WorldWideScience

Sample records for tweek sferics observed

  1. Chasing Lightning: Sferics, Tweeks and Whistlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, P. A.; Franzen, K.; Garcia, L.; Schou, P.; Rous, P.

    2008-12-01

    We all know what lightning looks like during a thunderstorm, but the visible flash we see is only part of the story. This is because lightning also generates light with other frequencies that we cannot perceive with our eyes, but which are just as real as visible light. Unlike the visible light from lightning, these other frequencies can carry the lightning's energy hundreds or thousands of miles across the surface of the Earth in the form of special signals called "tweeks" and "sferics". Some of these emissions can even travel tens of thousands of miles out into space before returning to the Earth as "whistlers". The INSPIRE Project, Inc is a non-profit scientific and educational corporation whose beginning mission was to bring the excitement of observing these very low frequency (VLF) natural radio waves emissions from lightning to high school students. Since 1989, INSPIRE has provided specially designed radio receiver kits to over 2,600 participants around the world to make observations of signals in the VLF frequency range. Many of these participants are using the VLF data they collect in very creative projects that include fiction, music and art exhibitions. During the Fall 2008 semester, the first INSPIRE based university-level course was taught at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) as part of its First-Year Seminar (FYS) series. The FYS classes are limited to 20 first-year students per class and are designed to create an active-learning environment that encourages student participation and discussion that might not otherwise occur in larger first-year classes. This presentation will cover the experiences gained from using the INSPIRE kits as the basis of a university course. This will include the lecture material that covers the basic physics of lightning, thunderstorms and the Earth's atmosphere, as well as the electronics required to understand the basic workings of the VLF kit. It will also cover the students assembly of the kit in an

  2. Characteristic of Tweek Atmospherics Observed in Mid-latitude using AWESOME VLF Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbayah Yusop

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the analysis of tweek atmospherics received by AWESOME VLF receiver at station of Gakona (62.71°N, 143.99°W during four months observation from January to April 2011. Tweek which originates from lightning discharge are used to monitor the nighttime D-region ionosphere using the fundamental cut-off frequency to measure the variations of the lower ionosphere’s reflection height, the equivalent electron density at the reflection height and the propagation distance travel by tweeks. In this study, a total of 1316 tweeks are analyzed and from the analysis, it shows that equinox’s season has the highest tweek occurrence compared to winter season in March and April. The maximum harmonic (m of t weeks is found to be up to fourth ( m = 4 and tweeks with mode number one (m = 1 are more dominantly occurred. Our observations indicate that the equivalent electron densities for tweeks varies from 22-27 eL/cm3 in the altitude ranged of 75 to 91 km and demonstrate that these ELF/VLF signals travel considerable distances up to 6700 km from the causative lightning discharges. The ionospheric parameters for three locations (high, middle and low latitude respectively were compared and the results show that they are almost consistent for all the locations.

  3. Morphological features of tweeks and nighttime D region ionosphere at tweek reflection height from the observations in the low-latitude Indian sector

    OpenAIRE

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Maurya, Ajeet K.; Singh, Rajesh ; Veenadhari, B.; Kumar, Sushil ; Cohen, M. B. ; Selvakumaran, R. ; Pant, P.; Singh, A. K. ; Siingh, D.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 19,308 tweeks recorded during April 2007 to March 2008, at Allahabad, a low-latitude station in the Indian sector, has been used to study seasonal occurrence which shows maximum tweek occurrence of about 63% during summer season and about 19% and 18% occurrences during equinox and winter seasons. Maximum occurrence of tweeks during summer season is consistent with the larger number of lightnings detected by World Wide Lightning Location Network in the Indian and Asia...

  4. ELF Sferics Produced by Rocket-Triggered Lightning and Observed at Great Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, N. A.; Moore, R. C.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Experimental observations of ELF radio atmospherics produced by rocket-triggered lightning flashes are used to analyze Earth-ionosphere waveguide excitation and propagation characteristics as a function of return stroke. Rocket-triggered lightning experiments are performed at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) located at Camp Blanding, Florida. Long-distance ELF observations are performed in California, Greenland, and Antarctica, although this work focuses on observations performed in Greenland. The lightning current waveforms directly measured at the base of the lightning channel (at the ICLRT) are used together with the Long Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC) code to predict the sferic waveform observed at the receiver locations under various ionospheric conditions. LWPC was developed by the Naval Ocean Systems Center over a period of many years. It is an inherently narrowband propagation code that has been modified to predict the broadband response of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide to an impulsive lightning flash while preserving the ability of LWPC to account for an inhomogeneous waveguide. This paper critically compares observations with model predictions, and in particular analyzes Earth-ionosphere waveguide excitation as a function of return stroke. The ability to infer source characteristics using observations at great distances may prove to greatly enhance the understanding of lightning processes that are associated with the production of transient luminous events (TLEs) as well as other ionospheric effects associated with lightning.

  5. Nighttime D-region electron density measurements from ELF-VLF tweek radio atmospherics recorded at low latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, A. K.; Veenadhari, B.; Singh, R.; Kumar, S.; Cohen, M.

    2012-12-01

    Dispersive atmospherics (tweeks) observed during 2010 simultaneously at two low latitude stations, Allahabad (geomagnetic lat., 16.79° N) and Nainital (geomagnetic lat. 20.48° N), have been utilized to estimate the nighttime D-region electron density at the ionospheric reflection height under the local nighttime propagation (21:00 - 02:00 LT or 15:30 - 20:30 UT). The analysis of simultaneously recorded tweeks at both the stations on five international quiet days during one month each from summer (June), winter (January) and equinox (March) seasons shows that the D-region electron density varies 21.5-24.5 cm-3 over the ionospheric reflection height of 85-95 km. The average values of Wait lower ionospheric parameters: ionospheric reference height h‧ and sharpness factor β are almost same during winter (86.1-85.9 km, 0.51-0.52 km-1) and equinox (85.6-85.7 km, 0.54 km-1) seasons. The values of h‧ and β during summer season are about 83.5 km and 0.60 km-1 at both stations. Overall, equivalent electron density profile obtained using tweek method shows lower values of electron density by about 5-60% than those obtained using IRI-2007 model and lower/higher by 2-68% than those obtained using rocket technique. The electron density estimated using all three techniques (tweek, IRI 2007, Rocket) is consistent in the altitude range of 82-98 km. The estimated geographic locations of causative lightnings of tweeks were matched with the locations and times of lightnings detected by the World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). The WWLLN detected about 27.5% of causative lightnings of tweeks simultaneously observed at both the stations.

  6. Nighttime D region electron density measurements from ELF-VLF tweek radio atmospherics recorded at low latitudes

    OpenAIRE

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Maurya, Ajeet K.; Veenadhari, B. ; Singh, Rajesh ; Kumar, Sushil ; Cohen, M. B. ; Selvakumaran, R. ; Gokani, Sneha ; Pant, P.; Singh, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersive atmospherics (tweeks) observed during 2010 simultaneously at two low-latitude stations, Allahabad (geomagnetic latitude, 16.05 N) and Nainital (geomagnetic latitude, 20.48 N), have been used to estimate the nighttime D region electron density at the ionospheric reflection height under the local nighttime propagation (21:00–02:00 LT or 15:30–20:30 UT). The analysis of simultaneously recorded tweeks at both the stations on five international quiet days during one month...

  7. Deconvolving the lightning sferic VLF source waveform from its temporally-superposed ionospheric reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Holzworth, R. H.; Shao, X.

    2010-12-01

    Powerful sferic signals can be used for ionospheric sounding. We have recently applied sferics from Narrow Bipolar Events (NBEs) to studying the ionospheric D-regions’ electron-density profile. The NBE sferic’s narrow temporal support allows the ionospheric reflection signal to be easily separated from the source sferic waveform, at least for ranges up to several-hundred km. Both NBEs and cloud-to-ground (CG) sferics are sufficiently powerful for practical use in ionospheric sounding of this sort. Unfortunately, the incidence of NBEs is small compared to CGs (perhaps on the order of 1:100). The Duke University group has benefited from use of CG sferics in D-region monitoring. The Duke approach does not require separation of the “source” waveform from the ionospheric reflections. By contrast, our approach relies on separating these two signal components. CG sferics observed at ranges up to several-hundred km present their own challenge. The CG source waveform is quite long compared to NBEs. Thus much of the CG source waveform is confounded by partial temporal overlap of signals reflected from the ionospheric D-region. This is especially true at night, when D-region attenuation is minimal, causing the strongest reflection amplitudes. How then can we separate the source waveform from the confounding ionospheric reflections? We will present a formal solution to this problem, based on using simultaneous sferic recordings at two or more sensor stations. The approach will be illustrated with CG recordings from multiple stations of the Los Alamos Sferic Array. Potentially the method will allow copious CG recordings to be exploited for D-region sounding as well as for gaining better “ground truth” on the CG source function.

  8. Investigation of the morphology and Wait's parameter variations of the low-latitude D region ionosphere using the multiple harmonics of tweeks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Le Minh

    2016-06-01

    Recording the tweeks with a maximum up to eight harmonics using the receiver installed at Tay Nguyen University (12.65° N, 108.02° E) during 2013-2014, we investigated the morphology of the nighttime D-region ionosphere. Tweeks were recorded on 5 quiet nights per month. The results show that the mean reflection height in 2014 (Rz = 79.3) is lower by 3.3 km than that in 2013 (Rz = 64.9). The reflection height at low latitudes is higher than that at high latitudes. The mean reference height h‧ in 2013 is higher about 0.9 km than that in 2014 and the mean sharpness factor β in 2013 is higher by 0.07 km-1 than that in 2014. The short-term variation of reflection heights for tweeks with harmonics m = 1-3 and sunspot number have the negative correlation coefficients. However, the correlations between them are not clear. On some nights, from 19:00-21:00 LT, the reflection height temporal variability shows a moderate to strong negative correlation with the tweek occurrence. This suggests that the reflection height variation may be caused by QE fields generated by lightning discharges. The variations of tweek reflection heights observed during 2013-2014, at low latitudes could be significantly caused by the ionization effect by Lyman- α and Lyman- β coming from geocorona, variation of neutral density, particle precipitations, and by direct energy coupling between lightning and lower ionosphere.

  9. Characteristics of VLF/LF Sferics from Elve-producing Lightning Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaes, P.; Zoghzoghy, F. G.; Marshall, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Lightning return strokes radiate an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) which interacts with the D-region ionosphere; the largest EMPs produce new ionization, heating, and optical emissions known as elves. Elves are at least six times more common than sprites and other transient luminous events. Though the probability that a lightning return stroke will produce an elve is correlated with the return stroke peak current, many large peak current strokes do not produce visible elves. Apart from the lightning peak current, elve production may depend on the return stroke speed, lightning altitude, and ionospheric conditions. In this work we investigate the detailed structure of lightning that gives rise to elves by analyzing the characteristics of VLF/LF lightning sferics in conjunction with optical elve observations. Lightning sferics were observed using an array of six VLF/LF receivers (1 MHz sample-rate) in Oklahoma, and elves were observed using two high-speed photometers pointed over the Oklahoma region: one located at Langmuir Laboratory, NM and the other at McDonald Observatory, TX. Hundreds of elves with coincident LF sferics were observed during the summer months of 2013. We present data comparing the characteristics of elve-producing and non-elve producing lightning as measured by LF sferics. In addition, we compare these sferic and elve observations with FDTD simulations to determine key properties of elve-producing lightning.

  10. Remote Sensing of the Night-time Lower Ionosphere from Lightning Generated Sferics Recorded in the South Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushil, K.; Ramachandran, V.

    The lightning generated Extremely Low Frequency ELF and Very Low Frequency VLF radio signals tweeks recorded using the lightning detection system under Word Wide Lightning Location WWLL Network at Suva 18 2 o S 178 3 o E Fiji a low latitude ground wave station in the South Pacific region are used to determine the lower ionospheric electron content and its variation during night-time Due to its least relative inaccessibility the lower ionosphere consisting of D-region is among the least studied regions of the Earth s atmosphere The lightning generated sferics which are short pulses typically of 1-10 ms with significant spectral contents over the ELF VLF can be used in the study of the lower ionosphere A total of 400 tweeks recoded in the time period of 1800-0600 hrs FST during 2003- 2004 have been analysed Matlab codes are used to analyse the data files recorded using lightning software and each of data file is of 11 MB with one minute duration The value of ionospheric reflecting height h calculated using waveguide mode theory of electromagnetic wave propagation in the spherical cell Earth-ionosphere waveguide having perfectly conducting boundaries is found to vary from 80-95 km in the night-time To estimate the electron density at the ionospheric reflection heights i e lower ionosphere we perform a qualitative analysis based on the propagation theory of radio waves in an infinite collisionless anisotropic ionospheric plasma Shvets and Hayakawa J Atmos Sol -Terr Phys 60 461

  11. Application of lightning discharge generated radio atmospherics/tweeks in lower ionospheric plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, A K; Singh, R; Veenadhari, B [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai - 410 218 (India); Pant, P [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital - 263129, Uttrakhand (India); Singh, A K, E-mail: ajeet.iig@gmail.co, E-mail: akmaurya@iigs.iigm.res.i [Physics Department, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi - 221005 (India)

    2010-02-01

    Lightning discharges during thunderstorm are the significant natural source of electromagnetic waves. They generate electromagnetic pulses, which vary from few Hz to tens of MHz, but the maximum radiated energy is confined in extremely low (ELF: 3-3000Hz) and very low (VLF: 3-30 KHz) frequency band. These pulsed signals with frequency dispersion are known as radio atmospherics or tweeks. These waves propagate through the process of multiple reflections in the earth-ionosphere waveguide over long distances with very low attenuation (2-3 dB/1000km). Since these waves are reflected by lower boundary of ionosphere, these are used extensively for probing the D-region ionosphere. D-region is important to the space weather, as well as the submarine communication and navigational aid. In this perspective the measurement of electron density profiles of the D-region is undoubtedly of great interest to both the development of reliable models and radio wave propagation. Earlier work on the tweeks is mainly focused to the theoretical considerations related to polarization, waveform analysis, and occurrence time and propagation mechanism. In this study we investigate tweeks to determine the equivalent night time electron densities at reflection height of the D-region. Distance traveled by the VLF waves from the causative lightning discharges to the receiving station has also been calculated. Tweeks recorded at a low latitude ground station of Allahabad (Geomag. lat. 16.05{sup 0} N) during the night of 23 March 2007 have been used in the present analysis. Based on the analysis of the fundamental cut-off frequency of tweeks, the estimated equivalent electron density of the D-region has been found to be in the range of {approx}20 to 25 el/cm{sup 3} at ionospheric reflection height of {approx}80 to 95 km respectively. Propagation distance in Earth-Ionosphere wave guide (EIWG) from causative lightning source to experimental site varies from {approx}1500 to 8000 km.

  12. Tweek: Merging 2D and 3D Interaction in Immersive Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick L Hartling

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Developers of virtual environments (VEs face an oftendifficult problem: users must have some way to interact with the virtual world. The application designers must determine how to map available inputs (button presses, hand gestures, etc. to actions within the VE. As a result, interaction within a VE is perhaps the most limiting factor for the development of complex virtual reality (VR applications. For example, interactions with large amounts of data, alphanumeric information, or abstract operations may not map well to current VR interaction methods, which are primarily spatial. Instead, twodimensional (2D interaction could be more effective. Current practices often involve the development of customized interfaces for each application. The custom interfaces try to match the capabilities of the available input devices. To address these issues, we have developed a middleware tool called Tweek. Tweek presents users with an extensible 2D Java graphical user interface (GUI that communicates with VR applications. Using this tool, developers are free to create a GUI that provides extended capabilities for interacting with a VE. This paper covers in detail the design of Tweek and its use with VR Juggler, an open source virtual reality development tool.

  13. Combined Microwave and Sferics Measurements as a Continuous Proxy for Latent Heating in Mesoscale Model Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D. -E.; Morales, C. A.; Weinman, J. A.; Olson, W. S.

    1999-01-01

    Planar rainfall distributions were retrieved from data provided by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) radiometers. Lightning generates Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio noise pulses called sferics. Those pulses propagate over large distances so that they can be continuously monitored with a network of ground based radio receivers. An empirical relationship between the sferics rate and the convective rainfall permitted maps of convective latent heating profiles to be derived continuously from the sferics distributions. Those inferred latent heating rates were assimilated into the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) that depicted an intense winter cyclone that passed over Florida on 2 February 1998. When compared to a 14 hour MM5 rainfall forecast using conventional data, the use of lightning data improved the forecast.

  14. Effects of a Solar Eclipse on the Propagation of VLF-LF Signals: Observations and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barin Kumar De

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results from the measurements of some of the fundamental parameters (amplitude of sferics and transmitted signal, conductivity of lower ionosphere of the ionospheric responses to the 22 July 2009 solar eclipse (partial: 91.7% are shown. This study summarizes our results from sferics signals at 81 kHz and subionospheric transmitted signals at 19.8 and 40 kHz recorded at Agartala, Tripura (latitude: 23¢XN, longitude: 91.4¢XE. We observed significant absorption in amplitude of these signals during the eclipse period compared to their ambient values for the same period during the adjacent 7 days. The signal strength along their propagation paths was controlled by the eclipse associated decrease in ionization in the D-region of the ionosphere. Waveguide mode theory calculations show that the elevation of the height of lower ionosphere boundary of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide to a value where the conductivity parameter was 106 unit. The absorption in 81 kHz sferics amplitude is high compared to the absorption in the amplitude of 40 kHz signal transmitted from Japan. The simultaneous changes in the amplitudes of sferics and in the amplitude of transmitted signals assert some sort of coupling between the upper atmosphere and the Earth¡¦s near-surface atmosphere prevailing clouds during solar eclipse.

  15. Magnetotelluric distortions directly observed with lightning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Lachlan; Macnae, James

    2017-08-01

    Galvanic distortions complicate magnetotelluric (MT) soundings. In this research, we use lightning network data to identify specific sferics in MT measurements and analyse these events on the basis of the lightning source location. Without source information, identification and removal of galvanic distortion is a fundamentally ill-posed problem, unless data are statistically decomposed into determinable and indeterminable parts. We use realistic assumptions of the earth-ionosphere waveguide propagation velocity to accurately predict the time of arrival, azimuth and amplitude for every significant sferic in our time-series data. For each sferic with large amplitude, we calculate the rotation of the electric field from the measured to the predicted arrival azimuth. This rotation of the electric field is a primary parameter of distortion. Our results demonstrate that a rudimentary model for near-surface galvanic distortion consistently fits observed electric field rotations. When local features rotate regional electric fields, then counter-rotating data to predicted arrival azimuths should correct the directional dependence of static shift. Although we used amplitude thresholds to simplify statistical processing, future developments should incorporate both signal-to-noise improvements and multisite decompositions. Lower amplitude signal may also be useful after the appropriate signal processing for noise reduction. We anticipate our approach will be useful for further work on MT distortion.

  16. Joint radio and optical observations of the most radio-powerful intracloud lightning discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Jacobson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The most radio-powerful intracloud lightning emissions are associated with a phenomenon variously called "narrow bipolar events" or "compact intracloud discharges". This article examines in detail the coincidence and timing relationship between, on the one hand, the most radio-powerful intracloud lightning events and, on the other hand, optical outputs (or lack thereof of the same discharge process. This is done, first, using coordinated very high frequency (VHF and optical observations from the FORTE satellite and, second, using coordinated sferic and all-sky optical observations from the Los Alamos Sferic Array. In both cases, it is found that the sought coincidences are exceedingly rare. Moreover, in the handful of coincidences between optical and intense radio emissions that have been identified, the radio emissions differ from their usual behavior, by being accompanied by approximately simultaneous "conventional" lightning radio emissions. It is implied that the most radio-powerful intracloud emission process essentially differs from ordinary incandescent lightning.

  17. Features of discrete VLF emissions observed at Gulmarg, India during the magnetic storm of 6–7 March, 1986

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Singh; A K Singh; D Siingh; R P Singh

    2007-12-01

    During the analysis of archived VLF data from Indian low latitude ground stations, some discrete VLF emissions recorded at the low latitude ground station Gulmarg (geomagnetic latitude 24°26′N; geomagnetic longitude 147° 09′E, L = 1.28) during moderate magnetic storm activity ( $K^{−}_{P}$} = 32, index varies from 4 to 6 during the observation period) on 6/7 March, 1986 are presented in this paper. The dynamic spectra of these discrete VLF emissions were observed along with tweeks and its harmonics, which is interesting and complex to explain. In most of the events the harmonic frequency of tweeks correlates with the starting frequency of harmonics of discrete emissions. In order to explain the observed features of discrete VLF emissions, we propose cyclotron resonance interaction between whistler mode wave and energetic electrons of inner radiation belt as possible generation mechanism. An attempt is also made to determine parallel energy, anisotropy and wave growth relevant to the generation process of VLF emissions.

  18. Subionospheric VLF signatures and their association with sprites observed during EuroSprite 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mika, A.; Haldoupis, C.; Marshall, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    to sprites. Bandpass filtering of the broadband VLF signal revealed that only about 5% of the sprites were escorted by early VLF perturbations, possibly due to backscatter. Finally, by using all 131 sprites captured during EuroSprite-2003, the time lags of the sprites to the preceding +/- CG discharges were...... computed and analyzed. The time-lag distribution had a well defined tail suggesting that at least one third of the sprites observed were lagging the +/- CG discharges by more than 30 up to 300 ms. In addition these "long-delayed" sprites were not accompanied by any radio-sferics during the sprite...

  19. Gamma Ray and Very Low Frequency Radio Observations from a Balloon-Borne Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, C.; Sheldon, A.; Cully, C. M.; Davalos, A.; Osakwe, C.; Galts, D.; Delfin, J.; Duffin, C.; Mansell, J.; Russel, M.; Bootsma, M.; Williams, R.; Patrick, M.; Mazzino, M. L.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Calgary's Student Organization for Aerospace Research (SOAR) built an instrument to participate in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) initiative organized by Louisiana State University and supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office (BPO) and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSPACE). The HASP platform will be launched in early September 2015 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico and will reach heights of 36 kilometers with a flight duration of 15 to 20 hours. The instrument, Atmospheric Phenomenon Observer Gamma/VLF Emissions Experiment (APOGEE), measures Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and sferics from lightning strikes with the use of Geiger tubes and a VLF detector. TGFs, which are quick bursts of high energy radiation that can occur alongside lightning, are believed to be the result of Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA). RREA occurs when a large number of relativistic electrons overcome atmospheric frictional forces and accelerate to relativistic velocities which excite secondary electrons that collide with the atmosphere causing bremsstrahlung radiation. Lightning strikes also produce sferics within the Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) bands which can be detected and used to locate the strikes. The goal of APOGEE is to further investigate the link between TGFs and RREA. These phenomena are very difficult to measure together as Bremsstrahlung radiation is easily detected from space but ionospheric reflection facilitates surface detection of sferics. A high altitude balloon provides a unique opportunity to study both phenomena using one instrument because both phenomena can easily be detected from its altitude. APOGEE has been designed and built by undergraduate students at the University of Calgary with faculty assistance and funding, and is equipped with three devices for data collection: a camera to have visual conformation of events, a series of Geiger Tubes to obtain directional gamma readings, and

  20. Fast low-level light pulses from the night sky observed with the SKYFLASH program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckler, J. R.; Franz, R. C.; Nemzek, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents further discussion of and new data on fast subvisual increases in the luminosity of the night sky described in our previous papers. A detailed technical description of the simple telescopic photometers used in the project SKYFLASH and their mode of operation including the detection of polarized Rayleigh-scattered flashes is provided. Distant lightning storms account for many of the events, and the complex relations between short and long luminous pulses with and without sferics are shown by examples from a new computerized data system, supplemented by two low-light-level TV cameras. Of particular interest are the previously observed 'long' events having a slow rise and fall, 20-ms duration, and showing small polarization and no coincident sferic. A group of such events on September 22-23 during the invasion of U.S. coasts by Hurricane Hugo, is discussed in detail. The recently observed 'plume' cloud-top-to-stratosphere lightning event is suggested as a possible source type for these flashes. An alternative source may be exploding meteors, recently identified during SKYFLASH observations by low-light-level television techniques as the origin of some sky-wide flash events described herein.

  1. Unusually high frequency natural VLF radio emissions observed during daytime in Northern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Jyrki; Turunen, Tauno; Kleimenova, Natalia; Rycroft, Michael; Gromova, Liudmila; Sirviö, Iina

    2016-12-01

    Geomagnetic field variations and electromagnetic waves of different frequencies are ever present in the Earth’s environment in which the Earth’s fauna and flora have evolved and live. These waves are a very useful tool for studying and exploring the physics of plasma processes occurring in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Here we present ground-based observations of natural electromagnetic emissions of magnetospheric origin at very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz), which are neither heard nor seen in their spectrograms because they are hidden by strong impulsive signals (sferics) originating in lightning discharges. After filtering out the sferics, peculiar emissions are revealed in these digital recordings, made in Northern Finland, at unusually high frequencies in the VLF band. These recently revealed emissions, which are observed for several hours almost every day in winter, contain short (˜1-3 min) burst-like structures at frequencies above 4-6 kHz, even up to 15 kHz; fine structure on the 1 s time scale is also prevalent. It seems that these whistler mode emissions are generated deep inside the magnetosphere, but the detailed nature, generation region and propagation behaviour of these newly discovered high latitude VLF emissions remain unknown; however, further research on them may shed new light on wave-particle interactions occurring in the Earth’s radiation belts.

  2. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  3. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  4. The triangulation of the gigantic jets observed by the optical observation network in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alfred B.; Huang, Chien-Fong; Peng, Kang-Ming; Su, Han-Tzong; Hsu, Rue-Ron

    2015-04-01

    The optical triangulation of sprites and elves by the multiple sites has been done in the past decades, but the similar observation on gigantic jets has never been reported yet. A ground optical observation network consisting of four stations at Kimen, Penghu, Tainan, and Taitung (from west to east) has been established in Taiwan since 2012. Each station equipped with two sets of Watec low-light sensitivity cameras, and the elevation and azimuth of the observation can be fully remote controlled to point toward the on-going convection system in the vicinity of Taiwan. In summer 2014, more than 6 gigantic jets were captured by at least two stations successfully. The triangulation and ULF sferics of these interesting events provides an excellent chance to explore the spatial and temporal evolution of the jets in different phases. In this presentation, this ground observation network will be introduced, the detail evolution of the recorded gigantic jets is presented. The preliminary result implies that the jets may not pop from the cloudtop straightforwardly, and some twists occur during the propagation of the jets. A more complicated analysis of the tomography for the advanced triangulation will be mentioned, too.

  5. Study the Broadband Very Low Frequency Data Received from Different Places and Observe the Possible Ionospheric Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmal, Sudipta; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Mondal, Sushanta Kumar; Ray, Suman

    2012-07-01

    We present the broad band data received from Stanford AWESOME VLF receiver at different places. We record the data from Kolkata, Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Center (IERC), Sitapur and Maitri Station, Antarctica. The broadband data contains data in the frequency range of 0-50kHz. This is in reality the Fourier transform of the magnetic field variation recorded from the magnetic cross loop antenna. The Antarctica data contains the signature of sferics but the signals do not have a strong signature of whistlers because the lightning effect is minimum at the conjugate points. Antarctica data is also dotted with massive precipitation of charged particles. For other baselines we try to observe the effect of the solar flares if any and try to compare it with quiet days.

  6. The effect of subionospheric propagation on whistlers recorded by the DEMETER satellite – observation and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lefeuvre

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available During a routine analysis of whistlers on the wide-band VLF recording of the DEMETER satellite, a specific signal structure of numerous fractional-hop whistlers, termed the "Spiky Whistler" (SpW was identified. These signals appear to be composed of a conventional whistler combined by the compound mode-patterns of guided wave propagation, suggesting a whistler excited by a lightning "tweek" spheric. Rigorous, full-wave modelling of tweeks, formed by the long subionospheric guided spheric propagation and of the impulse propagation across an arbitrarily inhomogeneous ionosphere, gave an accurate description of the SpW signals. The electromagnetic impulses excited by vertical, preferably CG lightning discharge, exhibited the effects of guided behaviour and of the dispersive ionospheric plasma along their paths. This modelling and interpretation provides a consistent way to determine the generation and propagation characteristics of the recorded SpW signals, as well as to describe the traversed medium.

  7. Observation of a TGF from the convective core of a thundercloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjesteland, Thomas; Østgaard, Nikolai; Christian, Hugh; Collier, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    On 25 October 2012 the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellites passed over a thunderstorm on the coast of Sri Lanka. RHESSI observed a Terrestrial Gamma ray Flash (TGF) originating from this thunderstorm. IR, microwave and radar data for the thundercloud were also measured by TRMM. Optical measurements of the causative lightning stroke were also made by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on TRMM.The World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) detected the VLF radio emissions from the lightning stroke, resulting in a location, which we also assume is the TGF source location in the convective core of the cloud. The core of the cloud rises to 15 km altitude. By comparing the time between the TGF, the WWLLN sferic and the optical stroke, measured by LIS, we find that WWLLN is simultaneous to the TGF while the optical signal occurs shortly afterwards. This is consistent with our previously study of RHESSI TGF and LIS by Østgaard et al [2013].

  8. Lightning and radar observations of hurricane Rita landfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Bradley G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Suszcynsky, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamlin, Timothy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeffery, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Kyle C [TEXAS TECH U.; Orville, R E [TEXAS A& M

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) owns and operates an array of Very-Low Frequency (VLF) sensors that measure the Radio-Frequency (RF) waveforms emitted by Cloud-to-Ground (CG) and InCloud (IC) lightning. This array, the Los Alamos Sferic Array (LASA), has approximately 15 sensors concentrated in the Great Plains and Florida, which detect electric field changes in a bandwidth from 200 Hz to 500 kHz (Smith et al., 2002). Recently, LANL has begun development of a new dual-band RF sensor array that includes the Very-High Frequency (VHF) band as well as the VLF. Whereas VLF lightning emissions can be used to deduce physical parameters such as lightning type and peak current, VHF emissions can be used to perform precise 3d mapping of individual radiation sources, which can number in the thousands for a typical CG flash. These new dual-band sensors will be used to monitor lightning activity in hurricanes in an effort to better predict intensification cycles. Although the new LANL dual-band array is not yet operational, we have begun initial work utilizing both VLF and VHF lightning data to monitor hurricane evolution. In this paper, we present the temporal evolution of Rita's landfall using VLF and VHF lightning data, and also WSR-88D radar. At landfall, Rita's northern eyewall experienced strong updrafts and significant lightning activity that appear to mark a transition between oceanic hurricane dynamics and continental thunderstorm dynamics. In section 2, we give a brief overview of Hurricane Rita, including its development as a hurricane and its lightning history. In the following section, we present WSR-88D data of Rita's landfall, including reflectivity images and temporal variation. In section 4, we present both VHF and VLF lightning data, overplotted on radar reflectivity images. Finally, we discuss our observations, including a comparison to previous studies and a brief conclusion.

  9. The early ELF signals of the gigantic jets captured by the Taiwan ground observation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A. B. C.; Huang, P. H.; Su, H. T.; Hsu, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The in-cloud ignition process of gigantic jets and blue jets receives attentions and discussions in the past years. The polarity and the position of their breakdown were proposed by Krehbiel et al. [2008] but no concrete observational evidence to support it directly. ELF spectrogram is a good tool to explore the electric activities, but traditional spectrograms are generated by a Fourier transform which obtain the frequency information through an integration operation. However the integration greatly limits the lowest frequency revealed by spectrogram and buries the important transient features. In this study, we applied a new but widely-used method, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), to explore the spectrogram. Instead of the integration, HHT obtains the frequency information by differentiating on the phase angle, and become a powerful tool to reveal the fast frequency variation associated with transient luminous events. More than 100 transient luminous events including 25 gigantic jets observed by Taiwan ground optical observation network were analyzed. The results indicate that approximately 70% of gigantic jets can identify a rapid frequency variation in the interval of 300-600 milliseconds before main surge discharge, and this early feature can not find a clear corresponding amplitude variation in its sferic. Since this early signal can not be identified from the traditional Fourier spectrogram, but clear in-cloud lightning was registered correspondingly by the ground optical observation. In contrast to gigantic jets, this feature of early frequency change can be seen only in less than 30% of sprites and elves. These observational evidences are able to provide new constraints on the early discharge process of gigantic jets in clouds.

  10. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  11. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  12. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... a participant and, as such, co-producer of the observed phenomenon. There is no such thing as a neutral or objective description. As observation deals with differences and process meaning, all descriptions are reconstructions and interpretations of the observed. Hence, the idea of neutral descriptions as well...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  13. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... a participant and, as such, co-producer of the observed phenomenon. There is no such thing as a neutral or objective description. As observation deals with differences and process meaning, all descriptions are re-constructions and interpretations of the observed. Hence, the idea of neutral descriptions as well...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  14. The brightest TGF ever observed? - New results from the RHESSI satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Nicole; Smith, David; Dwyer, Joseph; Splitt, Michael; Holzworth, Robert; Buzbee, Paul; Infanger, Alex; Lazarus, Steve

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are sub-millisecond bursts of gamma rays originating from thunderstorms. They were first discovered in 1994 by the BATSE instrument aboard the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory (CGRO). Since their discovery, thousands of TGFs have been detected by other gamma-ray satellites. A new class of super-bright terrestrial gamma-ray flashes has been found in the data from the Reuven-Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). These events are so bright that they cause the RHESSI instrumentation to become paralyzed during the peak of the TGF. While the instrument is paralyzed, all information about the TGF is lost. A new modeling method using the Compton tail of these TGFs is used to find their brightness. These events are modeled by using the relativistic feedback model and then propagating the gamma rays through the atmosphere and then through RHESSI. The TGFs are placed at different altitudes and distances from the spacecraft. Three TGFs were modeled using this method, one of which may be the brightest TGF ever observed. The range of possible luminosities for this event will be shown. For the other two events, a World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) lightning sferic match has been found so the distance from RHESSI is known. Using infrared (IR) data, the cloud top height can be estimated which, in the context of current in-cloud TGF models, places an upper limit on the altitude of the TGF. The brightness for these events, where the distance and altitude is known, will be reported. The benefits and limitations of this novel approach of using the Compton tails of TGFs will be discussed. Notably, the results obtained for the TGF luminosity at the source are nearly independent of the (unknown) original angular distribution of the bremsstrahlung radiation.

  15. Observer's observables. Residual diffeomorphisms

    CERN Document Server

    Duch, Paweł; Świeżewski, Jedrzej

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the fate of diffeomorphisms when the radial gauge is imposed in canonical general relativity. As shown elsewhere, the radial gauge is closely related to the observer's observables. These observables are invariant under a large subgroup of diffeomorphisms which results in their usefulness for canonical general relativity. There are, however, some diffeomorphisms, called residual diffeomorphisms, which might be "observed" by the observer as they do not preserve her observables. The present paper is devoted to the analysis of these diffeomorphisms in the case of the spatial and spacetime radial gauges. Although the residual diffeomorphisms do not form a subgroup of all diffeomorphisms, we show that their induced action in the phase space does form a group. We find the generators of the induced transformations and compute the structure functions of the algebras they form. The obtained algebras are deformations of the algebra of the Euclidean group and the algebra of the Poincar\\'e group in the spat...

  16. Lightning and ionospheric remote sensing using VLF/ELF radio atmospherics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummer, Steven Andrew

    Lightning discharges radiate the bulk of their electromagnetic energy in the Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3- 30 kHz) and Extremely Low Frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) frequency ranges. This energy, contained in impulse-like signals called radio atmospherics or sferics, is guided for long distances by multiple reflections from the ground and lower ionosphere. These two facts suggest that observed sferic waveforms radiated from lightning contain a great deal of information about both the state of the ionosphere along the propagation path and the dynamics of the current in the lightning return stroke. The aim of this dissertation is to develop and implement the necessary techniques to use sferic observations to determine the characteristics of the ionosphere and lightning. In this work, a quantitative model of sferic propagation is developed, and with it the spectral characteristics of VLF (> 1.5 kHz) sferics are shown to depend primarily on the propagation-path-averaged ionospheric D region electron density profile. Using this propagation model, a parameterized ionosphere is iteratively varied to find the theoretical sferic spectrum that agrees best with an observed sferic spectrum composed of the average of many individual sferic spectra. In most nighttime cases, the quality of the agreement allows the height of an exponentially-varying electron density profile to be inferred with a precision of 0.2 km. Since the general sferic waveform depends on the source current-moment waveform as well as the ionospherically- controlled propagation, the former quantity can be measured for individual discharges from observed sferics. Of particular interest are those lightning discharges associated with mesospheric optical emissions known as sprites. By using a robust deconvolution technique, source current-moment waveforms are extracted from individual observed ELF (< 1.5 kHz) sferics. The cases studied in detail show that optical emissions are sometimes produced with a smaller vertical

  17. Observing environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted; Noe, Egon

    2012-01-01

    , and analyse how their conceptions of environment are connected to differences of perspective and observation. Results: We show the need to distinguish between inside and outside perspectives on the environment, and identify two very different and complementary logics of observation, the logic of distinction......, and that it is based fully on the conception of observation as indication by means of distinction....

  18. Observables, Disassembled

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Bryan W

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that non-self-adjoint operators can be observables. There are only four ways for this to occur: non-self-adjoint observables can either be normal operators, or be symmetric, or have a real spectrum, or have none of these three properties. I explore each of these four classes of observables, arguing that the class of normal operators provides an equivalent formulation of quantum theory, whereas the other classes considerably extend it.

  19. Observation Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Heather

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher integrates science observations into the writing center. At the observation station, students explore new items with a science theme and use their notes and questions for class writings every day. Students are exposed to a variety of different topics and motivated to write in different styles all while…

  20. Observing nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book enables anyone with suitable instruments to undertake an examination of nebulae and see or photograph them in detail. Nebulae, ethereal clouds of gas and dust, are among the most beautiful objects to view in the night sky. These star-forming regions are a common target for observers and photographers. Griffiths describes many of the brightest and best nebulae and includes some challenges for the more experienced observer. Readers learn the many interesting astrophysical properties of these clouds, which are an important subject of study in astronomy and astrobiology. Non-mathematical in approach, the text is easily accessible to anyone with an interest in the subject. A special feature is the inclusion of an observational guide to 70 objects personally observed or imaged by the author. The guide also includes photographs of each object for ease of identification along with their celestial coordinates, magnitudes and other pertinent information. Observing Nebulae provides a ready resource to allow an...

  1. Observing Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbel, Ilil

    1991-01-01

    Describes how to observe and study the fascinating world of insects in public parks, backyards, and gardens. Discusses the activities and habits of several common insects. Includes addresses for sources of beneficial insects, seeds, and plants. (nine references) (JJK)

  2. Observational $\\Delta\

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, Antonio García; Monteiro, Mário J P F G; Suárez, Juan Carlos; Reese, Daniel R; Pascual-Granado, Javier; Garrido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Delta Scuti ($\\delta$ Sct) stars are intermediate-mass pulsators, whose intrinsic oscillations have been studied for decades. However, modelling their pulsations remains a real theoretical challenge, thereby even hampering the precise determination of global stellar parameters. In this work, we used space photometry observations of eclipsing binaries with a $\\delta$ Sct component to obtain reliable physical parameters and oscillation frequencies. Using that information, we derived an observational scaling relation between the stellar mean density and a frequency pattern in the oscillation spectrum. This pattern is analogous to the solar-like large separation but in the low order regime. We also show that this relation is independent of the rotation rate. These findings open the possibility of accurately characterizing this type of pulsator and validate the frequency pattern as a new observable for $\\delta$ Sct stars.

  3. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Léna, Pierre; Lebrun, François; Mignard, François; Pelat, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This is the updated, widely revised, restructured and expanded third edition of Léna et al.'s successful work Observational Astrophysics. It presents a synthesis on tools and methods of observational astrophysics of the early 21st century. Written specifically for astrophysicists and graduate students, this textbook focuses on fundamental and sometimes practical limitations on the ultimate performance that an astronomical system may reach, rather than presenting particular systems in detail. In little more than a decade there has been extraordinary progress in imaging and detection technologies, in the fields of adaptive optics, optical interferometry, in the sub-millimetre waveband, observation of neutrinos, discovery of exoplanets, to name but a few examples. The work deals with ground-based and space-based astronomy and their respective fields. And it also presents the ambitious concepts behind space missions aimed for the next decades. Avoiding particulars, it covers the whole of the electromagnetic spec...

  4. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Robert C

    1995-01-01

    Combining a critical account of observational methods (telescopes and instrumentation) with a lucid description of the Universe, including stars, galaxies and cosmology, Smith provides a comprehensive introduction to the whole of modern astrophysics beyond the solar system. The first half describes the techniques used by astronomers to observe the Universe: optical telescopes and instruments are discussed in detail, but observations at all wavelengths are covered, from radio to gamma-rays. After a short interlude describing the appearance of the sky at all wavelengths, the role of positional astronomy is highlighted. In the second half, a clear description is given of the contents of the Universe, including accounts of stellar evolution and cosmological models. Fully illustrated throughout, with exercises given in each chapter, this textbook provides a thorough introduction to astrophysics for all physics undergraduates, and a valuable background for physics graduates turning to research in astronomy.

  5. Deltagende observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, H.

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen er en introduktion til deltagende observation som samfundsvidenskabelig metode. I artiklen introduceres til de teorihistoriske rødder, forskellige tilgange til metoden, den konkrete fremgangsmåde og de dermed forbundne overvejelser. Endvidere eksemplificeres metoden, og der opstilles en...

  6. Deltagende observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, H.

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen er en introduktion til deltagende observation som samfundsvidenskabelig metode. I artiklen introduceres til de teorihistoriske rødder, forskellige tilgange til metoden, den konkrete fremgangsmåde og de dermed forbundne overvejelser. Endvidere eksemplificeres metoden, og der opstilles en...

  7. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benz Arnold O.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  8. Observational asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, Christoffer

    2008-05-01

    This dissertation is submitted to the Faculty of Science at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the PhD degree in Astronomy. The work presented has been performed under the supervision of Dr Hans Kjeldsen and Dr Torben Artentoft. The work was mainly carried out at the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus and at the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt, Berlin (1 April to 1 October, 2005). The dissertation contains two parts where the first is a general review of the current status of observational asteroseismology; the second contains five papers that have been produced during the PhD project. The review in the first part of this dissertation describes the main observational methods and techniques in asteroseismology and discusses recent scientific results from asteroseismology of solar-like stars and low-degree helioseismology of the Sun, including results from seismic studies of e.g. abundances, flares, dynamos, granulation and rotation. The second part of this dissertation includes four published refereed papers on: variable stars in the COROT fields; slowly pulsating B stars in the NGC 371; flare driven global oscillations in the Sun; high-frequency modes in solar-like stars, and one yet unpublished paper on mixed modes in beta Hydri. The four most signigicant results obtained in this PhD project are: the discovery of a strong correlation between the energy at high frequency in the solar acoustic spectrum and flares, which suggest that flares drive global oscillations in the Sun in the same way that the entire Earth is set ringing for several weeks after a major earthquake such as the 2004 December Sumatra-Andaman one; the discovery that the Sun is not the only solar-like star that has oscillations with frequencies higher than the atmospheric acoustic cut-off frequency; the discovery of 29 candidate slowly pulsating B stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud which could, if confirmed

  9. Ionosphere-magnetosphere studies using ground based VLF radio propagation technique: an Indian example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Subhas

    Since IGY period (1957-58), natural and artificially produced Very Low Frequency (VLF) elec-tromagnetic radiations are being recorded at large number of ground stations all over the world and on-board satellites to study various radio wave-thermal/energetic plasma interactive pro-cesses related to earth's ionosphere-plasmasphere-magnetosphere environment. The terrestrial propagation of these VLF radio waves are primarily enabled through the earth ionosphere wave guide (EIWG) mode to long horizontal distances around the globe and ducted along the ge-omagnetic field lines into the conjugate hemisphere through the plasmasphere-magnetosphere regions. The time frequency spectra of the received signals indicate presence of dispersion (wave/group velocities changing with frequency) and various cut-off frequencies based on the width of the EIWG, electron gyro and plasma frequencies etc., providing several types of received signals like whistlers, chorus, tweeks, hiss and hisslers which can be heard on loud-speakers/earphones with distinguishing audio structures. While the VLF technique has been a very effective tool for studying middle and high latitude phenomena, the importance of the similar and anomalous observations over the Indian low latitude stations provide potentially new challenges for their scientific interpretation and modelling. The ducted and non-ducted magnetospheric propagation, pro-longitudinal (PL) mode, low latitude TRIMPI/TLE (Tran-sient Luminous Emissions) or other effects of wave-particle/wave-wave interactions, effects due to ionospheric irregularities and electric fields, full wave solutions to D-region ionisation per-turbations due to solar and stellar energetic X-and γ ray emissions during normal and flaring conditions are a few problems which have been addressed in these low latitude studies over India. Since the conjugate points of Indian stations lie over the Indian oceanic region, the VLF propagation effects would be relatively free from

  10. Observer Use of Standardized Observation Protocols in Consequential Observation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Courtney A.; Yi, Qi; Jones, Nathan D.; Lewis, Jennifer M.; McLeod, Monica; Liu, Shuangshuang

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from a handful of large-scale studies suggests that although observers can be trained to score reliably using observation protocols, there are concerns related to initial training and calibration activities designed to keep observers scoring accurately over time (e.g., Bell, et al, 2012; BMGF, 2012). Studies offer little insight into how…

  11. Observer's Interface for JWST Observation Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Miranda; Douglas, Robert; Moriarty, Christopher; Roman, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    In support of the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, various teams at STScI (the Space Telescope Science Institute) have collaborated on how to re-structure the view of a an observing program within the Astronomer's Proposal Tool (APT) to accommodate for the differences between HST and JWST. For HST APT programs, the structure is visit-dominant, and there is one generic form for entering observing information that spans all instruments with their required fields and options. This can result in sometimes showing irrelevant fields to the user for a given observing goal. Also, the generation of mosaicked observations in HST requires the user to manually calculate the position of each tile within the mosaic, accounting for positional offsets and the roll of the telescope, which is a time consuming process. Now, for JWST programs in APT, the description of the observations has been segregated by instrument and mode into discrete observing templates. Each template's form allows instrument specific choices and displays of relevant information. APT will manually manage the number of visits needed to perform the observation. This is particularly useful for mosaics and dithering with JWST. For example, users will select how they would like a mosaic to be tiled at the observation level, and the visits are automatically created. In this, visits have been re-structured to be purely informational; all editing is done at the observation level. These options and concepts are illustrated to future users via the corresponding poster.

  12. SMM Observations of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnopper, Herbert; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During the past year I have participated in a series of team telecons to I plan our observation of Saturn with SMM. The observation, scheduled for this month (September), was canceled and a new observation is being planned for 2002.

  13. The Observation Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Once the reasons for habitual observation in the classroom have been established, and the intent to observe has been settled, the practical details of observation must be organized. In this article, O'Shaughnessy gives us a model for the implementation of observation. She thoroughly reviews Montessori's work curves and how they can be used to show…

  14. Response of low latitude D-region ionosphere to the Total Solar Eclipse of 22 July 2009, deduced from ELF/VLF analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Singh, R.; Singh, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Response of the D-region of the ionosphere to the total solar eclipse of 22 July 2009 at low latitude, Varanasi (geomagnetic lat = 140 55'N, longitude = 1540 E, dip. angle = 37.30) was investigated using ELF/VLF radio signal. The solar eclipse started at 05:30:04.4 hrs IST and lasted up to 07:27 hrs IST with totally from 6.25 IST to 6.27 IST.The changes in D-region ionospheric VLF reflection heights and electron density during eclipse have been estimated from tweek analysis. The reflection height increased from ~90 km from the first occurrence of tweek to about 93-94 km at the totality and then decreased to ~89 km at the end of the eclipse. The reflection heights are lower by 2-3 km as compared to the usual nighttime tweek reflection heights. The electron density is found to vary between 25-27 cm-3 at the reflection heights. The significant increase in tweek reflection height of about 15 km during the eclipse as compared to the daytime (morning) reflection heights of ~ 78 km is observed. Observations suggest that about 30-40% obscuration of solar disc can lead to the tweeks occurrence which otherwise occur only in the nighttime. A significant increase of 3dB in the strength of the amplitude of VLF signal is observed around the time of TSE as compared to a control day. These low latitude ionospheric perturbations on the eclipse day are discussed and compared with other normal days. During a solar eclipse, the decrease in solar flux due to moon's shadow causes sudden change in the D-region physical and chemical processes. During the totality due to blocking of Lyman-α 1215Å (major D-region ionizing radiation) by moon's umbral shadow, the electron density decreases drastically towards the nighttime values [Smith, 1972]. During the TSE, there was no production of ionization in the ionosphere and the ions and electrons in the lowest part of it recombined at a rapid rate resulting a depletion in the electron density in the 'D' region of the Ionosphere and hence an

  15. Lightning-Generated Whistler Waves Observed by Probes On The Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System Satellite at Low Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzworth, R. H.; McCarthy, M. P.; Pfaff, R. F.; Jacobson, A. R.; Willcockson, W. L.; Rowland, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    Direct evidence is presented for a causal relationship between lightning and strong electric field transients inside equatorial ionospheric density depletions. In fact, these whistler mode plasma waves may be the dominant electric field signal within such depletions. Optical lightning data from the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite and global lightning location information from the World Wide Lightning Location Network are presented as independent verification that these electric field transients are caused by lightning. The electric field instrument on C/NOFS routinely measures lightning ]related electric field wave packets or sferics, associated with simultaneous measurements of optical flashes at all altitudes encountered by the satellite (401.867 km). Lightning ]generated whistler waves have abundant access to the topside ionosphere, even close to the magnetic equator.

  16. Connecting Participant Observation Positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCurdy, Patrick; Uldam, Julie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we argue for the importance of considering participant observation roles in relation to both insider/outsider and overt/covert roles. Through combining key academic debates on participant observation, which have separately considered insider/outsider and overt/covert participant...... observation, we develop a reflexive framework to assist researchers in (1) locating the type of participant observation research; (2) identifying implications of participant observation for both the research and the subjects under study; and (3) reflecting on how one’s role as participant observer shifts over...

  17. OBSCAN Observer Scanning System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Paper logs are the primary data collection tool used by observers of the Northeast Fisheries Observer Program deployed on commercial fishing vessels. After the data...

  18. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  19. Lightship Daily Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations taken on board lightships along the United States coasts from 1936 - 1983. Generally 4-6 observations daily. Also includes deck logs, which give...

  20. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  1. JAPANSE LONGLINE OBSERVER JPLL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data that were collected by trained observers aboard Japanese pelagic longline vessels operating in the US EEZ. Observers collected...

  2. Regional National Cooperative Observer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA publication dedicated to issues, news and recognition of observers in the National Weather Service Cooperative Observer program. Issues published regionally...

  3. Bottomfish Observer Database - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data collected by at sea observers in the Bottomfish Observer Program in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands from October 2003 - April 2006.

  4. Lightship Monthly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Weather Observations (Monthly Form 1001) from lightship stations in the United States. Please see the 'Surface Weather Observations (1001)' library for more...

  5. Clasroom Observation Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Akbayrak, Burcu

    1999-01-01

    In this article observation techniques as a data collecting tool used in social and educational research are examined and discussed. First the concepts and purposes of the observation technique are explained and later systematic and non-systematic observation techniques are described. Two research projects conducted in the classroom are then summarized. These are ‘ORACLE’ (Observational Research and Classroom Learning Evaluation Project), and ‘PRINDEP’ (Primary Needs Independent Evaluation Pr...

  6. Cloning of observables

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraro, Alessandro; Galbiati, Matteo; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the concept of cloning for classes of observables and classify cloning machines for qubit systems according to the number of parameters needed to describe the class under investigation. A no-cloning theorem for observables is derived and the connections between cloning of observables and joint measurements of noncommuting observables are elucidated. Relationships with cloning of states and non-demolition measurements are also analyzed.

  7. Being observed magnifies action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinmetz, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411851675; Xu, Q.; Fishbach, A.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that people, when observed, perceive their actions as more substantial because they add the audience’s perspective to their own perspective. We find that participants who were observed while eating (Study 1) or learned they were observed after eating (Study 2) recalled eating

  8. Observations of School Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Robert M.

    An observational study is described, not yet completed, of learning in school classrooms. Observations were made in a number of classes ranging from grade 1 to grade 12, including teaching in a variety of school subjects. The purpose of the study was to explore and refine a method for observing the events which support (or fail to support)…

  9. Observation of online communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Sladjana V.; Rask, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the application of observation to online settings with a special focus on observer roles. It draws on a study of online observation of a virtual community, i.e. an open source software (OSS) community. The paper examines general and specific advantages and disadvantages...... of the observer roles in online settings by relating these roles to the same roles assumed in offline settings. The study suggests that under the right circumstances online and offline observation may benefit from being combined as they complement each other well. Quality issues and factors important to elicit...

  10. Observation of online communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Sladjana V.; Rask, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the application of observation to online settings with a special focus on observer roles. It draws on a study of online observation of a virtual community, i.e. an open source software (OSS) community. The paper examines general and specific advantages and disadvantages...... of the observer roles in online settings by relating these roles to the same roles assumed in offline settings. The study suggests that under the right circumstances online and offline observation may benefit from being combined as they complement each other well. Quality issues and factors important to elicit...... trustworthy observational data from online study settings, such as OSS communities, are discussed. A proposition is made concerning how threats to credibility and transferability in relation to online observation (i.e. lack of richness and detail, risk of misunderstandings) can be diminished, while...

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Observational Cosmology Observational Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Dale Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Observational Cosmology by Stephen Serjeant fills a niche that was underserved in the textbook market: an up-to-date, thorough cosmology textbook focused on observations, aimed at advanced undergraduates. Not everything about the book is perfect - some subjects get short shrift, in some cases jargon dominates, and there are too few exercises. Still, on the whole, the book is a welcome addition. For decades, the classic textbooks of cosmology have focused on theory. But for every Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect there is a Butcher-Oemler effect; there are as many cosmological phenomena established by observations, and only explained later by theory, as there were predicted by theory and confirmed by observations. In fact, in the last decade, there has been an explosion of new cosmological findings driven by observations. Some are so new that you won't find them mentioned in books just a few years old. So it is not just refreshing to see a book that reflects the new realities of cosmology, it is vital, if students are to truly stay up on a field that has widened in scope considerably. Observational Cosmology is filled with full-color images, and graphs from the latest experiments. How exciting it is that we live in an era where satellites and large experiments have gathered so much data to reveal astounding details about the origin of the universe and its evolution. To have all the latest data gathered together and explained in one book will be a revelation to students. In fact, at times it was to me. I've picked up modern cosmological knowledge through a patchwork of reading papers, going to colloquia, and serving on grant and telescope allocation panels. To go back and see them explained from square one, and summarized succinctly, filled in quite a few gaps in my own knowledge and corrected a few misconceptions I'd acquired along the way. To make room for all these graphs and observational details, a few things had to be left out. For one, there are few derivations

  12. Observing Double Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  13. Engaging the Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M.

    2009-09-01

    In the past, the physical presence and direct interaction of the astronomer with an observatory's staff and telescope equipment encouraged understanding and responsiveness between both staff and observers. But now, observatories often face the problem of expediently exchanging information with observers. New observatory procedures and policies such as automated-, remote- and service-observing, dynamic scheduling, data pipelining, or fully software-arbitrated telescope control provide for more efficient telescope use, but they have reduced the role of the observer to that of a customer rather than a partner in the process of observing. Topics for discussion will include scheduling, data quality, control interfaces, training and preparation for observing, and information distribution technologies, e.g., use of web sites, email, and RSS feeds.

  14. The Observer Strikes Back

    CERN Document Server

    Hartle, James

    2015-01-01

    In the modern quantum mechanics of cosmology observers are physical systems within the universe. They have no preferred role in the formulation of the theory nor in its predictions of third person probabilities of what occurs. However, observers return to importance for the prediction of first person probabilities for what we observe of the universe: What is most probable to be observed is not necessarily what is most probable to occur. This essay reviews the basic framework for the computation of first person probabilities in quantum cosmology starting with an analysis of very simple models. It is shown that anthropic selection is automatic in this framework, because there is no probability for us to observe what is where we cannot exist. First person probabilities generally favor larger universes resulting from inflation where there are more places for us to be. In very large universes it is probable that our observational situation is duplicated elsewhere. The calculation of first person probabilities then...

  15. Observer dependent geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Hohmann, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    From general relativity we have learned the principles of general covariance and local Lorentz invariance, which follow from the fact that we consider observables as tensors on a spacetime manifold whose geometry is modeled by a Lorentzian metric. Approaches to quantum gravity, however, hint towards a breaking of these symmetries and the possible existence of more general, non-tensorial geometric structures. Possible implications of these approaches are non-tensorial transformation laws between different observers and an observer-dependent notion of geometry. In this work we review two different frameworks for observer dependent geometries, which may provide hints towards a quantization of gravity and possible explanations for so far unexplained phenomena: Finsler spacetimes and Cartan geometry on observer space. We discuss their definitions, properties and applications to observers, field theories and gravity.

  16. How observers create reality

    CERN Document Server

    Josephson, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    Wheeler proposed that repeated acts of observation give rise to the reality that we observe, but offered no detailed mechanism for this. Here this creative process is accounted for on the basis of the idea that nature has a deep technological aspect that evolves as a result of selection processes that act upon observers making use of the technologies. This leads to the conclusion that our universe is the product of agencies that use these evolved technologies to suit particular purposes.

  17. Jupiter System Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senske, Dave; Kwok, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed mission for the Jupiter System Observer. The presentation also includes overviews of the mission timeline, science goals, and spacecraftspecifications for the satellite.

  18. Aerosol Observation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The aerosol observation system (AOS) is the primary Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) platform for in situ aerosol measurements at the surface. The principal...

  19. Maximally incompatible quantum observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Schultz, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.schultz@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ziman, Mario, E-mail: ziman@savba.sk [RCQI, Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University, Botanická 68a, 60200 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-01

    The existence of maximally incompatible quantum observables in the sense of a minimal joint measurability region is investigated. Employing the universal quantum cloning device it is argued that only infinite dimensional quantum systems can accommodate maximal incompatibility. It is then shown that two of the most common pairs of complementary observables (position and momentum; number and phase) are maximally incompatible.

  20. The observer's sky atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Karkoschka, E

    2007-01-01

    This title includes a short introduction to observing, a thorough description of the star charts and tables, a glossary and much more. It is perfect for both the beginner and seasoned observer. It is fully revised edition of a best-selling and highly-praised sky atlas.

  1. The Concerned Observer Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiger, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Describes a classroom experiment--the "concerned observer" experiment--for production students that dramatizes basic film language by relating it to several levels of human observation. Details the experiment's three levels, and concludes that film language mimics wide-ranging states of human emotion and ideological persuasion. (PRA)

  2. The Concerned Observer Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiger, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Describes a classroom experiment--the "concerned observer" experiment--for production students that dramatizes basic film language by relating it to several levels of human observation. Details the experiment's three levels, and concludes that film language mimics wide-ranging states of human emotion and ideological persuasion. (PRA)

  3. Observing Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Classroom observation is a crucial aspect of any system of teacher evaluation. No matter how skilled a teacher is in other aspects of teaching--such as careful planning, working well with colleagues, and communicating with parents--if classroom practice is deficient, that individual cannot be considered a good teacher. Classroom observations can…

  4. Becoming a Scientific Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Greg MacDonald leaves no stone unturned as he places the complexity of second-plane observation into one coherent vision that includes the fundamentals of self-construction, the essential field of observation (freedom of work within the prepared environment), the role of the human tendencies, the construction of developmental facets, and the…

  5. Deltagende observation 2. udgave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Krogstrup, Hanne Kathrine

    Denne bog er en teoretisk og praktisk introduktion til deltagende observation, og giver konkrete anvisninger, som er nyttige for såvel erfarne som den uprøvede feltforsker.......Denne bog er en teoretisk og praktisk introduktion til deltagende observation, og giver konkrete anvisninger, som er nyttige for såvel erfarne som den uprøvede feltforsker....

  6. Participation beyond observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    , however, the researchers typically uphold the notion that all they methodically engage in is participant observation. The paper argues that important aspects of children’s living and understanding may be lost when considering them mere objects of one’s visual and verbal research practices. First I delve...... on investigating children’s perspectives through participant observation, but also ontological and political ones....

  7. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-06-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  8. Galileo's Observations of Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, E. M.

    2001-11-01

    In 1979, Stillman Drake and Charles Kowal found that the astronomer Galileo actually observed the planet Neptune in the years 1612 and 1613. Galileo's observing notebooks still exist and are preserved in the National Central Library in Florence, Italy. In them, one can see the discovery of the four large moons of Jupiter, and one can follow the subsequent work of Galileo as he improved his telescopes, charted the nightly positions of the satellites, and refined his ability to predict their future configurations. One sees his observing innovations and improving accuracies which seem to reach a crescendo just at the time of his observations of Neptune. Further scrutiny of Galileo's notebooks has revealed other intriguing observations. One is a probable fourth observation of Neptune which has a direct bearing upon present-day ephemerides. There are also observations of two other objects which, to this day, despite some effort, remain unidentified - possibly asteroids, comets, novae, or supernovae. More than of just historical interest, Galileo's work still has important implications for present-day astronomy. The research described in this talk was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Mars Observer's costly solitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, John

    1993-09-01

    An evaluation is presented of the ramifications of the loss of contact with the Mars Observer spacecraft in August, 1993; the Observer constituted the first NASA mission to Mars in 17 years. It is noted that most, if not all of the scientists involved with the mission will have to find alternative employment within 6 months. The loss of the Observer will leave major questions concerning the geologic history of Mars, and its turbulent atmospheric circulation, unanswered. A detailed account of the discovery of the loss of communications, the unsuccessful steps taken to rectify the problem, and the financial losses incurred through the failure of the mission, are also given.

  10. Water Current Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tidal, river and ocean current observations collected by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. Period of record is late 1800s to mid-1980s.

  11. Oil Rig Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather observations taken at offshore platforms along the United States coastlines. The majority are located in oil-rich areas of the Gulf of Mexico, Gulf of...

  12. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  13. NWS Corrections to Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Form B-14 is the National Weather Service form entitled 'Notice of Corrections to Weather Records.' The forms are used to make corrections to observations on forms...

  14. Mexico - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mexican Surface Daily Observations taken at 94 observatories located throughout Mexico, beginning in 1872 and going up through 1981. The data resided on paper...

  15. IELP Class Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈了了

    2010-01-01

    @@ As an exchange student majoring in English, I am curious about how English is taught to international students here in America. Therefore, I observed an IELP (Intensive English Learning Program) class in Central Connecticut State University where I study.

  16. Monthly Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms is a set of historical manuscript records for the period 1893-1948. The collection includes two very similar form types: Form...

  17. Cooperative Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly logs include a daily account of temperature extremes and precipitation, along with snow data at some locations. U.S. Cooperative Observer Program (COOP)...

  18. Observing across Continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomb, Nick; Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III; Kotoski, James

    Real-time use of remote telescopes can bring the excitement of professional observing into the classroom. By linking with remote telescopes across time zones and continents it is possible to carry out observations during normal school hours. In this paper we report on collaborations between Sydney Observatory which has a 20-cm remote telescope on top of the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney New Mexico Tech which has a 35-cm telescope at its Etscorn Observatory and the Metropolitan Madison School District in Wisconsin which has an observatory with a 35-cm telescope. Four classes of year 7 students at Spring Harbor Environmental Middle School in Madison successfully controlled the Sydney telescope via the Internet over two series of observing session in 2001 and 2002. The presence of a trained observer in the telescope dome in text communication with the students via the NetMeeting program greatly added to the educational value of the sessions. Teachers

  19. Surface Weather Observing Manuals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Manuals and instructions for taking weather observations. Includes the annual Weather Bureau 'Instructions for Preparing Meteorological Forms...' and early airways...

  20. GRB Observational Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bing; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We summarize basic observational properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), including prompt emission properties, afterglow properties, and classification schemes. We also briefly comment on the current physical understanding of these properties.

  1. Longline Observer Data System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LODS, the Hawaii Longline Observer Data System, is a complete suite of tools designed to collect, process, and manage quality fisheries data and information. Guided...

  2. Visually observing comets

    CERN Document Server

    Seargent, David A J

    2017-01-01

    In these days of computers and CCD cameras, visual comet observers can still contribute scientifically useful data with the help of this handy reference for use in the field. Comets are one of the principal areas for productive pro-amateur collaboration in astronomy, but finding comets requires a different approach than the observing of more predictable targets. Principally directed toward amateur astronomers who prefer visual observing or who are interested in discovering a new comet or visually monitoring the behavior of known comets, it includes all the advice needed to thrive as a comet observer. After presenting a brief overview of the nature of comets and how we came to the modern understanding of comets, this book details the various types of observations that can usefully be carried out at the eyepiece of a telescope. Subjects range from how to search for new comets to visually estimating the brightness of comets and the length and orientation of tails, in addition to what to look for in comet heads a...

  3. Solar Prominences: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Parenti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar prominences are one of the most common features of the solar atmosphere. They are found in the corona but they are one hundred times cooler and denser than the coronal material, indicating that they are thermally and pressure isolated from the surrounding environment. Because of these properties they appear at the limb as bright features when observed in the optical or the EUV cool lines. On the disk they appear darker than their background, indicating the presence of a plasma absorption process (in this case they are called filaments. Prominence plasma is embedded in a magnetic environment that lies above magnetic inversion lines, denoted a filament channel. This paper aims at providing the reader with the main elements that characterize these peculiar structures, the prominences and their environment, as deduced from observations. The aim is also to point out and discuss open questions on prominence existence, stability and disappearance. The review starts with a general introduction of these features and the instruments used for their observation. Section 2 presents the large scale properties, including filament morphology, thermodynamical parameters, magnetic fields, and the properties of the surrounding coronal cavity, all in stable conditions. Section 3 is dedicated to small-scale observational properties, from both the morphological and dynamical points of view. Section 4 introduces observational aspects during prominence formation, while Section 5 reviews the sources of instability leading to prominence disappearance or eruption. Conclusions and perspectives are given in Section 6.

  4. ALMA Observations of TNOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Bryan J.; Brown, Michael E.

    2016-10-01

    Some of the most fundamental properties of TNOs are still quite poorly constrained, including diameter and density. Observations at long thermal wavelengths, in the millimeter and submillimeter, hold promise for determining these quantities, at least for the largest of these bodies (and notably for those with companions). Knowing this information can then yield clues as to the formation mechanism of these bodies, allowing us to distinguish between pairwise accretion and other formation scenarios.We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) to observe Orcus, Quaoar, Salacia, and 2002 UX25 at wavelengths of 1.3 and 0.8 mm, in order to constrain the sizes of these bodies. We have also used ALMA to make astrometric observations of the Eris-Dysnomia system, in an attempt to measure the wobble of Eris and hence accurately determine its density. Dysnomia should also be directly detectable in those data, separate from Eris (ALMA has sufficient resolution in the configuration in which the observations were made). Results from these observations will be presented and discussed.

  5. Personalized numerical observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankov, Jovan G.; Pretorius, P. Hendrik

    2010-02-01

    It is widely accepted that medical image quality should be assessed using task-based criteria, such as humanobserver (HO) performance in a lesion-detection (scoring) task. HO studies are time consuming and cost prohibitive to be used for image quality assessment during development of either reconstruction methods or imaging systems. Therefore, a numerical observer (NO), a HO surrogate, is highly desirable. In the past, we have proposed and successfully tested a NO based on a supervised-learning approach (namely a support vector machine) for cardiac gated SPECT image quality assessment. In the supervised-learning approach, the goal is to identify the relationship between measured image features and HO myocardium defect likelihood scores. Thus far we have treated multiple HO readers by simply averaging or pooling their respective scores. Due to observer variability, this may be suboptimal and less accurate. Therefore, in this work, we are setting our goal to predict individual observer scores independently in the hope to better capture some relevant lesion-detection mechanism of the human observers. This is even more important as there are many ways to get equivalent observer performance (measured by area under receiver operating curve), and simply predicting some joint (average or pooled) score alone is not likely to succeed.

  6. Observing workplace incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Tara C; Hershcovis, M Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Interpersonal mistreatment at work often occurs in the presence of others; however, these "others" are rarely examined in empirical research despite their importance to the context of the negative interaction. We conducted 2 experiments to examine how witnessing incivility affects observer reactions toward instigators and targets. In Study 1, participants (N = 60) worked virtually with an ostensible instigator and target. In Study 2, participants (N = 48) worked in vivo with confederates (hired actors) on a job task. Across these 2 studies, we found that observers of incivility tend to punish instigators while their reactions to targets were generally unaffected. Further, the effect of witnessing incivility was mediated by observers' negative emotional reaction toward the instigator. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Negotiated interactive observation:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, Gitte

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I discuss the possibilities and limitations of the ethnographer participating in the different on-going activities and events in highly specialised healthcare systems. The concept of participant observation is based on a number of assumptions, particularly that the ethnographer...... will become one of ‘them’ to be able to follow the steps belonging to the accepted ethnographic research practice of doing fieldwork. The character of fieldwork in highly specialised healthcare systems does not fit well with this assumption. I suggest that we need to rethink the concept of participant...... observation and I propose negotiated interactive observation as a more appropriate way to describe ethnographic fieldwork in a setting such as the hospital or the clinic....

  8. Observation and Quantum Objectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Healey, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The paradox of Wigner's friend challenges the objectivity of description in quantum theory. A pragmatist interpretation can meet this challenge by judicious appeal to decoherence. On this interpretation, quantum theory provides situated agents with resources for predicting and explaining what happens in the physical world---not conscious observations of it. Even in Wigner's friend scenarios, differently situated agents agree on the objective content of statements about the values of physical magnitudes. In more realistic circumstances quantum Darwinism also permits differently situated agents equal observational access to evaluate their truth. In this view, quantum theory has nothing to say about consciousness or conscious experiences of observers. But it does prompt us to reexamine the significance even of everyday claims about the physical world.

  9. Observe Your Shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovšek, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Observe Your Shadow was the title of an observational experiment that was, among others, conducted in the scope of the past year's (2014-2015) first Slovene science competition for elementary school pupils between the ages of 6 and 13. The main reason for establishing a new science competition was popularization of science and its experimental methods, particularly among elementary school students. Elementary school teachers are not generally specialists in science, but rather have (and should have) extremely wide scopes of interests and competencies. By providing them with ideas and instructions for science experiments, we aim to enrich regular school lessons. In the first year alone, the competition took place in over half of Slovene elementary schools, with a total of 9000 participating students. In this paper we shall report about pupils' responses to tasks related to one of the experiments, namely, observation of their shadows on a sunny day.

  10. Observations to information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Observations provide the fundamental constraint on natural science interpretations. Earth science observations originate in many contexts, including in-situ field observations and monitoring, various modes of remote sensing and geophysics, sampling for ex-situ (laboratory) analysis, as well as numerical modelling and simulation which also provide estimates of parameter values. Most investigations require a combination of these, often sourced from multiple initiatives and archives, so data discovery and re-organization can be a significant project burden. The Observations and Measurements (O&M) information model was developed to provide a common vocabulary that can be applied to all these cases, and thus provide a basis for cross-initiative and cross-domain interoperability. O&M was designed in the context of the standards for geographic information from OGC and ISO. It provides a complementary viewpoint to the well-known feature (object oriented) and coverage (property field) views, but prioritizes the property determination process. Nevertheless, use of O&M implies the existence of well defined feature types. In disciplines such as geology and ecosystem sciences the primary complexity is in their model of the world, for which the description of each item requires access to diverse observation sets. On the other hand, geophysics and earth observations work with simpler underlying information items, but in larger quantities over multiple spatio-temporal dimensions, acquired using complex sensor systems. Multiple transformations between the three viewpoints are involved in the data flows in most investigations, from collection through analysis to information and story. The O&M model classifies observations: - from a provider viewpoint: in terms of the sensor or procedure involved; - from a consumer viewpoint: in terms of the property being reported, and the feature with which it is associated. These concerns carry different weights in different applications

  11. Confronting theory with observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström... [], Lars; Bjerrum-Bohr, N. Emil J.; Butt, Sharaz

    2011-01-01

    This workshop exposed theoretical cosmologists to some of the important observations that are being made of our universe. The goal was to encourage theorists to think concretely about the questions being raised by these new discoveries and also to acquire a sense of the realistic constaints on th...... on theoretical ideas and models that will be possible from the coming generation of cosmological observations. The atmosphere was kept lively and informal, with relatively few talks each day, which provided plenty of time for discussion and callaboration among the participants...

  12. Network observability transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Jianhui; Motter, Adilson E

    2012-12-21

    In the modeling, monitoring, and control of complex networks, a fundamental problem concerns the comprehensive determination of the state of the system from limited measurements. Using power grids as example networks, we show that this problem leads to a new type of percolation transition, here termed a network observability transition, which we solve analytically for the configuration model. We also demonstrate a dual role of the network's community structure, which both facilitates optimal measurement placement and renders the networks substantially more sensitive to "observability attacks." Aside from their immediate implications for the development of smart grids, these results provide insights into decentralized biological, social, and technological networks.

  13. Confronting theory with observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström... [], Lars; Bjerrum-Bohr, N. Emil J.; Butt, Sharaz

    2011-01-01

    This workshop exposed theoretical cosmologists to some of the important observations that are being made of our universe. The goal was to encourage theorists to think concretely about the questions being raised by these new discoveries and also to acquire a sense of the realistic constaints on th...... on theoretical ideas and models that will be possible from the coming generation of cosmological observations. The atmosphere was kept lively and informal, with relatively few talks each day, which provided plenty of time for discussion and callaboration among the participants...

  14. MAXI observations of GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Serino, Motoko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Ohno, Masanori; Ogawa, Yuji; Nishimura, Yasunori; Fukushima, Kosuke; Higa, Masaya; Ishikawa, Kazuto; Ishikawa, Masaki; Kawamuro, Taiki; Kimura, Masashi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Morii, Mikio; Nakagawa, Yujin E; Nakahira, Satoshi; Nakajima, Motoki; Nakano, Yuki; Negoro, Hitoshi; Onodera, Takuya; Sasaki, Masayuki; Shidatsu, Megumi; Sugimoto, Juri; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Suwa, Fumitoshi; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Tachibana, Yutaro; Takagi, Toshihiro; Toizumi, Takahiro; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Usui, Ryuichi; Yamada, Hisaki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yoshidome, Koshiro; Yoshii, Taketoshi

    2014-01-01

    Monitor of all-sky image (MAXI) Gas Slit Camera (GSC) detects gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) including the bursts with soft spectra, such as X-ray flashes (XRFs). MAXI/GSC is sensitive to the energy range from 2 to 30 keV. This energy range is lower than other currently operating instruments which is capable of detecting GRBs. Since the beginning of the MAXI operation on August 15, 2009, GSC observed 35 GRBs up to the middle of 2013. One third of them are also observed by other satellites. The rest of them show a trend to have soft spectra and low fluxes. Because of the contribution of those XRFs, the MAXI GRB rate is about three times higher than those expected from the BATSE log N - log P distribution. When we compare it to the observational results of the Wide-field X-ray Monitor on the High Energy Transient Explorer 2, which covers the the same energy range to that of MAXI/GSC, we find a possibility that many of MAXI bursts are XRFs with Epeak lower than 20 keV. We discuss the source of soft GRBs observed only b...

  15. Climate Observations from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    The latest Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Status Report on global climate observations, delivered to the UNFCCC COP21 in November 2016, showed how satellite data are critical for observations relating to climate. Of the 50 Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) identified by GCOS as necessary for understanding climate change, about half are derived only from satellite data while half of the remainder have a significant input from satellites. Hence data from Earth observing satellite systems are now a fundamental requirement for understanding the climate system and for managing the consequences of climate change. Following the Paris Agreement of COP21 this need is only greater. Not only will satellites have to continue to provide data for modelling and predicting climate change but also for a much wider range of actions relating to climate. These include better information on loss and damage, resilience, improved adaptation to change, and on mitigation including information on greenhouse gas emissions. In addition there is an emerging need for indicators of the risks associated with future climate change which need to be better quantified, allowing policy makers both to understand what decisions need to be taken, and to see the consequences of their actions. The presentation will set out some of the ways in which satellite data are important in all aspects of understanding, managing and predicting climate change and how they may be used to support future decisions by those responsible for policy related to managing climate change and its consequences.

  16. SWIFT Observations AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    I will present results from the x-ray and optical follow-up observations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) survey. I will discuss the nature of obscuration in these objects, the relationship to optical properties and the change of properties with luminosity and galaxy type.

  17. Multicolor Observations of Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, L.; Carini, M. T.; Scott, R. L.; Barnaby, D.; Ryle, W. T.; Monroe, T. R.

    2003-05-01

    Blazars are the most extreme members of a class of objects known as Active Galactic Nuclei. The defining characteristics of Blazars are large amplitude continuum variability at all wavelengths, a featureless optical continuum, and large amplitude, highly variable polarization. Variations on the timescale of hours are known as microvariability, and represent the fastest variations observed in these sources and thus (via light travel time arguments) provide the tightest constraints on the size of the emission region. Using the 42 inch Hall telescope at Lowell Observatory and the 0.6 meter telescope at Bell Observatory at Western Kentucky University, we obtained observations of the objects PKS 0716+714 and BL Lacertae in B and I filters and the objects OJ 287 and 3C 66A in V and I filters. These observations allow us to 1) set limits to the size of the emission regions responsible for any observed microvariability and 2) determine what, if any, amplitude difference exists between the variations at widely separated optical bands and to determine if lags exist in the variations at different optical bands. Funding for this research was provided by the NASA/Kentucky Space Grant Consortium, NASA/Kentucky EPSCoR Program and the Applied Research and Technology Program at WKU.

  18. Observation of semileptonic decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Cronström, H. I.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reidenbach, M.; Reiner, R.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hölscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Seidel, S. C.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reβing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Kostina, G.; Lubimov, V.; Murat, P.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Shibaev, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1993-04-01

    Observation of the semileptonic decay of the charmed baryon ? in the decay channel ? has been made using the ARGUS detector at the e+e- storage ring DORIS II at DESY. The cross section times branching ratio was found to be ?.

  19. Methods Evolved by Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Montessori's idea of the child's nature and the teacher's perceptiveness begins with amazing simplicity, and when she speaks of "methods evolved," she is unveiling a methodological system for observation. She begins with the early childhood explosion into writing, which is a familiar child phenomenon that Montessori has written about…

  20. Observations of artificial satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. MAMMANO

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available The following publication gives the results of photographic
    observations of artificial satellites made at Asiago during the second
    and third year of this programme. The fixed camera technique and that
    with moving film (the latter still in its experimental stage have been used.

  1. Observation of WZ Production

    CERN Document Server

    Abulencia, A; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Bölla, G; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca-Almenar, C; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Da Ronco, S; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; De Pedis, D; Deisher, A; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Di Turo, P; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dorr, C; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; García, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes Da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Höcker, A; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lee, Y J; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P F; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; MacQueen, D; Mack, P; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McCarthy, K; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtälä, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mukherjee, A; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mäki, T; Müller, T; Mülmenstädt, J; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Saint-Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Sjölin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Sánchez, C; Söderberg, M; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; Van Remortel, N; Vanguri, R; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobuev, I P; Volpi, G; Vázquez, F; Wagner, J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S; Österberg, K

    2007-01-01

    We report the first observation of the associated production of a W boson and a Z boson. This result is based on 1.1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from ppbar collisions at sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 16 WZ candidates passing our event selection with an expected background of 2.7 +/- 0.4 events. A fit to the missing transverse energy distribution indicates an excess of events compared to the background expectation corresponding to a significance equivalent to six standard deviations. The measured cross section is sigma(ppbar -> WZ) = 5.0^{+1.8}_{-1.6} pb, consistent with the standard model expectation.

  2. Observation of WZ production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenaro, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdeckerc, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McCarthy, K; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojma, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; Vanguri, R; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-04-20

    We report the first observation of the associated production of a W boson and a Z boson. This result is based on 1.1 fb;-1 of integrated luminosity from pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 16 WZ candidates passing our event selection with an expected background of 2.7+/-0.4 events. A fit to the missing transverse energy distribution indicates an excess of events compared to the background expectation corresponding to a significance equivalent to 6 standard deviations. The measured cross section is sigma(pp-->WZ)=5.0(-1.6)(+1.8) pb, consistent with the standard model expectation.

  3. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  4. Awareness as observational heterarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei eSonoda

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Libet et al. (1983 revealed that brain activity precedes conscious intention. For convenience in this study, we divide brain activity into two parts: a conscious field (CF and an unconscious field (UF. Most studies have assumed a comparator mechanism or an illusion of CF and discuss the difference of prediction and postdiction. We propose that problems to be discussed here are a twisted sense of agency between CF and UF, and another definitions of prediction and postdiction in a mediation process for the twist. This study specifically examines the definitions throughout an observational heterarchy model based on internal measurement. The nature of agency must be emergence that involves observational heterarchy. Consequently, awareness involves processes having duality in the sense that it is always open to the world (postdiction and that it also maintains self robustly (prediction.

  5. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    CERN Document Server

    Gulminelli, F

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurationa...

  6. Observing workplace incivility

    OpenAIRE

    Tara C. Reich; M. Sandy Hershcovis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Interpersonal mistreatment at work often occurs in the presence of others; however, these “others” are rarely examined in empirical research despite their importance to the context of the negative interaction. We conducted 2 experiments to examine how witnessing incivility affects observer reactions toward instigators and targets. In Study 1, participants (N = 60) worked virtually with an ostensible instigator and target. In Study 2, participants (N = 48) worked in vivo with confeder...

  7. Southern hemisphere observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    Because of insurmountable problems associated with absolute dating, the non-literate cultures of the Southern Hemisphere can contribute little to Applied Historical Astronomy, although Maori traditions document a possible supernova dating to the period 1000-1770 AD. In contrast, the abundant nineteenth century solar, planetary, cometary and stellar observational data provided by Southern Hemisphere professional and amateur observatories can serve as an invaluable mine of information for present-day astronomers seeking to incorporate historical data in their investigations.

  8. Heisenberg's observability principle

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, JE

    2014-01-01

    Werner Heisenberg's 1925 paper ‘Quantum-theoretical re-interpretation of kinematic and mechanical relations’ marks the beginning of quantum mechanics. Heisenberg famously claims that the paper is based on the idea that the new quantum mechanics should be ‘founded exclusively upon relationships between quantities which in principle are observable’. My paper is an attempt to understand this observability principle, and to see whether its employment is philosophically defensible. Against interpr...

  9. Special Observance Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    guide are not inclusive in nature and can be modified as necessary to support the needs of project officers and established committees. It is suggested... inclusive . Based on specific needs and desires, organizations may recognize other observances and are not required to limit their special...states, mayors of cities, and heads of other instrumentalities of government, as well as leaders of industry, educational and religious groups, labor

  10. Individual Colorimetric Observer Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Asano

    Full Text Available This study proposes a vision model for individual colorimetric observers. The proposed model can be beneficial in many color-critical applications such as color grading and soft proofing to assess ranges of color matches instead of a single average match. We extended the CIE 2006 physiological observer by adding eight additional physiological parameters to model individual color-normal observers. These eight parameters control lens pigment density, macular pigment density, optical densities of L-, M-, and S-cone photopigments, and λmax shifts of L-, M-, and S-cone photopigments. By identifying the variability of each physiological parameter, the model can simulate color matching functions among color-normal populations using Monte Carlo simulation. The variabilities of the eight parameters were identified through two steps. In the first step, extensive reviews of past studies were performed for each of the eight physiological parameters. In the second step, the obtained variabilities were scaled to fit a color matching dataset. The model was validated using three different datasets: traditional color matching, applied color matching, and Rayleigh matches.

  11. NICER observation of magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Arzoumanian, Zaven

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is a NASA Explorer Misson of Opportunity as an attached payload aboard the International Space Station (ISS), launch in August 2016. The NICER is planned to study the interior composition and structure within neutron stars via high precise measurement of their stellar mass and radius, also to investigate dynamic and energetic behaviors of their activities. This mission will enable pulsar rotation-resolved spectroscopy in the 0.2--12 keV energy band with large collection area (about twice of the XMM-Newton observatory for soft X-ray timing), precise time-tagging resolution (~200 nsec, 25 times better than RXTE), and high sensitivity (about 2e-14 erg/s/cm2 in the 0.5--10 keV, 5-sigma for 10 ksec exposure). As one of prime goals of the mission, we will describe the science planning of the NICER magnetar observations. The NICER is expected to provide monitoring of fainter magnetar sources which cannot be performed by Swift due to its little collective area. Deep observations of quiescent magnetars and high-B radio pulsars can be also performed with the NICER to study their spectral similarity as a key to investigate the connection between these two sub-classes. Finally, ToO programs are suitable to follow-up the magnate outburst relaxation down to much fainter flux level. We will introduce the NICER strategy of the magnetar observation.

  12. R Aqr observing campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2016-01-01

    Dr. George Wallerstein (University of Washington) has requested AAVSO coverage of the long period/symbiotic variable R Aquarii beginning immediately in support of high resolution spectroscopic observations planned for 2016 January 19 and 21. Several other astronomers, including Drs. Lee Anne Willson (Iowa State University), Ulisse Munari (INAF, Astronomical Observatory of Padua, Italy), and Fred Walter (Stony Brook University) are studying R Aqr closely and additional spectroscopic and other observations are planned for the near future. R Aqr is both a Mira (M) and a symbiotic (ZAND) - it is a close binary system consisting of a hot star and a late-type star (the Mira), both enveloped in nebulosity. As a result, the very interesting light curve shows not only the Mira pulsation but also complex eclipse behavior as the two stars interact. The period of Mira variation is 387.0 days; the eclipse period is 43.6-44 years. The cause of the eclipse is unknown; several theories h! ave been proposed, including a focused accretion stream, a disk or cloud around the secondary, and a triggered mass loss that produces an opaque cloud. Careful investigation of this upcoming event should help to resolve this question. The last eclipse of R Aqr was in 1978. The next eclipse is predicted for 2022, but may be early. The current behavior of R Aqr suggests that the eclipse, which lasts for several years, may either be beginning or its beginning may be imminent. R Aqr was at minimum in early December 2015 at magnitude V=11.4, and is currently at visual magnitude 11.0. During this phase of the approximately 44-year eclipse cycle, at maximum it may be as bright as V 6.0-6.5 but is not expected to become brighter. Beginning immediately, nightly BVRI CCD and DSLR photometry and visual observations are requested. As R Aqr brightens towards maximum and is in range, PEP observations are also requested. Ongoing spectroscopy over the next several years will be interesting to see as the system

  13. Observing with CHEOPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, Kate

    2017-04-01

    CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite) is the first exoplanet mission dedicated to the search for transits of exoplanets by means of ultrahigh precision photometry of bright stars already known to host planets, with launch readiness foreseen by the end of 2018. It is also the first S-class mission in ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025. The mission is a partnership between Switzerland and ESA's science programme, with important contributions from 10 other member states. It will provide the unique capability of determining accurate radii for a subset of those planets in the super- Earth to Neptune mass range, for which the mass has already been estimated from ground- based spectroscopic surveys. It will also provide precision radii for new planets discovered by the next generation of ground-based transits surveys (Neptune-size and smaller). The high photometric precision of CHEOPS will be achieved using a photometer covering the 0.35 - 1.1um waveband, designed around a single frame-transfer CCD which is mounted in the focal plane of a 30 cm equivalent aperture diameter, f/5 on-axis Ritchey-Chretien telescope. 20% of the observing time in the 3.5 year nominal mission will be available to Guest Observers from the Community. Proposals will be requested through open calls from ESA that are foreseen to be every year, with the first 6 months before launch. In this poster I will provide an overview of how to obtain data from CHEOPS, with a particular focus on the CHEOPS Guest Observers Programme.

  14. Radar Observations of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostro, S. J.

    2003-05-01

    During the past 25 years, radar investigations have provided otherwise unavailable information about the physical and dynamical properties of more than 200 asteroids. Measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency provide two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as a decameter. Sequences of delay-Doppler images can be used to produce geologically detailed three-dimensional models, to define the rotation state precisely, to constrain the internal density distribution, and to estimate the trajectory of the object's center of mass. Radar wavelengths (4 to 13 cm) and the observer's control of transmitted and received polarizations make the observations sensitive to near-surface bulk density and macroscopic structure. Since delay-Doppler positional measurements are orthogonal to optical angle measurements and typically have much finer fractional precision, they are powerful for refining orbits and prediction ephemerides. Radar astrometry can add decades or centuries to the interval over which an asteroid's close Earth approaches can accurately be predicted and can significantly refine collision probability estimates based on optical astrometry alone. In the highly unlikely case that a small body is on course for an Earth collision in this century, radar reconnaissance would almost immediately distinguish between an impact trajectory and a near miss and would dramatically reduce the difficulty and cost of any effort to prevent the collision. The sizes and rotation periods of radar-detected asteroids span more than four orders of magnitude. These observations have revealed both stony and metallic objects, elongated and nonconvex shapes as well as nearly featureless spheroids, small-scale morphology ranging from smoother than the lunar regolith to rougher than the rockiest terrain on Mars, craters and diverse linear structures, non-principal-axis spin states, contact binaries, and binary systems.

  15. Distributed Observer Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Michael; Mazzone, Rebecca; Little, William; Elfrey, Priscilla; Mann, David; Mabie, Kevin; Cuddy, Thomas; Loundermon, Mario; Spiker, Stephen; McArthur, Frank; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Distributed Observer network (DON) is a NASA-collaborative environment that leverages game technology to bring three-dimensional simulations to conventional desktop and laptop computers in order to allow teams of engineers working on design and operations, either individually or in groups, to view and collaborate on 3D representations of data generated by authoritative tools such as Delmia Envision, Pro/Engineer, or Maya. The DON takes models and telemetry from these sources and, using commercial game engine technology, displays the simulation results in a 3D visual environment. DON has been designed to enhance accessibility and user ability to observe and analyze visual simulations in real time. A variety of NASA mission segment simulations [Synergistic Engineering Environment (SEE) data, NASA Enterprise Visualization Analysis (NEVA) ground processing simulations, the DSS simulation for lunar operations, and the Johnson Space Center (JSC) TRICK tool for guidance, navigation, and control analysis] were experimented with. Desired functionalities, [i.e. Tivo-like functions, the capability to communicate textually or via Voice-over-Internet Protocol (VoIP) among team members, and the ability to write and save notes to be accessed later] were targeted. The resulting DON application was slated for early 2008 release to support simulation use for the Constellation Program and its teams. Those using the DON connect through a client that runs on their PC or Mac. This enables them to observe and analyze the simulation data as their schedule allows, and to review it as frequently as desired. DON team members can move freely within the virtual world. Preset camera points can be established, enabling team members to jump to specific views. This improves opportunities for shared analysis of options, design reviews, tests, operations, training, and evaluations, and improves prospects for verification of requirements, issues, and approaches among dispersed teams.

  16. Observing braneworld black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, R; Beckwith, K; Done, C; Gregory, Ruth; Whisker, Richard; Beckwith, Kris; Done, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Spacetime in the vicinity of an event horizon can be probed using observations which explore the dynamics of the accretion disc. Many high energy theories of gravity lead to modifications of the near horizon regime, potentially providing a testing ground for these theories. In this paper, we explore the impact of braneworld gravity on this region by formulating a method of deriving the general behaviour of the as yet unknown braneworld black hole solution. We use simple bounds to constrain the solution close to the horizon.

  17. Observing GRBs with TMT

    CERN Document Server

    Crampton, David; 10.1393/ncb/i2007-10274-1

    2008-01-01

    The Thirty-Meter Telescope is an ambitious project to build a giant segmented mirror telescope with fully integrated adaptive optics systems that will produce diffraction-limited images. A powerful suite of instruments is being developed that, coupled with the ability to rapidly switch between targets and instruments, will allow TMT to take advantage of GRBs to probe fundamental physics in extreme conditions and as the ultimate tomographic beacons, especially if some are as far as z ~ 10. This article gives a brief summary of TMT and its instruments, and some examples of the potential offered by observation of GRBs.

  18. Cosmology Theory and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, A D

    1998-01-01

    The comparison of the Standard Cosmological Model (SCM) with astronomical observations, i.e. theory versus experiment, and with the Minimal Standard Model (MSM) in particle physics, i.e. theory versus theory, is discussed. The main issue of this talk is whether cosmology indicates new physics beyond the standard $SU(3)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)$ model with minimal particle content. The answer to this question is strongly and definitely "YES". New, yet unknown, physics exists and cosmology presents very weighty arguments in its favor.

  19. Observing farming systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Egon; Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted

    2012-01-01

    In Denmark, agriculture is becoming increasingly specialised, and more and more actors are becoming involved in farm decision making. These trends are more or less pronounced in other European countries as well. We therefore find that to understand modern farming systems, we have to shift the focus...... of analysis from individual farmers to communication and social relations. This is where Luhmann’s social systems theory can offer new insights. Firstly, it can help observe and understand the operational closure and system logic of a farming system and how this closure is produced and reproduced. Secondly...

  20. Geomagnetic Observations and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Mandea, Mioara

    2011-01-01

    This volume provides comprehensive and authoritative coverage of all the main areas linked to geomagnetic field observation, from instrumentation to methodology, on ground or near-Earth. Efforts are also focused on a 21st century e-Science approach to open access to all geomagnetic data, but also to the data preservation, data discovery, data rescue, and capacity building. Finally, modeling magnetic fields with different internal origins, with their variation in space and time, is an attempt to draw together into one place the traditional work in producing models as IGRF or describing the magn

  1. Observing Disoriented Chiral Condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Bjorken, James D; Taylor, C C

    1993-01-01

    We speculate that, in very high energy hadronic collisions, large fireballs may be produced with interiors which have anomalous chiral order parameters. Such a process would result in radiation of pions with distinctive momentum and isospin distributions, and may provide an explanation of Centauro and related phenomena in cosmic-ray events. The phenomenology of such events is reviewed, with emphasis on the possibility of observing such phenomena at Fermilab experiment T-864 (MiniMax), or at a Full Acceptance Detector (FAD) at the SSC.

  2. Observation, innovation and triangulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetmar, Vibeke

    2007-01-01

    In the article the focus is on classroom research which aims at offering some evidence-based description of the interplay between the logic of practice in school and schooling on the one hand and the teachers' efforts to realize notions of innovation and change on the other hand. Based...... on experiences from a pilot project in three different classrooms methodological possibilities and problems are presented and discussed: 1) educational criticism, including the concepts of positions, perspectives and connoisseurship, 2) classroom observations and 3) triangulation as a methodological tool....

  3. Global Observations from PHOBOS

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, M D

    2003-01-01

    Particle production in Au+Au collisions has been measured in the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC for a range of collision energies. Three empirical observations have emerged from this dataset which require theoretical examination. First, there is clear evidence of limiting fragmentation. Namely, particle production in central Au+Au collisions, when expressed as $dN/d\\eta'$ ($\\eta' \\equiv \\eta-y_{beam}$), becomes energy independent at high energy for a broad region of $\\eta'$ around $\\eta'=0$. This energy-independent region grows with energy, allowing only a limited region (if any) of longitudinal boost-invariance. Second, there is a striking similarity between particle production in e+e- and Au+Au collisions (scaled by the number of participating nucleon pairs). Both the total number of produced particles and the longitudinal distribution of produced particles are approximately the same in e+e- and in scaled Au+Au. This observation was not predicted and has not been explained. Finally, particle production has been ...

  4. Observations of glitches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Cristobal

    2016-07-01

    Glitches are sudden spin ups observed in the otherwise smooth rotation of pulsars. These rare and rather small events are thought to be caused by an erratic relationship between a loosely coupled internal superfluid and the crust of the neutron star. They are known to be one of the very few phenomena which allow us to study the interior of pulsars. The largest events are followed by a period of relaxation, lasting from month to years, in which the rotation evolves back to the pre-glitch state. These recoveries might represent the response of internal superfluid components to the sudden change in rotation at the glitch. Therefore, the study and comprehension of glitches and their recoveries provide ways to refine our understanding of superfluid physics in the extreme and unique conditions present inside neutron stars. In this talk I will summarise the current observational status of glitch research. This will include not only the detection of new glitches but also the analysis of our detection capabilities and the design of monitoring campaigns that could deliver a wider range of detections. I will also present ongoing research on the glitch size distribution of particular sources and some recent results regarding the long-term effects that glitch recoveries pose on pulsar spin evolution.

  5. Copernicus Earth observation programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žlebir, Silvo

    European Earth observation program Copernicus is an EU-wide programme that integrates satellite data, in-situ data and modeling to provide user-focused information services to support policymakers, researchers, businesses and citizens. Land monitoring service and Emergency service are fully operational already, Atmosphere monitoring service and Marine environment monitoring service are preoperational and will become fully operational in the following year, while Climate change service and Security service are in an earlier development phase. New series of a number of dedicated satellite missions will be launched in the following years, operated by the European Space Agency and EUMETSAT, starting with Sentinel 1A satellite early this year. Ground based, air-borne and sea-borne in-situ data are provided by different international networks and organizations, EU member states networks etc. European Union is devoting a particular attention to secure a sustainable long-term operational provision of the services. Copernicus is also stated as a European Union’s most important contribution to Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The status and the recent development of the Copernicus programme will be presented, together with its future perspective. As Copernicus services have already demonstrated their usability and effectiveness, some interesting cases of their deployment will be presented. Copernicus free and open data policy, supported by a recently adopted EU legislative act, will also be presented.

  6. Observations of Distant Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Megan

    2004-01-01

    The is the proceedings and papers supported by the LTSA grant: Homer, D. J.\\& Donahue, M. 2003, in "The Emergence of Cosmic Structure": 13'h Astrophysics Conference Proceedings, Vol. 666,3 1 1-3 14, (AIP). Baumgartner, W. H., Loewenstein, M., Horner, D. J., Mushotzky, R. F. 2003, HEAD- AAS, 35.3503. Homer, D. J. , Donahue, M., Voit G. M. 2003, HEAD-AAS, 35.1309. Nowak, M. A., Smith, B., Donahue, M., Stocke, J. 2003, HEAD-AAS, 35.1316. Scott, D., Borys, C., Chapman, S. C., Donahue, M., Fahlman, G. G., Halpem, M. Newbury, P. 2002, AAS, 128.01. Jones, L. R. et al. 2002, A new era in cosmology, ASP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 283, p. 223 Donahue, M., Daly, R. A., Homer, D. J. 2003, ApJ, 584, 643, Constraints on the Cluster Environments and Hotspot magnetic field strengths for radio sources 3280 and 3254. Donahue, M., et al. 2003, ApJ, 598, 190. The mass, baryonic fraction, and x-ray temperature of the luminous, high-redshift cluster of galaxies MS045 1.6-0305 Perlman, E. S. et al. 2002, ApJS, 140, 256. Smith, B. J., Nowak, M., Donahue, M., Stocke, J. 2003, AJ, 126, 1763. Chandra Observations of the Interacting NGC44 10 Group of Galaxies. Postman, M., Lauer, T. R., Oegerle, W., Donahue, M. 2002, ApJ, 579, 93. The KPNO/deep-range cluster survey I. The catalog and space density of intermediate-redshift clusters. Molnar, S. M., Hughes, J. P., Donahue, M., Joy, M. 2002, ApJ, 573, L91, Chandra Observations of Unresolved X-Ray Sources around Two Clusters of Galaxies. Donahue, M., Mack, J., 2002 NewAR, 46, 155, HST NIcmos and WFPC2 observations of molecular hydrogen and dust around cooling flows. Koekemoer, A. M. et al. 2002 NewAR, 46, 149, Interactions between the A2597 central radio source and dense gas host galaxy. Donahue, M. et al. 2002 ApJ, 569,689, Distant cluster hunting II.

  7. Coronal Mass Ejections: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Webb

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar eruptive phenomena embrace a variety of eruptions, including flares, solar energetic particles, and radio bursts. Since the vast majority of these are associated with the eruption, development, and evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, we focus on CME observations in this review. CMEs are a key aspect of coronal and interplanetary dynamics. They inject large quantities of mass and magnetic flux into the heliosphere, causing major transient disturbances. CMEs can drive interplanetary shocks, a key source of solar energetic particles and are known to be the major contributor to severe space weather at the Earth. Studies over the past decade using the data sets from (among others the SOHO, TRACE, Wind, ACE, STEREO, and SDO spacecraft, along with ground-based instruments, have improved our knowledge of the origins and development of CMEs at the Sun and how they contribute to space weather at Earth. SOHO, launched in 1995, has provided us with almost continuous coverage of the solar corona over more than a complete solar cycle, and the heliospheric imagers SMEI (2003 – 2011 and the HIs (operating since early 2007 have provided us with the capability to image and track CMEs continually across the inner heliosphere. We review some key coronal properties of CMEs, their source regions and their propagation through the solar wind. The LASCO coronagraphs routinely observe CMEs launched along the Sun-Earth line as halo-like brightenings. STEREO also permits observing Earth-directed CMEs from three different viewpoints of increasing azimuthal separation, thereby enabling the estimation of their three-dimensional properties. These are important not only for space weather prediction purposes, but also for understanding the development and internal structure of CMEs since we view their source regions on the solar disk and can measure their in-situ characteristics along their axes. Included in our discussion of the recent developments in CME

  8. Observing the Inflationary Reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jerome; Vennin, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating proper...

  9. VERITAS Galactic Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Gareth

    2013-06-15

    We report on recent Galactic results and discoveries made by the VERITAS collaboration. The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is a ground-based gamma-ray observatory, located in southern Arizona, able to detect gamma rays of energies from 100 GeV up to 30 TeV. VERITAS has been fully operational since 2007 and its current sensitivity enables the detection of a 1% Crab Nebula flux at 5 sigma in under 30 hours. The observatory is well placed to view large parts of the galactic plane including its center, resulting in a strong galactic program. Objects routinely observed include Pulsars, Pulsar Wind Nebula, X-ray binaries and sources with unidentified counterparts in other wavelengths.

  10. Spatial Standard Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to devices and methods for the measurement and/or for the specification of the perceptual intensity of a visual image, or the perceptual distance between a pair of images. Grayscale test and reference images are processed to produce test and reference luminance images. A luminance filter function is convolved with the reference luminance image to produce a local mean luminance reference image. Test and reference contrast images are produced from the local mean luminance reference image and the test and reference luminance images respectively, followed by application of a contrast sensitivity filter. The resulting images are combined according to mathematical prescriptions to produce a Just Noticeable Difference, JND value, indicative of a Spatial Standard Observer, SSO. Some embodiments include masking functions, window functions, special treatment for images lying on or near borders and pre-processing of test images.

  11. Semantic Observation Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Kuhn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the integration of sensor-based information into analysis and decision making has been a research topic for many years, semantic interoperability has not yet been reached. The advent of user-generated content for the geospatial domain, Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI, makes it even more difficult to establish semantic integration. This paper proposes a novel approach to integrating conventional sensor information and VGI, which is exploited in the context of detecting forest fires. In contrast to common logic-based semantic descriptions, we present a formal system using algebraic specifications to unambiguously describe the processing steps from natural phenomena to value-added information. A generic ontology of observations is extended and profiled for forest fire detection in order to illustrate how the sensing process, and transformations between heterogeneous sensing systems, can be represented as mathematical functions and grouped into abstract data types. We discuss the required ontological commitments and a possible generalization.

  12. Observation of Bs mixing

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    A peculiar and most important property of Bs mesons is that they transform spontaneously into their own antiparticles, and back again. These transitions, known as flavor oscillations or mixing, are extremely rapid, rendering their measurement a very challenging experimental task. The determination of the Bs oscillation frequency is, at the same time, of great interest for constraining elements of the Standard Model CKM matrix and its unitarity. Large samples of Bs mesons collected by the CDF and D0 experiments operating at the Fermilab Tevatron have recently yielded unprecedented results, which are here reported. Emphasis is given to details of the analysis developed at CDF, presenting the observation of Bs mixing, the precise measurement of the oscillation frequency, and a discussion of its impact on the description of the flavor sector.

  13. Infrared observations of comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanner, Martha S.

    1991-01-01

    Selected comets are observed in the near infrared (1 to 2.2 micron) and thermal infrared (3.5 to 20 micron) with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and other telescopes as appropriate, in order to characterize the physical properties of the dust grains; their composition, size distribution, emissivity, and albedo. Systematic variations in these properties among comets are looked for, in order to understand the heterogeneity of comet nuclei. Spectrophotometry of the 10 micron silicate emission feature is particularly emphasized. The rate of dust production from the nucleus and its temporal variability are also determined. Knowledge of the dust environment is essential to S/C design and mission planning for NASA's CRAF mission.

  14. Observing alternatives to inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Peter, P

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the possibility that the inflationary paradigm, undoubtfully today's best framework to understand all the present cosmological data, may still have some viable challengers. The underlying idea for such discussions is that although inflation already passed quite a large number of tests, indeed enough to make it part of the so-called ``standard model'' of cosmology, it has always been through indirect measurements: there is not a chance that we may ever directly check its validity, and therefore, in order to assert its factuality with increasing level of confidence, it is required that we compare its predictions not only to observations, but also to as many contenders as possible. Among other categories of possible models, we wish to put the emphasis in particular on bouncing cosmologies that, however not as complete as the inflation paradigm might be, could still represent a reasonnable way of explaining the current data. Hopefully, future data will be able to discriminate between these various sets...

  15. Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Chiu, John; Finger, Mark H.; Koh, Danny T.; Nelson, Robert W.; Prince, Thomas A.; Rubin, Bradley C.; Scott, D. Matthew; Stollberg, Mark; Vaughan, Brian A.; Wilson, Colleen A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    We summarize 5 years of continuous monitoring of accretion-powered pulsars with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Our 20-70 keV observations have determined or refined the orbital parameters of 13 binaries, discovered five new transient accreting pulsars, measured the pulsed flux history during outbursts of 12 transients (GRO J1744-28, 4U 0115+634, GRO J1750-27, GS 0834-430, 2S 1417-624, GRO J1948+32, EXO 2030+375, GRO J1008-57, A0535+26, GRO J2058+42, 4U 1145-619, and A1118-616), and also measured the accretion torque history during outbursts of six of those transients whose orbital param- eters were also known. We have also continuously measured the pulsed flux and spin frequency for eiaht persistently accreting pulsars (Her X-1, Cen X-3, Vela X-1, OAO 1657-415, GX 301-2, 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, and GX 1+4). Because of their continuity and uniformity over a long baseline, BATSE observations have provided new insights into the long-term behavior of accreting magnetic neutron stars. We have found that all accreting pulsars show stochastic variations in their spin frequencies and luminosities, including those displaying secular spin-up or spin-down on long timescales, which blurs the con- ventional distinction between disk-fed and wind-fed binaries. Pulsed flux and accretion torque are strongly correlated in outbursts of transient accreting pulsars but are uncorrelated, or even anti- correlated, in persistent sources. We describe daily folded pulse profiles, frequency, and flux measurements that are available through the Compton Observatory Science Support Center at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.

  16. [Pierre Janet observes history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Homberger, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Janet, philosopher and physician, Freud's junior by three years, not only described traumatic dissociation and pathogenic subconscious ideas; he outlined a comprehensive system of psychology. Still, he considered his concepts to be mere linguistic tools, designed to grasp mental phenomena as precisely as possible. His prime interest was in observations - his own and those of others, whether his contemporaries at home and abroad or predecessors of all kinds. Janet never regarded himself as a historian, but his works as well as his way of thinking are most interesting from a historiographical point of view. His three-volume Médications psychologiques of 1919 contains a wealth of material about the history of psychotherapy. Furthermore, he dealt with his sources in a critical and historically reflexive manner. The later Janet considered any explanation and theory to be "inventions", more or less useful and basically open to change. By working with the notion of "narration", he described scientific statements as narratives, different from lies, fairy-tales or novels only in their claim to be verifiable. Every narration, however, is placed in a social context: narrators always wish to evoke a particular image of the real in their audience. Thus Janet established the link between scientific edifices and individual motivation, an unsettling link in terms of the history of science and certainly alien, if not positively abhorrent to Freud.

  17. The constellation observing Atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Privett, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Designed for anyone who wishes to learn the constellations or observe the best and brightest deep sky objects and double stars, this book contains an alphabetical list of constellations complete with star maps, historical background, and highlights of deep sky objects. Each entry contains position and physical information on enough stars to support astronomers in star-hopping, swinging the telescope from star to star to star to arrive at a faint target. It provides a carefully selected list of accessible and rewarding deep sky objects. Full-color maps show the constellations, with star types (spectral and physical) indicated by the colors used on the map. Extended objects such as galaxies and nebulae are shown with the approximate apparent size in the sky. With unmatched thoroughness and accessibility, this is a constellation atlas that makes the ideal companion to a night's telescope viewing, for novices and expert amateur astronomers alike. Easy to navigate and refer to, it is the key that unlocks the do...

  18. CMS tracker observes muons

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A computer image of a cosmic ray traversing the many layers of the TEC+ silicon sensors. The first cosmic muon tracks have been observed in one of the CMS tracker endcaps. On 14 March, a sector on one of the two large tracker endcaps underwent a cosmic muon run. Since then, thousands of tracks have been recorded. These data will be used not only to study the tracking, but also to exercise various track alignment algorithms The endcap tested, called the TEC+, is under construction at RWTH Aachen in Germany. The endcaps have a modular design, with silicon strip modules mounted onto wedge-shaped carbon fibre support plates, so-called petals. Up to 28 modules are arranged in radial rings on both sides of these plates. One eighth of an endcap is populated with 18 petals and called a sector. The next major step is a test of the first sector at CMS operating conditions, with the silicon modules at a temperature below -10°C. Afterwards, the remaining seven sectors have to be integrated. In autumn 2006, TEC+ wil...

  19. Rheoencephalographic observations in migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. L. Von Almay

    1971-12-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiological concept of migraine presently held attributes the major changes to vascular factors. Therefore, it seemed appropriate to use rheoencephalography to test cerebral hemodynamics in cases of migraine. This very harmless and well suited method revealed: (1 on routine tracings during the painless intervall only 1/7 of the cases showed significant changes, while more than 2/3 could be classified with the help of an orthostatic stress test under REG-observation; (2 REG is more often correct for diagnosis than EEG and this does not surprise since REG monitors cerebral hemodynamics directly while EEG records activity for parenchyma and thus only secondarily depends on circulation; (3 similar conditions were previously seen in Meniere's disease where EEG also is less efficient than REG. According to the results of this study, it should be interesting to include REG in the work-up of migrainous patients. In these and under similar conditions, REG will be of diagnostic value.

  20. Observation as an Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Pat; Wilson, Angene

    1999-01-01

    Considers the use of observation in the classroom as a means of student assessment. Focuses on developing an observation instrument, the scoring criteria, and using progress-based rankings rather than static rankings. Provides an example teacher observation form. (CMK)

  1. Nonlinear Observers for Gyro Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienel, Julie; Sanner, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear observers for gyro calibration are presented. The first observer estimates a constant gyro bias. The second observer estimates scale factor errors. The third observer estimates the gyro alignment for three orthogonal gyros. The convergence properties of all three observers are discussed. Additionally, all three observers are coupled with a nonlinear control algorithm. The stability of each of the resulting closed loop systems is analyzed. Simulated test results are presented for each system.

  2. Differential cortical activation during observation and observation-and-imagination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, H. I.; Wolkorte, R.; Ijzerman, M. J.; van Putten, M. J. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    The activity of the brain during observation or imagination of movements might facilitate the relearning of motor functions after stroke. The present study examines whether there is an additional effect of imagination over observation-only. Eight healthy subjects observed and observed-and-imagined a

  3. Differential cortical activation during observation and observation-and-imagination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, H.I.; Wolkorte, R.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2013-01-01

    The activity of the brain during observation or imagination of movements might facilitate the relearning of motor functions after stroke. The present study examines whether there is an additional effect of imagination over observation-only. Eight healthy subjects observed and observed-and-imagined a

  4. Differential cortical activation during observation and observation-and-imagination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, H. I.; Wolkorte, R.; Ijzerman, M. J.; van Putten, M. J. A. M.

    The activity of the brain during observation or imagination of movements might facilitate the relearning of motor functions after stroke. The present study examines whether there is an additional effect of imagination over observation-only. Eight healthy subjects observed and observed-and-imagined a

  5. Radio emissions from double RHESSI TGFs

    CERN Document Server

    Mezentsev, Andrew; Gjesteland, Thomas; Albrechtsen, Kjetil; Lehtinen, Nikolai; Marisaldi, Martino; Smith, David; Cummer, Steven

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) is performed in association with World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) sources and very low frequency (VLF) sferics recorded at Duke University. RHESSI clock offset is evaluated and found to experience changes on the 5 August 2005 and 21 October 2013, based on the analysis of TGF-WWLLN matches. The clock offsets were found for all three periods of observations with standard deviations less than 100 {\\mu}s. This result opens the possibility for the precise comparative analyses of RHESSI TGFs with the other types of data (WWLLN, radio measurements, etc.) In case of multiple-peak TGFs, WWLLN detections are observed to be simultaneous with the last TGF peak for all 16 cases of multipeak RHESSI TGFs simultaneous with WWLLN sources. VLF magnetic field sferics were recorded for two of these 16 events at Duke University. These radio measurements also attribute VLF sferics to the second pea...

  6. Landing the uniformly accelerating observers

    OpenAIRE

    Rothenstein, Bernhard; Popescu, Stefan; Gruber, Ronald P.

    2006-01-01

    Observers of the uniformly accelerating observers or the observers who make up the system of uniformly accelerating observers reach the same velocity V at different times ti which depends on V and on theirs acceleration gi. Considering a platform that moves with constant velocity V, the observers can land smoothly on it. Their ages and locations in the inertial reference frame attached to the platform are reckoned and compared.

  7. THE VALUE OF CLASSROOM OBSERVATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of the value of classroom observation for both the teacher being observed and the observer. 1. Introduction I have been a teacher for nearly two years. I did not like classroom observation until a week before. It hasbeen teaching practice on an advanced teacher training course that has made me change my mind. Now I want to be observed when I have difficulties or want to try something new. Here I shall discuss the value

  8. Peer Observation of Teaching: Perceptions of the Observer and the Observed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohut, Gary F.; Burnap, Charles; Yon, Maria G.

    2007-01-01

    While peer observation of teaching is regarded as an important part of a faculty member's promotion and tenure portfolio, little has been reported on its usefulness. Results from this study indicate that both observers and observees value the peer observation process, are neutral about the adequacy of observer training, use a variety of…

  9. An assessment of pre-service language teachers’ practicum observation forms: descriptive observation vs. critical observation

    OpenAIRE

    Genc, Bilal; Buyukkarci, Kagan

    2013-01-01

    Practicing the role of teacher and auditing/observing experienced teachers are essential parts of practicum studies of pre-service teachers. Regarding observation we differentiate between two kinds of practice: descriptive observation and critical observation. In this paper we reported on 38 pre-service teachers’ weekly practicum study observation reports of the classes they taught and audited over a twelve week period during their practicum study. The study examined the level of critical obs...

  10. Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossiter, John R.; Percy, Larry

    2013-01-01

    unrealistic laboratory studies, textbook writers continuing to ignore practitioners' research appearing in trade publications and practitioner-oriented journals, and practitioners peeling off into high-sounding but meaningless jargon. also evident is the tendency to regard the new electronic media...... as a classification of the new advertising formats in terms of traditional analogs with mainstream media advertising....

  11. Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossiter, John R.; Percy, Larry

    2013-01-01

    as requiring a new model of how advertising communicates and persuades, which, as the authors' textbooks explain, is sheer nonsense and contrary to the goal of integrated marketing. We provide in this article a translation of practitioners' jargon into more scientifically acceptable terminology as well...... product or service or to achieve a higher price that consumers are willing to pay than would obtain in the absence of advertising. What has changed in recent years is the notable worsening of the academic-practitioner divide, which has seen academic advertising researchers pursuing increasingly...... unrealistic laboratory studies, textbook writers continuing to ignore practitioners' research appearing in trade publications and practitioner-oriented journals, and practitioners peeling off into high-sounding but meaningless jargon. also evident is the tendency to regard the new electronic media...

  12. Central American and Caribbean Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather and soil temperature observations from foreign countries, taken by foreign and American observers. Includes NOAA forms collected and archived at NCDC, and...

  13. Lightship Daily Observations - NARA Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations taken on board lightships along the United States coasts from 1893 - 1943. Generally 4-6 observations daily. Also includes deck logs, which give...

  14. US Daily Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pilot Balloon observational forms for the United States. Taken by Weather Bureau and U.S. Army observers. Period of record 1918-1960. Records scanned from the NCDC...

  15. Ship Observations - VOS and Navy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Combination of Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) and US Navy Ship weather observations. Obs generally taken 2-4 times daily at 00, 06, 12, and 18z.

  16. OBPRELIM Observer Preliminary Data System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Paper logs are the primary data collection tool used by observers of the Northeast Fisheries Observer Program and Industry Funded Scallop Program deployed on...

  17. US Air Force Base Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly observations taken by U.S. Air Force personnel at bases in the United States and around the world. Foreign observations concentrated in the Middle East and...

  18. US Naval Observatory Hourly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly observations journal from the National Observatory in Washington DC. The observatory is the first station in the United States to produce hourly observations...

  19. Solar Eclipses Observed from Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of the solar corona are still best observed during totality of solar eclipses, and other high-resolution observations of coronal active regions can be observed with radio telescopes by differentiation of occultation observations, as we did with the Jansky Very Large Array for the annular solar eclipse of 2012 May 20 in the US. Totality crossing Antarctica included the eclipse of 2003 November 23, and will next occur on 2021 December 4; annularity crossing Antarctica included the eclip...

  20. Fault detection using (PI) observers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, J.; Shafai, B.

    The fault detection and isolation (FDI) problem in connection with Proportional Integral (PI) Observers is considered in this paper. A compact formulation of the FDI design problem using PI observers is given. An analysis of the FDI design problem is derived with respectt to the time domain...... properties. A method for design of PI observers applied to FDI is given....

  1. Observers in Spacetime and Nonlocality

    CERN Document Server

    Mashhoon, B

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of observers in relativity theory are critically examined. For field measurements in Minkowski spacetime, the Bohr-Rosenfeld principle implies that the connection between actual (i.e., noninertial) and inertial observers must be nonlocal. Nonlocal electrodynamics of non-uniformly rotating observers is discussed and the consequences of this theory for the phenomenon of spin-rotation coupling are briefly explored.

  2. Classroom Observation Criteria and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Richard O.

    Classroom observation is an integral part of teacher preparation. The observer must enter the classroom with a frame-of-reference: knowledge of the teacher's goals and objectives, awareness of the climate of the classroom, and knowledge of the discipline. Observation forms to objectively record classroom interaction, assess the learning climate,…

  3. astroplan: Observation Planning for Astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brett

    2016-03-01

    Astroplan is an observation planning package for astronomers. It is an astropy-affiliated package which began as a Google Summer of Code project. Astroplan facilitates convenient calculation of common observational quantities, like target altitudes and azimuths, airmasses, and rise/set times. Astroplan also computes when targets are observable given various extensible observing constraints, for example: within a range of airmasses or altitudes, or at a given separation from the Moon. Astroplan is taught in the undergraduate programming for astronomy class, and enables observational Pre- MAP projects at the University of Washington. In the near future, we plan to implement scheduling capabilities in astroplan on top of the constraints framework.

  4. Observability estimate and state observation problems for stochastic hyperbolic equations

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we derive a boundary and an internal observability inequality for stochastic hyperbolic equations with nonsmooth lower order terms. The required inequalities are obtained by global Carleman estimate for stochastic hyperbolic equations. By these inequalities, we study a state observation problem for stochastic hyperbolic equations. As a consequence, we also establish a unique continuation property for stochastic hyperbolic equations.

  5. VERITAS Observations under Bright Moonlight

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The presence of moonlight is usually a limiting factor for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes due to the high sensitivity of the camera photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In their standard configuration, the extra noise limits the sensitivity of the experiment to gamma-ray signals and the higher PMT currents also accelerates PMT aging. Since fall 2012, observations have been carried out with VERITAS under bright moonlight (Moon illumination $> 35\\%$), in two observing modes, by reducing the voltage applied to the PMTs and with UV bandpass filters, which allow observations up to $\\sim80\\%$ Moon illumination resulting in $29\\%$ more observing time over the course of the year. In this presentation, we provide details of these new observing modes and their performance relative to the standard VERITAS observations.

  6. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  7. Observability of multivariate differential embeddings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, Luis Antonio [Laboratorio de Modelagem, Analise e Controle de Sistemas Nao Lineares, Departamento de Engenharia Eletronica, Universidade Federeal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Letellier, Christophe [Universite de Rouen-CORIA UMR 6614, Av. de l' Universite, BP 12, F-76801 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France)

    2005-07-15

    The present paper extends some results recently developed for the analysis of observability in nonlinear dynamical systems. The aim of the paper is to address the problem of embedding an attractor using more than one observable. A multivariate nonlinear observability matrix is proposed which includes the monovariable nonlinear and linear observability matrices as particular cases. Using the developed framework and a number of worked examples, it is shown that the choice of embedding coordinates is critical. Moreover, in some cases, to reconstruct the dynamics using more than one observable could be worse than to reconstruct using a scalar measurement. Finally, using the developed framework it is shown that increasing the embedding dimension, observability problems diminish and can even be eliminated. This seems to be a physically meaningful interpretation of the Takens embedding theorem.

  8. NS&T Management Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianotto, David [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  9. Sequential measurements of conjugate observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmeli, Claudio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Heinosaari, Teiko [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, University of Turku, 20014 Turku (Finland); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: claudio.carmeli@gmail.com, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica ' Francesco Brioschi' , Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-07-15

    We present a unified treatment of sequential measurements of two conjugate observables. Our approach is to derive a mathematical structure theorem for all the relevant covariant instruments. As a consequence of this result, we show that every Weyl-Heisenberg covariant observable can be implemented as a sequential measurement of two conjugate observables. This method is applicable both in finite- and infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces, therefore covering sequential spin component measurements as well as position-momentum sequential measurements.

  10. Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is often referred to as the primary source of energy release during solar flares. Directly observing reconnection occurring in the solar atmosphere, however, is not trivial considering that the scale size of the diffusion region is magnitudes smaller than the observational capabilities of current instrumentation, and coronal magnetic field measurements are not currently sufficient to capture the process. Therefore, predicting and studying observationally feasible signatures of the precursors and consequences of reconnection is necessary for guiding and verifying the simulations that dominate our understanding. I will present a set of such observations, particularly in connection with long-duration solar events, and compare them with recent simulations and theoretical predictions.

  11. Observability of Inertial Navigation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To improve the observability of strapdown inertial navigation system and the effectiveness of Kalman filter in the navigation system, the method of estimating the observability is analyzed based on eigenvalues and eigenvectors which are proved to be availabe, on this basis two-position alignment technigue is applied. The simulation shows that two-position alignment really makes the system's observability change from being incomplete to being complete, and the test method based on eigenvalues and eigenvectors is available to determine the observability of every state vector.

  12. Earth observation Water Cycle Multi-Mission Observation Strategy (WACMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Su

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Observing and monitoring the different components of the global water cycle and their dynamics are essential steps to understand the climate of the Earth, forecast the weather, predict natural disasters like floods and droughts, and improve water resources management. Earth observation technology is a unique tool to provide a global understanding of many of the essential variables governing the water cycle and monitor their evolution over time from global to basin scales. In the coming years an increasing number of Earth observation missions will provide an unprecedented capacity to quantify several of these variables on a routine basis. In this context, the European Space Agency (ESA, in collaboration with the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP, launched the Water Cycle Multi-Mission Observation Strategy (WACMOS project in 2009. The project aims at developing and validating a novel set of geo-information products relevant to the water cycle covering the following thematic areas: evapotranspiration, soil moisture, cloud characterization and water vapour. The generation of these products is based on a number of innovative techniques and methods aiming at exploiting the synergies of different types of Earth observation data available today to the science community. This paper provides an overview of the major findings of the project with the ultimate goal of demonstrating the potential of innovative multi-mission based strategies to improve current observations by maximizing the synergistic use of the different types of information provided by the currently available observation systems.

  13. Observing Teaching. SEDA Paper 79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sally, Ed.; And Others

    This publication offers practical support to those in British higher education implementing the Observation of Teaching governmental directives. It provides discussion of key issues as well as a range of materials on how to carry out teaching observation including 23 checklists. The materials are grouped in four main areas: general issues, self…

  14. Observations and Theory of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, J C

    2003-01-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the observations of supernovae and the theory of their explosion mechanisms. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: observations of the spectra, spectropolarimetry, and light curves of supernovae of various types, theory of thermonuclear explosions, core collapse, and radioactive decay, applications to cosmology, and possible connections to gamma-ray bursts.

  15. chi Cygnids observation in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Yasuo

    2015-12-01

    The chi Cygnids (IAU MDC code: 00757 CCY) are a new meteor shower reported by Green (2015) green15 in 2015 September. I find members of the chi Cygnids in the 2015 data of the Japanese TV meteor observing network the `SonotaCo network'. Additionally a few meteors from this shower were observed in 2010.

  16. Early pulsar observations with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessels, J.; Stappers, B.; Hassall, T.; Weltevrede, P.; Alexov, A.; Coenen, T.; van Leeuwen, J.; Kondratiev, V.; Mol, J.D.; Kramer, M.; Noutsos, A.; Karastergiou, A.

    2010-01-01

    This contribution to the proceedings of "A New Golden Age for Radio Astronomy" is simply intended to give some of the highlights from pulsar observations with LOFAR at the time of its official opening: June 12th, 2010. These observations illustrate that, though LOFAR is still under construction and

  17. ASTRO-G Observing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, A.; Tsuboi, M.; Kono, Y.; Takeuchi, H.; Mochizuki, N.; Murata, Y.; ASTRO-G Group

    2009-08-01

    ASTRO-G for the VSOP-2 project is a radio telescope satellite for a next-generation space very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) following HALCA for the VSOP project. It will be launched in 2012. We present the overview of ASTRO-G observing systems and available observing modes.

  18. The INTEGRAL Core Observing Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, C; Gehrels, N.; Lund, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.

    1999-01-01

    The Core Programme of the INTEGRAL mission is defined as the portion of the scientific programme covering the guaranteed time observations for the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. This paper describes the current status of the Core Programme preparations and summarizes the key elements of the observing programme.

  19. Observable Effects of Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Lay Nam; Sun, Chen; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the generic phenomenology of quantum gravity and, in particular, argue that the observable effects of quantum gravity, associated with new, extended, non-local, non-particle-like quanta, and accompanied by a dynamical energy-momentum space, are not necessarily Planckian and that they could be observed at much lower and experimentally accessible energy scales.

  20. Improving Instruction through Teacher Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protheroe, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    Describes classroom observation techniques focusing on what the students are learning rather than how the teacher is teaching. Highlights research on effective teaching; provides examples of programs to teach principals effective classroom observation and teacher-evaluation techniques; emphasizes link between teacher evaluation and professional…

  1. New particle observations in SELEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Soon Yung; /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2004-12-01

    Particle observations in data from SELEX, the charm hadro-production experiment (E781) at Fermilab are reviewed. These include observations of the doubly charmed baryon {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +}(3520) and the charmed strange meson D{sub sJ}{sup +}(2632).

  2. Observational constraints on cluster evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, S.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833347

    2008-01-01

    Current observational constraints on the dynamical evolution of star clusters are reviewed. Theory and observations now agree nicely on the mass dependency and time scales for disruption of young star clusters in galactic disks, but many problems still await resolution. The origin of the mass

  3. Information capacity of quantum observable

    CERN Document Server

    Holevo, A S

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider the classical capacities of quantum-classical channels corresponding to measurement of observables. Special attention is paid to the case of continuous observables. We give the formulas for unassisted and entanglement-assisted classical capacities $C,C_{ea}$ and consider some explicitly solvable cases which give new examples of entanglement-breaking channels with $C_{ea}>C.$

  4. Loop quantum gravity and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Barrau, A

    2014-01-01

    Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

  5. Timed Testing under Partial Observability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Alexandre; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Li, Shuhao

    2009-01-01

    To steer model-based conformance testing of real-time systems towards certain test purposes or test coverage, many testing methods need (to be enhanced with) the assumption of full observability of the System Under Test (SUT), which means that the tester can observe precisely what state...... precision sensors that we use to measure the SUT. This paper studies the problem of testing timed systems that are only partially observable. We model the SUT using Timed Game Automata (TGA) which has internal actions, uncontrollable outputs and timing uncertainty of outputs. We define the partial...... observability of SUT using a set of predicates over the TGA state space, and specify the test purposes in Computation Tree Logic (CTL) formulas. A recently developed partially observable timed game solver is used to generate winning strategies, which are used as test cases. We propose a conformance testing...

  6. Time generated by intrinsic observers

    CERN Document Server

    Svozil, Karl

    2009-01-01

    We shortly review the construction of knowledge by intrinsic observers. Intrinsic observers are embedded in a system and are inseparable parts thereof. The intrinsic viewpoint has to be contrasted with an extrinsic, "God's eye" viewpoint, from which the system can be observed externally without in any way changing it. This epistemological distinction has concrete, formalizable consequences. One consequence is the emergence of "complementarity" for intrinsic observers, even if the underlying system is totally deterministic (computable). Another consequence is the appearence of time and inertial frames for intrinsic observers. The necessary operational techniques are developed in the context of Cellular Automata. We finish with a somewhat speculative question. Given space-time frames generated by clocks which use sound waves for synchronization; why could supersonic travel not cause time paradoxes?

  7. Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) surface observation data.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — GMOS global surface elemental mercury (Hg0) observations from 2013 & 2014. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Sprovieri, F., N. Pirrone,...

  8. Observability and observer design for hybrid multicell choppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, F. J.; Ghanes, M.; Barbot, J.-P.

    2010-03-01

    Multicell choppers are part of a class of hybrid systems in which the continuous state vector is always unobservable, in the sense that the observability matrix never has full rank. Due to their hybrid behaviour, the recent concept of Z(T N )-observability can be applied and analysed in the context of multicell choppers, which allows to give conditions, in terms of the switching sequence, under which the voltage across each capacitor can be reconstructed, not instantly, but after some number of switchings. The case when a DC-motor is coupled to the multicell chopper is also considered. It is shown that, under certain admissible assumptions, the voltages across the capacitors and the motor speed can be acceptably estimated. Two observers, one based on the super-twisting algorithm and the other one based on an adaptive approach, are designed. Additionally, we design an observer for the partial state observation. Simulations are given where the proposed observers are compared and the effectiveness of both is shown.

  9. Ideal AFROC and FROC observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurd, Parmeshwar; Liu, Bin; Gindi, Gene

    2010-02-01

    Detection of multiple lesions in images is a medically important task and free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analyses and its variants, such as alternative FROC (AFROC) analyses, are commonly used to quantify performance in such tasks. However, ideal observers that optimize FROC or AFROC performance metrics have not yet been formulated in the general case. If available, such ideal observers may turn out to be valuable for imaging system optimization and in the design of computer aided diagnosis techniques for lesion detection in medical images. In this paper, we derive ideal AFROC and FROC observers. They are ideal in that they maximize, amongst all decision strategies, the area, or any partial area, under the associated AFROC or FROC curve. Calculation of observer performance for these ideal observers is computationally quite complex. We can reduce this complexity by considering forms of these observers that use false positive reports derived from signal-absent images only. We also consider a Bayes risk analysis for the multiple-signal detection task with an appropriate definition of costs. A general decision strategy that minimizes Bayes risk is derived. With particular cost constraints, this general decision strategy reduces to the decision strategy associated with the ideal AFROC or FROC observer.

  10. Solar Ca II K Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertello, Luca; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Tlatov, Andrey; Singh, Jagdev

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most important archives of past and current long-term solar synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca II K are described here. These observations are very important for understanding the state of the solar magnetism on time scales up to several decades. The first observations of this kind began in 1904 at the Kodaikanal Observatory (India), followed by similar programs at different other locations. Regular full-disk Ca II K monitoring programs started in 1915 at the Mount Wilson Observatory (USA) and in 1917 at the National Solar Observatory of Japan. Beginning in 1919 and in 1926 regular observations were taken also at the Paris-Meudon Observatory (France) and at the "Donati solar tower telescope of the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Italy, respectively. In 1926 the the Astronomical Observatory of the Coimbra University in Portugal started its own program of Ca II K observations. Although some of these programs have been terminated over the years, their data archives constitute a unique resource for studies of solar variability. In the early 1970s, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak (USA) started a new program of daily Sun-as-a-star observations in the Ca II K line. Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility.

  11. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, Glenn Delfosse, Jr.

    1997-09-01

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e+e/sp- pair creation near a nucleus with the e+ being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  12. Software for recording observational files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendo, A H; Argilaga, M T; Rivera, M A

    2000-08-01

    We offer the new software Codex, written in Visual Basic 3.0. It is a tool adequate in observational methodology. Its fundamental objective is to record motor and verbal behavior using the data types proposed by Bakeman and Quera (1995, 1996), together with the field formats proposed by Hall (1963), Weick (1968), Hutt and Hutt (1974), and Anguera (1979). It is designed to allow for data interchange between specific programs in use in observational methodology (SDIS-GSEQ, The Observer, and Theme) and other general programs (spread sheets, statistics applications, word processing programs, sound cards, etc.).

  13. Observational methodology in sport sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teresa Anguera

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the conceptual framework, the key literature and the methods (observation tools, such as category systems and field formats, and coding software, etc. that should be followed when conducting research from the perspective of observational methodology. The observational designs used by the authors’ research group over the last twenty years are discussed, and the procedures for analysing data and assessing their quality are described. Mention is also made of the latest methodological trends in this field, such as the use of mixed methods.

  14. Bulletin of International Simultaneous Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The publication of the Bulletin of International Simultaneous Observations, began July 1, 1875, with daily maps added in 1877. It was published for distribution...

  15. Lightship Monthly Observations - NARA Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations taken on board lightships along the United States coasts from 1891 - 1918. Each form covers multiple days, usually one week. Also includes deck logs,...

  16. Sliding mode control and observation

    CERN Document Server

    Shtessel, Yuri; Fridman, Leonid; Levant, Arie

    2014-01-01

    The sliding mode control methodology has proven effective in dealing with complex dynamical systems affected by disturbances, uncertainties and unmodeled dynamics. Robust control technology based on this methodology has been applied to many real-world problems, especially in the areas of aerospace control, electric power systems, electromechanical systems, and robotics. Sliding Mode Control and Observation represents the first textbook that starts with classical sliding mode control techniques and progresses toward newly developed higher-order sliding mode control and observation algorithms and their applications. The present volume addresses a range of sliding mode control issues, including: *Conventional sliding mode controller and observer design *Second-order sliding mode controllers and differentiators *Frequency domain analysis of conventional and second-order sliding mode controllers *Higher-order sliding mode controllers and differentiators *Higher-order sliding mode observers *Sliding mode disturbanc...

  17. Upper Air Observations - Synoptic Code

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily radiosonde and rawinsonde observations at standard and significant levels, recorded in synoptic code. Period of record 1950-1951.

  18. Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD) is a relational database being developed by the Assessment and Standards Division (ASD) of the US Environmental...

  19. An introduction to observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Gallaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Observational Astrophysics follows the general outline of an astrophysics undergraduate curriculum targeting practical observing information to what will be covered at the university level. This includes the basics of optics and coordinate systems to the technical details of CCD imaging, photometry, spectography and radio astronomy.  General enough to be used by students at a variety of institutions and advanced enough to be far more useful than observing guides targeted at amateurs, the author provides a comprehensive and up-to-date treatment of observational astrophysics at undergraduate level to be used with a university’s teaching telescope.  The practical approach takes the reader from basic first year techniques to those required for a final year project. Using this textbook as a resource, students can easily become conversant in the practical aspects of astrophysics in the field as opposed to the classroom.

  20. CalNex Observational Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Observations made during the 2010 CalNex measurement campaign. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Woody , M., K. Baker , P. Hayes, J....

  1. US Monthly Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly winds aloft summary forms summarizing Pilot Balloon observational data for the United States. Generally labeled as Form 1114, and then transitioning to Form...

  2. Observability transition in real networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Radicchi, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    We consider the observability model in networks with arbitrary topologies. We introduce a system of coupled nonlinear equations, valid under the locally treelike ansatz, to describe the size of the largest observable cluster as a function of the fraction of directly observable nodes present in the network. We perform a systematic analysis on 95 real-world graphs and compare our theoretical predictions with numerical simulations of the observability model. Our method provides almost perfect predictions in the majority of the cases, even for networks with very large values of the clustering coefficient. Potential applications of our theory include the development of efficient and scalable algorithms for real-time surveillance of social networks, and monitoring of technological networks.

  3. Observability transition in real networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    We consider the observability model in networks with arbitrary topologies. We introduce a system of coupled nonlinear equations, valid under the locally tree-like ansatz, to describe the size of the largest observable cluster as a function of the fraction of directly observable nodes present in the network. We perform a systematic analysis on 95 real-world graphs and compare our theoretical predictions with numerical simulations of the observability model. Our method provides almost perfect predictions in the majority of the cases, even for networks with very large values of the clustering coefficient. Potential applications of our theory include the development of efficient and scalable algorithms for real-time surveillance of social networks, and monitoring of technological networks.

  4. Observations afield on Alaskan wolves

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Widespread observations of wolves and their habits in Alaska during the period 1948-1954 generally confirm published reports of these phenomena elsewhere....

  5. Surface Weather Observations (Pre-1893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly weather records from U.S. Army Forts stations (~1820-1871), U.S. Army Signal Service Stations (1871-1892), Smithsonian Institution voluntary observer network...

  6. Archetypal Analysis for Nominal Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Sohan; Eugster, Manuel J A

    2016-05-01

    Archetypal analysis is a popular exploratory tool that explains a set of observations as compositions of few 'pure' patterns. The standard formulation of archetypal analysis addresses this problem for real valued observations by finding the approximate convex hull. Recently, a probabilistic formulation has been suggested which extends this framework to other observation types such as binary and count. In this article we further extend this framework to address the general case of nominal observations which includes, for example, multiple-option questionnaires. We view archetypal analysis in a generative framework: this allows explicit control over choosing a suitable number of archetypes by assigning appropriate prior information, and finding efficient update rules using variational Bayes'. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach extensively on simulated data, and three real world examples: Austrian guest survey dataset, German credit dataset, and SUN attribute image dataset.

  7. VLBI Observing System for VSOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, J. S.; Murphy, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) Space Observatory Program (VSOP) satellite is scheduled for launch in September 1996. This paper describes the VLBI observing system for VSOP and its differences from ground radio telescope VLBI systems.

  8. COOP Wind and Radiation Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind and radiation data from stations in the National Weather Service Cooperative Observers Network. Some precipitation and pressure forms are mistakenly placed in...

  9. Pre-1947 Marine Monthly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations taken on board U.S. Navy and merchant marine vessels and submitted to the U.S. Weather Bureau. Merchant ships are of many nationalities, and mainly...

  10. Pre-1947 Marine Daily Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations taken on board merchant marine vessels and submitted to the U.S. Weather Bureau. Ships are of many nationalities, and mainly cover voyages in the North...

  11. Window observers for linear systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utkin Vadim

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Given a linear system x ˙ = A x + B u with output y = C x and a window function ω ( t , i.e., ∀ t , ω ( t ∈ {0,1 }, and assuming that the window function is Lebesgue measurable, we refer to the following observer, x ˆ = A x + B u + ω ( t L C ( x − x ˆ as a window observer. The stability issue is treated in this paper. It is proven that for linear time-invariant systems, the window observer can be stabilized by an appropriate design under a very mild condition on the window functions, albeit for linear time-varying system, some regularity of the window functions is required to achieve observer designs with the asymptotic stability. The corresponding design methods are developed. An example is included to illustrate the possible applications

  12. Overview of Saturn lightning observations

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, G; Kurth, W S; Gurnett, D A; Zarka, P; Barry, T; Delcroix, M; Go, C; Peach, D; Vandebergh, R; Wesley, A

    2011-01-01

    The lightning activity in Saturn's atmosphere has been monitored by Cassini for more than six years. The continuous observations of the radio signatures called SEDs (Saturn Electrostatic Discharges) combine favorably with imaging observations of related cloud features as well as direct observations of flash-illuminated cloud tops. The Cassini RPWS (Radio and Plasma Wave Science) instrument and ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) in orbit around Saturn also received ground-based support: The intense SED radio waves were also detected by the giant UTR-2 radio telescope, and committed amateurs observed SED-related white spots with their backyard optical telescopes. Furthermore, the Cassini VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and CIRS (Composite Infrared Spectrometer) instruments have provided some information on chemical constituents possibly created by the lightning discharges and transported upward to Saturn's upper atmosphere by vertical convection. In this paper we summarize the main results on Satur...

  13. GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations: Ship, fixed/drifting buoy, and CMAN in-situ surface temperature. Global Telecommunication System (GTS) Data. The...

  14. Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD) is a relational database developed by the Assessment and Standards Division (ASD) of the U.S. EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality (formerly the Office of Mobile Sources).

  15. The Sprite 2005 Observation Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chanrion, Olivier Arnaud; Crosby, Norma; Armone, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    and outreach programmes for the young scientists hired. Educational activities were based on the following elements: national PhD programmes, activities at CAL and other meetings, a dedicated summer school, and two European sprite observational campaigns. The young scientists were strongly involved...... in the latter and, as an example, the "EuroSprite2005" observational campaign is presented in detail. Some of the young scientists participated in the instrument set-up, others in the campaign logistics, some coordinated the observations, and others gathered the results to build a catalogue. During the four......-month duration of this campaign, all of them took turns in operating the system and making their own night observations. The ongoing campaign activities were constantly advertised and communicated via an Internet blog. In summary the campaign required all the CAL young scientists to embark on experimental work...

  16. Olson Order of Quantum Observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvurečenskij, Anatolij

    2016-11-01

    M.P. Olson, Proc. Am. Math. Soc. 28, 537-544 (1971) showed that the system of effect operators of the Hilbert space can be ordered by the so-called spectral order such that the system of effect operators is a complete lattice. Using his ideas, we introduce a partial order, called the Olson order, on the set of bounded observables of a complete lattice effect algebra. We show that the set of bounded observables is a Dedekind complete lattice.

  17. Cosmological Inflation: Theory and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    In this article we review the theory of cosmological inflation with a particular focus on the beautiful connection it provides between the physics of the very small and observations of the very large. We explain how quantum mechanical fluctuations during the inflationary era become macroscopic density fluctuations which leave distinct imprints in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We describe the physics of anisotropies in the CMB temperature and polarization and discuss how CMB observations can be used to probe the primordial universe.

  18. Earth observation for rangeland monitoring

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available for the methodology is presented in Figure 1. Figure 1: Conceptual framework for the development of grass nutrient estimation models, using remote sensing at various scales Earth Observation for Rangeland Monitoring DR A RAMOELO, DR M CHO AND DR R MATHIEU CSIR... and canopy N conforms to the underlying geology (Figure 2). ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The authors would like to thank the Department of Science and Technology which contributed financially to this work through the grant ?Earth Observation Application Development...

  19. Resolved observations of transition disks

    CERN Document Server

    Casassus, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Resolved observations are bringing new constraints on the origin of radial gaps in protoplanetary disks. The kinematics, sampled in detail in one case-study, are indicative of non-Keplerian flows, corresponding to warped structures and accretion which may both play a role in the development of cavities. Disk asymmetries seen in the radio continuum are being interpreted in the context of dust segregation via aerodynamic trapping. We summarise recent observational progress, and also describe prospects for improvements in the near term.

  20. Observations of TT Ari requested in support of MOST observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2012-08-01

    Dr. Nikolaus Vogt (Universidad de Valparaiso, Chile) requested simultaneous photometry and spectroscopy of the novalike (VY Scl subtype) cataclysmic variable TT Ari in support of upcoming observations with the Canadian Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) satellite 2012 September 13 through October 20. The Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia of the Valparaiso University will carry out photometry with small telescopes in central Chile but the assistance of other observers, particularly in other latitudes and longitudes, is requested. The observations are being carried out to study superhump behavior, which is still not well understood despite the amount of research done in all classes of cataclysmic variables. TT Ari exibits superhumps - both positive (the superhump period is longer than the orbital period) and negative (the superhump period is shorter than the orbital period). While positive superhumps are thought probably to be the result of an eccentric configuration in the accretion disk, the mechanism for negative superhumps is not yet understood except that it may be related to the disk's being warped out of the orbital plane, leading to complex torque phenomena. TT Ari, one of the brightest cataclysmic variables, exhibits occasional fadings of several magnitudes, from its usual high-state (maximum) magnitude of ~10.5V to a low-state magnitude as faint as 16V. These fadings occur every 20-25 years, and last between 500 and 1000 days. According to observations in the AAVSO International Database, TT Ari is currently magnitude 10.5V. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details, particularly regarding goals of the campaign, and observing instructions.

  1. Solar and lunar observation planning for Earth-observing sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Xiong, X.

    2011-11-01

    MODIS on-orbit calibration activities include the use of the on-board solar diffuser (SD), SD stability monitor (SDSM) and regularly scheduled lunar observations for the Reflective Solar Bands (RSB) radiometric calibration. Normally, the SD door is closed when there is no SD/SDSM observation to avoid the unnecessary illumination of the sunlight on the SD, which causes the SD degradation. The SD is illuminated over a very short period of time when the spacecraft crosses from the night side to the day side. To implement a SD/SDSM calibration, the SD door needs to be open and the SDSM needs to be turned on during the short period of time when the SD is illuminated. A planning tool is needed to predict the exact times for the opening and closing of SD door and SDSM on/off operations of SDSM for each SD/SDSM calibration. The tool is also needed for MODIS yaw maneuvers implemented for SD bi-direction reflectance factor (BRF) validation and SD screen vignetting function (VF) derivation. MODIS observes the Moon through its space view (SV) port. To increase the opportunity for more lunar observations and to keep the lunar phase angle in a selected narrow range that minimizes the view geometric effect on the observed lunar irradiance, a spacecraft roll maneuver is allowed and implemented for MODIS lunar observations. A lunar observation planning tool is required to predict the time and roll angle needed for each lunar observation in the selected phase angle range. The tool is also needed to determine the phase angle range such that the MODIS can view the Moon in as many months as possible each year with the phase angle in the range. The MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) is responsible for MODIS instrument operation and calibration. We have developed a set of tools to address these needs and have successfully applied them to both Terra and Aqua MODIS. In this paper, we describe the design methodologies and the implementation of the tools. The tools have also been

  2. Tactile perception during action observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastano, Roberta; Inuggi, Alberto; Vargas, Claudia D; Baud-Bovy, Gabriel; Jacono, Marco; Pozzo, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that tactile perception becomes less acute during movement to optimize motor control and to prevent an overload of afferent information generated during action. This empirical phenomenon, known as "tactile gating effect," has been associated with mechanisms of sensory feedback prediction. However, less attention has been given to the tactile attenuation effect during the observation of an action. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and how the observation of a goal-directed action influences tactile perception as during overt action. In a first experiment, we recorded vocal reaction times (RTs) of participants to tactile stimulations during the observation of a reach-to-grasp action. The stimulations were delivered on different body parts that could be either congruent or incongruent with the observed effector (the right hand and the right leg, respectively). The tactile stimulation was contrasted with a no body-related stimulation (an auditory beep). We found increased RTs for tactile congruent stimuli compared to both tactile incongruent and auditory stimuli. This effect was reported only during the observation of the reaching phase, whereas RTs were not modulated during the grasping phase. A tactile two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) discrimination task was then conducted in order to quantify the changes in tactile sensitivity during the observation of the same goal-directed actions. In agreement with the first experiment, the tactile perceived intensity was reduced only during the reaching phase. These results suggest that tactile processing during action observation relies on a process similar to that occurring during action execution.

  3. Observing Projects in Introductory Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Introductory astronomy classes without laboratory components face a unique challenge of how to expose students to the process of science in the framework of a lecture course. As a solution to this problem small group observing projects are incorporated into a 40 student introductory astronomy class composed primarily of non-science majors. Students may choose from 8 observing projects such as graphing the motion of the moon or a planet, measuring daily and seasonal motions of stars, and determining the rotation rate of the Sun from sunspots. Each group completes two projects, requiring the students to spend several hours outside of class making astronomical observations. Clear instructions and a check-list style observing log help students with minimal observing experience to take accurate data without direct instructor assistance. Students report their findings in a lab report-style paper, as well as in a formal oral or poster presentation. The projects serve a double purpose of allowing students to directly experience concepts covered in class as well as providing students with experience collecting, analyzing, and presenting astronomical data.

  4. Partnership proposed for ocean observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossby, T.

    2012-04-01

    A report released on 1 March 2012 proposes a formal partnership between the ocean-observing communities and the global shipping industry for the systematic long-term study of the ocean water column from surface to depth. According to the report, the rationale for the proposal is that commercial ships on the high seas offer a cost-effective opportunity to contribute to directly addressing a significant observational deficiency. "The ocean is vastly under observed, particularly below the ocean surface, where satellites cannot measure the ocean's properties," according to the report, "OceanScope: A proposed partnership between the maritime industries and the ocean observing community to monitor the global ocean water column," prepared by the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research/International Association for the Physical Sciences of the Oceans (SCOR/IAPSO) Working Group 133. "Observations below the surface depend on getting platforms (ships, moored buoys, floats, gliders, etc.) to locations far beyond the coasts, which can be expensive," the report states.

  5. Simulating Reionization: Character and Observability

    CERN Document Server

    Iliev, Ilian T; Mellema, Garrelt; Pen, Ue-Li; McDonald, Patrick; Bond, J Richard

    2007-01-01

    In recent years there has been considerable progress in our understanding of the nature and properties of the reionization process. In particular, the numerical simulations of this epoch have made a qualitative leap forward, reaching sufficiently large scales to derive the characteristic scales of the reionization process and thus allowing for realistic observational predictions. Our group has recently performed the first such large-scale radiative transfer simulations of reionization, run on top of state-of-the-art simulations of early structure formation. This allowed us to make the first realistic observational predictions about the Epoch of Reionization based on detailed radiative transfer and structure formation simulations. We discuss the basic features of reionization derived from our simulations and some recent results on the observational implications for the high-redshift Ly-alpha sources.

  6. Observational Constraints on Exponential Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Louis; Luo, Ling-Wei; Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    We study the observational constraints on the exponential gravity model of f(R)=-beta*Rs(1-e^(-R/Rs)). We use the latest observational data including Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP) Union2 compilation, Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) and Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) in our analysis. From these observations, we obtain a lower bound on the model parameter beta at 1.27 (95% CL) but no appreciable upper bound. The constraint on the present matter density parameter is 0.245< Omega_m^0<0.311 (95% CL). We also find out the best-fit value of model parameters on several cases.

  7. Anisotropic Inflation and Cosmological Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Emami, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations opened up a new window on the inflationary model building. As it was firstly reported by the WMAP data, there may be some indications of statistical anisotropy on the CMB map, although the statistical significance of these findings are under debate. Motivated by these observations, people begun considering new inflationary models which may lead to statistical anisotropy. The simplest possible way to construct anisotropic inflation is to introduce vector fields. During the course of this thesis, we study models of anisotropic inflation and their observational implications such as power spectrum, bispectrum etc. Firstly we build a new model, which contains the gauge field which breaks the conformal invariance while preserving the gauge invariance. We show that in these kind of models, there can be an attractor phase in the evolution of the system when the back-reaction of the gauge field becomes important in the evolution of the inflaton field. We then study the cosmological perturbation the...

  8. External observer reflections on QBism

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    In this short review I present my personal reflections on QBism. I have no intrinsic sympathy neither to QBism nor to subjective interpretation of probability in general. However, I have been following development of QBism from its very beginning, observing its evolution and success, sometimes with big surprise. Therefore my reflections on QBism can be treated as "external observer" reflections. I hope that my representation of this interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM) has some degree of objectivity. It may be useful for researchers who are interested in quantum foundations, but do not belong to the QBism-community, because I tried to analyze essentials of QBism critically (i.e., not just emphasizing its advantages, as in a typical publication of QBists). QBists may be interested as well - in comments of an external observer who monitored development of this approach to QM during last 16 years. The second part of the paper is devoted to interpretations of probability, objective versus subjective, and view...

  9. Observation of the Top Quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Álvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Chevalier, L.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; de, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dugad, S. R.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Edmunds, D.; Efimov, A. O.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Yu.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Franzini, P.; Fredriksen, S.; Fuess, S.; Galjaev, A. N.; Gallas, E.; Gao, C. S.; Gao, S.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glaubman, M.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gomez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hatcher, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnstad, H.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M.; Kernan, A.; Kerth, L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B. I.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lanou, R. E.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. K.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Mandrichenko, I. V.; Mangeot, Ph.; Mani, S.; Mansoulié, B.; Mao, H. S.; Margulies, S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Marx, M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; Melanson, H. L.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Milder, A.; Milner, C.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mohammadi-Baarmand, M.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mudan, M.; Murphy, C.; Murphy, C. T.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neis, E.; Nemethy, P.; NešiĆ, D.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pluquet, A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pušeljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rao, M. V.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Read, A. L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Roldan, J. M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rusin, S.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schmid, D.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stocker, F.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Taketani, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, T. L.; Teiger, J.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Virador, P. R.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; von Goeler, E.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, J.; Wang, L. Z.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; Wenzel, W. A.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Wilcox, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Wolf, Z.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, Y. H.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1995-04-01

    The D0 Collaboration reports on a search for the standard model top quark in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron with an integrated luminosity of approximately 50 pb-1. We have searched for tt¯ production in the dilepton and single-lepton decay channels with and without tagging of b-quark jets. We observed 17 events with an expected background of 3.8+/-0.6 events. The probability for an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2×10-6 (equivalent to 4.6 standard deviations). The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with top quark decay. We conclude that we have observed the top quark and measured its mass to be 199+19-21 (stat) +/-22 (syst) GeV/c2 and its production cross section to be 6.4+/-2.2 pb.

  10. Incremental Observer Relative Data Extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukauskas, Linas; Bøhlen, Michael Hanspeter

    2004-01-01

    or a Panorama, where an observer is data space this approach is far from optimal. A more scalable approach is to make the observer-aware database system and to restrict the communication between the database and visualization systems to the relevant data. In this paper VR-tree, an extension of the R......The visual exploration of large databases calls for a tight coupling of database and visualization systems. Current visualization systems typically fetch all the data and organize it in a scene tree that is then used to render the visible data. For immersive data explorations in a Cave......-tree, is used to index visibility ranges of objects. We introduce a new operator for incremental Observer Relative data Extraction (iORDE). We propose the Volatile Access STructure (VAST), a lightweight main memory structure that is created on the fly and is maintained during visual data explorations. VAST...

  11. Controllers, observers, and applications thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Miklosovic, Robert (Inventor); Radke, Aaron (Inventor); Zhou, Wankun (Inventor); Zheng, Qing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Controller scaling and parameterization are described. Techniques that can be improved by employing the scaling and parameterization include, but are not limited to, controller design, tuning and optimization. The scaling and parameterization methods described here apply to transfer function based controllers, including PID controllers. The parameterization methods also apply to state feedback and state observer based controllers, as well as linear active disturbance rejection (ADRC) controllers. Parameterization simplifies the use of ADRC. A discrete extended state observer (DESO) and a generalized extended state observer (GESO) are described. They improve the performance of the ESO and therefore ADRC. A tracking control algorithm is also described that improves the performance of the ADRC controller. A general algorithm is described for applying ADRC to multi-input multi-output systems. Several specific applications of the control systems and processes are disclosed.

  12. Is Observation Mathematically-Laden?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Michael Muller

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we will defend the epistemological claim that observation is mathematically- laden. A well-known thesis in the philosophy of science is that observation is theory-laden. The claim that observation is mathematically laden can be similarly justified. The first part of the paper focuses on the definition of mathematically-ladeness and its relations to the best-known problem of theory-ladeness. The second part of the paper presents some explicit examples and outlines the consequences and the difficulties of this epistemological limit. Finally, a specific context for this problem is discussed in detail: we will analyze the question of deterministic chaos as a paradigmatic example of mathematically-ladeness and show that the deterministic or indeterministic nature of chaos is strongly linked to the choice of a particular mathematical description.

  13. Observation Predicates in Flow Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Sun, Hongyan

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the connection between strong and soft type systems we explore flow analyses with hard constraints on the admissible solutions. We show how to use observation predicates and formula rearrangements to map flow analyses with hard constraints into more traditional flow analyses in such ......Motivated by the connection between strong and soft type systems we explore flow analyses with hard constraints on the admissible solutions. We show how to use observation predicates and formula rearrangements to map flow analyses with hard constraints into more traditional flow analyses...... in such a way that the hard constraints are satisfi ed exactly when the observation predicates report no violations. The development is carried out in a large fragment of a first order logic with negation and also takes care of the transformations necessary in order to adhere to the stratification restrictions...

  14. Light Propagation For Accelerated Observers

    CERN Document Server

    Adewole, A I A

    2001-01-01

    We show that for an observer in translational, rotational or gravitational motion, a linearly polarized plane wave has two modes of propagation in a stationary, homogeneous and isotropic medium according to Hertz's version of Maxwell's theory. The first mode is characterized by polarization at right angles to the direction of propagation and has a phase velocity that is controlled by the material constants of the medium. The second mode is characterized by polarization along the propagation direction and has a phase velocity that is controlled by the motion of the observer. We outline some applications of the second mode in emerging technologies.

  15. Ground level cosmic ray observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Grimani, C.; Brunetti, M.T.; Codino, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Papini, P.; Massimo Brancaccio, F.; Piccardi, S. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Hof, M. [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Physik

    1995-09-01

    Cosmic rays at ground level have been collected using the NMSU/Wizard - MASS2 instrument. The 17-hr observation run was made on September 9. 1991 in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, Usa. Fort Sumner is located at 1270 meters a.s.l., corresponding to an atmospheric depth of about 887 g/cm{sup 2}. The geomagnetic cutoff is 4.5 GV/c. The charge ratio of positive and negative muons and the proton to muon ratio have been determined. These observations will also be compared with data collected at a higher latitude using the same basic apparatus.

  16. Biomimetic Cloning of Quantum Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2013-01-01

    We propose a bio-inspired sequential quantum protocol for the cloning and preservation of the statistics associated to quantum observables of a given system. It combines the cloning of a set of commuting observables, permitted by the no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, with a controllable propagation of the initial state coherences to the subsequent generations. The protocol mimics the scenario in which an individual in an unknown quantum state copies and propagates its quantum information into an environment of blank qubits. Finally, we propose a realistic experimental implementation of this protocol in trapped ions.

  17. Ginga observations of Seyfert galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaki, H.; Koyama, K.

    1993-01-01

    We observed twenty-eight Seyfert 2 galaxies with the Japanese X-ray satellite, Ginga, and found Seyfert 2 galaxies, in general, have the X-ray spectral characteristics of obscured Seyfert 1 nuclei. This results agrees with the predictions from the Unified Seyfert model proposed by Antonucci and Miller. However, among the observed Seyfert 2 galaxies, there are a few galaxies with no evidence of an obscuration, contrary to the general predictions of the unified model. We note that type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGN) will contribute to the Cosmic Diffuse X-ray Background, if the unified Seyfert model can be extended to the far distant AGN such as quasars.

  18. Space-Based Observation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    jusqu’ici par des systèmes aéroportés, par des systèmes spatiaux. Les capteurs spatiaux sont des capteurs radar et optiques . Les capteurs optiques ...de l’observation de la terre à partir de capteurs spatiaux offre de nombreux avantages par rapport à l’observation à partir de capteurs terrestres...résolution optique . Le SAR a également d’autres fonctionnalités telles que la classification basée sur les techniques Doppler ou la polarimétrie, la

  19. Observing Conditions for Submillimeter Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Radford, Simon J E

    2011-01-01

    Consistently superb observing conditions are crucial for achieving the scientific objectives of a telescope. Submillimeter astronomy is possible only at a few exceptionally dry sites, notably Mauna Kea, the Antarctic plateau, and the Chajnantor region in the high Andes east of San Pedro de Atacama in northern Chile. Long term measurements of 225 GHz and 350 \\mu m atmospheric transparency demonstrate all three locations enjoy significant periods of excellent observing conditions. Conditions on the Chajnantor plateau and at the South Pole are better more often than on Mauna Kea. Conditions are better during winter and at night. Near the summit of Cerro Chajnantor, conditions are better than on the Chajnantor plateau.

  20. Observation af kritisk syge patienter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, Lone; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Lippert, Anne

    2009-01-01

    . MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective observational study at Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. Study personnel measured vital signs on all patients present on five wards during the evening and night and interviewed nursing staff about patients with abnormal vital signs. Subsequently, patient records were...... vital signs measured by study personnel. A total of 77% of patients had vital signs documented in their records on the day of the observation. The previous day, vital signs were documented in 70% of records and on the day after in 66%. The documentation of vital signs was significantly higher when staff...

  1. EMC Aspects of Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucek, J.; Ahlen, L.; Bale, S.; Bonnell, J.; Boudin, N.; Brienza, D.; Carr, C.; Cipriani, F.; Escoubet, C. P.; Fazakerley, A.; Gehler, M.; Genot, V.; Hilgers, A.; Hanock, B.; Jannet, G.; Junge, A.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; De Keyser, J.; Kucharek, H.; Lan, R.; Lavraud, B.; Leblanc, F.; Magnes, W.; Mansour, M.; Marcucci, M. F.; Nakamura, R.; Nemecek, Z.; Owen, C.; Phal, Y.; Retino, A.; Rodgers, D.; Safrankova, J.; Sahraoui, F.; Vainio, R.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.; Steinhagen, J.; Vaivads, A.; Wielders, A.; Zaslavsky, A.

    2016-05-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is a spacecraft mission dedicated to the study of plasma turbulence in near-Earth space. The mission is currently under study for implementation as a part of ESA Cosmic Vision program. THOR will involve a single spinning spacecraft equipped with state of the art instruments capable of sensitive measurements of electromagnetic fields and plasma particles. The sensitive electric and magnetic field measurements require that the spacecraft- generated emissions are restricted and strictly controlled; therefore a comprehensive EMC program has been put in place already during the study phase. The THOR study team and a dedicated EMC working group are formulating the mission EMC requirements already in the earliest phase of the project to avoid later delays and cost increases related to EMC. This article introduces the THOR mission and reviews the current state of its EMC requirements.

  2. Issues to Be Further Observed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi Zhongyun

    2004-01-01

    @@ In observing the U.S. status in the world, we should discern the changes in the factors that have helped this nation become prosperous and strong by looking below the superficial phenomena. In my book A Cold-Eyed Survey Beyond Seas, I mentioned some factors that promoted America to become rich and powerful.

  3. The problem of passive observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, M.

    2010-01-01

    Trygve Haavelmo's methodological manifesto "The Probability Approach in Econometrics" not only laid down the paradigm for the research pursued at the Cowles Commission, but also sets out a strategy for measurement outside the laboratory. His conceptualization of "passive observation" is still very u

  4. Participant observation in risk problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriessen, H.; Kluin, M.H.A.; Van Gulijk, C.; Ale, B.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Participant observation is a method to collect information through active participation in the social world that is under study, in this case two different risk-related working areas where confidentiality and secrecy are paramount. In reality there is a difference between what people do and say they

  5. Herschel observations of interstellar chloronium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neufeld, David A.; Roueff, Evelyne; Snell, Ronald L.; Lis, Dariusz; Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; Black, John H.; De Luca, Massimo; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Gupta, Harshal; Indriolo, Nick; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck; Larsson, Bengt; Melnick, Gary J.; Menten, Karl M.; Monje, Raquel; Nagy, Zsofia; Phillips, Thomas G.; Sandqvist, Aage; Sonnentrucker, Paule; van der Tak, Floris; Wolfire, Mark G.

    2012-01-01

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared, we have observed parachloronium (H2Cl+) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sourc

  6. Incremental Observer Relative Data Extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukauskas, Linas; Bøhlen, Michael Hanspeter

    2004-01-01

    -tree, is used to index visibility ranges of objects. We introduce a new operator for incremental Observer Relative data Extraction (iORDE). We propose the Volatile Access STructure (VAST), a lightweight main memory structure that is created on the fly and is maintained during visual data explorations. VAST...

  7. Observability inequalities for thin shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴树根; 姚鹏飞

    2003-01-01

    We consider the exact controllability problem from boundary for thin shells. Under some check-able geometric assumptions on the middle surface, we establish the observability inequalities via the Bochnertechnique for the Dirichlet control and the Neumann control problems. We also give several examples to verifythe geometric assumptions.

  8. Sky Observations by the Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Sackes, Mesut

    2008-01-01

    The "National Science Education Standards (NSES)" state that students in grades K-4 are expected to understand that astronomical objects in the sky, including the Sun, Moon, and stars--have properties, locations, and patterns of movement that can be observed and described. They further suggest using an inquiry-based approach to teach…

  9. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

    1998-01-01

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  10. Observation of anharmonic Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisow, Felix; Wang, Gang; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    We report on the experimental observation of Bloch oscillations of an optical wave packet in a lattice with second-order coupling. To this end, we employ zigzag waveguide arrays, in which the second-order coupling can be precisely tuned.

  11. Observational modeling of topological spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaei, M.R. [Department of Mathematics, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman 76169-14111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mrmolaei@mail.uk.ac.ir

    2009-10-15

    In this paper a model for a multi-dimensional observer by using of the fuzzy theory is presented. Relative form of Tychonoff theorem is proved. The notion of topological entropy is extended. The persistence of relative topological entropy under relative conjugate relation is proved.

  12. Herschel observations of interstellar chloronium

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, David A; Snell, Ronald L; Lis, Dariusz; Benz, Arnold O; Bruderer, Simon; Black, John H; De Luca, Massimo; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goldsmith, Paul F; Gupta, Harshal; Indriolo, Nick; Bourlot, Jacques Le; Petit, Franck Le; Larsson, Bengt; Melnick, Gary J; Menten, Karl M; Monje, Raquel; Nagy, Zsofia; Phillips, Thomas G; Sandqvist, Aage; Sonnentrucker, Paule; van der Tak, Floris; Wolfire, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI), we have observed para-chloronium (H2Cl+) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight-lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sources Sgr A (+50 km/s cloud) and W31C. Both the para-H2-35Cl+ and para-H2-37Cl+ isotopologues were detected, through observations of their 1(11)-0(00) transitions at rest frequencies of 485.42 and 484.23 GHz, respectively. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio of 3, the observed optical depths imply that chloronium accounts for ~ 4 - 12% of chlorine nuclei in the gas phase. We detected interstellar chloronium emission from two sources in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1: the Orion Bar photodissociation region and the Orion South condensation. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio of 3 for chloronium, the observed emission line fluxes imply total beam-averaged column densities of ~ 2.0E+13 cm-2 and ~ 1.2E+13 cm-2, respect...

  13. Backyard Astronomy: Observing Moon Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandou, Bob

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity involving the observation of moon phases that can provide a one-on-one learning experience and stimulate interaction between a child and an adult family member. This activity can also be initiated by teachers and outcomes can be integrated into the classroom science curriculum. (JRH)

  14. Trends in Classroom Observation Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabianca, Jodi M.; Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations and ratings of classroom teaching and interactions collected over time are susceptible to trends in both the quality of instruction and rater behavior. These trends have potential implications for inferences about teaching and for study design. We use scores on the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary (CLASS-S) protocol from…

  15. Observing and Simulating Galaxy Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karen Pardos

    , most [CII] emission can be traced back to the molecular part of their ISM. The observed L[CII]-SFR relation at z > 0:5 is reproduced and a similar relation is established on kpc scales for the first time theoretically. A third study uncovers the presence of AGNs among massive galaxies at z _ 2...

  16. Observations of Local Seychelles Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Identification of physical oceanographic controls on mass and momentum transport on scales that are relevant to local ecology and fisheries and that... determine biological connectivity amongst the Seychelles’ multiple islands. • Collection of observational data that will provide validation and forcing...predictive modeling at local scales. The islands thus present a valuable venue for development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for flow

  17. The Teacher As Contemplative Observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard C.

    1999-01-01

    In a unique teacher-training program at Naropa Institute, future teachers learn to bring the fundamentals of Buddhist practice---observation, meditation, contemplation, and compassion--into the classroom. Contemplative teaching begins by rediscovering one's senses and by knowing and experiencing oneself directly. Spiritual education is not about…

  18. The INTEGRAL Core Observing Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, C.; Gehrels, N.; Lund, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The Core Programme of the INTEGRAL mission is defined as the portion of the scientific programme covering the guaranteed time observations for the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. This paper describes the current status of the Core Programme preparations and summarizes the key elements...

  19. The INTEGRAL Core Observing Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, C.; Gehrels, N.; Lund, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The Core Programme of the INTEGRAL mission is defined as the portion of the scientific programme covering the guaranteed time observations for the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. This paper describes the current status of the Core Programme preparations and summarizes the key elements...

  20. Countesthorpe College: an observant study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Ann; Stamatabis, Kathy

    1974-01-01

    Discussed the objectives and the conditions which made possible a new school embodying radical innovations. The results of a observational study at an early stage of the school's development, undertaken by a group of students, are summarised here by two of them, both now teaching in Leicestershire Upper Schools. (Editor/RK)

  1. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF INTERSTELLAR CHLORONIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, David A.; Indriolo, Nick [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Roueff, Evelyne; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, LUTH UMR 8102, 5 Pl. Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Snell, Ronald L. [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Lis, Dariusz; Monje, Raquel; Phillips, Thomas G. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benz, Arnold O. [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Bruderer, Simon [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Black, John H.; Larsson, Bengt [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala (Sweden); De Luca, Massimo; Gerin, Maryvonne [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Superieure, UPMC and UCP (France); Goldsmith, Paul F.; Gupta, Harshal [JPL, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Melnick, Gary J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Menten, Karl M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Nagy, Zsofia [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); and others

    2012-03-20

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared, we have observed para-chloronium (H{sub 2}Cl{sup +}) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sources Sgr A (+50 km s{sup -1} cloud) and W31C. Both the para-H{sup 35}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and para-H{sup 37}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} isotopologues were detected, through observations of their 1{sub 11}-0{sub 00} transitions at rest frequencies of 485.42 and 484.23 GHz, respectively. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of 3, the observed optical depths imply that chloronium accounts for {approx}4%-12% of chlorine nuclei in the gas phase. We detected interstellar chloronium emission from two sources in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1: the Orion Bar photodissociation region and the Orion South condensation. For an assumed OPR of 3 for chloronium, the observed emission line fluxes imply total beam-averaged column densities of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} and {approx}1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, respectively, for chloronium in these two sources. We obtained upper limits on the para-H{sup 35}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} line strengths toward H{sub 2} Peak 1 in the Orion Molecular cloud and toward the massive young star AFGL 2591. The chloronium abundances inferred in this study are typically at least a factor {approx}10 larger than the predictions of steady-state theoretical models for the chemistry of interstellar molecules containing chlorine. Several explanations for this discrepancy were investigated, but none has proven satisfactory, and thus the large observed abundances of chloronium remain puzzling.

  2. Observing binary inspiral with LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, L S

    1994-01-01

    Gravitational radiation from a binary neutron star or black hole system leads to orbital decay and the eventual coalescence of the binary's components. During the last several minutes before the binary components coalesce, the radiation will enter the bandwidth of the United States Laser Inteferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and the French/Italian VIRGO gravitational radiation detector. The combination of detector sensitivity, signal strength, and source density and distribution all point to binary inspiral as the most likely candidate for observation among all the anticipated sources of gravitational radiation for LIGO/VIRGO. Here I review briefly some of the questions that are posed to theorists by the impending observation of binary inspiral.

  3. Observations of the Icy Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, Adwin; Whittet, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Freeze-out of the gas phase elements onto cold grains in dense interstellar and circumstellar media builds up ice mantles consisting of molecules that are mostly formed in situ (H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and more). This review summarizes the detected infrared spectroscopic ice features and compares the abundances across Galactic, extragalactic, and solar system environments. A tremendous amount of information is contained in the ice band profiles. Laboratory experiments play a critical role in the analysis of the observations. Strong evidence is found for distinct ice formation stages, separated by CO freeze out at high densities. The ice bands have proven to be excellent probes of the thermal history of their environment. The evidence for the long-held idea that processing of ices by energetic photons and cosmic rays produces complex molecules is weak. Recent state of the art observations show promise for much progress in this area with planned infrared facilities.

  4. Kepler observations of Am stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balona, L. A.; Ripepi, V.; Cantanzaro, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of high-resolution spectra for two pulsating Am stars in the Kepler field. The stellar parameters derived in this way are important because parameters derived from narrow-band photometry may be affected by the strong metal lines in these stars. We analyse the Kepler time...... series of ten known Am stars and find that six of them clearly show δ Scuti pulsations. The other four appear to be non-pulsating. We derive fundamental parameters for all known pulsating Am stars from ground-based observations and also for the Kepler Am stars to investigate the location...... of the instability strip for pulsating Am stars. We find that there is not much difference between the Am-star instability strip and the δ Scuti instability strip. We find that the observed location of pulsating Am stars in the HR diagram does not agree with the location predicted from diffusion calculations. Based...

  5. Observational features of pulsar glitches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pulsar glitches are sudden increases in the rotation rate which probably result from angular momentum transfer within the neutron star. We review the observational features of the 39 glitches detected at Nanshan from 2000 to 2008, including several events which appear to be slow glitches. A wide variety of post-glitch behavior is observed with very little recovery in some pulsars and over-recovery in others. Analysis of the whole sample of known glitches shows that fractional glitch amplitudes are correlated with characteristic age with a peak at about 105 years, but there is a spread of two or three orders of magnitude at all ages. For individual pulsars with many glitches, the time until the next glitch is sometimes proportional to the fractional glitch amplitude.

  6. Pulsar observations at Mt. Pleasant

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, D R; McCulloch, P M

    2002-01-01

    Two daily pulsar monitoring programs are progressing at the Mount Pleasant Observatory, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. A new system involving the 26-metre radio telescope monitors 10 young pulsars daily and is focussed on near-real-time glitch finding. This will allow Target of Opportunity observations to measure post-glitch heating of the neutron star surface (Helfand, Gotthelf, & Halpern 2000). The 14-metre continues its 21st year of daily monitoring of the Vela pulsar with a recent comprehensive frontend upgrade. This is prior to an upgrade of the backend equipment currently in progress. The 14-metre observed the most recent glitch of the Vela pulsar in January 2000 to the highest time resolution of any glitch and revealed a particularly short-term decay component (Dodson, McCulloch, & Lewis 2002). This decay component will provide constraints to the nature of the coupling of the stellar crust to the liquid interior.

  7. AAO Observer - August 2011 Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Brough, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This edition of the Australian Astronomical Observatory Observer contains articles on the commissioning of the new SAMI instrument giving the first hexabundle galaxy spectra; galaxy parameter variations across and through the 6dFGS Fundamental Plane; an introduction to the new Dragonfly stellar interferometer; an update on the RAdial VElocity (RAVE) survey at half a million spectra; the Magellanic Quasars Survey; the Integrated Photonic Spectrograph's first look at the heart of the Scorpion; using AAOMega to measure the age of the young open cluster IC2602; making MANIFEST fibres for the Giant Magellan Telescope and a Voyage through Filaments of Galaxies. The Observer also contains thoughts on diversity in the astronomy community and reports on the recent Supernovae and their Host Galaxies conference and the 2011 Science Meets Parliament. In addition there are the usual features of the AUSGO Corner, Epping News and Letter from Coona.

  8. Radio observations of Planck clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Ruta

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a number of new galaxy clusters have been detected by the ESA-Planck satellite, the South Pole Telescope and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Several of the newly detected clusters are massive, merging systems with disturbed morphology in the X-ray surface brightness. Diffuse radio sources in clusters, called giant radio halos and relics, are direct probes of cosmic rays and magnetic fields in the intra-cluster medium. These radio sources are found to occur mainly in massive merging clusters. Thus, the new SZ-discovered clusters are good candidates to search for new radio halos and relics. We have initiated radio observations of the clusters detected by Planck with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. These observations have already led to the detection of a radio halo in PLCKG171.9-40.7, the first giant halo discovered in one of the new Planck clusters.

  9. Solar System Observations with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, James; Hammel, Heidi; Milam, Stefanie; Stansberry, John; Lunine, Jonathan; Chanover, Nancy; Hines, Dean; Sonneborn, George; Tiscareno, Matthew; Brown, Michael; Ferruit, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will enable a wealth of new scientific investigations in the near- and mid- infrared, with sensitivity and spatial-spectral resolution greatly surpassing its predecessors. In this paper, we focus upon Solar System science facilitated by JWST, discussing the most current information available concerning JWST instrument properties and observing techniques relevant to planetary science. We also present numerous example observing scenarios for a wide variety of Solar System targets to illustrate the potential of JWST science to the Solar System community. This paper updates and supersedes the Solar System white paper published by the JWST Project in 2010 (Lunine et al., 2010). It is based both on that paper and on a workshop held at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences in Reno, NV in 2012.

  10. Observations for CMIP5 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, J.; Waliser, D.; Crichton, D.; Braverman, A.; Boland, S.; Williams, D.; Gleckler, P.; Taylor, K.; Potter, J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this is to provide the community of researchers that will access and evaluate the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) model results access to analogous, analogous sets in terms of periods, variables, temporal/spatial frequency, sets of observational data. A collaborative effort between JPL/NASA and PCMDI is underway to provide the community of researchers that will access and evaluate the CMIP5 model results access to analogous sets of observational data. A number of NASA satellite data sets have been identified that have model equivalents. Thus far: AIRS, MLS, TES, QuikSCAT, CloudSat, Topex/Poseidon, CERES, TRMM, AMSR-E have been identified.

  11. INTEGRAL Observations of GW170104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savchenko, V.; Ferrigno, C.; Bozzo, E.

    2017-01-01

    We used data from the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) to set upper limits on the γ-ray and hard X-ray prompt emission associated with the gravitational-wave event GW170104, discovered by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo collaboration....... The unique omnidirectional viewing capability of the instruments on board INTEGRAL allowed us to examine the full 90% confidence level localization region of the LIGO trigger. Depending on the particular spectral model assumed and the specific position within this region, the upper limits inferred from...... the INTEGRAL observations range from F γ = 1.9 × 10−7 erg cm−2 to F γ = 10−6 erg cm−2 (75 keV–2 MeV energy range). This translates into a ratio between the prompt energy released in γ-rays along the direction to the observer and the gravitational-wave energy of E γ /E GW INTEGRAL...

  12. Observations and Effects of Dipolarization Fronts Observed in Earth's Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Dipolarization fronts in Earth's magnetotail are characterized by sharp jumps in magnetic field, a drop in density, and often follow earthward fast plasma flow. They are commonly detected near the equatorial plane of Earth s tail plasma sheet. Sometimes, but not always, dipolarization fronts are associated with global substorms and auroral brightenings. Both Cluster, THEMIS, and other spacecraft have detected dipolarization fronts in a variety of locations in the magnetotail. Using multi-spacecraft analyses together with simulations, we have investigated the propagation and evolution of some dipolarization events. We have also investigated the acceleration of electrons and ions that results from such magnetic-field changes. In some situations, the velocities of fast earthward flows are comparable to the Alfven speed, indicating that the flow bursts might have been generated by bursty reconnection that occurred tailward of the spacecraft. Based on multi-spacecraft timing analysis, dipolarization fronts are found to propagate mainly earthward at 160-335 km/s and have thicknesses of 900-1500 km, which corresponds to the ion inertial length or gyroradius scale. Following the passage of dipolarization fronts, significant fluctuations are observed in the x and y components of the magnetic field. These peaks in the magnetic field come approximately 1-2 minutes after passage of the dipolarization front. These Bx and By fluctuations propagate primarily dawnward and earthward. Field-aligned electron beams are observed coincident with those magnetic field fluctuations. Non-Maxwellian electron and ion distributions are observed that are associated with the dipolarization that may be unstable to a range of electrostatic and/or whistler instabilities. Enhanced electrostatic broadband noise at frequencies below and near the lower-hybrid frequency is also observed at or very close to these fronts. This broadband noise is thought to play a role in further energizing the particles

  13. Lidar Observations of Wave Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, K. L.; Raubenheimer, B.; Spore, N.; Gorrell, L.; Slocum, R. K.; Elgar, S.

    2016-02-01

    As waves propagate across the inner-surf zone, through a shorebreak, to the swash, their shapes can evolve rapidly, particularly if there are large changes in water depth over a wavelength. As wave shapes evolve, the time history of near-bed wave-orbital velocities also changes. Asymmetrical near-bed velocities result in preferential directions for sediment transport, and spatial variations in asymmetries can lead to morphological evolution. Thus, understanding and predicting wave shapes in the inner-surf and swash zones is important to improving sediment transport predictions. Here, rapid changes in wave shape, quantified by 3rd moments (skewness and asymmetry) of the sea-surface elevation time series, were observed on a sandy Atlantic Ocean beach near Duck, NC using terrestrial lidar scanners that measure the elevation of the water surface along a narrow cross-shore transect with high spatial [O(1 cm)] and temporal [O(0.5 s)] resolution. The terrestrial lidar scanners were mounted on a tower on the beach dune (about 8 m above the water surface) and on an 8-m tall amphibious tripod [the Coastal Research Amphibious Buggy (CRAB)]. Observations with the dune lidar are used to investigate how bulk wave shape parameters such as wave skewness and asymmetry, and the ratio of wave height to water depth (gamma) vary with beach slope, tide level, and offshore wave conditions. Observations with the lidar mounted on the CRAB are used to investigate the evolution of individual waves propagating across the surf zone and shorebreak to the swash. For example, preliminary observations from the CRAB include a wave that appeared to shoal and then "pitch" backwards immediately prior to breaking and running up the beach. Funded by the USACE Coastal Field Data Collection Program, ASD(R&E), and ONR.

  14. UAS Developments Supporting Wildfire Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosia, V. G.; Dahlgren, R. P.; Watts, A.; Reynolds, K. W.; Ball, T.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfires are regularly occurring emergency events that threaten life, property, and natural resources in every U.S. State and many countries around the world. Despite projections that $1.8 billion will be spent by U.S. Federal agencies alone on wildfires in 2014, the decades-long trend of increasing fire size, severity, and cost is expected to continue. Furthermore, the enormous potential for UAS (and concomitant sensor systems) to serve as geospatial intelligence tools to improve the safety and effectiveness of fire management, and our ability to forecast fire and smoke movements, remains barely tapped. Although orbital sensor assets are can provide the geospatial extent of wildfires, generally those resources are limited in use due to their spatial and temporal resolution limitations. These two critical elements make orbital assets of limited utility for tactical, real-time wildfire management, or for continuous scientific analysis of the temporal dynamics related to fire energy release rates and plume concentrations that vary significantly thru a fire's progression. Large UAS platforms and sensors can and have been used to monitor wildfire events at improved temporal, spatial and radiometric scales, but more focus is being placed on the use of small UAS (sUAS) and sensors to support wildfire observation strategies. The use of sUAS is therefore more critical for TACTICAL management purposes, rather than strategic observations, where small-scale fire developments are critical to understand. This paper will highlight the historical development and use of UAS for fire observations, as well as the current shift in focus to smaller, more affordable UAS for more rapid integration into operational use on wildfire events to support tactical observation strategies, and support wildfire science measurement inprovements.

  15. Observational constraints on undulant cosmologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena Requejo, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    In an undulant universe, cosmic expansion is characterized by alternating periods of acceleration and deceleration. We examine cosmologies in which the dark-energy equation of state varies periodically with the number of e-foldings of the scale factor of the universe, and use observations to constrain the frequency of oscillation. We find a tension between a forceful response to the cosmic coincidence problem and the standard treatment of structure formation.

  16. Experimental observation of fractional echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, G.; Hertz, E.; Billard, F.; Lavorel, B.; Siour, G.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Faucher, O.; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2016-09-01

    We report the observation of fractional echoes in a double-pulse excited nonlinear system. Unlike standard echoes, which appear periodically at delays which are integer multiples of the delay between the two exciting pulses, the fractional echoes appear at rational fractions of this delay. We discuss the mechanism leading to this phenomenon, and provide experimental demonstration of fractional echoes by measuring third harmonic generation in a thermal gas of CO2 molecules excited by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses.

  17. Measuring bias from unbiased observable

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seokcheon

    2014-01-01

    Since Kaiser introduced galaxies as a biased tracer of the underlying total mass field, the linear galaxies bias, b(z) appears ubiquitously both in theoretical calculations and in observational measurements related to galaxy surveys. However, the generic approaches to the galaxy density is a non-local and stochastic function of the underlying dark matter density and it becomes difficult to make the analytic form of b(z). Due to this fact, b(z) is known as a nuisance parameter and the effort has been made to measure bias free observable quantities. We provide the exact and analytic function of b(z) which also can be measured from galaxy surveys using the redshift space distortions parameters, more accurately unbiased observable \\beta \\sigma_{\\rm{gal}} = f \\sigma_8. We also introduce approximate solutions for b(z) for different gravity theories. One can generalize these approximate solutions to be exact when one solves the exact evolutions for the dark matter density fluctuation of given gravity theories. These...

  18. The ALMA Observation Support Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Heywood, I; Williams, C J

    2011-01-01

    The ALMA Observation Support Tool (OST) is an ALMA simulator which is interacted with solely via a standard web browser. It is aimed at users who may or may not be experts in interferometry, or those that do not wish to familarise themselves with the simulation components of a data reduction package. It has been designed to offer full imaging simulation capability for an arbitrary ALMA observation while maintaining the accessibility of other online tools such as the ALMA Sensitivity Calculator. Simulation jobs are defined by selecting and entering options on a standard web form. The user can specify the standard parameters that would need to be considered for an ALMA observation (e.g. pointing direction, frequency set up, duration), and there is also the option to upload arbitrary sky models in FITS format. Once submitted, jobs are sequentially processed by a remote server running a CASA-based back-end system. The user is notified by email when the job is complete, and directed to a standard web page which co...

  19. Observation of Nonlinear Compton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotseroglou, T.

    2003-12-19

    This experiment tests Quantum Electrodynamics in the strong field regime. Nonlinear Compton scattering has been observed during the interaction of a 46.6 GeV electron beam with a 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} laser beam. The strength of the field achieved was measured by the parameter {eta} = e{var_epsilon}{sub rms}/{omega}mc = 0.6. Data were collected with infrared and green laser photons and circularly polarized laser light. The timing stabilization achieved between the picosecond laser and electron pulses has {sigma}{sub rms} = 2 ps. A strong signal of electrons that absorbed up to 4 infrared photons (or up to 3 green photons) at the same point in space and time, while emitting a single gamma ray, was observed. The energy spectra of the scattered electrons and the nonlinear dependence of the electron yield on the field strength agreed with the simulation over 3 orders of magnitude. The detector could not resolve the nonlinear Compton scattering from the multiple single Compton scattering which produced rates of scattered electrons of the same order of magnitude. Nevertheless, a simulation has studied this difference and concluded that the scattered electron rates observed could not be accounted for only by multiple ordinary Compton scattering; nonlinear Compton scattering processes are dominant for n {ge} 3.

  20. Observer perspective imagery with stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Robyn; Menzies, Ross; Packman, Ann; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Adults who stutter are at risk of developing a range of psychological conditions. Social anxiety disorder is the most common anxiety disorder associated with stuttering. Observer perspective imagery is one cognitive process involved in the maintenance of some anxiety disorders. This involves viewing images as if looking at the self from the perspective of another. In contrast, the field perspective involves looking out from the self at the surrounding environment. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of observer perspective imagery with stuttering. The authors administered the Hackmann, Surawy and Clark (1998) semi-structured interview to 30 adults who stutter and 30 controls. Group images and impressions were compared for frequency, perspective recalled and emotional valence. The stuttering group was significantly more likely than controls to recall images and impressions from an observer rather than a field perspective for anxious situations. It is possible the present results could reflect the same attentional processing bias that occurs with anxiety disorders in the non-stuttering population. These preliminary results provide an explanation for the persistence of conditions such as social anxiety disorder with stuttering. Clinical implications are discussed.

  1. HST Observations of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrs, A. D.; Garner, C. J.; McIntosh, C. M.; Landis, R. R.; Schultz, A. B.

    2005-12-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observed the Moon in August 2005, using the High Resolution Camera (HRC) of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) (proposal ID 10719, PI Garvin). Three sites were observed: the Apollo 15 and 17 landing sites, and Aristarchus crater. Four filters were used: the F658N in the red, the F502N in the visible, the F344N in the UV, and the F250W in the vacuum UV. HST affords spatial resolution of about 100m on the Moon, as well as access to the vacuum UV, which are impossible from ground based observations. Tracking was necessarily done under gyro control and so some image drift occurred between and during exposures. We present HST data that has been processed to remove instrumental distortion and drift during the exposures. We use the MISTRAL image restoration algorithm (Mugnier et al. 2004) and a trailed point spread function to minimize the effects of image motion. We will make mosaics of data in individual filters and where there is spatial overlap between the mosaics, present maps showing both the relative age of the surface material, as well as its overall composition. Mugnier et al. (2004): "MISTRAL: a myopic edge-preserving image restoration method, with application to astronomical adaptive-optics-corrected long-exposure images", JOSA A, vol 21 no. 10, pp. 1841-1854

  2. Developing a Carbon Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B., III

    2015-12-01

    There is a clear need to better understand and predict future climate change, so that science can more confidently inform climate policy, including adaptation planning and future mitigation strategies. Understanding carbon cycle feedbacks, and the relationship between emissions (fossil and land use) and the resulting atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) concentrations in a changing climate has been recognized as an important goal by the IPCC. The existing surface greenhouse gas observing networks provide accurate and precise measurements of background values, but they are not configured to target the extended, complex and dynamic regions of the carbon budget. Space Agencies around the globe are committed to CO2 and CH4 observations: GOSAT-1/2, OCO-2/3, MERLin, TanSat, and CarbonSat. In addition to these Low Earth Orbit (LEO) missions, a new mission in Geostationary Orbit (GEO), geoCARB, which would provide mapping-like measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide concentrations over major land areas, has been recently proposed to the NASA Venture Program. These pioneering missions do not provide the spatial/temporal coverage to answer the key carbon-climate questions at process relevant scales nor do they address the distribution and quantification of anthropogenic sources at urban scales. They do demonstrate, however, that a well-planned future system of system integrating space-based LEO and GEO missions with extensive in situ observations could provide the accuracy, spatial resolution, and coverage needed to address critical open issues in the carbon-climate system. Dr. Diana Wickland devoted enormous energy in developing a comprehensive apprioach to understand the global carbon cycle; she understood well that an integrated, coordinated, international approach is needed. This shines through in her recent contribution in co-chairing the team that produced the "CEOS Strategy for Carbon Observations from Space." A NASA-funded community

  3. Biologic relativity: Who is the observer and what is observed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torday, John S; Miller, William B

    2016-05-01

    When quantum physics and biological phenomena are analogously explored, it emerges that biologic causation must also be understood independently of its overt appearance. This is similar to the manner in which Bohm characterized the explicate versus the implicate order as overlapping frames of ambiguity. Placed in this context, the variables affecting epigenetic inheritance can be properly assessed as a key mechanistic principle of evolution that significantly alters our understanding of homeostasis, pleiotropy, and heterochrony, and the purposes of sexual reproduction. Each of these become differing manifestations of a new biological relativity in which biologic space-time becomes its own frame. In such relativistic cellular contexts, it is proper to question exactly who has observer status, and who and what are being observed. Consideration within this frame reduces biology to cellular information sharing through cell-cell communication to resolve ambiguities at every scope and scale. In consequence, it becomes implicit that eukaryotic evolution derives from the unicellular state, remaining consistently adherent to it in a continuous evolutionary arc based upon elemental, non-stochastic physiologic first principles. Furthermore, the entire cell including its cytoskeletal apparatus and membranes that participate in the resolution of biological uncertainties must be considered as having equivalent primacy with genomes in evolutionary terms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interplay of Electroweak Precision Observables and B Physics Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Heinemeyer, S

    2007-01-01

    Indirect information about the possible scale of supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking is provided by B physics observables (BPO) as well as electroweak precision observables (EWPO). We review the combination of the constraints imposed by recent measurements of the BPO BR(b -> s gamma), BR(B_s -> mu+ mu-), BR(B_u -> tau nu_tau) and Delta M_{B_s} with those obtained from the experimental measurements of the EWPO M_W, sin^2 theta_eff, Gamma_Z, (g-2)_mu and M_h. We perform a chi^2 fit to the parameters of the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM), in which the SUSY-breaking parameters are universal at the GUT scale. Assuming that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) provides the cold dark matter density preferred by WMAP and other cosmological data, we confirm the preference found previously for a relatively low SUSY-breaking scale, though there is some slight tension between the EWPO and the BPO.

  5. Initial Results of DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, Magnetic Fields, and Plasma Waves Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Maynard, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF oscillations corresponding to a variety of plasma waves, in particular banded ELF hiss, whistlers, and lower hybrid wave turbulence triggered by lightning-induced sferics. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics and irregularities inherent to the Earth's low latitude ionosphere.

  6. Observations of a Windy Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    Hubble view of the Homunculus Nebula surrounding Eta Carinae [NASA Hubble Space Telescope/Jon Morse (University of Colorado)]The incredibly luminous massive star Eta Carinae has long posed a challenge for astronomers to model. New observations are now in so were our models correct?Dramatic TargetThe massive evolved star Eta Carinae, located 7,500 light-years away in the constellation Carina, is the most luminous star in the Milky Way. Eta Carinae has a quite a reputation for drama: it has been very unstable in the past, exhibiting repeated eruptions that have created the spectacular Homunculus Nebula surrounding it. Its present-day wind has the highest mass-loss rate of any hot star weve observed.Picture of Stellar WindTop panel: February 2017 observations of Eta Carinae in continuum (left) and H-alpha. Middle panel: the normalized radial profile for H-alpha and continuum emission. Bottom panel: the full width at half maximum for H-alpha and continuum emission of Eta Carinae. The H-alpha is about 2.5 to 3 milliarcseconds wider than the continuum. [Adapted from Wu et al. 2017]In our goal to understand the late evolutionary phases of very massive stars, weve developed radiative-transfer models to explain the behavior of Eta Carinae. One of the most well-known models, developed by John Hillier and collaborators in 2001, describes Eta Carinaes mass loss via stellar winds. With the right observations, this model is testable, since it predicts observable locations for different types of emission. In particular, one prediction of the Hillier et al. model is that the dense, ionized winds surrounding the star should emit in H-alpha at distances between 6 and 60 AU, with a peak around 20 AU.This nicely testable hypothesis is rendered less convenient by the fact that its hard to get resolved images of Eta Carinaes H-alpha emission. Its distance from us and the fact that its shrouded in the complex nebula it created have thus far prevented us from resolving the H

  7. Observing the Anthropocene from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittus, Hansjörg

    2016-07-01

    Influence of mankind on Earth's climate is evident. The growing population using the resources available, especially by burning goal, oil and gas, changes the composition of the Earth's atmosphere with the result of a continuously increasing temperature. Effects are not limited to the regional scale but are evident on the whole planet, meanwhile named Anthropocene. According to this global influence, it's necessary to also extend monitoring to the entire planet. Space-based observation systems are not limited by any artificial borders and are in principle able, to cover the whole Earth. In principle, two different ways of observation can be selected: Either a dedicated spacecraft will be send into low earth orbit (LEO) or existing platforms are used. Advantages of satellites are the more or less freely selectable orbit (with orbits covering also the polar regions) and the possible adaption of spacecraft platform for the dedicated instrument. On the other hand platforms like the ISS space station enable continuous long term coverage with different instruments. The drawback of an only limited coverage based on the orbit inclination is made up by the possibility to service systems on the station. Furthermore different generations of sensors can be run in parallel and therefore cross calibrated if needed. This paper reviews the currently available sensors types and discusses potential future needs. Included in this discussion is the international space station as an already available platform for earth observation. Furthermore, discussion should also take into account, that an increasing number of constellations with dozens or even thousand satellites are planned. Are these constellations also an option for an increased temporal and spatial monitoring of the Earth?

  8. APR-2 Tropical Cyclone Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, S. L.; Tanelli, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Second Generation Airborne Precipitation Radar (APR-2) participated in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment in August and September of 2010, collecting a large volume of data in several tropical systems, including Hurricanes Earl and Karl. Additional measurements of tropical cyclone have been made by APR-2 in experiments prior to GRIP (namely, CAMEX-4, NAMMA, TC4); Table 1 lists all the APR-2 tropical cyclone observations. The APR-2 observations consist of the vertical structure of rain reflectivity at 13.4 and 35.6 GHz, and at both co-polarization and crosspolarization, as well as vertical Doppler measurements and crosswind measurements. APR-2 normally flies on the NASA DC-8 aircraft, as in GRIP, collecting data with a downward looking, cross-track scanning geometry. The scan limits are 25 degrees on either side of the aircraft, resulting in a roughly 10-km swath, depending on the aircraft altitude. Details of the APR-2 observation geometry and performance can be found in Sadowy et al. (2003).The multiparameter nature of the APR-2 measurements makes the collection of tropical cyclone measurements valuable for detailed studies of the processes, microphysics and dynamics of tropical cyclones, as well as weaker systems that are associated with tropical cyclone formation. In this paper, we give a brief overview of how the APR-2 data are processed. We also discuss use of the APR-2 cross-track winds to estimate various quantities of interest in in studies of storm intensification. Finally, we show examples of the standard products and derived information.

  9. Functional observer and state feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we show the relation between state space approach and transfer function approach for functional observer and state feedback design. Two approaches can be transformed into each other, based on this result. More importantly, we find that the state space approach introduces some severe, unnecessary restrictions in solving the problem. The restrictions are, however, reduced to be a trivial condition in transfer function approach. It is believed that the result presented in this paper will be useful in developing both approaches, and motivate some new results for solving the problem.

  10. Lagrangian Observations of Rip Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    me with her faith that I could do it and her positive attitude despite the challenges she has faced as a new sixth-grade teacher. xiv THIS PAGE...turned off for the day. Throughout the deployment period drifters were deployed in similar-sized groups composed of new drifters and/or those that... Techonology , 20, 1069-1075, 2003. Schmidt, W.E., R.T. Guza, and D.N. Slinn, Surf zone currents over irregular bathymetry: Drifter observations and numerical

  11. Observations involving broadband impedance modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J.S. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Results for single- and multi-bunch instabilities can be significantly affected by the precise model that is used for the broadband impedance. This paper discusses three aspects of broadband impedance modelling. The first is an observation of the effect that a seemingly minor change in an impedance model has on the single-bunch mode coupling threshold. The second is a successful attempt to construct a model for the high-frequency tails of an r.f. cavity. The last is a discussion of requirements for the mathematical form of an impedance which follow from the general properties of impedances. (author)

  12. Observable Heavy Higgs Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Keus, Venus; Moretti, Stefano; Sokolowska, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter (DM), arising from an Inert Higgs Doublet, may either be light, below the $W$ mass, or heavy, above about 525 GeV. While the light region may soon be excluded, the heavy region is known to be very difficult to probe with either Direct Detection (DD) experiments or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We show that adding a second Inert Higgs Doublet helps to make the heavy DM region accessible to both DD and the LHC, by either increasing its couplings to the observed Higgs boson, or lowering its mass to $360 \\gev \\lesssim m_{DM}$, or both.

  13. From observational to dynamic genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. A. Haworth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Twin and family studies have shown that most traits are at least moderately heritable. But what are the implications of finding genetic influence for the design of intervention and prevention programs? For complex traits, heritability does not mean immutability, and research has shown that genetic influences can change with age, context and in response to behavioural and drug interventions. The most significant implications for intervention will come when we move from observational genetics to investigating dynamic genetics, including genetically sensitive interventions. Future interventions should be designed to overcome genetic risk and draw upon genetic strengths by changing the environment.

  14. Spin Observables and Path Integrals

    CERN Document Server

    López, J A

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the formulation of spin observables associated to a non-relativistic spinning particles in terms of grassmanian differential operators. We use as configuration space variables for the pseudo-classical description of this system the positions $x$ and a Grassmanian vector quantum amplitudes as path integrals in this superspace. We compute the quantum action necessary for this description including an explicit expression for the boundary terms. Finally we shown how for simple examples, the path integral may be performed in the semi-classical approximation, leading to the correct quantum propagator.

  15. Observable heavy Higgs dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keus, Venus [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics,Gustaf Hallstromin katu 2, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton,Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); King, Stephen F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton,Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Moretti, Stefano [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton,Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory,Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Sokolowska, Dorota [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Pasteura 5,02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-11-04

    Dark Matter (DM), arising from an Inert Higgs Doublet, may either be light, below the W mass, or heavy, above about 525 GeV. While the light region may soon be excluded, the heavy region is known to be very difficult to probe with either Direct Detection (DD) experiments or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We show that adding a second Inert Higgs Doublet helps to make the heavy DM region accessible to both DD and the LHC, by either increasing its couplings to the observed Higgs boson, or lowering its mass to 360 GeV≲m{sub DM}, or both.

  16. Plateau Inflation and Planck Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    A new family of inflationary models is introduced and analysed. The behaviour of the parameters characterising the models suggest preferred values, which generate the most interesting testable predictions. Results are further improved if late reheating and/or a subsequent period of thermal inflation is taken into account. Specific model realisations consider a sub-Planckian inflaton variation or a potential without fine-tuning of mass scales, based on the Planck and GUT scales. A toy model realisation in the context of global and local supersymmetry is examined and results fitting the Planck observations are determined.

  17. EUV observations of comet Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripken, H. W.; Fahr, H. J.; Lay, G.

    The use of spaceborne or sounding-rocket EUV observations to determine the He/H abundance ratio, the shape of the Lyman-alpha emission line, and the H velocity distribution in comet Halley is discussed. The resonance-absorption-cell spectrophotometers of the payloads proposed by Fahr et al. (1984) for the Ultra-Halley experiment are briefly characterized and shown to be capable of obtaining quantitative measurements of the 58.4-nm line of He for comet He/H ratios in excess of 0.0004, successfully eliminating or accounting for geocoronal and cosmic contamination.

  18. Infrared Observations of Active Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guichard

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report medium resolution, spectroscopic observations of a selected sample of AGNs and Starburst galaxies, at wavelengths ranging from 1.1 to 2.4 microns . Strong HI, HeI, H2 and [FeII] emission lines have been detected, as well as stellar features, such as the CO bandheads in both H- and K-band, and SiI, NaI, and CaI lines. The excitation mechanisms for the H2 emission are discussed.

  19. Local observation in eternal inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, James; Hawking, S W; Hertog, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    We consider landscape models that admit several regions where the conditions for eternal inflation hold. It is shown that one can use the no-boundary wave function to calculate small departures from homogeneity within our past light cone despite the possibility of much larger fluctuations on super horizon scales. The dominant contribution comes from the history exiting eternal inflation at the lowest value of the potential. In a class of landscape models this predicts a tensor to scalar ratio of about 10%. In this way the no-boundary wave function defines a measure for the prediction of local cosmological observations.

  20. Understanding experimentally-observed fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2016-01-01

    We discuss two topics on the experimental measurements of fluctuation observables in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. First, we discuss the effects of the thermal blurring, i.e. the blurring effect arising from the experimental measurement of fluctuations in momentum space as a proxy of the thermal fluctuations defined in coordinate space, on higher order cumulants. Second, we discuss the effect of imperfect efficiency of detectors on the measurement of higher order cumulants. We derive effective formulas which can carry out the correction of this effect for higher order cumulants based on the binomial model.

  1. Classification of Intermittent Dependent Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    report was prepared in conjirnction with research funded by the Naval Ocean Systems Center, San Diego, California. This report was prepared by: PATRICIA ...variance- cov aria nce matrix S T k= Let the matrices Hi(t) and Hi be such that Hj(t)Hj (t)T yit (2.14) and HilHiT =-i (2.15) It follows that Y(t)l M...Gaver and Patricia A. Jacobs. "Item identities and their related observables." Naval Postgraduate School Technical Report, NPS55-90-03, 1989. P. A. W

  2. Sparsity considerations for dependent observations

    CERN Document Server

    Alquier, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive introduction for the study of L1-penalized estimators in the context of dependent observations. We define a general $\\ell_{1}$-penalized estimator for solving problems of stochastic optimization. This estimator turns out to be the LASSO in the regression estimation setting. Powerful theoretical guarantees on the statistical performances of the LASSO were provided in recent papers, however, they usually only deal with the iid case. Here, we study our estimator under various dependence assumptions.

  3. Observations involving broadband impedance modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    Results for single- and multi-bunch instabilities can be significantly affected by the precise model that is used for the broadband impendance. This paper discusses three aspects of broadband impendance modeling. The first is an observation of the effect that a seemingly minor change in an impedance model has on the single-bunch mode coupling threshold. The second is a successful attempt to construct a model for the high-frequency tails of an r.f cavity. The last is a discussion of requirements for the mathematical form of an impendance which follow from the general properties of impendances.

  4. Photometrical Observations "SBIRS GEO-2"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Epishev, V. P.; Karpenko, G. F.; Sukhov, K. P.; Kudak, V. I.

    Photometrical observations GSS "SBIRS GEO 2" in B,V,R filters were carried near the equinoxes 2014-2015. Used velocity electrophotometer based on the FEU-79 in the pulse-counting mode. Received more than 25 light curves. From the known dimensions are defined; effective reflecting area - Sγλ, the spectral reflectance index - γλ, periods of light variation. Color-indices showed that in the reflected light flux from the GSS prevails "red" component. In the light curves are periodically dips and specular flash. This shows that GSS orbit is not in a static position specified triaxial orientation as in dynamic motion. Assumed following dynamics of the satellite "SBIRS GEO 2" in orbit. Helical scanning the Earth's surface visible infrared sensors satellite occurs with a period P1 = 15.66 sec. and swinging of the GSS about the direction of the motion vector of the satellite in an orbit with P2 = 62.64 sec., from the northern to the southern pole. Thus, during the period of swinging GSS going on 2 scan the visible part of the northern and southern hemispheres. In some dates observations dynamics work satellite in orbit changed.

  5. Committed warming inferred from observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten; Pincus, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Due to the lifetime of CO2, the thermal inertia of the oceans, and the temporary impacts of short-lived aerosols and reactive greenhouse gases, the Earth’s climate is not equilibrated with anthropogenic forcing. As a result, even if fossil-fuel emissions were to suddenly cease, some level of committed warming is expected due to past emissions as studied previously using climate models. Here, we provide an observational-based quantification of this committed warming using the instrument record of global-mean warming, recently improved estimates of Earth’s energy imbalance, and estimates of radiative forcing from the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Compared with pre-industrial levels, we find a committed warming of 1.5 K (0.9-3.6, 5th-95th percentile) at equilibrium, and of 1.3 K (0.9-2.3) within this century. However, when assuming that ocean carbon uptake cancels remnant greenhouse gas-induced warming on centennial timescales, committed warming is reduced to 1.1 K (0.7-1.8). In the latter case there is a 13% risk that committed warming already exceeds the 1.5 K target set in Paris. Regular updates of these observationally constrained committed warming estimates, although simplistic, can provide transparent guidance as uncertainty regarding transient climate sensitivity inevitably narrows and the understanding of the limitations of the framework is advanced.

  6. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Chan, Tucker; Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-04-02

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables — jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum — have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their “local” computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applications do require knowledge about the jet constituents, we also build a hybrid event shape that incorporates (local) jet clustering information. As a straightforward application of our general technique, we derive an event-shape version of jet trimming, allowing event-wide jet grooming without explicit jet identification. Finally, we briefly mention possible applications of our method for jet substructure studies.

  7. Jet Observables Without Jet Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolini, Daniele; Thaler, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables---jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum---have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their "local" computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applicatio...

  8. Sensors for observing ecosystem status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kröger

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to review the availability and application of sensors for observing marine ecosystem status. It gives a broad overview of important ecosystem variables to be investigated, such as biogeochemical cycles, primary and secondary production, species distribution, animal movements, habitats and pollutants. Some relevant legislative drivers are listed, as they provide one context in which ecosystem studies are undertaken. In addition to literature cited within the text the paper contains some useful web links to assist the reader in making an informed instrument choice, as the authors feel that the topic is so broad, it is impossible to discuss all relevant systems or to provide appropriate detail for those discussed. This is therefore an introduction to how and why ecosystem status is currently observed, what variables are quantified, from what platforms, using remote sensing or in-situ measurements, and gives examples of useful sensor based tools. Starting with those presently available, to those under development and also highlighting sensors not yet realised but desirable for future studies.

  9. Sensors for observing ecosystem status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kröger

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to review the availability and application of sensors for observing marine ecosystem status. It gives a broad overview of important ecosystem variables to be investigated, such as biogeochemical cycles, primary and secondary production, species distribution, animal movements, habitats and pollutants. Some relevant legislative drivers are listed, as they provide one context in which ecosystem studies are undertaken. In addition to literature cited within the text the paper contains some useful web links to assist the reader in making an informed instrument choice, as the authors feel that the topic is so broad, it is impossible to discuss all relevant systems or to provide appropriate detail for those discussed. It is therefore an introduction to how and why ecosystem status is currently observed, what variables are quantified, from what platforms, using remote sensing or in-situ measurements, and gives examples of useful sensor based tools. Starting with those presently available, to those under development and also highlighting sensors not yet realised but desirable for future studies.

  10. Observation of the Top Quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. B.

    1995-08-01

    Top quark production is observed in{bar p}p collisions at{radical}s= 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup+19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup+3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

  11. Observations of substorm fine structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazutin

    Full Text Available Particle and magnetic field measurements on the CRRES satellite were used, together with geosynchronous satellites and ground-based observations, to investigate the fine structure of a magnetospheric substorm on February 9, 1991. Using the variations in the electron fluxes, the substorm activity was divided into several intensifications lasting about 3–15 minutes each. The two main features of the data were: (1 the intensifications showed internal fine structure in the time scale of about 2 minutes or less. We call these shorter periods activations. Energetic electrons and protons at the closest geosynchronous spacecraft (1990 095 were found to have comparable activation structure. (2 The energetic (>69 keV proton injections were delayed with respect to electron injections, and actually coincided in time with the end of the intensifications and partial returns to locally more stretched field line configuration. We propose that the energetic protons could be able to control the dynamics of the system locally be quenching the ongoing intensification and possibly preparing the final large-scale poleward movement of the activity. It was also shown that these protons originated from the same intensification as the preceeding electrons. Therefore, the substorm instability responsible for the intensifications could introduce a negative feedback loop into the system, creating the observed fine structure with the intensification time scales.

    Key words. Magnetospheric Physics (Storms and substorms.

  12. Magnetar outbursts: an observational review

    CERN Document Server

    Rea, Nanda

    2011-01-01

    Transient outbursts from magnetars have shown to be a key property of their emission, and one of the main way to discover new sources of this class. From the discovery of the first transient event around 2003, we now count about a dozen of outbursts, which increased the number of these strongly magnetic neutron stars by a third in six years. Magnetar outbursts might involve their multi-band emission resulting in an increased activity from radio to hard X-ray, usually with a soft X-ray flux increasing by a factor of 10-1000 with respect to the quiescent level. A connected X-ray spectral evolution is also often observed, with a spectral softening during the outburst decay. The flux decay times vary a lot from source to source, ranging from a few weeks to several years, as also the decay law which can be exponential-like, a power-law or even multiple power-laws can be required to model the flux decrease. We review here on the latest observational results on the multi-band emission of magnetars, and summarize one...

  13. Observation of Pollution from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, J. P.; Richter, A.; Bovensmann, H.; Buchwitz, M.; Andrés Hernández, M. D.; Hilboll, A.; Schoenhardt, A.; Blechschmidt, A.; Alvarado, L.; Wittrock, F.

    2016-12-01

    The rapid growth of population since the industrial revolution has led to large changes in surface emissions and land use change. It is now over 30 years since the SCIAMACHY project was initiated. This project has led to the GOME (ESA ERS-2 1995-2011), SCIAMACHY (ESA Envisat 2002 to 2011) GOME-2 (EUMETSAT/ESA Metop A, 2006 to present, Metop B 2012 to present, Metop C planned launch 2018) and the spin offs OMI (NASA AURA 2004-present) . This presentation addresses observations of tropospheric trace gas pollutants retrieved these instruments with a focus on recent studies of the ozone precursors NO2, HCHO and CHO.CHO, the halogen oxides BrO, IO and CH4 and CO2. It will discuss the objectives of the DLR HALO EMeRGe mission. The latter is research mission combining satelltie and aircraft observations, whihc aims to study pollution from major pollution centers in Europe and Asia, and is planned to take palce in 2017 and 2018.

  14. Shipboard Video Observations of Whitecaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendeman, M.; Thomson, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Video observations of breaking ocean surface waves in deep water (i.e., whitecaps) are useful for determining which waves are breaking and inferring how much energy these breakers are dissipating. We present shipboard video of breaking waves from a research cruise in the North Pacific. As with airborne systems, motion compensation is essential in geo-rectifying the image. A stabilization method based on the location of the horizon in the image is shown to be effective in correcting pitch and roll motions to within one degree, without an IMU (inertial motion unit). After rectification, whitecaps are identified and measured based on the translation of surface foam patches, which appear as groups of bright pixels. Two standard breaking metrics, whitecap coverage and Phillips' Λ(c) distribution, are calculated for the full dataset and compared with other recent observations. In addition, the growth rate of the whitecap foam patches is used to examine a new dissipation function, independent from Λ(c), which was developed in laboratory experiments. Finally, we present preliminary whitecap results from a stereo system. Stereo imaging has the potential to provide much more information about the geometry and kinematics of breaking surface waves in the field, but significant technical challenges remain.

  15. Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, A.; Cerezo, F.; Fernandez, M.; Lomba, J.; Lopez, M.; Moreno, J.; Neira, A.; Quintana, C.; Torres, J.; Trigo, R.; Urena, J.; Vega, E.; Vez, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Spanish Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITyC) and the Ministry of Defense (MoD) signed an agreement in 2007 for the development of a "Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System" based, in first instance, on two satellites: a high resolution optical satellite, called SEOSAT/Ingenio, and a radar satellite based on SAR technology, called SEOSAR/Paz. SEOSAT/Ingenio is managed by MITyC through the Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI), with technical and contractual support from the European Space Agency (ESA). HISDESA T together with the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA, National Institute for Aerospace Technology) will be responsible for the in-orbit operation and the commercial operation of both satellites, and for the technical management of SEOSAR/Paz on behalf of the MoD. In both cases EADS CASA Espacio (ECE) is the prime contractor leading the industrial consortia. The ground segment development will be assigned to a Spanish consortium. This system is the most important contribution of Spain to the European Programme Global Monitoring for Environment and Security, GMES. This paper presents the Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System focusing on SEOSA T/Ingenio Programme and with special emphasis in the potential contribution to the ESA Third Party Missions Programme and to the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security initiative (GMES) Data Access.

  16. Dusty winds II. Observational Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Zeljko

    2010-01-01

    We compare observations of AGB stars and predictions of the Elitzur & Ivezic (2001) steady-state radiatively driven dusty wind model. The model results are described by a set of similarity functions of a single independent variable, and imply general scaling relations among the system parameters. We find that the model properly reproduces various correlations among the observed quantities and demonstrate that dust drift through the gas has a major impact on the structure of most winds. From data for nearby oxygen-rich and carbon-rich mass-losing stars we find that (1) the dispersion in grain properties within each group is rather small; (2) both the dust cross-section per gas particle and the dust-to-gas mass ratio are similar for the two samples even though the stellar atmospheres and grain properties are very different; (3) the dust abundance in both outflows is significantly below the Galactic average, indicating that most of the Galactic dust is not stardust - contrary to popular belief, but in suppor...

  17. Conformal Relativity: Theory and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Pervushin, V; Zorin, A

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical and observational arguments are listed in favor of a new principle of relativity of units of measurements as the basis of a conformal-invariant unification of General Relativity and Standard Model by replacement of all masses with a scalar (dilaton) field. The relative units mean conformal observables: the coordinate distance, conformal time, running masses, and constant temperature. They reveal to us a motion of a universe along its hypersurface in the field space of events like a motion of a relativistic particle in the Minkowski space, where the postulate of the vacuum as a state with minimal energy leads to arrow of the geometric time. In relative units, the unified theory describes the Cold Universe Scenario, where the role of the conformal dark energy is played by a free minimal coupling scalar field in agreement with the most recent distance-redshift data from type Ia supernovae. In this Scenario, the evolution of the Universe begins with the effect of intensive creation of primordial W-Z-b...

  18. Spitzer observations of hydrogen deuteride

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, D A; Hollenbach, D J; Sonnentrucker, P; Melnick, G J; Bergin, E A; Snell, R L; Forrest, W J; Watson, D M; Kaufman, M J; Neufeld, David A.; Green, Joel D.; Hollenbach, David J.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Melnick, Gary J.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Snell, Ronald L.; Forrest, William J.; Watson, Dan M.; Kaufman, and Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    We report the detection of interstellar hydrogen deuteride (HD) toward the supernova remnant IC443, and the tentative detection of HD toward the Herbig Haro objects HH54 and HH7 and the star forming region GGD37 (Cepheus A West). Our detections are based upon spectral line mapping observations of the R(3) and R(4) rotational lines of HD, at rest wavelengths of 28.502 and 23.034 micron respectively, obtained using the Infrared Spectrograph onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The HD R(4)/R(3) line intensity ratio promises to be a valuable probe of the gas pressure in regions where it can be observed. The derived HD/H2 abundance ratios are 1.19(+0.35/-0.24)E-5, 1.80(+0.54/-0.32)E-5, and 1.41(+0.46/-0.33)E-5 respectively (68.3% confidence limits, based upon statistical errors alone) for IC443 (clump C), HH54, and HH7. If HD is the only significant reservoir of gas-phase deuterium in these sources, the inferred HD/H2 ratios are all consistent with a gas-phase elemental abundance [n(D)/n(H)](gas) ~ 7.5E-6, a facto...

  19. Ocean Observations of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Don

    2016-01-01

    The ocean influences climate by storing and transporting large amounts of heat, freshwater, and carbon, and exchanging these properties with the atmosphere. About 93% of the excess heat energy stored by the earth over the last 50 years is found in the ocean. More than three quarters of the total exchange of water between the atmosphere and the earth's surface through evaporation and precipitation takes place over the oceans. The ocean contains 50 times more carbon than the atmosphere and is at present acting to slow the rate of climate change by absorbing one quarter of human emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning, cement production, deforestation and other land use change.Here I summarize the observational evidence of change in the ocean, with an emphasis on basin- and global-scale changes relevant to climate. These include: changes in subsurface ocean temperature and heat content, evidence for regional changes in ocean salinity and their link to changes in evaporation and precipitation over the oceans, evidence of variability and change of ocean current patterns relevant to climate, observations of sea level change and predictions over the next century, and biogeochemical changes in the ocean, including ocean acidification.

  20. Herschel Observations of Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Thomas E; Tappert, Claus; Hoffman, Douglas I; Campbell, Ryan K

    2012-01-01

    We have used the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory to observe eight cataclysmic variables at 70 and 160 microns. Of these eight objects, only AM Her was detected. We have combined the Herschel results with ground-based, Spitzer, and WISE observations to construct spectral energy distributions for all of the targets. For the two dwarf novae in the sample, SS Cyg and U Gem, we find that their infrared luminosities are completely dominated by their secondary stars. For the two highly magnetic "polars" in our survey, AM Her and EF Eri, we find that their mid-infrared excesses, previously attributed to circumbinary dust emission, can be fully explained by cyclotron emission. The WISE light curves for both sources show large, orbitally modulated variations that are identically phased to their near-IR light curves. We propose that significant emission from the lowest cyclotron harmonics (n

  1. Stereoscopic observations from meteorological satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, A. F.; Mack, R.; Negri, A.

    The capability of making stereoscopic observations of clouds from meteorological satellites is a new basic analysis tool with a broad spectrum of applications. Stereoscopic observations from satellites were first made using the early vidicon tube weather satellites (e.g., Ondrejka and Conover [1]). However, the only high quality meteorological stereoscopy from low orbit has been done from Apollo and Skylab, (e.g., Shenk et al. [2] and Black [3], [4]). Stereoscopy from geosynchronous satellites was proposed by Shenk [5] and Bristor and Pichel [6] in 1974 which allowed Minzner et al. [7] to demonstrate the first quantitative cloud height analysis. In 1978 Bryson [8] and desJardins [9] independently developed digital processing techniques to remap stereo images which made possible precision height measurement and spectacular display of stereograms (Hasler et al. [10], and Hasler [11]). In 1980 the Japanese Geosynchronous Satellite (GMS) and the U.S. GOES-West satellite were synchronized to obtain stereo over the central Pacific as described by Fujita and Dodge [12] and in this paper. Recently the authors have remapped images from a Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) to the coordinate system of a Geosynchronous Earth Orbiter (GEO) and obtained stereoscopic cloud height measurements which promise to have quality comparable to previous all GEO stereo. It has also been determined that the north-south imaging scan rate of some GEOs can be slowed or reversed. Therefore the feasibility of obtaining stereoscopic observations world wide from combinations of operational GEO and LEO satellites has been demonstrated. Stereoscopy from satellites has many advantages over infrared techniques for the observation of cloud structure because it depends only on basic geometric relationships. Digital remapping of GEO and LEO satellite images is imperative for precision stereo height measurement and high quality displays because of the curvature of the earth and the large angular separation of the

  2. Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Haruhisa

    In order to meet the requirements of Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) as well as to continue the ADEOS and ADEOS2 missions, JAXA is now planning the GCOM mission which is composed of a series of satellites. There are two series of satellites, and they are now called GCOM-W and GCOM-C satellites. Both series are composed of 3 satellites with 5 years lifetime. Hence, 13 years of continuous observation can be assured with 1 year overlaps. The first satellite of GCOM-W will be launched in fiscal 2011 while the first one of GCOM-C will be launched in fiscal 2013. In regard to global warming, the GCOM intends the measurement of most factors involved in the energy and water cycle and material cycle, which are the main mechanisms determining climate change, and also analysis of the relevant processes. Within the material cycle, measurement of the carbon cycle is a key subject. In this particular field, the GCOM aims at estimating the primary production as well as carbon flux based on measurement data on land vegetation and phytoplankton. In regard to changes of the land environment, the measuring subjects are tropical forests and the global distribution of vegetation and its changes. In regard to the cryosphere, the sea ice concentration and snow coverage are measured and their interaction with the climate is analyzed. GCOM-W1 will carry AMSR2 (AMSR F/O). AMSR2 will be very similar to AMSR on ADEOS2 and AMSR-E on EOS-Aqua with some modifications. The aperture of AMSR2 is 2m, and AMSR2 will have more accurate hot load than AMSR. Two kinds of modification are intro-duced. One is to use an actively controlled thermal reflector over the hot load. This reflector is called a temperature controlled plate (TCP). Another modification is to shield the ambient emissions. GCOM-C1 will carry GLI F/O (called the second generation GLI : SGLI). The SGLI will be rather different from GLI on ADEOS2. The main targets of SGLI are atmospheric aerosols, coastal zone and land

  3. 50 CFR 600.746 - Observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Observers. 600.746 Section 600.746... Observers. (a) Applicability. This section applies to any fishing vessel required to carry an observer as part of a mandatory observer program or carrying an observer as part of a voluntary observer...

  4. Observing Planetary Rings with JWST: Science Justification and Observation Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Tiscareno, Matthew S; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N; de Pater, Imke; Hamilton, Douglas P; Hedman, Matthew M; Nicholson, Philip D; Showalter, Mark R; Tamayo, Daniel; Verbiscer, Anne J

    2014-01-01

    The rings that adorn the four giant planets are of prime importance as accessible natural laboratories for disk processes, as clues to the origin and evolution of planetary systems, and as shapers as well as detectors of their planetary environments. The retinue of small moons accompanying all known ring systems are intimately connected as both sources and products, as well as shepherds and perturbers, of the rings. Leading sources of data on ring systems include spacecraft such as Cassini and Voyager, but also space telescopes such as Hubble and Spitzer as well as ground-based telescopes. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is being prepared for launch in 2018 to begin a planned five-year mission. JWST will have the capability to observe solar system objects as close as Mars. Although most of the hardware is already designed and under construction if not completed, work continues on the development of operations guidelines and software and the completion of calibration tasks. The purpose of this white pape...

  5. Spitzer Observations of IC 2118

    CERN Document Server

    Guieu, S; Stauffer, J R; Vrba, F J; Noriega-Crespo, A; Spuck, T; Moody, T Roelofsen; Sepulveda, B; Weehler, C; Maranto, A; Cole, D M; Flagey, N; Laher, R; Penprase, B; Ramirez, S; Stolovy, S

    2010-01-01

    IC 2118, also known as the Witch Head Nebula, is a wispy, roughly cometary, ~5 degree long reflection nebula, and is thought to be a site of triggered star formation. In order to search for new young stellar objects (YSOs), we have observed this region in 7 mid- and far-infrared bands using the Spitzer Space Telescope and in 4 bands in the optical using the U. S. Naval Observatory 40-inch telescope. We find infrared excesses in 4 of the 6 previously-known T Tauri stars in our combined infrared maps, and we find 6 entirely new candidate YSOs, one of which may be an edge-on disk. Most of the YSOs seen in the infrared are Class II objects, and they are all in the "head" of the nebula, within the most massive molecular cloud of the region.

  6. Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lochner, Michelle; Zwart, Jonathan T L; Smirnov, Oleg; Bassett, Bruce A; Oozeer, Nadeem; Kunz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) New telescopes like the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will push into a new sensitivity regime and expose systematics, such as direction-dependent effects, that could previously be ignored. Current methods for handling such systematics rely on alternating best estimates of instrumental calibration and models of the underlying sky, which can lead to inaccurate uncertainty estimates and biased results because such methods ignore any correlations between parameters. These deconvolution algorithms produce a single image that is assumed to be a true representation of the sky, when in fact it is just one realisation of an infinite ensemble of images compatible with the noise in the data. In contrast, here we report a Bayesian formalism that simultaneously infers both systematics and science. Our technique, Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations (BIRO), determines all parameters directly from the raw data, bypassing image-making entirely, by sampling from the joint posterior probability distribution. Thi...

  7. Multifrequency observations of BL Lacertae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.

    1990-01-01

    Optical, IR, and radio monitoring data covering 20 years are presented for BL Lac. Also, four simultaneous multifrequency spectra are given, covering the range 10 to the 9th - 10 to the 18th Hz. These spectra include ground-based observations and data from the Einstein, Exosat, IUE, and IRAS satellites. From the monitoring data, the character of emission variability is determined using structure functions. The multifrequency spectra are used to study the origin of X-ray emission and to determine the physical parameters of emitting regions. The data show that the emitting region is inhomogeneous, with a small inner region of high density and magnetic field that eventually becomes a large, partially opaque radio emitting region with a low density and magnetic fields. Also, the two simple predictions of the synchrotron self-Compton model are reproduced by the multifrequency spectra.

  8. Sky cover from MFRSR observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kassianov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their modeled clear-sky counterparts are the main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumuli. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from a ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR. The MFRSR data are collected at the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumuli. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  9. COSMOS Hubble Space Telescope Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Scoville, N Z; Blain, A W; Calzetti, D; Comastri, A; Capak, P; Carilli, C; Carlstrom, J E; Carollo, C M; Colbert, J; Daddi, E; Ellis, Richard S; Elvis, M; Ewald, S P; Fall, M; Franceschini, A; Giavalisco, M; Green, W; Griffiths, R E; Guzzo, L; Hasinger, G; Impey, C; Kneib, J P; Koda, J; Koekemoer, A; Lefèvre, O; Lilly, S; Liu, C T; McCracken, H J; Massey, R; Mellier, Y; Miyazaki, S; Mobasher, B; Mould, J; Norman, C; Réfrégier, A; Renzini, A; Rhodes, J; Rich, M; Sanders, D B; Schiminovich, D; Schinnerer, E; Scodeggio, M; Sheth, K; Shopbell, P L; Taniguchi, Y; Tyson, N; Urry, C M; Van Waerbeke, L; Vettolani, P; White, S D M; Yan, L

    2006-01-01

    The Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) was initiated with an extensive allocation (590 orbits in Cycles 12-13) using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for high resolution imaging. Here we review the characteristics of the HST imaging with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and parallel observations with NICMOS and WFPC2. A square field (1.8$\\sq$\\deg) has been imaged with single-orbit ACS I-F814W exposures with 50% completeness for sources 0.5\\arcsec in diameter at I$_{AB} $ = 26.0 mag. The ACS imaging is a key part of the COSMOS survey, providing very high sensitivity and high resolution (0.09\\arcsec FWHM, 0.05\\arcsec pixels) imaging and detecting a million objects. These images yield resolved morphologies for several hundred thousand galaxies. The small HST PSF also provides greatly enhanced sensitivity for weak lensing investigations of the dark matter distribution.

  10. An international biodiversity observation year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall; Adams; Mooney; Boxshall; Dobson; Nakashizuka

    2001-01-01

    The International Geophysical Year (IGY), which took place between July 1957 and December 1958, helped us to rethink the world. At a time when there was a major paradigm shift in our understanding of the physical world, the international collaboration of the IGY helped to reset the discipline. The International Biodiversity Observation Year (IBOY) is now occurring at a time when our dependence on, and understanding of, biodiversity is being acknowledged as a paradigm shift in our present view of the world. Although the benefits of IGY were initially intellectual with practical effects remaining unknown until many years later, the benefits of greater knowledge of biodiversity will support efforts towards sustainability and affect the quality of life, both now and in the future. By providing the framework for international collaborations between scientists involved in every aspect of life on Earth, IBOY has the potential to redefine our current understanding of biodiversity in a manner similar to how IGY helped redefine the geophysical world.

  11. Observability of market daily volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroni, Filippo; Serva, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    We study the price dynamics of 65 stocks from the Dow Jones Composite Average from 1973 to 2014. We show that it is possible to define a Daily Market Volatility σ(t) which is directly observable from data. This quantity is usually indirectly defined by r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) where the r(t) are the daily returns of the market index and the ω(t) are i.i.d. random variables with vanishing average and unitary variance. The relation r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) alone is unable to give an operative definition of the index volatility, which remains unobservable. On the contrary, we show that using the whole information available in the market, the index volatility can be operatively defined and detected.

  12. Whatever Shines Should be Observed

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna-Lawlor, S. M. P.

    2003-08-01

    It is good to mark the new Millennium by looking back as well as forward. Whatever Shines should be Observed looks to the nineteenth century to celebrate the achievements of five distinguished women, four of whom were born in Ireland while the fifth married into an Irish family, who made pioneering contributions to photography, microscopy, astronomy and astrophysics. The women featured came from either aristocratic or professional families. Thus, at first sight, they had many material advantages among their peers. In the ranks of the aristocracy there was often a great passion for learning, and the mansions in which these families lived contained libraries, technical equipment (microscopes and telescopes) and collections from the world of nature. More modest professional households of the time were rich in books, while activities such as observing the stars, collecting plants etc. typically formed an integral part of the children's education. To balance this it was the prevailing philosophy that boys could learn, in addition to basic subjects, mathematics, mechanics, physics, chemistry and classical languages, while girls were channelled into 'polite' subjects like music and needlework. This arrangement allowed boys to progress to University should they so wish, where a range of interesting career choices (including science and engineering) was open to them. Girls, on the other hand, usually received their education at home, often under the tutelage of a governess who would not herself had had any serious contact with scientific or technical subjects. In particular, progress to University was not during most of the nineteenth century an option for women, and access to scientific libraries and institutions was also prohibited. Although those women with aristocratic and professional backgrounds were in a materially privileged position and had an opportunity to 'see' through the activities of their male friends and relatives how professional scientific life was lived

  13. Multiwavelength Observations of Recent Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.; Gicquel, Adeline; Cordiner, Martin; Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Chuang, Yo-Ling; Villanueva, Geronimo; DiSanti, Michael A.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Remijan, Anthony J.; Coulson, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Comets provide important clues to the physical and chemical processes that occurred during the formation and early evolution of the Solar System, and could also have been important for initiating prebiotic chemistry on the early Earth. Comets are comprised of molecular ices, that may be pristine inter-stellar remnants of Solar System formation, along with high-temperature crystalline silicate dust that is indicative of a more thermally varied history in the protosolar nebula. Comparing abundances of cometary parent volatiles, and isotopic fractionation ratios, to those found in the interstellar medium, in disks around young stars, and between cometary families, is vital to understanding planetary system formation and the processing history experienced by organic matter in the so-called interstellar-comet connection. We will present a comparison of molecular abundances in these comets to those observed in others, supporting a long-term effort of building a comet taxonomy based on composition.

  14. [Bias in observational research: 'confounding'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenwold, Rolf H H

    2012-01-01

    Confounding is an important and common issue in observational (non-randomized) research on the effects of pharmaceuticals or exposure to etiologic factors (determinants). Confounding is present when a third factor, related to both the determinant and the outcome, distorts the causal relation between these two. There are different methods to control for confounding. The most commonly used are restriction, stratification, multivariable regression models, and propensity score methods. With these methods it is only possible to control for variables for which data is known: measured confounders. Research in the area of confounding is currently directed at the incorporation of external knowledge on unmeasured confounders, the evaluation of instrumental variables, and the impact of time-dependent confounding.

  15. Ice sheet hydrology from observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter (Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ-, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    The hydrological systems of ice sheets are complex. Our view of the system is split, largely due to the complexity of observing the systems. Our basic knowledge of processes have been obtained from smaller glaciers and although applicable in general to the larger scales of the ice sheets, ice sheets contain features not observable on smaller glaciers due to their size. The generation of water on the ice sheet surface is well understood and can be satisfactorily modeled. The routing of water from the surface down through the ice is not complicated in terms of procat has been problematic is the way in which the couplings between surface and bed has been accomplished through a kilometer of cold ice, but with the studies on crack propagation and lake drainage on Greenland we are beginning to understand also this process and we know water can be routed through thick cold ice. Water generation at the bed is also well understood but the main problem preventing realistic estimates of water generation is lack of detailed information about geothermal heat fluxes and their geographical distribution beneath the ice. Although some average value for geothermal heat flux may suffice, for many purposes it is important that such values are not applied to sub-regions of significantly higher fluxes. Water generated by geothermal heat constitutes a constant supply and will likely maintain a steady system beneath the ice sheet. Such a system may include subglacial lakes as steady features and reconfiguration of the system is tied to time scales on which the ice sheet geometry changes so as to change pressure gradients in the basal system itself. Large scale re-organization of subglacial drainage systems have been observed beneath ice streams. The stability of an entirely subglacially fed drainage system may hence be perturbed by rapid ice flow. In the case of Antarctic ice streams where such behavior has been observed, the ice streams are underlain by deformable sediments. It is

  16. Radar Observation of Insects - Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, E.; Downing, J.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were conducted at several sites over the coastal lowlands of New Jersey and over a region of high plains and low mountains in Oklahoma. In one area, a salt marsh in New Jersey, extensive ground tests were combined with laboratory data on expected insect backscatter to arrive at an extremely convincing model of the insect origin of most Dot Angels. A great deal of insight was studied from radar on the buildup and dispersal of insect swarms, since radar can follow where other means of trapping and observation cannot. Data on large-scale behavior as a function of wind and topography are presented. Displayed techniques which show individual or small swarm motion within some larger cloud or mass, or which can show the overall motion over great distances were developed. The influence of wind and terrain on insect motion and dispersal is determined from radar data.

  17. Barred Galaxies: an Observer's Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Gadotti, Dimitri A

    2008-01-01

    I review both well established and more recent findings on the properties of bars, and their host galaxies, stemming from photometric and spectroscopic observations, and discuss how these findings can be understood in terms of a global picture of the formation and evolution of bars, keeping a connection with theoretical developments. In particular, I show the results of a detailed structural analysis of ~ 300 barred galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, providing physical quantities, such as bar length, ellipticity and boxyness, and bar-to-total luminosity ratio, that can either be used as a solid basis on which realistic models can be built, or be compared against more fundamental theoretical results. I also show correlations that indicate that bars grow longer, thinner and stronger with dynamical age, and that the growth of bars and bulges is connected. Finally, I briefly discuss open questions and possible directions for future research.

  18. FUSE Observations of eta Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Iping, R C; Gull, T R

    2004-01-01

    Eta Carinae was observed by FUSE through the LWRS (30 arcsec x30 arcsec) and HIRS (1.25 arcsec x 20 arcsec) apertures in March and April 2004. There are significant differences between the two spectra. About half of the LWRS flux appears to be due to two B-type stars near the edge of the LWRS aperture, 14 arcsec from eta Carinae. The HIRS spectrum (LiF1 channel) therefore reveals the intrinsic FUV spectrum of eta Carinae without this stellar contamination. The HIRS spectrum contains strong interstellar H2 having high rotational excitation (up to J=8). Most of the atomic species with prominent ISM features (C II, Fe II, Ar I, P II, etc) also have strong blue-shifted absorption to v= ~ -580 km/s that is associated with expanding debris from the 1840 eruption.

  19. Observational Analysis of Coronal Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpeanu, D.-C.; Rachmeler, L; Mierla, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Coronal fans (see Figure 1) are bright observational structures that extend to large distances above the solar surface and can easily be seen in EUV (174 angstrom) above the limb. They have a very long lifetime and can live up to several Carrington rotations (CR), remaining relatively stationary for many months. Note that they are not off-limb manifestation of similarly-named active region fans. The solar conditions required to create coronal fans are not well understood. The goal of this research was to find as many associations as possible of coronal fans with other solar features and to gain a better understanding of these structures. Therefore, we analyzed many fans and created an overview of their properties. We present the results of this statistical analysis and also a case study on the longest living fan.

  20. Observed properties of extrasolar planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Andrew W

    2013-05-03

    Observational surveys for extrasolar planets probe the diverse outcomes of planet formation and evolution. These surveys measure the frequency of planets with different masses, sizes, orbital characteristics, and host star properties. Small planets between the sizes of Earth and Neptune substantially outnumber Jupiter-sized planets. The survey measurements support the core accretion model, in which planets form by the accumulation of solids and then gas in protoplanetary disks. The diversity of exoplanetary characteristics demonstrates that most of the gross features of the solar system are one outcome in a continuum of possibilities. The most common class of planetary system detectable today consists of one or more planets approximately one to three times Earth's size orbiting within a fraction of the Earth-Sun distance.

  1. Moving Observer Support for Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukauskas, Linas

    Interactive visual data explorations impose rigid requirements on database and visualization systems. Systems that visualize huge amounts of data tend to request large amounts of memory resources and heavily use the CPU to process and visualize data. Current systems employ a loosely coupled...... architecture to exchange data between database and visualization. Thus, the interaction of the visualizer and the database is kept to the minimum, which most often leads to superfluous data being passed from database to visualizer. This Ph.D. thesis presents a novel tight coupling of database and visualizer...... together with the VR-tree enables the fast extraction of appearing and disappearing objects from the observer's view as he navigates through the data space. Usage of VAST structure significantly reduces the number of objects to be extracted from the VR-tree and VAST enables a fast interaction of database...

  2. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  3. Nature of the Physical Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osoroma, Drahcir S.

    2010-12-01

    The nature of the observer has long plagued physical science. Here we review the current status of cognitive science in the context of a cosmology of mind in an Anthropic Multiverse. The concept of an élan vital or life force has long been considered the elementary action principle driving the evolution of living-systems by theologically minded scientists and individuals. Sufficiently extending Einstein's original model of a Static Universe, to a Holographic Anthropic Multiverse (HAM), provides a context for solving this centuries old problem for introducing this type of teleological principle into Physics, Biology, Medicine and Psychology. This means the contemporary framework of biological mechanism should no longer be considered the formal philosophical basis for describing living systems and contemporary allopathic (scientific) medicine. The new noetic action principle has far reaching implications for medicine and transpersonal psychology.

  4. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  5. Observing the observer (II): deciding when to decide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunizeau, Jean; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Pessiglione, Matthias; Kiebel, Stefan J; Friston, Karl J; Stephan, Klaas E

    2010-12-14

    In a companion paper [1], we have presented a generic approach for inferring how subjects make optimal decisions under uncertainty. From a Bayesian decision theoretic perspective, uncertain representations correspond to "posterior" beliefs, which result from integrating (sensory) information with subjective "prior" beliefs. Preferences and goals are encoded through a "loss" (or "utility") function, which measures the cost incurred by making any admissible decision for any given (hidden or unknown) state of the world. By assuming that subjects make optimal decisions on the basis of updated (posterior) beliefs and utility (loss) functions, one can evaluate the likelihood of observed behaviour. In this paper, we describe a concrete implementation of this meta-Bayesian approach (i.e. a Bayesian treatment of Bayesian decision theoretic predictions) and demonstrate its utility by applying it to both simulated and empirical reaction time data from an associative learning task. Here, inter-trial variability in reaction times is modelled as reflecting the dynamics of the subjects' internal recognition process, i.e. the updating of representations (posterior densities) of hidden states over trials while subjects learn probabilistic audio-visual associations. We use this paradigm to demonstrate that our meta-Bayesian framework allows for (i) probabilistic inference on the dynamics of the subject's representation of environmental states, and for (ii) model selection to disambiguate between alternative preferences (loss functions) human subjects could employ when dealing with trade-offs, such as between speed and accuracy. Finally, we illustrate how our approach can be used to quantify subjective beliefs and preferences that underlie inter-individual differences in behaviour.

  6. Observing the observer (II: deciding when to decide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Daunizeau

    Full Text Available In a companion paper [1], we have presented a generic approach for inferring how subjects make optimal decisions under uncertainty. From a Bayesian decision theoretic perspective, uncertain representations correspond to "posterior" beliefs, which result from integrating (sensory information with subjective "prior" beliefs. Preferences and goals are encoded through a "loss" (or "utility" function, which measures the cost incurred by making any admissible decision for any given (hidden or unknown state of the world. By assuming that subjects make optimal decisions on the basis of updated (posterior beliefs and utility (loss functions, one can evaluate the likelihood of observed behaviour. In this paper, we describe a concrete implementation of this meta-Bayesian approach (i.e. a Bayesian treatment of Bayesian decision theoretic predictions and demonstrate its utility by applying it to both simulated and empirical reaction time data from an associative learning task. Here, inter-trial variability in reaction times is modelled as reflecting the dynamics of the subjects' internal recognition process, i.e. the updating of representations (posterior densities of hidden states over trials while subjects learn probabilistic audio-visual associations. We use this paradigm to demonstrate that our meta-Bayesian framework allows for (i probabilistic inference on the dynamics of the subject's representation of environmental states, and for (ii model selection to disambiguate between alternative preferences (loss functions human subjects could employ when dealing with trade-offs, such as between speed and accuracy. Finally, we illustrate how our approach can be used to quantify subjective beliefs and preferences that underlie inter-individual differences in behaviour.

  7. Scheduling observations of celestial objects for Earth observing sensor calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Truman; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-10-01

    Radiometric calibration of Earth-observing satellite sensors is critical for tracking on-orbit gain changes throughout the satellite's mission. The Moon, being a stable, well-characterized radiometric target, has been used effectively for tracking the relative gain changes of the reflective solar bands for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board EOS AM-1 (Terra) and PM-1 (Aqua). The Moon is viewed through the MODIS space-view port, and the relative phase of the Moon is restricted to within 0.5 degrees of a chosen target phase to increase the accuracy of the calibration. These geometric restrictions require spacecraft maneuvers in order to bring space-view port into proper alignment with the position of the Moon when the phase requirement is met. In this paper, we describe a versatile tool for scheduling such maneuvers based on the required geometry and lunar phase restrictions for a general spacecraft bound instrument. The results of the scheduling tool have been verified using lunar images from Aqua and Terra MODIS after a scheduled roll maneuver was performed. This tool has also been tested for the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder on-board the Suomi-NPP spacecraft. As an extension of this work, we have also developed a tool for scheduling views of bright stars. These stars provide another well-characterized radiometric source that can be used for sensor calibration. This tool has been implemented to determine the times in which a chosen star can be viewed by the high gain stages of the day/night band for the VIIRS instrument.

  8. What Catches the Eye in Class Observation? Observers' Perspectives in a Multidisciplinary Peer Observation of Teaching Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ana Cristina; Lopes, Amélia; Valente, Jorge M. S.; Mouraz, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Peer Observation of Teaching has raised a lot of interest as a device for quality enhancement of teaching. While much research has focused on its models, implementation schemes and feedback to the observed, little attention has been paid to what the observer actually sees and can learn from the observation. A multidisciplinary peer observation of…

  9. Radio observations of massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Blomme, Ronny

    2011-01-01

    Detectable radio emission occurs during almost all phases of massive star evolution. I will concentrate on the thermal and non-thermal continuum emission from early-type stars. The thermal radio emission is due to free-free interactions in the ionized stellar wind material. Early ideas that this would lead to an easy and straightforward way of measuring the mass-loss rates were thwarted by the presence of clumping in the stellar wind. Multi-wavelength observations provide important constraints on this clumping, but do not allow its full determination. Non-thermal radio emission is associated with binarity. This conclusion was already known for some time for Wolf-Rayet stars and in recent years it has become clear that it is also true for O-type stars. In a massive-star binary, the two stellar winds collide and around the shocks a fraction of the electrons are accelerated to relativistic speeds. Spiralling in the magnetic field these electrons emit synchrotron radiation, which we detect as non-thermal radio em...

  10. Non-invasive light observer

    CERN Document Server

    Morichetti, Francesco; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Sampietro, Marco; Strain, Michael; Sorel, Marc; Melloni, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Photonic technologies lack non-invasive monitoring tools to inspect the light inside optical waveguides. This is one of the main barriers to large scale of integration, even though photonic platforms are potentially ready to host several thousands of elements on a single chip. Here, we demonstrate non-invasive light observation in silicon photonics devices by exploiting photon interaction with intra-gap energy states localized at the waveguide surface. Light intensity is measured through a ContactLess Integrated Photonic Probe (CLIPP) that introduces no measurable extra-photon absorption and a phase perturbation as low as 0.2 mrad, comparable to thermal fluctuations of less than 3 mK. Multipoint light monitoring is demonstrated with a sensitivity of -30 dBm and a dynamic range of 40 dB. CLIPP technology is simple, inherently CMOS compatible, and scalable to hundreds of probing points per chip. This concept provides a viable way to real-time conditioning and feedback control of densely-integrated photonic syst...

  11. Observation of optomechanical buckling transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Kemiktarak, U.; Fan, J.; Ragole, S.; Lawall, J.; Taylor, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    Correlated phases of matter provide long-term stability for systems as diverse as solids, magnets and potential exotic quantum materials. Mechanical systems, such as buckling transition spring switches, can have engineered, stable configurations whose dependence on a control variable is reminiscent of non-equilibrium phase transitions. In hybrid optomechanical systems, light and matter are strongly coupled, allowing engineering of rapid changes in the force landscape, storing and processing information, and ultimately probing and controlling behaviour at the quantum level. Here we report the observation of first- and second-order buckling transitions between stable mechanical states in an optomechanical system, in which full control of the nature of the transition is obtained by means of the laser power and detuning. The underlying multiwell confining potential we create is highly tunable, with a sub-nanometre distance between potential wells. Our results enable new applications in photonics and information technology, and may enable explorations of quantum phase transitions and macroscopic quantum tunnelling in mechanical systems.

  12. Management of onchocerciasis. Personal observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, J L

    1982-01-09

    During a 12-month period (1977 - 1978) of employment in the river forest area of the Ivory Coast, an isolated area hyperendemic for onchocerciasis, a unique opportunity arose to study the disease in depth. Personal observations and experiences with the disease did not necessarily correlate with textbook statements. Although onchocerciasis may involve almost any area of the body it more commonly involves the skin, eyes, lymphatics and groin area. The disease does not appear to cause premature or direct death, but is often acutely and chronically disabling. Diethylcarbamazine and suramin are effective in preventing disabling complications and in diminishing or controlling the progression of complications, but are nephrotoxic. Surgery is utilized to excise microfilaria-producing nodules in order to minimize or control disease progression and for the repair of the frequently occurring complication of inguinal or femoral hernias and hydroceles. A high percentage of patients had microfilarial eye infiltrates but blindness was uncommon. The disease should therefore be known as 'river eye disease' rather than the current 'river blindness'. There is no known method of effective prevention of the disease that is acceptable on a long-term basis.

  13. Orbital Debris Observations with WFCAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bold, Matthew; Cross, Nick; Irwin, Mike; Kendrick, Richard; Kerr, Thomas; Lederer, Susan; Mann, Robert; Sutorius, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope has been operating for 35 years on the summit of Mauna Kea as a premier Infrared astronomical facility. In its 35th year the telescope has been turned over to a new operating group consisting of University of Arizona, University of Hawaii and the LM Advanced Technology Center. UKIRT will continue its astronomical mission with a portion of observing time dedicated to orbital debris and Near Earth Object detection and characterization. During the past 10 years the UKIRT Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) has been performing large area astronomical surveys in the J, H and K bands. The data for these surveys have been reduced by the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit in Cambridge, England and archived by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. During January and February of 2014 the Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) was used to scan through the geostationary satellite belt detecting operational satellites as well as nearby debris. Accurate photometric and astrometric parameters have been developed by CASU for each of the detections and all data has been archived by WFAU.

  14. Optimisation of solar synoptic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klvaña, Miroslav; Sobotka, Michal; Švanda, Michal

    2012-09-01

    The development of instrumental and computer technologies is connected with steadily increasing needs for archiving of large data volumes. The current trend to meet this requirement includes the data compression and growth of storage capacities. This approach, however, has technical and practical limits. A further reduction of the archived data volume can be achieved by means of an optimisation of the archiving that consists in data selection without losing the useful information. We describe a method of optimised archiving of solar images, based on the selection of images that contain a new information. The new information content is evaluated by means of the analysis of changes detected in the images. We present characteristics of different kinds of image changes and divide them into fictitious changes with a disturbing effect and real changes that provide a new information. In block diagrams describing the selection and archiving, we demonstrate the influence of clouds, the recording of images during an active event on the Sun, including a period before the event onset, and the archiving of long-term history of solar activity. The described optimisation technique is not suitable for helioseismology, because it does not conserve the uniform time step in the archived sequence and removes the information about solar oscillations. In case of long-term synoptic observations, the optimised archiving can save a large amount of storage capacities. The actual capacity saving will depend on the setting of the change-detection sensitivity and on the capability to exclude the fictitious changes.

  15. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.

  16. Chandra Observations of Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Andrea; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present early X-ray results from Chandra for two starburst galaxies, M82 and NGC3256, obtained using AXAF CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-I) and the HRC. For M82 the arcsecond spatial resolution enables us to separate the point source component from the extended emission for the first time. Astrometry reveals that most of the X-ray sources are not coincident with the family of compact radio sources believed to be Super Nova Remnants (SNRs). In addition, based on three epoch Chandra observations, several of the X-ray sources are clearly variable indicating that they are binaries. When we deconvolve the extended and point source components detected in the hard X-ray band, we find that 50 percent arises from the extended component. This fact, together with its morphology, constrains the various models proposed to explain the hard X-ray emission. For NGC3256 we resolve two closely separated nuclei. These new data support a pure starburst origin for the total X-ray emission rather than a composite AGN/starburst, thereby making NGC3256 one of the most X-ray luminous starburst galaxies known.

  17. Geotail observations of FTE velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Korotova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the plasma velocity signatures expected in association with flux transfer events (FTEs. Events moving faster than or opposite the ambient media should generate bipolar inward/outward (outward/inward flow perturbations normal to the nominal magnetopause in the magnetosphere (magnetosheath. Flow perturbations directly upstream and downstream from the events should be in the direction of event motion. Flows on the flanks should be in the direction opposite the motion of events moving at subsonic and subAlfvénic speeds relative to the ambient plasma. Events moving with the ambient flow should generate no flow perturbations in the ambient plasma. Alfvén waves propagating parallel (antiparallel to the axial magnetic field of FTEs may generate anticorrelated (correlated magnetic field and flow perturbations within the core region of FTEs. We present case studies illustrating many of these signatures. In the examples considered, Alfvén waves propagate along event axes away from the inferred reconnection site. A statistical study of FTEs observed by Geotail over a 3.5-year period reveals that FTEs within the magnetosphere invariably move faster than the ambient flow, while those in the magnetosheath move both faster and slower than the ambient flow.

  18. Lamb pulse observed in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, H.; Given, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that seismograms observed at Longmire, Washington, for four eruptions of Mt. St. Helens, those on May 18, June 13, August 7, and August 8, 1980, can be interpreted as Lamb pulses excited by a nearly vertical single force representing the counter force of the eruption. These data furnish reliable estimates of the impulse of the force K (time integral of the force), from which the total momentum and the kinetic energy, E, of the ejecta associated with the eruption can be estimated. The estimates made of K are 1.4 x 10 to the 19th, 1.4 x 10 to the 16th, 3.7 x 10 to the 15th, and 2.8 x 10 to the 15th dynes-sec for the four eruptions (given chronologically). The corresponding estimates for E range from 0.70 to 2.6 x 10 to the 23rd, 0.70 to 2.6 x 10 to the 20th, 1.9 x 10 to the 19th, and 1.4 to 5.3 x 10 to the 19th erg using values of ejecta velocity ranging from 100 to 375 m/sec. The ratio of K to the amplitude of the air wave excited by the eruption is found to be 20 to 40 times larger for the main event on May 18 than for the other events, indicating a significant difference in the eruptive mechanism. A digital seismograph in the vicinity of a volcano is shown to provide a simple means for quantifying the explosive power of a volcanic eruption.

  19. Observing the Anthropocene from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, John

    The industrial revolution, which began in the UK in the late 18th century, has been fuelled by the use of cheap energy from fossil fuel combustion. It has facilitated a dramatic rise in both the human population, now above 7 Billion with 50% now living in urban agglomerations, and its standard of living. It is anticipated that by 2050 there will be of the order of 8.3 to 10 billion people, 75% living in cities. Anthropogenic activity has resulted in pollution from the local to the global scale changes in land use, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, the modification of biogeochemical cycling, acid deposition, impacted on ecosystems and ecosystem services, destruction of biodiversity and climate change. The impact of man has moved the earth from the Holocene to the new geological epoch of the Anthropocene. To improve our understanding of the earth atmosphere system and the accuracy of the prediction of its future changes, knowledge of the amounts and distributions of trace atmospheric constituents are essential -“One cannot manage what is not measured”. An integrated observing system, comprising ground and space based segments is required to improve our science and to provide an evidence base needed for environmental policymakers. Passive remote sensing measurements made of the up-welling radiation at the top of the atmosphere from instrumentation on space borne platforms provide a unique opportunity to retrieve globally atmospheric composition. This presentation describes results from the SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY on ESA Envsiat 2002 to 2012) and its spin offs GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment ESA ERS-2 1995 to 2011) and GOME-2 (ESA/EUMETSAT Metop series). The potential of the SCIAMACHY successors Sentinel 5, CarbonSat, and SCIA-ISS will also be addressed.

  20. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Unique Five-Week VLT Study of the Polarisation of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow "Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" are certainly amongst the most dramatic events known in astrophysics. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays, first detected in the late 1960's by military satellites, last from less than one second to several minutes. GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. The energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00. During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of extremely massive stars, the so-called hypernovae. This was finally demonstrated some months ago when astronomers, using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), documented in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the light source ("the optical afterglow") of the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 (cf. ESO PR 16/03). A conclusive and direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars was provided on this occasion. Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 was discovered on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer spacecraft. Follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) showed the burst to have a redshift of 0.1685 [1]. This corresponds to a distance of about 2,650 million light-years, making GRB 030329 the second-nearest long-duration GRB ever detected. The proximity of GRB 030329 resulted in very bright afterglow emission, permitting the most extensive follow-up observations of any afterglow to date. A team of astronomers [2] led by Jochen Greiner of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany) decided to make use of this unique opportunity to study the

  1. New observations on meniscal cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Jada Jean; Connor, Gregory F.; Helms, Clyde A. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of meniscal cysts, assess the frequency of various magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics, and emphasize radiographic observations not commonly reported. A total of 2,095 consecutive knee MR imaging reports from a 22 month period were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of meniscal cysts. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed the cases where cysts were reported. A meniscal cyst was considered present if abnormally increased signal was identified within an enlarged meniscus (i.e., intrameniscal cyst) or if a loculated fluid-intensity lesion with a clear connection to the adjacent meniscus was identified (i.e., parameniscal cyst). Presence or absence of a meniscal tear, intrameniscal and parameniscal signal intensity, patient age, sex, location of meniscal cyst, presence of discoid meniscus, and size of the parameniscal cyst component were recorded. All knee imaging examinations were performed on a 1.5T MR unit. Imaging findings were correlated with arthroscopic reports when available. A total of 167 cases (8.0%) of meniscal cysts were diagnosed in 161 patients. Of the 167 cysts, 69 (41.3%) were located in the lateral meniscus and 98 (58.7%) in the medial meniscus. In 6 patients (3.7%), meniscal cysts were present in both menisci of the same knee. Twelve (7.2%) meniscal cysts were associated with discoid menisci. Ninety-seven (57.8%) meniscal cysts were associated with meniscal tears. Of the total number of meniscal cysts, 104 (62.3%) had a parameniscal cyst. An isolated intrameniscal cyst was present in 63 (37.7%) cases. One hundred (96%) of the parameniscal cyst components were isointense to fluid on T2-weighted FSE images. All cysts exhibited abnormal intrameniscal signal. Only 14 (8.4%) of the intrameniscal components were isointense to fluid on T2-weighted FSE images. The arthroscopic reports of 88 of the 161 (54.7%) patients were available for review and correlation. A tear extending to

  2. Observational Study of Travelers' Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuris

    1995-03-01

    Background: European air travelers returning from Algeria, Egypt, Mexico, Morocco, and Tunisia were interviewed about their experience of travelers' diseases upon arrival in Brussels. Diarrhea was mentioned by 37% of the adults and 27% of the children. These subjects were questioned about the types of measures taken, type and duration of drug treatment (if any), and about duration of diarrhea and side effects experienced. Methods: Final analysis was performed based on 2160 interviews. The largest proportion of diarrhea was reported in the age group 15-24 years (46%). Results: The majority of the 2160 subjects had opted for drug treatment (81%): 927 subjects for loperamide alone, 235 for loperamide in combination with nifuroxazide, and 178 for nifuroxazide alone. Other drugs had been used less frequently. The median time to recovery was 2.4 days with loperamide compared to 3.2 days with nifuroxazide and to 3.4 days for the no-treatment group. Conclusions: A stratification of the results by severity of the diarrhea suggests a rank of antidiarrheal potency as follows: loperamide > nifuroxazide > no-drug treatment. The side effect with the highest incidence was constipation (2.4% with loperamide). (J Travel Med 2:11-15, 1995) Travelers' diarrhea is usually defined as the passage of at least three unformed stools per day or any number of such stools when accompanied by fever, abdominal cramping, or vomiting. The definition may be broadened to include more trivial bowel disturbance.1,2 The duration of this self-limited disease generally is 3 to 5 days. Medical intervention aims at shortening the duration of disease, thus allowing the sufferer to resume his or her usual activities at an early stage. A shortened period of recovery to physical well-being has obvious favorable economic implications if the traveler is on business and may help the maintenance of a desired level of quality of life while a traveler is on holiday. An observational study of various medical

  3. Clinical Observation on Thyroid Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seon Yang; Shin, Yong Tae; Cho, Bo Yun; Kim, Byung Kuk; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1978-09-15

    Clinical features of 147 patients with biopsy-proven thyroid carcinomas were investigated from January, 1972 to April, 1978 at the Seoul National University Hospital with the following results. 1) The incidence of thyroid carcinomas according to their histopathological classification revealed 76.2% of papillary carcinoma, 19.0% of follicular carcinoma, and 3 cases of occult sclerozing carcinoma, 1 case of giant cell carcinoma and 1 case of metastatic melanoma. 2) The ratio of male to female patients was 1:8.3 and showed no difference between papillary and follicular carcinomas. 3) The age distribution showed the peak incidence in the fourth decade (29.3%) followed by the fifth and sixth decades. 4) The average duration of illness from the onset of symptoms was about 5 years while it was 4.4 years and 7.6 years in the papillary and follicular carcinomas respectively. 5) The diameter of the thyroid masses was smaller than 5 cm in 53.6% of the patients, from 5 cm to 10 cm in 40.0% and larger than 10 cm in 6.4%. 6) In 36.4% of the patients with thyroid carcinomas the thyroid masses were fixed to adjacent tissues. 7) Metastasis to the regional lymph nodes was noted in 40.0% of the total cases, and in 45.2% and 17.6% of the papillary and follicular carcinomas respectively, while the lung and bone metastases were found in 10.0% and 4.4% in each type respectively. 8) 88.9% of the patients showed cold areas in the thyroid scans using {sup 131}I. 9) Typical psammoma bodies were observed in 21.3% of the cases in the microscopic examination of the pathological specimens. 10) The initial diagnosis of thyroid malignancy could be made before histological confirmation in 64.5% of the patients. 11) The clinical staging slightly modified from Schulz method revealed 43.6% of the patients in stage I, 26.4% in stage II, 20.9% in stage III and 9.1% in stage IV. 12) The association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis was noted in 4 cases, with nodular goiter in 3 cases, and with follicular

  4. Port Operational Marine Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, A.; Stefanov, A.; Slabakova, V.; Marinova, V.

    2009-04-01

    The Port Operational Marine Observing System (POMOS) is a network of distributed sensors and centralized data collecting, processing and distributing unit. The system is designed to allow for the real-time assessment of weather and marine conditions throughout the major Bulgarian ports: Varna, Burgas and Balchik, supporting thereby Maritime administration to secure safety navigation in bays, canals and ports. Real-time information within harbors is obtained using various sensors placed at thirteen strategic locations to monitor the current state of the environment. The most important for navigation weather and sea-state parameters are measured: wind speed and direction, air temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, visibility, solar radiation, water temperature and salinity, sea level, currents speed and direction, mean wave's parameters. The system consist of: 11 weather stations (3 with extra solar radiation and 4 with extra visibility measurement), 9 water temperature and salinity sensors, 9 sea-level stations, two sea currents and waves stations and two canal currents stations. All sensors are connected to communication system which provides direct intranet access to the instruments. Every 15 minutes measured data is transmitted in real-time to the central collecting system, where data is collected, processed and stored in database. Database is triple secured to prevent data losses. Data collection system is double secured. Measuring system is secured against short power failure and instability. Special software is designed to collect, store, process and present environmental data and information on different user-friendly screens. Access to data and information is through internet/intranet with the help of browsers. Actual data from all measurements or from separate measuring place can be displayed on the computer screens as well as data for the last 24 hours. Historical data are available using report server for extracting data for selectable

  5. Science Studies from Archived Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Manweiler, J. W.; Patterson, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Goals for spaceflight investigations include the discovery and characterization of physical features of the in- situ and remote environment. Abundant successes of flight investigations are easily documented. Prudent scientific practice dictates that to the maximum extent possible, observations should be well-characterized, reliably catalogued, and knowledgeably interpreted. This is especially true of data sets used in the publication of results in the reviewed literature. Typical scientific standards include making primary data numbers available to other investigators for replicated study. While NASA's contracts with investigators have required that data be submitted to agency official archives, the details, completeness (especially of ancillary and metadata) and forms differ from investigation to investigation and project to project. After several generations of improvements and refinements, modern computing and communications technology makes it possible to link multiple data sets at multiple locations through a unified data model. Virtual Observatories provide the overall organizational structures and SPASE-compliant XML defines the data granules that can be located. Proofs of the feasibility and value of this latest approach remain to be seen, but its ultimate goal of improving archival research using flight-derived data sets appears to depend on user acceptance and efficient use of the VxO resources. Criteria based on the authors experience in science derived from archival sources follow: 1. Interfaces and tools must be easy to learn, easy to use, and reliable. 2. Data numbers must be promptly downloadable in plain text. 3. Data must be available in or readily converted to physical units using calibrations and algorithms easily traceable as part of the search. Knowledge about (or heritage of) specific data items present in the science literature must be associated with the search for that item. 4. Data items must be trustworthy, having quoted uncertainties and

  6. Observer Manual and Current Data Collection Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observer Program web page that lists the observer field manual and all current data collection forms that observers are required to take out to sea.

  7. Observer Manual and Current Data Collection Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observer Program web page that lists the observer field manual and all current data collection forms that observers are required to take out to sea.

  8. Model Observers in Medical Imaging Research

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xin; Park, Subok

    2013-01-01

    Model observers play an important role in the optimization and assessment of imaging devices. In this review paper, we first discuss the basic concepts of model observers, which include the mathematical foundations and psychophysical considerations in designing both optimal observers for optimizing imaging systems and anthropomorphic observers for modeling human observers. Second, we survey a few state-of-the-art computational techniques for estimating model observers and the principles of im...

  9. Review of instrumentation for observational particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoichiro, E-mail: suzuki@suketto.icrr.u-tokyo.ac.j [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka-Cho, Hida (Japan); Kamioka Satellite, Institute for the Mathematics and Physics of the Universe, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    Particle experiments that do not use the accelerator beams (observational particle experiments) have become important subjects recently. We have reviewed the detector for the observational particle experiments.

  10. Electro-Optics/Low Observables Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electro-Optics/Low Observables Laboratory supports graduate instruction for students enrolled in the Low Observables program. Its purpose is to introduce these...

  11. Observable currents in lattice field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, José A

    2016-01-01

    Observable currents are spacetime local objects that induce physical observables when integrated on an auxiliary codimension one surface. Since the resulting observables are independent of local deformations of the integration surface, the currents themselves carry most of the information about the induced physical observables. I study observable currents in a multisymplectic framework for Lagrangian field theory over discrete spacetime. A weak version of observable currents preserves many of their properties, while inducing a family of observables capable of separating points in the space of physically distinct solutions. A Poisson bracket gives the space of observable currents the structure of a Lie algebra. Peierls bracket for bulk observables gives an algebra homomorphism mapping equivalence classes of bulk observables to weak observable currents. The study covers scalar fields, nonlinear sigma models and gauge theories (including gauge theory formulations of general relativity) on the lattice. Even when ...

  12. Observation: A Practice That Must Be Practiced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lontz, Karey M.

    2016-01-01

    Karey Lontz's article on learning how to "dominate by observation" (to master the practice of observation so as to use it most effectively for the benefit of the children) takes us from a general to specific understanding of observation. She begins with a look at the importance of observation in human history and in the history of…

  13. 50 CFR 660.719 - Scientific observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific observers. 660.719 Section 660... § 660.719 Scientific observers. (a) All fishing vessels with permits issued under this subpart and... accommodate an NMFS certified observer on board to collect scientific data. (b) All vessels with observers...

  14. 10 CFR 26.33 - Behavioral observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Behavioral observation. 26.33 Section 26.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Program Elements § 26.33 Behavioral observation. Licensees... behavioral observation. Behavioral observation must be performed by individuals who are trained under § 26.29...

  15. Optimal intervalscreening og observation af abdominale aortaaneurismer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Vammen, Sten; Henneberg, E W

    2001-01-01

    Screening and observation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) produce psychological stress. Consequently, safe and optimal intervals of rescreening and observation must be developed.......Screening and observation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) produce psychological stress. Consequently, safe and optimal intervals of rescreening and observation must be developed....

  16. Guidance for Technology Decisions from Classroom Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Talbot

    2012-01-01

    Correlational analysis of two years of classroom observation indicates relationships between technology use and various classroom characteristics, including teacher roles and instructional strategies. Three observers used the ISTE Classroom Observation Tool (ICOT) to record 144 observations of classrooms participating in a variety of educational…

  17. 34 CFR 300.310 - Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Observation. 300.310 Section 300.310 Education... Observation. (a) The public agency must ensure that the child is observed in the child's learning environment... specific learning disability, must decide to— (1) Use information from an observation in routine classroom...

  18. Model observers in medical imaging research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Park, Subok

    2013-10-04

    Model observers play an important role in the optimization and assessment of imaging devices. In this review paper, we first discuss the basic concepts of model observers, which include the mathematical foundations and psychophysical considerations in designing both optimal observers for optimizing imaging systems and anthropomorphic observers for modeling human observers. Second, we survey a few state-of-the-art computational techniques for estimating model observers and the principles of implementing these techniques. Finally, we review a few applications of model observers in medical imaging research.

  19. Experimental Synchronization by Means of Observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Martínez-Guerra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we deal with the experimental synchronization of the Colpitts oscillator in a real-time implementation. Our approach is based on observer design theory in a master-slave configuration thus, a chaos synchronization problem can be posed as an observer design procedure, where the coupling signal is viewed as a measurable output and a slave system is regarded as an observer. A polynomial observer is used for synchronizing the Colpitts oscillator employing linear matrix inequalities. Finally, a comparison with a reduced order observer and a high gain observer is given to assess the performance of the proposed observer.

  20. The Early ULF Signal of the Gigantic Jets Revealed By Hilbert-Huang Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Hsun; Bing-Chih Chen, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    The conventional Fourier analysis on the sferics in ULF and VLF bandpasses has been done for years. Several phenomena e.g. whistler and Schumann resonance have been well studied by the Fourier spectrum comprehensively. But the Fourier analysis is computed by an integration over time, therefore, the temporal resolution is smoothed, and limited not only by the sampling rate but also the size of the integration window. The instantaneous frequency can't be obtained through this conventional approach. We introduce the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) instead of Fourier transform to analyze the sferics of TLEs recorded at Lulin observatory. The Hilbert-Huang transform decomposes a signal into so-called intrinsic mode functions (IMF), and derive instantaneous frequency data by differentiating the phase angle yielded by Hilbert transform. Our analysis of HHT on several gigantic jets recorded by ground observation surprisingly revealed an early signal of frequency-change during the phase of the leading jet, and this early signal can not be identified by Fourier analysis. In the phase of leading jet, the amplitude of the sferics remains a constant and no significant features are recognized in the recorded waveform, but an obvious frequency change about 100-200 millisecond prior to the main discharge of the full development jets (FDJs), which can be clearly recognized in the HHT spectra of all observed gigantic jets. From a further simulation, this frequency change is confirmed to come from the nature of the discharge, not an alias or a false signal generated by the analysis method. This early signal may implies an in-cloud discharge process which is suggested by Krehbiel et al. [2008

  1. The rarity of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes: 2. RHESSI stacking analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. M.; Buzbee, P.; Kelley, N. A.; Infanger, A.; Holzworth, R. H.; Dwyer, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    We searched for gamma-ray emission from lightning using the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite by identifying times when RHESSI was near over 2 million lightning discharges localized by the Worldwide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). We then stacked together the gamma-ray arrival times relative to the sferic times, correcting for light propagation time to the satellite. The resulting stacked gamma-ray time profile is sensitive to an average level of gamma-ray emission per lightning discharge far lower than what can be recognized above background for a single terrestrial gamma-ray flash (TGF). The summed signal from presumed small, previously unknown TGFs simultaneous with WWLLN discharges is remarkably weak: for the region from 0 to 300 km beneath RHESSI's footprint, (6.2 ± 3.8) × 10-3 detector counts/discharge are measured, as opposed to a typical range of 12-50 detector counts for TGFs identified solely from the gamma-ray signal. Under the assumption of a broken power law differential distribution of TGF intensities, we find that the index must harden dramatically or cut off just below the sensitivity limit of current satellites and that for most scenarios less than 1% of lightning can produce a TGF that belongs anywhere in the same distribution as those that are observable. For the minority of scenarios where more than a few percent of flashes produce a TGF, most of these "TGFs" are less than 10-4 of the luminosity of the faintest RHESSI TGFs and therefore closer to the luminosity of lightning stepped leaders. The rarity of TGFs holds not only for TGFs simultaneous with the sferic observed by WWLLN but also for any time within 10 ms of the sferic, allowing (for example) for the possibility that different events within the upward propagation of a negative leader in positive intracloud lightning triggered the TGF and WWLLN's detection.

  2. Exponential Observers for Lotka-Volterra Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. V. Sundarapandian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper solves the exponential observer design problem for Lotka-Volterra systems. Explicitly, Sundarapandian’s theorem (2002 for observer design for exponential observer design is used to solve the nonlinear observer design problem for 2-species, 3-species and 4-species Lotka-Volterra systems. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed exponential observer design for the Lotka-Volterra systems.

  3. Existence conditions for unknown input functional observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, T.; MacDougall, S.; Sreeram, V.; Trinh, H.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence and design of an unknown input Functional observer. The existence of the observer can be verified by computing a nullspace of a known matrix and testing some matrix rank conditions. The existence of the observer does not require the satisfaction of the observer matching condition (i.e. Equation (16) in Hou and Muller 1992, 'Design of Observers for Linear Systems with Unknown Inputs', IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 37, 871-875), is not limited to estimating scalar functionals and allows for arbitrary pole placement. The proposed observer always exists when a state observer exists for the unknown input system, and furthermore, the proposed observer can exist even in some instances when an unknown input state observer does not exist.

  4. Meteors and how to observe them

    CERN Document Server

    Lunsford, Robert

    2009-01-01

    No two meteor showers are alike, and their variation depends on current conditions and the observer's location. This introduction to the art of meteor observing explains how best to view meteor activity under all conditions and from all locations.

  5. Workshop III – Cosmology: Observations versus theories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T R Seshadri

    2000-10-01

    The topics on which there were presentations in this workshop can broadly be divided into the following categories: Observational aspects of large-scale structures in the universities; phase transitions in the early universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; observational cosmology.

  6. Observer and At Sea Monitor Database (OBDBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Northeast Fisheries Observer Database System (OBDBS) contains data collected on commercial fishing vessels by observers from 1989 - present and at-sea monitors...

  7. Coldwater River NWR Ancillary Bird Observations 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ancillary bird observations on Coldwater River NWR in 2006 were recorded by local birders. No sampling design was used to generate the observations

  8. Coldwater River NWR Ancillary Bird Observations 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ancillary bird observations on Coldwater River NWR in 2009 were recorded by local birders. No sampling design was used to generate the observations

  9. Actors', partners', and observers' perceptions of sarcasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, P

    2000-10-01

    This study compared actors', partners', and observers' perceptions of the amount of sarcasm used by participants (n = 80) in videotaped conversations. Significant differences were found among perceptions of actors, partners, and observers. Of the three perspectives, actors perceived themselves as using the greatest amount of sarcasm, followed by partners' perceptions of actors. Observers perceived actors as using the least amount of sarcasm. Correlations conducted to assess whether partners and observers recognized actors' individual attempts at sarcasm during the conversations were generally low.

  10. A Metric Observer for Induction Motors Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Benbouzid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with metric observer application for induction motors. Firstly, assuming that stator currents and speed are measured, a metric observer is designed to estimate the rotor fluxes. Secondly, assuming that only stator currents are measured, another metric observer is derived to estimate rotor fluxes and speed. The proposed observer validity is checked throughout simulations on a 4 kW induction motor drive.

  11. Observability of discretized partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Dee, Dick P.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that complete observability of the discrete model used to assimilate data from a linear partial differential equation (PDE) system is necessary and sufficient for asymptotic stability of the data assimilation process. The observability theory for discrete systems is reviewed and applied to obtain simple observability tests for discretized constant-coefficient PDEs. Examples are used to show how numerical dispersion can result in discrete dynamics with multiple eigenvalues, thereby detracting from observability.

  12. First INTEGRAL observations of Cygnus X-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhu, O.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Zdziarski, A.A.;

    2003-01-01

    We present the first INTEGRAL results on Cyg X-3 from the PV phase observations of the Cygnus region. The source was clearly detected by the JEM-X, ISGRI and SPI. The INTEGRAL observations were supported by simultaneous pointed RXTE observations. Their lightcurves folded over the 4.8 hour binary...

  13. Resistance to Change and Relapse of Observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Eric A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Four experiments examined relapse of extinguished observing behavior of pigeons using a two-component multiple schedule of observing-response procedures. In both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) food reinforcement alternated with extinction and observing responses produced stimuli associated with the availability of the VI…

  14. Observers for a Class of Chaotic Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ping

    2006-01-01

    The design of observers for a class of practical physical chaotic systems is discussed.By using only one state variable and its time derivatives,a control law is constructed to achieve the synchronization between the investigated chaotic systems and their observers,and the results are proved theoretically.Several observers of chaotic systems are designed by using this method.

  15. 46 CFR 15.815 - Radar observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar observers. 15.815 Section 15.815 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.815 Radar observers. (a) Each person in the required complement of deck officers, including... endorsement as radar observer. (b) Each person who is employed or serves as pilot in accordance with...

  16. Communicating with Accelerated Observers in Minkowski Spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    FLores, F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Our goal here is to determine the spatial and temporal constraints on communication between two observers at least one of which moves with constant proper acceleration in two-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. We take as a simplified model of communication one observer bouncing a light signal off another observer. Our derivations use only elementary…

  17. 50 CFR 300.215 - Observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Observers. 300.215 Section 300.215... Western and Central Pacific Fisheries for Highly Migratory Species § 300.215 Observers. (a) Applicability... which a WCPFC Area Endorsement is required. (b) Notifications. (c) Accommodating observers. All...

  18. 50 CFR 300.43 - Observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Observers. 300.43 Section 300.43 Wildlife... Pacific Tuna Fisheries § 300.43 Observers. (a) The operator and each member of the crew of a vessel shall allow and assist any person identified as an observer under the Treaty by the Pacific Island Parties:...

  19. 29 CFR 452.107 - Observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Observers. 452.107 Section 452.107 Labor Regulations... OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.107 Observers. (a) Under the provisions of section 401(c), each candidate must be permitted to have an observer (1) at the polls and (2) at...

  20. 50 CFR 660.519 - Scientific observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific observers. 660.519 Section 660... § 660.519 Scientific observers. All fishing vessels operating in the coastal pelagic species fishery... California and land catch in another area, may be required to accommodate NMFS- certified observers aboard...

  1. 18 CFR 701.56 - Observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Observers. 701.56... Headquarters Organization § 701.56 Observers. (a) Chairmen and Vice-Chairmen of River Basin Commissions established under Title II of the Act shall be Observers. (b) The Chairman, with the concurrence of...

  2. 50 CFR 600.506 - Observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Observers. 600.506 Section 600.506..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Foreign Fishing § 600.506 Observers. (a) General. To... Science and Research Director (see table 2 to § 600.502) may assign U.S. observers to FFV's. Except...

  3. 46 CFR 11.480 - Radar observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar observer. 11.480 Section 11.480 Shipping COAST... ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.480 Radar observer. (a) This section contains the requirements that an applicant must meet to qualify as a radar observer. (Part 15 of this chapter specifies...

  4. 15 CFR 971.1005 - Observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Observers. 971.1005 Section 971.1005... SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Enforcement § 971.1005 Observers. (a) Purpose of observers. Each licensee and permittee shall allow, at such times and to such...

  5. Structural Controllability and Observability in Influence Diagrams

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Brian Y.; Shachter, Ross D.

    2013-01-01

    Influence diagram is a graphical representation of belief networks with uncertainty. This article studies the structural properties of a probabilistic model in an influence diagram. In particular, structural controllability theorems and structural observability theorems are developed and algorithms are formulated. Controllability and observability are fundamental concepts in dynamic systems (Luenberger 1979). Controllability corresponds to the ability to control a system while observability a...

  6. Subtleties of Invariance, Covariance and Observer Independence

    CERN Document Server

    Klajn, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    The role of the observers is frequently obscured in the literature, either by writing equations in a coordinate system implicitly pertaining to some specific observer or by entangling the invariance and the observer dependence of physical quantities. Using examples in relativistic kinematics and classical electrodynamics we clarify the confusion underlying these misconceptions.

  7. Identifying Mentors' Observations for Providing Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mentors' feedback can assist preservice teachers' development; yet feedback tends to be variable from one mentor to the next. What do mentors observe for providing feedback? In this study, 24 mentors observed a final-year preservice teacher through a professionally video-recorded lesson and provided written notes for feedback. They observed the…

  8. Designing a System for Observation of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on observation of teaching in a Higher Education (HE) context with a view to proposing some guidelines for the design and practice of institutional systems to observe teaching. Design/methodology/approach: A literature review and a proposed model for a system of observation of teaching…

  9. Learning through Observing Peers in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenberg, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Learning through peer observation in higher education is most frequently investigated from the perspective of the teacher who is observed. What is under-examined is "how" learning arises for the observer by watching a peer in practice. This paper provides insight into this question through an interpretive-phenomenological analysis of a…

  10. Observational Learning and Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Bridget A.; DeQuinzio, Jaime A.

    2012-01-01

    A skill essential for successful inclusion in general education settings is the ability to learn by observing others. Research, however, has documented children with autism display significant deficits in the fundamental skills necessary for observational learning. This article outlines the skills essential for observational learning from an…

  11. Resistance to Change and Relapse of Observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Eric A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Four experiments examined relapse of extinguished observing behavior of pigeons using a two-component multiple schedule of observing-response procedures. In both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) food reinforcement alternated with extinction and observing responses produced stimuli associated with the availability of the VI…

  12. 28 CFR 552.12 - Close observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Close observation. 552.12 Section 552.12... of Housing Units, Inmates, and Inmate Work Areas § 552.12 Close observation. When there is reasonable... observation status will be determined on an individual basis. Ordinarily, the Captain, in consultation with...

  13. 10 CFR 26.407 - Behavioral observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Behavioral observation. 26.407 Section 26.407 Energy... observation. While the individuals specified in § 26.4(f) are constructing safety- or security-related SSCs, licensees and other entities shall ensure that these individuals are subject to behavioral observation...

  14. Participant observation of children’s communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Charlotte; Kousholt, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    concrete examples, we elucidate an approach where theoretical concepts guide how researchers conduct observations. It is concluded that such situated observations are at odds with a tendency in psychology to focus separately on isolated individual characteristics. Situated observations thus shift awareness...

  15. 16 CFR 1031.14 - Observation criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Observation criteria. 1031.14 Section 1031... COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES Employee Involvement § 1031.14 Observation... sole purpose of observation, with the advance approval of his or her supervisor and any other person...

  16. Observations of Nonlinear Phenomena in Rotordynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrich, Fredric F.

    Observations, analysis and understanding of nonlinear rotordynamic phenomena observed in aircraft gas turbine engines and other high-speed rotating machinery over the course of the author's career are described. Included are observations of sum-and-difference frequency response; effects of roller bearing clearance; relaxation oscillations; subharmonic response; chaotic response; and other generic nonlinear responses such as superharmonic and ultra-subharmonic response.

  17. Observability conditions of switched linear singular systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin MENG; Jifeng ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    The observability problem of switched linear singular(SLS) systems is studied in this paper. Based on the observability definition, the unobservable subspaces of given switching laws are investigated under the condition that all subsystems are regular. A necessary condition and a sufficient condition for observability of SLS systems are given. It is shown that the observability and controllability are dual for some special SLS systems with circulatory switching laws. The method developed here is applicable to the observability analysis of normal switched linear systems.

  18. Observing storm surges from satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guoqi

    2016-07-01

    Storm surges can cause catastrophic damage to properties and loss of life in coastal communities. Thus it is important to enhance our capabilities of observing and forecasting storm surges for mitigating damage and loss. In this presentation we show examples of observing storm surges around the world using nadir satellite altimetry, during Hurricane Sandy, Igor, and Isaac, as well as other cyclone events. The satellite observations are evaluated against tide-gauge observations and discussed for dynamic mechanisms. We also show the potential of a new wide-swath altimetry mission, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), for observing storm surges.

  19. Observation, observation, observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Pumain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Voilà que celles dont on a longtemps déploré la rareté, la lenteur de préparation, et les difficultés d’accès, et qui évoquaient plutôt des reliefs montagneux, en un mot les données utiles aux sciences humaines et sociales, voilà qu’elles surgissent de partout, en masses fluides, par grandes vagues déferlantes, et déjà l’expression anglaise qui les désigne devient un nouveau champ de connaissances : les big data sont nées ! Comme la plupart des systèmes qui les enregistrent comportent une géo...

  20. Observation, observation, observation

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Pumain

    2014-01-01

    After having deplored for a long time the rarity, the slow pace of preparation and the lack of access to what seemed to be mountainous terrains, big data has been created, emerging in fluid masses, wave after wave, to become a new sphere of knowledge, useful for human and social sciences. Because many of the systems that record them contain a geo-positioning device - from the GPS, the mobile phone, the surveillance cameras, sensors hidden in vehicles or scattered in the environment to the vir...

  1. Local and gauge invariant observables in gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Khavkine, Igor

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that General Relativity (GR) does not possess any non-trivial local (in a precise standard sense) and diffeomorphism invariant observables. We propose a generalized notion of local observables, which retain the most important properties that follow from the standard definition of locality, yet is flexible enough to admit a large class of diffeomorphism invariant observables in GR. The generalization comes at a small price, that the domain of definition of a generalized local observable may not cover the entire phase space of GR and two such observables may have distinct domains. However, the subset of metrics on which generalized local observables can be defined is in a sense generic (its open interior is non-empty in the Whitney strong topology). Moreover, generalized local gauge invariant observables are sufficient to separate diffeomorphism orbits on this admissible subset of the phase space. Connecting the construction with the notion of differential invariants, gives a general scheme for...

  2. Highlights from the VERITAS AGN Observation Program

    CERN Document Server

    Benbow, Wystan

    2015-01-01

    The VERITAS array of four 12-m imaging atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes began full-scale operations in 2007, and is one of the world's most sensitive detectors of astrophysical VHE (E>100 GeV) $\\gamma$-rays. Observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are a major focus of the VERITAS Collaboration, and more than 60 AGN, primarily blazars, are known to emit VHE photons. Approximately 3400 hours have been devoted to the VERITAS AGN observation program and roughly 160 AGN are already observed with the array, in most cases with the deepest VHE exposure to date. These observations have resulted in 34 detections, most of which are accompanied by contemporaneous, multi-wavelength observations, enabling a more detailed study of the underlying jet-powered processes. Recent highlights of the VERITAS AGN observation program, and the collaboration's long-term AGN observation strategy, are presented.

  3. Observer's Interface for Solar System Target Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Anthony; Link, Miranda; Moriarty, Christopher; Stansberry, John A.

    2016-10-01

    When observing an asteroid or comet with HST, it has been necessary for the observer to manually enter the target's orbital elements into the Astronomer's Proposal Tool (APT). This allowed possible copy/paste transcription errors from the observer's source of orbital elements data. In order to address this issue, APT has now been improved with the capability to identify targets in and then download orbital elements from JPL Horizons. The observer will first use a target name resolver to choose the intended target from the Horizons database, and then download the orbital elements from Horizons directly into APT. A manual entry option is also still retained if the observer does not wish to use elements from Horizons. This new capability is available for HST observing, and it will also be supported for JWST observing. The poster shows examples of this new interface.

  4. Microlensing Parallax for Observers in Heliocentric Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Novati, S Calchi

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the ongoing Spitzer observational campaign, and the forecoming K2 one, we revisit, working in an heliocentric reference frame, the geometrical foundation for the analysis of the microlensing parallax, as measured with the simultaneous observation of the same microlensing event from two observers with relative distance of order AU. For the case of observers at rest we discuss the well known fourfold microlensing parallax degeneracy and determine an equation for the degenerate directions of the lens trajectory. For the case of observers in motion, we write down an extension of the Gould (1994) relationship between the microlensing parallax and the observable quantities and, at the same time, we highlight the functional dependence of these same quantities from the timescale of the underlying microlensing event. Furthermore, through a series of examples, we show the importance of taking into account the motion of the observers to correctly recover the parameters of the underlying microlensing event. ...

  5. Real Observers and the Holographic Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Dance, M C

    2004-01-01

    The holographic principle asserts that the observable number of degrees of freedom inside a volume is proportional not to the volume, but to the surface area bounding the volume. There is currently a need to explain the principle in terms of a more fundamental microscopic theory. This paper suggests a potential explanation. This paper suggests that in general, for an observer to observe the r coordinate of an event, the process of making that observation must generate at least as much entropy as the information that the observation gains. Following on from that, this paper sets out a simple argument that leads to the result that observers on the surface of a sphere can observe an amount of information about the enclosed system that is no more than an amount that is proportional to the surface area of the sphere.

  6. COCOA: Simulating Observations of Star Cluster Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Abbas; Giersz, Mirek; Pych, Wojciech; Dalessandro, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    COCOA (Cluster simulatiOn Comparison with ObservAtions) creates idealized mock photometric observations using results from numerical simulations of star cluster evolution. COCOA is able to present the output of realistic numerical simulations of star clusters carried out using Monte Carlo or N-body codes in a way that is useful for direct comparison with photometric observations. The code can simulate optical observations from simulation snapshots in which positions and magnitudes of objects are known. The parameters for simulating the observations can be adjusted to mimic telescopes of various sizes. COCOA also has a photometry pipeline that can use standalone versions of DAOPHOT (ascl:1104.011) and ALLSTAR to produce photometric catalogs for all observed stars.

  7. The Art of Observation: A Pedagogical Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbery, Caroline; McAteer, Rebecca A

    2015-12-01

    Observational skills, honed through experience with the literary and visual arts, bring together in a timely manner many of the goals of the medical humanities, providing thematic cohesion through the act of seeing while aiming to advance clinical skills through a unified practice. In an arts observation pedagogy, nature writing serves as an apt model for precise, clinically relevant linguistic noticing because meticulous attention to the natural world involves scientific precision; additionally, a number of visual metaphors employed in medicine are derived from close observation of the natural world. Close reading reinforces observational skills as part of integrative, multidisciplinary clinical practice. Literary precision provides an educational bridge to recognizing the importance of detail in the clinical realm. In weighing multiple perspectives, observation applied to practice helps learners understand the nuances of the role of witness, activating reflection consonant with the viewer's professional identity. The realization that seeing is highly filtered through the observer's values allows the act of observation to come under scrutiny, opening the observer's gaze to disturbance and challenging the values and precepts of the prevailing medical culture. Application of observational skills can, for example, help observers recognize and address noxious effects of the built environment. As learners describe what they see, they also develop the communication skills needed to articulate both problems and possible improvements within their expanding sphere of influence. The ability to craft this speech as public narrative can lead to interventions with positive impacts on physicians, their colleagues, and patients.

  8. Assessing observational studies of medical treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butani Yogita

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have assessed the validity of the observational study design by comparing results of studies using this design to results from randomized controlled trials. The present study examined design features of observational studies that could have influenced these comparisons. Methods To find at least 4 observational studies that evaluated the same treatment, we reviewed meta-analyses comparing observational studies and randomized controlled trials for the assessment of medical treatments. Details critical for interpretation of these studies were abstracted and analyzed qualitatively. Results Individual articles reviewed included 61 observational studies that assessed 10 treatment comparisons evaluated in two studies comparing randomized controlled trials and observational studies. The majority of studies did not report the following information: details of primary and ancillary treatments, outcome definitions, length of follow-up, inclusion/exclusion criteria, patient characteristics relevant to prognosis or treatment response, or assessment of possible confounding. When information was reported, variations in treatment specifics, outcome definition or confounding were identified as possible causes of differences between observational studies and randomized controlled trials, and of heterogeneity in observational studies. Conclusion Reporting of observational studies of medical treatments was often inadequate to compare study designs or allow other meaningful interpretation of results. All observational studies should report details of treatment, outcome assessment, patient characteristics, and confounding assessment.

  9. Nebulae and how to observe them

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, Steven

    2007-01-01

    This "Astronomers' Observing Guides" are designed for practical amateur astronomers who not only want to observe, but want to know the details of exactly what they are looking at. Nebulae are the places where the stars are born. For amateur astronomers, the many different kinds of nebulae vary from "easy" targets that can be seen with modest equipment under mediocre skies, to "challenging" objects that require experienced observers, large telescopes and excellent seeing. The concept of the book - and of the series - is to present an up-to-date detailed description and categorisation (part one); and then (part two) to consider how best to successfully observe and record the large range of astronomical objects that fall under the general heading of "nebulae". "Nebulae, and How to Observe Them" is a mine of information for all levels of amateur observers, from the beginner to the experienced.

  10. The importance of the observer in science

    CERN Document Server

    Standish, R K

    2005-01-01

    The concept of {\\em complexity} (as a quantity) has been plagued by numerous contradictory and confusing definitions. By explicitly recognising a role for the observer of a system, an observer that attaches meaning to data about the system, these contradictions can be resolved, and the numerous complexity measures that have been proposed can be seen as cases where different observers are relevant, and/or being proxy measures that loosely scale with complexity, but are easy to compute from the available data. Much of the epistemic confusion in the subject can be squarely placed at science's tradition of removing the observer from the description in order to guarantee {\\em objectivity}. Explicitly acknowledging the role of the observer helps untangle other confused subject areas. {\\em Emergence} is a topic about which much ink has been spilt, but it can be understand easily as an irreducibility between description space and meaning space. Quantum Mechanics can also be understood as a theory of observation. The ...

  11. A database of worldwide glacier thickness observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gärtner-Roer, I.; Naegeli, K.; Huss, M.;

    2014-01-01

    One of the grand challenges in glacier research is to assess the total ice volume and its global distribution. Over the past few decades the compilation of a world glacier inventory has been well-advanced both in institutional set-up and in spatial coverage. The inventory is restricted to glacier...... surface observations. However, although thickness has been observed on many glaciers and ice caps around the globe, it has not yet been published in the shape of a readily available database. Here, we present a standardized database of glacier thickness observations compiled by an extensive literature...... review and from airborne data extracted from NASA's Operation IceBridge. This database contains ice thickness observations from roughly 1100 glaciers and ice caps including 550 glacier-wide estimates and 750,000 point observations. A comparison of these observational ice thicknesses with results from...

  12. Shifting entanglement from states to observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranade, Kedar [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Harshman, Nathan [Department of Physics, American University, Washington DC (United States); Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We illustrate that for any pure state on a finite-dimensional Hilbert space we can construct observables that induce a tensor product structure such that the amount of entanglement of the state may take arbitrary values. In particular, we provide an example of how to construct observables on a d-dimensional system such that an arbitrary known pure state can be treated as maximally entangled. In effect, we show how entanglement properties can be shifted from states to observables.

  13. First INTEGRAL observations of Cygnus X-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhu, O.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Zdziarski, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    We present the first INTEGRAL results on Cyg X-3 from the PV phase observations of the Cygnus region. The source was clearly detected by the JEM-X, ISGRI and SPI. The INTEGRAL observations were supported by simultaneous pointed RXTE observations. Their lightcurves folded over the 4.8 hour binary ...... with parameters similar to those found for black-hole binaries at high Eddington rates....

  14. Observability and Controllability for Smooth Nonlinear Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Schaft, A.J. van der

    1982-01-01

    The definition of a smooth nonlinear system as proposed recently, is elaborated as a natural generalization of the more common definitions of a smooth nonlinear input-output system. Minimality for such systems can be defined in a very direct geometric way, and already implies a usual notion of observability, namely, local weak observability. As an application of this theory, it is shown that observable nonlinear Hamiltonian systems are necessarily controllable, and vice versa.

  15. Sampling error of observation impact statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Hyun Mee

    2014-01-01

    An observation impact is an estimate of the forecast error reduction by assimilating observations with numerical model forecasts. This study compares the sampling errors of the observation impact statistics (OBIS) of July 2011 and January 2012 using two methods. One method uses the random error under the assumption that the samples are independent, and the other method uses the error with lag correlation under the assumption that the samples are correlated with each other. The OBIS are obtain...

  16. Enhanced Ocean Predictability Through Optimal Observing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Enhanced Ocean Predictability Through Optimal Observing Strategies A. D. Kirwan, Jr. College of Marine Studies University of Delaware Robinson Hall...observation strategies that will maximize the capacity to predict mesoscale and submesoscale conditions so as to provide the best possible nowcasts and...systems approaches on developing optimal observing strategies . The common thread linking both approaches is Lagrangian data, so this phase of the work

  17. The resistance to change of observing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahan, Timothy A; Magee, Adam; Dobberstein, Andria

    2003-11-01

    Observing responses produce contact with discriminative stimuli and have been considered analogous to attending. Many studies have examined the effects of reinforcement rate on the resistance to change of simple operant behavior, but nothing is known about the resistance to change of observing. Two experiments examined the effects of primary reinforcement rate on the resistance to change of observing behavior of pigeons. In Experiment 1, a multiple schedule of observing-response procedures was arranged. In a rich component, observing responses produced stimuli correlated with a high rate of random-interval (RI) reinforcement or extinction. In a lean component, observing responses produced stimuli correlated with a lower rate of RI reinforcement or extinction. In both components, observing responses produced the multiple-schedule stimuli on a fixed-interval 0.75-s schedule. In Experiment 2, a similar procedure was used, but observing in the rich and lean components produced schedule-correlated stimuli on an RI 15-s schedule. Observing in the rich component occurred at a higher rate and was more resistant to disruptions produced by presession feeding and response-independent food deliveries during intercomponent intervals. Despite more frequent observing during unsignaled periods of extinction than unsignaled periods of RI reinforcement, observing during extinction periods was less resistant to change. In addition, replicating the usual result, responding on the food key was generally more resistant to change in the presence of stimuli associated with higher reinforcement rates. These results suggest that quantitative descriptions of resistance to change derived with simple food-maintained responding may be applicable to observing, and perhaps by extension, to attending.

  18. Differences in observers' and teachers' fidelity assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, William B; Pankratz, Melinda M; Bishop, Dana C

    2014-10-01

    As evidence-based programs become disseminated, understanding the degree to which they are implemented with fidelity is crucial. This study tested the validity of fidelity ratings made by observers versus those made by teachers. We hypothesized that teachers' reports about fidelity would have a positivity bias when compared to observers' reports. Further, we hypothesized that there would generally be low correspondence between teachers' and observers' ratings of fidelity. We examined teachers' and observers' ratings as they were related to mediating variables targeted for change by the intervention. Finally, we examined the role that years of teaching experience played in achieving fidelity. Eighteen teachers and four research assistants participated in this project as raters. Teachers made video recordings of their implementation of All Stars and completed fidelity assessment forms. Trained observers independently completed parallel forms for 215 sampled classroom sessions. Both teachers and observers rated adherence, quality of delivery, attendance, and participant engagement. Teachers made more positive fidelity ratings than did observers. With the exception of ratings for attendance, teachers and observers failed to agree on fidelity ratings. Observers' ratings were significantly related to students' pretest assessments of targeted program mediators. That observers' ratings were related to students' pretest scores, suggests it is easier to teach well when students are predisposed to program success. Teachers' ratings were infrequently related to mediators, but when they were, the relationship was counterintuitive. Experienced teachers taught with greater fidelity than novice teachers. While possibly inflated and inaccurate, gathering fidelity assessments from teachers may sensitize them to issues of fidelity as a result of requiring form completion. Assessing fidelity through observers' ratings of video recordings has significant merit. As a longterm investment

  19. Observer and observer-based H∞ control of generalized Hamiltonian systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuzhen; GE S. S.; CHENG Daizhan

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with observer design for generalized Hamiltonian systems and its applications. First, by using the systems' structural properties, a new observer design method called Augment Plus Feedback is provided and two kinds of observers are obtained: non-adaptive and adaptive ones. Then, based on the obtained observer, H∞ control design is investigated for generalized Hamiltonian systems, and an observer-based control design is proposed. Finally, as an application to power systems, an observer and an observer-based H∞ control law are designed for single-machine infinite-bus systems.Simulations show that both the observer and controller obtained in this paper work very well.

  20. Data Assimilation: Making Sense of Earth Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Albert Lahoz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Climate change, air quality and environmental degradation are important societal challenges for the 21st Century. These challenges require an intelligent response from society, which in turn requires access to information about the Earth System. This information comes from observations and prior knowledge, the latter typically embodied in a model describing relationships between variables of the Earth System. Data assimilation provides an objective methodology to combine observational and model information to provide an estimate of the most likely state and its uncertainty for the whole Earth System. This approach adds value to the observations – by filling in the spatio-temporal gaps in observations; and to the model – by constraining it with the observations. In this review paper we motivate data assimilation as a methodology to fill in the gaps in observational information; illustrate the data assimilation approach with examples that span a broad range of features of the Earth System (atmosphere, including chemistry; ocean; land surface; and discuss the outlook for data assimilation, including the novel application of data assimilation ideas to observational information obtained using Citizen Science. Ultimately, a strong motivation of data assimilation is the many benefits it provides to users. These include: providing the initial state for weather and air quality forecasts; providing analyses and reanalyses for studying the Earth System; evaluating observations, instruments and models; assessing the relative value of elements of the Global Observing System (GOS; and assessing the added value of future additions to the GOS.

  1. Minimal covariant observables identifying all pure states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmeli, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.carmeli@gmail.com [D.I.M.E., Università di Genova, Via Cadorna 2, I-17100 Savona (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku (Finland); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-09-02

    It has been recently shown by Heinosaari, Mazzarella and Wolf (2013) [1] that an observable that identifies all pure states of a d-dimensional quantum system has minimally 4d−4 outcomes or slightly less (the exact number depending on d). However, no simple construction of this type of minimal observable is known. We investigate covariant observables that identify all pure states and have minimal number of outcomes. It is shown that the existence of this kind of observables depends on the dimension of the Hilbert space.

  2. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels.

  3. Reconstructing light curves from HXMT imaging observations

    CERN Document Server

    Huo, Zhuo-Xi; Li, Yi-Ming; Zhou, Jian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) is a Chinese space telescope mission. It is scheduled for launch in 2015. The telescope will perform an all-sky survey in hard X-ray band (1 - 250 keV), a series of deep imaging observations of small sky regions as well as pointed observations. In this work we present a conceptual method to reconstruct light curves from HXMT imaging observation directly, in order to monitor time-varying objects such as GRB, AXP and SGR in hard X-ray band with HXMT imaging observations.

  4. LTR design of proportional-integral observers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob; Shafai, B.;

    1995-01-01

    This paper applies the proportional-integral (PI) observer in connection with loop transfer recovery (LTR) design for continuous-time systems. We show that a PI observer makes it possible to obtain time recovery, i.e., exact recovery for t -+ -, under mild conditions. Based on an extension...... of the LQG/LTR method of proportional (P) observers, a systematic LTR design method is derived for the PI observer. Our recovery design method allows time recovery and frequency (normal) recovery to be done independently. Furthermore, we give explicit expressions for the recovery error when asymptotic...

  5. RXTE Observations of Cygnus X-3

    CERN Document Server

    McCollough, M L; Zhang, S N; Harmon, B A; Paciesas, W S; Dieters, S W; Hjellming, R M; Rupen, M P; Mioduszewski, A J; Waltman, E B; Ghigo, F D; Pooley, G G; Fender, R P; Cui, W; Trushkin, S A

    1998-01-01

    In the period between May 1997 and August 1997 a series of pointed RXTE observations were made of Cyg X-3. During this period Cyg X-3 made a transition from a quiescent radio state to a flare state (including a major flare) and then returned to a quiescent radio state. Analyses of the observations are made in the context of concurrent observations in the hard X-ray (CGRO/BATSE), soft X-ray (RXTE/ASM) and the radio (Green Bank Interferometer, Ryle Telescope, and RATAN-600). Preliminary analyses of the observations are presented.

  6. Advancing an Information Model for Environmental Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsburgh, J. S.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Hooper, R. P.; Lehnert, K. A.; Schreuders, K.; Tarboton, D. G.; Valentine, D. W.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2011-12-01

    Observational data are fundamental to hydrology and water resources, and the way they are organized, described, and shared either enables or inhibits the analyses that can be performed using the data. The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) project is developing cyberinfrastructure to support hydrologic science by enabling better access to hydrologic data. HIS is composed of three major components. HydroServer is a software stack for publishing time series of hydrologic observations on the Internet as well as geospatial data using standards-based web feature, map, and coverage services. HydroCatalog is a centralized facility that catalogs the data contents of individual HydroServers and enables search across them. HydroDesktop is a client application that interacts with both HydroServer and HydroCatalog to discover, download, visualize, and analyze hydrologic observations published on one or more HydroServers. All three components of HIS are founded upon an information model for hydrologic observations at stationary points that specifies the entities, relationships, constraints, rules, and semantics of the observational data and that supports its data services. Within this information model, observations are described with ancillary information (metadata) about the observations to allow them to be unambiguously interpreted and used, and to provide traceable heritage from raw measurements to useable information. Physical implementations of this information model include the Observations Data Model (ODM) for storing hydrologic observations, Water Markup Language (WaterML) for encoding observations for transmittal over the Internet, the HydroCatalog metadata catalog database, and the HydroDesktop data cache database. The CUAHSI HIS and this information model have now been in use for several years, and have been deployed across many different academic institutions as well as across several national agency data repositories. Additionally, components of the HIS

  7. A harmonized vocabulary for soil observed properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Bruce; Wilson, Peter; Cox, Simon; Vleeshouer, Jamie

    2014-05-01

    Interoperability of soil data depends on agreements concerning models, schemas and vocabularies. However, observed property terms are often defined during different activities and projects in isolation of one another, resulting in data that has the same scope being represented with different terms, using different formats and formalisms, and published in various access methods. Significantly, many soil property vocabularies conflate multiple concepts in a single term, e.g. quantity kind, units of measure, substance being observed, and procedure. Effectively, this bundles separate information elements into a single slot. We have developed a vocabulary for observed soil properties by adopting and extending a previously defined water quality vocabulary. The observed property model separates the information elements, based on the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Observations & Measurements model and extending the NASA/TopQuadrant 'Quantities, Units, Dimensions and Types' (QUDT) ontology. The imported water quality vocabulary is formalized using the Web Ontology Language (OWL). Key elements are defined as sub-classes or sub-properties of standard Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) elements, allowing use of standard vocabulary interfaces. For the soil observed property vocabulary, terms from QUDT and water quality are used where possible. These are supplemented with additional unit of measure (Unit), observed property (ScaledQuantityKind) and substance being observed (SubstanceOrTaxon) vocabulary entries required for the soil properties. The vocabulary terms have been extracted from the Australian Soil and Land Survey Field Handbook and Australian Soil Information Transfer and Evaluation System (SITES) vocabularies. The vocabulary links any chemical substances to items from the Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) ontology. By formalizing the model for observable properties, and clearly labelling the separate elements, soil property observations may

  8. Observing SU(2) phases with neutrons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Veer Chand Rakhecha; Apoorva G Wagh

    2001-02-01

    We present an overview of polarized neutron experiments observing SU(2) phases. The first experimental separation of geometric and dynamical phases, the explicit verification of Pauli anticommutation and the first observation of interference amplitudes and phases in noncyclic evolutions are described. These experiments elucidate the physics of phases and phase jumps propounded by the Pancharatnam connection.

  9. Multi-spacecraft observations of quasiperiodic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Frantisek; Pickett, Jolene S.; Hospodarsky, George; Santolik, Ondrej; Bezdekova, Barbora; Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Parrot, Michel; Kurth, William; Kletzing, Craig

    2016-04-01

    Whistler mode electromagnetic waves observed in the inner magnetosphere at frequencies of a few kilohertz sometimes exhibit a nearly periodic modulation of the wave intensity. The modulation periods may range from several tens of seconds up to a few minutes, and such emissions are usually called quasiperiodic (QP) emissions. The origin of these events is still unclear, but it seems that their generation might be related to compressional ULF magnetic field pulsations which periodically modulate resonance conditions in the source region. From an observational point of view, single-point measurements are quite insufficient, as they do not allow us to distinguish between spatial and temporal variations of the emissions. Multipoint observations of these events are, on the other hand, rather rare. We present several QP wave events observed simultaneously by several different spacecraft (Cluster, Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, DEMETER). We demonstrate that although the quasiperiodic modulation is observed over a huge spatial region, individual spacecraft do not see the QP elements at exactly the same times. Moreover, when an event is observed simultaneously on the dawnside and on the duskside, the modulation period observed on the duskside is about twice larger than the modulation period observed on the dawnside. We present a qualitative explanation of these phenomena.

  10. Galaxies and how to observe them

    CERN Document Server

    Steinicke, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    This book is a unique work satisfying the need for a modern, comprehensive review of all major aspects of galaxy observation. It is the only book to specialize on visual observation of galaxies and will appeal to beginners and experienced stargazers alike.

  11. Observing programs, what are the priorities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meynet, G.; Henrichs, H.

    2015-01-01

    This brief note reflects the exchanges that were made between the participants during the general discussion on the observing programs. Because of time constraints only two questions have been addressed: 1) What is the priority between large programs and detailed observations of one or only a few ob

  12. Staging Liver Fibrosis with Statistical Observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Jonathan Frieman

    Chronic liver disease is a worldwide health problem, and hepatic fibrosis (HF) is one of the hallmarks of the disease. Pathology diagnosis of HF is based on textural change in the liver as a lobular collagen network that develops within portal triads. The scale of collagen lobules is characteristically on order of 1mm, which close to the resolution limit of in vivo Gd-enhanced MRI. In this work the methods to collect training and testing images for a Hotelling observer are covered. An observer based on local texture analysis is trained and tested using wet-tissue phantoms. The technique is used to optimize the MRI sequence based on task performance. The final method developed is a two stage model observer to classify fibrotic and healthy tissue in both phantoms and in vivo MRI images. The first stage observer tests for the presence of local texture. Test statistics from the first observer are used to train the second stage observer to globally sample the local observer results. A decision of the disease class is made for an entire MRI image slice using test statistics collected from the second observer. The techniques are tested on wet-tissue phantoms and in vivo clinical patient data.

  13. Social defaults : Observed choices become choice defaults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huh, Young Eun; Vosgerau, J.; Morewedge, C.K.

    2014-01-01

    Defaults effects can be created by social contexts. The observed choices of others can become social defaults, increasing their choice share. Social default effects are a novel form of social influence not due to normative or informational influence: participants were more likely to mimic observed

  14. Identifying influential multinomial observations by perturbation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyangoma, S.O.; Fung, W.-K.; Jansen, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    The assessment of the influence of individual observations on the outcome of the analysis by perturbation has received a lot of attention for situations in which the observations are independent and identically distributed. However, no methods based on minor perturbations for carrying out such asses

  15. 50 CFR 300.113 - Scientific observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... standards of the observer vessel safety check list developed by the Northeast Fisheries Science Center http... the vessel is in compliance with the standards of the observer vessel safety check list. (4... limited to: (i) Engaging in the use, possession, or distribution of illegal drugs; or (ii) Engaging...

  16. Local and gauge invariant observables in gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavkine, Igor

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that general relativity (GR) does not possess any non-trivial local (in a precise standard sense) and diffeomorphism invariant observable. We propose a generalized notion of local observables, which retain the most important properties that follow from the standard definition of locality, yet is flexible enough to admit a large class of diffeomorphism invariant observables in GR. The generalization comes at a small price—that the domain of definition of a generalized local observable may not cover the entire phase space of GR and two such observables may have distinct domains. However, the subset of metrics on which generalized local observables can be defined is in a sense generic (its open interior is non-empty in the Whitney strong topology). Moreover, generalized local gauge invariant observables are sufficient to separate diffeomorphism orbits on this admissible subset of the phase space. Connecting the construction with the notion of differential invariants gives a general scheme for defining generalized local gauge invariant observables in arbitrary gauge theories, which happens to agree with well-known results for Maxwell and Yang-Mills theories.

  17. Future control architecture and emerging observability needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morch, Andrei Z.; Jakobsen, Sigurd Hofsmo; Visscher, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    or observing. The present practices of observing distribution networks are quite limited and vary from country to country. New network architectures are expected to evolve in the close future, including web-of-cells (concept defined in ELECTRA), which will result in new control schemes, significantly different...

  18. Controllability/observability analysis of digital circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, L.H.

    1978-11-01

    The testability of a digital circuit is directy related to the difficulty of controlling and observing the logical values of internal nodes from circuit inputs and outputs, respectively. A method for analyzing digital circuits in terms of six functions which characterize combinational and sequential controllability and observability is presented.

  19. Controllability/observability analysis of digital circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, L.H.

    1979-01-01

    The testability of a digital circuit is directly related to the difficulty of controlling and observing the logical values of internal nodes from circuit inputs and outputs, respectively. A method for analyzing digital circuits in terms of six functions which characterize combinational and sequential controllability and observability is presented.

  20. Controllability/observability analysis of digital circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, L.H.

    1979-09-01

    The testability of a digital circuit is directly related to the difficulty of controlling and observing the logical values of internal nodes from circuit inputs and outputs, respectively. A method for analyzing digital circuits in terms of six functions which characterize combinational and sequential controllability and observability is presented.

  1. Low energy observables with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Recent results in the soft QCD sector of the Standard Model are presented. Measurements of low energy observables were performed with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In particular, underlying event, charged particle correlation and diffraction observables are reported and various models of Monte Carlo predictions are compared to the data.

  2. VSOP Monitoring Observations of 1928+738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D. W.; Edwards, P. G.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we review the VSOP monitoring observations of the core-dominated quasar 1928+738. Combining our VSOP observations with other VLBI data we find that the combined dataset can be well fit using a relativistic ballistic precessing jet model in which the precession is caused by the orbital motion in a binary black hole system.

  3. Confounding in publications of observational intervention studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenwold, Rolf H. H.; Hoes, Arno W.; Hak, Eelko

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a systematic literature search in Medline to assess the proportion of observational intervention studies appreciating confounding bias in peer-reviewed medical literature from 1985 through 2005. This study shows only 9% of all papers on observational intervention studies published in pe

  4. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; O`Reilly, Brian; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael; Sigg, Daniel; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-01-01

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this work we describe the first observation of parametric instability in an Advanced LIGO detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  5. Optimistic Biases in Observational Learning of Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, A.; Symmonds, M.; Dolan, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Action-outcome contingencies can be learnt either by active trial-and-error, or vicariously, by observing the outcomes of actions performed by others. The extant literature is ambiguous as to which of these modes of learning is more effective, as controlled comparisons of operant and observational learning are rare. Here, we contrasted human…

  6. Preservice Teacher Observations in Peer Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jayne M.; Garn, Alex; Jenkins, Patience

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify what and how preservice teachers observe when peer coaching during an early field experience. Twenty-three male and 14 female preservice teachers trained in peer coaching participated in the study. Coaches observed a peer partner teach five 40-min lessons to small groups of elementary or junior high school…

  7. Rain observations in tropical storm Cora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilheit, T. T.; Chang, A. T. C.; King, J. L.; Rodgers, E. B.; Nieman, R. A.; Krupp, B. M.; Siddalingaiah, H.; Diesen, B. C.; Stratigos, J.

    1979-01-01

    Passive microwave observations were made in tropical storm Cora at 19.35 and 94GHz. These observations suggest that 94GHz is appropriate for mapping the extent of rain over either land or ocean backgrounds and that some rainfall intensity measurement is also possible.

  8. Spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, S; Tabosa, J W R; Failache, H; Lezama, A

    2006-09-15

    We report on the first spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler shift associated with light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. The effect is evidenced as the broadening of a Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency coherence resonance on Rb vapor when the two incident Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams have opposite topological charges. The observations closely agree with theoretical predictions.

  9. Peer Observation of Teaching: A Decoupled Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, John Martyn; D'Artrey, Meriel; Rowe, Deborah-Anne

    2011-01-01

    This article details the findings of research into the academic teaching staff experience of peer observation of their teaching practice. Peer observation is commonly used as a tool to enhance a teacher's continuing professional development. Research participants acknowledged its ability to help develop their teaching practice, but they also…

  10. Evolution of Observation: Implementing Programmatic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender-Slack, Delane A.; Young, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    In the study reported, we examine the evolution of preservice teacher observation, focusing on the essential nature of observation to preservice teachers' learning about teaching while in the field. The study was 3 years long, and it involved 79 preservice teachers during semester-long language arts methods courses in early childhood and…

  11. Teaching Observations: Promoting Development through Critical Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzipanagos, Stylianos; Lygo-Baker, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The teaching observation process in a higher education context can be underpinned by an intention to enhance learning and teaching or used as a managerial tool to ensure standards are met or maintained. In this article we examine the perceptions of observees using a model that engages educational developers as observers. We seek to examine whether…

  12. Structured Observation Component. Secondary Teacher Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael L.; Keen, Phyllis A.

    A format is presented for use of student teachers in structuring their classroom observation techniques. Fifteen classroom and school activities are listed with a comprehensive questionnaire accompanying each. These questionnaires guide the student on what behaviors to observe and suggest objective and subjective responses to these behaviors to be…

  13. Classroom Observation Techniques. IDEA Paper No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheson, Keith A.

    Techniques for observing the classroom behavior of teachers and students are examined. These techniques provide a framework for analyzing and understanding classroom interaction, for making decisions about what should be happening, and for changing instructional behavior when it is necessary. The observation methods allow collection, analysis, and…

  14. Classroom Observation of Potential Special Education Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forness, Steven R.

    The present study is a portion of a larger study dealing with early identification of children with potential learning or behavioral difficulties. Specifically, the purpose of this phase of the project was (1) to refine classroom observation techniques and procedures and (2) to collect classroom observation data on children in regular classes who…

  15. Pure Gravitational Back-Reaction Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Tsamis, N C

    2013-01-01

    After discussing the various issues regarding and requirements on pure quantum gravitational observables in homogeneous-isotropic conditions, we construct a composite operator observable satisfying most of them. We also expand it to first order in the loop counting parameter and suggest it as a physical quantifier of gravitational back-reaction in an initially inflating cosmology.

  16. Observational Challenges for the Standard FLRW Model

    CERN Document Server

    Buchert, Thomas; Kleinert, Hagen; Roukema, Boudewijn F; Wiltshire, David L

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the "Fourteenth Marcel Grossman Meeting on General Relativity" parallel session DE3, "Large--scale Structure and Statistics", concerning observational issues in cosmology, we summarise some of the main observational challenges for the standard FLRW model and describe how the results presented in the session are related to these challenges.

  17. EE Cep observations requested for upcoming eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-07-01

    The AAVSO requests observations for the upcoming eclipse of EE Cephei, a long-period eclipsing variable. EE Cep has a period of 2,050 days, and shows strong variations in the eclipse light curve from one event to the next. Observations are needed to study the morphology of the upcoming eclipse, which will be used to better understand the shape of the eclipsing disk and how it precesses. Mid-eclipse is predicted to be August 23, 2014, but the early stages of the eclipse may begin as much as a month earlier. EE Cep is being observed by a number of amateur and professional astronomers using multiple telescopes at multiple wavelengths. Among these is a collaboration (see https://sites.google.com/site/eecep2014campaign/) headed by Cezary Galan at the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Poland; several individual AAVSO observers are already participating in this effort. The AAVSO is not currently a partner in that campaign, but all data submitted to the AAVSO will be publicly available. The AAVSO strongly encourages observers to begin following this star now, and to continue observations into October 2014 at least. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  18. Experimental observation of shear thickening oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    We report experimental observations of the shear thickening oscillation, i.e. the spontaneous macroscopic oscillation in the shear flow of severe shear thickening fluid. Using a density-matched starch-water mixture, in the cylindrical shear flow of a few centimeters flow width, we observed...

  19. Fokuseret pædagogisk observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, René

    2000-01-01

    Om afdækning og observation af fx hukommelsesfunktioner hos svage elever med hjælp af praktiske øvelser......Om afdækning og observation af fx hukommelsesfunktioner hos svage elever med hjælp af praktiske øvelser...

  20. Development of the Counselor Response Observation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Antti P.; Soini, Hannu S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the measures included in the Counselor Response Observation System. The Counselor Response Observation System consists of the Counselor Response Coding System and the Skilled Verbal Responding Scale. Detailed results of their validity and reliability are presented.