium at 6550 and 6714 are also discussed, giving attention to spontaneous emission measurements at 6550 and 5350 A, the effects of additive molecules, and laser cavity experiments at 6550 and 6714 A.

  8. Solid-State Ceramic Laser Material for Remote Sensing of Ozone Using Nd:Yttria, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II we will develop transparent Nd:Yttria ceramic laser materials that can operate at 914 nm and 946 nm suitable for applications in ozone LIDAR systems. We...

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of confocal scan laser ophthalmoscope (HRT II) versus GDX for diagnosing glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari-Payam, Mahdi; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Yaghoubi, Mohsen; Moradijou, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of confocal scan laser ophthalmoscopy (HRT II) and compare it with scanning laser polarimetry (GDx) for diagnosing glaucoma. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed at two eye hospitals in Iran. The outcome was measured as the proportion of correctly diagnosed patients based on systematic review and Meta analysis. Costs were estimated at two hospitals that used the HRT II (Noor Hospital) and current diagnostic testing technology GDx (Farabi Hospital) from the perspective of the healthcare provider. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated on the base scenario. Annual average costs were estimated as 12.70 USD and 13.59 USD per HRT II and GDx test in 2012, respectively. It was assumed that 80% of the maximum feasible annual tests in a work shift would be performed using HRT II and GDx and that the glaucoma-positive (Gl+) proportion would be 56% in the referred eyes; the estimated diagnostic accuracies were 0.753 and 0.737 for GDx and HRT II, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated at USD44.18 per additional test accuracy. In a base sensitivity sampling analysis, we considered different proportions of Gl+ patients (30%-85%), one or two work shifts, and efficiency rate (60%-100%), and found that the ICER ranged from USD29.45to USD480.26, the lower and upper values in all scenarios. Based on ICER, HRT II as newer diagnostic technology is cost-effective according to the World Health Organization threshold of <1 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita in Iran in 2012 (USD7228). Although GDx is more accurate and costly, the average cost-effectiveness ratio shows that HRT II provided diagnostic accuracy at a lower cost than GDx.

  10. Stark broadening in the laser-induced Cu I and Cu II spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skočić, M; Burger, M; Nikolić, Z; Bukvić, S; Djeniže, S

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present the Stark widths (W) of 22 neutral (Cu I) and 100 singly ionized (Cu II) copper spectral lines that have been measured at 18 400 K and 19 300 K electron temperatures and 6.3 × 10  22 m −3 and 2.1 × 10  23 m −3 electron densities, respectively. The experiment is conducted in the laser-induced plasma—the Nd:YAG laser, operating at 532 nm, was used to produce plasma from the copper sample in the residual air atmosphere at a pressure of 8 Pa. The electron temperature and density were estimated by the Boltzmann-plot method and from the Saha equation. The investigated Cu I lines belong to the 4s–4p′, 4s  2 –4p″ and 4p′–4d′ transitions while Cu II spectral lines belong to the 4s–4p, 4p–5s, 4p–4d, 4p–4s  2 , 4d–4f and 4d–v transitions. Comparison with existing experimental data was possible only in the case of 17 Cu II lines due to a lack of experimental and theoretical values. The rest of the data, Stark widths of 22 Cu I and 83 Cu II lines are published for the first time. (paper)

  11. Measurement of the BESSY II electron beam energy by Compton-backscattering of laser photons

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, R; Thornagel, R; Brandt, G; Görgen, R; Ulm, G

    2002-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of all storage ring parameters is essential for the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) to operate the electron storage ring BESSY II as a primary source standard. One parameter entering the Schwinger equation for the calculation of the spectral photon flux of bending magnet radiation is the electron beam energy. So at BESSY II the electron beam energy is measured by two independent techniques one of which is described in this paper: the photons from a CO sub 2 -laser are scattered in a head-on collision with the stored electrons. From the spectrum of the backscattered photons that are detected by an energy-calibrated HPGe detector the electron beam energy can be determined. The experimental set-up at the BESSY II electron storage ring as well as the current experimental status are described for operation of the storage ring at the energies of 900 and 1700 MeV.

  12. Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbock, L J; Otto, O; Skarstam, D R; Jahn, S; Chimerel, C; Gornall, J L; Keyser, U F, E-mail: ufk20@cam.ac.u [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-17

    We combine for the first time optical tweezer experiments with the resistive pulse technique based on capillaries. Quartz glass capillaries are pulled into a conical shape with tip diameters as small as 27 nm. Here, we discuss the translocation of {lambda}-phage DNA which is driven by an electrophoretic force through the nanocapillary. The resulting change in ionic current indicates the folding state of single {lambda}-phage DNA molecules. Our flow cell design allows for the straightforward incorporation of optical tweezers. We show that a DNA molecule attached to an optically trapped colloid is pulled into a capillary by electrophoretic forces. The detected electrophoretic force is in good agreement with measurements in solid-state nanopores.

  13. Dynamic array generation and pattern formation for optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, P.C.; Glückstad, J.

    2000-01-01

    The generalised phase contrast approach is used for the generation of optical arrays of arbitrary beam shape, suitable for applications in optical tweezers for the manipulation of biological specimens. This approach offers numerous advantages over current techniques involving the use of computer-......-generated holograms or diffractive optical elements. We demonstrate a low-loss system for generating intensity patterns suitable for the trapping and manipulation of small particles or specimens....

  14. Recent Achievements on Photovoltaic Optoelectronic Tweezers Based on Lithium Niobate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel García-Cabañes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an up-dated summary of the fundamentals and applications of optoelectronic photovoltaic tweezers for trapping and manipulation of nano-objects on the surface of lithium niobate crystals. It extends the contents of previous reviews to cover new topics and developments which have emerged in recent years and are marking the trends for future research. Regarding the theoretical description of photovoltaic tweezers, detailed simulations of the electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic forces acting on different crystal configurations are discussed in relation to the structure of the obtained trapping patterns. As for the experimental work, we will pay attention to the manipulation and patterning of micro-and nanoparticles that has experimented an outstanding progress and relevant applications have been reported. An additional focus is now laid on recent work about micro-droplets, which is a central topic in microfluidics and optofluidics. New developments in biology and biomedicine also constitute a relevant part of the review. Finally, some topics partially related with photovoltaic tweezers and a discussion on future prospects and challenges are included.

  15. Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

  16. Phosphorescent Platinum(II) and Palladium(II) Complexes with Azatetrabenzoporphyrins—New Red Laser Diode-Compatible Indicators for Optical Oxygen Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A new class of oxygen indicators is described. Platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes of azatetrabenzoporphyrins occupy an intermediate position between tetrabenzoporphyrins and phthalocyanines and combine features of both. The new dyes are excitable in the red part of the spectrum and possess strong room-temperature NIR phosphorescence. Other features include excellent spectral compatibility with the red laser diodes and 632.8 nm line of He−Ne laser, excellent photostability, and significantly shorter decay times than for the respective meso-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrins. Applicability of the complexes for optical oxygen sensing is demonstrated. PMID:20186289

  17. Exact theory of optical tweezers and its application to absolute calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutra, Rafael de Sousa; Viana, Nathan B.; Maia Neto, Paulo A.

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become a powerful tool for basic and applied research in cell biology. Here, we describe an experimentally verified theory for the trapping forces generated by optical tweezers based on first principles that allows absolute calibration. For pedagogical reasons, the steps tha...

  18. Determination of femto Newton forces and fluid viscosity using optical tweezers: application to Leishmania amazonensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes B., Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Marques, Gustavo P.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this research is to use the displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) as a force transducer in mechanical measurements in life sciences. To do this we compared the theoretical optical and hydrodynamic models with experimental data under a broad variation of parameters such as fluid viscosity, refractive index, drag velocity and wall proximities. The laser power was measured after the objective with an integration sphere because normal power meters do not provide an accurate measurement for beam with high numerical apertures. With this careful laser power determination the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under very different conditions shows an almost 45 degrees straight line. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces and vice-versa. With this calibration we observed the forces of polystyrene bead attached to the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. The force range is from 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons and these experiments shows that OT can be used for infection mechanism and chemotaxis studies in parasites. The other application was to use the optical force to measure viscosities of few microliters sample. Our result shows 5% accuracy measurements.

  19. Atomic data of Ti II from laser produced Ti plasmas by optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refaie, A.I.; Farrag, A.A.; El Sharkawy, H.; El Sherbini, T.M.

    2005-06-01

    In the present study, the emission spectrum of titanium produced from laser induced plasma has been measured at different distances from the target. The Titanium target is irradiated by using the high power Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=1064 nm) that generates energy 750 mJ/pulse of duration rate 6 ns and repetition rate 10 Hz in vacuum and at different distances. The variation of the distance from the target affects the measured plasma parameters, i.e. the electron density, the ion temperature and the velocity distribution. The electron density increases with the increase of the distance from the target. At a distance 0.6 mm from the target it decreases to 2.28·10 16 cm -3 . The temperature increases with the distance from the get until a distance of 1 mm, after that it decreases. It is found that the plasma velocity increases with the distance then it decreases again. Then, Energy levels and transition probabilities for 3d 2 4p →(3d 2 4s + 3d 3 ) lines have been determined by measurement of emission line intensities from an optically thin laser produced plasma of Ti II in vacuum. Calculations with intermediate coupling using Hartree-Fock wave functions have been carried out in order to place the experimental data on an absolute scale and also to evaluate the lifetimes. The plasma parameters in different regions of the plasma plume have been measured and used to obtain further transition probabilities. (author)

  20. Optical Fiber Tweezers Fabricated by Guided Wave Photo-Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita S. Rodrigues Ribeiro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the use of guided wave photo-polymerization for the fabrication of novel polymeric micro tips for optical trapping is demonstrated. It is shown that the selective excitation of linear polarized modes, during the fabrication process, has a direct impact on the shape of the resulting micro structures. Tips are fabricated with modes LP02 and LP21 and their shapes and output intensity distribution are compared. The application of the micro structures as optical tweezers is demonstrated with the manipulation of yeast cells.

  1. Probing the mechanical properties, conformational changes, and interactions of nucleic acids with magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Franziska; Ermann, Niklas; Lipfert, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acids are central to the storage and transmission of genetic information. Mechanical properties, along with their sequence, both enable and fundamentally constrain the biological functions of DNA and RNA. For small deformations from the equilibrium conformations, nucleic acids are well described by an isotropic elastic rod model. However, external forces and torsional strains can induce conformational changes, giving rise to a complex force-torque phase diagram. This review focuses on magnetic tweezers as a powerful tool to precisely determine both the elastic parameters and conformational transitions of nucleic acids under external forces and torques at the single-molecule level. We review several variations of magnetic tweezers, in particular conventional magnetic tweezers, freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers, and discuss their characteristic capabilities. We then describe the elastic rod model for DNA and RNA and discuss conformational changes induced by mechanical stress. The focus lies on the responses to torque and twist, which are crucial in the mechanics and interactions of nucleic acids and can directly be measured using magnetic tweezers. We conclude by highlighting several recent studies of nucleic acid-protein and nucleic acid-small-molecule interactions as further applications of magnetic tweezers and give an outlook of some exciting developments to come. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Invited Article: A review of haptic optical tweezers for an interactive microworld exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacoret, Cécile; Régnier, Stéphane

    2013-08-01

    This paper is the first review of haptic optical tweezers, a new technique which associates force feedback teleoperation with optical tweezers. This technique allows users to explore the microworld by sensing and exerting picoNewton-scale forces with trapped microspheres. Haptic optical tweezers also allow improved dexterity of micromanipulation and micro-assembly. One of the challenges of this technique is to sense and magnify picoNewton-scale forces by a factor of 1012 to enable human operators to perceive interactions that they have never experienced before, such as adhesion phenomena, extremely low inertia, and high frequency dynamics of extremely small objects. The design of optical tweezers for high quality haptic feedback is challenging, given the requirements for very high sensitivity and dynamic stability. The concept, design process, and specification of optical tweezers reviewed here are focused on those intended for haptic teleoperation. In this paper, two new specific designs as well as the current state-of-the-art are presented. Moreover, the remaining important issues are identified for further developments. The initial results obtained are promising and demonstrate that optical tweezers have a significant potential for haptic exploration of the microworld. Haptic optical tweezers will become an invaluable tool for force feedback micromanipulation of biological samples and nano- and micro-assembly parts.

  3. Determination of fluid viscosity and femto Newton forces of Leishmania amazonensis using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes, Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; de Y. Pozzo, Liliana; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-08-01

    The displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) can be used as a force transducer for mechanical measurements in life sciences such as the measurement of forces of living microorganisms or the viscosity of local fluids. The technique we used allowed us to measure forces on the 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons range of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. These observations can be used to understand the infection mechanism and chemotaxis of these parasites. The same technique was used to measure viscosities of few microliters sample with agreement with known samples better than 5%. To calibrate the force as a function of the microsphere displacement we first dragged the microsphere in a fluid at known velocity for a broad range of different optical and hydrodynamical parameters. The hydrodynamical model took into account the presence of two walls and the force depends on drag velocity, fluid viscosity and walls proximities, while the optical model in the geometric optics regime depends on the particle and fluid refractive indexes and laser power. To measure the high numerical (NA) aperture laser beam power after the objective we used an integration sphere to avoid the systematic errors of usual power meters for high NA beams. After this careful laser power measurement we obtained an almost 45 degrees straight line for the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle horizontal displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under variation of all the parameters described below. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces, as we have done for the parasite force measurement, or vice-versa, as we did for the viscosity measurements.

  4. The repeatability of three diagnostic methods (visual using ICDAS II, laser fluorescence, and radiographic) for early caries detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukmasari, S.; Lestari, W.; Ko, B. B.; Noh, Z.; Asmail, N.; Yaacob, N.

    2017-08-01

    Newly introduced ICDAS II as a visual method, laser fluorescence as another technique that have ability to quantify early mineral loss of tooth structure and intra oral radiograph, are methods can be used in the clinic. To provide standardization for comprehensive caries management at an early stage, all methods supposed to be tested between users. The objective of this research is to evaluate the repeatability of each system. It is a comparative cross sectional study using 100 extracted permanent teeth without obvious cavitation (premolar & molar) that were collected and stored in thymol solution. The teeth were embedded on the wax block and labeled with numbers. All 5 surfaces were examined by 5 examiners using visual (ICDAS II), laser fluorescence (LF) and radiographic examination. The data were then analyzed to measure intra and inter examiner repeatability using Cronbach’s alpha and inter-item correlation matrix. Intra-examiner repeatability for all examiners was >0.7. Chronbach’s a value for inter-examiner repeatability for ICDAS II was >0.8 on 3 surfaces except on buccal and lingual. LF exhibit repeatability of >0.8 on all surfaces. Radiograph shows a low value of inter examiner repeatability (caries detection in daily clinical basis. Laser fluorescence exhibits the highest repeatability while the radiograph showed weak inter-examiner repeatability. Treatment decisions of ICDAS II propose more preventive treatment for early caries lesions compared to laser fluorescence.

  5. Holographic Raman tweezers controlled by multi-modal natural user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomori, Zoltán; Keša, Peter; Nikorovič, Matej; Valušová, Eva; Antalík, Marián; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Holographic optical tweezers provide a contactless way to trap and manipulate several microobjects independently in space using focused laser beams. Although the methods of fast and efficient generation of optical traps are well developed, their user friendly control still lags behind. Even though several attempts have appeared recently to exploit touch tablets, 2D cameras, or Kinect game consoles, they have not yet reached the level of natural human interface. Here we demonstrate a multi-modal ‘natural user interface’ approach that combines finger and gaze tracking with gesture and speech recognition. This allows us to select objects with an operator’s gaze and voice, to trap the objects and control their positions via tracking of finger movement in space and to run semi-automatic procedures such as acquisition of Raman spectra from preselected objects. This approach takes advantage of the power of human processing of images together with smooth control of human fingertips and downscales these skills to control remotely the motion of microobjects at microscale in a natural way for the human operator. (paper)

  6. Dynamic measurements and simulations of airborne picolitre-droplet coalescence in holographic optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bzdek, Bryan R.; Reid, Jonathan P.; Collard, Liam; Sprittles, James E.; Hudson, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    We report studies of the coalescence of pairs of picolitre aerosol droplets manipulated with holographic optical tweezers, probing the shape relaxation dynamics following coalescence by simultaneously monitoring the intensity of elastic backscattered light (EBL) from the trapping laser beam (time resolution on the order of 100 ns) while recording high frame rate camera images (time resolution <10 μs). The goals of this work are to: resolve the dynamics of droplet coalescence in holographic optical traps; assign the origin of key features in the time-dependent EBL intensity; and validate the use of the EBL alone to precisely determine droplet surface tension and viscosity. For low viscosity droplets, two sequential processes are evident: binary coalescence first results from the overlap of the optical traps on the time scale of microseconds followed by the recapture of the composite droplet in an optical trap on the time scale of milliseconds. As droplet viscosity increases, the relaxation in droplet shape eventually occurs on the same time scale as recapture, resulting in a convoluted evolution of the EBL intensity that inhibits quantitative determination of the relaxation time scale. Droplet coalescence was simulated using a computational framework to validate both experimental approaches. The results indicate that time-dependent monitoring of droplet shape from the EBL intensity allows for robust determination of properties such as surface tension and viscosity. Finally, the potential of high frame rate imaging to examine the coalescence of dissimilar viscosity droplets is discussed.

  7. Proceedings of the OPTELACIC 2009. VI International TECNOLASER Event. II Meeting of Optic, Life and Heritage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    The Center of Applied Technologies and Nuclear Development (CEADEN) and the Cuban Physical Society (SCF) celebrated the VI International Workshop Tecnolaser, T ECNOLASER 2009 , and the II International Meeting Optics, Life and Heritage in the CAPITOLIO, Havana, Cuba, the week of 13-16 April 2009, under the general lemma O ptics and Laser Technology in Science, Industry and Culture . Main Topics for Tecnolaser Session: Laser technology, optics, processing of images, and spectroscopy in medicine, biology, chemistry, nonotechnology and industry; Electronics, mechanics and automation associated to optics and laser techniques; Development and construction of laser installations, instruments and optic elements; Optoelectronic, photonic and fiber optic; Processing of materials with laser; Optic techniques of measurement and spectroscopy and Optic tweezers. Main Topics for Optics, Life and Heritage: Optics and Light in Life Sciences; Environmental Analysis by Means of Optics, Image Processing, or Laser spectroscopy; Optics, Laser, Image Processing or Spectroscopy in Heritage Conservation and Restauration; Optics and Holography in Art; Archaeological and Museological Optics Applications; Hand drawn holography and Biophotonic

  8. The study of adhesive forces between the type-3 fimbriae of Klebsiella pneumoniae and collagen-coated surfaces by using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chiahan; Fan, Chia-chieh; Huang, Ying-Jung; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Long, Hsu

    2004-10-01

    Adherence to host cells by a bacterial pathogen is a critical step for establishment of infection. It will contribute greatly to the understanding of bacterial pathogenesis by studying the biological force between a single pair of pathogen and host cell. In our experiment, we use a calibrated optical tweezers system to detach a single Klebsiella pneumoniae, the pathogen, from collagen, the host. By gradually increasing the laser power of the optical tweezers until the Klebsiella pneumoniae is detached from the collagen, we obtain the magnitude of the adhesive force between them. This happens when the adhesive force is barely equal to the trapping force provided by the optical tweezers at that specific laser power. This study is important because Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen which causes suppurative lesions, urinary and respiratory tract infections. It has been proved that type 3 fimbrial adhesin (mrkD) is strongly associated with the adherence of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Besides, four polymorphic mrkD alleles: namely, mrkDv1, v2, v3, and v4, are typed by using RFLP. In order to investigate the relationship between the structure and the function for each of these variants, DNA fragments encoding the major fimbrial proteins mrkA, mrkB, mrkC are expressed together with any of the four mrkD adhesins in E. coli JM109. Our study shows that the E. coli strain carrying the mrkDv3 fimbriae has the strongest binding activity. This suggests that mrkDv3 is a key factor that enhances the adherence of Klebsiella Pneumoniae to human body.

  9. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    traditional cell counting methods. Keywords. Antimicrobial activity; optical tweezer; bacterial suspensions; silver nanoparticles. 1. Introduction. The toxicity of silver ions and silver containing compounds on microbes is well known. Nanoparticles of silver are expected to exhibit enhanced antimicrobial properties when.

  10. Flocking multiple microparticles with automatically controlled optical tweezers: solutions and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyao; Wang, Can; Lou, Yunjiang

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an efficient approach to achieve microparticles flocking with robotics and optical tweezers technologies. All particles trapped by optical tweezers can be automatically moved toward a predefined region without collision. The main contribution of this paper lies in the proposal of several solutions to the flocking manipulation of microparticles in microenvironments. First, a simple flocking controller is proposed to generate the desired positions and velocities for particles' movement. Second, a velocity saturation method is implemented to prevent the desired velocities from exceeding a safe limit. Third, a two-layer control architecture is proposed for the motion control of optical tweezers. This architecture can help make many robotic manipulations achievable under microenvironments. The proposed approach with these solutions can be applied to many bioapplications especially in cell engineering and biomedicine. Experiments on yeast cells with a robot-tweezers system are finally performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  11. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2009-08-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45°, smaller angles give a full 2π phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  12. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2009-01-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45 deg., smaller angles give a full 2π phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  13. Mechanical properties of a giant liposome studied using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitamichi, Yoko; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2009-09-01

    The mechanical properties of a micrometer-sized giant liposome are studied by deforming it from the inside using dual-beam optical tweezers. As the liposome is extended, its shape changes from a sphere to a lemon shape, and finally, a tubular part is generated. The surface tension σ and the bending rigidity κ of the lipid membrane are obtained from the measured force-extension curve. In a one-phase liposome, it was found that σ increases as the charged component increases but κ remains approximately constant. In a two-phase liposome, the characteristic deformation and the force-extension curve differ from those observed for the one-phase liposome.

  14. Novedosa pinza lumínica New light tweezer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bernstein

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta la primera pinza adaptada a la novedosa tecnología lumínica, mediante diodo ultrabrillante, sin cables ni fibra óptica, a fin de lograr la adecuada iluminación de cavidades oscuras de difícil acceso, y que gracias a su cobertura aislante y su punta libre, permite la cauterización bajo buena iluminación de vasos sangrantes distales, sin lesionar sitios de apoyo accidental de sus ramas.Introducing the first tweezer adjusted to the newest lighting technology though ultra-bright diode, without cables nor optical fiber to obtain the proper illumination of dark and hard acces caves, and thanks to its insulating cover, and its free point allows the cauterization under good illumination of bloody vasels without injurying sites of accidental supports of its branches.

  15. iTweezers: optical micromanipulation controlled by an Apple iPad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, R W; Gibson, G; Padgett, M J; Carberry, D; Picco, L; Miles, M

    2011-01-01

    The 3D interactive manipulation of multiple particles with holographic optical tweezers is often hampered by the control system. We use a multi-touch interface implemented on an Apple iPad to overcome many of the limitations of mouse-based control, and demonstrate an elegant and intuitive interface to multi-particle manipulation. This interface connects to the tweezers system hardware over a wireless network, allowing it to function as a remote monitor and control device. (technical note)

  16. Femtosecond-laser experiment for Master II students: generation, measurement and control of femtoseconds pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druon, Fréderic; Peyrot, Tom; Larrouy, Arthur; Courvoisier, Arnaud; Lejeune, Cédric; Avignon, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    In the framework of the experiment platform LEnsE (Laboratoire d'Enseignement Expérimental) of the Institut d'Optique Graduate School in Palaiseau, we present a new lab work dedicated to Master-­-II-­-level students. This lab work is integrated in the formation in the field of ultrashort-­-pulse lasers and its objective is to train students to this specific technology. The varied topics include generation, measurement and basic control of ultrashort pulses. Key concepts are studied, such as the time-­-frequency duality, nonlinear effects, the group velocity dispersion (GVD) and more generally managing spectral and temporal phase. The lab work is based on a totally accessible Ti:sapphire laser (Mira 800 from Coherent). It is used to understand crucial concepts in the generation process such as GVD and self-­-phase-­-modulation in the solitonic regime and Kerr lens mode-­-locking. Because the pulse measurement is a crucial issue to address in ultrafast optics, the lab work also studies different apparatus commonly used to fully characterize fs pulse train: photodiode, spectrometer, and more specifically second-­-order autocorrelator. The autocorrelation concept is detailed using a homemade accessible apparatus. For a simple manipulation of femtosecond pulses, we propose to realize a spectral-­-phase control with high-­-dispersive glass to temporally stretch the pulses. GTI mirrors then re-­-compress them. The three pillars generation-­-measurement-­-control will be described with a practical approach at the conference.

  17. Laser-Directed CVD 3D Printing System for Refractory Metal Propulsion Hardware, Phase II, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this work, Ultramet is developing a three-dimensional (3D) laser-directed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) additive manufacturing system to build free-form...

  18. High-Power, High-Efficiency 1.907nm Diode Lasers, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — nLight developed high-power, high-efficiency laser diodes emitting at 1907nm for the pumping of solid-state lasers during the Phase I. The innovation brought to bear...

  19. Coherent Laser Radar Metrology System for Large Scale Optical Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of laser radar metrology inspection system is proposed that incorporates a novel, dual laser coherent detection scheme capable of eliminating both...

  20. Laser Power Transmission Employing a Dual-Use Photovoltaic Concentrator at the Receiving End, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a wireless laser power transmission system employing a dual-use photovoltaic concentrator at the receiving end. Specifically, the laser...

  1. Argon-Doped Capsule Implosion Experiments on the Shenguang-II Laser Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhimin; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Jiyan; Miao, Wenyong; Chen, Jiabin; Yang, Guohong; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Zhang, Baohan

    2017-10-01

    Argon is often doped in the hydrogen isotope capsule as the tracer for diagnosing the status of the hot spot in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments. Implosion performance could be affected by the doped argon. For instance, it could bring about the concentration of the heavier argon ions in the center of hot spot, thus degrading the implosion performance. Moreover, implosion mix could be investigated by doping heavier elements in hydrogen isotope capsule, and the atomic-mix effects have been investigated in the pioneering studies. In this talk, we present the performance of argon-doped implosion experiments, in which D-D reaction was used for the substitute of D-T fuel. The experiments were conducted on the Shenguang-II laser facility. The doping-fraction of argon was set as 1%, 2% and 10% (atomic fraction). The temperature and density of electrons are determined by the K-shell emission spectra of the highly-ionized argon. The size of hot spot was recorded by a time-resolving x-ray monochromatic imaging system. The neutron yield were detected by both BF3 and scintillator detectors. A strong correlation between argon x-ray line intensity and neutron yields have been found in the experiments, and the convergence ratios deduced from the hot-spot imaging agree well with numerical simulation for the difference doping fraction which brings about the change of the equations of states and radiative opacity. NSFC Grant under Contract No. 11675158.

  2. Using optical tweezers for measuring the interaction forces between human bone cells and implant surfaces: System design and force calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Martin; Madgavkar, Ashwin; Stjerndahl, Maria; Wu, Yanrong; Tan, Weihong; Duran, Randy; Niehren, Stefan; Mustafa, Kamal; Arvidson, Kristina; Wennerberg, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Optical tweezers were used to study the interaction and attachment of human bone cells to various types of medical implant materials. Ideally, the implant should facilitate cell attachment and promote migration of the progenitor cells in order to decrease the healing time. It is therefore of interest, in a controlled manner, to be able to monitor the cell adhesion process. Results from such studies would help foresee the clinical outcome of integrating medical implants. The interactions between two primary cell culture models, human gingival fibroblasts and bone forming human osteoblast cells, and three different implant materials, glass, titanium, and hydroxyapatite, were studied. A novel type of optical tweezers, which has a newly designed quadrant detector and a powerful 3 W laser was constructed and force calibrated using two different methods: one method in which the stiffness of the optical trap was obtained by monitoring the phase lag between the trap and the moved object when imposing a forced oscillation on the trapped object and another method in which the maximum trapping force was derived from the critical velocity at which the object escapes the trap. Polystyrene beads as well as cells were utilized for the calibrations. This is the first time that cells have been used directly for these types of force calibrations and, hence, direct measurements of forces exerted on cells can be performed, thus avoiding the difficulties often encountered when translating the results obtained from cell measurements to the calibrations obtained with reference materials. This more straightforward approach represents an advantage in comparison to established methods

  3. Novel method to sample very high power CO2 lasers: II Continuing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric, John; Seibert, Daniel B., II; Green, Lawrence I.

    2005-04-01

    For the past 28 years, the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory (LHMEL) at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH, has worked with CO2 lasers capable of producing continuous energy up to 150 kW. These lasers are used in a number of advanced materials processing applications that require accurate spatial energy measurements of the laser. Conventional non-electronic methods are not satisfactory for determining the spatial energy profile. This paper describes continuing efforts in qualifying the new method in which a continuous, real-time electronic spatial energy profile can be obtained for very high power, (VHP) CO2 lasers.

  4. Development and Demonstration of a Multiplexed Magnetic Tweezers Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith Charles

    This dissertation is concerned with the methods and applications of single molecule force spectroscopy. In the introduction, the traditional single molecule force spectroscopy instruments are introduced and the advantages and drawbacks of each are discussed. The first chapter is a review of methods to ensure that biomolecular bond lifetime parameter estimations are not contaminated by multiple bond data. This review culminates in an examination of the literature on the strength of the bond between biotin and streptavidin and finds that by filtering the numerous publications for those that clearly demonstrate specific single bond behavior, there is a consensus of the bond strength and kinetic parameters. The second chapter of the dissertation discusses the capabilities of a magnetic tweezer assay, which combines massive multiplexing, precision bead tracking, and bi-directional force control into a flexible and stabile platform for examining single molecule behavior. Using a novel method for increasing the precision of force estimations on heterogeneous paramagnetic beads, I demonstrate the instrument by examining the force dependence of uncoiling and recoiling velocity of type 1 fimbriae from Eschericia coli (E. coli) bacteria, and see similar results to previous studies. Chapter 3 is a study of the lifetime of the activated FimH-mannose bond under various force conditions using the previously described magnetic tweezer. The bond is found to be extremely long-lived at forces less than 30 pN, with an average lifetime > 1000 times longer than the biotin-streptavidin bond, making it one of the strongest non-covalent interactions known in nature. Furthermore, the average lifetime of the bond is similar between 9 and 30 pN of force, suggesting a force range at which the lifetime is force-independent, demonstrating ideal bond behavior for the first time in a natural system. It is hypothesized that the long lifetime and ideal behavior is due to a gateway that locks mannose

  5. Comparison of CO2 and Nd:YAG laser welding of grade 250 maraging steel, IIW doc. II-A-173-06

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available :YAG Laser Welding of Grade 250 Maraging Steel IIW Doc. II-A-173-06 C. van Rooyen1, H.P. Burger1, P. Kazadi1, C. Kriek2 1National Laser Centre-CSIR, Meiring Naude Rd, Pretoria, South Africa 2Denel Land Systems, Western Cape, Reeb Rd, Firgrove, South...

  6. Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Passeron, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be succesfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-aulait macules should not b...

  7. Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Du, K.; Loosen, P.; Herziger, G.

    1991-01-01

    Laser, consisting of a beam path multiple-folded by means of two cavity end mirrors and having at least one reflector folding the laser beam retroreflectively, the axis of which is arranged offset in parallel to the axis of a further reflector. So that the laser exhibits an improved beam quality while retaining its comparatively low adjustment sensitivity, the beam path is folded at least twice by means of the retoreflective reflector.

  8. Improved antireflection coated microspheres for biological applications of optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Valentina; Sonnberger, Aaron; Abdosamadi, Mohammad K.; McDonald, Craig; Schäffer, Erik; McGloin, David

    2016-09-01

    The success of optical tweezers in cellular biology1 is in part due to the wide range of forces that can be applied, from femto- to hundreds of pico-Newtons; nevertheless extending the range of applicable forces to the nanoNewton regime opens access to a new set of phenomena that currently lie beyond optical manipulation. A successful approach to overcome the conventional limits on trapping forces involves the optimization of the trapped probes. Jannasch et al.2 demonstrated that an anti-reflective shell of nanoporous titanium dioxide (aTiO2, nshell = 1.75) on a core particle made out of titanium dioxide in the anatase phase (cTiO2, ncore = 2.3) results in trappable microspheres capable to reach forces above 1 nN. Here we present how the technique can be further improved by coating the high refractive index microspheres with an additional anti-reflective shell made out of silica (SiO2). This external shell not only improves the trap stability for microspheres of different sizes, but also enables the use of functionalization techniques already established for commercial silica beads in biological experiments. We are also investigating the use of these new microspheres as probes to measure adhesion forces between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) in effector T-Cells and will present preliminary results comparing standard and high-index beads.

  9. Toward automated formation of microsphere arrangements using multiplexed optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Keshav; Bollavaram, Manasa; Banerjee, Ashis G.

    2016-09-01

    Optical tweezers offer certain advantages such as multiplexing using a programmable spatial light modulator, flexibility in the choice of the manipulated object and the manipulation medium, precise control, easy object release, and minimal object damage. However, automated manipulation of multiple objects in parallel, which is essential for efficient and reliable formation of micro-scale assembly structures, poses a difficult challenge. There are two primary research issues in addressing this challenge. First, the presence of stochastic Langevin force giving rise to Brownian motion requires motion control for all the manipulated objects at fast rates of several Hz. Second, the object dynamics is non-linear and even difficult to represent analytically due to the interaction of multiple optical traps that are manipulating neighboring objects. As a result, automated controllers have not been realized for tens of objects, particularly with three dimensional motions with guaranteed collision avoidances. In this paper, we model the effect of interacting optical traps on microspheres with significant Brownian motions in stationary fluid media, and develop simplified state-space representations. These representations are used to design a model predictive controller to coordinate the motions of several spheres in real time. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the utility of the controller in automatically forming desired arrangements of varying configurations starting with randomly dispersed microspheres.

  10. Slowing down DNA translocation using magnetic and optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hongbo; Wu, Shanshan; Ryul Park, Sang; Potter, Andrew; Ling, X. S.

    2006-03-01

    Electric-field driven DNA translocation through nanopores can be exploited for DNA sequencing and other applications. However, the DNA translocation under normal patch-clamp-type measurement is too fast to allow detailed measurements of individual or few nucleotides. We propose a concept to slow down the DNA translocation through the nanopore by using magnetic (or optical) tweezers. The 3' end of a single-strand DNA can be attached to a streptavidin-coated magnetic bead through a single biotin molecule. During DNA translocation, the 5' end of DNA will be electrophoretically drawn through the nanopore to the trans side while the 3' end of DNA stays in the cis side with the magnetic bead. A set of permanent magnets or electric coils can be used to generate a magnetic field gradient large enough to pull the bead, hence the DNA out of the nanopore. The net force on the magnetic bead will determine this back-translocation speed. By carefully tuning the magnetic field gradient and the voltage bias on the nanopore, one can make the back-translocation much slower than the conventional forward-translocation in which case the DNA is driven only by the electric force. We will report our experimental design as well as the preliminary results.

  11. Self-focusing and filamentation of a laser beam within the paraxial stationary approximation. Part II: computer simulations; Autofocalisation et filamentation d`un faisceau laser dans le cadre de l`approximation paraxiale et stationnaire. Partie II: simulations numeriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blain, M.A.; Bonnaud, G.; Chiron, A.; Riazuelo, G.

    1996-02-01

    This report addresses the propagation of an intense laser beam in a unmagnetized plasma, which is relevant for both the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the ultra-high intensity (UHI) pulses. The width and the irradiance of the laser pulses are respectively: (0.1-10) nanosecond and (10{sup 13}-10{sup 16}) W/cm{sup 2} for the ICF context and (0.1-1) picosecond and in excess of 10{sup 1}8 W/cm{sup 2} for the UHI context. The nonlinear mechanisms for beam self-focusing and filamentation, induced by both the ponderomotive expelling of charged particles and the relativistic increase of the electron mass, are specified studied. Part I deals with the theoretical aspects and part II is concerned with the results of two-dimensional simulations. The results have been obtained within the framework of the paraxial approximation and the stationary response of the plasma. The large set of scenarios that characterize the behavior of Gaussian beam and a modulated beam is presented; a synthetic overview of the previous theoretical works is also provided. The interplay of two crossing beams is discussed. This report will be a help to improve the uniformity of the laser irradiation in the ICF context and to channel a very intense laser beam over large distance in the UHI context. (authors). 17 refs., 53 figs., 14 tabs.

  12. Biological Effects of Laser Radiation. Volume II. Review of Our Studies on Biological Effects of Laser Radiation-1965-1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-17

    improve dental therapy and provide improved methods for prevention of dental caries and for prophylaxis. -39- DENTISTRY 1. Lobene, R and Fine, S...alter the immunological capability/virulence ratio of influenza virus; gross and microscopic descriptions of lesions, their natural history, and...Clinical Studies 22 Chapter 7 Ultraviolet Studies - Eyes and Skin 24 Chapter 8 Dental Studies 35 Chapter 9 Mechanisms of Interaction of Laser Radiation

  13. Development and characterization of type-II semiconductor structures for the tuning region in tunable laser diodes; Entwicklung und Charakterisierung von Typ-II-Heterostrukturen fuer die Abstimmregion in abstimmbaren Laserdioden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesel, G.

    2005-04-01

    In this thesis the most important criteria for the design of type-II superlattices for a tuning layer in tunable laser diodes are stated. For the experimental realization and verification of the theoretical results different type-II heterostructures were fabricated and characterized. These structures thereby differ mainly in the reached band discontinuities.

  14. tweezercalib 2.0: Faster version of MatLab package for precise calibration of optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Martin; Tolic-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    We present a vectorized version of the MatLab (MathWorks Inc) package tweezercalib for calibration of optical tweezers with precision. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number...

  15. Dual-mode optical fiber-based tweezers for robust trapping and manipulation of absorbing particles in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Souvik; Kanti Saha, Tushar; Kumar, Avinash; Bera, Sudipta K.; Banerjee, Ayan

    2017-12-01

    We develop an optical tweezers system using a single dual-mode optical fiber where mesoscopic absorbing particles can be trapped in three dimensions and manipulated employing photophoretic forces. We generate a superposition of fundamental and first order Hermite-Gaussian beam modes by the simple innovation of coupling a laser into a commercial optical fiber designed to be single mode for a wavelength higher than that of the laser. We achieve robust trapping of the absorbing particles for hours using both the pure fundamental and superposition mode beams and attain large manipulation velocities of ˜5 mm s-1 in the axial direction and ˜0.75 mm s-1 in the radial direction. We then demonstrate that the superposition mode is more effective in trapping and manipulation compared to the fundamental mode by around 80%, which may be increased several times by the use of a pure first order Hermite-Gaussian mode. The work has promising implications for trapping and spectroscopy of aerosols in air using simple optical fiber-based traps.

  16. Characterization of O-glycosylated precursors of insulin-like growth factor II by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespersen, S.; Koedam, J.A.; Hoogerbrugge, C.M.; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der; Brande, J.L. van den

    1996-01-01

    High molecular weight precursors of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) were isolated from Cohn fraction IV of human plasma by ultrafiltration, affinity chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Molecular weight determination by matrix-assisted laser

  17. Fiber based optical tweezers for simultaneous in situ force exertion and measurements in a 3D polyacrylamide gel compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M; Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-07-01

    Optical tweezers play an important role in biological applications. However, it is difficult for traditional optical tweezers based on objective lenses to work in a three-dimensional (3D) solid far away from the substrate. In this work, we develop a fiber based optical trapping system, namely inclined dual fiber optical tweezers, that can simultaneously apply and measure forces both in water and in a 3D polyacrylamide gel matrix. In addition, we demonstrate in situ, non-invasive characterization of local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide gel by measurements on an embedded bead. The fiber optical tweezers measurements agree well with those of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The inclined dual fiber optical tweezers provide a promising and versatile tool for cell mechanics study in 3D environments.

  18. Manipulation of Nanoparticles Using Dark-Field-Illumination Optical Tweezers with Compensating Spherical Aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Hua, Zhou; Run-Zhe, Tao; Zhi-Bin, Hu; Min-Cheng, Zhong; Zi-Qiang, Wang; Yin-Mei, Li; Jun, Cai

    2009-01-01

    Based on our previous investigation of optical tweezers with dark field illumination [Chin. Phys. Lett. 25(2008)329], nanoparticles at large trap depth are better viewed in wide field and real time for a long time, but with poor forces. Here we present the mismatched tube length to compensate for spherical aberration of an oil-immersion objective in a glass-water interface in an optical tweezers system for manipulating nanoparticles. In this way, the critical power of stable trapping particles is measured at different trap depths. It is found that trap depth is enlarged for trapping nanoparticles and trapping forces are enhanced at large trap depth. According to the measurement, 70-nm particles are manipulated in three dimensions and observed clearly at large appropriate depth. This will expand applications of optical tweezers in a nanometre-scale colloidal system. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  19. Low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration with up-regulation of dynamin II expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chung Tsai

    Full Text Available Low-level laser therapy (LLLT is commonly used to treat sports-related tendinopathy or tendon injury. Tendon healing requires tenocyte migration to the repair site, followed by proliferation and synthesis of the extracellular matrix. This study was designed to determine the effect of laser on tenocyte migration. Furthermore, the correlation between this effect and expression of dynamin 2, a positive regulator of cell motility, was also investigated. Tenocytes intrinsic to rat Achilles tendon were treated with low-level laser (660 nm with energy density at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 J/cm(2. Tenocyte migration was evaluated by an in vitro wound healing model and by transwell filter migration assay. The messenger RNA (mRNA and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were determined by reverse transcription/real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR and Western blot analysis respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was used to evaluate the dynamin 2 expression in tenocytes. Tenocytes with or without laser irradiation was treated with dynasore, a dynamin competitor and then underwent transwell filter migration assay. In vitro wound model revealed that more tenocytes with laser irradiation migrated across the wound border to the cell-free zone. Transwell filter migration assay confirmed that tenocyte migration was enhanced dose-dependently by laser. Real-time PCR and Western-blot analysis demonstrated that mRNA and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were up-regulated by laser irradiation dose-dependently. Confocal microscopy showed that laser enhanced the expression of dynamin 2 in cytoplasm of tenocytes. The stimulation effect of laser on tenocytes migration was suppressed by dynasore. In conclusion, low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration in a process that is mediated by up-regulation of dynamin 2, which can be suppressed by dynasore.

  20. Towards Gotthard-II: development of a silicon microstrip detector for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Andrä, M.; Barten, R.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Fröjdh, E.; Greiffenberg, D.; Lopez-Cuenca, C.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Redford, S.; Ruat, M.; Ruder, C.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Thattil, D.; Tinti, G.; Turcato, M.; Vetter, S.

    2018-01-01

    Gotthard-II is a 1-D microstrip detector specifically developed for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser. It will not only be used in energy dispersive experiments but also as a beam diagnostic tool with additional logic to generate veto signals for the other 2-D detectors. Gotthard-II makes use of a silicon microstrip sensor with a pitch of either 50 μm or 25 μm and with 1280 or 2560 channels wire-bonded to adaptive gain switching readout chips. Built-in analog-to-digital converters and digital memories will be implemented in the readout chip for a continuous conversion and storage of frames for all bunches in the bunch train. The performance of analogue front-end prototypes of Gotthard has been investigated in this work. The results in terms of noise, conversion gain, dynamic range, obtained by means of infrared laser and X-rays, will be shown. In particular, the effects of the strip-to-strip coupling are studied in detail and it is found that the reduction of the coupling effects is one of the key factors for the development of the analogue front-end of Gotthard-II.

  1. Mechanical properties of stored red blood cells using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adriana; Alexandre de Thomaz, Andre; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; de Lourdes Barjas-Castro, Maria; Brandao, Marcelo M.; Saad, Sara T. O.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the red blood cell (RBC) membrane overall elasticity μ by measuring the deformation of the cells when dragged at a constant velocity through a plasma fluid by an optical tweezers. The deformability of erythrocytes is a critical determinant of blood flow in the microcirculation. We tested our method and hydrodynamic models, which included the presence of two walls, by measuring the RBC deformation as a function of drag velocity and of the distance to the walls. The capability and sensitivity of this method can be evaluated by its application to a variety of studies, such as, the measurement of RBC elasticity of sickle cell anemia patients comparing homozygous (HbSS), including patients taking hydroxyrea (HU) and heterozygous (HbAS) with normal donors and the RBC elasticity measurement of gamma irradiated stored blood for transfusion to immunosupressed patients as a function of time and dose. These studies show that the technique has the sensitivity to discriminate heterozygous and homozygous sickle cell anemia patients from normal donors and even follow the course of HU treatment of Homozygous patients. The gamma irradiation studies show that there is no significant change in RBC elasticity over time for up to 14 days of storage, regardless of whether the unit was irradiated or not, but there was a huge change in the measured elasticity for the RBC units stored for more than 21 days after irradiation. These finds are important for the assessment of stored irradiated RBC viability for transfusion purposes because the present protocol consider 28 storage days after irradiation as the limit for the RBC usage.

  2. Mechanical and electrical properties of red blood cells using optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, A; Castro, M L Barjas; Brandão, M M; Fernandes, H P; Huruta, R R; Costa, F F; Saad, S T O; Thomaz, A A; Pozzo, L Y; Barbosa, L C; Cesar, C L

    2011-01-01

    Optical tweezers are a very sensitive tool, based on photon momentum transfer, for individual, cell by cell, manipulation and measurements, which can be applied to obtain important properties of erythrocytes for clinical and research purposes. Mechanical and electrical properties of erythrocytes are critical parameters for stored cells in transfusion centers, immunohematological tests performed in transfusional routines and in blood diseases. In this work, we showed methods, based on optical tweezers, to study red blood cells and applied them to measure apparent overall elasticity, apparent membrane viscosity, zeta potential, thickness of the double layer of electrical charges and adhesion in red blood cells

  3. Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. [Lasers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Spaceflight 1.94 Micron Tm Fiber Laser Transmitter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek will develop a spaceflight prototype 1940 nm, 100 W thulium (Tm) laser suitable for NASA spaceflight and long-duration unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)...

  6. Short Pulsed Laser Methods for Velocimetry and Thermometry in High Enthalpy Facilities, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A suite of pulsed laser diagnostics is proposed for studying aspects of planetary entry and Earth atmospheric reentry in arc jets. For example, dissociation of...

  7. Tunable Narrow Linewidth, Low Noise 2.05 Micron Single Frequency Seeder Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an all-fiber based 2.05-micron single frequency, narrow linewidth seeder laser with 10 nm tuning range and 5GHz frequency modulation for next generation...

  8. Efficient High Power 2 micron Tm3+-Doped Fiber Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of new Tm3+ doped germanate glass fibers for efficient high power 2-micron fiber lasers capable of generating an output power of...

  9. Multi-kW Uplink Fiber-Laser Beacon with Agile Signal Format, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration —  Laser beacons with scalable powers are needed for ground to deep-space optical communication uplinks. They serve as absolute reference for tracking of spacecraft...

  10. A Laser-Based Diagnostic Suite for Hypersonic Test Facilities, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a suite of laser-based diagnostics for the study of reactive and non-reactive hypersonic flows....

  11. Frequency-Locked Single-Frequency Fiber Laser at 2 Micron, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Frequency-locked single-frequency 2 micron fiber laser is proposed to be used for airborne/spaceborne coherent lidar measurements, i.e., Active Sensing of CO2...

  12. Tunable, Narrow Line Width Mid-Infrared Laser Source, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this project is to advance the technology of interband cascade (IC) lasers and their facet coatings and to design, build, and deliver to NASA a...

  13. Noncontact laser photothermal keratoplasty. II: Refractive effects and treatment parameters in cadaver eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, G; Ren, Q; Parel, J M

    1994-01-01

    Noncontact laser photothermal keratoplasty may provide a new alternative for the treatment of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. The purpose of this article is to study the refractive effect that laser photoablation keratoplasty is capable of producing on a normal human cadaver cornea, including the relationship between the keratometric changes and laser treatment parameters. The human cadaver eyes were treated with a holmium laser (pulsed Ho:YAG, 2.10 microns, 250 microseconds) coupled to a maskable, polyprismatic delivery system mounted on either an optical bench or a slit-lamp microscope. Using a topographic videokeratography system, we first investigated the refractive effect that noncontact laser photothermal keratoplasty would produce on a normal cadaver cornea. We then studied the keratometric changes produced by different radiant exposure levels at a fixed treatment pattern, as well as by different treatment patterns at a fixed radiant exposure level. Finally, we studied the possible therapeutic application of laser photothermal keratoplasty for correcting high postoperative astigmatism on a cadaver eye model. For the single-pulse 3-millimeter ring of eight-spot treatment, the keratometric power of the cornea initially increased with the radiant exposure and peaked at 26 J/cm2. The refractive effect was increased by projecting an additional set of eight spots equidistant between the first eight spots on the same diameter ring. Eighteen J/cm2 was the minimal radiant exposure required to produce consistent and predictable keratometric changes. The corneas were flattened using treatment patterns smaller than or equal to 3 mm in diameter and steepened using treatment patterns larger than or equal to 5 mm in diameter. A transition zone between 4 and 5 mm was observed in which minimal and unpredictable keratometric changes of the central cornea occurred. The surgically-induced astigmatism (> 10.00 D) was corrected by progressive laser photothermal keratoplasty

  14. Tissue distribution of a new photosensitizer ATX-S10Na(II) and effect of a diode laser (670 nm) in photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, K; Yamada, I; Tanaka, H; Fujise, Y; Hashimoto, K

    2003-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to analyse the quantitative tissue distribution of ATX-S10Na(II) and to investigate the maximal effect of a diode laser and the irradiation conditions required to obtain this effect in photodynamic therapy (PDT) with ATX-S10Na(II). Spectrofluorometry was used to obtain quantitative tissue distribution of ATX-S10Na(II) in Colon 26 carcinoma-bearing mice as a function of time following administration. Next, transplanted tumours of mice with or without ATX-S10Na(II) were treated with the diode laser under conditions in which power density and irradiation time were varied. Tumour tissue concentrations of ATX-S10Na(II) were higher than in all tissues at all intervals following administration. The uptake of ATX-S10Na(II) by most tissues was rapid, with maximal concentrations occurring 1 h after i.v. injection, and ATX-S10Na(II) was almost excreted within 24 h after administration. The maximal depth of necrosis induced by PDT in the treated tumour was 7.9 mm under conditions in which power density was 160 mW/cm2 and total dose was above 100 J/cm2. PDT with ATX-S10Na(II) and the diode laser is useful for the treatment of superficial cancers.

  15. Seeding of a free electron laser: examples of UVSOR-II, SPARC and perspectives for ARC-EN-CIEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labat, M.

    2008-09-01

    This work presents a general study on Free Electron Lasers (FEL) in the seeded configuration. Three examples are given: the UVSOR-II FEL (Okazaki, Japan), the SPARC FEL (Frascati, Italy) and the ARC-EN-CIEL project FEL (France). In the case of the UVSOR-II FEL, seeded with a Ti:Sa laser at 1 kHz repetition rate, several studies have been performed: electron beam dynamics, spatial coherence, spectral structure and angular distribution of the radiation, optimization in helical mode. In the case of the SPARC FEL, the injection of a harmonic source generated in rare gas (HHG) is foreseen. This original combination stands as an attractive source for users with a high temporal and spatial coherence degree together with a high intensity from UV to X rays. A dedicated harmonic source has been designed, assembled and tested for the SPARC FEL. The operation of the combined devices should start in Winter 2008, allowing fine characterization of the HHG-FEL association and further demonstration of original HGHG-FELs (High Gain Harmonic Generation) configuration. Finally, during the simulation studies performed for the design of the ARC-EN-CIEL light sources, a new propagation regime of the FEL pulse has been observed and is still under study. (author)

  16. Recent developments in Cr{sup 2+}-doped II-VI compound lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, R.H.; DeLoach, L.D.; Schaffers, K.I., Patel, F.D.; Beach, R.J.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burger, A. [Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Center for Photonic Materials and Devices

    1996-09-01

    Transition-metal-doped zinc chalcogenide crystals have recently been investigated as potential mid-IR lasers. Tetrahedrally-coordinated Cr{sup 2+} ions are especially attractive as lasants on account of high luminescence quantum yields for emission in the 2000-3000 nm range. {sup 5}E radiative lifetimes and emission cross sections are respectively {approximately}10 {mu}sec and {approximately}10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}. The associated absorption band peaked at {approximately}1800 nm enables laser-diode pumping of the Cr{sup 2+} systems. Laser demonstrations with ZnS:Cr and ZnSe:Cr (using a MgF{sub 2}:Co{sup 2+} laser pump source) gave slope efficiencies up to 30%. Excited-state-absorption losses appear small, and passive losses dominate. Tuning experiments with a birefringent filter evidence a tuning range covering at least 2280 - 2530 nm. Cr-doped laser samples can be produced by Bridgman growth, seeded physical vapor transport, or diffusion doping.

  17. Research Advances: Nanoscale Molecular Tweezers; Cinnamon as Pesticide?; Recently Identified Dietary Sources of Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2004-12-01

    This Report from Other Journals surveys articles of interest to chemists that have been recently published in other science journals. Topics surveyed include reports that receptors have been designed to act as molecular tweezers; cinnamon has potential in the fight against mosquitoes; and high levels of antioxidants are found in some surprising foods. See Featured Molecules .

  18. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oene, Maarten M; Dickinson, Laura E; Cross, Bronwen; Pedaci, Francesco; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H

    2017-03-07

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in principle allow the application and active control of a calibrated load torque, to study single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli. We manipulate the external load on the motor by adjusting the magnetic field experienced by a magnetic bead linked to the motor, and we probe the motor's response. A simple model describes the average motor speed over the entire range of applied fields. We extract the motor torque at stall and find it to be similar to the motor torque at drag-limited speed. In addition, use of the magnetic tweezers allows us to force motor rotation in both forward and backward directions. We monitor the motor's performance before and after periods of forced rotation and observe no destructive effects on the motor. Our experiments show how magnetic tweezers can provide active and fast control of the external load while also exposing remaining challenges in calibration. Through their non-invasive character and straightforward parallelization, magnetic tweezers provide an attractive platform to study nanoscale rotary motors at the single-motor level.

  19. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oene, M.M.; Dickinson, L.E.; Cross, B.; Pedaci, F.; Lipfert, J.; Dekker, N.H.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in

  20. Molecular Tweezers for Lysine and Arginine – Powerful Inhibitors of Pathologic Protein Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Molecular tweezers represent the first class of artificial receptor molecules that made the way from a supramolecular host to a drug candidate with promising results in animal tests. Due to their unique structure, only lysine and arginine are well complexed with exquisite selectivity by a threading mechanism, which unites electrostatic, hydrophobic and dispersive attraction. However, tweezer design must avoid self-dimerization, self-inclusion and external guest binding. Moderate affinities of the molecular tweezers towards sterically well accessible basic amino acids with fast on and off rates protect normal proteins from a potential interference with their biological function. However, the early stages of abnormal Aβ, α-synuclein, and TTR assembly are redirected upon tweezer binding towards the generation of amorphous non-toxic material that can be degraded by the intracellular and extracellular clearance mechanisms. Thus, specific host–guest chemistry between aggregation-prone proteins and lysine/arginine binders rescues cell viability and restores animal health in models of AD, PD, and TTR amyloidosis. PMID:27546596

  1. Molecular tweezers for lysine and arginine - powerful inhibitors of pathologic protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit

    2016-10-15

    Molecular tweezers represent the first class of artificial receptor molecules that have made the way from a supramolecular host to a drug candidate with promising results in animal tests. Due to their unique structure, only lysine and arginine are well complexed with exquisite selectivity by a threading mechanism, which unites electrostatic, hydrophobic and dispersive attraction. However, tweezer design must avoid self-dimerization, self-inclusion and external guest binding. Moderate affinities of molecular tweezers towards sterically well accessible basic amino acids with fast on and off rates protect normal proteins from potential interference with their biological function. However, the early stages of abnormal Aβ, α-synuclein, and TTR assembly are redirected upon tweezer binding towards the generation of amorphous non-toxic materials that can be degraded by the intracellular and extracellular clearance mechanisms. Thus, specific host-guest chemistry between aggregation-prone proteins and lysine/arginine binders rescues cell viability and restores animal health in models of AD, PD, and TTR amyloidosis.

  2. Stretching single DNA molecules to demonstrate high-force capabilities of holographic optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farré, Arnau; van der Horst, Astrid; Blab, Gerhard A.; Downing, Benjamin P. B.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2010-01-01

    The well calibrated force-extension behaviour of single double-stranded DNA molecules was used as a standard to investigate the performance of phase-only holographic optical tweezers at high forces. Specifically, the characteristic overstretch transition at 65 pN was found to appear where expected,

  3. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Understanding and characterizing microbial activity reduction in the presence of antimicrobial agents can help in the design and manufacture of antimicrobial drugs. We demonstrate the use of an optical tweezer setup in recording the changes in bacterial activity with time, induced by the presence of foreign bodies in a ...

  4. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oene, Maarten M.; Dickinson, Laura E.; Cross, Bronwen; Pedaci, Francesco; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in principle allow the application and active control of a calibrated load torque, to study single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli. We manipulate the external load on the motor by adjusting the magnetic field experienced by a magnetic bead linked to the motor, and we probe the motor’s response. A simple model describes the average motor speed over the entire range of applied fields. We extract the motor torque at stall and find it to be similar to the motor torque at drag-limited speed. In addition, use of the magnetic tweezers allows us to force motor rotation in both forward and backward directions. We monitor the motor’s performance before and after periods of forced rotation and observe no destructive effects on the motor. Our experiments show how magnetic tweezers can provide active and fast control of the external load while also exposing remaining challenges in calibration. Through their non-invasive character and straightforward parallelization, magnetic tweezers provide an attractive platform to study nanoscale rotary motors at the single-motor level. PMID:28266562

  5. Custom Made Versatile Device: A Modified Tweezer for Multiple Uses in Clinical Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most commonly it is difficult to overcome some clinical steps during orthodontics treatment, such as placing closed coil spring, engaging NiTi archwire into the bracket slot of severely crowded teeth, to address such messy procedure a new innovative versatile device is designed. This aritcle depicts the fabrication and clinical use of the device-modified tweezer.

  6. Characterization of the Stiffness of Multiple Particles Trapped by Dielectrophoretic Tweezers in a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myeonggu; Choi, Seungyeop; Ko, Kwan Hwi; Kim, Min Hyung; Lee, Sei-Young; Key, Jaehong; Yoon, Young-Ro; Park, In Soo; Lee, Sang Woo

    2016-01-26

    Characterization of the stiffness of multiple particles trapped by tweezers-based force spectroscopy is a key step in building simple, high-throughput, and robust systems that can investigate the molecular interactions in a biological process, but the technology to characterize it in a given environment simultaneously is still lacking. We first characterized the stiffness of multiple particles trapped by dielectrophoretic (DEP) tweezers inside a microfluidic device. In this characterization, we developed a method to measure the thermal fluctuations of the trapped multiple particles with DEP tweezers by varying the heights of the particles in the given environment at the same time. Using the data measured in this controlled environment, we extracted the stiffness of the trapped particles and calculated their force. This study not only provides a simple and high-throughput method to measure the trap stiffness of multiple particles inside a microfluidic device using DEP tweezers but also inspires the application of the trapped multiple particles to investigate the dynamics in molecular interactions.

  7. Construction and actuation of a microscopic gear assembly formed using optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung-Dae; Lee, Yong-Gu

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of micrometer-sized parts is an important manufacturing process; any development in it could potentially change the current manufacturing practices for micrometer-scale devices. Due to the lack of reliable microassembly techniques, these devices are often manufactured using silicon, which includes etching and depositions with little use of assembly processes. The result is the requirement of specialized manufacturing conditions with hazardous byproducts and limited applications where only simple mechanisms are allowed. Optical tweezers are non-contact type manipulators that are very suitable for assembling microparts and solve one of the most difficult problems for microassembly, which is the sticking of the physical manipulator to the micropart. Although contact type manipulators can be surface modified to be non-sticky, this involves extra preprocessing—optical tweezers do not require such additional efforts. The weakness of using optical tweezers is that the permanent assembly of parts is not possible as only very small forces can be applied. We introduce an advanced microassembly environment with the combined use of optical tweezers and a motorized microtip, where the former is used to position two parts and the latter is used to introduce deformation in the parts so that they form a strongly fitted assembly. (paper)

  8. Accounting for polarization in the calibration of a donut beam axial optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollari, Russell; Milstein, Joshua N

    2018-01-01

    Advances in light shaping techniques are leading to new tools for optical trapping and micromanipulation. For example, optical tweezers made from Laguerre-Gaussian or donut beams display an increased axial trap strength and can impart angular momentum to rotate a specimen. However, the application of donut beam optical tweezers to precision, biophysical measurements remains limited due to a lack of methods for calibrating such devices sufficiently. For instance, one notable complication, not present when trapping with a Gaussian beam, is that the polarization of the trap light can significantly affect the tweezers' strength as well as the location of the trap. In this article, we show how to precisely calibrate the axial trap strength as a function of height above the coverslip surface while accounting for focal shifts in the trap position arising from radiation pressure, mismatches in the index of refraction, and polarization induced intensity variations. This provides a foundation for implementing a donut beam optical tweezers capable of applying precise axial forces.

  9. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in bacterial activity levels as a function of time of contact with the antibacterial agent with greater efficacy than traditional cell counting methods. ... In this work, we demonstrate the use of an optical tweezer in monitoring the effect of .... can be used as an effective tool for characterizing real time changes in bacterial activity ...

  10. Molecular tweezers modulate 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Rose, Rolf; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Bartel, Maria; Ramirez-Anguita, Juan Manuel; Dutt, Som; Wilch, Constanze; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Schrader, Thomas; Ottmann, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has recently emerged as a promising way to modulate protein functions, but devising molecules that will interact with a protein in the desired manner is difficult as many competing interactions exist in a biological environment (with solvents, salts or different sites for the target biomolecule). We now show that lysine-specific molecular tweezers bind to a 14-3-3 adapter protein and modulate its interaction with partner proteins. The tweezers inhibit binding between the 14-3-3 protein and two partner proteins—a phosphorylated (C-Raf) protein and an unphosphorylated one (ExoS)—in a concentration-dependent manner. Protein crystallography shows that this effect arises from the binding of the tweezers to a single surface-exposed lysine (Lys214) of the 14-3-3 protein in the proximity of its central channel, which normally binds the partner proteins. A combination of structural analysis and computer simulations provides rules for the tweezers' binding preferences, thus allowing us to predict their influence on this type of protein-protein interactions.

  11. Construction and actuation of a microscopic gear assembly formed using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Dae; Lee, Yong-Gu

    2013-06-01

    The assembly of micrometer-sized parts is an important manufacturing process; any development in it could potentially change the current manufacturing practices for micrometer-scale devices. Due to the lack of reliable microassembly techniques, these devices are often manufactured using silicon, which includes etching and depositions with little use of assembly processes. The result is the requirement of specialized manufacturing conditions with hazardous byproducts and limited applications where only simple mechanisms are allowed. Optical tweezers are non-contact type manipulators that are very suitable for assembling microparts and solve one of the most difficult problems for microassembly, which is the sticking of the physical manipulator to the micropart. Although contact type manipulators can be surface modified to be non-sticky, this involves extra preprocessing—optical tweezers do not require such additional efforts. The weakness of using optical tweezers is that the permanent assembly of parts is not possible as only very small forces can be applied. We introduce an advanced microassembly environment with the combined use of optical tweezers and a motorized microtip, where the former is used to position two parts and the latter is used to introduce deformation in the parts so that they form a strongly fitted assembly.

  12. Microrheology of concentrated DNA solutions using optical tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . In this work, we report the determination of microrheological properties of concentrated, double-stranded calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) solutions using passive, laser-scattering based particle-tracking methodology. From power spectral analysis, ...

  13. Atom lasers, coherent states, and coherence II. Maximally robust ensembles of pure states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiseman, H.M.; Vaccaro, John A.

    2002-01-01

    As discussed in the preceding paper [Wiseman and Vaccaro, preceding paper, Phys. Rev. A 65, 043605 (2002)], the stationary state of an optical or atom laser far above threshold is a mixture of coherent field states with random phase, or, equivalently, a Poissonian mixture of number states. We are interested in which, if either, of these descriptions of ρ ss as a stationary ensemble of pure states, is more natural. In the preceding paper we concentrated upon the question of whether descriptions such as these are physically realizable (PR). In this paper we investigate another relevant aspect of these ensembles, their robustness. A robust ensemble is one for which the pure states that comprise it survive relatively unchanged for a long time under the system evolution. We determine numerically the most robust ensembles as a function of the parameters in the laser model: the self-energy χ of the bosons in the laser mode, and the excess phase noise ν. We find that these most robust ensembles are PR ensembles, or similar to PR ensembles, for all values of these parameters. In the ideal laser limit (ν=χ=0), the most robust states are coherent states. As the phase noise or phase dispersion is increased through ν or the self-interaction of the bosons χ, respectively, the most robust states become more and more amplitude squeezed. We find scaling laws for these states, and give analytical derivations for them. As the phase diffusion or dispersion becomes so large that the laser output is no longer quantum coherent, the most robust states become so squeezed that they cease to have a well-defined coherent amplitude. That is, the quantum coherence of the laser output is manifest in the most robust PR ensemble being an ensemble of states with a well-defined coherent amplitude. This lends support to our approach of regarding robust PR ensembles as the most natural description of the state of the laser mode. It also has interesting implications for atom lasers in particular

  14. The slab geometry laser. II - Thermal effects in a finite slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, T. J.; Byer, R. L.; Eggleston, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents two methods for calculating the thermally induced stress, focusing, and depolarization in a pumped zigzag-slab solid-state laser. A computer program capable of detailed calculations of thermal effects in the general case is described. An approximate analysis of slab thermal effects in many cases allows calculation of these effects without use of the computer model directly. The analysis predicts that slabs of square cross section can be designed to have low depolarization and thermal focusing compared to Nd:YAG laser rods.

  15. Developing a New Biophysical Tool to Combine Magneto-Optical Tweezers with Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaokun Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel experimental setup in which magnetic and optical tweezers are combined for torque and force transduction onto single filamentous molecules in a transverse configuration to allow simultaneous mechanical measurement and manipulation. Previously we have developed a super-resolution imaging module which, in conjunction with advanced imaging techniques such as Blinking assisted Localisation Microscopy (BaLM, achieves localisation precision of single fluorescent dye molecules bound to DNA of ~30 nm along the contour of the molecule; our work here describes developments in producing a system which combines tweezing and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument also features an acousto-optic deflector that temporally divides the laser beam to form multiple traps for high throughput statistics collection. Our motivation for developing the new tool is to enable direct observation of detailed molecular topological transformation and protein binding event localisation in a stretching/twisting mechanical assay that previously could hitherto only be deduced indirectly from the end-to-end length variation of DNA. Our approach is simple and robust enough for reproduction in the lab without the requirement of precise hardware engineering, yet is capable of unveiling the elastic and dynamic properties of filamentous molecules that have been hidden using traditional tools.

  16. Effects of laser immunotherapy on late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients in a Phase II clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), a novel technique with a local intervention to induce systemic antitumor effects, was developed to treat metastatic cancers. The pre-clinical studies of LIT have shown its unique characteristics in generating a specific antitumor immunity in treating metastatic tumors in rats and mice. For late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients, who were considered to be out of other available treatment options, we conducted a small Phase II clinical trial using LIT starting in 2009 in Lima, Peru. This Phase II study was closed in December of 2012, as acknowldged by the Ministry of Health (MOH) of Peur letter 438-2014-OGITT/INS dated March 5th, 2014. Ten patients were enrolled and received LIT in one or multiple 4-week treatment cycles. At the study closing date, four patients were alive and two of them remained cancer free. Here, following the successful conclusion of our Phase II study, we report the clinical effects of LIT on metastatic breast cancer patients. Specifically, we present the overall status of all the patients three years after the treatment and also the outcomes of two long-term surviving patients.

  17. Excitation wavelength dependent O2 release from copper(II)-superoxide compounds: laser flash-photolysis experiments and theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracini, Claudio; Liakos, Dimitrios G; Zapata Rivera, Jhon E; Neese, Frank; Meyer, Gerald J; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2014-01-29

    Irradiation of the copper(II)-superoxide synthetic complexes [(TMG3tren)Cu(II)(O2)](+) (1) and [(PV-TMPA)Cu(II)(O2)](+) (2) with visible light resulted in direct photogeneration of O2 gas at low temperature (from -40 °C to -70 °C for 1 and from -125 to -135 °C for 2) in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MeTHF) solvent. The yield of O2 release was wavelength dependent: λexc = 436 nm, ϕ = 0.29 (for 1), ϕ = 0.11 (for 2), and λexc = 683 nm, ϕ = 0.035 (for 1), ϕ = 0.078 (for 2), which was followed by fast O2-recombination with [(TMG3tren)Cu(I)](+) (3) and [(PV-TMPA)Cu(I)](+) (4). Enthalpic barriers for O2 rebinding to the copper(I) center (∼10 kJ mol(-1)) and for O2 dissociation from the superoxide compound 1 (45 kJ mol(-1)) were determined. TD-DFT studies, carried out for 1, support the experimental results confirming the dissociative character of the excited states formed upon blue- or red-light laser excitation.

  18. Laser Transmitter for Space-Based Atmospheric and Oceanographic LIDAR, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — echnical Abstract: IThis Phase II SBIR program will build on successful Phase I work to provide Technology Readiness Level 4 (TRL-4) laboratory brassboard...

  19. High-throughput sorting and analysis of human sperm with a ring-shaped laser trap

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, B; Shi, LZ; Nascimento, JM; Botvinick, EL; Ozkan, M; Berns, MW; Esener, SC

    2007-01-01

    Sperm motility is an important concept in fertility research. To this end, single spot laser tweezers have been used to quantitatively analyze the motility of individual sperm. However, this method is limited with throughput (single sperm per spot), lacks the ability of in-situ sorting based on motility and chemotaxis, requires high laser power (hundreds of milliWatts) and can not be used to dynamically monitor changes in sperm swimming behavior under the influence of a laser beam. Here, we r...

  20. Development of A Microhand using Direct Laser Writing for IndirectOptical Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    purposes, Ytterbium fibre laser (YLM-10-LP- SC), which emits 1070 nm wavelength light with a power of up to 10.6 watts (this is the optical output, the...Development of A Microhand using Direct Laser Writing for Indirect Optical Manipulation Ebubekir Avci1 and Guang-Zhong Yang2 Abstract— In this paper...we propose manipulation ability extension of the optical tweezers by developing microhands, which are to use as end-effectors of the laser beam

  1. Triplet extinction coefficients of some laser dyes. II. Interim technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlopoulos, T.G.; Golich, D.J.

    1989-04-19

    The authors measured the triplet extinction coefficients T over the laser action spectral region of DODC, DMC, Sulforhodamine B, Rhodamine 575, Coumarin 523, Coumarine 521 Coumarin 504, Coumarin 498, Coumarin 490, LD466, bis-MSB, BBO, and OLIG0415. The different lines from an argon- and a krypton-ion cw laser were employed for excitation. McClure's method was again employed to measure the triplet extinction coefficients. The authors provide a simplified derivation of McClure's equation. The triplet extinction coefficient of Rhodamine 575 was also measured by using the depletion method and improving it by reconstructing for true triplet-triplet absorption. The value obtained is in good agreement with the one obtained by McClure's method.

  2. Steady flow in a model of the human carotid bifurcation. Part II--laser-Doppler anemometer measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadvaj, B K; Mabon, R F; Giddens, D P

    1982-01-01

    The evidence for hypothesizing a relationship between hemodynamics and atherogenesis as well as the motivation for selecting the carotid bifurcation for extensive fluid dynamic studies has been discussed in Part I of this two-paper sequence. Part II deals with velocity measurements within the bifurcation model described by Fig. 1 and Table 1 of the previous paper. A plexiglass model conforming to the dimensions of the average carotid bifurcation was machined and employed for velocity measurements with a laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA). The objective of this phase of the study was to obtain quantitative information on the velocity field and to estimate levels and directions of wall shear stress in the region of the bifurcation.

  3. Microrheology of concentrated DNA solutions using optical tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Semiflexible biopolymers play a vital role in shaping cellular structure and rigidity. In this work, we report the determination of microrheological properties of concentrated, double-stranded calf thymus. DNA (CT-DNA) solutions using passive, laser-scattering based particle-tracking methodology. From power.

  4. A polypeptide-DNA hybrid with selective linking capability applied to single molecule nano-mechanical measurements using optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Moayed

    Full Text Available Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an efficient, rapid and specific manner, based on the recently developed linkage between the protein StrepTactin (STN and the peptide StrepTag II (ST. We introduce a two-step approach, in which we first construct a hybrid between DNA and a tandem of two STs peptides (tST. In a second step, this hybrid is linked to polystyrene bead surfaces and Maltose Binding Protein (MBP using STN. Furthermore, we show the STN-tST linkage is more stable against forces applied by optical tweezers than the commonly used biotin-Streptavidin (STV linkage. It can be used in conjunction with Neutravidin (NTV-biotin linkages to form DNA tethers that can sustain applied forces above 65 pN for tens of minutes in a quarter of the cases. The method is general and can be applied to construct other surface-DNA and protein-DNA hybrids. The reversibility, high mechanical stability and specificity provided by this linking procedure make it highly suitable for single molecule mechanical studies, as well as biosensing and lab on chip applications.

  5. Micropulse diode laser trabeculoplasty (MDLT: A phase II clinical study with 12 months follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Maria Fea

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Maria Fea, Alex Bosone, Teresa Rolle, Beatrice Brogliatti, Federico Maria GrignoloIstituto di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Clinica Oculistica dell’ Università di Torino, Torino, ItalyObjective: This pilot study evaluates the pressure lowering potential of subthreshold micropulse diode laser trabeculoplasty (MDLT for a clinically meaningful duration in patients with medically uncontrolled open angle glaucoma (OAG.Design: prospective interventional case series.Participants: Thirty-two eyes of 20 consecutive patients with uncontrolled OAG (12 bilateral and 8 unilateral.Methods: Confluent subthreshold laser applications over the inferior 180° of the anterior TM using an 810 nm diode laser in a micropulse operating mode. The intraocular pressure (IOP was measured at baseline and at 1 hour, 1 day, 1 week, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-treatment. Flare was measured with a Kowa FM 500 flare-meter at baseline and at 3 hours, 1 day, 1 week, and 12 months post-treatment. After treatment, the patients were maintained on their pre-treatment drug regimen.Main outcome measures: Criteria for treatment response were IOP reduction ≥3 mm Hg and IOP ≤21 mm Hg within the first week after MDLT. Eyes not complying to the above criteria during the follow-up were considered treatment failure. Mean IOP change and percentage of IOP reduction during the follow-up were calculated.Results: One eye was analyzed for bilateral patients. A total of 20 eyes were thus included. Four eyes (20% did not respond to treatment during the first week. One additional eye failed at the 6 month visit. The treatment was successful in 15 eyes (75% at 12 months. The IOP was significantly lower throughout follow-up (p < 0.01. At 12 months, the mean percentage of IOP reduction in the 15 respondent eyes was 22.1% and 12 eyes (60% had IOP reduction higher than 20%. During the first two postoperative days, one eye with pigmentary glaucoma experienced a significant increase of flare

  6. Physical Model of Laser-Assisted Blocking of Blood Flow: II. Pulse Modulation of Radiation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zheltov, GI

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Zheltov_2007_1.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 13104 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Zheltov_2007_1.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 ISSN 0030-400X, Optics... This study is a continuation of our preceding inves- tigation [1], where we considered the mechanism of blocking blood flow under laser irradiation and assumed that the experimentally observed contraction of blood vessels [2] is a consequence...

  7. Dual-trap Raman tweezers for probing dynamics and heterogeneity of interacting microbial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Guiwen; Yao, Hui-Lu; Liu, Junxian; Li, Yong-Qing

    2010-11-01

    We report on development of dual-trap Raman tweezers for monitoring cellular dynamics and heterogeneity of interacting living cells suspended in a liquid medium. Dual-beam optical tweezers were combined with Raman spectroscopy, which allows capturing two cells that are in direct contact or closely separated by a few micrometers and simultaneously acquiring their Raman spectra with an imaging CCD spectrograph. As a demonstration, we recorded time-lapse Raman spectra of budding yeast cells held in dual traps for over 40 min to monitor the dynamic growth in a nutrient medium. We also monitored two germinating Bacillus spores after the initiation with L-alanine and observed their heterogeneity in the release of CaDPA under identical microenvironment.

  8. Low cost optical tweezers systems using double coil driving stepping motor to controlling sample stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laowattanatham, N.; Cheamanunkul, N.; Plaipichit, S.; Buranasiri, P.; Nuansri, R.

    2013-06-01

    In this research, the low cost optical tweezers systems using X-Y stage has been developed by using 5-phase stepping motor. By using sequential double coil driving, we can obtain the driving torque larger than using the single coil driving. The moving scale is fine resolution at 0.2 micrometer. The overall systems based on microcontroller PIC18F458 and joystick controller with LabView® graphical user interface (GUI). The mechanical damping has been included in the system for decreasing the vibrational noise. By using this method, our optical tweezers system is cheaper than the other commercial system that has been used the piezoelectric driving, and still has the same efficiency.

  9. Neural Network for Image-to-Image Control of Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Weiland, Kenneth E.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2004-01-01

    A method is discussed for using neural networks to control optical tweezers. Neural-net outputs are combined with scaling and tiling to generate 480 by 480-pixel control patterns for a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM can be combined in various ways with a microscope to create movable tweezers traps with controllable profiles. The neural nets are intended to respond to scattered light from carbon and silicon carbide nanotube sensors. The nanotube sensors are to be held by the traps for manipulation and calibration. Scaling and tiling allow the 100 by 100-pixel maximum resolution of the neural-net software to be applied in stages to exploit the full 480 by 480-pixel resolution of the SLM. One of these stages is intended to create sensitive null detectors for detecting variations in the scattered light from the nanotube sensors.

  10. Virtual Environment for Manipulating Microscopic Particles With Optical Tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yong-Gu; Lyons, Kevin W.; LeBrun, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, virtual reality techniques are used to define an intuitive interface to a nanoscale manipulation device. This device utilizes optical methods to focus laser light to trap and reposition nano-to-microscopic particles. The underlying physics are simulated by the use of Lagrange mechanics. A unique control method for the manipulation of the particles is also provided. The user can naturally grab and steer the particles. Behind the scene, a complex computation is performed to find ...

  11. A feasibility study of in vivo applications of single beam acoustic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-10-01

    Tools that are capable of manipulating micro-sized objects have been widely used in such fields as physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Several devices, including optical tweezers, atomic force microscope, micro-pipette aspirator, and standing surface wave type acoustic tweezers have been studied to satisfy this need. However, none of them has been demonstrated to be suitable for in vivo and clinical studies. Single beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT) is a technology that uses highly focused acoustic beam to trap particles toward the beam focus. Its feasibility was first theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by Lee and Shung several years ago. Since then, much effort has been devoted to improving this technology. At present, the tool is capable of trapping a microparticle as small as 1 μm, as well as a single red blood cell. Although in comparing to other microparticles manipulating technologies, SBAT has advantages of providing stronger trapping force and deeper penetration depth in tissues, and producing less tissue damage, its potential for in vivo applications has yet been explored. It is worth noting that ultrasound has been used as a diagnostic tool for over 50 years and no known major adverse effects have been observed at the diagnostic energy level. This paper reports the results of an initial attempt to assess the feasibility of single beam acoustic tweezers to trap microparticles in vivo inside of a blood vessel. The acoustic intensity of SBAT under the trapping conditions that were utilized was measured. The mechanical index and thermal index at the focus of acoustic beam were found to be 0.48 and 0.044, respectively, which meet the standard of commercial diagnostic ultrasound system.

  12. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    van Oene, M.M.; Dickinson, L.E.; Cross, B.; Pedaci, F.; Lipfert, J.; Dekker, N.H.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in principle allow the application and active control of a calibrated load torque, to study single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli. We manipulate the external load on the motor by adjusting the magneti...

  13. Optical tweezers and surface plasmon resonance combination system based on the high numerical aperture lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xuchen; Zhang, Bei; Lan, Guoqiang; Wang, Yiqiao; Liu, Shugang

    2015-11-01

    Biology and medicine sample measurement takes an important role in the microscopic optical technology. Optical tweezer has the advantage of accurate capture and non-pollution of the sample. The SPR(surface plasmon resonance) sensor has so many advantages include high sensitivity, fast measurement, less consumption of sample and label-free detection of biological sample that the SPR sensing technique has been used for surface topography, analysis of biochemical and immune, drug screening and environmental monitoring. If they combine, they will play an important role in the biological, chemical and other subjects. The system we propose use the multi-axis cage system, by using the methods of reflection and transmiss ion to improve the space utilization. The SPR system and optical tweezer were builtup and combined in one system. The cage of multi-axis system gives full play to its accuracy, simplicity and flexibility. The size of the system is 20 * 15 * 40 cm3 and thus the sample can be replaced to switch between the optical tweezers system and the SPR system in the small space. It means that we get the refractive index of the sample and control the particle in the same system. In order to control the revolving stage, get the picture and achieve the data stored automatically, we write a LabVIEW procedure. Then according to the data from the back focal plane calculate the refractive index of the sample. By changing the slide we can trap the particle as optical tweezer, which makes us measurement and trap the sample at the same time.

  14. Sturge-Weber syndrome type II treated with PDL 595 nm laser

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalska-Brocka, Joanna; Brocki, Maciej; Uczniak, Sebastian; Uczniak, Kamila; Kaszuba, Andrzej; Jurowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is rare congenital disorder presenting facial port-wine stains (PWS) eye abnormalities and cerebrovascular malformations. The frequency of SWS is estimated at 1 in 50 000. Cerebrovascular abnormalities can be responsible for seizures, hemiparesis, mental retardation and ophthalmologic abnormalities cause intraocular pressure, glaucoma. Etiopathogenesis of SWS remains elusive. We present a case of a 7-year-old girl with SWS type II. A port-wine stain involves the up...

  15. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  16. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacchia, Nicholas A.; Valentine, Megan T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  17. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacchia, Nicholas A; Valentine, Megan T

    2015-05-01

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  18. Raman Tweezers as a Diagnostic Tool of Hemoglobin-Related Blood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rusciano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the development of a Raman Tweezers system for detecting hemoglobin-related blood disorders at a single cell level. The study demonstrates that the molecular fingerprint insight provided by Raman analysis holds great promise for distinguishing between healthy and diseased cells in the field of biomedicine. Herein a Raman Tweezers system has been applied to investigate the effects of thalassemia, a blood disease quite diffuse in the Mediterranean Sea region. By resonant excitation of hemoglobin Raman bands, we examined the oxygenation capability of normal, alpha- and beta-thalassemic erythrocytes. A reduction of this fundamental red blood cell function, particularly severe for beta-thalassemia, has been found. Raman spectroscopy was also used to draw hemoglobin distribution inside single erythrocytes; the results confirmed the characteristic anomaly (target shape, occurring in thalassemia and some other blood disorders. The success of resonance Raman spectroscopy for thalassemia detection reported in this review provide an interesting starting point to explore the application of a Raman Tweezers system in the analysis of several blood disorders.

  19. Grating-flanked plasmonic coaxial apertures for efficient fiber optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Amr A E; Sheikhoelislami, Sassan; Gastelum, Steven; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-09-05

    Subwavelength plasmonic apertures have been foundational for direct optical manipulation of nanoscale specimens including sub-100 nm polymeric beads, metallic nanoparticles and proteins. While most plasmonic traps result in two-dimensional localization, three-dimensional manipulation has been demonstrated by integrating a plasmonic aperture on an optical fiber tip. However, such 3D traps are usually inefficient since the optical mode of the fiber and the subwavelength aperture only weakly couple. In this paper we design more efficient optical-fiber-based plasmonic tweezers combining a coaxial plasmonic aperture with a plasmonic grating coupler at the fiber tip facet. Using full-field finite difference time domain analysis, we optimize the grating design for both gold and silver fiber-based coaxial tweezers such that the optical transmission through the apertures is maximized. With the optimized grating, we show that the maximum transmission efficiency increases from 2.5% to 19.6% and from 1.48% to 16.7% for the gold and silver structures respectively. To evaluate their performance as optical tweezers, we calculate the optical forces and the corresponding trapping potential on dielectric particles interacting with the apertures. We demonstrate that the enahncement in the transmission translates into an equivalent increase in the optical forces. Consequently, the optical power required to achieve stable optical trapping is significantly reduced allowing for efficient localization and 3D manipulation of sub-30 nm dielectric particles.

  20. Holographic optical tweezers combined with a microfluidic device for exposing cells to fast environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Emma; Scrimgeour, Jan; Enger, Jonas; Goksör, Mattias

    2007-05-01

    Optical manipulation techniques have become an important research tool for single cell experiments in microbiology. Using optical tweezers, single cells can be trapped and held during long experiments without risk of cross contamination or compromising viability. However, it is often desirable to not only control the position of a cell, but also to control its environment. We have developed a method that combines optical tweezers with a microfluidic device. The microfluidic system is fabricated by soft lithography in which a constant flow is established by a syringe pump. In the microfluidic system multiple laminar flows of different media are combined into a single channel, where the fluid streams couple viscously. Adjacent media will mix only by diffusion, and consequently two different environments will be separated by a mixing region a few tens of micrometers wide. Thus, by moving optically trapped cells from one medium to another we are able to change the local environment of the cells in a fraction of a second. The time needed to establish a change in environment depends on several factors such as the strength of the optical traps and the steepness of the concentration gradient in the mixing region. By introducing dynamic holographic optical tweezers several cells can be trapped and analyzed simultaneously, thus shortening data acquisition time. The power of this system is demonstrated on yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) subjected to osmotic stress, where the volume of the yeast cell and the spatial localization of green fluorescent proteins (GFP) are monitored using fluorescence microscopy.

  1. Dislocation reactions, grain boundaries, and irreversibility in two-dimensional lattices using topological tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, William T M; Hollingsworth, Andrew D; Grier, David G; Chaikin, Paul M

    2013-09-24

    Dislocations, disclinations, and grain boundaries are topological excitations of crystals that play a key role in determining out-of-equilibrium material properties. In this article we study the kinetics, creation, and annihilation processes of these defects in a controllable way by applying "topological tweezers," an array of weak optical tweezers which strain the lattice by weakly pulling on a collection of particles without grabbing them individually. We use topological tweezers to deterministically control individual dislocations and grain boundaries, and reversibly create and destroy dislocation pairs in a 2D crystal of charged colloids. Starting from a perfect lattice, we exert a torque on a finite region and follow the complete step-by-step creation of a disoriented grain, from the creation of dislocation pairs through their reactions to form a grain boundary and their reduction of elastic energy. However, when the grain is rotated back to its original orientation the dislocation reactions do not retrace. Rather, the process is irreversible; the grain boundary expands instead of collapsing.

  2. CO2 laser-assisted sclerectomy surgery, part II: multicenter clinical preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffen, Noa; Ton, Yokrat; Degani, Joshua; Assia, Ehud I

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of CO2 laser-assisted sclerectomy surgery (CLASS) in primary and pseudoexfoliative open-angle glaucoma. Patients for primary filtration surgery underwent CLASS with a CO2 laser system (OT-134-IOPtiMate, IOPtima Ltd., Ramat Gan, Israel). This self-controlled system gradually ablates and removes scleral layers until percolating fluid absorbs the energy, attenuating further tissue ablation. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured at baseline, 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Complete success was defined as 5≤IOP≤18 mm Hg and 20% IOP reduction with no medication at a 12-month endpoint visit, and qualified success as the same IOP range with or without medication. Thirty of 37 patients completed 12 months of follow-up. Mitomycin C was used in 25 procedures (83.3%). The mean baseline IOP of 26.3±7.8 mm Hg (mean±SD) dropped to 14.4±3.4 and 14.3±3.1 mm Hg at 6 and 12 months, respectively, with 42.4% and 40.7% IOP reduction at 6 and 12 months, respectively (P<0.001). Complete success was achieved by 76.7% and 60% of the patients at 6 and 12 months, respectively, whereas qualified success was achieved by 83.3% and 86.6% of the patients at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Complications were mild and transitory with no sequela. Short-term and intermediate results suggest that CLASS may become a simple, safe, and effective means of choice for the treatment of open-angle glaucoma.

  3. Turnable Semiconductor Laser Spectroscopy in Hollow Optical Waveguides, Phase II SBIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory J. Fetzer, Ph.D.

    2001-12-24

    In this study a novel optical trace gas sensor based on a perforated hollow waveguide (PHW) was proposed. The sensor has been given the acronym ESHOW for Environmental Sensor using Hollow Optical Waveguides. Realizations of the sensor have demonstrated rapid response time (<2s), low minimum detection limits (typically around 3 x 10-5 absorbance). Operation of the PHW technology has been demonstrated in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid0infrared (MIR) regions of the spectrum. Simulation of sensor performance provided in depth understanding of the signals and signal processing required to provide high sensitivity yet retain rapid response to gas changes. A dedicated sensor electronics and software foundation were developed during the course of the Phase II effort. Commercial applications of the sensor are ambient air and continuous emissions monitoring, industrial process control and hazardous waste site monitoring. There are numerous other applications for such a sensor including medical diagnosis and treatment, breath analysis for legal purposes, water quality assessment, combustion diagnostics, and chemical process control. The successful completion of Phase II resulted in additional funding of instrument development by the Nations Institute of Heath through a Phase I SBIR grant and a strategic teaming relationship with a commercial manufacture of medical instrumentation. The purpose of the NIH grant and teaming relationship is to further develop the sensor to monitor NO in exhaled breath for the purposes of asthma diagnosis.

  4. New quantum cascade laser architectures: II-VI quantum cascade emitters, high k-space lasing, and short injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Kale J.

    Quantum cascade (QC) lasers are today's most capable mid-infrared light sources. With up to watt-level room temperature emission over a broad swath of mid-infrared wavelengths, these tiny semiconductor devices enable a variety of applications and technologies such as ultra-sensitive systems for detecting trace molecules in the vapor phase. The foundation of a QC structure lies in alternating hundreds of wide- and narrow-bandgap semiconductor layers to form a coupled quantum well system. In this way, the laws of quantum mechanics are used to precisely engineer electron transport and create artificial optical transitions. The result is a material with capabilities not found in nature, a truly "designer" material. As a central theme in this thesis, we stress the remarkable flexibility of the quantum cascade---the ability to highly tailor device structure for creative design concepts. The QC idea, in fact, relies on no particular material system for its implementation. While all QC lasers to date have been fabricated from III--V materials such as InGaAs/AlInAs, I detail our preliminary work on ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe---a II--VI materials system---where we have demonstrated electroluminescence. We then further discuss how the inherent QC flexibility can be exploited for new devices that extend QC performance and capabilities. In this regard, we offer the examples of excited state transitions and short injectors. Excited state transitions are an avenue to enhancing optical gain, which is especially needed for longer-wavelength devices where optical losses hinder performance. Likewise, shortening the QC injector length over a conventional QC structure has powerful implications for threshold current, output power, and wall-plug efficiency. In both cases, novel physical effects are discovered. Pumping electrons into highly excited states led to the discovery of high k-space lasing from highly non-equilibrium electron distributions. Shortening QC injector regions allowed us to

  5. Leishmania amazonensis chemotaxis under glucose gradient studied by the strength and directionality of forces measured with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Ayres, Diana Copi; Giorgio, Selma; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2007-02-01

    Chemotaxis is the mechanism microorganisms use to sense the environment surrounding them and to direct their movement towards attractive, or away from the repellent, chemicals. The biochemical sensing is almost the only way for communication between unicellular organisms. Prokaryote and Eukaryote chemotaxis has been mechanically studied mainly by observing the directionality and timing of the microorganisms movements subjected to a chemical gradient, but not through the directionality and strength of the forces it generates. To observe the vector force of microorganisms under a chemical gradient we developed a system composed of two large chambers connected by a tiny duct capable to keep the chemical gradient constant for more than ten hours. We also used the displacements of a microsphere trapped in an Optical Tweezers as the force transducer to measure the direction and the strength of the propulsion forces of flagellum of the microorganism under several gradient conditions. A 9μm diameter microsphere particle was trapped with a Nd:YAG laser and its movement was measured through the light scattered focused on a quadrant detector. We observed the behavior of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis (eukaryote) under several glucose gradients. This protozoa senses the gradient around it by swimming in circles for three to five times following by tumbling, and not by the typical straight swimming/tumbling of bacteria. Our results also suggest that force direction and strength are also used to control its movement, not only the timing of swimming/tumbling, because we observed a higher force strength clearly directed towards the glucose gradient.

  6. An aerodynamic study of labial stop consonants after laser cordectomy of types II-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallet, Lucille

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the aerodynamic parameters of intraoral pressure (IOP), oral airflow (OAF), and estimated transglottal pressure of 10 French patients treated by a cordectomy of types II-III with a group of 10 French healthy subjects. Prospective. The collection of the aerodynamic data was conducted with EVA2. Parameters were measured using logatomes of the type CV1·CV2·CVC3 where C represents [p,b] and V is one of the vowels [a,i,u] in the positions one and two (n = 240). The maximum peaks of IOP of the plosives [p] and [b] and the maximum peaks of OAF at their releases were extracted. Finally, the transglottal pressure was estimated, necessary for the voicing of [b], to establish the difference in the IOP mean peak of [p] and [b] at the same intensity. Subsequently, the differences in IOP for both positions and each vocalic contexts, "IOP(p-b)" were calculated, and the reports of these differences for the IOP of [p], viz "IOP(p-b)/IOP(p)", were established for a normalization of the results. This study highlights an increase of the IOP and the OAF in voiceless contexts for both groups. The elevation of both parameters observed for the patients-confirmed by the calculation of the estimated transglottal pressure-does show some degree of laryngeal incompetence. The patients treated by cordectomy of types II-III maintain a relatively good voicing contrast. A certain difficulty in the execution of this articulatory feature is found. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Determining the structure-mechanics relationships of dense microtubule networks with confocal microscopy and magnetic tweezers-based microrheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yali; Valentine, Megan T

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential in maintaining the shape, strength, and organization of cells. Its spatiotemporal organization is fundamental for numerous dynamic biological processes, and mechanical stress within the MT cytoskeleton provides an important signaling mechanism in mitosis and neural development. This raises important questions about the relationships between structure and mechanics in complex MT structures. In vitro, reconstituted cytoskeletal networks provide a minimal model of cell mechanics while also providing a testing ground for the fundamental polymer physics of stiff polymer gels. Here, we describe our development and implementation of a broad tool kit to study structure-mechanics relationships in reconstituted MT networks, including protocols for the assembly of entangled and cross-linked MT networks, fluorescence imaging, microstructure characterization, construction and calibration of magnetic tweezers devices, and mechanical data collection and analysis. In particular, we present the design and assembly of three neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnetic tweezers devices optimized for use with MT networks: (1) high-force magnetic tweezers devices that enable the application of nano-Newton forces and possible meso- to macroscale materials characterization; (2) ring-shaped NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers devices that enable oscillatory microrheology measurements; and (3) portable magnetic tweezers devices that enable direct visualization of microscale deformation in soft materials under applied force. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Photodiode Based Detection for Multiple Trap Optical Tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Dino

    This thesis is concerned with the position tracking of microscopic, optically trapped particles and the quantification of the forces acting on them. A new detection method for simultaneous, three-dimensional tracking of multiple particles is presented, its performance is evaluated, and its...... usefulness is illustrated in specific application examples. Optical traps enable contact-less, all-optical manipulation of microscopic objects. Over the last decades, this laser-based micro-manipulation tool has facilitated numerous exciting discoveries within biology and physics, and it is today regarded...... as one of the workhorses of biophysical research. There exists a variety of implementations of optical traps, from simple single traps to complex multiple traps with engineered three-dimensional light fields. In comparison to single beam optical traps, multiple beam optical traps offer more freedom...

  9. He-Ne laser protection barrier by means of poly (Tetrafluoroethylene-Perfluoro vinyl Ether) grafted by acrylic acid complexed with Cu(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ahdal, M.A.; Fayek, S.A.; El-Sawy, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    Appropriate eye and skin protection is a prerequisite for the safe operation of He-Ne laser in industrial and laboratory environments. In the present paper, measurement of the optical parameters of poly (tetrafluoroethylene-perfluorovinyl ether) grafted by acrylic acid and complexed with Cu(II) are reported. He-Ne laser beam radiation on wavelength of 632.8 nm and power 12.5mW was used. Transmittance and reflectance spectra and refractive index dispersion are presented. The study showed that the material has a protective level 4. Environmental conditions like thermal and fading processes were tested. This suggested that the material preserves its protective features as a protective eye and skin barriers of protective level 4. This was applied for occupational working time up to 8 h, temperature up to 50 degree C and for a time equal 74 days after laser irradiation. Radiation protection from laser sources has attracted a great deal of attention for long time because of their importance for human body. Intensive progress in lasers, optical communications, and data storage has challenged scientists to achieve perfection in optical components. These challenges have resulted in an active development of a wide variety of unconventional optical elements (Hariharan, 1996 and Efimov et al., 2002). Alexandrite solid state lasers with a wavelength of about 755 nm are frequently used in the field of medicine (Schirmarcher and Sutter, 2001). For removing tattoos, the Q-switched versions with impulse widths of several ten nanoseconds are an ideal instrument to keep the thermal stress of the patient's skin at low level. He-Ne laser is one of the most commonly used visible light lasers

  10. The manipulation of micron-sized metal particles by pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jimin; Shun, Daqing; Zhong, Xiajun

    2006-08-01

    In Selective Laser Micro Sintering the powder particles should be assembled or arranged and sintered together. Optical tweezers make used of optical refractive force to manipulate micro objects. Currently the manipulated objects are limited to nano or several micro meters scale. In this paper we develop a novel optical tweezers which employs pulse laser force to drive bigger particles and assemble them. This pulse laser is controlled to form spiral trap which can grasp big particles. In our experiment the 50μm- 100μm-diameter metal particles were moved on a solid surfaces in a process we call 'laser spiral driving force'. Nearly any shape particle, including sphere and non-regular shape, can be moved on the surfaces.

  11. Laser Tweezer Controlled Solid Immersion Lens for High Resolution Imaging in Microfluidic and Biological Samples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Birkbeck, Aaron L; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Esener, Sadik C

    2005-01-01

    ...). Up to now, solid immersion lens imaging systems have relied upon cantilever-mounted SILs that are difficult to integrate into microfluidic systems and require an extra alignment step with external optics...

  12. 2-D Laser-Calibrated Doppler Images of HeII and CIII Emission on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, S. L.; Samuell, Cameron; Meyer, W. H.

    2017-10-01

    Recent improvements to the DIII-D CIS system have reduced the error bars of the inferred Doppler velocity by over an order of magnitude, i.e. to 0.1 km/s. Coherence imaging of plasma emission superimposes an interferogram on the plasma image, and the interferometer phase is a sensitive measure of the central wavelength of the emission. A tuneable diode laser calibration image at 465 nm is automatically acquired between plasma shots and provides the rest wavelength in the lab frame; the wavelength is measured with a wavemeter to 0.01 pm. The interferometer is stabilized mechanically and thermally with a unique system so that the interferometer drift between calibrations is small. These improvements have enabled tomographically inverted images of main ion He II parallel flow in the divertor during He plasma operation. The parallel flow, as expected, is observed to depend on the direction of the B × ∇B drift, which is reversed by changing the direction of the toroidal field. For many conditions, the C III Doppler velocity is also in the same direction as the main ion. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-88688.

  13. ToF-SIMS and laser-SNMS analysis of Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells with silver nanoparticles using an argon cluster ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nees, Ricarda; Pelster, Andreas; Körsgen, Martin; Jungnickel, Harald; Luch, Andreas; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2015-06-15

    The use of nanoparticles is one of the fastest expanding fields in industrial as well as in medical applications, owing to their remarkable characteristics. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are among the most-commercialized nanoparticles because of their antibacterial effects. Laser postionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry in combination with argon cluster ion sputtering was used for the first time to investigate the effects of AgNPs on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) II cells. Depth profiles and high-resolution three dimensional (3D) images of nanoparticles and organic compounds from cells were obtained using an Ar cluster ion beam for sputtering and Bi3 (+) primary ions for the analysis. The 3D distribution of AgNPs and other organic compounds in MDCK II cells could be readily detected with very high efficiency, sensitivity, and submicron lateral resolution. The argon cluster ion beam is well suited for the sputtering of biological samples. It enables a high sample removal rate along with low molecular degradation. The outer membrane, the cytoplasm, and the nuclei of the cells could be clearly visualized using the signals PO(+) and C3H8N(+) or CN(+) and C3H8N(+). The laser-SNMS images showed unambiguously that AgNPs are incorporated by MDCK II cells and often form silver aggregates with a diameter of a few micrometers, mainly close to the outside of the cell nuclei.

  14. Novel tunable dynamic tweezers using dark-bright soliton collision control in an optical add/drop filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeka, Chat; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Yupapin, Preecha P; Ali, Jalil

    2010-12-01

    We propose a novel system of the dynamic optical tweezers generated by a dark soliton in the fiber optic loop. A dark soliton known as an optical tweezer is amplified and tuned within the microring resonator system. The required tunable tweezers with different widths and powers can be controlled. The analysis of dark-bright soliton conversion using a dark soliton pulse propagating within a microring resonator system is analyzed. The dynamic behaviors of soliton conversion in add/drop filter is also analyzed. The control dark soliton is input into the system via the add port of the add/drop filter. The dynamic behavior of the dark-bright soliton conversion is observed. The required stable signal is obtained via a drop and throughput ports of the add/drop filter with some suitable parameters. In application, the trapped light/atom and transportation can be realized by using the proposed system.

  15. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm(2), a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle's position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  16. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim [Institute of Bioelectronics (ICS-8/PGI-8), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm{sup 2}, a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle’s position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence with an OPO system. Part II: direct determination of lead content in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, A; Lijour, Y; Giamarchi, P; Burel-Deschamps, L; Stephan, L

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescence was induced by coupling a laser with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to develop an analytical method for the direct determination of lead content, at ultra-trace level, in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF). The optimization of atomization conditions, laser pulse energy, and mainly temporal parameters allowed us to reach a 3 fg detection limit (0.3 ng L(-1)) despite the low repetition rate of the device. The expected error on predicted concentrations of lead, at trace levels, in seawater was below 15%.

  18. The Cryptococcus neoformans capsule: lessons from the use of optical tweezers and other biophysical tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Bruno; Frases, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients. The main virulence factor of C. neoformans is the polysaccharide capsule; however, many fundamental aspects of capsule structure and function remain poorly understood. Recently, important capsule properties were uncovered using optical tweezers and other biophysical techniques, including dynamic and static light scattering, zeta potential and viscosity analysis. This review provides an overview of the latest findings in this emerging field, explaining the impact of these findings on our understanding of C. neoformans biology and resistance to host immune defenses. PMID:26157436

  19. In vivo vascular flow profiling combined with optical tweezers based blood routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Robert; Sugden, Wade W.; Siekmann, Arndt F.; Denz, Cornelia

    2017-07-01

    In vivo wall shear rate is quantified during zebrafish development using particle image velocimetry for biomedical diagnosis and modeling of artificial vessels. By using brightfield microscopy based high speed video tracking we can resolve single heart-beat cycles of blood flow in both space and time. Maximum blood flow velocities and wall shear rates are presented for zebrafish at two and three days post fertilization. By applying biocompatible optical tweezers as an Optical rail we present rerouting of red blood cells in vivo. With purely light-driven means we are able to compensate the lack of proper red blood cell blood flow in so far unperfused capillaries.

  20. Nano-bio-optomechanics: nanoaperture tweezers probe single nanoparticles, proteins, and their interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Reuven

    2015-09-01

    Nanoparticles in the single digit nanometer range can be easily isolated and studied with low optical powers using nanoaperture tweezers. We have studied individual proteins and their interactions with small molecules, DNA and antibodies. Recently, using the fluctuations of the trapped object, we have pioneered a new way to "listen" to the vibrations of nanoparticles in the 100 GHz - 1 THz range; the approach is called extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR). EAR gives unprecedented low frequency spectra of individual proteins in solution, allowing for identification and analysis, as well as probing their role in biological functions. We have also used EAR to study the elastic properties, shape and size of various individual nanoparticles.

  1. C60Recognition from Extended Tetrathiafulvalene Bis-acetylide Platinum(II) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, Guillaume; Dron, Paul I; Vincent, Manon; Canevet, David; Allain, Magali; Goeb, Sébastien; Sallé, Marc

    2016-11-18

    The favorable spatial organization imposed by the square planar 4,4'-di(tert-butyl)-2,2'-bipyridine (dbbpy) platinum(II) complex associated with the electronic and shape complementarity of π-extended tetrathiafulvalene derivatives (exTTF) toward fullerenes is usefully exploited to construct molecular tweezers, which display good affinities for C 60 .

  2. New approaches in the design of magnetic tweezers–current magnetic tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessalova, Valentina [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1-2, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Perov, Nikolai [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1-2, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14, 236004 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Rodionova, Valeria [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14, 236004 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology ' MISiS' , Leninsky Prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    The main advantages of the magnetic tweezers are the low price and simplicity of use. However the range of their application is reduced due to shortcomings like, for example, the remanent induction of the core and interaction between ferromagnetic cores. We present the new design of magnetic tweezers–Current Magnetic Tweezers (CMT) that allow particle manipulation by means of the magnetic field generated by the electric currents flowing through the non-magnetic wires. Arranging wires in different geometric shapes allows the particle movement either in two or three dimensions. Forces acting on the magnetic particles with the magnetic moment of 2·10{sup −11} A m{sup 2} at distances up to 1 mm had been experimentally measured. It is established that a current of about 1 A at a 1 mm distance generates force of (approximately) 3 pN which is consistent with theoretical estimates. - Highlights: • We suggest the idea and the results of the test the prototype based on 3 wire's system that allows manipulation of nanoparticles on XY plane.

  3. Probing mechanical properties of Jurkat cells under the effect of ART using oscillating optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Khakshour

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoid leukemia is a common type of blood cancer and chemotherapy is the initial treatment of choice. Quantifying the effect of a chemotherapeutic drug at the cellular level plays an important role in the process of the treatment. In this study, an oscillating optical tweezer was employed to characterize the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of Jurkat cells exposed to the chemotherapeutic agent, artesunate (ART. A motion equation for a bead bound to a cell was applied to describe the mechanical characteristics of the cell cytoskeleton. By comparing between the modeling results and experimental results from the optical tweezer, the stiffness and viscosity of the Jurkat cells before and after the ART treatment were obtained. The results demonstrate a weak power-law dependency of cell stiffness with frequency. Furthermore, the stiffness and viscosity were increased after the treatment. Therefore, the cytoskeleton cell stiffness as the well as power-law coefficient can provide a useful insight into the chemo-mechanical relationship of drug treated cancer cells and may serve as another tool for evaluating therapeutic performance quantitatively.

  4. New approaches in the design of magnetic tweezers–current magnetic tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessalova, Valentina; Perov, Nikolai; Rodionova, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    The main advantages of the magnetic tweezers are the low price and simplicity of use. However the range of their application is reduced due to shortcomings like, for example, the remanent induction of the core and interaction between ferromagnetic cores. We present the new design of magnetic tweezers–Current Magnetic Tweezers (CMT) that allow particle manipulation by means of the magnetic field generated by the electric currents flowing through the non-magnetic wires. Arranging wires in different geometric shapes allows the particle movement either in two or three dimensions. Forces acting on the magnetic particles with the magnetic moment of 2·10 −11 A m 2 at distances up to 1 mm had been experimentally measured. It is established that a current of about 1 A at a 1 mm distance generates force of (approximately) 3 pN which is consistent with theoretical estimates. - Highlights: • We suggest the idea and the results of the test the prototype based on 3 wire's system that allows manipulation of nanoparticles on XY plane.

  5. Binding mechanism of PicoGreen to DNA characterized by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Schellenberg, Helene; Walhorn, Volker; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescent dyes are broadly used in many biotechnological applications to detect and visualize DNA molecules. However, their binding to DNA alters the structural and nanomechanical properties of DNA and, thus, interferes with associated biological processes. In this work we employed magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the binding of PicoGreen to DNA at room temperature in a concentration-dependent manner. PicoGreen is an ultrasensitive quinolinium nucleic acid stain exhibiting hardly any background signal from unbound dye molecules. By means of stretching and overwinding single, torsionally constrained, nick-free double-stranded DNA molecules, we acquired force-extension and supercoiling curves which allow quantifying DNA contour length, persistence length and other thermodynamical binding parameters, respectively. The results of our magnetic tweezers single-molecule binding study were well supported through analyzing the fluorescent spectra of stained DNA. On the basis of our work, we could identify a concentration-dependent bimodal binding behavior, where, apparently, PicoGreen associates to DNA as an intercalator and minor-groove binder simultaneously.

  6. A study of red blood cell deformability in diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Thomas J.; Richards, Christopher J.; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh; Jones, Philip H.

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) in which high blood sugar levels cause swelling, leaking and occlusions in the blood vessels of the retina, often resulting in a loss of sight. The microvascular system requires red blood cells (RBCs) to undergo significant cellular deformation in order to pass through vessels whose diameters are significantly smaller than their own. There is evidence to suggest that DM impairs the deformability of RBCs, and this loss of deformability has been associated with diabetic kidney disease (or nephropathy) - another microvascular complication of DM. However, it remains unclear whether reduced deformability of RBCs correlates with the presence of DR. Here we present an investigation into the deformability of RBCs in patients with diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers. To extract a value for the deformability of RBCs we use a dual-trap optical tweezers set-up to stretch individual RBCs. RBCs are trapped directly (i.e. without micro-bead handles), so rotate to assume a `side-on' orientation. Video microscopy is used to record the deformation events, and shape analysis software is used to determine parameters such as initial and maximum RBC length, allowing us to calculate the deformability for each RBC. A small decrease in deformability of diabetes cells subject to this stretching protocol is observed when compared to control cells. We also report on initial results on three dimensional imaging of individual RBCs using defocussing microscopy.

  7. Auto- and cross-power spectral analysis of dual trap optical tweezer experiments using Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hansen, Yann; Mehlich, Alexander; Pelz, Benjamin; Rief, Matthias; Netz, Roland R

    2012-09-01

    The thermal fluctuations of micron-sized beads in dual trap optical tweezer experiments contain complete dynamic information about the viscoelastic properties of the embedding medium and-if present-macromolecular constructs connecting the two beads. To quantitatively interpret the spectral properties of the measured signals, a detailed understanding of the instrumental characteristics is required. To this end, we present a theoretical description of the signal processing in a typical dual trap optical tweezer experiment accounting for polarization crosstalk and instrumental noise and discuss the effect of finite statistics. To infer the unknown parameters from experimental data, a maximum likelihood method based on the statistical properties of the stochastic signals is derived. In a first step, the method can be used for calibration purposes: We propose a scheme involving three consecutive measurements (both traps empty, first one occupied and second empty, and vice versa), by which all instrumental and physical parameters of the setup are determined. We test our approach for a simple model system, namely a pair of unconnected, but hydrodynamically interacting spheres. The comparison to theoretical predictions based on instantaneous as well as retarded hydrodynamics emphasizes the importance of hydrodynamic retardation effects due to vorticity diffusion in the fluid. For more complex experimental scenarios, where macromolecular constructs are tethered between the two beads, the same maximum likelihood method in conjunction with dynamic deconvolution theory will in a second step allow one to determine the viscoelastic properties of the tethered element connecting the two beads.

  8. Kinetics of DNA translocase SpoIIIE studied by dual optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Lin; Qu, E.; Guo, Honglian; Xu, Chunhua; Li, Zhaolin; Huang, Lu; Zhang, Daozhong; Li, Zhiyuan

    2009-11-01

    DNA translocase SpoIIIE protein is a kind of motor proteins, which transports DNA from one side of the membrane to the other side, so it plays an important role in cell division. In experiment, λDNA is labeled on one end with biotin and the other with digoxigenin. In this work we study kinetics of DNA translocase SpoIIIE by means of dual optical tweezers. In our experiment, λDNA is tethered between streptavidin-coated polystyrene bead and antidigoxigenin-coated polystyrene bead held by dual optical tweezers. One trap is immovable, and the other is movable. When SpoIIIE protein transports DNA, the length of DNA changes. The length change can be calculated according to the displacement of the trapped bead, which is detected by quadrant photodiode. When SpoIIIE transports DNA, DNA is shortened by up to about 500nm, then as the translocation stops, the DNA returns to its normal length, and this process repeats time and time again. The most probable speed that SpoIIIE transports DNA is 710nm/s.

  9. Real-time identification of the singleness of a trapped bead in optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunguang; Su, Chenguang; Yun, Zelin; Wang, Sirong; He, Chengzhi; Gao, Xiaoqing; Li, Shuai; Li, Hongbin; Hu, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaotang

    2018-02-10

    Beads trapped in optical tweezers are aligned along the optical propagation direction, which makes it difficult to determine the number of beads with bright-field microscopy. This problem also dramatically influences the measurement of the optical trapping based single-molecule force spectroscopy. Here, we propose a video processing approach to count the number of trapped micro-objects in real time. The approach uses a normalized cross-correlation algorithm and image enhancement techniques to amplify a slight change of the image induced by the entry of an exotic object. As tested, this method introduces a ∼10% change per bead to the image similarity, and up to four beads, one-by-one falling into the trap, are identified. Moreover, the feasibility of the above analysis in a moving trap is investigated. A movement of the trap leads to a fluctuation of less than 2% for the similarity signal and can be ignored in most cases. The experimental results prove that image similarity measurement is a sensitive way to monitor the interruption, which is very useful, especially during experiments. In addition, the approach is easy to apply to an existing optical tweezers system.

  10. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Huguet, J. M.; Ritort, F.

    2013-01-01

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  11. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Huguet, J. M. [Small Biosystems Lab, Dept. de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ritort, F. [Small Biosystems Lab, Dept. de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ciber-BBN de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  12. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Measurements of Neutral (ArI) and singly-ionized (ArII) Argon in a LargeScale Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R. F.; Fisher, D. M.; Hatch, M. W.; Gilmore, M.; Dwyer, R. H.; Meany, K.; Zhang, Y.; Desjardins, T. R.

    2017-10-01

    In order to investigate the role of neutral dynamics in helicon discharges in the HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) plasma device at U. New Mexico, a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed. The LIF system is based on a >250 mW, tunable diode laser with a tuning range between 680 and 700nm. For neutral Argon, the laser pumps the metastable (2P3/20) 4s level to the (2P1/20) 4p level using 696. 7352 nm light. The fluorescence radiation from decay to the (2P1/20) 4s level at 772. 6333 nm is observed. For singly ionized Argon, the laser pumps the 3s23p4(3 P)3d level to the 3s23p4(3 P)4p level using 686.3162nm light. The fluorescence radiation from the decay to the 3s23p4(3 P)4s level is observed. The system design, and velocity measurements in the axial, azimuthal and radial directions for ArI, and in the axial direction for ArII will be presented. Supported by U.S. National Science Foundation Award 1500423.

  13. Synthesis, Hirshfeld surface analysis, laser damage threshold, third-order nonlinear optical property and DFT computation studies of Dichlorobis(DL-valine)zinc(II): A spectroscopic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrambalam, S.; Manimaran, D.; Hubert Joe, I.; Rastogi, V. K.; Ul Hassan, Israr

    2018-01-01

    The organometallic crystal of Dichlorobis(DL-valine)zinc(II) was grown by solution growth method. The computed structural geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and UV-visible spectra were compared with experimental results. Hirshfeld surface map was used to locate electron density and the fingerprint plots percentages are responsible for the stabilization of intermolecular interactions in molecular crystal. The second-order hyperpolarizability value of the molecule was also calculated at density functional theory method. The surface resistance and third-order nonlinear optical property of the crystal were studied by laser induced surface damage threshold and Z-scan techniques, respectively using Nd:YAG laser with wavelength 532 nm. The open aperture result exhibits the reverse saturation absorption, which indicate that this material has potential candidate for optical limiting and optoelectronic applications.

  14. Tunable Single Frequency 2.05 Micron Fiber Laser Using New Ho-Doped Fiber, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal, we propose to demonstrate and build a widely tunable, narrow linewidth, single frequency fiber laser near 2.05 micron by developing an innovative...

  15. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure–function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2–amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme–substrate interactions, enzyme–substrate active complex formation, and protein folding–binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  16. High-force NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers device optimized for microrheology experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Valentine, Megan T

    2012-05-01

    We present the design, calibration, and testing of a magnetic tweezers device that employs two pairs of permanent neodymium iron boron magnets surrounded by low-carbon steel focusing tips to apply large forces to soft materials for microrheology experiments. Our design enables the application of forces in the range of 1-1800 pN to ∼4.5 μm paramagnetic beads using magnet-bead separations in the range of 0.3-20 mm. This allows the use of standard coverslips and sample geometries. A high speed camera, custom LED-based illumination scheme, and mechanically stabilized measurement platform are employed to enable the measurement of materials with viscoelastic moduli as high as ∼1 kPa.

  17. High-force NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers device optimized for microrheology experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Jun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Valentine, Megan T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We present the design, calibration, and testing of a magnetic tweezers device that employs two pairs of permanent neodymium iron boron magnets surrounded by low-carbon steel focusing tips to apply large forces to soft materials for microrheology experiments. Our design enables the application of forces in the range of 1-1800 pN to {approx}4.5 {mu}m paramagnetic beads using magnet-bead separations in the range of 0.3-20 mm. This allows the use of standard coverslips and sample geometries. A high speed camera, custom LED-based illumination scheme, and mechanically stabilized measurement platform are employed to enable the measurement of materials with viscoelastic moduli as high as {approx}1 kPa.

  18. Stretching single DNA molecules to demonstrate high-force capabilities of holographic optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Arnau; van der Horst, Astrid; Blab, Gerhard A; Downing, Benjamin P B; Forde, Nancy R

    2010-04-01

    The well calibrated force-extension behaviour of single double-stranded DNA molecules was used as a standard to investigate the performance of phase-only holographic optical tweezers at high forces. Specifically, the characteristic overstretch transition at 65 pN was found to appear where expected, demonstrating (1) that holographic optical trap calibration using thermal fluctuation methods is valid to high forces; (2) that the holographic optical traps are harmonic out to >250 nm of 2.1 mum particle displacement; and (3) that temporal modulations in traps induced by the spatial light modulator (SLM) do not affect the ability of optical traps to hold and steer particles against high forces. These studies demonstrate a new high-force capability for holographic optical traps achievable by SLM technologies. ((c) 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  19. Micro-particle manipulation by single beam acoustic tweezers based on hydrothermal PZT thick film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Benpeng; Xu, Jiong; Yang, Xiaofei; Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Tian; Xiong, Ke; Shiiba, Michihisa; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Single-beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT), used in laboratory-on-a-chip (LOC) device has promising implications for an individual micro-particle contactless manipulation. In this study, a freestanding hydrothermal PZT thick film with excellent piezoelectric property (d 33 = 270 pC/N and k t = 0.51) was employed for SBAT applications and a press-focusing technology was introduced. The obtained SBAT, acting at an operational frequency of 50 MHz, a low f-number (∼0.9), demonstrated the capability to trap and manipulate a micro-particle sized 10μm in the distilled water. These results suggest that such a device has great potential as a manipulator for a wide range of biomedical and chemical science applications.

  20. Evaluation of cavitated and non-cavitated carious lesions using the WHO basic methods, ICDAS-II and laser fluorescence measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridula Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was aimed to compare the diagnostic outcome of the WHO criteria, ICDAS-II criteria and laser fluorescence measurements in measuring the caries ratings of children. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: The study involved 31 children between 3 and 14 years of age, attending the Department of Pedodontics at Maulana Azad College of Dental Sciences, New Delhi. The surface-related caries status was registered according to the WHO basic method criteria (1997. Additionally, the ICDAS-II visual criteria and the DIAGNOdent readings were documented. Statistical analysis used: The data were analysed with ezANOVA and Excel 2000 (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA, USA. Results: The mean ICDAS-II values amounted to 8.76 ± 0.72. The mean values for DMFS/def were 7.67 ± 0.91, whereas for DIAGNOdent it amounted to 4.00 ± 0.62. Conclusions: In conclusion, this study showed the diagnostic potential of the ICDAS-II criteria in comparison to the traditional WHO criteria by means of the non-cavitated caries lesions additionally detected. The DIAGNOdent use in field studies that already apply detailed visual criteria seems to bring limited additional information.

  1. The ETA-II linear induction accelerator and IMP wiggler: A high-average-power millimeter-wave free-electron-laser for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1992-05-01

    We have constructed a 140-GHz free-electron laser to generate high-average-power microwaves for heating the MTX tokamak plasma. A 5.5-m steady-state wiggler (intense Microwave Prototype-IMP) has been installed at the end of the upgraded 60-cell ETA-II accelerator, and is configured as an FEL amplifier for the output of a 140-GHz long-pulse gyrotron. Improvements in the ETA-II accelerator include a multicable-feed power distribution network, better magnetic alignment using a stretched-wire alignment technique (SWAT). and a computerized tuning algorithm that directly minimizes the transverse sweep (corkscrew motion) of the electron beam. The upgrades were first tested on the 20-cell, 3-MeV front end of ETA-II and resulted in greatly improved energy flatness and reduced corkscrew motion. The upgrades were then incorporated into the full 60-cell configuration of ETA-II, along with modifications to allow operation in 50-pulse bursts at pulse repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The pulse power modifications were developed and tested on the High Average Power Test Stand (HAPTS), and have significantly reduced the voltage and timing jitter of the MAG 1D magnetic pulse compressors. The 2-3 kA. 6-7 MeV beam from ETA-II is transported to the IMP wiggler, which has been reconfigured as a laced wiggler, with both permanent magnets and electromagnets, for high magnetic field operation. Tapering of the wiggler magnetic field is completely computer controlled and can be optimized based on the output power. The microwaves from the FEL are transmitted to the MTX tokamak by a windowless quasi-optical microwave transmission system. Experiments at MTX are focused on studies of electron-cyclotron-resonance heating (ECRH) of the plasma. We summarize here the accelerator and pulse power modifications, and describe the status of ETA-II, IMP, and MTX operations

  2. The ETA-II linear induction accelerator and IMP wiggler: A high-average-power millimeter-wave free-electron laser for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have constructed a 140-GHz free-electron laser to generate high-average-power microwaves for heating the MTX tokamak plasma. A 5.5-m steady-state wiggler (Intense Microwave, Prototype-IMP) has been installed at the end of the upgraded 60-cell ETA-II accelerator, and is configured as an FEL amplifier for the output of a 140-GHz long-pulse gyrotron. Improvements in the ETA-II accelerator include a multicable-feed power distribution network, better magnetic alignment using a stretched-wire alignment technique (SWAT), and a computerized tuning algorithm that directly minimizes the transverse sweep (corkscrew motion) of the electron beam. The upgrades were first tested on the 20-cell, 3-MeV front end of ETA-II and resulted in greatly improved energy flatness and reduced corkscrew motion. The upgrades were then incorporated into the full 60-cell configuration of ETA-II, along with modifications to allow operation in 50-pulse bursts at pulse repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The pulse power modifications were developed and tested on the High Average Power Test Stand (HAPTS), and have significantly reduced the voltage and timing jitter of the MAG 1D magnetic pulse compressors. The 2-3 kA, 6-7 MeV beam from ETA-II is transported to the IMP wiggler, which has been reconfigured as a laced wiggler, with both permanent magnets and electromagnets, for high magnetic field operation. Tapering of the wiggler magnetic field is completely computer controlled and can be optimized based on the output power. The microwaves from the FEL are transmitted to the MTX tokamak by a windowless quasi-optical microwave transmission system. Experiments at MTX are focused on studies of electron-cyclotron-resonance heating (ECRH) of the plasma. The authors summarize here the accelerator and pulse power modifications, and describe the status of ETA-II, IMP, and MTX operations

  3. Treatment of Acne Scars of Skin Types II to V by Sublative Fractional Bipolar Radiofrequency and Bipolar Radiofrequency Combined with Diode Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garretson, Cara Beth

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of sublative fractional bipolar radiofrequency and bipolar radio frequency combined with diode laser for the treatment of both superficial and deep acne scars in patients with skin types II to V. Design: Prospective, single-center study. Subjects received up to five treatments with sublative fractional bipolar radiofrequency and bipolar radiofrequency combined with diode laser. Treatments were directed to at least two facial (forehead, perioral, cheeks) and/or neck areas with acne scars at four-week intervals. Treatment parameters on each subject were based on skin type and on skin responses to test spots on the target area just before treatment. Setting: Physician office. Participants: Subjects (n=20, aged 40.7±10.5 years [mean ± SD], skin types II–V) with acne scars and without acne lesions enrolled in this prospective study. Measurements: Results were evaluated just before each treatment and at four and 12 weeks after the final treatment using the Goodman Scar Scale, a quantitative method of evaluating scars that attempts to reduce grading subjectivity, as well as by patient satisfaction. Results: Acne scars improved significantly one month after three treatments and improvement persisted for at least 12 weeks after the fifth treatment. Improvement was not affected by skin type. Adverse effects were limited to transient erythema and edema. Conclusion: The combination of diode laser and bipolar radiofrequency energy device in addition to fractionated sublative radiofrequency is a safe and statistically significantly effective combined modality for the treatment of both superficial and deep acne scars in patients with skin types II to V with minimal downtime and no significant side effects. PMID:22010052

  4. Portable magnetic tweezers device enables visualization of the three-dimensional microscale deformation of soft biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yali; Lin, Jun; Meschewski, Ryan; Watson, Erin; Valentine, Megan T

    2011-07-01

    We have designed and built a magnetic tweezers device that enables the application of calibrated stresses to soft materials while simultaneously measuring their microscale deformation using confocal microscopy. Unlike previous magnetic tweezers designs, our device is entirely portable, allowing easy use on microscopes in core imaging facilities or in collaborators' laboratories. The imaging capabilities of the microscope are unimpaired, enabling the 3-D structures of fluorescently labeled materials to be precisely determined under applied load. With this device, we can apply a large range of forces (~1-1200 pN) over micron-scale contact areas to beads that are either embedded within 3-D matrices or attached to the surface of thin slab gels. To demonstrate the usefulness of this instrument, we have studied two important and biologically relevant materials: polyacrylamide-based hydrogel films typical of those used in cell traction force microscopy, and reconstituted networks of microtubules, essential cytoskeletal filaments.

  5. Laser-assisted lipolysis for arm contouring in Teimourian grades I and II: a prospective study of 45 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclère, Franck Marie; Alcolea, Justo M; Vogt, Peter; Moreno-Moraga, Javier; Mordon, Serge; Casoli, Vincent; Trelles, Mario A

    2015-04-01

    Upper arm deformities secondary to weight loss or senile elastosis have led to an increased demand for aesthetic contouring procedures. We conducted this study to objectively assess if, in Teimourian low-grade upper arm remodelling, one session of laser-assisted lypolisis (LAL) could result in full patient satisfaction. Between 2011 and 2013, 45 patients were treated for unsightly fat arm Teimourian grade I (15 patients), grade IIa (15 patients) and grade IIb (15 patients) with one session of LAL. The laser used in this study was a 1470-nm diode laser (Alma Lasers, Cesarea, Israel) with the following parameters: continuous mode, 15 W power and transmission through a 600-μm optical fibre. Previous mathematical modelling suggested that 0.1 kJ was required in order to destroy 1 ml of fat. Treatment parameters and adverse effects were recorded.The arm circumference and skin pinch measurements were assessed pre and postoperatively. Patients were asked to file a satisfaction questionnaire. Pain during the anaesthesia and discomfort after the procedure were minimal. Complications included prolonged oedema in 11 patients. The average arm circumference decreased by 4.9 ± 0.4 cm in the right arm (p arm (p arm (p arm (p arm (p arm (p arm remodelling for Teimourian grades I to IIb is a safe and reproducible technique. The procedure allows reduction in the amount of adipose deposits while providing full skin tightening.

  6. Absolute, pressure-dependent validation of a calibration-free, airborne laser hygrometer transfer standard (SEALDH-II) from 5 to 1200 ppmv using a metrological humidity generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Bernhard; Ebert, Volker

    2018-01-01

    Highly accurate water vapor measurements are indispensable for understanding a variety of scientific questions as well as industrial processes. While in metrology water vapor concentrations can be defined, generated, and measured with relative uncertainties in the single percentage range, field-deployable airborne instruments deviate even under quasistatic laboratory conditions up to 10-20 %. The novel SEALDH-II hygrometer, a calibration-free, tuneable diode laser spectrometer, bridges this gap by implementing a new holistic concept to achieve higher accuracy levels in the field. We present in this paper the absolute validation of SEALDH-II at a traceable humidity generator during 23 days of permanent operation at 15 different H2O mole fraction levels between 5 and 1200 ppmv. At each mole fraction level, we studied the pressure dependence at six different gas pressures between 65 and 950 hPa. Further, we describe the setup for this metrological validation, the challenges to overcome when assessing water vapor measurements on a high accuracy level, and the comparison results. With this validation, SEALDH-II is the first airborne, metrologically validated humidity transfer standard which links several scientific airborne and laboratory measurement campaigns to the international metrological water vapor scale.

  7. Integração de dados do laser scanner com a banda pan-cromática do sensor QuickBird II para a identificação de edificações através das redes neurais numa abordagem orientação a regiões = Integration of the laser scanner with image panchromatic of QuickBird II in identification of building using neural network and region orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosar Faria Botelho

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A imagens produzidas pelo sensor QuickBird II e pelos dados laser scanner são produtos caros para comercialização, porém têm mostrado seu valor técnico-científico no processamento digital de imagens. O objetivo deste estudo está em mostrar uma alternativa viável para a identificação de edificações através da classificação de imagem de alta resolução utilizando dados do sistema laser scanner e imagens do QuickBird II. No intuito de diminuir os custos na aquisição dos dados para o processamento digital, foram utilizados dados de intensidade e altimetria do laser, integrando-os com a banda pan-cromática do sensor QuickBird II, por meio do algoritmo de redes neurais e uma abordagem orientada a regiões. O trabalho justifica-se por utilizar tecnologias recentes (laser scanner e imagem QuickBird II e um algoritmo integrador de variáveis de diferentes origens (as redes neurais artificiais, na elaboração de mapas temáticos com custos menores. O método mostrou-se viável para a elaboração de mapa temático.The images produced by QuickBird II sensor and laser scanner data areexpensive products to commercialize. Therefore, it has shown its value in the processing of digital images. The goal of this work is to show a viable option for building identification through high resolution image classification using laser scanner system data and images of QuickBird II. For doing so, it used intensity and altimetry laser data integrated with the panchromatic band of the QuickBird II sensor; by means of neural network algorithms and a region oriented approach. The work is justified because it uses recent technologies (laser scanner and QuickBird II images, and it can reduce the production costs of a thematic map. The method showed viable the elaboration of a thematic map.

  8. Evaluation of surface smoothness by a laser displacement sensor II: comparison of lateral effect photodiode and multielement array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandak, J.; Tanaka, C.; Ohtani, T.

    2004-01-01

    Development of accurate surface assessment technology is of vital interest to modern wood industries. In this experiment we investigated new and fast noncontacting sensors to determine their usefulness for wood surface evaluation and to verify their accuracy. Two types of laser displacement sensors [equipped with a position sensitive detector (PSD) and a charge coupled device (CCD) detector] are compared with a conventional stylus and with theoretical profiles. Hornbeam workpieces with triangular profiles of differing slope and height were used for the evaluation. The results show that resolution of both sensors decreases as the height of the profile decreases. The error ratio of the laser-scanned profiles changes as a function of profile height, in the range 5%–33%. The CCD method is superior for accurate surface roughness evaluation, although the PSD approach can still be used for monitoring the error of form in most applications

  9. MATILDA Version-2: Rough Earth TIALD Model for Laser Probabilistic Risk Assessment in Hilly Terrain - Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    conservative approximation in laser safety terms, since hills and elevated terrain generally provide shielding and reduce risk. A less conservative and...is “ star -shaped” with respect to a given target. A CRA is defined to be star -shaped when any radial vector, ω, emanating from the target, crosses...the Range boundary only once. Frequently the initial Range area does not satisfy the star -shaped condition, so a portion of it is truncated to form

  10. Light dark matter candidates in intense laser pulses II: the relevance of the spin degrees of freedom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba-Chávez, S.; Müller, C. [Institut für Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich-Heine-Universität DüsseldorfUniversitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2016-02-03

    Optical searches assisted by the field of a laser pulse might allow for exploring a variety of not yet detected dark matter candidates such as hidden-photons and scalar minicharged particles. These hypothetical degrees of freedom may be understood as a natural consequence of extensions of the Standard Model incorporating a hidden U(1)-gauge sector. In this paper, we study the effects induced by both candidates on the propagation of a probe electromagnetic wave in the vacuum polarized by a long laser pulse of moderate intensity, this way complementing our previous study [http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP06(2015)177]. We describe how the absence of a spin in the scalar charged carriers modifies the photon-paraphoton oscillations as compared with a fermionic minicharge model. In particular, we find that the regime close to their lowest threshold mass might provide the most stringent upper limit for minicharged scalars. The pure-laser based experiment investigated here could allow for excluding a sector in the parameter space of the particles which has not been experimentally ruled out by setups driven by dipole magnets. We explain how the sign of the ellipticity and rotation of the polarization plane acquired by a probe photon — in combination with their dependencies on the pulse parameters — can be exploited to elucidate the quantum statistics of the charge carriers.

  11. Force measuring optical tweezers system for long time measurements of P pili stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Fällman, Erik; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2006-02-01

    A force-measuring optical tweezers instrumentation and long time measurements of the elongation and retraction of bacterial fimbriae from Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) under strain are presented. The instrumentation is presented in some detail. Special emphasis is given to measures taken to reduce the influence of noise and drifts in the system and from the surrounding, which makes long term force measurements possible. Individual P pili from UPEC bacteria were used as a biological model system for repetitive unfolding and refolding cycles of bacterial fimbriae under equilibrium conditions. P pili have evolved into a three-dimensional helix-like structure, the PapA rod, that can be successively and significantly elongated and/or unfolded when exposed to external forces. The instrumentation is used for characterization of the force-vs.-elongation response of the PapA rod of individual P pili, with emphasis on the long time stability of the forced unfolding and refolding of the helical structure of the PapA rod. The results show that the PapA rod is capable of withstanding extensive strain, leading to a complete unfolding of the helical structure, repetitive times during the life cycle of a bacterium without any noticeable alteration of the mechanical properties of the P pili. This function is believed to be importance for UPEC bacteria in vivo since it provides a close contact to a host cell (which is an initial step of invasion) despite urine cleaning attempts.

  12. Dynamic translocation of ligand-complexed DNA through solid-state nanopores with optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sischka, Andy; Spiering, Andre; Anselmetti, Dario; Khaksar, Maryam; Laxa, Miriam; Koenig, Janine; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the threading and controlled translocation of individual lambda-DNA (λ-DNA) molecules through solid-state nanopores with piconewton force sensitivity, millisecond time resolution and picoampere ionic current sensitivity with a set-up combining quantitative 3D optical tweezers (OT) with electrophysiology. With our virtually interference-free OT set-up the binding of RecA and single peroxiredoxin protein molecules to λ-DNA was quantitatively investigated during dynamic translocation experiments where effective forces and respective ionic currents of the threaded DNA molecule through the nanopore were measured during inward and outward sliding. Membrane voltage-dependent experiments of reversible single protein/DNA translocation scans yield hysteresis-free, asymmetric single-molecule fingerprints in the measured force and conductance signals that can be attributed to the interplay of optical trap and electrostatic nanopore potentials. These experiments allow an exact localization of the bound protein along the DNA strand and open fascinating applications for label-free detection of DNA-binding ligands, where structural and positional binding phenomena can be investigated at a single-molecule level.

  13. Trapping, manipulation and rapid rotation of NBD-C8 fluorescent single microcrystals in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GALAUP, Jean-Pierre; RODRIGUEZ-OTAZO, Mariela; AUGIER-CALDERIN, Angel; LAMERE; Jean-Francois; FERY-FORGUES, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    We have built an optical tweezers experiment based on an inverted microscope to trap and manipulate single crystals of micro or sub-micrometer size made from fluorescent molecules of 4-octylamino-7-nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD-C8). These single crystals have parallelepiped shapes and exhibit birefringence properties evidenced through optical experiments between crossed polarizers in a polarizing microscope. The crystals are uniaxial with their optical axis oriented along their largest dimension. Trapped in the optical trap, the organic micro-crystals are oriented in such a way that their long axis is along the direction of the beam propagation, and their short axis follows the direction of the linear polarization. Therefore, with linearly polarized light, simply rotating the light polarization can orient the crystal. When using circularly or only elliptically polarized light, the crystal can spontaneously rotate and reach rotation speed of several hundreds of turns per second. A surprising result has been observed: when the incident power is growing up, the rotation speed increases to reach a maximum value and then decreases even when the power is still growing up. Moreover, this evolution is irreversible. Different possible explanations can be considered. The development of a 3D control of the crystals by dynamical holography using liquid crystal spatial modulators will be presented and discussed on the basis of the most recent results obtained. (Author)

  14. Uncoiling mechanism of Klebsiella pneumoniae type 3 pili measured by using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng-Jung; Chan, Chia-Han; Liu, Kuo-Liang; Huang, Ying-Jung; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chang, Hwan-You; Yew, Tri-Rung; Hsu, Ken Y.; Hsu, Long

    2007-09-01

    Pili are bacterial appendages that play many important roles in bacterial behaviors, physiology and interaction with hosts. Via pili, bacteria are able to adhere to, migrate onto, and colonize on host cells, mechanically. Different from the most studied type 1 and P type pili, which are rigid and thick with an average of 6~7 nm in diameter, type 3 pili are relatively tiny (3-5 nm in diameter) and flexible, and their biophysical properties remains unclear. By using optical tweezers, we found that the elongation processes of type 3 pili are divided into three phases: (1) elastic elongation, (2) uncoiling elongation, and (3) intrinsic elongation, separately. Besides, the uncoiling force of the recombinant pili displayed on the surface of E. coli [pmrkABCD V1F] is measured 20 pN in average stronger than that of E. coli [pmrkABCD V1]. This suggests that pilin MrkF is involved in determining the mechanical properties of the type 3 pili.

  15. Thermodynamic DNA Looping by a Two-Site Restriction Endonuclease Studied using Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmen, Gregory J.

    2005-03-01

    Many enzyme-DNA interactions involve multimeric protein complexes that bind at two distant sites such that the DNA is looped. An example is the type IIe restriction enzyme Sau3AI, which requires two recognition sites to cleave the DNA. Here we study this process at the single DNA level using force measuring optical tweezers. We characterize cleavage rates of single DNA molecules in the presence of Sau3AI as a function of enzyme concentration, incubation time, and the fractional extension of the DNA molecule. Activity is completely inhibited by tensions of a few picoNewtons. By replacing Mg^2+ with Ca^2+, the Sau3AI dimers form but do not cleave the DNA, thus trapping DNA loops. We are able to pull apart these loops, measuring the force needed and the length of DNA released for each. We also characterize the number and length distributions of these loops as a function of incubation time and DNA fractional extension. The results of these studies are discussed in the context of a Brownian dynamics model of DNA looping.

  16. Massive ordering and alignment of cylindrical micro-objects by photovoltaic optoelectronic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, Iris; Muñoz-Martínez, Juan F; Barroso, Álvaro; Denz, Cornelia; Ramiro, José B; García-Cabañes, Angel; Agulló-López, Fernando; Carrascosa, Mercedes

    2018-01-01

    Optical tools for manipulation and trapping of micro- and nano-objects are a fundamental issue for many applications in nano- and biotechnology. This work reports on the use of one such method, known as photovoltaic optoelectronics tweezers, to orientate and organize cylindrical microcrystals, specifically elongated zeolite L, on the surface of Fe-doped LiNbO 3 crystal plates. Patterns of aligned zeolites have been achieved through the forces and torques generated by the bulk photovoltaic effect. The alignment patterns with zeolites parallel or perpendicular to the substrate surface are highly dependent on the features of light distribution and crystal configuration. Moreover, dielectrophoretic chains of zeolites with lengths up to 100 μm have often been observed. The experimental results of zeolite trapping and alignment have been discussed and compared together with theoretical simulations of the evanescent photovoltaic electric field and the dielectrophoretic potential. They demonstrate the remarkable capabilities of the optoelectronic photovoltaic method to orientate and pattern anisotropic microcrystals. The combined action of patterning and alignment offers a unique tool to prepare functional nanostructures with potential applications in a variety of fields such as nonlinear optics or plasmonics.

  17. DNA condensation by TmHU studied by optical tweezers, AFM and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbrich, Carsten; Brutzer, Hergen; Salomo, Mathias; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Kremer, Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    The compaction of DNA by the HU protein from Thermotoga maritima (TmHU) is analysed on a single-molecule level by the usage of an optical tweezers-assisted force clamp. The condensation reaction is investigated at forces between 2 and 40 pN applied to the ends of the DNA as well as in dependence on the TmHU concentration. At 2 and 5 pN, the DNA compaction down to 30% of the initial end-to-end distance takes place in two regimes. Increasing the force changes the progression of the reaction until almost nothing is observed at 40 pN. Based on the results of steered molecular dynamics simulations, the first regime of the length reduction is assigned to a primary level of DNA compaction by TmHU. The second one is supposed to correspond to the formation of higher levels of structural organisation. These findings are supported by results obtained by atomic force microscopy. PMID:22210966

  18. Cell manipulation tool with combined microwell array and optical tweezers for cell isolation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Gou, Xue; Chen, Shuxun; Yan, Xiao; Sun, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Isolation from rare cells and deposition of sorted cells with high accuracy for further study are critical to a wide range of biomedical applications. In the current paper, we report an automated cell manipulation tool with combined optical tweezers and a uniquely designed microwell array, which functions for recognition, isolation, assembly, transportation and deposition of the interesting cells. The microwell array allows the passive hydrodynamic docking of cells, while offering the opportunity to inspect the interesting cell phenotypes with high spatio-temporal resolution based on the flexible image processing technique. In addition, dynamic and parallel cell manipulation in three dimensions can realize the target cell levitation from microwell and pattern assembly with multiple optical traps. Integrated with the programmed motorized stage, the optically levitated and assembled cells can be transported and deposited to the predefined microenvironment, so the tool can facilitate the integration of other on-chip functionalities for further study without removing these isolated cells from the chip. Experiments on human embryonic stem cells and yeast cells are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed cell manipulation tool. Besides the application to cell isolation and deposition, three other biological applications with this tool are also presented. (paper)

  19. Structural investigations of transition metal (II) tetracyanonickelate complexes of 3-chloropyridine using Fourier transform-infrared and laser Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyüz, Sevim; Akyüz, Tanil; Eric, J.; Davies, D.

    1992-01-01

    The FT-IR and laser-Raman spectra of five new complexes of the formula ML 2Ni(CN) 4 (where MMn, Fe, Ni, Zn or Cd; L3-chloropyridine) are reported. The complexes are shown to have a structure consisting of two dimensional polymeric layers formed with Ni(CN) 4 ions bridged by ML 2 cations. For a given series of isomorphous complexes, the effects of metal ligand bond formation on the ligand vibrational modes are examined and the metal-sensitivity sequence of the ligand frequencies is found to be Mn≈Cd

  20. Characterization of type I, II, III, IV, and V collagens by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura; Cohen, David; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2000-04-01

    The relative proportions of genetically distinct collagen types in connective tissues vary with tissue type and change during disease progression, development, wound healing, aging. This study aims to 1) characterize the spectro- temporal fluorescence emission of fiber different types of collagen and 2) assess the ability of time-resolved laser- induced fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between collagen types. Fluorescence emission of commercially available purified samples was induced with nitrogen laser excitation pulses and detected with a MCP-PMT connected to a digital storage oscilloscope. The recorded time-resolved emission spectra displayed distinct fluorescence emission characteristics for each collagen type. The time domain information complemented the spectral domain intensity data for improved discrimination between different collagen types. Our results reveal that analysis of the fluorescence emission can be used to characterize different species of collagen. Also, the results suggest that time-resolved spectroscopy can be used for monitoring of connective tissue matrix composition changes due to various pathological and non-pathological conditions.

  1. Dilute nitride type-II 'W' quantum well lasers for the near-infrared and mid-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jerry R.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Khandekar, Anish A.; Hawkins, B. E.; Yeh, J. Y.; Mawst, Luke J.; Kuech, Thomas F.; Tansu, Nelson

    2005-04-01

    Dilute nitride type-II "W" structures have potential for lasing at 1.55 microns (on GaAs substrates) and in the mid-infrared (3-6 microns, on InP substrates). The former active regions utilize (In)GaAsN/GaAsSb/(In)GaAsN/GaAs quantum wells, whereas the latter are based on InAsN/GaAsSb/InAsN/GaInP structures. Following a review of the theoretical rationale, we will present some preliminary MOCVD growth results for the GaAs-based type-II structures, along with their characterization by x-ray, TEM, and photoluminescence. The experimental energy gaps corresponding to the layer compositions determined from characterization are in good agreement with calculations based on the 10-band k×p formalism.

  2. Seeding of a free electron laser: examples of UVSOR-II, SPARC and perspectives for ARC-EN-CIEL; Injection d'un laser a electrons libres: exemples de SPARC, UVSOR-II et perspectives pour ARC-EN-CIEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labat, M

    2008-09-15

    This work presents a general study on Free Electron Lasers (FEL) in the seeded configuration. Three examples are given: the UVSOR-II FEL (Okazaki, Japan), the SPARC FEL (Frascati, Italy) and the ARC-EN-CIEL project FEL (France). In the case of the UVSOR-II FEL, seeded with a Ti:Sa laser at 1 kHz repetition rate, several studies have been performed: electron beam dynamics, spatial coherence, spectral structure and angular distribution of the radiation, optimization in helical mode. In the case of the SPARC FEL, the injection of a harmonic source generated in rare gas (HHG) is foreseen. This original combination stands as an attractive source for users with a high temporal and spatial coherence degree together with a high intensity from UV to X rays. A dedicated harmonic source has been designed, assembled and tested for the SPARC FEL. The operation of the combined devices should start in Winter 2008, allowing fine characterization of the HHG-FEL association and further demonstration of original HGHG-FELs (High Gain Harmonic Generation) configuration. Finally, during the simulation studies performed for the design of the ARC-EN-CIEL light sources, a new propagation regime of the FEL pulse has been observed and is still under study. (author)

  3. Power spectrum analysis with least-squares fitting: Amplitude bias and its elimination, with application to optical tweezers and atomic force microscope cantilevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørlykke, Simon F.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Optical tweezers and atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers are often calibrated by fitting their experimental power spectra of Brownian motion. We demonstrate here that if this is done with typical weighted least-squares methods, the result is a bias of relative size between -2/n and + 1/n....... The fitted value for the characteristic frequency is not affected by this bias. For the AFM then, force measurements are not affected provided an independent length-scale calibration is available. For optical tweezers there is no such luck, since the spring constant is found as the ratio...... of the characteristic frequency and the diffusion coefficient. We give analytical results for the weight-dependent bias for the wide class of systems whose dynamics is described by a linear (integro)differential equation with additive noise, white or colored. Examples are optical tweezers with hydrodynamic self...

  4. AFM picking-up manipulation of the metaphase chromosome fragment by using the tweezers-type probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Saito, Masato; Shichiri, Motoharu; Sugiyama, Sigeru; Takamura, Yuzuru; Hashiguchi, Gen; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the development of a new procedure based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the analysis of metaphase chromosome. The aim of this study was to obtain detailed information about the specific locations of genes on the metaphase chromosome. In this research, we performed the manipulation of the metaphase chromosome by using novel AFM probes to obtain chromosome fragments of a smaller size than the ones obtained using the conventional methods, such as glass microneedles. We could pick up the fragment of the metaphase chromosome dissected by the knife-edged probe by using our tweezers-type probe

  5. Simultaneous three-dimensional tracking of individual signals from multi-trap optical tweezers using fast and accurate photodiode detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Dino; Nader, S; Reihani, S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2014-09-22

    Multiple-beam optical traps facilitate advanced trapping geometries and exciting discoveries. However, the increased manipulation capabilities come at the price of more challenging position and force detection. Due to unrivaled bandwidth and resolution, photodiode based detection is preferred over camera based detection in most single/dual-beam optical traps assays. However, it has not been trivial to implement photodiode based detection for multiple-beam optical traps. Here, we present a simple and efficient method based on spatial filtering for parallel photodiode detection of multiple traps. The technique enables fast and accurate 3D force and distance detection of multiple objects simultaneously manipulated by multiple-beam optical tweezers.

  6. Cavity simulator and controller for VUV free electron laser SIMCON 2.1, part II: functional blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Czarski, Tomasz; Koprek, Waldemar; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2006-02-01

    The paper describes integrated system of hardware controller and simulator of the resonant superconducting, narrowband niobium cavity, originally considered for the TTF and TESLA in DESY, Hamburg (now predicted for the VUV and X-Ray FEL). The controller bases on a programmable circuit Xilinx VirtexII V3000 embedded on a PCB XtremeDSP Development Kit by Nallatech. The FPGA circuit configuration was done in the VHDL language. The internal hardware multiplication components, present in Virtex II chips, were used, to improve the floating point calculation efficiency. The implementation was achieved of a device working in the real time, according to the demands of the LLRF control system for the TESLA Test Facility. The device under consideration will be referred to as superconducting cavity (SCCav) SIMCON throughout this work. The following components are described here in detail: functional layer, parameter programming, foundations of control of particular blocks and monitoring of the real time processes. This note is accompanied by the one describing the DOOCS interface for the described hardware system. The interface was prepared in DOOCS and in Windows. The hardware and software of SIMCON was tested in CHECIA. The results were presented. While giving all necessary technical details required to understand the work of the integrated hardware controller and simulator and to enable its practical copying, this document is a unity with other TESLA technical notes published by the same team on the subject. Modeling was omitted, as it is addressed in detail in the quoted references.

  7. Exploring the Interaction of Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes with DNA Using Single-Molecule Techniques†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Vladescu, Ioana; McCauley, Micah; Ly, Elaine; Williams, Mark C.; Spain, Eileen M.; Nuñez, Megan E.

    2008-01-01

    Here we explore DNA binding by a family of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and optical tweezers. We demonstrate using AFM that Ru(bpy)2dppz2+ intercalates into DNA (Kb= 1.5 × 105 M−1), as does its close relative Ru(bpy)2dppx2+ (Kb= 1.5 × 105 M−1). However, intercalation by Ru(phen)32+ and other Ru(II) complexes with Kb's lower than Ru(bpy)2dppz2+ are difficult to determine using AFM because of competing aggregation and surface-binding phenomena. At the high Ru(II) concentrations required to evaluate intercalation, most of the DNA strands acquire a twisted, curled conformation that is impossible to measure accurately. The condensation of DNA on mica in the presence of polycations is well known, but it clearly precludes the accurate assessment by AFM of DNA intercalation by most Ru(II) complexes, though not by ethidium bromide and other monovalent intercalators. When stretching individual DNA molecules using optical tweezers the same limitation on high metal concentration does not exist. Using optical tweezers we show that Ru(phen)2dppz2+ intercalates avidly (Kb = 3.2 × 106 M−1) while Ru(bpy)32+ does not intercalate, even at micromolar ruthenium concentrations. Ru(phen)32+ is shown to intercalate weakly, i.e. at micromolar concentrations (Kb= 8.8 × 103 M−1). The distinct differences in DNA stretching behavior between Ru(phen)32+ and Ru(bpy)32+ clearly illustrate that intercalation can be distinguished from groove binding by pulling the DNA with optical tweezers. Our results demonstrate both the benefits and challenges of two single-molecule methods in exploring DNA binding, and help to elucidate the mode of binding of Ru(phen)32+. PMID:16649785

  8. Supramolecular Properties of Triazole-containing Two Armed Peptidomimetics: From Organogelators to Nucleotide-binding Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Tin Ki

    obtain a clearer picture on the mode of association of these two series of branched peptidomimetics, the length of the tripeptidomimetic arms was truncated to a dipeptide, and the amino acid, valine, was used for further studies. Both the two new candidates, 88-K-V2 and 89-B-V2, were shown to dimerize in chloroform as shown from vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) studies. 1H NMR titration experiments indicated a better dimerization strength for the latter candidate due to the intermolecular pi-pi interactions offered by its benzene ring in addition to the intermolecular hydrogen bonding by the amides and triazole units. H/D exchange and 2D NMR experiments, and molecular modeling revealed that 88-K-V2 dimerized through the formation of antiparallel beta-strands whereas formation of parallel beta-strands took place in 89-B-V2. Compound 88-K-V2 was found to form 1:1 complexes with chloride (Ka 640 M-1) and monobasic diethyl phosphate (DEP) ion (Ka 810 M-1) in chloroform. Interestingly, 89-B-V 2 was shown to form the usual 1:1 complex with the former ion (Ka 970 M-1) while forming an unexpected 2:1 complex with the latter with positive cooperativity. It was observed that both the amides and triazole protons were involved in anion-binding. In the 88-K-V2-DEP complex, the host formed a helix-like structure that wrapped around the anion located at the center of the complex as determined by 2D NMR and molecular modeling studies. Finally, further structural modification of 88-K-V2 gave a water-soluble nucleotide-binding tweezer 93-K-R2·4TFA . This tweezer consisted of four arginines (R), two triazole units, two pyrene probes and a small hydrophilic ethanolamine tail. Fluorescence study showed that this tweezer was able to form 1:1 complexes with different nucleotides in water with similar binding strength regardless of the number of phosphate groups present in the nucleotides. Moleular modeling suggested that such a charge-independent binding behavior was due to the similar number

  9. Advanced laser-backlit grazing-incidence x-ray imaging systems for inertial confinement fusion research. II. Tolerance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Guy R.; Folta, James A.

    2001-01-01

    Two example ultrahigh-spatial resolution laser-backlit grazing-incidence x-ray microscope designs for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research have been described [Appl. Opt. 40, 4570 (2001)]. Here details of fabrication, assembly, and optical surface errors that are characteristic of present state-of-the-art superpolished multilayer-coated spherical mirrors are given. They indicate that good image qualities can be expected; in particular, <0.5-μm spatial resolution at very high x-ray energies (up to 25 keV) appears to be feasible. Existing ICF imaging diagnostics approach ∼2 μm spatial at low (<2 keV) energy. The improvement in resolution compared with that of other grazing-incidence devices is attributed to a fortuitous residual on-axis aberration dependence on short wavelengths; recent advances in mirror fabrication, including a new thin-film deposition technique to correct figure errors precisely in one dimension; and novel design. For even higher resolution, a means of creating precise aspherical mirrors of spheric-quality microroughness may be possible by use of the same deposition technique

  10. Fault-Protected Laser Diode Drivers for Improving the Performance and Lifetime of Multiple-Millisecond, Long-Pulse LDAs for NASA LIDAR Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project will develop and deliver to NASA revolutionary laser diode driver technology with intelligent fault protection for driving high power laser diode...

  11. Label-free detection of HIV-1 infected cells via integration of optical tweezers and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugongolo, Masixole Yvonne; Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin; Noto, Luyanda Lunga; Maaza, Malik; Mthunzi-Kufa, Patience

    2018-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is currently detected using conventional qualitative and quantitative tests to determine the presence or absence of HIV in blood samples. However, the approach of these tests detects the presence of either viral antibodies or viral RNA that require labelling which may be costly, sophisticated and time consuming. A label-free approach of detecting the presence of HIV is therefore desirable. Of note optical tweezers can be coupled with other technologies including spectroscopy, which also investigates light-matter interactions. For example, coupling of optical tweezers with luminescence spectroscopy techniques has emerged as a powerful tool in biology for micro-manipulation, detection and analysis of individual cells. Integration of optical techniques has enabled studying biological particles in a label-free manner, whilst detecting functional groups and other essential molecules within mixed populations of cells. In the current study, an optical trapping system coupled to luminescence spectroscopy was utilised to detect the presence of HIV infection in TZM-bl cells in vitro. This was performed by infecting TZM-bl cells with the ZM53 HIV-1 pseudovirus, and incubating them for 48 hours prior analysis. The differences between infected and uninfected cells were thereafter displayed as shown by the spectrographs obtained. Combination of these two techniques has a potential in the field of infectious disease diagnostics.

  12. Single molecule measurements of DNA helicase activity with magnetic tweezers and t-test based step-finding analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Strub, Marie-Paule; Neuman, Keir C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers is a versatile and easy to implement single-molecule technique that has become increasingly prevalent in the study of nucleic acid based molecular motors. Here, we provide a description of the magnetic tweezers instrument and guidelines for measuring and analyzing DNA helicase activity. Along with experimental methods, we describe a robust method of single-molecule trajectory analysis based on the Student’s t-test that accommodates continuous transitions in addition to the discrete transitions assumed in most widely employed analysis routines. To illustrate the single-molecule unwinding assay and the analysis routine, we provide DNA unwinding measurements of Escherichia coli RecQ helicase under a variety of conditions (Na+, ATP, temperature, and DNA substrate geometry). These examples reveal that DNA unwinding measurements under various conditions can aid in elucidating the unwinding mechanism of DNA helicase but also emphasize that environmental effects on DNA helicase activity must be considered in relation to in vivo activity and mechanism. PMID:27131595

  13. Inactivation of Spores of Bacillus Species by Wet Heat: Studies on Single Spores Using Laser Tweezers Taman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    13/2011 22.00 Keren K. Griffiths, Jingqiao Zhang, Ann E. Cowan, Ji Yu, Peter Setlow. Germination proteins in the inner membrane of dormant Bacillus...that this technique can be used to rapidly identify single airborne particles or bacteria collected on a slide and to monitor germination dynamics of...the environment of dipicolinic acid in the core of superdormant spores is different from that in dormant spores [J. Bacteriol., 191, 5584 (2009

  14. Intracavity optical trapping with Ytterbium doped fiber ring laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Rania; Kalantarifard, Fatemeh; Elahi, Parviz; Ilday, F. Omer; Volpe, Giovanni; Maragò, Onofrio M.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a novel approach for trapping micron-sized particles and living cells based on optical feedback. This approach can be implemented at low numerical aperture (NA=0.5, 20X) and long working distance. In this configuration, an optical tweezers is constructed inside a ring cavity fiber laser and the optical feedback in the ring cavity is controlled by the light scattered from a trapped particle. In particular, once the particle is trapped, the laser operation, optical feedback and intracavity power are affected by the particle motion. We demonstrate that using this configuration is possible to stably hold micron-sized particles and single living cells in the focal spot of the laser beam. The calibration of the optical forces is achieved by tracking the Brownian motion of a trapped particle or cell and analysing its position distribution.

  15. Single-Molecule Manipulation of Double-Stranded DNA Using Optical Tweezers: Interaction Studies of DNA with RecA and YOYO-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, Martin L.; Scharer, Orlando D.; Kanaar, Ronald; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Schins, J.M.; Kanger, Johannes S.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1999-01-01

    By using optical tweezers and a specially designed flow cell with an integrated glass micropipette, we constructed a setup similar to that of Smith et al. (Science 271:795-799, 1996) in which an individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecule can be captured between two polystyrene beads. The first

  16. Inhibition of Mutant αB Crystallin-Induced Protein Aggregation by a Molecular Tweezer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Na; Bitan, Gal; Schrader, Thomas; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Osinska, Hanna; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2017-08-08

    Compromised protein quality control causes the accumulation of misfolded proteins and intracellular aggregates, contributing to cardiac disease and heart failure. The development of therapeutics directed at proteotoxicity-based pathology in heart disease is just beginning. The molecular tweezer CLR01 is a broad-spectrum inhibitor of abnormal self-assembly of amyloidogenic proteins, including amyloid β-protein, tau, and α-synuclein. This small molecule interferes with aggregation by binding selectively to lysine side chains, changing the charge distribution of aggregation-prone proteins and thereby disrupting aggregate formation. However, the effects of CLR01 in cardiomyocytes undergoing proteotoxic stress have not been explored. Here we assess whether CLR01 can decrease cardiac protein aggregation catalyzed by cardiomyocyte-specific expression of mutated αB-crystallin (CryAB R 120G ). A proteotoxic model of desmin-related cardiomyopathy caused by cardiomyocyte-specific expression of CryAB R 120G was used to test the efficacy of CLR01 therapy in the heart. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were infected with adenovirus expressing either wild-type CryAB or CryAB R 120G . Subsequently, the cells were treated with different doses of CLR01 or a closely related but inactive derivative, CLR03. CLR01 decreased aggregate accumulation and attenuated cytotoxicity caused by CryAB R 120G expression in a dose-dependent manner, whereas CLR03 had no effect. Ubiquitin-proteasome system function was analyzed using a ubiquitin-proteasome system reporter protein consisting of a short degron, CL1, fused to the COOH-terminus of green fluorescent protein. CLR01 improved proteasomal function in CryAB R 120G cardiomyocytes but did not alter autophagic flux. In vivo, CLR01 administration also resulted in reduced protein aggregates in CryAB R 120G transgenic mice. CLR01 can inhibit CryAB R 120G aggregate formation and decrease cytotoxicity in cardiomyocytes undergoing proteotoxic stress

  17. Laser microbeam manipulation of cell morphogenesis growing in fungal hyphae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracker, Charles E.; Murphy, Douglas J.; Lopez-Franco, Rosamaria

    1997-05-01

    Laser microbeam irradiation at 820 nm predictably and reproducibly altered morphogenetic patterns in fungal cells. Optical tweezers were highly effective as localized, noninvasive, and largely nondestructive probes under precise spatial and temporal control. In growing hyphae, the position of the Spitzenkorper (a multicomponent complex containing mainly secretory vesicles in the hyphal apex), is correlated with the site of maximum cell expansion during tip growth. The Spitzenkorper was not trapped by the laser, but moved away from the trap, and could be `chased' around the cell by the laser beam. Consequently, the direction of cell elongation was readily changed by moving the Spitzenkorper. When the laser was held steady at the cytoplasmic surface immediately beside the Spitzenkorper, an adventitious branch hypha was initiated on the same side of the hypha, suggesting that unilateral disturbance of vesicle traffic initiated a new lateral Spitzenkorper and hyphal branch near the original hyphal apex. If moving vesicles were trapped by the laser beam and transported to a different area of the cytoplasm near the cell surface, the cell profile bulged where the vesicles were newly concentrated. Variations in the mode of vesicle transfer caused: (1) single and multiple bulges, (2) adventitious branch hyphae, (3) increased cell diameter, and (4) changing directions of hyphal elongation. Thus, laser tweezers emerge as a powerful tool for controlling patterns of cell morphogenesis. The findings strongly support the hypothesis that sites of vesicle concentration and release to the cell surface are important determinants of cell morphogenesis in fungi. This conclusion lends support to the basic premises of a modern mathematical model of hyphal tip growth (the hyphoid/VSC model) but does not in itself provide the information needed for a comprehensive and integrated explanation of the mechanism of cell growth in fungi.

  18. Molecular cleft or tweezer compounds derived from trioxabicyclo[3.3.1]nonadiene diisocyanate and diacid dichloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Kollenz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structures of two derivatives of the bisdioxine diisocyanate 1, the bisurea 4 and the biscarbamate 5, are established by X-ray crystallography and DFT calculations. These compounds possess endo,endo structures, in the case of the bisurea 4 with two nearly parallel pendant chains. The X-ray structures are reproduced very well by DFT calculations. Similar endo,endo conformations are calculated for the bisamide crown ether derivatives 7, where two proximate and nearly parallel crown ether units endow the molecules with a claw-like molecular cleft or tweezer structure as evidenced by an enhanced ability to extract some alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth metal ions.

  19. Improvement of laser dicing performance II: dicing rate enhancement by multi beams and simultaneous aberration correction with phase-only spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Yu; Matsumoto, Naoya; Oyaizu, Masaki; Okuma, Jyunji; Nakano, Makoto; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Itoh, Haruyasu; Inoue, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    "Stealth Dicing" laser processing is a dry and debris-free semiconductor wafer dicing method achieved by generating thermal micro-cracks inside a wafer with a tightly focused laser beam. This method has two practical issues: (1) the dicing speed is limited by the repetition rate of the pulsed laser, and (2) integrated circuits on the opposite side of the wafer from the laser light are potentially damaged by excessive laser intensity required to compensate for insufficient beam convergence. The insufficient beam convergence is a result of spherical aberration due to a refractive index mismatch between air and the wafer. These problems can be resolved by incorporating a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) into the laser dicing system. The SLM produces two types of wavefront configurations simultaneously for two different functions. One is for multi-beam generation with a phase grating pattern. This improves the dicing speed by a factor equal to the number of diffracted beams. The other is for aberration correction of the multiple beams using a pre-distorted wavefront pattern. By correcting aberrations, the focused multiple beams inside the wafer will become sufficiently convergent to avoid undesirable laser damage. We demonstrated these improvements by dicing sapphire wafers with a pulsed laser and a high-numerical-aperture objective lens.

  20. Analytic estimation of almost-resonant molecular energy transfer due to multipolar potentials. II. VV relaxation of the laser levels of CF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pack, R.T.

    1982-01-01

    A quantal almost-resonant collisional energy transfer theory with a natural cutoff for the Born approximation is extended to spherical-top polyatomic molecules and used to calculate the rate from 100--400 K for the almost-resonant vibration to vibration process which depletes the upper laser level and populates the lower laser level of CF 4

  1. Three-Dimensional Optical Trapping of a Plasmonic Nanoparticle using Low Numerical Aperture Optical Tweezers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Karásek, Vítězslav; Paták, Aleš; Pokorná, Zuzana; Mika, Filip; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, JAN 29 (2015), 08106:1-9 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : discrete-dipole approximation * gold nanoparticles * radiation forces * spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  2. Marangoni effect visualized in two-dimensions Optical tweezers for gas bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniewicz, A.; Bartkiewicz, S.; Orlikowska, H.; Dradrach, K.

    2016-10-01

    In the report we demonstrate how, using laser light, effectively trap gas bubbles and transport them through a liquid phase to a desired destination by shifting the laser beam position. The physics underlying the effect is complex but quite general as it comes from the limited to two-dimension, well-known, Marangoni effect. The experimental microscope-based system consists of a thin layer of liquid placed between two glass plates containing a dye dissolved in a solvent and a laser light beam that is strongly absorbed by the dye. This point-like heat source locally changes surface tension of nearby liquid-air interface. Because of temperature gradients a photo-triggered Marangoni flows are induced leading to self-amplification of the effect and formation of large-scale whirls. The interface is bending toward beam position allowing formation of a gas bubble upon suitable beam steering. Using various techniques (employing luminescent particles or liquid crystals), we visualize liquid flows propelled by the tangential to interface forces. This helped us to understand the physics of the phenomenon and analyze accompanying effects leading to gas bubble trapping. The manipulation of sessile droplets moving on the glass surface induced via controlled with laser light interface bending (i.e. “droplet catapult”) is demonstrated as well.

  3. Direct measurement of the nonconservative force field generated by optical tweezers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wu, P.; Huang, R.; Tischer, Ch.; Jonáš, Alexandr; Florin, E. L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 10 (2009), 108101:1-4 ISSN 0031-9007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : manipulation * molecules * particles * equality * trap Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 7.328, year: 2009

  4. Catastrophic optical bulk degradation in high-power single- and multi-mode InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers: part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yongkun; Ayvazian, Talin; Brodie, Miles; Lingley, Zachary

    2018-03-01

    High-power single-mode (SM) and multi-mode (MM) InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well (QW) lasers are critical components for both terrestrial and space satellite communications systems. Since these lasers predominantly fail by catastrophic and sudden degradation due to catastrophic optical damage (COD), it is especially crucial for space satellite applications to investigate reliability, failure modes, precursor signatures of failure, and degradation mechanisms of these lasers. Our group reported a new failure mode in MM and SM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers in 2009 and 2016, respectively. Our group also reported in 2017 that bulk failure due to catastrophic optical bulk damage (COBD) is the dominant failure mode of both SM and MM lasers that were subject to long-term life-tests. For the present study, we continued our physics of failure investigation by performing long-term life-tests followed by failure mode analysis (FMA) using nondestructive and destructive micro-analytical techniques. We performed long-term accelerated life-tests on state-of-the-art SM and MM InGaAs- AlGaAs strained QW lasers under ACC mode. Our life-tests have accumulated over 25,000 test hours for SM lasers and over 35,000 test hours for MM lasers. We first employed electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique to identify failure modes of degraded SM lasers by observing dark line defects. All the SM failures that we studied showed catastrophic and sudden degradation and all of these failures were bulk failures. Since degradation mechanisms responsible for COBD are still not well understood, we also employed other techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) and high-resolution TEM to further study dark line defects and dislocations in post-aged lasers. Keywor

  5. Using optical tweezers to examine the chemotactic force to a single inflammatory cell--eosinophil stimulated by chemoattractants prepared from Toxocara Canis larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Po-Chen; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Ke-Min; Jen, Lin-Ni; Liu, Cheng-tzu; Hsu, Long

    2005-08-01

    Granulocytes are a group of white blood cells belonging to the innate immune system in human and in murine in which eosinophils play an important role in worm infection-induced inflammation. The migration of these cells is well characterized and has been separated into four steps: rolling, adhesion, transendothelial migration, and chemotaxis, however, the physical characteristics of the chemotactic force to eosinophils from worm component remain largely unknown. Note that optical tweezers are featured in the manipulation of a single cell and the measurement of biological forces. Therefore, we propose to use optical tweezers to examine the chemotactic force to a eosinophil from a T. canis lavae preparation in terms of distance during the migration of eosinophil.

  6. Synthesis and photoisomerization study of new aza-crown macrocyclic tweezer tethered through an azobenzene linker: The first report on supramolecular interaction of azobenzene moiety with C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Bahram; Mahdavian, Mahsa; García-Deibe, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    In the present communication, three bimacrocyclic tweezers linked through azobenzene moiety, Ln (n = 1-3) were synthesized in a multistep route and characterized by x-ray crystallography, IR, 1H and 13C NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy as well as CHN microanalysis. UV-visible spectroscopy established that the irradiation of L1 and L3 with UV light promoted the trans to cis isomerization. Irradiating the reaction mixtures with Hg lamp, significant supramolecular interactions between L1 and L3 with C60 were also found in terms of the association constants calculated by UV-visible spectroscopy, denoting on more pronounced interaction with C60 that in the absence of UV light. The molecular structures of L1-L3 calculated by using DFT method suggested a novel unprecedented interaction between the HOMO's of azobenzene moiety on the tweezer instead of the aromatic groups with C60.

  7. Non-spherical gold nanoparticles trapped in optical tweezers: Shape matters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Karásek, Vítězslav; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 7 (2015), s. 8179-8189 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-16195S; GA TA ČR TE01020233; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : discrete-dipole approximation * anisotropic particles * plasmon-resonance * gaussian beams * microparticles * spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.148, year: 2015

  8. Raman spectroscopy of single nanoparticles in a double-nanohole optical tweezer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Steven; Al Balushi, Ahmed A; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    A double nanohole in a metal film was used to trap nanoparticles (20 nm diameter) and simultaneously record their Raman spectrum using the trapping laser as the excitation source. This allowed for the identification of characteristic Stokes lines for titania and polystyrene nanoparticles, showing the capability for material identification of nanoparticles once trapped. Increased Raman signal was observed for the trapping of multiple nanoparticles. This system combines the benefits of nanoparticle isolation and manipulation with unique identification. (fast track communication)

  9. Raman Spectroscopy of Single Nanoparticles in a Double-Nanohole Optical Tweezer System

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Steven; Balushi, Ahmed A. Al; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    A double nanohole in a metal film was used to trap nanoparticles (20 nm diameter) and simultaneously record their Raman spectrum using the trapping laser as the excitation source. This allowed for the identification of characteristic Stokes lines for titania and polystyrene nanoparticles, showing the capability for material identification of nanoparticles once trapped. Increased Raman signal is observed for the trapping of multiple nanoparticles. This system combines the benefits of nanoparti...

  10. Laser Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  11. tweezercalib 2.1: Faster version of MatLab package for precise calibration of optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Poul Martin; Tolic-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2006-10-01

    New version program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier:ADTV_v2_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV_v2_1 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:no No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 134 188 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 050 368 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MatLab (Mathworks Inc.), standard license Computer:General computer running MatLab (Mathworks Inc.) Operating system:Windows2000, Windows-XP, Linux RAM:Of order four times the size of the data file Classification:3, 4.14, 18, 23 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADTV_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 174 (2006) 518 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: yes Nature of problem:Calibrate optical tweezers with precision by fitting theory to experimental power spectrum of position of bead doing Brownian motion in incompressible fluid, possibly near microscope cover slip, while trapped in optical tweezers. Thereby determine spring constant of optical trap and conversion factor for arbitrary-units-to-nanometers for detection system. The theoretical underpinnings of the procedure may be found in Ref. [3]. Solution method:Elimination of cross-talk between quadrant photo-diodes, output channels for positions (optional). Check that distribution of recorded positions agrees with Boltzmann distribution of bead in harmonic trap. Data compression and noise reduction by blocking method applied to power spectrum. Full accounting for hydrodynamic effects; Frequency-dependent drag force and interaction with nearby cover slip (optional). Full accounting for electronic filters (optional), for "virtual filtering" caused by detection system (optional). Full accounting for aliasing caused by finite sampling rate (optional). Standard non-linear least-squares fitting with custom written

  12. Eight-band k·p modeling of InAs/InGaAsSb type-II W-design quantum well structures for interband cascade lasers emitting in a broad range of mid infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryczko, K.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Wrocław University of Technology, Wybrzeże Wyspiańskiego 27, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland)

    2013-12-14

    Band structure properties of the type-II W-design AlSb/InAs/GaIn(As)Sb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells have been investigated theoretically in a systematic manner and with respect to their use in the active region of interband cascade laser for a broad range of emission in mid infrared between below 3 to beyond 10 μm. Eight-band k·p approach has been utilized to calculate the electronic subbands. The fundamental optical transition energy and the corresponding oscillator strength have been determined in function of the thickness of InAs and GaIn(As)Sb layers and the composition of the latter. There have been considered active structures on two types of relevant substrates, GaSb and InAs, introducing slightly modified strain conditions. Additionally, the effect of external electric field has been taken into account to simulate the conditions occurring in the operational devices. The results show that introducing arsenic as fourth element into the valence band well of the type-II W-design system, and then altering its composition, can efficiently enhance the transition oscillator strength and allow additionally increasing the emission wavelength, which makes this solution prospective for improved performance and long wavelength interband cascade lasers.

  13. Laser etching as an alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyfus, R.W.; Kelly, R.

    1989-01-01

    Atoms and molecules are removed from surfaces by intense laser beams. This fact has been known almost since the discovery of the laser. Within the present overall area of interest, namely understanding ion-beam-induced sputtering, it is equally important both to contrast laser etching to ion sputtering and to understand the underlying physics taking place during laser etching. Beyond some initial broad observations, the specific discussion is limited to, and aimed at, two areas: (i) short wavelength, UV, laser-pulse effects and (ii) energy fluences sufficiently small that only monolayers (and not microns) of material are removed per pulse. 38 refs.; 13 figs.; 5 tabs

  14. Interactions between the breast cancer-associated MUC1 mucins and C-type lectin characterized by optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soosan Hadjialirezaei

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate-protein interactions govern many crucial processes in biological systems including cell recognition events. We have used the sensitive force probe optical tweezers to quantify the interactions occurring between MGL lectins and MUC1 carrying the cancer-associated glycan antigens mucins Tn and STn. Unbinding forces of 7.6 pN and 7.1 pN were determined for the MUC1(Tn-MGL and MUC1(STn-MGL interactions, at a force loading rate of ~40 pN/s. The interaction strength increased with increasing force loading rate, to 27 and 37 pN at a force loading rate of ~ 310 pN/s. No interactions were detected between MGL and MUC1(ST, a glycoform of MUC1 also expressed by breast carcinoma cells. Interestingly, this glycan (ST can be found on proteins expressed by normal cells, although in this case not on MUC1. Additionally, GalNAc decorated polyethylene glycol displayed similar rupture forces as observed for MUC1(Tn and MUC1(STn when forced to unbind from MGL, indicating that GalNAc is an essential group in these interactions. Since the STn glycan decoration is more frequently found on the surface of carcinomas than the Tn glycan, the binding of MUC1 carrying STn to MGL may be more physiologically relevant and may be in part responsible for some of the characteristics of STn expressing tumours.

  15. Signatures of Nucleotide Analog Incorporation by an RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Revealed Using High-Throughput Magnetic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dulin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses pose a threat to public health that is exacerbated by the dearth of antiviral therapeutics. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp holds promise as a broad-spectrum, therapeutic target because of the conserved nature of the nucleotide-substrate-binding and catalytic sites. Conventional, quantitative, kinetic analysis of antiviral ribonucleotides monitors one or a few incorporation events. Here, we use a high-throughput magnetic tweezers platform to monitor the elongation dynamics of a prototypical RdRp over thousands of nucleotide-addition cycles in the absence and presence of a suite of nucleotide analog inhibitors. We observe multiple RdRp-RNA elongation complexes; only a subset of which are competent for analog utilization. Incorporation of a pyrazine-carboxamide nucleotide analog, T-1106, leads to RdRp backtracking. This analysis reveals a mechanism of action for this antiviral ribonucleotide that is corroborated by cellular studies. We propose that induced backtracking represents a distinct mechanistic class of antiviral ribonucleotides.

  16. Optical tweezers studies of viral DNA packaging: Motor function and DNA confinement in Bacteriophages phi29, lambda, and T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas

    2007-03-01

    In the assembly of many viruses a powerful molecular motor translocates the genome into a pre-assembled capsid. We use optical tweezers to directly measure translocation of a single DNA molecule into the viral capsid. Improved techniques allow us to measure initiation and early stages of packaging. With phi29 the DNA terminal protein was found to cause large variations in the starting point of packaging. Removal of this protein results in terminal initiation, permitting more accurate assessment of motor function and DNA confinement forces. We investigated the role of electrostatic repulsion by varying ionic screening of the DNA. The observed trends are in accord with those theoretically expected considering counter-ion competition; however the forces are larger than expected in comparison with recent theories and DNA ejection measurements. We have recently succeeded in extending our methods to study two other phages: lambda and T4. These systems have unique structural and functional features, presenting an opportunity for comparative studies in this family of molecular motors. Initial measurements show that lambda and T4 translocate DNA several times faster than the phi29 motor, but are more sensitive to applied load.

  17. Observing dynamics of chromatin fibers in Xenopus egg extracts by single DNA manipulation using a transverse magnetic tweezer setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jie; Skoko, Dunja; Marko, John; Maresca, Tom; Heald, Rebecca

    2005-03-01

    We have studied assembly of chromatin on single DNAs using Xenopus egg extracts and a specially designed magnetic tweezer setup which generates controlled force in the focal plane of the objective, allowing us to visualize and measure DNA extension under a wide range of constant tensions. We found, in the absence of ATP, interphase extracts assembled nucleosomes against DNA tensions of up to 3.5 piconewtons (pN). We observed force-induced disassembly and opening-closing fluctuations indicating our experiments were in mechano-chemical equilibrium. We found that the ATP-depleted reaction can do mechanical work of 27 kcal/mol per nucleosome, providing a measurement of the free energy difference between core histone octamers on and off DNA. Addition of ATP leads to highly dynamic behavior: time courses show processive runs of assembly and disassembly of not observed in the -ATP case, with forces of 2 pN leading to nearly complete fiber disassembly. Our study shows that ATP hydrolysis plays a major role in nucleosome rearrangement and removal, and suggests that chromatin in vivo may be subject to continual assembly and disassembly.

  18. Two-point active microrheology in a viscous medium exploiting a motional resonance excited in dual-trap optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shuvojit; Kumar, Randhir; Banerjee, Ayan

    2018-04-01

    Two-point microrheology measurements from widely separated colloidal particles approach the bulk viscosity of the host medium more reliably than corresponding single-point measurements. In addition, active microrheology offers the advantage of enhanced signal to noise over passive techniques. Recently, we reported the observation of a motional resonance induced in a probe particle in dual-trap optical tweezers when the control particle was driven externally [Paul et al., Phys. Rev. E 96, 050102(R) (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevE.96.050102]. We now demonstrate that the amplitude and phase characteristics of the motional resonance can be used as a sensitive tool for active two-point microrheology to measure the viscosity of a viscous fluid. Thus, we measure the viscosity of viscous liquids from both the amplitude and phase response of the resonance, and demonstrate that the zero crossing of the phase response of the probe particle with respect to the external drive is superior compared to the amplitude response in measuring viscosity at large particle separations. We compare our viscosity measurements with those using a commercial rheometer and obtain an agreement ˜1 % . The method can be extended to viscoelastic material where the frequency dependence of the resonance may provide further accuracy for active microrheological measurements.

  19. Fast characterisation of cell-derived extracellular vesicles by nanoparticles tracking analysis, cryo-electron microscopy, and Raman tweezers microspectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irène Tatischeff

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The joint use of 3 complementary techniques, namely, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA, cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM and Raman tweezers microspectroscopy (RTM, is proposed for a rapid characterisation of extracellular vesicles (EVs of various origins. NTA is valuable for studying the size distribution and concentration, Cryo-EM is outstanding for the morphological characterisation, including observation of vesicle heterogeneity, while RTM provides the global chemical composition without using any exogenous label. The capabilities of this approach are evaluated on the example of cell-derived vesicles of Dictyostelium discoideum, a convenient general model for eukaryotic EVs. At least 2 separate species differing in chemical composition (relative amounts of DNA, lipids and proteins, presence of carotenoids were found for each of the 2 physiological states of this non-pathogenic microorganism, that is, cell growth and starvation-induced aggregation. These findings demonstrate the specific potency of RTM. In addition, the first Raman spectra of human urinary exosomes are reported, presumably constituting the primary step towards Raman characterisation of EVs for the purpose of human diseases diagnoses.

  20. Disrupting self-assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic protein oligomers by "molecular tweezers" - from the test tube to animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Aida; Bitan, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, therapy for diseases caused by abnormal protein folding and aggregation (amyloidoses) is limited to treatment of symptoms and provides only temporary and moderate relief to sufferers. The failure in developing successful disease-modifying drugs for amyloidoses stems from the nature of the targets for such drugs - primarily oligomers of amyloidogenic proteins, which are distinct from traditional targets, such as enzymes or receptors. The oligomers are metastable, do not have well-defined structures, and exist in dynamically changing mixtures. Therefore, inhibiting the formation and toxicity of these oligomers likely will require out-of-the-box thinking and novel strategies. We review here the development of a strategy based on targeting the combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that are key to the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins using lysine (K)-specific "molecular tweezers" (MTs). Our discussion includes a survey of the literature demonstrating the important role of K residues in the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins and the development of a lead MT derivative called CLR01, from an inhibitor of protein aggregation in vitro to a drug candidate showing effective amelioration of disease symptoms in animal models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  1. Acoustic radiation force on a sphere in standing and quasi-standing zero-order Bessel beam tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitri, F.G.

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the exact acoustic scattering from a sphere immersed in an ideal fluid and centered along the propagation axis of a standing or quasi-standing zero-order Bessel beam, explicit partial-wave representations for the radiation force are derived. A standing or a quasi-standing acoustic field is the result of propagating two equal or unequal amplitude zero-order Bessel beams, respectively, along the same axis but in opposite sense. The Bessel beam is characterized by the half-cone angle β of its plane wave components, such that β = 0 represents a plane wave. It is assumed here that the half-cone angle β for each of the counter-propagating acoustic Bessel beams is equal. Fluid, elastic and viscoelastic spheres immersed in water are treated as examples. Results indicate the capability of manipulating spherical targets based on their mechanical and acoustical properties. This condition provides an impetus for further designing acoustic tweezers operating with standing or quasi-standing Bessel acoustic waves. Potential applications include particle manipulation in micro-fluidic lab-on-chips as well as in reduced gravity environments

  2. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – bis(benzoin)ethylenediiminato have been prepared and characterized by infrared, elemental analysis, conductivity measurements and solubility. The potentiometric, and elemental analyses studies of the complexes revealed 1:1 ...

  3. A Penning trap for advanced studies with particles in extreme laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, M.; Quint, W.; Paulus, G. G.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2012-08-01

    We present a Penning trap as a tool for advanced studies of particles in extreme laser fields. Particularly, trap-specific manipulation techniques allow control over the confined particles' localization and spatial density by use of trap electrodes as 'electrostatic tweezers' and by application of a 'rotating wall', respectively. It is thereby possible to select and prepare well-defined ion ensembles and to optimize the laser-particle interaction. Non-destructive detection of reaction educts and products with up to single-ion sensitivity supports advanced studies by maintaining the products for further studies at extended confinement times of minutes and above. The trap features endcaps with conical openings for applications with strongly focused lasers. We show that such a modification of a cylindrical trap is possible while harmonicity and tunability are maintained.

  4. Optical pulses, lasers, measuring techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Früngel, Frank B A

    1965-01-01

    High Speed Pulse Technology: Volume II: Optical Pulses - Lasers - Measuring Techniques focuses on the theoretical and engineering problems that result from the capacitor discharge technique.This book is organized into three main topics: light flash production from a capacitive energy storage; signal transmission and ranging systems by capacitor discharges and lasers; and impulse measuring technique. This text specifically discusses the air spark under atmospheric conditions, industrial equipment for laser flashing, and claims for light transmitting system. The application of light impulse sign

  5. Studying effect of carrier fluid viscosity in magnetite based ferrofluids using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitha, S.; Iyengar, Shruthi S.; Ananthamurthy, Sharath; Bhattacharya, Sarbari

    2018-02-01

    Ferrofluids with varying viscosities of carrier fluids have been prepared with magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). They were found to be nearly spherical in shape with an almost uniform size of 13nm. The superparamagnetic nature of the water based ferrofluids at room temperature was established by SQUID magnetometry. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) was carried out to establish the size of the nanoparticle clusters in the ferrofluids synthesized. The results indicate an increase in cluster size with increase in carrier fluid viscosity. This is supported by results from Raman Spectroscopy. A further attempt to characterise these ferrofluids was made by studying the behaviour of well characterised non-magnetic micron sized probes that are optically trapped while suspended in the ferrofluid. An increase in carrier fluid viscosity results in a decrease in corner frequency when only the carrier fluid is used as the suspending medium. When the magnetic component is also present the corner frequency is higher than with just the carrier fluid. This relative increase happens at all laser powers at the trapping plane. This trend is also found to be independent of the size and material of the probe particle. Comparisons of various parameters that influence optical trapping lead us to believe that the enhancement could be due to a directed motion of the magnetic clusters in the presence of an optical trap.

  6. Analysis of glass and glass melts during the vitrification of fly and bottom ashes by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy. Part II. Process analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panne, U.; Clara, M.; Haisch, C.; Niessner, R.

    1998-12-01

    Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) is employed for in situ and on-line process analysis of major glass constituents during a vitrification process for fly and bottom ashes from waste incineration. The system is based on an Nd:YAG laser for plasma ignition, while the elemental emissions from the plasma are detected time-resolved by an intensified multichannel analyzer. The perpendicular, single axis, imaging optics allow a remote sensing of the composition of the hot glass melt. Taking into account the plasma characteristics for calibration, good agreement between the LIPS analysis and the established reference analysis is achieved for the concentration ratios of SiO 2, Al 2O 3, and CaO. In addition, LIPS is applied to the analysis of aerosols generated by homogeneous nucleation during the heating-up of the investigated fly ashes. A distinctive temperature dependence of the heavy metal concentration of the aerosols is observed.

  7. Propagation of high-energy laser beams through the earth's atmosphere II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 21-23, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Peter B. (Editor); Wilson, Leroy E. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to turbulence at the inner scale, modeling turbulent transport in laser beam propagation, variable wind direction effects on thermal blooming correction, realistic wind effects on turbulence and thermal blooming compensation, wide bandwidth spectral measurements of atmospheric tilt turbulence, remote alignment of adaptive optical systems with far-field optimization, focusing infrared laser beams on targets in space without using adaptive optics, and a simplex optimization method for adaptive optics system alignment. Consideration is also given to ground-to-space multiline propagation at 1.3 micron, a path integral approach to thermal blooming, functional reconstruction predictions of uplink whole beam Strehl ratios in the presence of thermal blooming, and stability analysis of semidiscrete schemes for thermal blooming computation.

  8. Power spectrum analysis with least-squares fitting: amplitude bias and its elimination, with application to optical tweezers and atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørrelykke, Simon F; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-07-01

    Optical tweezers and atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers are often calibrated by fitting their experimental power spectra of Brownian motion. We demonstrate here that if this is done with typical weighted least-squares methods, the result is a bias of relative size between -2/n and +1/n on the value of the fitted diffusion coefficient. Here, n is the number of power spectra averaged over, so typical calibrations contain 10%-20% bias. Both the sign and the size of the bias depend on the weighting scheme applied. Hence, so do length-scale calibrations based on the diffusion coefficient. The fitted value for the characteristic frequency is not affected by this bias. For the AFM then, force measurements are not affected provided an independent length-scale calibration is available. For optical tweezers there is no such luck, since the spring constant is found as the ratio of the characteristic frequency and the diffusion coefficient. We give analytical results for the weight-dependent bias for the wide class of systems whose dynamics is described by a linear (integro)differential equation with additive noise, white or colored. Examples are optical tweezers with hydrodynamic self-interaction and aliasing, calibration of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models in finance, models for cell migration in biology, etc. Because the bias takes the form of a simple multiplicative factor on the fitted amplitude (e.g. the diffusion coefficient), it is straightforward to remove and the user will need minimal modifications to his or her favorite least-squares fitting programs. Results are demonstrated and illustrated using synthetic data, so we can compare fits with known true values. We also fit some commonly occurring power spectra once-and-for-all in the sense that we give their parameter values and associated error bars as explicit functions of experimental power-spectral values.

  9. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chih-Ming [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuarn-Jang [Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wei-Ting [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chien-Ting [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Jing-Shin [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chien-Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Ou, Keng-Liang [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  10. Laser-refrigeration of rare-earth-doped nanocrystals in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Paden B.; Smith, Bennett; Zhou, Xuezhe; Crane, Matthew J.; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Single-beam laser-tweezers have been demonstrated over the past several decades to confine nanometer-scale particles in three dimensions with sufficient sensitivity to measure the spring constants of individual biological macromolecules including DNA. Large laser-irradiance values (on the order of MW/cm2) commonly are used to generate laser traps which can lead to significant laser-heating within the 3D optical potential well. To date, laser-refrigeration of particles within an aqueous medium has not been reported stemming primarily from the large near-infrared (NIR) optical absorption coefficient of liquid water (0.2 cm-1 at lambda = 1020nm). In this paper we will detail the methods on how single-beam laser-traps can be used to induce and quantify the refrigeration of optically trapped nanocrystals in an aqueous medium. Analysis of the Brownian dynamics of individual nanocrystals via forward light scattering provides a way to determine both a relative and absolute measurement of particle's temperature. Signal analysis considerations to interpreting Brownian motion data of trapped particles in nonisothermal aqueous environments, or so-called hot Brownian motion, are detailed. Applications of these methods to determining local laser-refrigeration of laser trapped nanoparticles in water show promise at realizing the first observation of particles undergoing cold Brownian motion.

  11. Optical measurements of ripples using a scanning-laser slope gauge: Part II--data analysis and interpretation from a laboratory wave tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Erik J.; Hara, Tetsu

    1992-12-01

    A description of a new scanning laser slope gauge is given and the preliminary results obtained from laboratory wave tank measurements are presented. The device relies on the measurements of two components of surface slope to compute spatial and temporal lags used to estimate the full three-dimensional spectrum. The device is capable of resolving frequencies in the range between zero and 63 Hertz, and wavelengths in the range between 0.63 and 20 centimeters. The technique makes use of a two-dimensional laser scanner which samples the perimeter of a 10 centimeter square (an unfilled aperture.) The laboratory results show mechanically generated waves propagating on both distilled water and a one micro-molar solution of Triton-X100R in distilled water. Results indicate the device is well suited to measure the full three dimensional spectra of capillary-gravity waves and is capable of providing ground-truth measurements for the verification of remotely sensed ocean surface features.

  12. The Newest Laser Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Baek Yeon

    2007-01-01

    This book mentions laser processing with laser principle, laser history, laser beam property, laser kinds, foundation of laser processing such as laser oscillation, characteristic of laser processing, laser for processing and its characteristic, processing of laser hole including conception of processing of laser hole and each material, and hole processing of metal material, cut of laser, reality of cut, laser welding, laser surface hardening, application case of special processing and safety measurement of laser.

  13. A fast dual wavelength laser beam fluid-less optical CT scanner for radiotherapy 3D gel dosimetry II: dosimetric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    New clinical radiotherapy dosimetry systems need comprehensive demonstration of measurement quality. Practicality and reliability are other important aspects for clinical dosimeters. In this work the performance of an optical CT scanner for true 3D dosimetry is assessed using a radiochromic gel dosimeter. The fluid-less scanner utilised dual lasers to avoid the necessity for pre-irradiation scans and give greater robustness of image quality, enhancing practicality. Calibration methods using both cuvettes and reconstructed volumes were developed. Dosimetric accuracy was similar for dual and single wavelength measurements, except that cuvette calibration reliability was reduced for dual wavelength without pre-irradiation scanning. Detailed performance parameters were specified for the dosimetry system indicating the suitability for clinical use. The most significant limitations of the system were due to the gel dosimeter rather than the optical CT scanner. Quality assurance guidelines were developed to maintain dosimetry system performance in routine use.

  14. A new laser-ranged satellite for General Relativity and space geodesy: II. Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analyses of the LARES 2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Sindoni, Giampiero; Ries, John C.; Paolozzi, Antonio; Matzner, Richard; Koenig, Rolf; Paris, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    In the previous paper we have introduced the LARES 2 space experiment. The LARES 2 laser-ranged satellite is planned for a launch in 2019 with the new VEGA C launch vehicle of the Italian Space Agency (ASI), ESA and ELV. The main objectives of the LARES 2 experiment are accurate measurements of General Relativity, gravitational and fundamental physics and accurate determinations in space geodesy and geodynamics. In particular LARES 2 is aimed to achieve a very accurate test of frame-dragging, an intriguing phenomenon predicted by General Relativity. Here we report the results of Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analyses fully confirming an error budget of a few parts in one thousand in the measurement of frame-dragging with LARES 2 as calculated in our previous paper.

  15. Deinococcus radiodurans RecA nucleoprotein filaments characterized at the single-molecule level with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pobegalov, Georgii, E-mail: george.pobegalov@nanobio.spbstu.ru [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Cherevatenko, Galina; Alekseev, Aleksandr; Sabantsev, Anton; Kovaleva, Oksana; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Morozova, Natalia [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Baitin, Dmitrii [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Khodorkovskii, Mikhail [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-23

    Deinococcus radiodurans can survive extreme doses of ionizing radiation due to the very efficient DNA repair mechanisms that are able to cope even with hundreds of double-strand breaks. RecA, the critical protein of homologous recombination in bacteria, is one of the key components of the DNA-repair system. Repair of double-strand breaks requires RecA binding to DNA and assembly of the RecA nucleoprotein helical filaments. The Escherichia coli RecA protein (EcRecA) and its interactions with DNA have been extensively studied using various approaches including single-molecule techniques, while the D. radiodurans RecA (DrRecA) remains much less characterized. However, DrRecA shows some remarkable differences from E. coli homolog. Here we combine microfluidics and single-molecule DNA manipulation with optical tweezers to follow the binding of DrRecA to long double-stranded DNA molecules and probe the mechanical properties of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments at physiological pH. Our data provide a direct comparison of DrRecA and EcRecA binding to double-stranded DNA under identical conditions. We report a significantly faster filaments assembly as well as lower values of persistence length and contour length for DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments compared to EcRecA. Our results support the existing model of DrRecA forming more frequent and less continuous filaments relative to those of EcRecA. - Highlights: • We investigate Deinococcus radiodurans RecA interactions with long double-stranded DNA at the single-molecule level. • At physiological pH D. radiodurans RecA forms nucleoprotein filaments significantly faster relative to Escherichia coli RecA. • D. radiodurans RecA-dsDNA nucleoprotein filaments are more flexible and slightly shorter compared to those of E. coli RecA.

  16. Proposal of a computerized algorithm for continuous wave CO2 laser on-line control during orthopaedic surgery. Phase II: simplified algorithm version (LCA-s) and helmet-mounted data access device solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canestri, F

    1997-08-01

    This paper is the continuation of the Phase I report published in 1992 by Canestri. It contains recent findings on how to speed-up the process of sublimated volume forecasting for a TEM11* CO2 laserbeam in CW mode following an original model proposed by the author--called LCA--here presented in a simplified version (LCA-s) on PMMA (polymethylmethacrilate) samples. Other interesting parameters, such as the time required to create the minimal injury vb along with its physical interpretations, are reported and explained. TEM11*, TEM01* and TEM00 beams profiles are also compared and discussed for LCA-s. The results of both Phase I and Phase II of this investigation can be integrated in one single solution package for the end-user, combining fast decisions making and operational features. The final part of this paper describes the 'helmet-mounted' data recall visor methodology which allows the surgeon to access to a data base for information retrieval during the course of an operation without interrupting the surgical case itself. This particularly interesting application allows the surgeon to consult a centrally-located data base which contains important information regarding similar clinical cases, choice of laserbeam profiles and focal lengths, simulation of beam behaviours, performances and other data. The on-line and direct access to the data base supports him in all those borderline situations in the O.R. in which the laser device type and configuration/calibration play a device role in the success of the operation. Also, the helmet-mounted display frees surgeon's hands in order to allow him to continue the operation while consulting the data base on-line, thus speeding up decision processes regarding changes of laser set-up, general calibration optimization and remote clinical consultancy.

  17. Management of cataract with macular oedema due to diabetes mellitus Type-II and hypertension with grid laser prior to surgery and intra-vitreal bevacizumab (avastin) peroperatively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahab, S.; Ahmed, J.

    2010-01-01

    To study the visual outcome in patients subjected to cataract extraction with prior grid laser and intraoperative intravitreal bevacizumab injection. Methods: This prospective case series comprised of 38 patients subjected to phacoemulsification and in the bag intraocular lens implantation at Al-Noor Eye Hospital and Sindh Govt Lyari General Hospital Karachi from January 2007 to December 2008. All the patients had prior macular grid treatment and intra-operative injection of intra-vitreal Avastin. Diabetes mellitus duration, preoperative glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level and other systemic and local complications of diabetes were recorded. The patients were clinically assessed with bio microscopic examination preoperatively, and postoperatively on day 1, week 1, and in months 1, 2, 3 and 6 respectively. Visual acuity and state of macular oedema was clinically assessed and documented. Results: Out of thirty-eight patients, eighteen were males and 20 were females. Mean duration of diabetes was 9.92 +- 5.5 years (Range 4-16) while that of hypertension was 7.87 +- 3.66 years (Range = 2-15). HbA1c level was 8.36% +- 1.93% (range 6.3 - 12.3). Thirty-one (81.5%) patients had HbA1c level 8.0% or above indicating a poor control. At 6 months of follow up best corrected distant visual acuity of 6/6 to 6/9 was achieved in 23(60.5 %), 6/12 in 11(28.9%) and 6/24 in 4(10.5%) cases while best corrected near acuity of N/6 was achieved in 22(57.8%) N/8 in 12(31.4%) and N/12 in 4(10.5%) cases. At 6 months follow up visual acuity declined in two cases because of uncontrolled diabetes and hypertension. Conclusion: Cataract surgery in diabetic patients with macular oedema and hypertension has a good visual outcome if prior macular grid laser is performed and intra-vitreal anti VEGF is injected during surgery. (author)

  18. Annual report to the Laser Facility Committee 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This paper is the annual report of the Science and Engineering Research Council, research and development work carried out at the Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Laboratory, United Kingdom, 1985/6. Part I contains the technical details of the studies of the High Power Laser scientific programme and Laser Support Facility, as well as the Laser Research and Development investigations. Part II concerns the application of UV lasers to microcircuit fabrication. (UK)

  19. High-throughput sorting and analysis of human sperm with a ring-shaped laser trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Bing; Shi, Linda Z; Nascimento, Jaclyn M; Botvinick, Elliot L; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Berns, Michael W; Esener, Sadik C

    2007-06-01

    Sperm motility is an important concept in fertility research. To this end, single spot laser tweezers have been used to quantitatively analyze the motility of individual sperm. However, this method is limited with throughput (single sperm per spot), lacks the ability of in-situ sorting based on motility and chemotaxis, requires high laser power (hundreds of milliWatts) and can not be used to dynamically monitor changes in sperm swimming behavior under the influence of a laser beam. Here, we report a continuous 3-D ring-shaped laser trap which could be used for multi-level and high-throughput (tens to hundred sperm per ring) sperm sorting based on their motility and chemotaxis. Under a laser power of only tens of milliWatts, human sperm with low to medium velocity are slowed down, stopped, or forced to change their trajectories to swim along the ring due to the optical gradient force in the radial direction. This is the first demonstration of parallel sperm sorting based on motility with optical trapping technology. In addition, by making the sperm swimming along the circumference of the ring, the effect of laser radiation, optical force and external obstacles on sperm energetics are investigated in a more gentle and quantitative way. The application of this method could be extended to motility and bio-tropism studies of other self-propelled cells, such as algae and bacteria.

  20. Laser Velocimeter Measurements in the Pump of an Automotive Torque Converter Part II – Effect of Pump Speed and Oil Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald D. Flack

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The velocity field inside a torque converter pump was studied for two separate effects: variable pump rotational speed and variable oil viscosity. Three-dimensional velocity measurements were taken using a laser velocimeter for both the pump mid- and exit planes. The effect ofvariable pump rotational speed was studied by running the pump at two different speeds and holding speed ratio (pump rotational speed]turbine rotational speed constant. Similarly, the effect of viscosity on the pump flow field was studied by varying the temperature and]or using two different viscosity oils as the working fluid in the pump. Threedimensional velocity vector plots, through-flow contour plots, and secondary flow profiles were obtained for both pump planes and all test conditions. Results showed that torque converter mass flows increased approximately linearly with increasing pump rotational speed (and fixed speed ratio but that the flow was not directly proportional to pump rotational speed. However, mass flows were seen to decrease as the oil viscosity was decreased with a resulting increased Reynolds number; for these conditions the high velocity regions were seen to decrease in size and low velocity regions were seen to increase in size. In the pump mid-plane strong counter-clockwise secondary flows and in the exit plane strong clockwise secondary flows were observed. The vorticities and slip factors were calculated from the experimental results and are presented. The torque core-to-shell and blade-to-blade torque distributions were calculated for both planes. Finally, the flow fields were seen to demonstrate similitude when Reynolds numbers were matched.

  1. Laser Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Laser Resurfacing Uses for Laser Resurfacing Learn more ...

  2. Lasers technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Laser Technology Program of IPEN is developed by the Center for Lasers and Applications (CLA) and is committed to the development of new lasers based on the research of new optical materials and new resonator technologies. Laser applications and research occur within several areas such as Nuclear, Medicine, Dentistry, Industry, Environment and Advanced Research. Additional goals of the Program are human resource development and innovation, in association with Brazilian Universities and commercial partners

  3. Laser Dyes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    treatments, including port-wine stain and tattoo removal, diag- nostic measurements, lithotripsy, activation of photosensitive drugs for photodynamic therapy, etc. In the field of medical applications, dye lasers have potential advantages over other lasers. Dye lasers are unique sources of tunable coherent radiation, from the ...

  4. HF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Iwasaki, Matae

    1977-01-01

    A review is made of the research and development of HF chemical laser and its related work. Many gaseous compounds are used as laser media successfully; reaction kinetics and technological problems are described. The hybrid chemical laser of HF-CO 2 system and the topics related to the isotope separation are also included. (auth.)

  5. Mirrorless lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wavelength of operation thereby tuning the laser. Another way of ... of operation. Considering the crucial role of mirrors in a laser, the phrase 'mirrorless lasers' seems to be a paradoxical one. However, in what follows, we will see how one can indeed ..... A possible military application is to have a small area in a person's.

  6. Lasers (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1969-01-01

    A laser is an instrument that produces an enormously intense pencil-thin beam of light. In this booklet we shall learn what there is about the laser that gives it so much promise. We shall investigate what it is, how it works, and the different kinds of lasers there are.

  7. Microchip Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    USA E-mail: zayhowski@ll.mit.edu Abstract Microchip lasers are a rich family of solid-state lasers defined by their small size, robust integration...reliability, and potential for low-cost mass production. Continuous-wave microchip lasers cover a wide range of wavelengths, often operate single

  8. Excimer Laser Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    in analogy to the previously reported XeF (Ref. •)), XeCl Qief. 5), krl (Ret. 5), and XeBr (Ref. Hi lasers. Addition of Xc to these mix- tures...nr r rI I iI i 250 240 WAVELENGTH (nm FIG, 0. Densltomctcr trace of Krl ’ fS —"I) emission spec- trum from a mixture of 1 " Kr and 0.1 T K; in

  9. Lasers for RF guns: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1994-01-01

    In the past decade, laser driven RF guns have matured from a device under development to a proven source for high brightness and low emittance electron beams. The reliability of the electron beam from these sources is dictated by the laser system that drives it. In addition, capabilities of the laser systems play a vital role in the design of the electron source for future machines such as the TESLA and NLC. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for discussing the design criteria for the laser systems so that the reliability of the existing sources could be improved and the future machines could be serviced. The Workshop brought together experts in RF Guns, accelerators, and lasers, from both the commercial and academic community. Most of the presentations, discussions and conclusions at the workshop are included in these proceedings. The contents are divided into three sections, Section I contains the invited talks that outline the requirements of the RF Guns and the capabilities of the laser systems to meet these requirements. Section II includes most of the papers presented in the poster session. These papers describe various laser systems used with electron guns, schemes to modify the laser beam profile to optimize the electron bunch, and computer simulations of electron trajectories. Section III contains the summaries of the working groups. As the summary section indicates, with sufficient feed back systems, the electron gun could be made to operate reliably with minimum downtime, using commercial lasers currently available. The design of laser systems for future colliders depend critically on the choice of the cathode m the gun and its efficiency. Tentative designs of laser systems for the TESLA test facility and LCLS had been drawn assuming a copper cathode. Using a more efficient cathode will ease the energy requirement of the laser and simplify the design. The individual papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere

  10. Laser photocoagulation - eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser coagulation; Laser eye surgery; Photocoagulation; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic eye disease; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic retinopathy; Focal photocoagulation; Scatter (or pan retinal) photocoagulation; Proliferative ...

  11. Mechanisms of backtrack recovery by RNA polymerases I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisica, Ana; Engel, Christoph; Jahnel, Marcus; Roldán, Édgar; Galburt, Eric A; Cramer, Patrick; Grill, Stephan W

    2016-03-15

    During DNA transcription, RNA polymerases often adopt inactive backtracked states. Recovery from backtracks can occur by 1D diffusion or cleavage of backtracked RNA, but how polymerases make this choice is unknown. Here, we use single-molecule optical tweezers experiments and stochastic theory to show that the choice of a backtrack recovery mechanism is determined by a kinetic competition between 1D diffusion and RNA cleavage. Notably, RNA polymerase I (Pol I) and Pol II recover from shallow backtracks by 1D diffusion, use RNA cleavage to recover from intermediary depths, and are unable to recover from extensive backtracks. Furthermore, Pol I and Pol II use distinct mechanisms to avoid nonrecoverable backtracking. Pol I is protected by its subunit A12.2, which decreases the rate of 1D diffusion and enables transcript cleavage up to 20 nt. In contrast, Pol II is fully protected through association with the cleavage stimulatory factor TFIIS, which enables rapid recovery from any depth by RNA cleavage. Taken together, we identify distinct backtrack recovery strategies of Pol I and Pol II, shedding light on the evolution of cellular functions of these key enzymes.

  12. [Pigmentary lasers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, Thierry; Toubel, Gérard

    2009-10-01

    The pigmentary disorders are a very heterogeneous group with a high therapeutic demand from the patients. The lasers have provided a major advance in the treatment of some pigmentary lesions. The indication and the optimal parameters are actually quite well defined. However, pigmentary lasers have limits and some dermatosis can even be worsened after laser treatment. Those limitations as well as the potential side effects have to clearly be explained to the patients that often seek for a miracle cure.

  13. Laser accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Vigil, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In 1979,W. B. Colson and S. K. Ride proposed a new kind of electron accelerator using a uniform magnetic field in combination with a circularly-polarized laser field. A key concept is to couple the oscillating electric field to the electron’s motion so that acceleration is sustained. This dissertation investigates the performance of the proposed laser accelerator using modern high powered lasers and mag-netic fields that are significan...

  14. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, S.

    1982-02-01

    In this paper, the physics of laser fusion is described on an elementary level. The irradiated matter consists of a dense inner core surrounded by a less dense plasma corona. The laser radiation is mainly absorbed in the outer periphery of the plasma. The absorbed energy is transported inward to the ablation surface where plasma flow is created. Due to this plasma flow, a sequence of inward going shock waves and heat waves are created, resulting in the compression and heating of the core to high density and temperature. The interaction physics between laser and matter leading to thermonuclear burn is summarized by the following sequence of events: Laser absorption → Energy transport → Compression → Nuclear Fusion. This scenario is shown in particular for a Nd:laser with a wavelength of 1 μm. The wavelength scaling of the physical processes is also discussed. In addition to the laser-plasma physics, the Nd high power pulsed laser is described. We give a very brief description of the oscillator, the amplifiers, the spatial filters, the isolators and the diagnostics involved. Last, but not least, the concept of reactors for laser fusion and the necessary laser system are discussed. (author)

  15. Biocavity Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  16. Cardiac functional analysis by laser speckle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, G.; Singh, M.

    The laser speckle interference pattern during movement of a rough surface is employed to measure the respective displacements. The purpose of this work is to apply this technique in the form of laser speckle displacement cardiography to analyse the displacement patterns during the I and II heart sounds. The recording is performed by illuminating the chest over the cardiac region by collimated laser beam controlled by an ECG operated electric shutter. By analysis the 3-D displacement patterns are obtained. A comparison shows that the displacement at the apex, right ventricle, aortic and mitral valvular regions are significantly higher during I sound than that of II sound.

  17. Laser Cooling of 2-6 Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-12

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0067 Laser Cooling of II-VI Semiconductors Qihua Xiong NANYANG TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY Final Report 08/12/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...From - To) 15 May 2013 to 14 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laser Cooling of II-VI Semiconductors 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-13-1...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The breakthrough of laser cooling in semiconductor has stimulated strong interest in further scaling up towards

  18. Backtracking determines the force sensitivity of RNAP II in a factor-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galburt, Eric A; Grill, Stephan W; Wiedmann, Anna; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Choy, Jason; Nogales, Eva; Kashlev, Mikhail; Bustamante, Carlos

    2007-04-12

    RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is responsible for transcribing all messenger RNAs in eukaryotic cells during a highly regulated process that is conserved from yeast to human, and that serves as a central control point for cellular function. Here we investigate the transcription dynamics of single RNAP II molecules from Saccharomyces cerevisiae against force and in the presence and absence of TFIIS, a transcription elongation factor known to increase transcription through nucleosomal barriers. Using a single-molecule dual-trap optical-tweezers assay combined with a novel method to enrich for active complexes, we found that the response of RNAP II to a hindering force is entirely determined by enzyme backtracking. Surprisingly, RNAP II molecules ceased to transcribe and were unable to recover from backtracks at a force of 7.5 +/- 2 pN, only one-third of the force determined for Escherichia coli RNAP. We show that backtrack pause durations follow a t(-3/2) power law, implying that during backtracking RNAP II diffuses in discrete base-pair steps, and indicating that backtracks may account for most of RNAP II pauses. Significantly, addition of TFIIS rescued backtracked enzymes and allowed transcription to proceed up to a force of 16.9 +/- 3.4 pN. Taken together, these results describe a regulatory mechanism of transcription elongation in eukaryotes by which transcription factors modify the mechanical performance of RNAP II, allowing it to operate against higher loads.

  19. Integração de dados do laser scanner com a banda pan-cromática do sensor QuickBird II para a identificação de edificações através das redes neurais numa abordagem orientação a regiões - DOI: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v27i2.1489

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosar Faria Botelho

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A imagens produzidas pelo sensor QuickBird II e pelos dados laser scanner são produtos caros para comercialização, porém têm mostrado seu valor técnico-científico no processamento digital de imagens. O objetivo deste estudo está em mostrar uma alternativa viável para a identificação de edificações através da classificação de imagem de alta resolução utilizando dados do sistema laser scanner e imagens do QuickBird II. No intuito de diminuir os custos na aquisição dos dados para o processamento digital, foram utilizados dados de intensidade e altimetria do laser, integrando-os com a banda pan-cromática do sensor QuickBird II, por meio do algoritmo de redes neurais e uma abordagem orientada a regiões. O trabalho justifica-se por utilizar tecnologias recentes (laser scanner e imagem QuickBird II e um algoritmo integrador de variáveis de diferentes origens (as redes neurais artificiais, na elaboração de mapas temáticos com custos menores. O método mostrou-se viável para a elaboração de mapa temático

  20. High power lasers & systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chatwin, Chris; Young, Rupert; Birch, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Some laser history;\\ud Airborne Laser Testbed & Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL);\\ud Laser modes and beam propagation;\\ud Fibre lasers and applications;\\ud US Navy Laser system – NRL 33kW fibre laser;\\ud Lockheed Martin 30kW fibre laser;\\ud Conclusions

  1. configuration of ArII

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There is a constant interest in the study of rare gases in connection with plasma physics, high temperature arcs and laser. The knowledge of lifetime and transition probabilities of singly ionized argon (ArII) is of great value in atomic structure stud- ies and also with regard to the above-mentioned applications. Most of the ...

  2. Optics clustered to output unique solutions: a multi-laser facility for combined single molecule and ensemble microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David T; Botchway, Stanley W; Coles, Benjamin C; Needham, Sarah R; Roberts, Selene K; Rolfe, Daniel J; Tynan, Christopher J; Ward, Andrew D; Webb, Stephen E D; Yadav, Rahul; Zanetti-Domingues, Laura; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L

    2011-09-01

    Optics clustered to output unique solutions (OCTOPUS) is a microscopy platform that combines single molecule and ensemble imaging methodologies. A novel aspect of OCTOPUS is its laser excitation system, which consists of a central core of interlocked continuous wave and pulsed laser sources, launched into optical fibres and linked via laser combiners. Fibres are plugged into wall-mounted patch panels that reach microscopy end-stations in adjacent rooms. This allows multiple tailor-made combinations of laser colours and time characteristics to be shared by different end-stations minimising the need for laser duplications. This setup brings significant benefits in terms of cost effectiveness, ease of operation, and user safety. The modular nature of OCTOPUS also facilitates the addition of new techniques as required, allowing the use of existing lasers in new microscopes while retaining the ability to run the established parts of the facility. To date, techniques interlinked are multi-photon/multicolour confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging for several modalities of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and time-resolved anisotropy, total internal reflection fluorescence, single molecule imaging of single pair FRET, single molecule fluorescence polarisation, particle tracking, and optical tweezers. Here, we use a well-studied system, the epidermal growth factor receptor network, to illustrate how OCTOPUS can aid in the investigation of complex biological phenomena. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  3. LCLS Laser (in Polish)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    The most powerful now in the world, American X-ray laser LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source), has been working as a research and user facility since 2009. It is further developed to LCLSII machine at the Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory SLAC in Menlo Park CA. In a certain sense, LCLS is a response to the EXFEL machine and a logical extension of LCLS. All these machines are light sources of the fifth generation. EXFELis expected to open user facility in 2016, at a cost of over 1 bil Euro. LCLS II, which design started in 2010, will be operational in 2017. The lasers LCLS, LCLS II and EXFEL use SASE and SEED methods to generate light and are powered by electron liniacs, LCLS by a wrm one, and EXFEL by a cold one. The liniacs have energies approaching 20 GeV, and are around 2 - 3 km in length. EXFEL liniac uses SRF TESLA cavity technology at 1,3GHz. A prototype of EXFEL was FLASH laser. SLAC Laboratory uses effectively over 50 years experience in research, building and exploitation of linear electron acce...

  4. Improved Laser Manipulation for On-chip Fabricated Microstructures Based on Solution Replacement and Its Application in Single Cell Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the fabrication and assembly of microstructures inside a microfluidic device based on a photocrosslinkable resin and optical tweezers. We also report a method of solution replacement inside the microfluidic channel in order to improve the manipulation performance and apply the assembled microstructures for single cell cultivation. By the illumination of patterned ultraviolet (UV through a microscope, microstructures of arbitrary shape were fabricated by the photocrosslinkable resin inside a microfluidic channel. Based on the microfluidic channel with both glass and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS surfaces, immovable and movable microstructures were fabricated and manipulated. The microstructures were fabricated at the desired places and manipulated by the optical tweezers. A rotational microstructure including a microgear and a rotation axis was assembled and rotated in demonstrating this technique. The improved laser manipulation of microstructures was achieved based on the on-chip solution replacement method. The manipulation speed of the microstructures increased when the viscosity of the solvent decreased. The movement efficiency of the fabricated microstructures inside the lower viscosity solvent was evaluated and compared with those microstructures inside the former high viscosity solvent. A novel cell cage was fabricated and the cultivation of a single yeast cell (w303 was demonstrated in the cell cage, inside the microfluidic device.

  5. Mirrorless lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    conventional laser, the random laser had one partially reflecting mirror for providing an output port, and a surface or volume scatterer at the other end to provide non-resonant feedback. The volume scatterer was a suspension of chalk particles (about 20 microns di- ameter), in water and surface scatterer was a plate with a ...

  6. excimer laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-07

    Jan 7, 2014 ... is necessary to deposit one order higher input electric power into gas medium than those required for XeCl and KrF lasers. ... neon/helium at a pressure of a few bars was excited by transverse electric discharge. The. Figure 6. Laser pulse ... and also to drive discharge rapidly. The discharge chamber was ...

  7. Laser yellowing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environmental degradation of surfaces. Pulsed lasers are generally used for ... sorb contamination very strongly while the underlying substrate is left untouched thus rendering the process self-limiting. ... contaminated with two different encrustations, using short free running Nd:YAG and long Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ...

  8. Laser processing of thin films for optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Hideo

    1995-04-01

    This paper reviews the laser processing of II-VI and III-V compound semiconductors for optoelectronic devices. when a laser beam scanning system is combined with MBE or MOCVD apparatus, the resultant growth process is called laser-assisted epitaxy. Laser irradiation of the films has various effects, depending on the growth conditions: doping efficiency, film growth rate, and film composition are affected. Using these effects, laser-assisted epitaxy has been used to make photodetectors, laser diodes, and integrated devices for multiwavelength transmission.

  9. Blue-emitting laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Ishibashi, A.

    This paper reviews the recent results of blue-emitting laser diodes. These devices are based on ZnMgSSe alloy II-VI semiconductors. Recently we have achieved room temperature continuous-wave operation of ZnMgSSe blue lasers for the first time. ZnMgSSe alloys offer a wide range of band-gap energy from 2.8 to 4.5 eV, while maintaining lattice matching to GaAs substrates. These characteristics make ZnMgSSe suitable for cladding layers of blue lasers. In this article, the feasibilities of ZnMgSSe will be reviewed. The laser structures and characteristics will be also mentioned.

  10. Laser cleaning of pulsed laser deposited rhodium films for fusion diagnostic mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uccello, A.; Maffini, A.; Dellasega, D.; Passoni, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pulsed laser deposition is exploited to produce Rh films for first mirrors. ► Pulsed laser deposition is exploited to produce tokamak-like C contaminants. ► Rh laser damage threshold has been evaluated for infrared pulses. ► Laser cleaning of C contaminated Rh films gives promising results. -- Abstract: In this paper an experimental investigation on the laser cleaning process of rhodium films, potentially candidates to be used as tokamak first mirrors (FMs), from redeposited carbon contaminants is presented. A relevant issue that lowers mirror's performance during tokamak operations is the redeposition of sputtered material from the first wall on their surface. Among all the possible techniques, laser cleaning, in which a train of laser pulses is launched to the surface that has to be treated, is a method to potentially mitigate this problem. The same laser system (Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064-nm and 7-ns pulses) has been employed with three aims: (i) production by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of Rh film mirrors, (ii) production by PLD of C deposits with controlled morphology, and (iii) investigation of the laser cleaning method onto C contaminated Rh samples. The evaluation of Rh films laser damage threshold, as a function of fluence and number of pulses, is discussed. Then, the C/Rh films have been cleaned by the laser beam. The exposed zones have been characterized by visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), showing promising results

  11. Fiber Coupled Pulse Shaper for Sub-Nanosecond Pulse Lidar, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II effort will develop an all-diode laser and fiber optic based, single frequency, sub-nanosecond pulsed laser source...

  12. Studies of viral DNA packaging motors with optical tweezers: a comparison of motor function in bacteriophages φ29, λ, and T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas E.; Fuller, Derek N.; Raymer, Dorian M.; Rickgauer, Peter; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Catalano, Carlos E.; Kottadiel, Vishal; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2007-09-01

    A key step in the assembly of many viruses is the packaging of double-stranded DNA into a viral procapsid (an empty protein shell) by the action of an ATP-powered portal motor complex. We have developed methods to measure the packaging of single DNA molecules into single viral proheads in real time using optical tweezers. We can measure DNA binding and initiation of translocation, the DNA translocation dynamics, and the filling of the capsid against resisting forces. In addition to studying bacteriophage φ29, we have recently extended these methods to study the E. coli bacteriophages λ and T4, two important model systems in molecular biology. The three systems have different capsid sizes/shapes, genome lengths, and biochemical and structural differences in their packaging motors. Here, we compare and contrast these three systems. We find that all three motors translocate DNA processively and generate very large forces, each exceeding 50 piconewtons, ~20x higher force than generated by the skeletal muscle myosin 2 motor. This high force generation is required to overcome the forces resisting the confinement of the stiff, highly charged DNA at high density within the viral capsids. However, there are also striking differences between the three motors: they exhibit different DNA translocation rates, degrees of static and dynamic disorder, responses to load, and pausing and slipping dynamics.

  13. Pb II

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    ., 2009) biomaterials. However, the ..... reported for various microorganisms by various researchers (Gong et al., 2005). At biomass ... the increase in initial Pb (II) was also observed for removal of Pb (II) by loofa sponge immobilized Aspergillus.

  14. Ultrasensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) in serum based on the gold film sensor using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Pengfei

    2015-10-01

    Hg2+ ions are one of the most toxic heavy metal ion pollutants, and are caustic and carcinogenic materials with high cellular toxicity. The Hg2+ ions can accumulate in the human body through the food chain and cause serious and permanent damage to the brain with both acute and chronic toxicity. According to the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines, Hg2+ ions must be at concentrations below 1 ng/ml (10 nM) in drinking water. If the Hg2+ ions are higher than 2.5 ng/ml in serum, that will bring mercury poisoning. The traditional testing for Hg2+ ions includes atomic absorption, atomic fluorescence, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. These methods are usually coupled with gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. However, these instrument-based techniques are rather complicated, time-consuming, costly, and unsuitable for online and portable use. An ultrasensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) in serum was investigated using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system (LSCI-SPR). The detection limit was as low as 0.01 ng/ml for Hg2+ ions in fetal calf serum and that is lower than that was required Hg2+ ions must be at concentrations below 1 ng/ml by the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. This sensor was designed on a T-rich, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-modified gold film, which can be individually manipulated using specific T-Hg2+-T complex formation. The quenching intensity of the fluorescence images for rhodamine-labeled ssDNA fitted well with the changes in SPR. The changes varied with the Hg2+ ion concentration, which is unaffected by the presence of other metal ions. A good liner relation was got with the coefficients of 0.9116 in 30% fetal calf serums with the linear part over a range of 0.01 ng/ml to10 ng/ml.

  15. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  16. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  17. Laser-plasma interactions and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Neely, David; Bingham, Robert; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Laser-Plasma Interactions and Applications covers the fundamental and applied aspects of high power laser-plasma physics. With an internationally renowned team of authors, the book broadens the knowledge of young researchers working in high power laser-plasma science by providing them with a thorough pedagogical grounding in the interaction of laser radiation with matter, laser-plasma accelerators, and inertial confinement fusion. The text is organised such that the theoretical foundations of the subject are discussed first, in Part I. In Part II, topics in the area of high energy density physics are covered. Parts III and IV deal with the applications to inertial confinement fusion and as a driver of particle and radiation sources, respectively. Finally, Part V describes the principle diagnostic, targetry, and computational approaches used in the field. This book is designed to give students a thorough foundation in the fundamental physics of laser-plasma interactions. It will also provide readers with knowl...

  18. Prospects of the high power iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohla, K.; Brederlow, G.; Fill, E.; Volk, R.; Witte, K.J.

    1976-09-01

    The characteristic properties of the iodine laser (gaseous laser substance, photolytic pump mechanism, variable stimulated emission cross-section) made it possible in a relatively short time to generate ns pulses in the kJ range. The Asterix II and III iodine laser systems at IPP are working successfully, and the question arises what prospects are afforded for further iodine laser development. What are the problems that have to be clarified in order to build 10 or 100 kJ systems for laser fusion experiments. According to our experience these can be classified as follows: 1) Short pulse generation and contrast ratio, 2) pulse shaping in a high-gain laser and amplification in the coherent time range, 3) non-linear properties at high intensities, 4) scalable pumping schemes and chemical processes. (orig./WL) [de

  19. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  20. Laser Refractography

    CERN Document Server

    Rinkevichyus, B.S; Raskovskaya, I.L

    2010-01-01

    This book describes the basic principles of laser refractography, a flexible new diagnostic tool for measuring optically inhomogeneous media and flows. Laser refractography is based on digital imaging and computer processing of structured laser beam refraction (SLR) in inhomogeneous transparent media. Laser refractograms provide both qualitative and quantitative measurements and can be used for the study of fast and transient processes. In this book, the theoretical basis of refractography is explored in some detail, and experimental setups are described for measurement of transparent media using either 2D (passed radiation) or 3D (scattered radiation) refractograms. Specific examples and applications are discussed, including visualization of the boundary layer near a hot or cold metallic ball in water, and observation of edge effects and microlayers in liquids and gases. As the first book to describe this new and exciting technique, this monograph has broad cross-disciplinary appeal and will be of interest t...

  1. Laser Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Better Job? Start by Visiting the Dentist Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects Temporomandibular Joint Disorder ... speed up tooth whitening procedures. What are the benefits of using dental lasers? There are several advantages. ...

  2. Laser accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A brief discussion is given on the feasibility of using lasers to accelerate particle beams. A rough theory of operation is developed, and numerical results are obtained for an example equivalent to the Fermilab Accelerator

  3. Laser endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElvein, R B

    1981-11-01

    A carbon dioxide laser operating in the invisible infrared range (10.6 mu) generates a beam of energy that is almost completely absorbed by biological tissue with release of intense heat and rapid destruction. A laser attached to a rigid bronchoscope has been used in 18 patients ranging in age from 21 to 62 years to treat a variety of causes of airway obstruction. These include tracheal stenosis and granulation tissue (6 patients), adenoma (1), web (2), and carcinoma (9). The results were good in 15 and poor in 3 patients. However, all patients had an improved airway after laser treatment with the best results occurring in patients with benign, inflammatory disease. The advantages of the laser are a lack of bleeding, minimal edema after treatment, and minimal scar formation. The disadvantages are the expense of the machine, and the need for general anesthesia and direct visualization of the lesion.

  4. Il laser

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, William V

    1974-01-01

    Verso il 1960, il laser era ancora "una soluzione alla ricerca di un problema", ma fin dagli anni immediatamente successivi si è rivelato uno strumento insostituibile per le applicazioni più svariate.

  5. Analysis of radiation parameters to control the effects of Nd:YAG laser surgery on gastric malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo-Fernández, M. L.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Hernández-González, A.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopic laser surgery provides an advantageous alternative to Argon Plasma Coagulation, endoscopic tweezers or electro-ablation in gastroenterology that facilitates a selective ablation of stomach tumors with an additional hemostatic effect in the surrounding tissue. This coagulation effect can also be employed for the treatment of gastric ulcers. It is mandatory to control the laser parameters regardless of the desired effect, either cancerous tissue ablation or coagulation to prevent ulcerous bleeding, in order to avoid stomach wall perforation or an insufficient therapeutic outcome. Dosimetric models constitute an attractive tool to determine the proper light dose in order to offer a customized therapy planning that optimizes the treatment results. In this work, a model for Nd:YAG laser surgery is applied to predict both the coagulation zone in gastric ulcers and the removal in adenocarcinomas under different laser setups. Results show clear differences in the effective zone of the gastric malignancy affected by both coagulation and ablation. Therefore the current model could be employed in the clinical practice to plan the optimal laser beam parameters to treat a certain type of pathologic stomach tissue with variable morphology and without risk of perforation or undertreated parts.

  6. Laser bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, D R; Harrell, J H

    2001-11-01

    Because the lung cancer epidemic shows no signs of abating, little doubt exists that the need for interventional bronchoscopists will persist for many years to come. The Nd:YAG laser and the rigid bronchoscope remain crucial weapons in the fight against lung cancer. With more than 4000 published interventions pertaining to it, this combination is ideal for treating central airways obstruction. The safety and efficacy of laser bronchoscopy has been well established, and the reported incidence of complications is impressively low. If complications were to arise, a skilled bronchoscopist can manage them easily by using the beneficial attributes of the rigid bronchoscope. Many complications can be avoided by implementing the established safety procedures and techniques. A solid understanding of laser physics and tissue interactions is a necessity to anyone performing laser surgery. The team approach, relying on communication among the bronchoscopist, anesthesiologist, laser technician, and nurses, leads to a safer and more successful procedure. It is important to remember, however, that this is typically a palliative procedure, and therefore the focus should be on alleviating symptoms and improving quality of life. Unfortunately, because not every patient is a candidate for laser bronchoscopy, there are specific characteristics of endobronchial lesions that make them more or less amenable to resection. Each year a promising new technology is being developed, such as argon plasma coagulation, cryotherapy, and endobronchial electrosurgery. Although it is unclear what role these technologies will have, prospective controlled studies must be done to help clarify this question. The future may lay in combining these various technologies along with Nd:YAG laser bronchoscopy to maximize the therapeutic, palliative, and possibly even curative effect. As the experience of the medical community with Nd:YAG laser bronchoscopy continues to grow and as more health-care professionals

  7. Green lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2010-01-01

    Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range......Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range...

  8. High SBS-Threshold Er/Yb Co-Doped Phosphate Glass Fiber Amplifiers for High Power, Sub-us Pulsed, Narrow Linewidth, All Fiber-Based Laser Transmitter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase I, NP Photonics has achieved 1.2 kW peak power for 105 ns fiber laser pulses, and successfully demonstrated the feasibility to produce monolithic high SBS...

  9. A laser ablation ICP-MS based method for multiplexed immunoblot analysis: applications to manganese-dependent protein dynamics of photosystem II in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Pedas, Pai Rosager

    2015-01-01

    analysed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), which allowed selective and relative quantitative analysis via the different lanthanides. The method was evaluated against established liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC...

  10. Chinese marketplace of lasers and laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huanan

    1992-05-01

    Today I want to introduce the subject of laser materials in China. I will discuss the general background of lasers and laser materials in China. Second, I want to show you some recent rapid development of lasers and laser materials in China. Third, I want to give you an overview of key R&D centers and manufacturers of lasers and laser materials. Fourth, I want to analyze some important export trends from China. Finally, I want to say something about the active international cooperation in the field of lasers and laser materials.

  11. MR-guided laser interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettag, Martin; Ulrich, Frank; Bock, Wolfgang J.; Kahn, Thomas; Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim; Hessel, Stefan F. F.

    1992-06-01

    Low-power interstitial thermal therapy using a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser and a newly designed fiberoptic transmission system, the ITT laser fiber, is a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of cerebral tumors. After CT-guided stereotactic implantation of an applicator probe, we performed laser-induced interstitial thermal therapy in a patient with an astrocytomas WHO grade II under simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) control. In order to assess the effects of the treatment a 2D-Flash sequence with an acquisition time of 15 sec was used. It could be demonstrated that laser-tissue interactions progressed with duration of irradiation depending on laser powers applied. There was a well-defined area of tissue necrosis with a maximum size of 17 mm in diameter in the center of the tumor and a small zone of transient perifocal edema. With regard to experimental studies, it seems to be possible to define between reversible and irreversible laser-tissue effects.

  12. Laser material processing

    CERN Document Server

    Steen, William

    2010-01-01

    This text moves from the basics of laser physics to detailed treatments of all major materials processing techniques for which lasers are now essential. New chapters cover laser physics, drilling, micro- and nanomanufacturing and biomedical laser processing.

  13. Laser-Vorrichtung

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, J.

    1992-01-01

    The laser device has a laser oscillator and a downstream laser amplifier which has an entry zone for the laser beam, which comes from the laser oscillator before it is amplified, and an exit for the amplified laser beam. The laser amplifier also has a convolutional mirror which is opposite the entry zone for the laser beam to be amplified. The laser device is designed so that the amplifying medium in the laser amplifier can be optimally utilized if the laser device has a compact design. To th...

  14. Lasers, the Price of Admission in 2045

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    guided surface-to- air missile, the Nike Ajax, became operational in 1954.4 Radar technology quickly decreased in size and weight for airborne...with beam quality of 1.3 times the diffraction limit (DL).69 Northrop Grumman now advertises the FIRESTRIKE laser based on the technology from...earlier Vesta and Vesta II lasers. The FIRESTRIKE is advertised as a rugged and scalable line replaceable unit (LRU), 15kW power, beam quality of 1.5 DL

  15. Laser heating tunability by off-resonant irradiation of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormeño, Silvia; Gregorio-Godoy, Paula; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Juárez, Beatriz H; Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo

    2014-01-29

    Temperature changes in the vicinity of a single absorptive nanostructure caused by local heating have strong implications in technologies such as integrated electronics or biomedicine. Herein, the temperature changes in the vicinity of a single optically trapped spherical Au nanoparticle encapsulated in a thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) shell (Au@pNIPAM) are studied in detail. Individual beads are trapped in a counter-propagating optical tweezers setup at various laser powers, which allows the overall particle size to be tuned through the phase transition of the thermo-responsive shell. The experimentally obtained sizes measured at different irradiation powers are compared with average size values obtained by dynamic light scattering (DLS) from an ensemble of beads at different temperatures. The size range and the tendency to shrink upon increasing the laser power in the optical trap or by increasing the temperature for DLS agree with reasonable accuracy for both approaches. Discrepancies are evaluated by means of simple models accounting for variations in the thermal conductivity of the polymer, the viscosity of the aqueous solution and the absorption cross section of the coated Au nanoparticle. These results show that these parameters must be taken into account when considering local laser heating experiments in aqueous solution at the nanoscale. Analysis of the stability of the Au@pNIPAM particles in the trap is also theoretically carried out for different particle sizes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. A 2D optomechanical focused laser spot scanner: analysis and experimental results for microstereolithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, P S; Deshmukh, S

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes and analyzes a 2D optomechanical-focused laser spot scanning system (patent pending) which allows uniform intensity focused spot scanning with high speed and high resolution over a large range of scan. Such scanning is useful where variation of focused spot characteristics affects the performance of applications such as micro-/nano-stereolithography, laser micro-machining, scanning optical tweezers, optical scanning microscopy, and so on. Proposed scanning is achieved by using linear movement of mirrors and lens maintaining the alignment of motion and optical axis of laser. Higher speed and high resolution at the same time are achieved by use of two serial double parallelogram flexural mechanisms with mechatronics developed around them. Optical analysis is carried out to demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed system numerically and is further supported by the experimental results. Additional analysis is carried out to demonstrate robustness of the scanner in the case of small misalignment errors incurred in actual practice. Although the proposed scanner is useful in general in several applications mentioned above, discussion in this paper is focused on microstereolithography

  17. Laser Heterodyning

    CERN Document Server

    Protopopov, Vladimir V

    2009-01-01

    Laser heterodyning is now a widespread optical technique, based on interference of two waves with slightly different frequencies within the sensitive area of a photo-detector. Its unique feature – preserving phase information about optical wave in the electrical signal of the photo-detector – finds numerous applications in various domains of applied optics and optoelectronics: in spectroscopy, polarimetry, radiometry, laser radars and Lidars, microscopy and other areas. The reader may be surprised by a variety of disciplines that this book covers and satisfied by detailed explanation of the phenomena. Very well illustrated, this book will be helpful for researches, postgraduates and students, working in applied optics.

  18. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    ABSTRACT: A Schiff base was prepared from the reaction of 2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid and 2, 4 - pentanedione. The reaction of the prepared Schiff base with ethanolic solution of copper (II) chloride formed diaquo bis( N – 2 – amino – 3 - methylbutyl - 2, 4 - pentanedionato) copper (II) complex. The Schiff base is ...

  19. High-power optics lasers and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the basics, realization and materials for high power laser systems and high power radiation interaction with  matter. The physical and technical fundamentals of high intensity laser optics and adaptive optics and the related physical processes in high intensity laser systems are explained. A main question discussed is: What is power optics? In what way is it different from ordinary optics widely used in cameras, motion-picture projectors, i.e., for everyday use? An undesirable consequence of the thermal deformation of optical elements and surfaces was discovered during studies of the interaction with powerful incident laser radiation. The requirements to the fabrication, performance and quality of optical elements employed within systems for most practical applications are also covered. The high-power laser performance is generally governed by the following: (i) the absorption of incident optical radiation (governed primarily by various absorption mechanisms), (ii) followed by a temperature ...

  20. Fractional laser-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlendsson, Andrés M; Doukas, Apostolos G; Farinelli, William A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Ablative fractional laser (AFXL) is rapidly evolving as one of the foremost techniques for cutaneous drug delivery. While AFXL has effectively improved topical drug-induced clearance rates of actinic keratosis, treatment of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) has been challenging......, potentially due to insufficient drug uptake in deeper skin layers. This study sought to investigate a standardized method to actively fill laser-generated channels by altering pressure, vacuum, and pressure (PVP), enquiring its effect on (i) relative filling of individual laser channels; (ii) cutaneous...

  1. Two-beam laser fabrication technique and the application for fabricating conductive silver nanowire on flexible substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Cang He

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a two-beam laser fabrication technique is proposed to fabricate silver nanowire (AgNW on the polyethylene terephthalate (PET substrate. The femtosecond pulse laser in the technique plays a role in generating Ag nanoparticles from the silver aqueous solution by multiphoton photoreduction. The continuous wave (CW laser of the technique works as optical tweezers, and make the Ag nanoparticles gather to a continuous AgNW by the optical trapping force. The optical trapping force of the CW laser was calculated under our experimental condition. The flexibility and the resistance stability of the AgNW that fabricated by this technique are very excellent. Compared to the resistance of the AgNW without bending, the decreasing rate of the AgNW resistance is about 16% under compressed bending condition at the radius of 1 mm, and the increasing rate of the AgNW resistance is only 1.3% after the AgNW bended about 3500 times at the bending radius of 1 mm. The study indicates that the AgNW is promising for achieving flexible device and would promote the development of the flexible electronics.

  2. Laser Dyes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 9. Laser Dyes. G S Shankarling K J Jarag. General Article Volume 15 Issue 9 September ... Author Affiliations. G S Shankarling1 K J Jarag1. Dyestuff Technology, Department Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga Mumbai 400 019, India.

  3. Laser heterodyning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Protopopov, V. V

    2009-01-01

    ..., radiometry, laser radars and lidars, microscopy and other areas. Therefore, it is remarkable that such a widely used optical phenomenon has never before been comprehensively reviewed in a single work, as has been done many times for other subjects such as interferometry. I think there are several possible reasons for this. Perhap...

  4. Laser yellowing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. M B Sai Prasad1 Salvatore Siano2. Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India; CNR-IFAC, Polo Scientifico di Sesto Fiorentino, Via Madonna del Piano, 10, Sesto Fiorentino (FI)-50019, Italy ...

  5. Laser device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source for light circuits on a silicon platform. A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region arranged between a first mirror structure and a second mirror structure, both acting as mirrors, by forming a grating region including an active material...

  6. Mirrorless lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Experimental realization of mirrorless lasers in the last decade have resulted in hectic activity in this field, due to their novelty, simplicity and ruggedness and their great potential for application. In this article, I will review the various developments in this field in roughly chronological order, and discuss some possible ...

  7. Therapeutic effects of Laser and L-carnitine against amiodarone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COX-II) and lipoxygenase (LOX) as well as oxidative stress and inflammation ... induced fibrosis. Keywords: Amiodarone, Lung toxicity, Laser; L-carnitine. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science Citation Index ...

  8. Compact, Dual Channel, Mid-IR Laser Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a dual channel, compact mid-infrared laser spectrometer for planetary atmosphere...

  9. Simulating the Effects of Laser Damage to the Retina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    This Phase II SBIR brought vision and signal processing researchers from the Air Force, academia and the public sector together to develop a visualization tool for modeling laser damage to the retina...

  10. Sambot II: A self-assembly modular swarm robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; Wei, Hongxing; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Cancan

    2018-04-01

    The new generation of self-assembly modular swarm robot Sambot II, based on the original generation of self-assembly modular swarm robot Sambot, adopting laser and camera module for information collecting, is introduced in this manuscript. The visual control algorithm of Sambot II is detailed and feasibility of the algorithm is verified by the laser and camera experiments. At the end of this manuscript, autonomous docking experiments of two Sambot II robots are presented. The results of experiments are showed and analyzed to verify the feasibility of whole scheme of Sambot II.

  11. Multi-Channel Tunable Source for Atomic Sensors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR will seek to develop a prototype laser source suitable for atomic interferometry from compact, robust, integrated components. AdvR's design is...

  12. Novel Instrumentation for Rocket Propulsion Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed SBIR Phase II program is to develop, deploy and deliver novel laser-based instruments that provide rapid, in situ, simultaneous...

  13. Nanowire Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couteau C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs, solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  14. Excimer Laser Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Basting, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    This comprehensive survey on Excimer Lasers investigates the current range of the technology, applications and devices of this commonly used laser source, as well as the future of new technologies, such as F2 laser technology. Additional chapters on optics, devices and laser systems complete this compact handbook. A must read for laser technology students, process application researchers, engineers or anyone interested in excimer laser technology. An effective and understandable introduction to the current and future status of excimer laser technology.

  15. Soliton laser: A computational two-cavity model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, P.; If, F.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1987-01-01

    An improved computational two-cavity model of the soliton laser proposed and designed by Mollenauer and Stolen [Opt. Lett. 9, 13 (1984)] is obtained through refinements of (i) the laser cavity model, (ii) the pulse propagation in the fiber cavity, and (iii) the coupling between the two cavities...

  16. Single treatment of grades II and III cellulite using a minimally invasive 1,440-nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser and side-firing fiber: an institutional review board-approved study with a 24-month follow-up period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Gordon H

    2013-12-01

    Cellulite represents one of the common topographic alterations to the skin surface and one of the structural changes to the subdermal fat and septal band of the posterolateral thighs. Currently, no treatment exists to address this entity with a multifactorial genesis that produces long-term beneficial outcomes. This clinical study evaluated the safety and efficacy of the 1,440-nm laser and the duration of the clinical benefits during 2 years. Initially, 25 healthy women with thigh cellulite were enrolled in this prospective institutional review board (IRB)-approved study. For grade II cellulite, the laser fiber delivered up to 1,000 J of energy to the undersurface of the entire involved skin. For grade III cellulite, the laser fiber distributed 1,300 to 1,500 J of energy to melt the subdermal fat, subcise the taut septal bands, and heat the reticular dermis. Baseline and posttreatment analyses included standardized high-resolution photography, skin elasticity measurements, ultrasound scanning for dermal thickness, histology, investigator global assessment scores, and recording of adverse events. Of the 24 subjects who underwent treatment, only 20 were available for the 6-month follow-up assessment. Objective measurements at 2 years demonstrated an increase over the baseline mean skin elasticity (34 %) and mean dermal thickness (11 %), as well as an increase in the average percentage of dermal thickening determined by ultrasound imaging. Independent investigator global assessments were rated higher for grade II subjects than for grade III subjects throughout the 2-year follow-up period. Mild adverse events disappeared by the third month. This IRB-conducted clinical trial, as part of a multicenter study for Food and Drug Administration approval, demonstrated the safety and efficacy of a single minimally invasive treatment for grades II and III thigh cellulite during a 2-year follow-up period. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each

  17. Laser Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Photocathode emitters eject electrons from the cathode by the photoelectric effect. A drive laser source shines light energy onto a metal or...synchronized so that the electrons ejected via the photoelectric effect are properly accelerated. 15 Figure 2.4: Cross-section of a triple spoke cavity, from...2.3: Available Pulsed Magnets at PFF LANL. SP = Short Pulse. MP = Mid-Pulse, after [19] Cell No. Magnet Pulse Duration (ms) Bore (mm) 1 50 T SP 25 24

  18. Project LASER

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA formally launched Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering and Research) in March 1990, a program designed to help teachers improve science and mathematics education and to provide 'hands on' experiences. It featured the first LASER Mobile Teacher Resource Center (MTRC), is designed to reach educators all over the nation. NASA hopes to operate several MTRCs with funds provided by private industry. The mobile unit is a 22-ton tractor-trailer stocked with NASA educational publications and outfitted with six work stations. Each work station, which can accommodate two teachers at a time, has a computer providing access to NASA Spacelink. Each also has video recorders and photocopy/photographic equipment for the teacher's use. MTRC is only one of the five major elements within LASER. The others are: a Space Technology Course, to promote integration of space science studies with traditional courses; the Volunteer Databank, in which NASA employees are encouraged to volunteer as tutors, instructors, etc; Mobile Discovery Laboratories that will carry simple laboratory equipment and computers to provide hands-on activities for students and demonstrations of classroom activities for teachers; and the Public Library Science Program which will present library based science and math programs.

  19. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  20. Diode laser prostatectomy (VLAP): initial canine evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopchok, George E.; Verbin, Chris; Ayres, Bruce; Peng, Shi-Kaung; White, Rodney A.

    1995-05-01

    This study evaluated the acute and chronic effects of diode laser (960 nm) prostatectomy using a Prolase II fiber in a canine model (n equals 5). The laser fiber consists of a 1000 um quartz fiber which reflects a cone of laser energy, at 45 degree(s) to the axis of the fiber, into the prostatic urethra (Visual Laser Ablation of Prostate). Perineal access was used to guide a 15.5 Fr cystoscope to the level of the prostate. Under visual guidance and continual saline irrigation, 60 watts of laser power was delivered for 60 seconds at 3, 9, and 12 o'clock and 30 seconds at the 6 o'clock (posterior) positions for a total energy fluence of 12,600 J. One prostate received an additional 60 second exposure at 3 and 9 o'clock for a total fluence of 19,800 J. The prostates were evaluated at one day (n equals 1) and 8 weeks (n equals 4). The histopathology of laser effects at one day show areas of necrosis with loss of glandular structures and stromal edema. Surrounding this area was a zone of degenerative glandular structures extending up to 17.5 mm (cross sectional diameter). The histopathology of the 8 week laser treated animals demonstrated dilated prostatic urethras with maximum cross- sectional diameter of 23.4 mm (mean equals 18.5 +/- 3.9 mm). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of diode laser energy for prostatic tissue coagulation and eventual sloughing. The results also demonstrate the safety of diode laser energy, with similar tissue response as seen with Nd:YAG laser, for laser prostatectomy.

  1. Surface changes of implants after laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechmann, Peter; Sadegh, Hamid M. M.; Goldin, Dan S.; Hennig, Thomas

    1999-05-01

    Periimplantitis is one of the major factors for the loss of dental implants. Due to the minor defense ability of the tissue surrounding the implant compared to natural teeth treatment of periimplantitis in the early stage is very important. Reducing bacteria with a laser might be the most successful step in therapy of periimplantitis. Aim of the study was to observe changes in surface morphology of seven different implants after irradiation with three different lasers. Two kinds of flat round samles were prepared by the manufacturers either identical to the body surface or to the cervical area of the corresponding implants. The samples were irradiated using different power settings. The lasers used were a CO2 laser (Uni Laser 450P, ASAH Medico Denmark; fiber guided, wavelength 10.6 μm, max. average power 8.3 W, "soft-pulse" and cw) an Er:YAG laser (KaVo Key Laser II, wavelength 2.94 μm, pulse duration 250-500μs, pulse energy 60-500 mJ, pulse repetition rate 1-15 Hz, focus diameter 620 μm, air-water cooling; Biberach, Germany; a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser (laboratory prototype, q-switched, fiber guided, wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 1 μs, pulse repetition rate 30 Hz, water cooling). After irradiation the implant surfaces were investigated with a Scanning Electron Microscope. Ablation thresholds were determined. After CO2 laser irradiation no changes in surface morphology were observed whereas using the pulsed Er:YAG laser or frequency doubled Alexandrite laser even at low energies loss of integrity or melting of the surface was observed. The changes in surface morphology seem to depend very strongly on the type of surface coating.

  2. Laser Technologies in Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    Biophysics Ies. Lab., lech Univ Budapest IBdbpest Krusper ltca 2-4. Budapest 1l11 - HUNGARY P. "drlharan - CSIRu Dlv of Applied Physics, Box 218 lindfield...of Contour Naps of Manufacturing Components ---- 1H3O-IiIUU U.R. Barton and N.J. Lalor Liverpool Polytechnic. U.K. SESSION 2C - Laser lech . fcr Chai...8217- 0: : C0. 0 W W41> . id IA4󈧒 00)1-40 w I 04J Id 4 C41.-C 4 o r1-D 1- IV ,- COcO 0 1. .-- A 0-C4 4- C m In ~ 44) 4 411.1A -.41 -1044.. 4- 0 CL 4

  3. High-power laser sources for industry and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Friedrich

    2007-06-01

    Despite the invention and availability of a wide variety of laser sources, only very few types have made their way into the industrial use, which very often requires reliable three shift running, high uptime and low running costs. Over a long time the CO II gas laser has dominated the high power material processing area and still holds with 41.1 % the biggest market share in that field. The most modern, most reliable and most cost efficient type of CO II laser is the diffusion cooled slab configuration, which provides almost diffraction limited beam quality and is nowadays available in a power range up to 8 kW. The advantage of solid state lasers is that their radiation can be guided through optical fibers, but they suffered from high cost and low efficiency. The appearance of diode lasers as a very efficient and reliable pumping source, however, has boosted solid state laser technology. Not only the beam quality and efficiency of the classical rod design could be improved by replacing broadband lamps by monochromatic diode lasers but furthermore, because of the high brilliance of the diode lasers, new concepts as the thin disc and the fiber laser could be realized. Especially the higher efficiency, reducing the running cost in conjunction with improved beam quality makes the solid state lasers the tool of the future, whenever 3D applications are under consideration.

  4. Qualitative analysis of laser cutting of CV joints for the automobile industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboites, V.; Ramírez, R.; Rayas, J.

    2006-02-01

    The optimization of an automatic laser cutting system is reported. This CO II laser system assisted by an O II gas jet is used in the cutting of Constant Velocity (CV) joint for the automotive industry. The experimental parameters varied in order to obtain cuts with low roughness were the laser power, cutting speed and oxygen pressure. A mathematical model is presented which explains many of the features of the qualitative optimization realized.

  5. HF-laser program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The HF laser is an attractive candidate driver for a large-system ICF scientific demonstration facility, for an ICF experimental power reactor and for a commercial laser--fusion power reactor. Previous accomplishments of the program have included demonstrations of high efficiency and high energy capability, efficient energy extraction from HF amplifiers, good beam quality and focusability, and short-pulse generation and amplification. In the reporting period, beam quality has been determined to be near-diffraction limited for a short pulsewidth (6 ns to 25 ns) oscillator-amplifier chain, suppression of amplified spontaneous emission has been demonstrated on an individual spectral line, high-pressure characteristics have been determined for the Phoenix I amplifier, and detailed comparisions between the kinetic code and experiments have been made. Details of two major upcoming experiments are also included. The first is energy extraction and beam quality measurements on the Phoenix I amplifier operating under saturated output power conditions. The second experiment, using a newly designed amplifier (Phoenix II), is designed to demonstrate the concept of angular-multiplexing: a pulse width-compression scheme

  6. Laser power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, D.

    1975-01-01

    The laser power supply includes a regulator which has a high voltage control loop based on a linear approximation of a laser tube negative resistance characteristic. The regulator has independent control loops for laser current and power supply high voltage

  7. Laser therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Yag lasers. These lasers are used to treat cancer of the uterus, colon, and esophagus. The laser-emitting fibers are put inside a tumor to heat up and damage the cancer cells. This treatment has been used to shrink ...

  8. Laser fusion: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.

    1975-01-01

    The laser fusion concept is described along with developments in neodymium and carbon dioxide lasers. Fuel design and fabrication are reviewed. Some spin-offs of the laser fusion program are discussed. (U.S.)

  9. Laser therapy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laser is used for many medical purposes. Because the laser beam is so small and precise, it enables ... without injuring surrounding tissue. Some uses of the laser are retinal surgery, excision of lesions, and cauterization ...

  10. Laser Research Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laser Research lab is thecenter for the development of new laser sources, nonlinear optical materials, frequency conversion processes and laser-based sensors for...

  11. Laser-induced narrowband coherent synchrotron radiation: Efficiency versus frequency and laser power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Evain

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the narrowband terahertz emission process occurring from electron bunches passing in a bending magnet, after a laser-induced sinusoidal modulation has been performed. In particular, we focus on experimental tunability curves, and power scalings with current and laser power. Theoretically, we simplify the problem formulation using the slowly varying envelope approximation. At low powers, the scaling with laser power appears to be quadratic, and analytical expressions for the tuning curves are obtained. Emission at first passage in the bending magnet, and after one full turn in the storage ring, are considered both experimentally and theoretically. The experiments are performed on the UVSOR-II storage ring.

  12. Laser safety at high profile laser facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, K.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Laser safety has been an active concern of laser users since the invention of the laser. Formal standards were developed in the early 1970's and still continue to be developed and refined. The goal of these standards is to give users guidance on the use of laser and consistent safety guidance and requirements for laser manufacturers. Laser safety in the typical research setting (government laboratory or university) is the greatest challenge to the laser user and laser safety officer. This is due to two factors. First, the very nature of research can put the user at risk; consider active manipulation of laser optics and beam paths, and user work with energized systems. Second, a laser safety culture that seems to accept laser injuries as part of the graduate student educational process. The fact is, laser safety at research settings, laboratories and universities still has long way to go. Major laser facilities have taken a more rigid and serious view of laser safety, its controls and procedures. Part of the rationale for this is that these facilities draw users from all around the world presenting the facility with a work force of users coming from a wide mix of laser safety cultures. Another factor is funding sources do not like bad publicity which can come from laser accidents and a poor safety record. The fact is that injuries, equipment damage and lost staff time slow down progress. Hence high profile/large laser projects need to adapt a higher safety regimen both from an engineering and administrative point of view. This presentation will discuss all these points and present examples. Acknowledgement. This work has been supported by the University of California, Director, Office of Science.

  13. Tuning the structural and optical properties of gold/silver nanoalloys prepared by laser ablation in liquids for ultra-sensitive spectroscopy and optical trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Neri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasmon resonance of metallic Au/Ag alloys in the colloidal state was tuned from 400 nm to 500 nm using a laser irradiated technique, performed directly in the liquid state. Interesting optical nonlinearities, trapping effects and spectroscopic enhancements were detected as function of gold concentration in the nanoalloys. In particular a reduction of the limiting threshold was observed by increasing the gold amount. The SERS activity of the Au/Ag alloys was tested in liquid and in solid state in presence of linear carbon chains as probe molecules. The dependence of the increased Raman signals on the nanoparticle Au/Ag atomic ratio is presented and discussed. Finally preliminary studies and prospects for optical and Raman tweezers experiments are discussed.

  14. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  15. Laser Protection TIL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laser Protection TIL conducts research and analysis of laser protection materials along with integration schemes. The lab's objectives are to limit energy coming...

  16. Laser satellite power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  17. Singlet-Oxygen Generation From Individual Semiconducting and Metallic Nanostructures During Near-Infrared Laser Trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Hanson, Jennifer L.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Devaraj, Arun; Perea, Daniel E.; Kim, Woo-Joong; Kilcoyne, Arthur L.; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-13

    Photodynamic therapy has been used for several decades in the treatment of solid tumors through the generation of reactive singlet-oxygen species (1O2). Recently, nanoscale metallic and semiconducting materials have been reported to act as photosensitizing agents with additional diagnostic and therapeutic functionality. To date there have been no reports of observing the generation of singlet-oxygen at the level of single nanostructures, particularly at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Here we demonstrate that NIR laser-tweezers can be used to observe the formation of singlet-oxygen produced from individual silicon and gold nanowires via use of a commercially available reporting dye. The laser trap also induces 2-photon photoexcitation of the dye following a chemical reaction with singlet oxygen. Corresponding 2-photon emission spectra confirms the generation of singlet oxygen from individual silicon nanowires at room temperature (30°C), suggesting a range of applications in understanding the impact of 1O2 on individual cancer cells.

  18. Towards trapping and laser cooling Ba and La ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankes, Jessie; Nelson, Amanda; Banner, Patrick; Olmschenk, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Trapped atomic ions are one of the leading candidates for applications in quantum information. We are currently working with barium ions (Ba II), directly loaded by laser ablation of a barium titanium oxide target, and laser cooled using visible laser light (650 nm and 494 nm). Motivated by applications of quantum networks, we also present progress towards laser cooling and trapping lanthanum ions (La III), which should enable quantum information protocols at telecom wavelengths for long-distance applications. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  19. Laser-assisted delivery of topical methotrexate - in vitro investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth Hjardem

    2016-01-01

    Ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) are increasingly used to treat dermatological disorders and to facilitate laser-assisted topical drug delivery. In this thesis, laser-tissue interactions generated by stacked pulses with a miniaturized low-power 2,940 nm AFXL were characterized (study I). Knowledge...... of the correlation between laser parameters and tissue effects was used to deliver methotrexate (MTX) topically through microscopic ablation zones (MAZs) of precise dimensions. MTX is a well-known chemotherapeutic and anti-inflammatory drug that may cause systemic adverse effects, and topical delivery is thus......) (study II & III), while qualitative analyses of MTX biodistribution in skin were illustrated and semi-quantified by fluorescence microscopy (study II & III) and desorption electro spray mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) (study III). Laser-tissue interactions generated by AFXL: AFXL-exposure generated...

  20. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Bhardwaj C. N., and Singh V. R., (1994), Synthesis and characterization of thallium (I) complexes of biologically active benzothiazolines, Indian Journal Chemistry 33(3): 423 - 425. Chakraborty H., Paul N., and Rahman M. L., (1994), Catalytic activities of Schiff bases aquo complexes of Cu (II) in the hydrolysis of amino acid ...

  1. Laser technology (selected articles)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-09

    This paper presents high-energy CW HF/DF chemical lasers developed under the U.S. Navy Sealite program and the Alpha program of the DARPA Triad program, and a brief account of Soviet chemical lasers. Continuous wave HF/DF chemical lasers were developed starting in the late sixties as high-power lasers of consistent interest to military circles. These are lasers that have the most matured technology among present-day high-energy lasers. It is hoped that in the near future CW HF/DF chemical lasers can be developed into a space laser weapon to deal with ICBMs. CW HF/DF chemical lasers are an integration of technologies in gas dynamics, chemistry, fluid chemistry, optics, and lasers. By using the branching chain reaction of heat liberation, inversion of the population ratio is generated to obtain lasers.

  2. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System Laser Transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, R. S.; Dallas, J. L.; Yu, A. W.; Mamakos, W. A.; Lukemire, A.; Schroeder, B.; Malak, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), scheduled to launch in 2001, is a laser altimeter and lidar for tile Earth Observing System's (EOS) ICESat mission. The laser transmitter requirements, design and qualification test results for this space- based remote sensing instrument are presented.

  3. Vascular anastomosis by Argon Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, O.M.; Macruz, R.; Armelin, E.; Brum, J.M.G.; Ribeiro, M.P.; Mnitentog, J.; Verginelli, G.; Pileggi, F.; Zerbini, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty four mongrel dogs, wheighing 13 to 24 kilograms were studied. After anesthesia, intubation and controlled ventilation, they were submitted to three types of vascular anastomosis: Group I - eight dogs with saphenous vein inter-carotid arteries by-pass: Group II - eight dogs with left mammary artery - left anterior descending coronary artery by-pass; Group III - eight dogs with venovenous anastomosis. In all groups 0.8 to 15 watts of Argon Laser power was applied to a total time of 90 to 300 seconds. The lower power for venovenous anastomosis and the greater for the arterial ones. The mean valves of resistence of the Laser anastomosis to pressure induced rupture was 730 mmHg in the immediate post operative study, and superior to 2.500 mmHg 30 days after. No signs of occlusion was demonstrated at the anastomosis sites by the angiographic and anathomo-patological study performed. (Author) [pt

  4. The echo-enabled harmonic generation options for FLASH II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Haixiao; Decking, Winfried; Faatz, Bart

    2011-03-01

    FLASH II is an upgrade to the existing free electron laser (FEL) FLASH. The echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) scheme is proposed to be a potential seeding option of FLASH II. In this paper, the possibility of EEHG operation of FLASH II is investigated for the first time. With a combination of existing numerical codes, i.e. a laser-beam interaction code in an undulator (LBICU), a beam tracking code in a chicane (ELEGANT) and an universal FEL simulating code (GENESIS), the effects of beam energy chirp and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on EEHG operation are studied as well. In addition, several interesting issues concerning EEHG simulation are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic tweezers for DNA micromanipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Charbel; Wirtz, Denis

    2000-12-01

    We detail the design of an electromagnetic assembly capable of generating a constant magnetic field superimposed to a large magnetic field gradient (between 40 and 100 T/m), which was uniform over a large gap (between 1.5 and 2 cm). Large gaps allowed the use of wide high numerical-aperture lenses to track microspheres attached to DNA molecules with an inverted light microscope. Given the geometric constraints of the microscope, computer-aided design was used to optimize the magnetic field gradient linearity, homogeneity, and amplitude, as well as the arrangement of the magnetic coils, the currents, and the mechanical stability of the assembly. The assembly was used to apply forces of controlled amplitude, direction, and time dependence on superparamagnetic microspheres by using magnetic coils instead of permanent magnets. A streptavidin-coated microsphere was attached to the 3' end of a λ-phage DNA molecule through a single biotin molecule. The 5' end of the λ-phage DNA molecule was tethered to a glass coverslip by conjugating the DNA's overhang to a complementary 12 base-pair primer, which was itself cross-linked to a heterobifunctional group placed on the glass coverslip. By tracking the centroid of this microsphere, the mechanical response of a single λ-phage DNA molecule was measured as a function of the applied magnetic force. The resulting force-extension curve was fitted with the worm-like-chain model to obtain λ-phage DNA's persistence length and contour length, which were in agreement with previous reports.

  6. Cu(II), Zn(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stereochemistry has been suggested to Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes. The thermal analysis data provided the kinetic parameters as order of decomposition reaction, activation energy and frequency factor. All theoretical calculations of the ligand and the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes were made using Gaussian 03 rev.

  7. Laser safety and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, K.S.

    1995-01-01

    Lasers are finding increasing routine applications in many areas of science, medicine and industry. Though laser radiation is non-ionizing in nature, the usage of high power lasers requires specific safety procedures. This paper briefly outlines the properties of laser beams and various safety procedures necessary in their handling and usage. (author)

  8. Visible Solid State Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikmet, R.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Diode lasers can be found in various applications most notably in optical communication and optical storage. Visible lasers were until recently were all based on IR diode lasers. Using GaN, directly blue and violet emitting lasers have also been introduced to the market mainly in the area of optical

  9. Laser cladding with powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, M.F.; Schneider, Marcel Fredrik

    1998-01-01

    This thesis is directed to laser cladding with powder and a CO2 laser as heat source. The laser beam intensity profile turned out to be an important pa6 Summary rameter in laser cladding. A numerical model was developed that allows the prediction of the surface temperature distribution that is

  10. Laser EXAFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.; Schwenzel, R.E.; Campbell, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus for obtaining EXAFS data of a material, comprising means for directing radiant energy from a laser onto a target in such manner as to produce X-rays at the target of a selected spectrum and intensity, suitable for obtaining the EXAFS spectrum of the material, means for directing X-rays from the target onto spectral dispersive means so located as to direct the spectrally resolved X-rays therefrom onto recording means, and means for positioning a sample of material in the optical path of the X-rays, the recording means providing a reference spectrum of X-rays not affected by the sample and absorption spectrum of X-rays modified by transmission through the sample

  11. Laser Microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Andra R; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin; Siegal, Gene P; Emmert-Buck, Michael R; Tangrea, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Laser microdissection (LM) offers a relatively rapid and precise method of isolating and removing specified cells from complex tissues for subsequent analysis of their RNA, DNA, protein or metabolite content, thereby allowing assessment of the role of different cell types in the normal physiological or disease processes being studied. In this unit, protocols for the preparation of mammalian frozen tissues, fixed tissues, and cytologic specimens for LM, including tissue freezing, tissue processing and paraffin embedding, histologic sectioning, cell processing, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry, and image-guided cell targeting are presented. Also provided are recipes for generating lysis buffers for the recovery of nucleic acids and proteins. The Commentary section addresses the types of specimens that can be utilized for LM and approaches to staining of specimens for cell visualization. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of tissue or cytologic specimens as this is critical to effective LM. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Current military laser applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flinchbaugh, D.E.

    1975-08-01

    Several important military applications with the predominant laser type used are reviewed. Most of these lasers are infrared lasers of one sort or another. Airborne tactical programs utilizing laser designator/illuminators are pictorially summarized, including range finding, target seeking, designation, tracking, reconnaissance, and surveillance. A typical designator optical system configuration is presented and discussed. Examples of operational laser systems are given. It is seen that many of the laser applications in the civilian community have either direct or indirect analogs in the military field. A self-contained HF/DF chemical laser weapon that recirculates its by-products is examined.

  13. Multibeam Fibre Laser Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    -laser cutting have until now limited its application in metal cutting. In this paper the first results of proof-of-principle studies applying a new approach (patent pending) for laser cutting with high brightness short wavelength lasers will be presented. In the approach, multi beam patterns are applied...... to control the melt flow out of the cut kerf resulting in improved cut quality in metal cutting. The beam patterns in this study are created by splitting up beams from 2 single mode fibre lasers and combining these beams into a pattern in the cut kerf. The results are obtained with a total of 550 W of single......The appearance of the high power high brilliance fibre laser has opened for new possibilities in laser materials processing. In laser cutting this laser has demonstrated high cutting performance compared to the dominating cutting laser, the CO2-laser. However, quality problems in fibre...

  14. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  15. Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    161. Synthesis, characterisation and electrochemical behaviour of. Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes derived from acetylacetone and p-anisidine and their antimicrobial activity. N RAMAN*, V MUTHURAJ, S RAVICHANDRAN and. A KULANDAISAMY. Department of Chemistry, VHNSN College, Virudhunagar 626 001 ...

  16. Prospects of Mid Infrared Silicon Raman Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Bahram

    2006-03-01

    Mid wave infrared (MWIR) lasers in the wavelength range of 2-5μm form an important tool for free space communications, bio-chemical detection and certain medical applications. Most organic chemicals and biological agents have unique signatures in the MWIR and can be detected using these lasers. The strong water absorption peak at 2.9μm renders such a laser attractive for surgery and dentistry. Solid state lasers comprising OPO-based nonlinear frequency converters and Raman lasers have been the popular choice for these applications. However, the low damage threshold, poor thermal conductivity and high cost limit the commercial availability of these sources. The recent demonstration of the first silicon Raman laser in 2004 combined with excellent transmission of silicon in the mid-IR suggests that silicon should be considered as a MWIR Raman crystal. In the near IR, where current silicon Raman lasers operate, free carriers that are generated by two photon absorption (TPA) create severe losses. TPA vanishes in the MWIR regime (λ > 2.25μm), hence eliminating the main problem with silicon Raman lasers. This combined with (i) the unsurpassed quality of commercial silicon crystals, (ii) the low cost and wide availability of the material, (iii) extremely high optical damage threshold of 1-4 GW/cm2 (depending on the crystal resistivity), and (iv) excellent thermal conductivity renders silicon a very attractive Raman crystal. Moreover, integrated waveguide and resonator technologies can lead to device miniaturization. This talk discusses the MWIR silicon laser and its applications.

  17. OUTCOMES AFTER LASER VERSUS COMBINED LASER AND BEVACIZUMAB TREATMENT FOR TYPE 1 RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY IN ZONE I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Je Moon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Sang Jin; Ham, Don-Il; Kang, Se Woong; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the anatomical and refractive outcomes in patients with Type 1 retinopathy of prematurity in Zone I. The medical records of 101 eyes of 51 consecutive infants with Type 1 retinopathy of prematurity in Zone I were analyzed. Infants were treated by conventional laser photocoagulation (Group I), combined intravitreal bevacizumab injection and Zone I sparing laser (Group II), or intravitreal bevacizumab with deferred laser treatment (Group III). The proportion of unfavorable anatomical outcomes including retinal fold, disc dragging, retrolental tissue obscuring the view of the posterior pole, retinal detachment, and early refractive errors were compared among the three groups. The mean gestational age at birth and the birth weight of all 51 infants were 24.3 ± 1.1 weeks and 646 ± 143 g, respectively. In Group I, an unfavorable anatomical outcome was observed in 10 of 44 eyes (22.7%). In contrast, in Groups II and III, all eyes showed favorable anatomical outcomes without reactivation or retreatment. The refractive error was less myopic in Group III than in Groups I and II (spherical equivalent of -4.62 ± 4.00 D in Group I, -5.53 ± 2.21 D in Group II, and -1.40 ± 2.19 D in Group III; P prematurity in Zone I, intravitreal bevacizumab with concomitant or deferred laser therapy yielded a better anatomical outcome than conventional laser therapy alone. Moreover, intravitreal bevacizumab with deferred laser treatment resulted in less myopic refractive error.

  18. Two photon absorption energy transfer in the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) modified with organic boron dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Rui; Feng, Jiao; Wang, Shuangqing; Li, Shayu; Yang, Chunhong; Yang, Guoqiang

    2014-07-01

    The plant light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC-II) play important roles in collecting solar energy and transferring the energy to the reaction centers of photosystems I and II. A two photon absorption compound, 4-(bromomethyl)-N-(4-(dimesitylboryl)phenyl)-N-phenylaniline (DMDP-CH2Br), was synthesized and covalently linked to the LHC-II in formation of a LHC-II-dye complex, which still maintained the biological activity of LHC-II system. Under irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at 754 nm, the LHC-II-dye complex can absorb two photons of the laser light effectively compared with the wild type LHC-II. The absorbed excitation energy is then transferred to chlorophyll a with an obvious fluorescence enhancement. The results may be interesting and give potentials for developing hybrid photosystems.

  19. ROK-PRC Cooperation on Laser Fusion Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Yong Joo; Han, J. M.; Lee, S. M.; Nam, S. M.; Kwan, D. H.; Cha, Y. H.; Baek, S. H.

    2009-03-01

    International treaties on the reduction of green-house gases are now being established worldwide and Korea is supposed to join these treaties in a near future. Meanwhile the energy production via fission reactors proposed as a solution to this global environmental contamination has still inherent problems in that it also produces long-life radioactive nuclear waste in the long run, causing many serious social issues. Now the ultimate solution in this situation is believed to be the production of energy by the nuclear fusion reaction. In this project, the collaboration regarding high energy laser fusion has been carried out mainly at the Chinese facility such as ShengGuang II (SG II) laser facility, and ultrahigh intensity laser system of KAERI has been used for the small scale laser fusion and production of fast neutrons. Thomson scattering experiment to analyze the fusion plasma, opacity measurement to understand and develop the computer simulation techniques have been carried out at SG II facility, and experiments on implosion reaction which is basic to laser fusion as well as that of X-ray absorption and transmission have been done at the GEKKO XII facility of ILE, Japan. Satisfactory results both for Korea and China have been deduced by the strategy of project such that different approaches for high energy laser fusion and low energy laser fusion were applied. That is, Korean partner could get opportunities of doing experiments at the large laser facilities to get plasma diagnostic technologies and high density simulation technologies, besides the opportunity to participate in the K-C-J collaborative experiments of implosion and X-ray spectroscopy. And Chinese partner could solve their problem related to the laser fusion and neutron generation which were not successful even with their far high 300TW laser system

  20. Infrared laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  1. Laser-surface interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the interaction of laser radiation with various surfaces at variable parameters of radiation. As a basic principle of classification we chose the energetic or intensity level of interaction of laser radiation with the surfaces. These two characteristics of laser radiation are the most important parameters defining entire spectrum of the processes occurring on the surfaces during interaction with electromagnetic waves. This is a first book containing a whole spectrum of the laser-surface interactions distinguished by the ranges of used laser intensity. It combines the surface response starting from extremely weak laser intensities (~1 W cm-2) up to the relativistic intensities (~1020 W cm-2 and higher). The book provides the basic information about lasers and acquaints the reader with both common applications of laser-surface interactions (laser-related printers, scanners, barcode readers, discs, material processing, military, holography, medicine, etc) and unusual uses of the processes on t...

  2. Infrared laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, C.D.; Carbone, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture

  3. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  4. Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference about this cutting-edge laser technology and its many new and interesting developments. Various aspects and trends of Raman fiber lasers are described in detail by experts in their fields. Raman fiber lasers have progressed quickly in the past decade, and have emerged as a versatile laser technology for generating high power light sources covering a spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. The technology is already being applied in the fields of telecommunication, astronomy, cold atom physics, laser spectroscopy, environmental sensing, and laser medicine. This book covers various topics relating to Raman fiber laser research, including power scaling, cladding and diode pumping, cascade Raman shifting, single frequency operation and power amplification, mid-infrared laser generation, specialty optical fibers, and random distributed feedback Raman fiber lasers. The book will appeal to scientists, students, and technicians seeking to understand the re...

  5. Laser cooling of solids

    OpenAIRE

    Nemova, Galina

    2009-01-01

    Parallel to advances in laser cooling of atoms and ions in dilute gas phase, which has progressed immensely, resulting in physics Nobel prizes in 1997 and 2001, major progress has recently been made in laser cooling of solids. I compare the physical nature of the laser cooling of atoms and ions with that of the laser cooling of solids. I point out all advantages of this new and very promising area of laser physics. Laser cooling of solids (optical refrigeration) at the present time can be lar...

  6. Excimer laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantoni, R.

    1988-01-01

    This lecture deals with laser induced material photoprocessing, especially concerning those processes which are initiated by u.v. lasers (mostly excimer laser). Advantages of using the u.v. radiation emitted by excimer lasers, both in photophysical and photochemical processes of different materials, are discussed in detail. Applications concerning microelectronics are stressed with respect to other applications in different fields (organic chemistry, medicine). As further applications of excimer lasers, main spectroscopic techniques for ''on line'' diagnostics which employ excimer pumped dye lasers, emitting tunable radiation in the visible and near u.v. are reviewed

  7. Lasers in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Margi A

    2002-05-01

    Laser technology continues to progress with the addition of new lasers, new delivery systems, and new applications. The introduction of lasers to veterinary ophthalmology has radically changed the level of care that we can provide to our patients. The development of the diode laser has particularly had an impact on veterinary ophthalmology. The diode's affordability, portability, and broad applications for veterinary patients have allowed laser surgery to become a routine part of veterinary ophthalmology practice. Educating the public and veterinary community in available laser techniques will generate improved ophthalmic care and provide more data on which to build future applications.

  8. Laser materials processing with diode lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lin; Lawrence, Jonathan; Spencer, Julian T.

    1996-01-01

    Laser materials processing is currently dominated by CO2, Nd-YAG and Excimer lasers. Continuous advances in semiconductor laser technology over the last decade have increased the average power output of the devices annualy by two fold, resulting in the commercial availability of the diode lasers today with delivery output powers in excess of 60W in CW mode and 5kW in qasi-CW mode. The advantages of compactness, high reliability, high efficiency and potential low cost, due to the mass producti...

  9. Comparative Study of Diode Laser Versus Neodymium-Yttrium Aluminum: Garnet Laser Versus Intense Pulsed Light for the Treatment of Hirsutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Neerja

    2015-01-01

    Lasers are widely used for the treatment of hirsutism. But the choice of the right laser for the right skin type is very important. Before starting with laser therapy, it is important to assess the skin type, the fluence, the pulse duration and the type of laser to be used. To compare the efficacy and side effects of Diode laser, Neodymium-yttrium aluminum - garnet (Nd: YAG) laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) on 30 female patients of hirsutism. Thirty female patients with hirsutism were selected for a randomised controlled study. The patients were divided into three groups of 10 patients each. In group I patients diode laser was used, in group II patients long pulsed Nd: YAG laser was used and in group III, IPL was used. The patients were evaluated and result graded according to a 4-point scale as excellent, >75% reduction; good, 50-75% reduction; fair; 25-50% reduction; and poor, diode laser group, followed by 35% hair reduction in the Nd: Yag laser group and 10% hair reduction in the IPL group. The percentage of hair reduction after four sessions of treatment was maximum (64%) in the diode laser group, followed by 62% hair reduction in the Nd: Yag laser group and 48% hair reduction in the IPL group. The percentage of hair reduction after eight sessions of treatment was maximum (92%) in the diode laser group, followed by 90% hair reduction in the Nd: YAG group and 70% hair reduction in the IPL group. To conclude for the Indian skin with dark hairs, the diode laser still stands the test of time. But, since the diode laser has a narrow margin of safety, proper pre and post-procedure cooling is recommended. Although, the side effects of Nd: YAG laser are less as compared to the diode laser, it is less efficacious as compared to the diode laser.

  10. 1982 laser program annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Grow, G.R.

    1983-08-01

    This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications

  11. [The treatment of bladder lithiasis with laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrabal Martín, Miguel; Nogueras Ocaña, Mercedes; Arrabal Polo, Miguel Angel; Miján Ortiz, José Luís; Valle Díaz de la Guardia, Francisco; Zuluaga Gómez, Armando

    2008-11-01

    The use of laser for endoscopic lithotripsy started in 1968 when Mulvaney tried a ruby laser without success; Later on, the CO2 laser and the Nd:YAG were tried. With the pulsed dye and alexandrite lasers energetic performances between 30 and 200 mJ are obtained, their capacity of fragmentation is not universal and is limited to small stones, generally ureteral stones, so that it has not been a therapeutic alternative for bladder lithiasis. The holmium laser generates energy pulses of 400-2500 mJ, it is able to fragment every type of stone. The objective of this work is to analyze the results of endoscopic bladder lithotripsy with holmium-YAG laser. In the period between 2006-2008 we treated 21 cases of bladder lithiasis, with a stone size between 1 and 4 cm in patients from 8-76 years, six women and 15 men, which correspond to: four cases of infantile lithiasis, 3 of uric acid, one case of cystine, seven cases of calcium oxalate and/or phosphate, five cases of bladder lithiasis growing around a double J catheter, and one case of lithiasis within on intravesical ureterocele. Treatment was performed with a 20W Dornier Medilas holmium-YAG equipment, applied using children/adult cystoscopes or 7-8.5 Ch ureteroscopes, both semirigid and flexible. Post operative control included KUB x-ray and ultrasound. We performed a study of lithogenic risk factors and stone fragments analysis. The 21 cases described are all secondary or type II bladder lithiasis. In all cases the absence of residual lithiasis was checked with imaging studies and the lithogenic risk factors were corrected with medical or surgical procedures. We consider that today bladder endoscopic lithotripsy with holmium laser is a therapeutic alternative. Despite there are multiple options for endoscopic treatment, transurethral lithotripsy with holmium laser offers good results with a low complication rate.

  12. Photonic bandgap fiber lasers and multicore fiber lasers for next generation high power lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirakawa, A.; Chen, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber lasers are realizing new laser spectra and nonlinearity mitigation that a conventional fiber laser cannot. Multicore fiber lasers are a promising tool for power scaling by coherent beam combination. © 2014 OSA....

  13. Fiber Laser Array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simpson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...., field-dependent, loss within the coupled laser array. During this program, Jaycor focused on the construction and use of an experimental apparatus that can be used to investigate the coherent combination of an array of fiber lasers...

  14. Laser in operative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yasini

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Today laser has a lot of usage in medicine and dentistry. In the field of dentistry, laser is used in soft tissue surgery, sterilization of canals (in root canal therapy and in restorative dentistry laser is used for cavity preparation, caries removal, sealing the grooves (in preventive dentistry, etching enamel and dentin, composite polymerization and removal of tooth sensitivity. The use of Co2 lasers and Nd: YAG for cavity preparation, due to creating high heat causes darkness and cracks around the region of laser radiation. Also due to high temperature of these lasers, pulp damage is inevitable. So today, by using the Excimer laser especially the argon floride type with a wavelength of 193 nm, the problem of heat stress have been solved, but the use of lasers in dentistry, especially for cavity preparation needs more researches and evaluations.

  15. Laser Processing and Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bäuerle, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    This book gives an overview of the fundamentals and applications of laser-matter interactions, in particular with regard to laser material processing. Special attention is given to laser-induced physical and chemical processes at gas-solid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid interfaces. Starting with the background physics, the book proceeds to examine applications of lasers in “standard” laser machining and laser chemical processing (LCP), including the patterning, coating, and modification of material surfaces. This fourth edition has been enlarged to cover the rapid advances in the understanding of the dynamics of materials under the action of ultrashort laser pulses, and to include a number of new topics, in particular the increasing importance of lasers in various different fields of surface functionalizations and nanotechnology. In two additional chapters, recent developments in biotechnology, medicine, art conservation and restoration are summarized. Graduate students, physicists, chemists, engineers, a...

  16. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  17. Wavelength sweepable laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength sweepable laser source is disclosed, wherein the laser source is a semiconductor laser source adapted for generating laser light at a lasing wavelength. The laser source comprises a substrate, a first reflector, and a second reflector. The first and second reflector together defines...... and having a rest position, the second reflector and suspension together defining a microelectromechanical MEMS oscillator. The MEMS oscillator has a resonance frequency and is adapted for oscillating the second reflector on either side of the rest position.; The laser source further comprises electrical...... connections adapted for applying an electric field to the MEMS oscillator. Furthermore, a laser source system and a method of use of the laser source are disclosed....

  18. Waveguide gas laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedong, C.

    1982-05-01

    Waveguide gas lasers are described. Transmission loss of hollow tube light waveguides, coupling loss, the calculation of output power, and the width of the oscillation belt are discussed. The structure of a waveguide CO2 laser is described.

  19. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Glaucoma Education Center Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  20. Multibeam fiber laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Hansen, Klaus Schütt; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    2009-01-01

    of single mode fiber laser power. Burr free cuts in 1 mm steel and aluminum and in 1 and 2 mm AISI 304 stainless steel is demonstrated over a wide range of cutting rates. The industrial realization of this approach is foreseen to be performed by either beam patterning by diffractive optical elements......The appearance of the high power high brilliance fiber laser has opened for new possibilities in laser materials processing. In laser cutting this laser has demonstrated high cutting performance compared to the dominating Cutting laser, the CO2 laser. However, quality problems in fiber...... to control the melt flow out of the cut kerf resulting in improved cut quality in metal cutting. The beam patterns in this study are created by splitting up beams from two single mode fiber lasers and combining these beams into a pattern in the cut kerf. The results are obtained with a total of 550 W...

  1. Tunable laser optics

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, FJ

    2015-01-01

    This Second Edition of a bestselling book describes the optics and optical principles needed to build lasers. It also highlights the optics instrumentation necessary to characterize laser emissions and focuses on laser-based optical instrumentation. The book emphasizes practical and utilitarian aspects of relevant optics including the essential theory. This revised, expanded, and improved edition contains new material on tunable lasers and discusses relevant topics in quantum optics.

  2. Laser Journal (Selected Articles),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-10

    chronic -33- "ś 7, laryngitis, vocal chord nodule etc, and obtained good results. TREATMENT OF CHRONIC LARYNGITIS WITH HeNe LASER OPTICAL FIBRE Lu Junan...decrease, and excessive menstruation. OBSERVATION ON THE EFFECT OF YAG LASER OPTICAL NEEDLE UPON CANINE VOCAL CHORD AND TONGUE TISSUE Laser Medicine...Research Laboratory, Shanghai Medical School Number 1 Irradiation of canine vocal chord and tongue tissue with a 1.06 micron YAG laser through an optical

  3. Laser cutting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Thomas J

    2015-03-03

    A workpiece cutting apparatus includes a laser source, a first suction system, and a first finger configured to guide a workpiece as it moves past the laser source. The first finger includes a first end provided adjacent a point where a laser from the laser source cuts the workpiece, and the first end of the first finger includes an aperture in fluid communication with the first suction system.

  4. Tunable high pressure lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. V.

    1976-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy CO2 lasers is considerably improved by high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening, permits tuning the laser lines off atmospheric absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. Applications of tunable high pressure CO2 lasers to energy transmission and to remote sensing are discussed along with initial efforts in tuning high pressure CO2 lasers.

  5. Laser cooling in semiconductors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Laser cooling of semiconductor is very important topic in science researches and technological applications. Here we will report our progresses on laser cooling in semiconductors. By using of strong coupling between excitons and longitudinal optical phonons (LOPs), which allows the resonant annihilation of multiple LOPs in luminescence up-conversion processes, we observe a net cooling by about 40 K starting from 290 kelvin with 514-nm pumping and about 15 K starting from100 K with 532-nm pumping in a semiconductor using group-II-VI cadmium sulphide nanobelts. We also discuss the thickness dependence of laser cooing in CdS nanobelts, a concept porotype of semiconductor cryocooler and possibility of laser cooling in II-VI semiconductor family including CdSSe、CdSe, CdSe/ZnTe QDs and bulk CdS et al., Beyond II-VI semiconductor, we will present our recent progress in laser cooling of organic-inorganic perovskite materials, which show a very big cooling power and external quantum efficiency in 3D and 2D case. Further more, we demonstrate a resolved sideband Raman cooling of a specific LO phonon in ZnTe, in which only one specific phonon resonant with exciton can be cooled or heated. In the end, we will discuss the nonlinear anti-Stokes Raman and anti-Stokes photoluminescence upcoversion in very low temperature as low as down to liquid 4.2 K. In this case, the anti-Stokes resonance induces a quadratic power denpendece of anti-Stokes Raman and anti-Stokes PL. We proposed a CARS-like process to explain it. This nonlinear process also provides a possible physics picture of ultra-low temperatures phonon assisted photoluminescence and anti-Stokes Raman process.

  6. Laser induced pyrolysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderborgh, N.E.

    1976-01-01

    The application of laser pyrolysis techniques to the problems of chemical analysis is discussed. The processes occurring during laser pyrolysis are first briefly reviewed. The problems encountered in laser pyrolysis gas chromatography are discussed using the analysis of phenanthrene and binary hydrocarbons. The application of this technique to the characterization of naturally occurring carbonaceous material such as oil shales and coal is illustrated

  7. Flexible Laser Metal Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Sigurd; Jørgensen, Steffen Nordahl; Kristiansen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new flexible and fast approach to laser cutting called ROBOCUT. Combined with CAD/CAM technology, laser cutting of metal provides the flexibility to perform one-of-a-kind cutting and hereby realises mass production of customised products. Today’s laser cutting techniques...

  8. Coatings for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Optical coatings are used in lasers systems for fusion research to control beam propagation and reduce surface reflection losses. The performance of coatings is important in the design, reliability, energy output, and cost of the laser systems. Significant developments in coating technology are required for future lasers for fusion research and eventual power reactors

  9. Laser processing of materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    minimal collateral thermal damage over conventional tissue welding. 7.6 Summary and future scope. Laser joining is one of the earliest recorded applications of laser material processing. That laser can heat a material irrespective of its chemistry, state, bonding or size/geometry, is obviously a big advantage in joining a ...

  10. Introducing the Yellow Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2018-01-01

    The author has acquired a yellow laser with the specific wavelength of 589 nm. Because this is the first time such a laser has been discussed in this journal, I feel it is appropriate to provide a discussion of its function and capabilities. Normal laser safety should be employed, such as not pointing it into eyes or at people, and using eye…

  11. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  12. Laser processing of materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/sadh/028/03-04/0495-0562. Keywords. Laser processing; laser–matter interaction; laser surface vitrification. Abstract. Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) is a coherent and monochromatic beam of electromagnetic radiation that can propagate in a straight line with ...

  13. LaserFest Celebration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  14. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Off-Label Drug Use in Cancer Treatment Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) CAM for Patients CAM for Health Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Lasers in Cancer Treatment On This Page What is laser light? What is laser therapy, and how is it used in cancer treatment? ...

  15. Advanced laser processing for industrial solar cell manufacturing (ALPINISM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, N.B.; Fieret, J. [Exitech Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-04

    The study was aimed at improving methods for the manufacture of high efficiency solar cells and thereby increase production rates. The project focused on the laser grooved buried contact solar cell (LGBC) which is produced by high-speed laser machining. The specific objectives were (i) to optimise the laser technology for high speed processing; (ii) to optimise the solar cell process conditions for high speed processing; (iii) to produce a prototype tool and demonstrate high throughput; and (iv) to demonstrate increased cell efficiency using laser processing of rear contact. Essentially, all the objectives were met and Exitech have already sold six production tools and one research tool developed in this study. In addition, it was found that laser processing at the rear cell surface offers the prospect of LGBC solar cells with an efficiency of 20 per cent. BP Solar Limited carried out this work under contract to the DTI.

  16. Laser-Based Lighting: Experimental Analysis and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivellin, Nicola; Yushchenko, Maksym; Buffolo, Matteo; De Santi, Carlo; Meneghini, Matteo; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; Zanoni, Enrico

    2017-10-11

    This paper presents an extensive analysis of the operating principles, theoretical background, advantages and limitations of laser-based lighting systems. In the first part of the paper we discuss the main advantages and issues of laser-based lighting, and present a comparison with conventional LED-lighting technology. In the second part of the paper, we present original experimental data on the stability and reliability of phosphor layers for laser lighting, based on high light-intensity and high-temperature degradation tests. In the third part of the paper (for the first time) we present a detailed comparison between three different solutions for laser lighting, based on (i) transmissive phosphor layers; (ii) a reflective/angled phosphor layer; and (iii) a parabolic reflector, by discussing the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. The results presented within this paper can be used as a guideline for the development of advanced lighting systems based on laser diodes.

  17. Laser-Based Lighting: Experimental Analysis and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Trivellin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an extensive analysis of the operating principles, theoretical background, advantages and limitations of laser-based lighting systems. In the first part of the paper we discuss the main advantages and issues of laser-based lighting, and present a comparison with conventional LED-lighting technology. In the second part of the paper, we present original experimental data on the stability and reliability of phosphor layers for laser lighting, based on high light-intensity and high-temperature degradation tests. In the third part of the paper (for the first time we present a detailed comparison between three different solutions for laser lighting, based on (i transmissive phosphor layers; (ii a reflective/angled phosphor layer; and (iii a parabolic reflector, by discussing the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. The results presented within this paper can be used as a guideline for the development of advanced lighting systems based on laser diodes.

  18. Laser activation of diamond surface for electroless metal plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenov, S. M.; Shafeev, G. A.; Laptev, V. A.; Loubnin, E. N.

    1994-04-01

    Selective area electroless nickel and copper deposition onto the surface of diamond single crystals and polycrystalline diamond films has been realized. Three methods of laser-assisted activation of diamond surface were applied: (i) prenucleation of diamond surface with a thin layer of palladium catalyst via laser-induced decomposition of a palladium acetyl-acetonate [Pd(acac)2] solid film; (ii) deposition of palladium by means of the decomposition of Pd(acac)2 dissolved in dimethylformamide; (iii) laser-induced damage of diamond surface.

  19. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, M.A.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding

  20. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, Mark Alan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding.