WorldWideScience

Sample records for tutored video instruction

  1. Instructional Aspects of Intelligent Tutoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Jules M., Ed.

    This collection contains three papers addressing the instructional aspects of intelligent tutoring systems (ITS): (1) "Some Experiences with Two Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teaching Computer Programming: Proust and the LISP-Tutor" (van den Berg, Merrienboer, and Maaswinkel); (2) "Some Issues on the Construction of Cooperative…

  2. Instruction, Cognitive Scaffolding, and Motivational Scaffolding in Writing Center Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jo; Thompson, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we quantitatively analyze the discourse of experienced writing center tutors in 10 highly satisfactory conferences. Specifically, we analyze tutors' instruction, cognitive scaffolding, and motivational scaffolding, all tutoring strategies identified in prior research from other disciplines as educationally effective. We find that…

  3. [The good PBL tutor--to be or not to be: instructional films for tutors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelin, Silvia; Huwendiek, Sören; Nikendei, Christoph; Dieter, Peter; Kirschfink, Michael; Bosse, Hans-Martin

    2008-01-01

    Many faculties worldwide apply the method of problem-based learning (PBL) in their curricula as a form of instruction by which students in small groups develop problem-solving strategies on the basis of a specific case. This approach fosters self-responsible and context-dependent learning, which aims at providing an improved anchoring of knowledge. For this reason, the previous decades have seen a distribution of the method to medical schools across the world. The role of the tutor assumes particular importance since, in contrast to the traditional university system, he or she serves as a facilitator who fosters and structures content-related and group-dynamic learning processes. In some cases, this requires an intervention by the tutor. The major challenge is to intervene at the right time and in an appropriate manner. This paper presents examples of difficult PBL situations using short film sequences to demonstrate and comments on potential approaches of the tutor in attempting to resolve the problem. Standard problem situations within a PBL tutorial were defined and produced in a film. A collection of seven frequent critical PBL situations are presented in short film sequences. Potential instruments of intervention are demonstrated in the videos and discussed. The film sequences may be downloaded in the supplementary of the electronic version of this article (www.sciencedirect.com). Within the framework of a tutor-training programme, the problematic situations and interventions presented in this article will help to sensitise tutors to potentially critical PBL tutorial situations and aid the development of individual resolution approaches.

  4. Video Methods for Speechreading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Donald G.

    1988-01-01

    Addressed are the history, methodology, and instructional benefits of self-instruction video as a component of speechreading instruction with adolescent and adult hearing-impaired individuals, focusing on: factors in video lesson design, advantages of various hardware alternatives and computer-assisted learning, instructional evaluation methods,…

  5. Peer Tutoring: An Economical Instructional Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundell, Kerth T.; Brown, William E.

    1979-01-01

    A peer tutoring model is described and suggestions for implementing peer tutoring programs are provided. The seven steps in the development of a peer tutoring program are: establishing a need, considering curriculum, assessing, selecting learners, selecting tutors, monitoring, and coordinating. (PHR)

  6. The Effects of Politeness-Related Instruction on Medical Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromme, Rainer; Brummernhenrich, Benjamin; Becker, Bettina-Maria; Jucks, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Tutors often fail to address learners' misconceptions. Although this may indicate a failure to grasp these misconceptions, it may simply be due to a wish to be polite and save the learner's face. In this study we examined whether instructing tutors about the pitfalls of politeness could increase the clarity and precision of their tutorial…

  7. Instructional video for teaching venepuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Michael; Harcharik, Sara; Moskalenko, Marina; Luber, Adam; Bernardo, Sebastian; Levitt, Jacob

    2014-10-01

    Safe venepuncture technique is a critical skill for health care professionals, to avoid accidental occupational injury. This study investigates whether watching an instructional video improves medical students' ability to perform venepuncture safely. This was a randomised, controlled, assessor-blinded trial that evaluated the utility of an instructional video, with the primary outcome of the ability to perform venepuncture safely. Forty-two second-year medical students were recruited and randomised to receive either video instruction (group A, n = 20) or no intervention (group B, n = 22). Prior to the study, all students attended an instructor-led workshop on venepuncture. During the study, students were paired and instructed to perform venepuncture on a partner. Performance was assessed using a points-based checklist. Pre- and post-study surveys were conducted to assess confidence with technique. The mean total checklist score was higher in group A than in group B, with values of 14.15 and 9.18, respectively (p instructional video performed venepuncture more effectively and reported greater confidence with the technique. Medical students can benefit from having access to an instructional video on venepuncture as an adjunct to the standard curriculum. Safe venepuncture technique is a critical skill for health care professionals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Instructional Design and Intelligent Tutoring: Theory and the Precision of Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Peter; Dannenberg, Roger B.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses instructional design methods used in intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) and describes the application of instructional systems design to the creation of an ITS called Piano Tutor, a multimedia workstation that is designed to provide first-year piano lessons. The ITS curriculum is analyzed, including critical lessons and skill groups.…

  9. Contemporary Tutorial Call: Using Purpose-Built Video as a Grammar Tutor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Jarrad R.; Gruba, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite an increased emphasis on form-focused instruction (FFI), the use of the computer as a grammar tutor has remained largely unexamined for nearly two decades. With new technologies at hand, there is a need to take a fresh look at online grammar tutors and link designs more strongly to contemporary second language acquisition (SLA) principles…

  10. Contributions of Minimax Theory to Instructional Decision Making in Intelligent Tutoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, H. J.

    1999-01-01

    Formulates decision rules for adapting the appropriate amount of instruction to learning needs in intelligent-tutoring systems. Highlights include minimax decision theory (a minimum information approach), a binomial model, and a comparison of the Bayesian decision component in the Minnesota Adaptive Instructional System and the minimax strategy.…

  11. Complex software training: Harnessing and optimizing video instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brar, Jagvir; van der Meij, Hans

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the design and effect of optimized video for statistics instruction. In addition, the use of video reviews to further optimize video instruction is examined. A Demonstration-Based Training (DBT) model was proposed and followed for the construction of the video. The videos w

  12. Complex software training: Harnessing and optimizing video instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brar, Jagvir; van der Meij, Hans

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the design and effect of optimized video for statistics instruction. In addition, the use of video reviews to further optimize video instruction is examined. A Demonstration-Based Training (DBT) model was proposed and followed for the construction of the video. The videos

  13. Effect of peer tutoring and cooperative learning instructional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues ... sampling with the use of the Pupil Rating Scale, Mathematics Tests (A and B) for ... Keywords: peer tutoring, cooperative learning, learning disabilities, personality types, school ...

  14. Rethinking of Instructional Short Movies and Videos: An Evaluation the Instructional Short Movie and Video Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay AKBAŞ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study; the short films and videos taking part in National Instructional Short Film and Video Contest held in Kırıkkale University are evaluated in terms of some variables such as; the departments of the teacher candidates, whether the product is video or film. Quantitative methods were used in the study. The research method of the study is descriptive method. Quantitative data was obtained by using Short Movie and Video Assessment Scale prepared by the researchers the rubric consists of four sub-titles, the usage of audio-visual elements, focusing the aims and objectives, selection and presentation of the content, taking target group into consideration. There are 20 items in the scale. Each item can be graded between 1 -10 and the arithmetic mean of the items gives the total point of the films. All of the 47 films taking part in the contest were evaluated. According to the results, these films and videos are graded as average. Besides this, there are no significant difference between instructional short film and videos in terms of technical aspects, content, aims and objectives; but for the target group/audience, videos are graded as more effective than short films. In addition, the scores of the instructional short films and videos prepared by the students in Department of Computer and Instructional Technologies are considerably higher than the other departments’ scores.

  15. From Teacher-Centered Instruction to Peer Tutoring in the Heterogeneous International Classroom: A Danish Case of Instructional Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueg, Klarissa; Lueg, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    This case study documents a seminar redesign from a teacher-centered instruction format to collaborative "reciprocal peer tutoring" (RPT) at Aarhus University, Denmark. Departing from concepts by Bourdieu and Vertovec, we argue that teaching concepts should meet the needs of students within Higher Education (HE). Our student sample is…

  16. Tutored Videotape-Instruction in Clinical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sox, Harold C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A comparison of traditional medical lecturing with a technique using a videotaped lecture that can be interrupted by a tutor for discussion or questions showed similar academic achievement rates but higher student ratings for the videotape method. The technique is recommended for specialized topics or areas in which the supply of expert lecturers…

  17. Improving physics instruction by analyzing video games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Ian D.

    2013-01-01

    Video games can be very powerful teaching systems, and game designers have become adept at optimizing player engagement while scaffolding development of complex skills and situated knowledge. One implication is that we might create games to teach physics. Another, which I explore here, is that we might learn to improve classroom physics instruction by studying effective games. James Gee, in his book What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy (2007), articulates 36 principles that make good video games highly effective as learning environments. In this theoretical work, I identify 16 themes running through Gee's principles, and explore how these themes and Gee's principles could be applied to the design of an on-campus physics course. I argue that the process pushes us to confront aspects of learning that physics instructors and even physics education researchers generally neglect, and suggest some novel ideas for course design.

  18. Devillainizing Video in Support of Comprehension and Vocabulary Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew; Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    In the classroom, teachers have long used videos as an addendum to the instruction they provide. Still, using video is often seen in a negative light and is used sparingly. This column calls upon research from a variety of fields that supports the use of video to enhance literacy instruction in classrooms. Relying on both theory and practice, the…

  19. Cognitive Tutoring based on Intelligent Decision Support in the PENTHA Instructional Design Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    dall'Acqua, Luisa

    2010-06-01

    The research finality of this paper is how to support Authors to develop rule driven—subject oriented, adaptable course content, meta-rules—representing the disciplinary epistemology, model of teaching, Learning Path structure, and assessment parameters—for intelligent Tutoring actions in a personalized, adaptive e-Learning environment. The focus is to instruct the student to be a decision manager for himself, able to recognize the elements of a problem, select the necessary information with the perspective of factual choices. In particular, our research intends to provide some fundamental guidelines for the definition of didactical rules and logical relations, that Authors should provide to a cognitive Tutoring system through the use of an Instructional Design method (PENTHA Model) which proposes an educational environment, able to: increase productivity and operability, create conditions for a cooperative dialogue, developing participatory research activities of knowledge, observations and discoveries, customizing the learning design in a complex and holistic vision of the learning / teaching processes.

  20. iDIY: Video-Based Instruction Using Ipads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Pei-Lin; Savage, Melissa N.; Bouck, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Video-based instruction is technology-based instruction delivered through video clips in which a human model demonstrates target behaviors (Rayner, Denholm, & Sigafoos, 2009). It can be used to teach a variety of skills, including social communication and behavioral and functional skills (Cihak & Schrader, 2008). Despite the advantages,…

  1. An Assessment of Streaming Video In Web-based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofield, Jay L.

    Streaming video used as an augmentation in Web-based instruction was investigated to: (1) determine if demographic characteristics would lead to significantly different beliefs about the use and perceived effectiveness of streaming video, and (2) whether or not there are characteristics of streaming video that would lead to beliefs about the…

  2. The challenge of automated tutoring in Web-based learning environments for information retrieval instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sormunen Eero; Pennanen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The need to enhance information literacy education increases demand for effective Web-based learning environments for information retrieval instruction. The paper introduces the Query Performance Analyser, a unique instructional tool for information retrieval learning environments. On top of an information retrieval system and within a given search assignment, the Query Performance Analyser supports learning by instantly visualizing achieved query performance. Although the Query Performance Analyser is a useful tool in training searching skills, performance feedback is not enough for learners practicing alone in Web-based learning environments. The paper reports the findings of a log analysis on user problems in exercising Boolean and best-match queries. A blueprint of an automated tutoring system for IR instruction is presented.

  3. A Video Specific Instruction Set Architecture for ASIP design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Shen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel video specific instruction set architecture for ASIP design. With single instruction multiple data (SIMD instructions, two destination modes, and video specific instructions, an instruction set architecture is introduced to enhance the performance for video applications. Furthermore, we quantify the improvement on H.263 encoding. In this paper, we evaluate and compare the performance of VS-ISA, other DSPs (digital signal processors, and conventional SIMD media extensions in the context of video coding. Our evaluation results show that VS-ISA improves the processor's performance by approximately 5x on H.263 encoding, and VS-ISA outperforms other architectures by 1.6x to 8.57x in computing IDCT.

  4. The editor dilemma in modern language instruction: Is tutoring out of control?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Correa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although academic dishonesty has received considerable attention in recent years, there is little research on how non-serious cheating issues in a discipline such as biology or chemistry can become highly serious offenses in the context of instruction in the modern languages (MLs. One of these grey areas is (unauthorized editing by a tutor and/or a native speaker: Given that a substantial part (if not all of the grade in a ML assignment is language usage (be it grammar, vocabulary, spelling, or organization, any assistance received that improves linguistic form (and as a consequence the student’s grade should be considered as an act of punishable academic dishonesty. Still, and even if it seems obvious, it is not uncommon for language instructors to come across assignments that contain advanced linguistic forms or colloquialisms that do not belong to the linguistic repertoire of the student who wrote it (Correa, 2011. In this paper I address the following questions: Is the use of a tutor/native speaker accidental plagiarism (Beasley, 2004, pseudepigraphy (Walker & Townley, 2012, or contract cheating (Clarke & Lancaster, 2006? Who is at fault? How can it be prevented or minimized? Should students be allowed to have tutors at all? Is there a double standard when it comes to graduate students and faculty?

  5. The Influence of Mathematics Vocabulary Instruction Embedded within Addition Tutoring for First-Grade Students with Mathematics Difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Sarah R.; Driver, Melissa K.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners indicate students require explicit instruction on mathematics vocabulary terms, yet no study has examined the effects of an embedded vocabulary component within mathematics tutoring for early elementary students. First-grade students with mathematics difficulty (MD; n = 98) were randomly assigned to addition tutoring…

  6. [Video Instruction for Synchronous Video Recording of Mimic Movement of Patients with Facial Palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaede, Rebecca Anna; Volk, Gerd Fabian; Modersohn, Luise; Barth, Jodi Maron; Denzler, Joachim; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2017-05-03

    Photografy and video are necessary to record the severity of a facial palsy or to allow offline grading with a grading system. There is no international standard for the video recording urgently needed to allow a standardized comparison of different patient cohorts. A video instruction was developed. The instruction was shown to the patient and presents several mimic movements. At the same time the patient is recorded while repeating the presented movement using commercial hardware. Facial movements were selected in such a way that it was afterwards possible to evaluate the recordings with standard grading systems (House-Brackmann, Sunnybrook, Stennert, Yanagihara) or even with (semi)automatic software. For quality control, the patients evaluated the instruction using a questionnaire. The video instruction takes 11 min and 05 and is divided in 3 parts: 1) Explanation of the procedure; 2) Foreplay and recreating of the facial movements; 3) Repeating of sentences to analyze the communication skills. So far 13 healthy subjects and 10 patients with acute or chronic facial palsy were recorded. All recordings could be assessed by the above mentioned grading systems. The instruction was rated as well explaining and easy to follow by healthy persons and patients. There is now a video instruction available for standardized recording of facial movement. This instruction is recommended for use in clinical routine and in clinical trials. This will allow a standardized comparison of patients within Germany and international patient cohorts. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Humanizing Instructional Videos in Physics: When Less Is More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Noah L.; Traxler, Adrienne L.

    2017-06-01

    Many instructors in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields are striving to create active learning environments in their classrooms and in doing so are frequently moving the lecture portion of their course into online video format. In this classroom-based study, we used a two group randomized experimental design to examine the efficacy of an instructional video that incorporates a human hand demonstrating and modeling how to solve frictional inclined plane problems compared to an identical video that did not include the human hand. The results show that the learners who viewed the video without the human hand present performed significantly better on a learning test and experienced a significantly better training efficiency than the learners who viewed the video with the human hand present. Meanwhile, those who learned with the human hand present in the instructional video rated the instructor as being more humanlike and engaging. The results have implications for both theory and practice. Implications for those designing instructional videos are discussed, as well as the limitations of the current study.

  8. Humanizing Instructional Videos in Physics: When Less Is More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Noah L.; Traxler, Adrienne L.

    2017-02-01

    Many instructors in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields are striving to create active learning environments in their classrooms and in doing so are frequently moving the lecture portion of their course into online video format. In this classroom-based study, we used a two group randomized experimental design to examine the efficacy of an instructional video that incorporates a human hand demonstrating and modeling how to solve frictional inclined plane problems compared to an identical video that did not include the human hand. The results show that the learners who viewed the video without the human hand present performed significantly better on a learning test and experienced a significantly better training efficiency than the learners who viewed the video with the human hand present. Meanwhile, those who learned with the human hand present in the instructional video rated the instructor as being more humanlike and engaging. The results have implications for both theory and practice. Implications for those designing instructional videos are discussed, as well as the limitations of the current study.

  9. Effects of Explicit Reading Strategies Instruction and Peer Tutoring on Second and Fifth Graders' Reading Comprehension and Self-Efficacy Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Keer, Hilde; Verhaeghe, Jean Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effectiveness of explicit reading comprehension strategies instruction, followed by practice in teacher-led whole-class activities (STRAT), reciprocal same-age (STRAT + SA) peer-tutoring activities, or cross-age peer-tutoring activities (STRAT + CA) on 2nd and 5th graders' reading comprehension and self-efficacy…

  10. The Effects of Video Modeling with Voiceover Instruction on Accurate Implementation of Discrete-Trial Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladescu, Jason C.; Carroll, Regina; Paden, Amber; Kodak, Tiffany M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study replicates and extends previous research on the use of video modeling (VM) with voiceover instruction to train staff to implement discrete-trial instruction (DTI). After staff trainees reached the mastery criterion when teaching an adult confederate with VM, they taught a child with a developmental disability using DTI. The…

  11. Video instruction is more effective than written instruction in improving inhaler technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Romil F; Gupta, Rakesh M

    2017-08-07

    Many patients with asthma use inhalers incorrectly. Better inhaler technique is associated with better asthma control. We tested the effectiveness of a computer-based video training solution versus traditional written instructions, both which may be used in a resource-limited setting, for teaching inhaler technique. We hypothesized that computer based training will provide a higher quality of instruction which will improve technique more effectively than written training. 50 asthma patients were recruited from pulmonary clinic at the Junta De Beneficencia Hospital, Ecuador (average age 48.2 years, 58% female). Inhaler technique was taught using written instructions in 20 and video in 30 patients. Inhaler technique was analyzed by video recording pre and post training inhaler use. Inhaler technique score was calculated for each video recording. Baseline performance was equivalent in each group, achieving an average of around 5 of 11 of the inhaler steps. Video training was significantly more effective than written instructions (change of 3.6 points vs. change of 0.4 points, p instruction appears to be inadequate to achieve safe and effective administration of inhaled medicine. In contrast, video-based education can effectively create adequate inhaler technique without additional provider time. REGISTRATION NUMBER (CLINICALTRIALS.GOV IDENTIFIER): NCT02660879. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Instructional Videos for Supporting Older Adults Who Use Interactive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramss, Denise; Struve, Doreen

    2009-01-01

    The study reported in this paper investigated the usefulness of different instructions for guiding inexperienced older adults through interactive systems. It was designed to compare different media in relation to their social as well as their motivational impact on the elderly during the learning process. Precisely, the video was compared with…

  13. Prospective Teachers' Views about Video-Enhanced General Biology Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Gülcan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the views of the prospective physics and chemistry teachers about the video-enhanced General Biology instruction. The participants included 19 second-year prospective teachers (10 in Physics and 9 in Chemistry Education) at Necatibey Faculty of Education, Balikesir University, Turkey in the 2011-2012 academic…

  14. The Value of Video in Online Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Denis P., II.; Rudd, Denis P.

    2014-01-01

    Online educational instruction has become more prevalent in American and international educational institutions and is increasingly the chosen format for many academic programs. The use of web conferencing, virtual classrooms, and computer-based training are becoming the common platform in which schools provide education in online teaching. This…

  15. The Effect of Peer Tutoring and Explicit Instructional Strategies on Primary School Pupils Learning Outcomes in Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tella

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effect of explicit and peer tutoring instructional strategies (treatment, pupils ability and gender on learning outcomes in primary school Mathematics. Data analysis involved the use of analysis of covariance (ANCOVA. The sample consisted of 170 primary 5 pupils selected through simple random from eight schools. The findings revealed that there was significant main effect of treatment on achievement in Mathematics and attitude towards Mathematics. Pupil's ability and gender were found not to have significant main effect on achievement in Mathematics and attitude toward Mathematics. However there was a significant interaction effect of treatment and pupils’ ability on pupils’ attitude towards Mathematics. All the two and three ways interaction effects on achievement and attitude were found not to be significant. These findings and application indicate that the significant main effect of treatment on mathematics achievement and attitude respectively provide empirical basis to suggest that primary school practicing Mathematics teacher should constantly use peer-tutoring and explicit teaching instructional strategies in Mathematics classrooms. The use of these instructional strategies in improving Mathematics achievement and attitude toward the subject should also be encouraged irrespective of student pupil’s ability and gender. There is also a need for developers of curriculum materials (e.g. teacher trainee's, textbook associated trainer's guide in Mathematics methodology to incorporate the significant findings of the present study. The textual material should contain detail of hour peer-tutoring and explicit-teaching instructional strategies could be made an integral part of Mathematics teaching at the primary school level.

  16. A comparison of video modeling, text-based instruction, and no instruction for creating multiple baseline graphs in Microsoft Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Bryan C; Fienup, Daniel M

    2015-09-01

    Graphing is socially significant for behavior analysts; however, graphing can be difficult to learn. Video modeling (VM) may be a useful instructional method but lacks evidence for effective teaching of computer skills. A between-groups design compared the effects of VM, text-based instruction, and no instruction on graphing performance. Participants who used VM constructed graphs significantly faster and with fewer errors than those who used text-based instruction or no instruction. Implications for instruction are discussed.

  17. Making It Work: Creating a Student-Friendly Repository of Instructional Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keba, Michelle; Segno, Jamie; Schofield, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This case study investigates how a team of librarians at Nova Southeastern University (NSU) worked together to assess and optimize their library's current instructional videos in order to create a mobile-first video hosting platform, known as LibraryLearn. Instructional library videos serve as invaluable resources for students who are not present…

  18. The Use of Videos as a Cognitive Stimulator and Instructional Tool in Tertiary ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Dalwinder; Yong, Esther; Zin, Norhayati Mohd; DeWitt, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    Even though technology is known to have a transformative effect on teaching and learning, videos are not widely used as an instructional tool in the classrooms in Malaysia. This paper focuses on using videos a cognitive stimulator and an instructional tool especially in tertiary ESL classrooms. This paper the potential of using videos for…

  19. The Effect of Problem-Based Video Instruction on Learner Perceptions of Learning and Knowledge Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of video and group discussion in problem-based video instruction on learner perceptions of learning and knowledge transfer. To achieve this purpose, this study compared learner perceptions of learning and knowledge transfer in problem-based video instruction (PBVI) with those in two other…

  20. Preconsent video-assisted instruction improves the comprehension and satisfaction in elderly patient visiting pain clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Koh, Won Uk; Rhim, Jin Ho; Karm, Myong Hwan; Yu, Hye Suk; Lee, Bo Yoeng; Shin, Jin Woo; Leem, Jeong Gill

    2012-10-01

    Elderly patients visiting pain clinic may be at greater risk of misunderstanding the explanation because of age-related cognitive decline. Video instruction may provide a consistent from of teaching in a visual and realistic manner. We evaluated the effect of educational video on the patient understanding and satisfaction in a group of geriatric patients visiting pain clinic. Ninety two patients aged more than 60 years old who were scheduled for transforaminal epidural block were recruited. After exposure to either video or paper instruction process, each patient was asked 5-item comprehension questions, overall satisfaction and preference question. During follow-up period, number of outpatient referral-line call for further explanation was counted. We observed significantly better comprehension in the video education compared with paper instruction (P video group (P = 0.015), and patients visiting pain clinic were more preferred video instruction (P Video approach to instruction process before consent improves treatment comprehension in geriatric patient visiting pain clinic.

  1. E-Tutoring lnteraction Strategy in Distance Video Conference System%基于远程视频会议系统的在线辅导教学交互策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晨婧仔; 焦建利

    2014-01-01

    With the development of information technology, people are involved into the open flexible network with more chances of the high quality education resources and the personalized learning. One-to-one personalized e-tuto-ring becomes a new way for K-12 students to access educational opportunities and programs outside of the traditional classroom. At the same time, e-learning provides the convenience for teachers' teaching which is no longer being re-stricted by time, space and other conditions. Through the literature review, the authors found that the quantity and quality of researches on the interaction of e-tutoring are not optimistic. Particularly in the field of primary education, there exist few researches on the interac-tion in online e-tutoring. At the same time, through the investigation and analysis of the e-tutoring practice, the au-thors found that the practitioners did not pay much attention to the importance of interaction as well. This study aims to build an e-tutoring interaction strategy based on the real-time online video conference system JoinNet, and hopes to help students engage e-tutoring better. Based on social constructivism learning theory, instruc-tional design theory, activity learning theory, the theory of communication in second language acquisition and the in-teraction theory in distance education, and based on the analysis of interaction characteristics of learners attending e-tutoring, the study developed an interaction strategy for e-tutoring in the real-time online video conference system JoinNet. And then, the study revised the interaction strategy through three rounds of action research with 20 teachers and students respectively. The authors also measured the effect of the interaction strategy. This study uses action research as the research framework, and integrates questionnaire investigation, interview, case analysis, content analysis and other research methods. This study also applies qualitative research and quantita

  2. YouTube™ as a Source of Instructional Videos on Bowel Preparation: a Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajumobi, Adewale B; Malakouti, Mazyar; Bullen, Alexander; Ahaneku, Hycienth; Lunsford, Tisha N

    2016-12-01

    Instructional videos on bowel preparation have been shown to improve bowel preparation scores during colonoscopy. YouTube™ is one of the most frequently visited website on the internet and contains videos on bowel preparation. In an era where patients are increasingly turning to social media for guidance on their health, the content of these videos merits further investigation. We assessed the content of bowel preparation videos available on YouTube™ to determine the proportion of YouTube™ videos on bowel preparation that are high-content videos and the characteristics of these videos. YouTube™ videos were assessed for the following content: (1) definition of bowel preparation, (2) importance of bowel preparation, (3) instructions on home medications, (4) name of bowel cleansing agent (BCA), (5) instructions on when to start taking BCA, (6) instructions on volume and frequency of BCA intake, (7) diet instructions, (8) instructions on fluid intake, (9) adverse events associated with BCA, and (10) rectal effluent. Each content parameter was given 1 point for a total of 10 points. Videos with ≥5 points were considered by our group to be high-content videos. Videos with ≤4 points were considered low-content videos. Forty-nine (59 %) videos were low-content videos while 34 (41 %) were high-content videos. There was no association between number of views, number of comments, thumbs up, thumbs down or engagement score, and videos deemed high-content. Multiple regression analysis revealed bowel preparation videos on YouTube™ with length >4 minutes and non-patient authorship to be associated with high-content videos.

  3. A Comparison of Video Modeling, Text-Based Instruction, and No Instruction for Creating Multiple Baseline Graphs in Microsoft Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Bryan C.; Fienup, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphing is socially significant for behavior analysts; however, graphing can be difficult to learn. Video modeling (VM) may be a useful instructional method but lacks evidence for effective teaching of computer skills. A between-groups design compared the effects of VM, text-based instruction, and no instruction on graphing performance.…

  4. ‘n Videogebaseerde tutor onderrig- en ondersteuningsprogram vir eerstejaar verpleegkunde studente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. du Rand

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available A video-based method of instruction was introduced to develop students academically as well as to implement parallel medium instruction. An action research approach was followed Lectures were video-taped beforehand and worked through with the students by a tutor in scheduled Afrikaans or English periods. Simultaneously a live class situation was handled by the lecturer in the other language. Over and above these methods additional video-based support sessions were conducted by tutors for high risk students. A survey indicated that 85% of students were satisfied with this method of instruction. The perceptions of high risk students to VSI were positive and they passed the examinations. Video lectures need to be carefully planned in order to be acceptable as one of a number of possible instruction methods at a multi-cultural university.

  5. Efficient Vocational Skills Training for People with Cognitive Disabilities: An Exploratory Study Comparing Computer-Assisted Instruction to One-on-One Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James R., Jr.; Juszczak, Andrew; Engel, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study compared the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction to that of one-on-one tutoring for teaching people with mild and moderate cognitive disabilities when both training methods are designed to take account of the specific mental deficits most commonly found in cognitive disability populations. Method: Fifteen…

  6. The Effect of Context-Based Video Instruction on Learning and Motivation in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun; Johnson, Scott D.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a constructivist approach to context-based video instruction for enhancing learning. To achieve this purpose, the authors examined whether video-based instruction that was developed using constructivist theory can affect student learning (i.e., comprehension and retention) and…

  7. Enhancing Teacher Learning from Guided Video Analysis of Literacy Instruction: An Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Carrie Eunyoung; Van Riper, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The technological infrastructure for the use of instructional and professional videos is common in today's educational venues. However, there has been a dearth of awareness and training to help teachers critically analyze and effectively utilize video recordings of authentic classroom instruction for their professional development. This self-study…

  8. Captioned Instructional Video: Effects on Content Comprehension, Vocabulary Acquisition and Language Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    BavaHarji, Madhubala; Alavi, Zhinoos Kamal; Letchumanan, Krishnaveni

    2014-01-01

    This experimental design study examined the effects of viewing captioned instructional videos on EFL learners' content comprehension, vocabulary acquisition and language proficiency. It also examined the participants' perception of viewing the captioned instructional videos. The 92 EFL students in two classes, who were undertaking the "Tape…

  9. Laparoscopy Instructional Videos : The Effect of Preoperative Compared With Intraoperative Use on Learning Curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekema, Theo H.; Talsma, Aaldert K.; Wevers, Kevin P.; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E. N.

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have shown that the use of intraoperative instructional videos has a positive effect on learning laparoscopic procedures. This study investigated the effect of the timing of the instructional videos on learning curves in laparoscopic skills training. DESIGN: After

  10. Examining Feedback in an Instructional Video Game Using Process Data and Error Analysis. CRESST Report 817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschang, Rebecca E.; Kerr, Deirdre S.; Chung, Gregory K. W. K.

    2012-01-01

    Appropriately designed technology-based learning environments such as video games can be used to give immediate and individualized feedback to students. However, little is known about the design and use of feedback in instructional video games. This study investigated how feedback used in a mathematics video game about fractions impacted student…

  11. Medical Student and Tutor Perceptions of Video Versus Text in an Interactive Online Virtual Patient for Problem-Based Learning: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodham, Luke A; Ellaway, Rachel H; Round, Jonathan; Vaughan, Sophie; Poulton, Terry; Zary, Nabil

    2015-06-18

    The impact of the use of video resources in primarily paper-based problem-based learning (PBL) settings has been widely explored. Although it can provide many benefits, the use of video can also hamper the critical thinking of learners in contexts where learners are developing clinical reasoning. However, the use of video has not been explored in the context of interactive virtual patients for PBL. A pilot study was conducted to explore how undergraduate medical students interpreted and evaluated information from video- and text-based materials presented in the context of a branched interactive online virtual patient designed for PBL. The goal was to inform the development and use of virtual patients for PBL and to inform future research in this area. An existing virtual patient for PBL was adapted for use in video and provided as an intervention to students in the transition year of the undergraduate medicine course at St George's, University of London. Survey instruments were used to capture student and PBL tutor experiences and perceptions of the intervention, and a formative review meeting was run with PBL tutors. Descriptive statistics were generated for the structured responses and a thematic analysis was used to identify emergent themes in the unstructured responses. Analysis of student responses (n=119) and tutor comments (n=18) yielded 8 distinct themes relating to the perceived educational efficacy of information presented in video and text formats in a PBL context. Although some students found some characteristics of the videos beneficial, when asked to express a preference for video or text the majority of those that responded to the question (65%, 65/100) expressed a preference for text. Student responses indicated that the use of video slowed the pace of PBL and impeded students' ability to review and critically appraise the presented information. Our findings suggest that text was perceived to be a better source of information than video in virtual

  12. Pedagogical Strategies for Human and Computer Tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Brian J.

    The pedagogical strategies of human tutors in problem solving domains are described and the possibility of incorporating these techniques into computerized tutors is examined. GIL (Graphical Instruction in LISP), an intelligent tutoring system for LISP programming, is compared to human tutors teaching the same material in order to identify how the…

  13. Using Video-Based Anchored Instruction To Enhance Learning: Taiwan's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Hsin-Yih Cindy

    2000-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated the effects of computer-assisted videodisc-based anchored instruction on attitudes toward mathematics and instruction as well as problem-solving skills among Taiwanese elementary students. Findings suggest that video-based anchored instruction provided a more motivating environment that enhanced students'…

  14. Pressurised metered dose inhaler-spacer technique in young children improves with video instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Nicole; Le Souëf, Peter; Turkovic, Lidija; McCahon, Lucy; Kicic, Anthony; Sly, Peter D; Devadason, Sunalene; Schultz, André

    2016-07-01

    The importance of good device technique to maximise delivery of aerosolised medications is widely recognised. Pressurised metered dose inhaler (pMDI)-spacer technique was investigated in 122 children, aged 2-7 years, with asthma. Eight individual steps of device technique were evaluated before and after viewing an instructional video for correct device technique. Video measurements were repeated every three months for nine months. Device technique improved directly after video instruction at the baseline study visit (p children scoring maximal (p = 0.02) and near-maximal (p = 0.04) scores. Repeated video instruction over time improves inhaler technique in young children. • Correct device technique is considered essential for sufficient delivery of inhaled medication. • Poor inhaler use is common in young asthmatic children using pressurised metered dose inhalers and spacers. What is New: • Video instruction could be used as a strategy to improve device technique in young children.

  15. From Tutor Scripts to Talking Sticks: 100 Ways to Differentiate Instruction in K-12 Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, Paula; Danaher, Sheila

    2010-01-01

    Differentiated instruction engages students of all abilities as active learners, decision-makers, and problem solvers--making educational experiences more meaningful for all. This one-of-a-kind book proves that designing differentiated instruction can be simple and fun! Packed with creative adaptation ideas like fidget bags, doodle notes, and…

  16. The challenge of automated tutoring in Web-based learning environments for information retrieval instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Sormunen Eero; Pennanen; Sami

    2004-01-01

    The need to enhance information literacy education increases demand for effective Web-based learning environments for information retrieval instruction. The paper introduces the Query Performance Analyser, a unique instructional tool for information retrieval learning environments. On top of an information retrieval system and within a given search assignment, the Query Performance Analyser supports learning by instantly visualizing achieved query performance. Although the Query Performance A...

  17. Effect of Instructional vs. Authentic Video Materials on Introvert and Extrovert Iranian EFL Learners' Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isazadeh, Parya; Makui, Selma Mohammad Zadeh; Ansarian, Loghman

    2016-01-01

    The study delved into the effect of instructional video materials vs. authentic video materials on vocabulary learning of extrovert and introvert Iranian EFL learners. To this end, Nelson proficiency test was administered to one hundred eighty (n = 180) language learners. Considering 1 standard deviation above and below the mean score, one hundred…

  18. Video-assisted instruction improves the success rate for tracheal intubation by novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Quijano, K J; Huang, Y M; Matevosian, R; Kaplan, M B; Steadman, R H

    2008-10-01

    Tracheal intubation via laryngoscopy is a fundamental skill, particularly for anaesthesiologists. However, teaching this skill is difficult since direct laryngoscopy allows only one individual to view the larynx during the procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine if video-assisted laryngoscopy improves the effectiveness of tracheal intubation training. In this prospective, randomized, crossover study, 37 novices with less than six prior intubation attempts were randomized into two groups, video-assisted followed by traditional instruction (Group V/T) and traditional instruction followed by video-assisted instruction (Group T/V). Novices performed intubations on three patients, switched groups, and performed three more intubations. All trainees received feedback during the procedure from an attending anaesthesiologist based on standard cues. Additionally, during the video-assisted part of the study, the supervising anaesthesiologist incorporated feedback based on the video images obtained from the fibreoptic camera located in the laryngoscope. During video-assisted instruction, novices were successful at 69% of their intubation attempts whereas those trained during the non-video-assisted portion were successful in 55% of their attempts (P=0.04). Oesophageal intubations occurred in 3% of video-assisted intubation attempts and in 17% of traditional attempts (Pvideo laryngoscopy for tracheal intubation training.

  19. Acquisition and Generalization of Chained Tasks Taught with Computer Based Video Instruction to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Kevin M.; Maguire, Amy; McClimon, Desiree

    2009-01-01

    Three elementary aged students with autism participated in an evaluation of computer based video instruction that targeted functional life skills. The effects of the software were analyzed in the context of a multiple probe design across and replicated across participants. This study represents a departure from more traditional video based…

  20. The Impact of Video Instruction: A Case Study of a Student with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, Susan; Johnson, Celia E.

    2009-01-01

    This case study of a preschool boy with Asperger's syndrome focuses on the use of video instruction for the purpose of teaching skills required for participation in classroom activities. After the classroom teacher identified four skill areas needing improvement (circle time, sharing, choosing centers, and singing), short video clips of…

  1. Intervention and Instruction with Video for Students with Autism: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Kevin Michael; Langone, John

    2005-01-01

    Efficacy research on video based instruction for children with autism is a promising area for practitioners and researchers. Researchers are successfully using video to teach a variety of social and functional skills. This literature review synthesizes these findings and examines critical features of each of the studies that contribute most to the…

  2. Preparing Preservice Teachers for Instruction on English-Language Development with Video Lesson Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the use of video lesson modules in a teaching methodology course to prepare preservice teachers for supporting the English-language development of pupils at K-8 schools. The basic material of a lesson module is a video lesson featuring instruction of an experienced classroom teacher in an English-language development setting of…

  3. Reviewing Instructional Studies Conducted Using Video Modeling to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Cimen; Diken, Ibrahim H.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored 31 instructional research articles written using video modeling to children with autism and published in peer-reviewed journals. The studies in this research have been reached by searching EBSCO, Academic Search Complete, ERIC and other Anadolu University online search engines and using keywords such as "autism, video modeling,…

  4. Eight guidelines for the design of instructional videos for software training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, van der H.; Meij, van der J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Video has become a popular means for delivering "how to" information about a wide variety of software tasks. With video rapidly becoming a major instructional method, the question arises of their effectiveness for software training. This paper provides a set of eight guidelines for the cons

  5. Bringing Balance to the Table: Comprehensive Writing Instruction in the Tutoring Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibb, Bethany

    2012-01-01

    Because writing centers have long been viewed as fix-it shops, mentioning the word "grammar" can spark a heated debate over the writing center's role. A brief history of the most recent grammar wars begins with researchers in the 1960s who found that "formal grammar has a negligible or, because it usually displaces some instruction and practice in…

  6. Laying the Foundations for Video-Game Based Language Instruction for the Teaching of EFL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Alejandro Galvis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces video-game based language instruction as a teaching approach catering to the different socio-economic and learning needs of English as a Foreign Language students. First, this paper reviews statistical data revealing the low participation of Colombian students in English as a second language programs abroad (U.S. context especially. This paper also provides solid reasons why the use of video games in education and foreign language education is justified. Additionally, this paper reviews second language acquisition theoretical foundations that provide the rationale for adapting video-game based language instruction in light of important second language acquisition constructs such as culture and identity, among others. Finally, this document provides options for further research to construct and test the efficacy of video-game based language instruction while simultaneously leaving it open for collaborative contributions.

  7. Video prompting versus other instruction strategies for persons with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilli, Viviana; Lancioni, Giulio E; Hoogeveen, Frans; Caffó, Alessandro; Singh, Nirbhay; O'Reilly, Mark; Sigafoos, Jeff; Cassano, Germana; Oliva, Doretta

    2013-06-01

    Two studies assessed the effectiveness of video prompting as a strategy to support persons with mild and moderate Alzheimer's disease in performing daily activities. In study I, video prompting was compared to an existing strategy relying on verbal instructions. In study II, video prompting was compared to another existing strategy relying on static pictorial cues. Video prompting and the other strategies were counterbalanced across tasks and participants and compared within alternating treatments designs. Video prompting was effective in all participants. Similarly effective were the other 2 strategies, and only occasional differences between the strategies were reported. Two social validation assessments showed that university psychology students and graduates rated the patients' performance with video prompting more favorably than their performance with the other strategies. Video prompting may be considered a valuable alternative to the other strategies to support daily activities in persons with Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Effect of Instructional vs. Authentic Video Materials on Introvert and Extrovert Iranian EFL Learners' Vocabulary Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parya Isazadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The study delved into the effect of instructional video materials vs. authentic video materials on vocabulary learning of extrovert and introvert Iranian EFL learners. To this end, Nelson proficiency test was administered to one hundred eighty (n=180 language learners. Considering 1 standard deviation above and below the mean score, one hundred twenty three (n=123 language learners were selected for the study. These participants were distributed into 4 experimental groups (with 25 learners and a control group (with 23 learners. Researcher-made vocabulary pretest and posttest which were designed using the vocabularies from the movies were also administered to the participants. The findings of the study after three weeks of treatment revealed that both authentic video materials and instructional video materials can have positive effect on vocabulary learning of Iranian EFL leaners. This effect, however, is not different among extrovert learners. It was also revealed that introvert EFL learners benefit more from authentic video materials. The findings of the study could be used by material developers or language teachers who may wish to use video materials in their classes. Keywords: Authentic video materials, Instructional video materials, Vocabulary learning, Introversion, Extroversion

  9. Un modelo de tutoría universitaria para el aprendizaje de materiales instruccionales Um modelo de tutoría universitaria para o aprendizado de materiais de instrução A College Tutoring Model for Learning through the Use of Instructional Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Angélica Ortega-Andrade

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Se exponen los resultados del estudio de un modelo diseñado para atender los problemas relacionados con la comprensión de la lectura y el aprendizaje de materiales instruccionales en estudiantes universitarios, con el apoyo del tutor. En el estudio participaron 59 tutores y 200 estudiantes de la Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, México. El diseño de la investigación fue cuasiexperimental, con tres grupos independientes de comparación. Se aplicó el Inventario de Estilos de Aprendizaje y Orientación Motivacional (Edaom de Castañeda y Ortega (2004, en un pretest-postest después de la intervención con el modelo durante un semestre. Los resultados indican, de manera moderada, que la intervención del tutor contribuyó a mejorar el desempeño de los estudiantes, en comparación con los otros dos grupos, y también que para el aprendizaje de materiales instruccionales se requiere entrenamiento por parte del tutor.Apresenta os resultados do estudo de um modelo concebido para resolver problemas relacionados com a compreensão de leitura e o aprendizado de materiais de instrução em estudantes universitarios com o apoio de tutores. O estudo envolveu 59 professores e 200 estudantes da Universidad Autónoma do Estado de Hidalgo no México. O desenho da pesquisa foi quase-experimental, com três grupos independentes para comparação. Nós aplicamos o Inventario de Estilos de Aprendizagem e Orientação Motivacional (Edaom de Castañeda e Ortega (2004 em um pré-teste-pós-teste após a intervenção com o modelo por um semestre. Os resultados indicam moderadamente que a intervenção do tutor ajudou para melhorar o desempenho dos alunos em comparação com os outros dois grupos, bem como que a aprendizagem de material didático necessita treinamento pelo tutor.Presents the results of a study on a model designed to address problems related to reading comprehension and learning with instructional materials among college students who

  10. Do Instructional Videos on Sputum Submission Result in Increased Tuberculosis Case Detection? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Mhalu

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of an instructional video about the production of diagnostic sputum on case detection of tuberculosis (TB, and evaluated the acceptance of the video.Randomized controlled trial.We prepared a culturally adapted instructional video for sputum submission. We analyzed 200 presumptive TB cases coughing for more than two weeks who attended the outpatient department of the governmental Municipal Hospital in Mwananyamala (Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. They were randomly assigned to either receive instructions on sputum submission using the video before submission (intervention group, n = 100 or standard of care (control group, n = 100. Sputum samples were examined for volume, quality and presence of acid-fast bacilli by experienced laboratory technicians blinded to study groups.Median age was 39.1 years (interquartile range 37.0-50.0; 94 (47% were females, 106 (53% were males, and 49 (24.5% were HIV-infected. We found that the instructional video intervention was associated with detection of a higher proportion of microscopically confirmed cases (56%, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 45.7-65.9%, sputum smear positive patients in the intervention group versus 23%, 95% CI 15.2-32.5%, in the control group, p <0.0001, an increase in volume of specimen defined as a volume ≥3ml (78%, 95% CI 68.6-85.7%, versus 45%, 95% CI 35.0-55.3%, p <0.0001, and specimens less likely to be salivary (14%, 95% CI 7.9-22.4%, versus 39%, 95% CI 29.4-49.3%, p = 0.0001. Older age, but not the HIV status or sex, modified the effectiveness of the intervention by improving it positively. When asked how well the video instructions were understood, the majority of patients in the intervention group reported to have understood the video instructions well (97%. Most of the patients thought the video would be useful in the cultural setting of Tanzania (92%.Sputum submission instructional videos increased the yield of tuberculosis cases through better quality of sputum

  11. Effect of the use of instructional anatomy videos on student performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Varun; Natarajan, Pradeep; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Jain, Sharad

    2008-01-01

    Medical schools have reduced the time allotted to anatomy instruction. Consequently, schools engage students in more independent settings using information and communication technologies (ICT). There has been limited research in the use of video aids, a type of ICT, to enhance anatomy examination performance. The objective of this study is to describe the design, usage, and effect on examination performance of eight locally developed instructional anatomy videos. First-year UCSF medical students (n = 141) had access to the videos. They reported their video usage, reason for usage, and satisfaction. The prior year students (n = 141) served as a historical control group. Anatomy and radiology examination performance was compared between groups while controlling for prior performance. The students with and without access to the videos did not differ in examination performance. Sixty-one (43%) students in the experimental group responded to the survey. Of these, 79% reported using at least one video, viewing an average of 4.75 of the eight videos. They watched 3.27 (SD = 1.57, range 1-5) of the five anatomy videos and 1.48 (SD = 1.35; range 0-3) of the three radiology videos. In a regression analysis controlling for age and MCAT scores, using the anatomy videos at least once improved anatomy examination performance by 3.4% (P-value = 0.007). There was no relationship between radiology video usage and radiology exam score. Video resource availability did not enhance student performance in anatomy and radiology. However, when analyzing performance for those whom we knew level of video use, there was a statistically different and higher anatomy achievement.

  12. Using Video Game-Based Instruction in an EFL Program: Understanding the Power of Video Games in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Alejandro Galvis Guerrero

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This small-scale action-research study examines the perceptions of four students in a military academy in Colombia undergoing the processof using a mainstream video game in their EFL classes instead of classic forms of instruction. The video game used served to approach EFL by means of language exploratory activities designed according to the context present in the video game and the course linguistic objectives. This study was conducted on the grounds that computer technology offers the possibility of enhancing EFL instruction by means of simulating and augmenting the target language context. The researcher’s belief is that video games offer a learning environment closely related to students’ experiences and preferences. Results from this study suggest that students were more entertained and attentive and demonstrated more engagement and disposition towards their English classes. Students also learned about matters related to the target language and culture, and were not only circumscribed to linguistic ones. Similarly, results from this study shed some light on the importance of offering access to technology to students before they advance to higher education that support video-gaming practices in the classroom.

  13. Investigating Language Tutor Social Inclusion Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhuizen, Gary

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the identities of tutors working in one-to-one instructional arrangements, which entail a tutor and an adult English learner working together to meet the particular language learning needs and goals of the learner. The tutors in this study are matched with their partners through an organization in New Zealand which aims to…

  14. Multimedia Tutors for Science and Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Beverly Park; Poli, Corrado; Grosse, Ian; Day, Roberta

    We have built several multimedia tutors for science and engineering education. This paper discusses Design for Manufacturing tutors and an electronic homework systems used by over 2000 students daily. The engineering tutors instruct students on efficient procedures for designing parts for manufacture. The goal is to support a deeper understanding…

  15. Investigating Language Tutor Social Inclusion Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhuizen, Gary

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the identities of tutors working in one-to-one instructional arrangements, which entail a tutor and an adult English learner working together to meet the particular language learning needs and goals of the learner. The tutors in this study are matched with their partners through an organization in New Zealand which aims to…

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Video Instruction on Social and Communication Skills Training for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla-Mehta, Smita; Miller, Trube; Callahan, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Video instruction as an intervention for teaching skills to children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is gaining increased momentum in applied settings.Video instruction, comprised of video modeling, video self-modeling, and point-of-view video, has been utilized in various fields of study with various populations and target behaviors.…

  17. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Video Instruction on Social and Communication Skills Training for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla-Mehta, Smita; Miller, Trube; Callahan, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Video instruction as an intervention for teaching skills to children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is gaining increased momentum in applied settings.Video instruction, comprised of video modeling, video self-modeling, and point-of-view video, has been utilized in various fields of study with various populations and target behaviors.…

  18. Is video-based instruction effective in the rehabilitation of children with autism spectrum disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagohara, Debora M

    2010-01-01

    To review intervention studies on the use of video-based instruction for teaching adaptive behaviours to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Electronic and hand searches were conducted to identify intervention studies that focus on using video-based instruction to teach adaptive behaviours to children with ASD. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were summarized in terms of: (a) participants, (b) setting, (c) model type, (d) target skills, (e) intervention type, (f) design and (g) outcomes. Forty-four studies encompassing 49 experiments met the inclusion criteria. The studies targeted a range of adaptive behaviours and academic skills. Most studies reported positive results, but the certainty of evidence was not strong for all of the studies due to reliance on pre-experimental designs. The results from this review support the use of video-based instruction in the rehabilitation of children with ASD.

  19. Peer Mediated Instruction and Intervention (PMII type Classwide Peer Tutoring (CWPT and Academics Ability of Natural Science-Biology in Vocational High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamsiah Hamsiah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Peer Mediated Instruction and Intervention (PMII tipe Classwide Peer Tutoring (CWPTdan Kemampuan Akademik pada Pembelajaran IPA Biologi SMK Abstract: Learning science in SMK 1 Bontang still dominated by conventional learning strategy is a method of learning with lecture. This has an impact on learning outcomes of cognitive science that tends biology is still low because the students have not been trained become independent learners, thus learning innovation PMII CWPT types can be used as a breakthrough to develop the cognitive learning. This study was conducted to determine the application CWPT strategies and academic skills in science teaching vocational Biology. Quasi-experimental research with pretest-posttest design Nonequivalent Control Group. Results of the study, namely: (1 there CWPT effect on the cognitive learning, (2 no influence academic ability to cognitive learning outcomes, and (3 there is no interaction effect between learning strategy and the academic ability toward the cognitive learning. Key Words: peer-mediated instruction and intervention, classwide peer tutoring, academic skills, cognitive learning outcomes Abstrak: Pembelajaran IPA di SMKN 1 Bontang masih didominasi dengan strategi belajar konvensio-nal yaitu metode belajar dengan ceramah. Hal ini berdampak terhadap hasil belajar kognitif IPA biolo-gi yang cendrung masih rendah karena siswa belum terlatih menjadi pebelajar yang mandiri, sehingga inovasi pembelajaran PMII tipe CWPT dapat digunakan sebagai terobosan untuk mengembangkan  hasil belajar kognitif. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui penerapan strategi CWPT dan kemam-puan akademik pada pembelajaran IPA Biologi SMK. Penelitian eksperimen semu dengan rancangan pretest-posttest Nonequivalent Control Group. Hasil penelitian, yaitu: (1 ada pengaruh CWPT ter-hadap hasil belajar kognitif,  (2 ada  pengaruh  kemampuan akademik terhadap hasil belajar kognitif, dan (3 tidak ada  pengaruh interaksi antara

  20. An instructional video enhanced bag-mask ventilation quality during simulated newborn resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deindl, Philipp; Schwindt, Jens; Berger, Angelika; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 20% of newborns infants need respiratory support at birth. This study evaluated whether video-based education could improve quality of positive pressure ventilation (PPV) performed by inexperienced staff during neonatal resuscitation. Fourth-year medical students were randomly paired and instructed to give PPV to a modified manikin as single-person resuscitators and as two-person-paired resuscitators using either an air cushion rim mask or a round mask before and after watching a self-instructional video. Airway pressure, gas flow, tidal volume and mask leak were recorded. PPV performance quality was analysed using video recording. Mask leak was lower during one-person ventilation when using the air cushion rim mask (56 ± 16%) compared to the round mask (71 ± 19%). Round mask leak during one-person ventilation was significantly lower when using the two point top hold in contrast to the 'o.k.' rim hold (before training: 63 ± 22% vs. 72 ± 18%, after training: 57 ± 17% vs. 77 ± 12%). Watching a self-instructional video improved performance quality scores of both correct head positioning, and the quality of airway manoeuvres compared to baseline, however mask leak was not significantly reduced. A self-instructional video significantly improved bag mask PPV performance in inexperienced providers but did not improve mask leak in a model of neonatal resuscitation. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Portable digital video instruction in predoctoral education of child behavior management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, James R; Johnson, Lynn A; Nainar, S M Hashim; Hu, Jan C C

    2007-04-01

    The goals of this exploratory study were to determine students' assessment of portable digital video instruction (using the Apple iPod) and to compare examination performance among groups of predoctoral dental students who did and did not utilize portable digital video instruction as a supplement to a conventional pediatric behavior management lecture. Dental students received a one-hour lecture on communication with the parent and child patient as part of their regular sophomore pediatric dentistry curriculum. Digital audio and digital video versions of this lecture were made available to all 113 students in the class. Eleven student volunteers were loaned portable digital video players (the iPod) containing the lecture for a two-week period. Upon completion of the study period, the entire class participated in an anonymous fifteen-minute post-intervention written assessment including a thirteen-item examination covering lecture material. Students who had used the iPod to review the digital video lecture material favored this medium as a pedagogical instrument and as a group performed significantly better on the examination than those who had not reviewed the digital material (p=0.034). In conclusion, portable digital instructional videos may be a useful educational methodology to help predoctoral dental students acquire knowledge in pediatric behavior management.

  2. College Students' Perceptions of Learning and Knowledge Transfer in Problem-Based Video Instruction: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate college students' perceptions of learning and knowledge transfer in problem-based video instruction. To achieve this purpose, this study compared students' interview data of learning and knowledge transfer in problem-based video instruction (PBVI) that was produced for an undergraduate course of the…

  3. Qualitative and Quantitative Evaluation of Three Types of Student-Generated Videos as Instructional Support in Organic Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Melinda C.; Dunnagan, Cathi L.; Hirsh, Lauren A. S.; Cherry, Clinton R.; Christianson, Kayla A.; Gibson, Radiance J.; Wolfe, Michael I.; Gallardo-Williams, Maria T.

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of student-generated videos as a supplement to teaching assistant (TA) instruction in an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Three videos covering different aspects of lab instruction (experimental technique, use of instrumentation, and calculations) were produced using…

  4. Students' Knowledge Comprehension after Implementation of Live Conventional Demonstration, Video Teaching and Video-Assisted Instruction Methods in Endodontic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh Akhlaghi, Nahid; Khalilak, Zohreh; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Moshari, Amirabbas; Ghaffari, Saman; Namazikhah, Mohammad Sadegh

    2017-01-01

    Video-assisted clinical instruction (VACID) has been found to be a beneficial teaching tool for various fields in dentistry. The aim of this interventional study was to compare the efficacy of live conventional demonstration (CD), video teaching, and VACID (video with explanation) methods in teaching of root canal treatment to undergraduate dental students. Forty-two undergraduate senior dental students participated in this study. The students experienced this course for the first time and were randomly divided into three groups (n=14). Group A attended live CD on a patient; group B watched a professionally produced demonstration video without any verbal explanation during 1 h; and finally group C watched the same video alongside live explanation by a mentor during the 1.5 h (VACID). The whole process was performed by an experienced endodontist on maxillary central incisors. All of The students carried out a multiple choice question exam to evaluate their comprehension. The mean score of the experimental groups were compared using ANOVA test and multiple comparisons were carried out with Tamhane test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. There was significant difference among three groups according to the ANOVA test (P<0.05). Group VACID had the highest mean scores. There was significant difference between the groups VACID and VT (P=0.011); no significant differences were found in other inter-group comparisons. According to the results, VACID may improve the quality of endodontic training in undergraduate dental students.

  5. Video Game-Based Learning: An Emerging Paradigm for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt D.

    2013-01-01

    Interactive digital media, or video games, are a powerful new medium. They offer immersive experiences in which players solve problems. Players learn more than just facts--ways of seeing and understanding problems so that they "become" different kinds of people. "Serious games" coming from business strategy, advergaming, and entertainment gaming…

  6. Teaching Employment Interview Skills through Interactive Video Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Gary M.; And Others

    An interactive video program, "The Screening Interview," has been developed at Miami University (Ohio) to help prepare college and university students for on-campus employment interviews with corporate recruiters. Within the context of the simulated interview situation provided by the program, students function as the alter ego of either…

  7. The effects of video modeling with voiceover instruction on accurate implementation of discrete-trial instruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vladescu, Jason C; Carroll, Regina; Paden, Amber; Kodak, Tiffany M

    2012-01-01

    ...) with voiceover instruction to train staff to implement discrete-trial instruction (DTI). After staff trainees reached the mastery criterion when teaching an adult confederate with VM, they taught a child with a developmental disability using DTI...

  8. Use of static picture prompts versus video modeling during simulation instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, Paul A; Cihak, David F; Gama, Robert I

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of static picture prompts and video modeling as classroom simulation strategies in combination with in vivo community instruction. Students with moderate intellectual disabilities were instructed in the tasks of withdrawing money from an ATM and purchasing items using a debit card. Both simulation strategies were effective and efficient at teaching the skills. The two simulation strategies were not functionally different in terms of number of trials to acquisition, number of errors, and number of instructional sessions to criterion.

  9. Laying the Foundations for Video-Game Based Language Instruction for the Teaching of EFL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, Héctor Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces video-game based language instruction as a teaching approach catering to the different socio-economic and learning needs of English as a Foreign Language students. First, this paper reviews statistical data revealing the low participation of Colombian students in English as a second language programs abroad (U.S. context…

  10. A Case Study: Implementing an Interactive Video Instruction System in Teaching Electronics and Industrial Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipe, Ron; And Others

    A study examined the development and implementation of an interactive video instruction system for teaching electronics and industrial maintenance at the University of Tennessee. The specific purposes of the study were to document unusual problems that may be encountered when this new technology is implemented, suggest corrective actions, and…

  11. An Evaluation of Video Modeling with Embedded Instructions to Teach Implementation of Stimulus Preference Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Rocío; Gongola, Leah; Homlitas, Christa

    2015-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across participants was used to evaluate the effects of video modeling with embedded instructions on training teachers to implement 3 preference assessments. Each assessment was conducted with a confederate learner or a child with autism during generalization probes. All teachers met the predetermined mastery criterion,…

  12. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities to Use Public Bus Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda; O'Brien, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach three young adults with moderate intellectual disabilities to push a "request to stop bus signal" and exit a city bus in response to target landmarks. A multiple probe design across three students and one bus route was used to evaluate effectiveness of…

  13. Video-Based Supplemental Instruction as an Alternative to Traditional Developmental Courses. An NCPR Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, F. Kim; Jacobs, Glen

    2010-01-01

    Video-based supplemental instruction (VSI) is a non-traditional course delivery system designed to improve developmental students' academic performance in difficult courses that typically have high failure and withdrawal rates. This paper describes the VSI model and examines data from VSI applications. (Contains 12 figures.)

  14. Systematic Review of Video-Based Instruction Component and Parametric Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kyle D.; Aljehany, Mashal Salman; Altaf, Enas Mohammednour

    2017-01-01

    Video-based instruction (VBI) has a substantial amount of research supporting its use with individuals with autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities. However, it has typically been implemented as a treatment package containing multiple interventions. Additionally, there are procedural variations of VBI. Thus, it is difficult…

  15. Improving Secondary School Students' Achievement and Retention in Biology through Video-Based Multimedia Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Amosa Isiaka; Yaki, Akawo Angwal; Gana, Eli S.; Ughovwa, Queen Eguono

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the effects of video-based multimedia instruction on secondary school students' achievement and retention in biology. In Nigeria, 120 students (60 boys and 60 girls) were randomly selected from four secondary schools assigned either into one of three experimental groups: Animation + Narration; Animation + On-screen Text;…

  16. Pre-instructional strategies and segment length in interactive video programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty; Rusman, Ellen; Vin, J.; de Vin, Jeroen; Verhagen, Pleunes Willem; Willemse, Arjeh; Wieggers, Maurice; Abel, Omalley; Maushak, Nancy J.; Wright, Kristen Egeland; Simonson, Michael

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of pre-instructional strategies on the relationship between learner-controlled or program-controlled length of video segments and on related test performance on post-tests and retention tests. The study looks at the effect of presenting learning objectives in ad

  17. Utilizing Simulation-Based Training of Video Clip Instruction for the Store Service Operations Practice Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Hung; Yen, Yu-Ren; Wu, Pai-Lu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a store service operations practice course based on simulation-based training of video clip instruction. The action research of problem-solving strategies employed for teaching are by simulated store operations. The counter operations course unit used as an example, this study developed 4 weeks of subunits for…

  18. Computer- and Video-Based Instruction of Food-Preparation Skills: Acquisition, Generalization, and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Kevin; Cihak, David

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer-based video instruction (CBVI) program to teach life skills. Three middle school-aged students with intellectual disabilities were taught how to make a sandwich, use a microwave, and set the table with a CBVI software package. A multiple probe across behaviors design was used to…

  19. A Blended Learning Study on Implementing Video Recorded Speaking Tasks in Task-Based Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkgoz, Yasemin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates designing and implementing a speaking course in which face-to-face instruction informed by the principles of Task-Based Learning is blended with the use of technology, the video, for the first-year student teachers of English in Turkish higher education. The study consisted of three hours of task-based classroom…

  20. Video-Taped Instruction Creates Listening and Visual Memory Integration for Higher Reading and Math Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erland, Jan

    This pre-post quasi-experimental study was conducted in a public school 5th grade class to determine the effects of video-taped instruction in teaching analysis and pattern finding skills. Methodology included guidelines from Cognitive Behavior Modification, Suggestopedia, and Guilford's Structure of Intellect Model within the Kaufman and Kaufman…

  1. 3-D Computer Animation vs. Live-Action Video: Differences in Viewers' Response to Instructional Vignettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dennie; McLaughlin, Tim; Brown, Irving

    2012-01-01

    This study explored computer animation vignettes as a replacement for live-action video scenarios of classroom behavior situations previously used as an instructional resource in teacher education courses in classroom management strategies. The focus of the research was to determine if the embedded behavioral information perceived in a live-action…

  2. Optimizing Instructional Video for Preservice Teachers in an Online Technology Integration Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Callaway, Rebecca; Bell, David

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of design instructional video based on the Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning by applying segmentation and signaling on the learning outcome of students in an online technology integration course. The study assessed the correlation between students' personal preferences (preferred learning styles and area…

  3. An Evaluation of Video Modeling with Embedded Instructions to Teach Implementation of Stimulus Preference Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Rocío; Gongola, Leah; Homlitas, Christa

    2015-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across participants was used to evaluate the effects of video modeling with embedded instructions on training teachers to implement 3 preference assessments. Each assessment was conducted with a confederate learner or a child with autism during generalization probes. All teachers met the predetermined mastery criterion,…

  4. Using Comprehensive Video-Module Instruction as an Alternative Approach for Teaching IUD Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rodriguez, Juan Antonio; Donnon, Tyrone

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine clinicians and residents have increasing educational and work demands that have made it difficult to provide and access training on specific procedures such as IUD insertion. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of video-module instruction could provide residents with the necessary knowledge and skills to perform an IUD insertion correctly when compared with the traditional form of instruction, which is a lecture-demonstration session provided by an academic gynecologist. Thirty-nine family medicine residents participated in the study during the induction period at the beginning of their residency program in July 2012 at the University of Calgary. A randomized, two group pretest/posttest experimental research design was used to compare the procedural knowledge and skills performance (posttest only) of residents trained using an alternative instructional intervention (video-module teaching) with the traditional lecture-demonstration approach to teaching IUD insertion. Both teaching methods were effective in providing procedural knowledge instruction, and the paired-samples t tests results were almost identical: t (37)=1.35. On the other hand, performance scores were significantly higher in the video-module group: t (37)=2.37, 95% CI (0.61, 8.00), with a mean difference in performance of 4.31. There were no significant differences in residents' satisfaction scores, and there was no correlation between the different scores and sex or age or between performance and level of satisfaction. This video-module instruction is an effective method to provide comprehensive IUD insertion training, and the psychomotor skills gain (performance component) was significantly higher than the traditional method of instruction.

  5. Assessment of Learner Acceptance and Satisfaction with Video-Based Instructional Materials for Teaching Practical Skills at a Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkor, Francis

    2011-01-01

    As video-based instructional materials become available to distance learners to learn practical skills at a distance, it is important to assess the instructional effectiveness of these materials and to understand how students respond to them. This paper is the second part of a larger exploratory study that assessed the instructional effectiveness…

  6. The impact of complete denture making instructional videos on self-directed learning of clinical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Haruka; Botelho, Michael George; Bridges, Susan; Leung, Katherine Chiu Man

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical instructional video with a structured worksheet for independent self-study in a complete denture program. 47 multilingual dental students completed a task by watching an instructional video with subtitles regarding clinical complete denture procedures. After completion, students evaluated their learning experience, and 11 students participated in focus group interviews to gain further insight. A mixed-methods approach to data collection and analysis provided descriptive statistical results and a grounded theory approach to coding identified key concepts and categories from the qualitative data. Over 70% of students had favorable opinions of the learning experience and indicated that the speed and length of the video were appropriate. Highly positive and conflicting negative comments regarding the use of subtitles showed both preferences for subtitles over audio and vice versa. The use of a video resource was considered valuable as the replay and review functions allowed better visualization of the procedures, which was considered a good recap tool for the clinical demonstration. It was also a better revision aid than textbooks. So, if the students were able to view these videos at will, they believed that videos supplemented their self-study. Despite the positive response, videos were not considered to replace live clinical demonstrations. While students preferred live demonstrations over the clinical videos they did express a realization of these as a supplemental learning material for self-study based on their ease of access, use for revision, and prior to clinical preparation. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Students’ Knowledge Comprehension after Implementation of Live Conventional Demonstration, Video Teaching and Video-Assisted Instruction Methods in Endodontic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh Akhlaghi, Nahid; Khalilak, Zohreh; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Moshari, Amirabbas; Ghaffari, Saman; Namazikhah, Mohammad Sadegh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Video-assisted clinical instruction (VACID) has been found to be a beneficial teaching tool for various fields in dentistry. The aim of this interventional study was to compare the efficacy of live conventional demonstration (CD), video teaching, and VACID (video with explanation) methods in teaching of root canal treatment to undergraduate dental students. Methods and Materials: Forty-two undergraduate senior dental students participated in this study. The students experienced this course for the first time and were randomly divided into three groups (n=14). Group A attended live CD on a patient; group B watched a professionally produced demonstration video without any verbal explanation during 1 h; and finally group C watched the same video alongside live explanation by a mentor during the 1.5 h (VACID). The whole process was performed by an experienced endodontist on maxillary central incisors. All of The students carried out a multiple choice question exam to evaluate their comprehension. The mean score of the experimental groups were compared using ANOVA test and multiple comparisons were carried out with Tamhane test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: There was significant difference among three groups according to the ANOVA test (P<0.05). Group VACID had the highest mean scores. There was significant difference between the groups VACID and VT (P=0.011); no significant differences were found in other inter-group comparisons. Conclusion: According to the results, VACID may improve the quality of endodontic training in undergraduate dental students. PMID:28512486

  8. Gaming the System: Video Games as a Theoretical Framework for Instructional Design

    OpenAIRE

    Beatty, Ian D.

    2014-01-01

    In order to facilitate analyzing video games as learning systems and instructional designs as games, we present a theoretical framework that integrates ideas from a broad range of literature. The framework describes games in terms of four layers, all sharing similar structural elements and dynamics: a micro-level game focused on immediate problem-solving and skill development, a macro-level game focused on the experience of the game world and story and identity development, and two meta-level...

  9. Comparison of expert instruction and computer-based video training in teaching fundamental surgical skills to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousiainen, Markku; Brydges, Ryan; Backstein, David; Dubrowski, Adam

    2008-04-01

    Practice using computer-based video instruction (CBVI) leads to improvements in surgical skills proficiency. This study investigated the benefits of the introduction of (a) learner-directed, interactive video training and (b) the addition of expert instruction on the learning and retention of the basic surgical skills of suturing and knot-tying in medical students. Using bench models, students were pre-tested on a suturing and knot-tying skill after viewing an instructional video. The students were then randomly assigned to three practice conditions: self-study with video; self-study with interactive video; or the combination of self-study with interactive video with the addition of subsequent expert instruction. All participants underwent 18 trials of practice in their assigned training condition. The effectiveness of training was assessed by an immediate post-test and a retention test one month later. Performance was evaluated using expert- and computer-based assessments. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. There were no differences in expert- and computer-based assessments between groups at pre-test. Although all three groups demonstrated significant improvements on both measures between the pre- and post-tests as well as between pre-tests and retention-tests (P instruction nor the addition of self-directed interaction with video leads to further improvements in skill development or retention. These findings further support the possible implementation of CBVI within surgical skills curricula.

  10. The Effect of Problem-Based Video Instruction on Learner Satisfaction, Comprehension and Retention in College Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun; Johnson, Scott D.

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to identify the effects of two major components (ie, video and group discussion) of problem-based video instruction (PBVI) on college students' learning. To achieve this purpose, this study examined whether or not PBVI can improve learner satisfaction, comprehension and retention by comparing the results from…

  11. Sign Language Tutoring Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Aran, Oya; Benoit, Alexandre; Carrillo, Ana Huerta; Fanard, François-Xavier; Campr, Pavel; Akarun, Lale; Caplier, Alice; Rombaut, Michele; Sankur, Bulent

    2008-01-01

    In this project, we have developed a sign language tutor that lets users learn isolated signs by watching recorded videos and by trying the same signs. The system records the user's video and analyses it. If the sign is recognized, both verbal and animated feedback is given to the user. The system is able to recognize complex signs that involve both hand gestures and head movements and expressions. Our performance tests yield a 99% recognition rate on signs involving only manual gestures and 85% recognition rate on signs that involve both manual and non manual components, such as head movement and facial expressions.

  12. Training Pre-Service Chinese Language Teachers to Create Instructional Video to Enhance Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lih-Ching Chen; Wang, Ming-Chian Ken

    2014-01-01

    Foreign language instruction is a complex and challenging task made even more so by situations in which the learner's native language is radically different from the foreign language being mastered. Nowhere is this more evident than in the case of native English speakers seeking to learn Mandarin Chinese. The rapid increase in the availability and…

  13. Technology-Assisted Sheltered Instruction: Instructional Streaming Video in an EFL Multi-Purpose Computer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Hsuan; Chuang, Tsung-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Content-based instruction (CBI) has been widely adopted for decades. However, existing CBI models cannot always be effectively put into practice, especially for learners of lower English proficiency in English as a foreign language (EFL) context. This study examined an animation design course adopting CBI to promote reading abilities of English…

  14. Success in tutoring electronic troubleshooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ellen M.

    1990-01-01

    Two years ago Dr. Sherrie Gott of the Air Force Human Resources Laboratory described an avionics troubleshooting tutor being developed under the Basic Job Skills Research Program. The tutor, known as Sherlock, is directed at teaching the diagnostic procedures necessary to investigate complex test equipment used to maintain F-15 fighter aircraft. Since Dr. Gott's presentation in 1987, the tutor has undergone field testing at two Air Force F-15 flying wings. The results of the field test showed that after an average of 20 hours on the tutor, the 16 airmen in the experimental group (who average 28 months of experience) showed significant performance gains when compared to a control group (having a mean experience level of 37 months) who continued participating in the existing on-the-job training program. Troubleshooting performance of the tutored group approached the level of proficiency of highly experienced airmen (averaging approximately 114 months of experience), and these performance gains were confirmed in delayed testing six months following the intervention. The tutor is currently undergoing a hardware and software conversion form a Xerox Lisp environment to a PC-based environment using an object-oriented programming language. Summarized here are the results of the successful field test. The focus is on: (1) the instructional features that contributed to Sherlock's success; and (2) the implementation of these features in the PC-based version of the avionics troubleshooting tutor.

  15. ssessment of Learner Acceptance and Satisfaction with Video-Based Instructional Materials for Teaching Practical Skills at a Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Donkor

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available As video-based instructional materials become available to distance learners to learn practical skills at a distance, it is important to assess the instructional effectiveness of these materials and to understand how students respond to them. This paper is the second part of a larger exploratory study that assessed the instructional effectiveness of video-based instructional materials for teaching distance learners practical skills in block-laying and concreting and how learners respond to these instructional materials. Specifically, this paper aims to assess learners’ acceptance and satisfaction with the materials. It also aims to determine whether levels of learner satisfaction and acceptance differ according to study centres. Data were collected from 71 respondents at three study centres using a self-completion questionnaire comprising 17 Likert-type items. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and Scheffe’s post hoc test at a 0.05 level of significance. Learners appeared positive about their learning experiences with the use of video-based instructional materials to learn practical skills at a distance as they rated highly all the items assessing their acceptance and satisfaction. Results of item-by-item ANOVA regarding learner acceptance indicated that the respondents, categorized according to study centres, exhibited similar levels of acceptance for nine of the ten items. For learner satisfaction, there were no statistically significant differences for six of the seven items. Thus, learners of different study centres exhibited about the same level of acceptance and satisfaction.

  16. Video-based instructions for surgical hand disinfection as a replacement for conventional tuition? A randomised, blind comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Uwe; Constantinescu, Mihai A.; Woermann, Ulrich; Schmitz, Felix; Schnabel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Various different learning methods are available for planning tuition regarding the introduction to surgical hand disinfection. These learning methods should help to organise and deal with this topic. The use of a video film is an alternative to conventional tuition due to the real presentation possibilities of practical demonstration. Objective: This study examines by way of comparison which form of communication is more effective for learning and applying surgical hand disinfection for medical students in their first year of studies: video-based instruction or conventional tuition. Methodology: A total of 50 first-year medical students were randomly allocated either to the “Conventional Instruction” (CI) study group or to the “Video-based Instruction” (VI) study group. The conventional instruction was carried out by an experienced nurse preceptor/nurse educator for the operating theatre who taught the preparatory measures and the actual procedure in a two-minute lesson. The second group watched a two-minute video sequence with identical content. Afterwards, both groups demonstrated practically the knowledge they had acquired at an individual practical test station. The quality (a) of the preparation and (b) of the procedure as well as (c) the quality of the results was assessed by 6 blind experts using a check list. The acceptability of the respective teaching method was also asked about using a questionnaire. Results: The group performance did not differ either in the preparation (t=-78, p<0.44) or in the quality (t=-99, p<0.34). With respect to performance, it was possible to demonstrate a strong treatment effect. In the practical (t=-3.33, p<0.002, d=0.943) and in the total score (t=-2.65, p<0.011, d=0.751), the group with video-based instruction achieved a significantly better result. In response to the question as to which of the two learning methods they would prefer, the significant majority (60.4%) of students stated video

  17. Video-based instructions for surgical hand disinfection as a replacement for conventional tuition? A randomised, blind comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Various different learning methods are available for planning tuition regarding the introduction to surgical hand disinfection. These learning methods should help to organise and deal with this topic. The use of a video film is an alternative to conventional tuition due to the real presentation possibilities of practical demonstration. Objective: This study examines by way of comparison which form of communication is more effective for learning and applying surgical hand disinfection for medical students in their first year of studies: video-based instruction or conventional tuition. Methodology: A total of 50 first-year medical students were randomly allocated either to the “Conventional Instruction” (CI study group or to the “Video-based Instruction” (VI study group. The conventional instruction was carried out by an experienced nurse preceptor/nurse educator for the operating theatre who taught the preparatory measures and the actual procedure in a two-minute lesson. The second group watched a two-minute video sequence with identical content. Afterwards, both groups demonstrated practically the knowledge they had acquired at an individual practical test station. The quality (a of the preparation and (b of the procedure as well as (c the quality of the results was assessed by 6 blind experts using a check list. The acceptability of the respective teaching method was also asked about using a questionnaire.Results: The group performance did not differ either in the preparation (=-78, <0.44 or in the quality (=-99, <0.34. With respect to performance, it was possible to demonstrate a strong treatment effect. In the practical (=-3.33, <0.002, =0.943 and in the total score (=-2.65, <0.011, =0.751, the group with video-based instruction achieved a significantly better result. In response to the question as to which of the two learning methods they would prefer, the significant majority (60.4% of students stated video instruction

  18. Gaming the System: Video Games as a Theoretical Framework for Instructional Design

    CERN Document Server

    Beatty, Ian D

    2014-01-01

    In order to facilitate analyzing video games as learning systems and instructional designs as games, we present a theoretical framework that integrates ideas from a broad range of literature. The framework describes games in terms of four layers, all sharing similar structural elements and dynamics: a micro-level game focused on immediate problem-solving and skill development, a macro-level game focused on the experience of the game world and story and identity development, and two meta-level games focused on building or modifying the game and on social interactions around it. Each layer casts gameplay as a co-construction of the game and the player, and contains three dynamical feedback loops: an exploratory learning loop, an intrinsic motivation loop, and an identity loop.

  19. Using Video Modeling with Voiceover Instruction Plus Feedback to Train Staff to Implement Direct Teaching Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakakos, Antonia R; Vladescu, Jason C; Kisamore, April N; Reeve, Sharon A

    2016-06-01

    Direct teaching procedures are often an important part of early intensive behavioral intervention for consumers with autism spectrum disorder. In the present study, a video model with voiceover (VMVO) instruction plus feedback was evaluated to train three staff trainees to implement a most-to-least direct (MTL) teaching procedure. Probes for generalization were conducted with untrained direct teaching procedures (i.e., least-to-most, prompt delay) and with an actual consumer. The results indicated that VMVO plus feedback was effective in training the staff trainees to implement the MTL procedure. Although additional feedback was required for the staff trainees to show mastery of the untrained direct teaching procedures (i.e., least-to-most and prompt delay) and with an actual consumer, moderate to high levels of generalization were observed.

  20. Development and Implementation of a Simple, Engaging Acid Rain Neutralization Experiment and Corresponding Animated Instructional Video for Introductory Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Danielle; Yennie, Craig J.; Lynch, Patrick; Lowry, Gregory; Budarz, James; Zhu, Wenlei; Wang, Li-Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe an acid rain neutralization laboratory experiment and its corresponding instructional video. This experiment has been developed and implemented for use in the teaching laboratory of a large introductory chemistry course at Brown University. It provides a contextually relevant example to introduce beginner-level students with…

  1. Teaching Splinting Techniques Using a Just-in-Time Training Instructional Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Tsun; Liu, Deborah R; Wang, Vincent J

    2017-03-01

    Splinting is a multistep procedure that is seldom performed by primary care physicians. Just-in-time training (JITT) is an emerging teaching modality and can be an invaluable asset for infrequently performed procedures or in locations where teaching resources and trained professionals are limited. Our objective was to determine the utility of JITT for teaching medical students the short-arm (SA) volar splinting technique. This was a prospective randomized controlled pilot study. An instructional video on SA volar splinting was produced. Students viewed the video or had access to standard medical textbooks (control group) immediately before applying an SA volar splint. The students were assessed for the quality of the splint via a standard 6-point skills checklist. The times required for presplinting preparation and for completion of the splint were also measured. Just-in-time training group students scored higher on the splint checklist (mean [SD], 5.45 [1.06]; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.99-5.92 vs mean [SD], 1.58 [1.12]; 95% CI, 1.04-2.12; P teaching and disseminating procedural skills, such as SA volar splinting.

  2. Combining the quantized color instruction set and loop unrolling on portable video processing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongmyon; Wills, D. Scott

    2004-04-01

    As wireless video products evolve, they demand more sophisticated processing at higher resolutions and frame rates. Computational performance and energy efficiency have become critical design issues. This paper presents the Quantized Color Pack eXtension (QCPX) combined with a loop unrolling (LU) technique to improve execution performance and energy efficiency of color image and video processing applications. QCPX applied to a 32-bit datapath processor supports parallel operations on two packed 16-bit YCbCr (Y: luminance, Cr and Cb: chrominance) color pixels, providing greater subword-level parallelism by increasing the number of smaller color pixels packed into a word. Instruction-level parallelism can be further enhanced through loop unrolling. These techniques provide greater performance and efficiency for multimedia workloads on mobile systems. Experimental results on a set of media benchmark applications indicate that the LU plus QCPX-optimized version achieves a speedup ranging from 3.8 to 7.9 while reducing the energy consumption from 76% to 87% over the baseline version on identically configured, dynamically scheduled ILP superscalar processors. The LU plus QCPX-optimized version also outperforms the LU plus MDMX-like (MIPS"s multimedia extension) version.

  3. Improving Secondary School Students' Achievement and Retention in Biology Through Video-based Multimedia Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amosa Isiaka Gambari, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the effects of video-based multimedia instruction on secondary school students' achievement and retention in biology. In Nigeria, 120 students (60 boys and 60 girls were randomly selected from four secondary schools assigned either into one of three experimental groups: Animation + Narration; Animation + On-screen Text; Animation + Narration + On-screen Text or a control group. The pretest, posttest experimental, and control group design was adopted. A 50-item multiple-choice objective test termed Biology Achievement Test (BAT was used for collecting data. The validated BAT was tested for reliability using Kuder Richardson (KR20, which yielded 0.89. T-test, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA, and Scheffe’s post-hoc analysis were used in determining the significant differences among the four groups. The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference among the experimental groups. Generally, students under multimedia instruction performed better than their colleagues in the conventional teaching method. However, students in conventional teaching method had better retention than other groups.

  4. A comparison of two forms of teaching instruction: video vs. live lecture for education in clinical periodontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlogan, S; Raman, V; Sweet, J

    2014-02-01

    This crossover controlled study aimed to compare the knowledge and skill attained by third-year dental students in three clinical exercises in the discipline of periodontology through video and live lecture instruction. Students (n = 35) segregated into two group either viewed a video or attended a live lecture repeated over three clinical teaching sessions. Pre-test and post-test written assessments were completed and comparisons between video and live lecture done (analysis of variance, P video and live lecture. For the combined three sessions, both video (n = 48) and live lecture (n = 47) groups attained similar mean pre-test scores. The mean post-test score was statistically significantly greater (P = 0.049) for the live lecture (74.9%, SD 14.9) compared to the video group (68.6%, SD 16.3). All students attained clinical proficiency via the simple checklist. In adding to their clinical skill, more students favoured video (97%) vs. live lecture (78.8%). Most students (97%) favoured a future combination of video and lecture. While students were deemed clinically competent via a simple checklist, the live lecture group performed better than the video group via the in-depth post-test assessment. Students had a preference for video and would like it integrated in the lecture rather than act as a substitute for the lecture. The use of video alone in clinical periodontology training may have limitations unless supplemented by appropriate learning activities. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Effectiveness of Instruction and Video Feedback on Staff's Trainer Behavior during One-to-One Training with Children with Severe Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vonderen, Annemarie; Didden, Robert; Beeking, Fenneke

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on response prompting and trainer behavior of direct-care staff during one-to-one training with five children with severe intellectual disability was assessed. During instruction, written information and verbal instruction were given concerning correct and incorrect trainer…

  6. Effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staffs trainer behavior during one-to-one training with children with severe intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonderen, A.M.H. van; Didden, H.C.M.; Beeking, F.M.L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on response prompting and trainer behavior of direct-care staff during one-to-one training with five children with severe intellectual disability was assessed. During instruction, written information and verbal instruction were given

  7. Effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staffs trainer behavior during one-to-one training with children with severe intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonderen, A.M.H. van; Didden, H.C.M.; Beeking, F.M.L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on response prompting and trainer behavior of direct-care staff during one-to-one training with five children with severe intellectual disability was assessed. During instruction, written information and verbal instruction were given

  8. Effectiveness of Instruction and Video Feedback on Staff's Trainer Behavior during One-to-One Training with Children with Severe Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vonderen, Annemarie; Didden, Robert; Beeking, Fenneke

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on response prompting and trainer behavior of direct-care staff during one-to-one training with five children with severe intellectual disability was assessed. During instruction, written information and verbal instruction were given concerning correct and incorrect trainer…

  9. Using Video Game-Based Instruction in an EFL Program: Understanding the Power of Video Games in Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Héctor Alejandro Galvis Guerrero

    2011-01-01

    This small-scale action-research study examines the perceptions of four students in a military academy in Colombia undergoing the processof using a mainstream video game in their EFL classes instead...

  10. Effect of Video-Based versus Personalized Instruction on Errors during Elastic Tubing Exercises for Musculoskeletal Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Jay; Schraefel, M. C.; Brandt, M.;

    2014-01-01

    only instruction in four typical neck/shoulder/arm rehabilitation exercises using elastic tubing. At a 2-week follow-up, the participants' technical execution was assessed by two blinded physical therapists using a reliable error assessment tool. The error assessment was based on ordinal deviation.......002). For the remaining three exercises the normalized error score did not differ. In conclusion, when instructing simple exercises to reduce musculoskeletal pain the use of video material is a cost-effective solution that can be implemented easily in corporations with challenging work schedules not allowing for a fixed...

  11. Learning, Interactional, and Motivational Outcomes in One-to-One Synchronous Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, Stephanie Ann; VanLehn, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Face-to-face (FTF) human-human tutoring has ranked among the most effective forms of instruction. However, because computer-mediated (CM) tutoring is becoming increasingly common, it is instructive to evaluate its effectiveness relative to face-to-face tutoring. Does the lack of spoken, face-to-face interaction affect learning gains and…

  12. The Use of a Cognitive Tutoring System in the Improvement of the Abstract Reasoning Component of Word Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J. L.; Regian, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a study of ninth-grade students that evaluated the ability of the Word Problem Solving Tutor, a cognitive tutoring system, to improve the abstract-reasoning component of word-problem solving. Compares combinations of traditional instruction, computer-assisted instruction, and the tutoring program and discusses implications for math…

  13. Learning, Interactional, and Motivational Outcomes in One-to-One Synchronous Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, Stephanie Ann; VanLehn, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Face-to-face (FTF) human-human tutoring has ranked among the most effective forms of instruction. However, because computer-mediated (CM) tutoring is becoming increasingly common, it is instructive to evaluate its effectiveness relative to face-to-face tutoring. Does the lack of spoken, face-to-face interaction affect learning gains and…

  14. Efficacy of Video-Assisted Instruction on Knowledge and Performance of Dental Students in Access Cavity Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Naseri, Mandana; Shantiaee, Yazdan; Rasekhi, Javid; Zadsirjan, Saeede; Mojtahed Bidabadi, Maryam; Khayat, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The conventional method of teaching endodontics has some drawbacks. Due to the small size of the oral cavity, students cannot closely observe the clinical procedure. Use of new teaching modalities such as the intraoral camera may obviate this problem. This study assessed the effect of video-assisted clinical instruction in dentistry (VACID) on dental student’s knowledge and performance in access cavity preparation during endodontic treatment. Methods and Materials: In this inter...

  15. ASPIRE: An Authoring System and Deployment Environment for Constraint-Based Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Antonija; Martin, Brent; Suraweera, Pramuditha; Zakharov, Konstantin; Milik, Nancy; Holland, Jay; McGuigan, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, the Intelligent Computer Tutoring Group (ICTG) has implemented many successful constraint-based Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) in a variety of instructional domains. Our tutors have proven their effectiveness not only in controlled lab studies but also in real classrooms, and some of them have been commercialized.…

  16. An Evaluation of the Generalized Intelligent Framework for Tutoring (GIFT) from an Author’s Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    SCHOLAR, developed in 1970 in the form of an education tutor ( Carbonell 1970). This was a very basic form of intelligent tutoring; many have been...group instruction as effective as one- to-one tutoring. Educational Researcher. 1984;13(6):4–16. Carbonell . AI in CAI: an artificial intelligence

  17. Using Cognitive Tutor Software in Learning Linear Algebra Word Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Ju

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of twelve 10th grade students using Cognitive Tutor, a math software program, to learn linear algebra word concept. The study's purpose was to examine whether students' mathematics performance as it is related to using Cognitive Tutor provided evidence to support Koedlinger's (2002) four instructional principles used…

  18. Scaffolded Video Self-Analysis: Discrepancies between Preservice Teachers' Perceived and Actual Instructional Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Peter; Hannafin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    While video is commonly used to record "expert" teachers, video editing and analysis tools have made it possible for preservice teachers to systematically document, assess, analyze and adapt their own teaching practices. This case study documents the experience of three preservice teachers as they used a Web-based video analysis tool to analyze…

  19. Designing and Evaluating Tutoring Feedback Strategies for Digital Learning Environments on the Basis of the Interactive Tutoring Feedback Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narciss, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the interactive tutoring feedback model (ITF-model; Narciss, 2006; 2008), and how it can be applied to the design and evaluation of feedback strategies for digital learning environments. The ITF-model conceptualizes formative tutoring feedback as a multidimensional instructional activity that aims at contributing to the…

  20. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities to Verbally Respond to Questions and Make Purchases in Fast Food Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Pridgen, Leslie S.; Cronin, Beth A.

    2005-01-01

    Computer-based video instruction (CBVI) was used to teach verbal responses to questions presented by cashiers and purchasing skills in fast food restaurants. A multiple probe design across participants was used to evaluate the effectiveness of CBVI. Instruction occurred through simulations of three fast food restaurants on the computer using video…

  1. Examining the Use of Video Study Groups for Developing Literacy Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Critical Elements of Strategy Instruction with Elementary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Lynn E.; Tochelli, Andrea L.

    2014-01-01

    This collective case study explored what nine elementary teachers' video study group discussions revealed about their understanding of pedagogical content knowledge for an explicit reading strategy instruction framework, Critical Elements of Strategy Instruction (CESI). Qualitative methods were used to inductively and deductively analyze…

  2. Instruction and Video Feedback to Improve Staff's Trainer Behaviour and Response Prompting during One-to-One Training with Young Children with Severe Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vonderen, Annemarie; Duker, Pieter; Didden, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on correct trainer behaviour and the use of prompt sequences of 10 direct-care staff during one-to-one training with 10 young children with severe intellectual disability. Following baseline, trainers received instruction (written and verbal) concerning (in)correct trainer…

  3. Instruction and video feedback to improve staff's trainer behaviour and response prompting during one-to-one training with young children with severe intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonderen, A.M.H. van; Duker, P.C.C.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on correct trainer behaviour and the use of prompt sequences of 10 direct-care staff during one-to-one training with 10 young children with severe intellectual disability. Following baseline, trainers received instruction (written a

  4. Instruction and video feedback to improve staff's trainer behaviour and response prompting during one-to-one training with young children with severe intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonderen, A.M.H. van; Duker, P.C.C.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on correct trainer behaviour and the use of prompt sequences of 10 direct-care staff during one-to-one training with 10 young children with severe intellectual disability. Following baseline, trainers received instruction (written a

  5. A randomized trial of video self-instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for lay persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfred, Rachel; Huszti, Ella; Fly, Deborah; Nichol, Graham

    2013-05-10

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves outcomes after cardiac arrest. Much of the lay public is untrained in CPR skills. We evaluated the effectiveness of a compression-only CPR video self-instruction (VSI) with a personal manikin in the lay public. Adults without prior CPR training in the past year or responsibility to provide medical care were randomized into one of three groups: 1) Untrained before testing, 2) 10-minute VSI in compressions-only CPR (CPR Anytime, American Heart Association, Dallas, TX), or 3) 22-minute VSI in compressions and ventilations (CPR Anytime). CPR proficiency was assessed using a sensored manikin. The primary outcome was composite skill competence of 90% during five minutes of skill demonstration. Evaluated were alternative cut-points for skill competence and individual components of CPR. 488 subjects (143 in untrained group, 202 in compressions-only group and 143 in compressions and ventilation group) were required to detect 21% competency with compressions-only versus 7% with untrained and 34% with compressions and ventilations. Analyzable data were available for the untrained group (n = 135), compressions-only group (n = 185) and the compressions and ventilation group (n = 119). Four (3%) achieved competency in the untrained group (p-value = 0.57 versus compressions-only), nine (4.9%) in the compressions-only group, and 12 (10.1%) in the compressions and ventilations group (p-value 0.13 vs. compressions-only). The compressions-only group had a greater proportion of correct compressions (p-value = 0.028) and compressions with correct hand placement (p-value = 0.0004) compared to the untrained group. VSI in compressions-only CPR did not achieve greater overall competency but did achieve some CPR skills better than without training.

  6. Relationship between plaque score and video-monitored brushing performance after repeated instruction--a controlled, randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, N; Klimek, J; Ganss, C

    2013-03-01

    Aim of this prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trial was to use the modified bass technique (MBT) and a specific brushing sequence to investigate whether two types of instruction methods lead to differences in plaque reduction and whether plaque reduction is related to technique adoption. Ninety-eight participants were randomly assigned to three groups: (1) control, no instruction; (2) verbal instruction by means of a leaflet; and (3) verbal instruction supported by demonstration, no leaflet. Brushing performance was video monitored. Plaque score (Turesky modified QHI (T-QHI)) was measured at baseline, afterwards participants received instructions. After 2 weeks, T-QHI was measured for a second time, and participants were re-instructed. After another 2 weeks, T-QHI was measured for a third time. At baseline, T-QHI did not differ between groups ((1) 1.99 ± 0.51, (2) 1.90 ± 0.51, (3) 1.93 ± 0.56). The second measurement revealed an improvement of T-QHI in the instructed groups and in the non-instructed control group ((1) 1.80 ± 0.47, (2) 1.58 ± 0.58, (3) 1.64 ± 0.58; n.s. between groups); in the intervention groups, remotivation achieved no further improvement ((1) 1.72 ± 0.48, (2) 1.52 ± 0.58, (3) 1.50 ± 0.69; n.s. between groups and compared to second measurement). Improvement of T-QHI was not related to proper performance of technique or brushing sequence. Those who fully adopted the brushing technique, the sequence or both did not have lower plaque scores. Technical performance and effectiveness were not linked. Within the study setting, the MBT was not effective in reducing plaque scores. The general recommendation of the MBT should be re-evaluated in further studies.

  7. "I Forgot I Wasn't Saving the World": the Use of Formative and Summative Assessment in Instructional Video Games for Undergraduate Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lookadoo, Kathryn L.; Bostwick, Eryn N.; Ralston, Ryan; Elizondo, Francisco Javier; Wilson, Scott; Shaw, Tarren J.; Jensen, Matthew L.

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the role of formative and summative assessment in instructional video games on student learning and engagement. A 2 (formative feedback: present vs absent) × 2 (summative feedback: present vs absent) factorial design with an offset control (recorded lecture) was conducted to explore the impacts of assessment in video games. A total of 172 undergraduates were randomly assigned to one of four instructional video game conditions or the control. Results found that knowledge significantly increased from the pretest for players in all game conditions. Participants in summative assessment conditions learned more than players without summative assessment. In terms of engagement outcomes, formative assessment conditions did not significantly produce better learning engagement outcomes than conditions without formative assessment. However, summative assessment conditions were associated with higher temporal disassociation than non-summative conditions. Implications for future instructional video game development and testing are discussed in the paper.

  8. Investigating How German Biology Teachers Use Three-Dimensional Physical Models in Classroom Instruction: a Video Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Sonja; Förtsch, Christian; Boone, William; von Kotzebue, Lena; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2017-07-01

    To obtain a general understanding of science, model use as part of National Education Standards is important for instruction. Model use can be characterized by three aspects: (1) the characteristics of the model, (2) the integration of the model into instruction, and (3) the use of models to foster scientific reasoning. However, there were no empirical results describing the implementation of National Education Standards in science instruction concerning the use of models. Therefore, the present study investigated the implementation of different aspects of model use in German biology instruction. Two biology lessons on the topic neurobiology in grade nine of 32 biology teachers were videotaped (N = 64 videos). These lessons were analysed using an event-based coding manual according to three aspects of model described above. Rasch analysis of the coded categories was conducted and showed reliable measurement. In the first analysis, we identified 68 lessons where a total of 112 different models were used. The in-depth analysis showed that special aspects of an elaborate model use according to several categories of scientific reasoning were rarely implemented in biology instruction. A critical reflection of the used model (N = 25 models; 22.3%) and models to demonstrate scientific reasoning (N = 26 models; 23.2%) were seldom observed. Our findings suggest that pre-service biology teacher education and professional development initiatives in Germany have to focus on both aspects.

  9. Strategic Tutor Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee-kwong, Kenneth Chao

    1996-01-01

    Discusses effective tutor monitoring strategies based on experiences at the Open Learning Institute of Hong Kong. Highlights include key performance and strategic control points; situational factors, including tutor expectations and relevant culture; Theory X versus Theory Y leadership theories; and monitoring relationships with tutors. (LRW)

  10. Strategic Tutor Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee-kwong, Kenneth Chao

    1996-01-01

    Discusses effective tutor monitoring strategies based on experiences at the Open Learning Institute of Hong Kong. Highlights include key performance and strategic control points; situational factors, including tutor expectations and relevant culture; Theory X versus Theory Y leadership theories; and monitoring relationships with tutors. (LRW)

  11. The Use of Web-Based Video for Instruction of GIS and Other Digital Geographic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudow, Joshua; Sounny-Slitine, M. Anwar

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a case study that highlights the benefits and limitations of Web-based video in lab sections of The Geographer's Craft, an upper-level undergraduate course in which students apply digital geographic methods. Over three years (2010-2013), the authors experimented with different teaching strategies utilizing Web-based video for…

  12. Instruction document on multimedia formats:optimal accessibility of audio, video and images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, E.J.A.; Wams, N.; Knubben, B.

    2010-01-01

    We increasingly express ourselves through multimedia. Internet traffic already consists for the most part of audio and video. A variety of formats are used for this purpose, often without due consideration. This document provides a background for choices that can be made for making video and audio a

  13. Using Video Modeling with Voice-over Instruction to Train Public School Staff to Implement a Preference Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovi, Gina M Delli; Vladescu, Jason C; DeBar, Ruth M; Carroll, Regina A; Sarokoff, Randi A

    2017-03-01

    The identification of putative reinforcers is a critical component of programming for individuals with disabilities. A multiple stimulus without replacement preference assessment is one option for identifying putative reinforcers; however, staff must be trained on the steps necessary to conduct the assessment for it to be useful in practice. This study examined the effectiveness of using video modeling with voice-over instruction (VMVO) to train two public school staff to conduct this assessment. Results demonstrate that VMVO was effective in training, producing generalized responding, maintenance, and high social validity ratings.

  14. Cross-Age Peer Tutors in Asynchronous Discussion Groups: Exploring the Impact of Three Types of Tutor Training on Patterns in Tutor Support and on Tutor Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Marijke; Van Keer, Hilde; De Wever, Bram; Valcke, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted in an authentic university setting with fourth-year Educational Sciences' students operating as online peer tutors to facilitate freshman tutees' online collaboration and knowledge construction in a blended "Instructional Sciences" course. Taking into account prior research uncovering weaknesses in online peer tutor…

  15. Can an instruction video or palpation aid improve the effectiveness of breast self-examination in detecting tumors? An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Georgi, Richard; Thele, Franziska; Hackethal, Andreas; Münstedt, Karsten

    2006-05-01

    Although large randomized trials have not shown benefits for breast self-examination (BSE), many organizations still endorse the practice. This study aimed to determine whether an instruction video or palpation aid improved the effectiveness of BSE. A total of 100 volunteers (50 men and 50 women) with no previous experience of BSE and/or clinical breast palpation were randomly assigned to the following intervention: instruction video seen versus not seen and use of palpation aids versus aids not used. Participants completed psychological trait and previous knowledge questionnaires before the intervention and/or breast examination. Examination was carried out on 24 different sized silicone breast forms, into 20 of which had been inserted tumor equivalents measuring 0.8-3.0 cm in diameter. The dependent variable was the rate of accurate tumor detection--the mean sum of correct positive hits (CPH)--defined as tumors detected within 20 s. Mean CPH values were then analyzed in relation to the interventions and other variables including gender and psychological measures (ANOVA and COVAR). Neither the instruction video nor interaction effects between gender and the instruction video influenced the mean CPH value. Furthermore, the palpation aid was strongly and significantly associated with a reduced detection (p=0.00003). Using an instruction video or palpation aid did not improve the effectiveness of breast examination in detecting tumors--a finding which supports results from large randomized studies. It is difficult to understand why BSE is still promoted by various groups.

  16. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training of family members before hospital discharge using video self-instruction: a feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewer, Audrey L; Leary, Marion; Decker, Christopher S; Andersen, James C; Fredericks, Amanda C; Bobrow, Bentley J; Abella, Benjamin S

    2011-09-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), yet rates of bystander CPR are low. This is especially the case for SCA occurring in the home setting, as family members of at-risk patients are often not CPR trained. To evaluate the feasibility of a novel hospital-based CPR education program targeted to family members of patients at increased risk for SCA. Prospective, multicenter, cohort study. Inpatient wards at 3 hospitals. Family members of inpatients admitted with cardiac-related diagnoses. Family members were offered CPR training via a proctored video-self instruction (VSI) program. After training, CPR skills and participant perspectives regarding their training experience were assessed. Surveys were conducted one month postdischarge to measure the rate of "secondary training" of other individuals by enrolled family members. At the 3 study sites, 756 subjects were offered CPR instruction; 280 agreed to training and 136 underwent instruction using the VSI program. Of these, 78 of 136 (57%) had no previous CPR training. After training, chest compression performance was generally adequate (mean compression rate 90 ± 26/minute, mean depth 37 ± 12 mm). At 1 month, 57 of 122 (47%) of subjects performed secondary training for friends or family members, with a calculated mean of 2.1 persons trained per kit distributed. The hospital setting offers a unique "point of capture" to provide CPR instruction to an important, undertrained population in contact with at-risk individuals. Copyright © 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  17. What Are They Doing in There? Case Studies of Volunteer Tutors and Adult Literacy Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzer, Alisa

    2006-01-01

    Through case studies of adult literacy learners and the volunteer tutors who instructed them, this article illustrates the strengths and challenges faced by these kinds of instructional pairs. The descriptions help to reveal critical issues that can inform researchers' and practitioners' thinking and practice with regard to tutor training and…

  18. A web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Seters, Janneke R.; Wellink, Joan; Tramper, Johannes; Goedhart, Martin J.; Ossevoort, Miriam A.

    2012-01-01

    When students have varying prior knowledge, personalized instruction is desirable. One way to personalize instruction is by using adaptive e-learning to offer training of varying complexity. In this study, we developed a web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design: the PCR Tutor. We used

  19. A web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Seters, Janneke R.; Wellink, Joan; Tramper, Johannes; Goedhart, Martin J.; Ossevoort, Miriam A.

    2012-01-01

    When students have varying prior knowledge, personalized instruction is desirable. One way to personalize instruction is by using adaptive e-learning to offer training of varying complexity. In this study, we developed a web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design: the PCR Tutor. We used par

  20. A Web-Based Adaptive Tutor to Teach PCR Primer Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Seters, Janneke R.; Wellink, Joan; Tramper, Johannes; Goedhart, Martin J.; Ossevoort, Miriam A.

    2012-01-01

    When students have varying prior knowledge, personalized instruction is desirable. One way to personalize instruction is by using adaptive e-learning to offer training of varying complexity. In this study, we developed a web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design: the PCR Tutor. We used part of the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (the…

  1. A Web-Based Adaptive Tutor to Teach PCR Primer Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Seters, Janneke R.; Wellink, Joan; Tramper, Johannes; Goedhart, Martin J.; Ossevoort, Miriam A.

    2012-01-01

    When students have varying prior knowledge, personalized instruction is desirable. One way to personalize instruction is by using adaptive e-learning to offer training of varying complexity. In this study, we developed a web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design: the PCR Tutor. We used part of the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (the…

  2. A web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Seters, Janneke R.; Wellink, Joan; Tramper, Johannes; Goedhart, Martin J.; Ossevoort, Miriam A.

    2012-01-01

    When students have varying prior knowledge, personalized instruction is desirable. One way to personalize instruction is by using adaptive e-learning to offer training of varying complexity. In this study, we developed a web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design: the PCR Tutor. We used par

  3. A Web-based Adaptive Tutor to Teach PCR Primer Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seters, van J.R.; Wellink, J.; Tramper, J.; Goedhart, M.J.; Ossevoort, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    When students have varying prior knowledge, personalized instruction is desirable. One way to personalize instruction is by using adaptive e-learning to offer training of varying complexity. In this study, we developed a web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design: the PCR Tutor. We used par

  4. VIDEO MODELING TO TRAIN STAFF TO IMPLEMENT DISCRETE-TRIAL INSTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, Cynthia N; Almeida, Daniel; Liu-Constant, Brian; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D

    2009-01-01

    Three new direct-service staff participated in a program that used a video model to train target skills needed to conduct a discrete-trial session. Percentage accuracy in completing a discrete-trial teaching session was evaluated using a multiple baseline design across participants. During baseline, performances ranged from a mean of 12% to 63% accuracy. During video modeling, there was an immediate increase in accuracy to a mean of 98%, 85%, and 94% for each participant. Performance during maintenance and generalization probes remained at high levels. Results suggest that video modeling can be an effective technique to train staff to conduct discrete-trial sessions. PMID:19949529

  5. Research Methods Tutor: evaluation of a dialogue-based tutoring system in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Elizabeth; Hastings, Peter; Allbritton, David

    2008-08-01

    Research Methods Tutor (RMT) is a dialogue-based intelligent tutoring system for use in conjunction with undergraduate psychology research methods courses. RMT includes five topics that correspond to the curriculum of introductory research methods courses: ethics, variables, reliability, validity, and experimental design. We evaluated the effectiveness of the RMT system in the classroom using a nonequivalent control group design. Students in three classes (n = 83) used RMT, and students in two classes (n = 53) did not use RMT. Results indicated that the use of RMT yieldedstrong learning gains of 0.75 standard deviations above classroom instruction alone. Further, the dialogue-based tutoring condition of the system resulted in higher gains than did the textbook-style condition (CAI version) of the system. Future directions for RMT include the addition of new topics and tutoring elements.

  6. The Instructor's Face in Video Instruction: Evidence from Two Large-Scale Field Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilcec, René F.; Bailenson, Jeremy N.; Gomez, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Multimedia learning research has established several principles for the effective design of audiovisual instruction. The image principle suggests that showing the instructor's face in multimedia instruction does not promote learning, because the potential benefits from inducing social responses are outweighed by the cost of additional cognitive…

  7. Individualising Media Practice Education Using a Feedback Loop and Instructional Videos Within an eLearning Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Harris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the development and impact of the author’s TELE (Technology Enhanced Learning Environment action research project for individualising media practice education. The latest iteration of different classroom methodologies being employed to develop high-level skills in media production, the author has combined an interactive eLearning approach with instructional videos and, crucially, an individual feedback loop in order to widen access to the curriculum and create a more efficient teaching and learning environment. The focus therefore is on student engagement and organisational efficiencies as a result of the research. It should be noted that there has been no funding attached to this work, nor are there any institutional imperatives or other stakeholder involvement in this research. This project has been undertaken by the author as an evolutionary development of the various methodologies developed, cognisant of the increased technology literacy of the student cohort. The educational benefit of bringing video instruction into the curriculum as part of the project is examined as a creative pedagogy of direct benefit to students rather than as a subliminal marketing tool that other systems are often used for. Over 16K words of written data was collected during the project, and this is analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively with reference to the initial objectives of the research

  8. How Does Private Tutoring Mediate the Effects of Socio-Economic Status on Mathematics Performance? Evidence from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalmis, Erkan Hasan; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Saatcioglu, Argun

    2016-01-01

    Private tutoring refers to additional instruction out of school. With its determinants and effects, private tutoring has received increasing attention from scholars over the past decades. Because of the increasing role of school and high-stakes exams, the demand for private tutoring has increased tremendously in Turkey. The purpose of this study…

  9. CORRECTED ERROR VIDEO VERSUS A PHYSICAL THERAPIST INSTRUCTED HOME EXERCISE PROGRAM: ACCURACY OF PERFORMING THERAPEUTIC SHOULDER EXERCISES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Kamesh; Hopp, Jennifer; Stanley, Laura; Spores, Ken; Braunreiter, David

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The accurate performance of physical therapy exercises can be difficult. In this evolving healthcare climate it is important to continually look for better methods to educate patients. The use of handouts, in-person demonstration, and video instruction are all potential avenues used to teach proper exercise form. The purpose of this study was to examine if a corrected error video (CEV) would be as effective as a single visit with a physical therapist (PT) to teach healthy subjects how to properly perform four different shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Study Design This was a prospective, single-blinded interventional trial. Methods Fifty-eight subjects with no shoulder complaints were recruited from two institutions and randomized into one of two groups: the CEV group (30 subjects) was given a CEV comprised of four shoulder exercises, while the physical therapy group (28 subjects) had one session with a PT as well as a handout of how to complete the exercises. Each subject practiced the exercises for one week and was then videotaped performing them during a return visit. Videos were scored with the shoulder exam assessment tool (SEAT) created by the authors. Results There was no difference between the groups on total SEAT score (13.66 ± 0.29 vs 13.46 ± 0.30 for CEV vs PT, p = 0.64, 95% CI [−0.06, 0.037]). Average scores for individual exercises also showed no significant difference. Conclusion/Clinical Relevance These results demonstrate that the inexpensive and accessible CEV is as beneficial as direct instruction in teaching subjects to properly perform shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Level of Evidence 1b

  10. Instruction and video feedback to improve staff's trainer behaviour and response prompting during one-to-one training with young children with severe intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vonderen, Annemarie; Duker, Pieter; Didden, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on correct trainer behaviour and the use of prompt sequences of 10 direct-care staff during one-to-one training with 10 young children with severe intellectual disability. Following baseline, trainers received instruction (written and verbal) concerning (in)correct trainer behaviour and response prompting. Then, video feedback was implemented and consisted of (a) interrupting a video presentation if an error occurred, (b) providing positive feedback, and (c) prompting the trainer to avoid errors or omissions. Data were collected in a non-concurrent multiple baseline design. The results showed that instruction and video feedback were highly effective in improving correct trainer behaviour. During baseline, trainers were inconsistent in their use of prompt sequences (21 correct prompt sequences were used as well as 17 incorrect prompt sequences). The intervention was effective in decreasing the number of incorrect prompt sequences. The trainers rated instruction and video feedback as an acceptable and effective intervention. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Learner Outcomes and Satisfaction: A Comparison of Live Video-Streamed Instruction, Satellite Broadcast Instruction, and Face-to-Face Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M'hammed; Yoshimura, Miki

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the final grade and satisfaction level differences among students taking specific courses using three different methods: face-to-face in class, via satellite broadcasting at remote sites, and via live video-streaming at home or at work. In each case, the same course was taught by the same instructor in all three delivery…

  12. Science teachers' learning to notice from video cases of the enactment of cognitively demanding instructional tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisa, Miray Tekkumru

    Members of a profession develop a professional vision that enables them to see and understand complex situations in particular ways. This study focuses on developing science teachers' professional vision by supporting their learning to attend to particular classroom interactions and make sense of them in particular ways. Specifically, this study investigated high school biology teachers' learning to notice in a professional development (PD) setting from video cases that depict classroom interactions during the enactment of high-level, cognitively demanding science tasks. A seven-session, video-based PD intervention in which teachers analyzed short video clips that illustrated students' engagement with cognitively demanding tasks was designed and implemented. The findings focused on changes in teacher noticing from pre- to post-PD as revealed through the analysis of two sets of baseline and exit interviews with each individual teacher as well as the analysis of particular PD sessions. According to the findings, there were mostly significant changes in what teachers attended to in the video cases and how they made sense of what they saw. In addition, there was a shift towards connecting the specifics of what they noticed in the video cases to the level or kind of student thinking as outlined in the Task Analysis Guide in Science framework. The findings are promising in terms of developing science teachers' professional vision of classroom interactions during the enactment of cognitively demanding tasks. The study findings provide implications for designing effective PD programs to support teachers' professional vision.

  13. Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Using Video Games to Enhance Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Matthew T.; Israel, Maya; Beecher, Constance C.; Basham, James D.

    2012-10-01

    Science education video game research points toward promising, but inconclusive results in both student learning outcomes and attitudes. However, student-level variables other than gender have been largely absent from this research. This study examined how students' reading ability level and disability status are related to their video game-playing behaviors outside of school and their perceptions about the use of science video games during school. Thirty-four teachers and 876 sixth- through ninth-grade students from 14 states participated in the study. All student groups reported that they would prefer to learn science from a video game rather than from traditional text, laboratory-based, or Internet environments. Chi-square analyses indicated a significant association between reading ability level, disability status, and key areas of interest including students' use of video games outside of school, their perceptions of their scientific abilities, and whether they would pursue a career in the sciences. Implications of these findings and areas for future research are identified.

  14. Flipped Classroom: A Comparison Of Student Performance Using Instructional Videos And Podcasts Versus The Lecture-Based Model Of Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retta Guy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the results of a study conducted at a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university. A quasi-experimental design was chosen for this study to compare student performance in two different classroom environments, traditional versus flipped. The study spanned 3 years, beginning fall 2012 through spring 2015. The participants included 433 declared business majors who self-enrolled in several sections of the Management Information Systems course during the study. The results of the current study mirrored those of previous works as the instructional method impacted students’ final grade. Thus, reporting that the flipped classroom approach offers flexibility with no loss of performance when compared to traditional lecture-based environments.

  15. Effectiveness of teaching automated external defibrillators use using a traditional classroom instruction versus self-instruction video in non-critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiboon, Ismail M; Qamruddin, Reza M; Jaafar, Johar M; Bakar, Afliza A; Hamzah, Faizal A; Eng, Ho S; Robertson, Colin E

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and retention of learning automated external defibrillator (AED) usage taught through a traditional classroom instruction (TCI) method versus a novel self instructed video (SIV) technique in non-critical care nurses (NCCN). A prospective single-blind randomized study was conducted over 7 months (April-October 2014) at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, Kuala Lampur, Malaysia. Eighty nurses were randomized into either TCI or SIV instructional techniques. We assessed knowledge, skill and confidence level at baseline, immediate and 6-months post-intervention. Knowledge and confidence were assessed via questionnaire; skill was assessed by a calibrated and blinded independent assessor using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) method. Pre-test mean scores for knowledge in the TCI group was 10.87 ± 2.34, and for the SIV group was 10.37 ± 1.85 (maximum achievable score 20.00); 4.05 ± 2.87 in the TCI and 3.71 ± 2.66 in the SIV (maximum score 11.00) in the OSCE evaluation and 9.54 ± 3.65 in the TCI and 8.56 ± 3.47 in the SIV (maximum score 25.00) in the individual's personal confidence level. Both methods increased the mean scores significantly during immediate post-intervention (0-month). At 6-months, the TCI group scored lower than the SIV group in all aspects 11.13 ± 2.70 versus 12.95 ± 2.26 (p=0.03) in knowledge, 7.27 ± 1.62 versus 7.68 ± 1.73 (p=0.47) in the OSCE, and 16.40 ± 2.72 versus 18.82 ± 3.40 (p=0.03) in confidence level. In NCCN's, SIV is as good as TCI in providing the knowledge, competency, and confidence in performing AED defibrillation.

  16. The effects of video-based and activity-based instruction on high school students' knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions related to seat belt use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tudor Griffith, III

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of video-based science instruction and accompanying activity-based instruction on the knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions of high school students' use of seat belts. Secondarily, the purpose was to determine order effects and interactions between the two treatments used in the study: video-based instruction and hands-on activity-based instruction. The study used Ajzen and Fishbein's theory of reasoned action to investigate the factors influencing high school students' behavioral intentions regarding seat belt use. This study used a pretest-posttest-posttest treatment design. Data were collected on 194 students in high school introductory biology and chemistry classes in Gainesville, Florida. Ten intact high school science classes (eight treatment and two control) took pretests and posttests measuring physics knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions toward seat belt use prior to and after participating in the two treatments. The treatment group students participated in at least 500 minutes of instructional time divided among five lessons over 10 instructional days. All participants were pretested on physics knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions toward seat belt use prior to two treatments. Treatment A was defined as participating in one 50-minute video-based instructional lesson. Treatment B was defined as participating in four hands-on science activities regarding crash-related physics concepts. Cronbach's coefficient alpha was used for analysis of the researcher-designed instruments, and ANOVA was used to analyze the data. The results of the analyses (p < .004) revealed that students who participated in either treatment showed significant differences in knowledge gains on 75% of the test items. The sequence of treatments did not produce significant differences in groups' posttest 2 knowledge mean scores. Combining the treatments resulted in higher mean knowledge scores than either

  17. Tutoring Executives Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bignoux, Stephane; Sund, Kristian J.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of learning and student satisfaction in the context of online university programs have largely neglected programs catering specifically to business executives. Such executives have typically been away from higher education for a number of years, and have collected substantial practical...... that in addition to some of the tutor behaviors already discussed in the literature, executive students look specifically for practical industry knowledge and experience in tutors, when judging how effective a tutor is. This has implications for both the recruitment and training of online executive MBA tutors....

  18. Speak fast, use jargon, and don't repeat yourself: a randomized trial assessing the effectiveness of online videos to supplement emergency department discharge instructions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare L Atzema

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emergency department discharge instructions are variably understood by patients, and in the setting of emergency department crowding, innovations are needed to counteract shortened interaction times with the physician. We evaluated the effect of viewing an online video of diagnosis-specific discharge instructions on patient comprehension and recall of instructions. METHODS: In this prospective, single-center, randomized controlled trial conducted between November 2011 and January 2012, we randomized emergency department patients who were discharged with one of 38 diagnoses to either view (after they left the emergency department a vetted online video of diagnosis-specific discharge instructions, or to usual care. Patients were subsequently contacted by telephone and asked three standardized questions about their discharge instructions; one point was awarded for each correct answer. Using an intention-to-treat analysis, differences between groups were assessed using univariate testing, and with logistic regression that accounted for clustering on managing physician. A secondary outcome measure was patient satisfaction with the videos, on a 10-point scale. RESULTS: Among 133 patients enrolled, mean age was 46.1 (s.d.D. 21.5 and 55% were female. Patients in the video group had 19% higher mean scores (2.5, s.d. 0.7 than patients in the control group (2.1, s.d. 0.8 (p=0.002. After adjustment for patient age, sex, first language, triage acuity score, and clustering, the odds of achieving a fully correct score (3 out of 3 were 3.5 (95% CI, 1.7 to 7.2 times higher in the video group, compared to the control group. Among those who viewed the videos, median rating of the videos was 10 (IQR 8 to 10. CONCLUSIONS: In this single-center trial, patients who viewed an online video of their discharge instructions scored higher on their understanding of key concepts around their diagnosis and subsequent care. Those who viewed the videos found them to

  19. Using Video-Based Instruction to Integrate Ethics into the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, Ali M.; Mintz, Steven M.; Wright, George M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a video case discussion project based on the IMA's Statement of Ethical Professional Practice that was administered in a cost accounting class to assess the extent to which students were able to identify and discuss ethical issues raised by the facts of a case scenario. The case was developed by the IMA to advance the…

  20. Observer Training Revisited: A Comparison of in Vivo and Video Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Carrie M.; Iwata, Brian A.; Fritz, Jennifer N.; Rolider, Natalie U.

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effects of 2 observer-training procedures. In vivo training involved practice during actual treatment sessions. Video training involved practice while watching progressively more complex simulations. Fifty-nine undergraduate students entered 1 of the 2 training conditions sequentially according to an ABABAB design. Results showed…

  1. Instructional analysis of lecture video recordings and its application for quality improvement of medical lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sunyong; Im, Sun Ju; Lee, Sun Hee; Kam, Beesung; Yune, So Joung; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Jung A; Lee, Yuna; Lee, Sang Yeoup

    2011-12-01

    The lecture is a technique for delivering knowledge and information cost-effectively to large medical classes in medical education. The aim of this study was to analyze teaching quality, based on triangle analysis of video recordings of medical lectures, to strengthen teaching competency in medical school. The subjects of this study were 13 medical professors who taught 1st- and 2nd-year medical students and agreed to a triangle analysis of video recordings of their lectures. We first performed triangle analysis, which consisted of a professional analysis of video recordings, self-assessment by teaching professors, and feedback from students, and the data were crosschecked by five school consultants for reliability and consistency. Most of the distress that teachers experienced during the lecture occurred in uniform teaching environments, such as larger lecture classes. Larger lectures that primarily used PowerPoint as a medium to deliver information effected poor interaction with students. Other distressing factors in the lecture were personal characteristics and lack of strategic faculty development. Triangle analysis of video recordings of medical lectures gives teachers an opportunity and motive to improve teaching quality. Faculty development and various improvement strategies, based on this analysis, are expected to help teachers succeed as effective, efficient, and attractive lecturers while improving the quality of larger lecture classes.

  2. Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Using Video Games to Enhance Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Matthew T.; Israel, Maya; Beecher, Constance C.; Basham, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Science education video game research points toward promising, but inconclusive results in both student learning outcomes and attitudes. However, student-level variables other than gender have been largely absent from this research. This study examined how students' reading ability level and disability status are related to their video…

  3. Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Using Video Games to Enhance Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Matthew T.; Israel, Maya; Beecher, Constance C.; Basham, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Science education video game research points toward promising, but inconclusive results in both student learning outcomes and attitudes. However, student-level variables other than gender have been largely absent from this research. This study examined how students' reading ability level and disability status are related to their video…

  4. The Effects of Guided Video Analysis on Teacher Candidates' Reflective Ability and Instructional Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagro, Sarah A.; deBettencourt, Laurie U.; Rosenberg, Michael S.; Carran, Deborah T.; Weiss, Margaret P.

    2017-01-01

    Internships are central to teacher preparation, but many novice teachers do not feel such student teaching experiences prepared them for teaching realities. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to understand the effects of guiding teacher candidates through common video-recording and self-reflection activities during student teaching…

  5. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach the Use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices for Ordering at Fast-Food Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Cronin, Beth

    2006-01-01

    In the study reported on here, the authors used computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach 3 high school students with moderate or severe intellectual disabilities how to order in fast-food restaurants by using an augmentative, alternative communication device. The study employed a multiple probe design to institute CBVI as the only…

  6. Effects of Computer-Based Video Instruction on the Acquisition and Generalization of Grocery Purchasing Skills for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Minkowan; Therrien, William J.; Hua, Youjia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) on teaching grocery purchasing skills to students with moderate intellectual disability (ID). Four high school students with mild to moderate ID participated in the study. A multiple-probe design across students was used to examine the effects. Results…

  7. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disabilities to Perform Multiple Step, Job Tasks in a Generalized Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ortega-Hurndon, Fanny

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach three young adults with moderate intellectual disabilities to perform complex, multiple step, job tasks in a generalized setting. A multiple probe design across three job tasks and replicated across three students was used to evaluate the effectiveness of…

  8. The Effect of Problem-Based Video Instruction on Student Satisfaction, Empathy, and Learning Achievement in the Korean Teacher Education Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun; Yang, Minwha

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether or not the use of video can have a positive effect on satisfaction, empathy, and learning achievement in problem-based instruction among Korean college students majoring in education. To achieve this purpose, this study compared the findings from three dependent variables in problem-based video…

  9. Using Video Self-Modelling to Increase Active Learning Responses during Small-Group Reading Instruction for Primary School Pupils with Social Emotional and Mental Health Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young-Pelton, Cheryl A.; Bushman, Samantha L.

    2015-01-01

    Effectiveness of a video self-modelling (VSM) intervention was examined with primary schoolchildren who attended a full-time special education programme for pupils with social emotional and behavioural difficulties and who exhibited inappropriate behaviour during small-group reading instruction. A randomised multiple-probe baseline design was used…

  10. Effects of Video-Based Cooperative, Competitive and Individualized Instructional Strategies on the Performance of Senior Secondary Schools Students in Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Amosa Isiaka; Shittu, Ahmed Tajudeen; Daramola, Florence Olutunu; James, Moses

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of video-based cooperative, competitive and individualized instructional strategies on the performance of senior secondary schools' students in geometry in Nigeria. It also examined the influence of gender on students' achievement. Pretest, posttest, experimental control group design was adopted for this study.…

  11. Effects of Computer-Based Video Instruction on the Acquisition and Generalization of Grocery Purchasing Skills for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Minkowan; Therrien, William J.; Hua, Youjia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) on teaching grocery purchasing skills to students with moderate intellectual disability (ID). Four high school students with mild to moderate ID participated in the study. A multiple-probe design across students was used to examine the effects. Results…

  12. Acquisition and retention of basic life support skills in an untrained population using a personal resuscitation manikin and video self-instruction (VSI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Henriksen, Mikael Johannes Vuokko; Isbye, Dan Lou

    2010-01-01

    Video-based self-instruction (VSI) with a 24-min DVD and a personal resuscitation manikin solves some of the barriers associated with traditional basic life support (BLS) courses. No accurate assessment of the actual improvement in skills after attending a VSI course has been determined......, and in this study we assess the skill improvement in laypersons undergoing VSI....

  13. Effects of Learner-Instructor Relationship-Building Strategies in Online Video Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yanghee; Thayne, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Although research has demonstrated that an increased rapport between instructors and learners can positively relate with increased learning gains, perhaps mediated by the positive attitudes toward the course and self-efficacy beliefs in the coursework, little has been done to test what instructional strategies might increase this rapport in online…

  14. Implications of Designing Instructional Video Using Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade, cognitive researchers identified three major challenges facing the use of multimedia materials in instruction. The first challenge is the inclusion of extraneous content that competes with the essential information for limited cognitive resources. Researchers found that including extraneous material in multimedia materials…

  15. Note-Taking within MetaTutor: Interactions between an Intelligent Tutoring System and Prior Knowledge on Note-Taking and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Gregory; Duffy, Melissa; Azevedo, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Hypermedia learning environments (HLE) unevenly present new challenges and opportunities to learning processes and outcomes depending on learner characteristics and instructional supports. In this experimental study, we examined how one such HLE--MetaTutor, an intelligent, multi-agent tutoring system designed to scaffold cognitive and…

  16. Tooth Tutoring: The Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Richard; And Others

    Findings are reported on a three year cross-age tutoring program in which undergraduate dental hygiene students and college students from other disciplines trained upper elementary students to tutor younger students in the techniques of dental hygiene. Data includes pre-post scores on the Oral Hygiene Index of plaque for both experimental and…

  17. Affect in Tutoring Dialogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Nijholt, Antinus; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is about INES, an intelligent, multimodal tutoring environment, and how we build a tutor agent in the environment that tries to be sensitive to the mental state of the student that interacts with it. The environment was primarily designed to help students practice nursing tasks. For

  18. Intelligent Tutoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer technology have advanced so much that it is feasible to build computer systems that are as effective as intelligent human tutors. Computer tutors have been developed for teaching students to do proofs in geometry and to write computer programs in the LISP language. (JN)

  19. Computer Tutors Get Personal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David L.

    2005-01-01

    After decades of research in artificial intelligence (AI) and cognitive psychology, a number of companies have emerged that offer intelligent tutor system (ITS) soft ware to schools. These systems try to mimic the help that a human tutor would provide to an individual student, something nearly impossible for teachers to accomplish in the…

  20. Tutoring Executives Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bignoux, Stephane; Sund, Kristian J.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of learning and student satisfaction in the context of online university programs have largely neglected programs catering specifically to business executives. Such executives have typically been away from higher education for a number of years, and have collected substantial practical...... experience in the subject matters they are taught. Their expectations in terms of both content and delivery may therefore be different from non-executive students. We explore perceptions of the quality of tutoring in the context of an online executive MBA program through participant interviews. We find...... that in addition to some of the tutor behaviors already discussed in the literature, executive students look specifically for practical industry knowledge and experience in tutors, when judging how effective a tutor is. This has implications for both the recruitment and training of online executive MBA tutors....

  1. Efficacy of Video-Assisted Instruction on Knowledge and Performance of Dental Students in Access Cavity Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mandana; Shantiaee, Yazdan; Rasekhi, Javid; Zadsirjan, Saeede; Mojtahed Bidabadi, Maryam; Khayat, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The conventional method of teaching endodontics has some drawbacks. Due to the small size of the oral cavity, students cannot closely observe the clinical procedure. Use of new teaching modalities such as the intraoral camera may obviate this problem. This study assessed the effect of video-assisted clinical instruction in dentistry (VACID) on dental student’s knowledge and performance in access cavity preparation during endodontic treatment. Methods and Materials: In this interventional study, twenty six undergraduate students were equally divided into two groups and received instructions on access cavity preparation via conventional demonstration (CD) or VACID using intraoral camera plus conventional demonstration. Students’ knowledge was assessed before and after the demonstration. The scores obtained by students were compared between the two groups. Data were analyzed using the Mann Whitney U test. Results: No significant difference was found between the two groups in knowledge and performance scores of students about pulp chamber removal, under-extension, over-extension, gouging, perforation or finding the main and extra canals. However, use of intraoral camera significantly reduced the number of student visits to instructors for problem solving (P=0.001). Conclusion: VACID is an effective educational method and as efficient as conventional demonstration in endodontics; as a result it can be used in combination with conventional teaching. PMID:27790265

  2. The Effect of an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) on Student Achievement in Algebraic Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tsai Chen; Md. Yunus, Aida Suraya; Ali, Wan Zah Wan; Bakar, Ab. Rahim

    2008-01-01

    In this experimental study, use of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) followed by use of an Intelligent Tutoring System (CAI+ITS) was compared to the use of CAI (CAI only) in tutoring students on the topic of Algebraic Expression. Two groups of students participated in the study. One group of 32 students studied algebraic expression in a CAI…

  3. Time-Quality Tradeoff of Waiting Strategies for Tutors to Retrieve Relevant Teaching Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Wen-Chung; Tseng, Shian-Shyong; Yang, Che-Ching; Liang, Tyne

    2011-01-01

    As more and more undergraduate students act as voluntary tutors to rural pupils after school, there is a growing need for a supporting environment to facilitate adaptive instruction. Among others, a teaching method retrieval system is intended to help tutors find relevant teaching methods for teaching a particular concept. However, teaching…

  4. Classwide Peer Tutoring: An Effective Strategy for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman-Perrott, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Effective intervention procedures are essential to breaking the cycle of school failure. Tobin and Sprague (2000) conducted a review of strategies that have shown to be effective with youth served in alternative education settings. Among those were instructional strategies, including tutoring. ClassWide Peer Tutoring (CWPT) is a well-researched…

  5. Time-Quality Tradeoff of Waiting Strategies for Tutors to Retrieve Relevant Teaching Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Wen-Chung; Tseng, Shian-Shyong; Yang, Che-Ching; Liang, Tyne

    2011-01-01

    As more and more undergraduate students act as voluntary tutors to rural pupils after school, there is a growing need for a supporting environment to facilitate adaptive instruction. Among others, a teaching method retrieval system is intended to help tutors find relevant teaching methods for teaching a particular concept. However, teaching…

  6. Intelligent tutoring systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.R.; Boyle, C.F.; Reiser, B.J.

    1985-04-26

    Cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer technology have advanced to the point where it is feasible to build computer systems that are as effective as intelligent human tutors. Computer tutors based on a set of pedagogical principles derived from the ACT theory of cognition have been developed for teaching students to do proofs in geometry and to write computer programs in the language LISP. 19 references, 2 figures.

  7. Learning through Tutoring: Low-Achieving Children as Tutors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robert S.; Allen, Vernon L.

    Recent evidence suggests that the use of children acting as tutors for their peers may prove beneficial to the tutor as well as to the tutee. There is now abundant, unsubstantiated anecdotal evidence, and some controlled experimental work, which suggests that the tutor benefits greatly from his involvement in teaching. The enactment of the role of…

  8. My Science Tutor: A Conversational Multimedia Virtual Tutor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Wayne; Cole, Ron; Bolaños, Daniel; Buchenroth-Martin, Cindy; Svirsky, Edward; Weston, Tim

    2013-01-01

    My Science Tutor (MyST) is an intelligent tutoring system designed to improve science learning by elementary school students through conversational dialogs with a virtual science tutor in an interactive multimedia environment. Marni, a lifelike 3-D character, engages individual students in spoken dialogs following classroom investigations using…

  9. Hypermedia Environments and Adaptive Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Reviews relevant professional literature concerning hypermedia environments and adaptive instruction for online learning for distance education and continuing education. Highlights include aptitude-treatment interaction; cognitive processes; navigational paths; log files; and intelligent tutors. Contains 125 references. (LRW)

  10. Who Is the Preferred Tutor in Clinical Skills Training: Physicians, Nurses, or Peers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abay, Ece Şükriye; Turan, Sevgi; Odabaşı, Orhan; Elçin, Melih

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Clinical skills centers allow structured training of undergraduate medical students for the acquisition of clinical skills in a simulated environment. Physician, nurse, or peer tutors are employed for training in those centers. All tutors should have appropriate training about the methodology used in the clinical skills training. Many of the studies revealed the effectiveness of various types of tutors. The aim of our study was to evaluate medical students' satisfaction with clinical skills training, and their opinions about the differences in coaching skills among the physician, nurse, and peer tutors. This study was conducted with third-year students (467 students) in 2013-2014 academic year at Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine. Participation rate was 85 % (397 students). The students attended the suturing skill training in groups of 40 students. First, a faculty member from the Department of Medical Education delivered a video demonstration and conducted discussion. After the demonstration, the students were divided into groups of 5-6 students. A physician, nurse, or a peer tutor facilitated each group. The students were asked to complete the Coaching Skills Evaluation Form after the practicum session. It contained 13 criteria for assessing the coaching skills. Additionally, the form included a question for rating the student's satisfaction with the tutor. The performance of the tutors at each step was rated on a three-point scale. Kruskal Wallis analysis was used to compare students' scores for their tutors. The students' satisfaction with tutors was high for all of the tutors. However, there was no difference between students' scores in suturing skill, and between physician, nurse, and peer tutors' coaching skills. Insights: In this study, we revealed that physician, nurse, and peer tutors were equally effective on the students' performances. They were also regarded as effective in their teaching role by students. But the most important

  11. Using Supplementary Video in Multimedia Instruction as a Teaching Tool to Increase Efficiency of Learning and Quality of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Ljubojevic

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research is to investigate efficiency of use of supplementary video content in multimedia teaching. Integrating video clips in multimedia lecture presentations may increase students’ perception of important information and motivation for learning. Because of that, students can better understand and remember key points of a lecture. Those improvements represent some important learning outcomes. This research showed that segmentation of teaching materials with supplementary video clips may improve lecture organization and presentation in order to achieve effective teaching and learning. The context of the video content and the position of supplementary video clips in teaching material are important influences on factors for motivation and efficiency of learning. This research presents the effects of the use of supplementary videos with different context of content (entertainment and educational as well as the effects of their position within the teaching material. The experimental results showed that the most efficient method of use of supplementary video is integration with educational video content in the middle of a lecture. This position of video insertion provides the best results. The context of video content influences efficiency of learning also. Entertainment video was not as efficient as educational, but it can be used to engage and motivate students for learning. The given results have been confirmed with a subjective assessment of students’ quality of experience with different methods of embedding video clips.

  12. Plan-based delivery composition in intelligent tutoring systems for introductory computer programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krammer, H.P.M.; van Merrienboer, J.J.G.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J.G.; Maaswinkel, Rudolf M.

    1994-01-01

    In a shell system for the generation of intelligent tutoring systems, the instructional model that one applies should be variable independent of the content of instruction. In this article, a taxonomy of content elements is presented in order to define a relatively content-independent instructional

  13. Nonverbal Behavior in Tutoring Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robert S.

    This document reports on a series of studies carried out concerning nonverbal behavior in peer tutoring interactions. The first study examined the encoding (enactment) of nonverbal behavior in a tutoring situation. Results clearly indicated that the tutor's nonverbal behavior was affected by the performance of the tutee. The question of whether or…

  14. THE HOMEWORK HELPER TUTOR MANUAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEERING, ALBERT R.

    THIS MANUAL FOR TUTORS IN THE MOBILIZATION FOR YOUTH-NEW YORK CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION HOMEWORK HELPER PROGRAM IS DESIGNED TO SUPPLEMENT THE TRAINING AND SUPERVISION THAT THE TUTORS RECEIVE FROM THE MASTER TEACHERS. THE PROGRAM EMPLOYS HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AS TUTORS FOR OTHER STUDENTS AT ALL GRADE LEVELS--ELEMENTARY, JUNIOR HIGH, AND HIGH SCHOOL.…

  15. Automated analysis of short responses in an interactive synthetic tutoring system for introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Christopher M.; Murphy, Sytil K.; Christel, Michael G.; Stevens, Scott M.; Zollman, Dean A.

    2016-06-01

    Computer-automated assessment of students' text responses to short-answer questions represents an important enabling technology for online learning environments. We have investigated the use of machine learning to train computer models capable of automatically classifying short-answer responses and assessed the results. Our investigations are part of a project to develop and test an interactive learning environment designed to help students learn introductory physics concepts. The system is designed around an interactive video tutoring interface. We have analyzed 9 with about 150 responses or less. We observe for 4 of the 9 automated assessment with interrater agreement of 70% or better with the human rater. This level of agreement may represent a baseline for practical utility in instruction and indicates that the method warrants further investigation for use in this type of application. Our results also suggest strategies that may be useful for writing activities and questions that are more appropriate for automated assessment. These strategies include building activities that have relatively few conceptually distinct ways of perceiving the physical behavior of relatively few physical objects. Further success in this direction may allow us to promote interactivity and better provide feedback in online learning systems. These capabilities could enable our system to function more like a real tutor.

  16. Towards an Intelligent Tutor for Mathematical Proofs

    CERN Document Server

    Autexier, Serge; Schiller, Marvin; 10.4204/EPTCS.79.1

    2012-01-01

    Computer-supported learning is an increasingly important form of study since it allows for independent learning and individualized instruction. In this paper, we discuss a novel approach to developing an intelligent tutoring system for teaching textbook-style mathematical proofs. We characterize the particularities of the domain and discuss common ITS design models. Our approach is motivated by phenomena found in a corpus of tutorial dialogs that were collected in a Wizard-of-Oz experiment. We show how an intelligent tutor for textbook-style mathematical proofs can be built on top of an adapted assertion-level proof assistant by reusing representations and proof search strategies originally developed for automated and interactive theorem proving. The resulting prototype was successfully evaluated on a corpus of tutorial dialogs and yields good results.

  17. Towards an Intelligent Tutor for Mathematical Proofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Autexier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Computer-supported learning is an increasingly important form of study since it allows for independent learning and individualized instruction. In this paper, we discuss a novel approach to developing an intelligent tutoring system for teaching textbook-style mathematical proofs. We characterize the particularities of the domain and discuss common ITS design models. Our approach is motivated by phenomena found in a corpus of tutorial dialogs that were collected in a Wizard-of-Oz experiment. We show how an intelligent tutor for textbook-style mathematical proofs can be built on top of an adapted assertion-level proof assistant by reusing representations and proof search strategies originally developed for automated and interactive theorem proving. The resulting prototype was successfully evaluated on a corpus of tutorial dialogs and yields good results.

  18. A Randomized Comparison between Video Demonstration and Verbal Instruction in Improving Rota Haler Technique in Children with Persistent Asthma: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugom, Archana; Chandrasekaran, Venkatesh

    2017-06-01

    Inhalation therapy is the cornerstone in management of asthma. Failure to use the device properly is one of the factors incriminated in poor control of asthma. To compare the technique of rota haler use in children with persistent asthma immediately after receiving either verbal instruction or a video based demonstration and again at one month following intervention. A total of 28 children, older than six years attending the childhood asthma clinic of our hospital, who were prescribed rota halers for the first time and who were technique naïve were enrolled into the study, after obtaining informed consent from the parents after meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. They were then randomly assigned to either verbal instructions (group of 14) or video demonstration group (group of 14), for teaching them the rota haler technique. Their technique was then assessed using a modified version of the inhaler device assessment tool immediately after education and one month after the intervention. The proportions of children with good technique in both groups at both time points were compared. There was no significant difference in the baseline variables like age, gender, location, socio-economic status and disease duration between both groups. The proportion of children achieving good technique was significantly more in the video group than the oral instruction group at immediate assessment and also at one month post intervention with an odds of 8 and 23.40 respectively (p=0.0262 and 0.0075 respectively). Video demonstration is effective in improving the technique of rota haler use at immediate assessment and at one month post intervention. Further studies are needed to validate this study and to assess factors that predict successful device use.

  19. Effect of Video-Based versus Personalized Instruction on Errors during Elastic Tubing Exercises for Musculoskeletal Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Jay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Workplace interventions have shown beneficial results of resistance training for chronic pain in the neck, shoulder, and arm. However, studies have relied on experienced exercise instructors, which may not be an available resource at most workplaces. The objective of this study is to evaluate the technical performance level of upper limb rehabilitation exercises following video-based versus personalized exercise instruction. We recruited 38 laboratory technicians and office workers with neck/shoulder pain for a two-week exercise training period receiving either (1 personal and video or (2 video only instruction in four typical neck/shoulder/arm rehabilitation exercises using elastic tubing. At a 2-week follow-up, the participants’ technical execution was assessed by two blinded physical therapists using a reliable error assessment tool. The error assessment was based on ordinal deviation of joint position from the ideal position of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist in a single plane by visual observation. Of the four exercises only unilateral shoulder external rotation had a higher normalized error score in the V group of 22.19 (9.30 to 12.64 (6.94 in the P group (P=0.002. For the remaining three exercises the normalized error score did not differ. In conclusion, when instructing simple exercises to reduce musculoskeletal pain the use of video material is a cost-effective solution that can be implemented easily in corporations with challenging work schedules not allowing for a fixed time of day to go see a personal trainer.

  20. Dissemination of CPR video self-instruction materials to secondary trainees: Results from a hospital-based CPR education trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Daniel J; Buckler, David G; Li, Jiaqi; Agarwal, Amit K; Di Taranti, Laura J; Kurtz, James; Reis, Ryan Dos; Leary, Marion; Abella, Benjamin S; Blewer, Audrey L

    2016-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) video self-instruction (VSI) materials have been promoted as a scalable approach to increase the prevalence of CPR skills among the lay public, in part due to the opportunity for secondary training (i.e., sharing of training materials). However, the motivations for, and barriers to, disseminating VSI materials to secondary trainees is poorly understood. This work represents an ancillary investigation of a prospective hospital-based CPR education trial in which family members of cardiac patients were trained using VSI. Mixed-methods surveys were administered to primary trainees six months after initial enrollment. Surveys were designed to capture motivations for, and barriers to, sharing VSI materials, the number of secondary trainees with whom materials were shared, and the settings, timing, and recipients of trainings. Between 07/2012 and 05/2015, 653 study participants completed a six-month follow-up interview. Of those, 345 reported sharing VSI materials with 1455 secondary trainees. Materials were shared most commonly with family members. In a logistic regression analysis, participants in the oldest quartile (age >63 years) were less likely to share materials compared to those in the youngest quartile (age ≤ 44 years, OR 0.58, CI 0.37-0.90, p=0.02). Among the 308 participants who did not share their materials, time constraints was the most commonly cited barrier for not sharing. VSI materials represent a strategy for secondary dissemination of CPR training, yet older individuals have a lower likelihood of sharing relative to younger individuals. Further work is warranted to remedy perceived barriers to CPR dissemination among the lay public using VSI approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dissemination of CPR video self-instruction materials to secondary trainees: results from a hospital-based CPR education trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Daniel J.; Buckler, David G.; Li, Jiaqi; Agarwal, Amit K.; Di Taranti, Laura J.; Kurtz, James; dos Reis, Ryan; Leary, Marion; Abella, Benjamin S.; Blewer, Audrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) video self-instruction (VSI) materials have been promoted as a scalable approach to increase the prevalence of CPR skills among the lay public, in part due to the opportunity for secondary training (i.e., sharing of training materials). However, the motivations for, and barriers to, disseminating VSI materials to secondary trainees is poorly understood. Methods This work represents an ancillary investigation of a prospective hospital-based CPR education trial in which family members of cardiac patients were trained using VSI. Mixed-methods surveys were administered to primary trainees six months after initial enrollment. Surveys were designed to capture motivations for, and barriers to, sharing VSI materials, the number of secondary trainees with whom materials were shared, and the settings, timing, and recipients of trainings. Results Between 07/2012–05/2015, 653 study participants completed a six-month follow-up interview. Of those, 345 reported sharing VSI materials with 1455 secondary trainees. Materials were shared most commonly with family members. In a logistic regression analysis, participants in the oldest quartile (age > 63 years) were less likely to share materials compared to those in the youngest quartile (age ≤ 44 years, OR 0.58, CI 0.37–0.90, p=0.02). Among the 308 participants who did not share their materials, time constraints was the most commonly cited barrier for not sharing. Conclusions VSI materials represent a strategy for secondary dissemination of CPR training, yet older individuals have a lower likelihood of sharing relative to younger individuals. Further work is warranted to remedy perceived barriers to CPR dissemination among the lay public using VSI approaches. PMID:26776900

  2. Good teacher, good tutor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couto LB

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lucélio B Couto, Gustavo S Romão, Reinaldo B Bestetti  Department of Medicine, University of Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil We have read with great interest the paper by Kassab et al, who have essentially shown that good teachers will be good tutors in a problem-based learning (PBL environment. We have been facing great difficulties to select tutors because there has been no tradition in PBL in our region in the preuniversity teaching. Furthermore, the majority of our teachers have been formed in a discipline-based medical curriculum. Therefore, it is reassuring to learn from the work by Kassab et al that subject-matter mastery is the powerful independent predictor of tutoring skills.  View the original paper by Kassab and colleagues.

  3. Tutoring Strategies: A Case Study Comparing Learning Center Tutors and Academic Department Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Geoffrey K.

    2010-01-01

    Peer tutoring at the postsecondary level has been studied extensively, particularly over the last twenty years. Peer tutoring programs are common across institutional type and size in the United States (Boylan, Bonham, Bliss, & Saxon, 1995; Maxwell, 2001) given students' preferences for tutors who share age and status similarity (Cohen, 1986;…

  4. The Impact of an Online Tutoring Program on Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amy K.; Whetstone, Patti

    2014-01-01

    The authors explored the impact of an online tutoring program, Math Whizz (Whizz Education, 2014), on student mathematics achievement at 15 elementary schools. Students participated in the use of the Math Whizz program for the duration of the school year as a supplement to mathematics instruction. The Math Whizz program recorded such information…

  5. TUTOR TRAINING KEY ISSUE IN E-LEARNING / FORMACIÓN DE TUTORES. ASPECTO CLAVE EN ENSEÑANZA VIRTUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Astudillo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The tutor has special relevance for the success of a virtual learning experience; the skills of a classroom teacher are not enough. Training processes for tutors are required to develop the necessary skills to perform the role that covers technical, pedagogical, social and administrative issues. This article presents an overview of the role of the tutors in virtual learning environments, the need to train these professionals and the experience of a Course on Tutoring, developed for the Center for Training, Experimentation and Educational Research. The Center has trained in a three-year period 1,611 tutors, to work in virtual courses offered to teachers by the Chilean Ministry of Education. The course is described, together with its instructional design, and its main results, like the high degree of retention and value assigned, all of which is understood as the first step in a process that is complemented by experience to become a virtual tutor.RESUMENEn el éxito de una experiencia formativa virtual, la figura del tutor cobra especial relevancia, las competencias de un docente presencial no son suficientes. Se requiere procesos formativos para que los tutores adquieran las competencias necesarias para desempeñar su rol que abarca las áreas técnica, pedagógica, social y administrativa. Este artículo presenta una visión general del rol del tutor en los entornos virtuales de aprendizaje, las necesidades de formar a estos profesionales y la experiencia del curso de tutores desarrollado para el Centro de Perfeccionamiento Experimentaciones e Investigaciones Pedagógicas que ha formado a los largo de tres años a 1.611 tutores, para actuar en los cursos virtuales que el Ministerio de Educación Chileno ofrece a sus docentes, se presenta el curso, su diseño instruccional, los principales resultados, como el alto grado de retención y valoración de esta instancia formativa, la cual se entiende como el primer paso de un proceso que se

  6. Children Interactions in Literacy Tutoring Situations:A Study with Urban Marginalized Populations in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Renata Rosemberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzed the conversational exchanges through which child tutors mediated literacy abilities and knowledge with young children in the framework of the project “From Child to Child: A Tutor-Child Literacy Program,” that is being conducted in Bueno s Aires, Argentina. The analysis considered the conversational moves deployed by both participants in the dyad, as well as the relationship between the tutor and the tutee. Likewise, it examined longitudinal variations in the interactions registered between the first tutoring sessions and the tutoring sessions that occurred after one year of the program. The tutoring sessions were video-taped and the different conversational moves deployed by the tutor and tutee were analyzed using an especially developed system of categories. Subsequently, the distribution of the categories of the tutee and tutor’s interactional moves in the corpus was analyzed quantitatively.Results showed significant longitudinal differences in the quantity of conversational moves: the tutors and the tutees increased their participation in the performance of the activities. The results demonstrated an increase in all the conversational moves the tutors utilized to promote the learning of the younger child tutee and a decrease in those conversational moves that do not promote learning.

  7. Studies in Tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloward, Robert D.

    This is the report of a demonstration tutorial project which was conducted in New York City as part of the Mobilization for Youth program. Eleven tutorial centers were established in neighborhood elementary schools, and 240 students from local academic and vocational high schools were hired to tutor 544 fourth- and fifth-grade pupils. Each center…

  8. The Complete Tutor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Howard

    2000-01-01

    Explains the relationship between computers and multiple intelligences and explores its potential. Topics include behaviorism and cognitivism; constructivism; multiple representations in the human mind, including various forms of intelligence; individual differences; the challenge of altering early representations; and machine versus human tutors.…

  9. The Complete Tutor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Howard

    2000-01-01

    Explains the relationship between computers and multiple intelligences and explores its potential. Topics include behaviorism and cognitivism; constructivism; multiple representations in the human mind, including various forms of intelligence; individual differences; the challenge of altering early representations; and machine versus human tutors.…

  10. EarthTutor: An Interactive Intelligent Tutoring System for Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A. M.; Parton, K.; Smith, E.

    2005-12-01

    feedback and adaptive instruction, EarthTutor aims to offer the benefits of a one-on-one human instructor in a cost-effective, easy-to-use application. We are currently working with remote sensing experts to develop EarthTutor labs for diverse earth science subjects such as global vegetation, stratospheric ozone, oceanography, polar sea ice and natural hazards. These labs will be packaged with the first public release of EarthTutor in December 2005. Custom labs can be designed with the EarthTutor authoring tool. The tool is basic enough to allow teachers to construct tutorials to fit their classroom's curriculum and locale, but also powerful enough to allow advanced users to create highly-interactive labs. Preliminary results from an ongoing pilot study demonstrate that the EarthTutor system is effective and enjoyable teaching tool, relative to traditional satellite imagery teaching methods.

  11. A New Paradigm for Intelligent Tutoring Systems: Example-Tracing Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleven, Vincent; McLaren, Bruce M.; Sewall, Jonathan; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    The Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tools (CTAT) support creation of a novel type of tutors called example-tracing tutors. Unlike other types of ITSs (e.g., model-tracing tutors, constraint-based tutors), example-tracing tutors evaluate student behavior by flexibly comparing it against generalized examples of problem-solving behavior. Example-tracing…

  12. Designing and Evaluating Tutoring Feedback Strategies for digital learning environments on the basis of the Interactive Tutoring Feedback Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Narciss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the interactive tutoring feedback model (ITF-model; Narciss, 2006; 2008, and how it can be applied to the design and evaluation of feedback strategies for digital learning environments. The ITF-model conceptualizes formative tutoring feedback as a multidimensional instructional activity that aims at contributing to the regulation of a learning process in order to help learners acquire or improve the competencies needed to master learning tasks. It integrates findings from systems theory with recommendations of prior research on interactive instruction and elaborated feedback, on task analyses, on error analyses, and on tutoring techniques. Based on this multi-dimensional view of formative tutoring feedback methodological implications for designing and investigating multiple effects of feedback under multiple individual and situational conditions are described. Furthermore, the paper outlines how the implications of the ITF-model have been applied in several studies to the design and evaluation of tutoring feedback strategies for digital learning environments (e.g., Narciss, 2004; Narciss & Huth, 2006; Narciss, Schnaubert, Andres, Eichelmann, Goguadze, & Sosnovsky, 2013.

  13. Using Video Production in Political Science Courses as an Instructional Strategy for Engaging Students in Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez-Morris, Mauricio; Tafur, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Video production has come into widespread use in various fields of social science. Visual anthropologists (Pink 2006), psychologists (Webster and Sell 2007), historians (Ferro 2000), and visual sociologists (Newman 2006) have used films and videos to document, to preserve, and to analyze social data. There is no reason to think that the use of…

  14. Using Supplementary Video in Multimedia Instruction as a Teaching Tool to Increase Efficiency of Learning and Quality of Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubojevic, Milos; Vaskovic, Vojkan; Stankovic, Srecko; Vaskovic, Jelena

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to investigate efficiency of use of supplementary video content in multimedia teaching. Integrating video clips in multimedia lecture presentations may increase students' perception of important information and motivation for learning. Because of that, students can better understand and remember key points of…

  15. The 1986 Literacy Tutor Coordination Program: A Report to the Legislature Pursuant to Chapter 312, Laws of 1986 (ESSB 4762).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Gilbert J.

    A $100,000 appropriation for fiscal year 1986 directed the Washington State Board for Community College Education and the state's Superintendent of Public Instruction to establish a pilot program for coordinating the efforts of volunteer literacy tutors. The 12 projects funded by the program recruited and trained 1,473 volunteer tutors and…

  16. PROLOG BASED AN INTELLIGENT TUTORING SYSTEM (ITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda DAĞ

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study; components of a web-based general purpose Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS has been realized by using Visual Prolog. A framework of the system has been constructed to apply various lesson. An ITS consists of four fundamental models which are domain expert model, user model, instruction model and user interface model. In this study, domain expert model, user model and user interface model have been realized. There are user interfaces for both author and student in the system. We aimed in this study, developing studies on ITS in our country and constructing a framework for an ITS.

  17. Teaching suturing and knot-tying skills to medical students: a randomized controlled study comparing computer-based video instruction and (concurrent and summary) expert feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xeroulis, George J; Park, Jason; Moulton, Carol-Anne; Reznick, Richard K; Leblanc, Vicki; Dubrowski, Adam

    2007-04-01

    We carried out a prospective, randomized, 4-arm study including control arm, blinding of examiners to determine effectiveness of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) and different types of expert feedback (concurrent and summary) on learning of a basic technical skill. Using bench models, participants were pre-tested on a suturing and instrument knot-tying skill after viewing an instructional video. The students were subsequently assigned randomly to 4 practice conditions: no additional intervention (control), self study with CBVI, expert feedback during practice trials (concurrent feedback), and expert feedback after practice trials (summary feedback). All participants underwent 19 trials of practice, over 1 hour, in their assigned training condition. The effectiveness of training was assessed both at an immediate post-test and 1 month later at a retention test. Performance was evaluated using both expert-based (Global Rating Scores) and computer-based assessment (Hand Motion Analysis). Data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. There were no differences in GRS between groups at pre-test. The CBVI, concurrent feedback and summary feedback methods were equally effective initially for the instruction of this basic technical skill to naive medical students and displayed better performance than control (control, 12.71 [10.79 to 14.62]; CBVI, 16.39 [14.38 to 18.40]; concurrent, 16.97 [15.79 to 18.15]; summary, 16.09 [13.57 to 18.62]; P .05). Our study showed that CBVI can be as effective as summary expert feedback in the instruction of basic technical skills to medical students. Thoughtfully incorporated into technical curricula, CBVI can make efficient use of faculty time and serve as a useful pedagogic adjunct for basic skills training. Additionally, our study provides evidence supporting an increased role of summary feedback to effectively train novices in technical skills.

  18. Creating Digital Games as Interactive Learning Environments: Factors That Affect Palestinian Teachers' Success in Modifying Video Games for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Bilal Khaleel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors that might predict Palestinian teachers' success in modding games for instruction. An instructional game design model named Game Modding for Non-Professionals (GMNP) was created specifically for the training of Palestinian teachers during this study. This study addressed the question: To…

  19. Output and English as a Second Language Pragmatic Development: The Effectiveness of Output-Focused Video-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Swain's Output Hypothesis proposes a facilitative effect for output on the acquisition of second language morphosyntax. In the context of classroom instruction, a number of studies and reviews suggest that explicit instruction in pragmatic elements promotes development. Other studies have offered less conclusive evidence of the effectiveness of…

  20. Creating Digital Games as Interactive Learning Environments: Factors That Affect Palestinian Teachers' Success in Modifying Video Games for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Bilal Khaleel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors that might predict Palestinian teachers' success in modding games for instruction. An instructional game design model named Game Modding for Non-Professionals (GMNP) was created specifically for the training of Palestinian teachers during this study. This study addressed the question: To…

  1. The Use of Game Dynamics to Enhance Curriculum and Instruction: What Teachers Can Learn from the Design of Video Games

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis Chandler

    2013-01-01

    Video games have received an increased amount of attention from educational institutions due to their widespread use and their ability to engage and sustain players in difficult learning tasks for extended amounts of time. While many studies have been done on digital games' potential to impact learning, only recently has educational research begun to analyze the game dynamics embedded in video games used to immerse students in difficult problem-solving and to support their learning. This ar...

  2. Tips for Reading Tutors = Consejos para los Tutores en Lectura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    Reading is the basis for learning and school success. While reading is learned primarily in the classroom, many students need extra time and help. Research shows that tutoring is a great way for individuals and groups outside school to support learning, but effective tutoring requires appropriate training and careful planning. This brochure,…

  3. Programmed Instruction for Teaching Java: Consideration of Learn Unit Frequency and Rule-Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emurian, Henry H.

    2007-01-01

    At the beginning of a Java computer programming course, nine students in an undergraduate class and nine students in a graduate class completed a web-based programmed instruction tutoring system that taught a simple computer program. All students exited the tutor with an identical level of skill, at least as determined by the tutor's required…

  4. Developing and Incorporating Instructional Videos and Quizzes as a Blended and Online Learning Component in an Undergraduate Optical Microscopy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, S.; Gualda, G. A. R.; Claiborne, L. L.; Brame, C.

    2015-12-01

    Optical mineralogy is not an easy skill to master as an undergraduate, but it is crucial for understanding what the Earth is made out of. It is a supplementary and specific skillset typically taught in a microscope lab supporting lessons on crystallography, chemistry and mineral analysis in the classroom. Mastering the basic skills is required for advancement in courses that utilize thin sections in teaching igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. This project asks: Will exposing undergraduate Earth and environmental studies students to optical microscopy figures in videos prior to lab assist in the acquisition of skills required to describe and distinguish Earth materials? This project is conducted in conjunction with the Blended and Online Learning Design (BOLD) Fellowship offered through the Center for Teaching (CFT) at Vanderbilt University. Eight videos and accompanying pre-lab questions were hosted online weekly in a semester-long, undergraduate Earth materials course. The focus of the design of the videos and supporting questions is specifically on microscopy skills rather than on optics concepts, which is taught post-video. The videos were made available prior to a weekly lab with the intent of familiarizing the student with the types of images and information he/she should obtain with the microscope. Multiple choice, formative-style questions accompany the videos in an online-hosted assignment. These questions are graded on basis of completion and are intended to aid in student metacognition. Subjects include students in the Vanderbilt University Earth Materials course and students from the Hanover College Mineralogy course. The effectiveness of the videos is assessed in two parts: (1) Comparing the homework and lab final grades of the students this year with those of the students last year (2) Analysis of a weekly questionnaire. The answers after each week will be compiled and compared. Collecting data from Vanderbilt University students and Hanover

  5. An experimental analysis of the effectiveness and sustainability of a Chinese tutoring package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hang; Miller, L Keith

    2012-01-01

    This experiment evaluated the effects of training tutors to use an instructional package to teach pronunciation and translation of the Chinese language. Tutors' correct use of the package increased from 68% of trials to 92% after training, and student correct pronunciation increased from 45% to 90%, with similar effects for translation. Continued use of the package, high social validity, and extended follow-up suggest that use of the package may be sustainable.

  6. Stupid Tutoring Systems, Intelligent Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    The initial vision for intelligent tutoring systems involved powerful, multi-faceted systems that would leverage rich models of students and pedagogies to create complex learning interactions. But the intelligent tutoring systems used at scale today are much simpler. In this article, I present hypotheses on the factors underlying this development,…

  7. Peer and Cross-Age Tutoring. ERIC Digest, Number 79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaustad, Joan

    One-to-one tutoring programs, such as peer and cross-age tutoring, can result in emotional and learning benefits for the tutor and the tutee. Peer tutoring involves two students of the same age. In cross-age tutoring, the tutor is older than the tutee. The Willamette High School Peer Tutoring Program in Eugene, Oregon; the Coca-Cola Valued Youth…

  8. Perceptions of Tutoring Roles and Psychological Distance among Instructors, Tutors and Students at a Korean University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Hong, Youngil; Choi, Hyoseon

    2017-01-01

    This study explores issues related to the tutor's role when initiating tutoring as an institutional strategy at a conventional university. Based on a pilot tutoring program implemented in four college courses, we investigated the perceptions of instructors, tutors and students regarding the role of tutoring and whether it affected the…

  9. Coaching Tutors: An Instrumental Case Study on Testing an Integrated Framework for Tutoring Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Alicia L.; Grant, Chris; Donthamsetty, Reshema

    2017-01-01

    The objective for the current qualitative case study was to examine participants' perceptions on the tutor coaching and session review frameworks. The location of the study was at the tutor coaches' place of business. At the beginning of the study, tutor coaches were trained on how to implement the tutoring coaching framework with their tutors,…

  10. Perceptions of Tutoring Roles and Psychological Distance among Instructors, Tutors and Students at a Korean University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Hong, Youngil; Choi, Hyoseon

    2017-01-01

    This study explores issues related to the tutor's role when initiating tutoring as an institutional strategy at a conventional university. Based on a pilot tutoring program implemented in four college courses, we investigated the perceptions of instructors, tutors and students regarding the role of tutoring and whether it affected the…

  11. Making good physics videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2017-05-01

    Online videos are an increasingly important way technology is contributing to the improvement of physics teaching. Students and teachers have begun to rely on online videos to provide them with content knowledge and instructional strategies. Online audiences are expecting greater production value, and departments are sometimes requesting educators to post video pre-labs or to flip our classrooms. In this article, I share my advice on creating engaging physics videos.

  12. Improving the Acquisition of Basic Technical Surgical Skills with VR-Based Simulation Coupled with Computer-Based Video Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, David; Kapralos, Bill; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Next to practice, feedback is the most important variable in skill acquisition. Feedback can vary in content and the way that it is used for delivery. Health professions education research has extensively examined the different effects provided by the different feedback methodologies. In this paper we compared two different types of knowledge of performance (KP) feedback. The first type was video-based KP feedback while the second type consisted of computer generated KP feedback. Results of this study showed that computer generated performance feedback is more effective than video based performance feedback. The combination of the two feedback methodologies provides trainees with a better understanding.

  13. Interactive film scenes for tutor training in problem-based learning (PBL): dealing with difficult situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Hans M; Huwendiek, Soeren; Skelin, Silvia; Kirschfink, Michael; Nikendei, Christoph

    2010-07-06

    In problem-based learning (PBL), tutors play an essential role in facilitating and efficiently structuring tutorials to enable students to construct individual cognitive networks, and have a significant impact on students' performance in subsequent assessments. The necessity of elaborate training to fulfil this complex role is undeniable. In the plethora of data on PBL however, little attention has been paid to tutor training which promotes competence in the moderation of specific difficult situations commonly encountered in PBL tutorials. Major interactive obstacles arising in PBL tutorials were identified from prior publications. Potential solutions were defined by an expert group. Video clips were produced addressing the tutor's role and providing exemplary solutions. These clips were embedded in a PBL tutor-training course at our medical faculty combining PBL self-experience with a non-medical case. Trainees provided pre- and post-intervention self-efficacy ratings regarding their PBL-related knowledge, skills, and attitudes, as well as their acceptance and the feasibility of integrating the video clips into PBL tutor-training (all items: 100 = completely agree, 0 = don't agree at all). An interactive online tool for PBL tutor training was developed comprising 18 video clips highlighting difficult situations in PBL tutorials to encourage trainees to develop and formulate their own intervention strategies. In subsequent sequences, potential interventions are presented for the specific scenario, with a concluding discussion which addresses unresolved issues. The tool was well accepted and considered worth the time spent on it (81.62 +/- 16.91; 62.94 +/- 16.76). Tutors considered the videos to prepare them well to respond to specific challenges in future tutorials (75.98 +/- 19.46). The entire training, which comprised PBL self-experience and video clips as integral elements, improved tutor's self-efficacy with respect to dealing with problematic situations (pre

  14. Tutoring Social Sciences learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Prades Plaza

    2016-03-01

    With this experience teaching innovation we have sought to improve our academic methodology, giving a strong weight to the tutoring, both onsite and virtual. We also have tried to encourage teamwork in groups and independent learning. Thanks to these improvements, we have continuously evaluated the students, while students self evaluate their learning process. In summary, the proposal of educational innovation that we have carried out has shown the need to promote a system of mentoring to advise, guide and support students in their learning process.

  15. Effects of Video Modeling on the Instructional Efficiency of Simultaneous Prompting among Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc-Tosun, Derya; Kurt, Onur

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of simultaneous prompting with and without video modeling in teaching food preparation skills to four participants with autism spectrum disorder, whose ages ranged from 5 to 6 years old. An adapted alternating treatment single-case experimental design was used to…

  16. Experiencing the role of PBL tutor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyberg-Åhlander, Viveka; Lundskog, Margareta; Hansson, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The tutor is important for student learning in the PBL group. The students expect the tutor to monitor and steer the group process and to support the learning process, helping students to become aware of their own learning. This study aimed at investigating the PBL tutor's role. Five PBL tutors at the Speech/Language Pathology program were interviewed regarding their view of the tutors' role and what support they need. The analysis of the transcribed interviews focused on finding patterns and variation regarding tutor-activity at different stages in the PBL work and in their views of their progress as tutors. The results indicate that being a tutor is a balancing act and that the tutor need continuous support and input from different sources. Tutors should be encouraged to reflect on their own reactions and interventions and to be explicit and confident in their thoughts about PBL.

  17. Effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's use of prompts and children's adaptive responses during one-to-one training in children with severe to profound intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonderen, A.M.H. van; Swart, C.C.W. de; Didden, H.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although relatively many studies have addressed staff training and its effect on trainer behavior, the effects of staff training on trainee's adaptive behaviors have seldomly been examined. We therefore assessed effectiveness of staff training, consisting of instruction and video feedback, on (a) st

  18. Effectiveness of Instruction and Video Feedback on Staff's Use of Prompts and Children's Adaptive Responses during One-to-One Training in Children with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vonderen, Annemarie; de Swart, Charlotte; Didden, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Although relatively many studies have addressed staff training and its effect on trainer behavior, the effects of staff training on trainee's adaptive behaviors have seldomly been examined. We therefore assessed effectiveness of staff training, consisting of instruction and video feedback, on (a) staff's response prompting, and (b) staff's trainer…

  19. Effectiveness of Instruction and Video Feedback on Staff's Use of Prompts and Children's Adaptive Responses during One-to-One Training in Children with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vonderen, Annemarie; de Swart, Charlotte; Didden, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Although relatively many studies have addressed staff training and its effect on trainer behavior, the effects of staff training on trainee's adaptive behaviors have seldomly been examined. We therefore assessed effectiveness of staff training, consisting of instruction and video feedback, on (a) staff's response prompting, and (b) staff's trainer…

  20. Effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's use of prompts and children's adaptive responses during one-to-one training in children with severe to profound intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonderen, A.M.H. van; Swart, C.C.W. de; Didden, H.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although relatively many studies have addressed staff training and its effect on trainer behavior, the effects of staff training on trainee's adaptive behaviors have seldomly been examined. We therefore assessed effectiveness of staff training, consisting of instruction and video feedback, on (a) st

  1. Training Undergraduate Physics Peer Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Jacob, A. T.

    2004-05-01

    The University of Wisconsin's Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program matches upper level undergraduate physics students in small study groups with students studying introductory algebra-based physics. We work with students who are potentially at-risk for having academic trouble with the course. They include students with a low exam score, learning disabilities, no high school physics, weak math backgrounds, and/or on academic probation. We also work with students from groups under represented in the sciences and who may be feeling isolated or marginal on campus such as minority, returning adult, and international students. The tutors provide a supportive learning environment, extra practice problems, and an overview of key concepts. In so doing, they help our students to build confidence and problem solving skills applicable to physics and other areas of their academic careers. The Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program is modeled after a similar program for chemistry created by the University of Wisconsin's Chemistry Learning Center. Both programs are now run in collaboration. The tutors are chosen for their academic strength and excellent communication skills. Our tutors are majoring in physics, math, and secondary-level science education. The tutors receive ongoing training and supervision throughout the year. They attend weekly discipline-specific meetings to discuss strategies for teaching the content currently being discussed in the physics course. They also participate in a weekly teaching seminar with science tutors from chemistry and biochemistry to discuss teaching methods, mentoring, and general information relating to the students with whom we work. We will describe an overview of the Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program with a focus on the teacher training program for our undergraduate tutors.

  2. A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Interactive Laser Disc and Classroom Video Tape for Safety Instruction of General Motors Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, James; Wagner, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    Describes evaluation that assessed the effectiveness of the Interactive Laser Disc System (ILDS) Training Program in comparison with classroom instruction with videotape for training of General Motors workers. Topics discussed include achievement test, attitude scales, opinion surveys, user preference questionnaires, interviews, and variables that…

  3. Applying and evaluating computer-animated tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Dominic W.; Bosseler, Alexis; Stone, Patrick S.; Connors, Pamela

    2002-05-01

    We have developed computer-assisted speech and language tutors for deaf, hard of hearing, and autistic children. Our language-training program utilizes our computer-animated talking head, Baldi, as the conversational agent, who guides students through a variety of exercises designed to teach vocabulary and grammer, to improve speech articulation, and to develop linguistic and phonological awareness. Baldi is an accurate three-dimensional animated talking head appropriately aligned with either synthesized or natural speech. Baldi has a tongue and palate, which can be displayed by making his skin transparent. Two specific language-training programs have been evaluated to determine if they improve word learning and speech articulation. The results indicate that the programs are effective in teaching receptive and productive language. Advantages of utilizing a computer-animated agent as a language tutor are the popularity of computers and embodied conversational agents with autistic kids, the perpetual availability of the program, and individualized instruction. Students enjoy working with Baldi because he offers extreme patience, he doesn't become angry, tired, or bored, and he is in effect a perpetual teaching machine. The results indicate that the psychology and technology of Baldi holds great promise in language learning and speech therapy. [Work supported by NSF Grant Nos. CDA-9726363 and BCS-9905176 and Public Health Service Grant No. PHS R01 DC00236.

  4. EI Videos

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The Quantitative Reasoning Center (QRC) at USAFA has the institution's primary responsibility for offering after hours extra instruction (EI) in core technical disciplines (mathematics, chemistry, physics, and engineering mechanics). Demand has been tremendous, totaling over 3600 evening EI sessions in the Fall of 2010. Meeting this demand with only four (now five) full time faculty has been challenging. EI Videos have been produced to help serve cadets in need of well-modeled solutions to homework-type problems. These videos have been warmly received, being viewed over 14,000 times in Fall 2010 and probably contributing to a significant increase in the first attempt success rate on the Algebra Fundamental Skills Exam in Calculus 1. EI Video production is being extended to better support Calculus 2, Calculus 3, and Physics 1.

  5. Reading Tutor, A Reading Support System for Japanese Language Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko KAWAMURA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper gives an overview of the tools and materials included in the Japanese language reading tutorial system Reading Tutor and the multilingual lexicographical project Reading Tutor Web Dictionary, and discusses their possible uses both for Japanese language instruction and to support autonomous language learning. The paper further presents one particular use of these tools and resources for the development of learning materials for foreign candidates to the Japanese certified care worker national examination, and concludes with suggestions for effective guidance geared at fostering autonomous vocabulary learning.-----Članek predstavlja orodja in gradiva v sistemu za podporo branju v japonščini Reading Tutor in v večjezičnem slovarskem projektu Reading Tutor Web Dictionary ter njihovo možno uporabo tako za poučevanje japonščine kot tudi za podporo samostojnemu jezikovnemu učenju. Nadalje predstavlja konkreten primer uporabe teh orodij in virov za izdelavo učnega gradiva za tuje kandidate, ki se pripravljajo na japonski državni izpit za zdravstvene delavce. V zaključku predlaga nekaj pedagoških pristopov za učinkovito podporo samostojnemu učenju besedišča.

  6. Making Sense of Video Analytics: Lessons Learned from Clickstream Interactions, Attitudes, and Learning Outcome in a Video-Assisted Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakos, Michail N.; Chorianopoulos, Konstantinos; Chrisochoides, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    Online video lectures have been considered an instructional media for various pedagogic approaches, such as the flipped classroom and open online courses. In comparison to other instructional media, online video affords the opportunity for recording student clickstream patterns within a video lecture. Video analytics within lecture videos may…

  7. Teacher Talk: One Teacher's Reflections during Comprehension Strategies Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Dana A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined one tutor's evolving use of particular talk moves during comprehension strategies instruction in a university-based clinical setting. Through engaging in audiotape reflection and transcript analysis with a coach, the tutor made shifts toward more explicit and purposeful strategies instruction, yet did not consistently…

  8. A Visualization-Based Tutoring Tool for Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tang-Hung; Khoo, I.-Hung

    2010-06-01

    In engineering disciplines, students usually have hard time to visualize different aspects of engineering analysis and design, which inherently are too complex or abstract to fully understand without the aid of visual explanations or visualizations. As examples, when learning materials and sequences of construction process, students need to visualize how all components of a constructed facility are assembled? Such visualization can not be achieved in a textbook and a traditional lecturing environment. In this paper, the authors present the development of a computer tutoring software, in which different visualization tools including video clips, 3 dimensional models, drawings, pictures/photos together with complementary texts are used to assist students in deeply understanding and effectively mastering materials. The paper will also discuss the implementation and the effectiveness evaluation of the proposed tutoring software, which was used to teach a construction engineering management course offered at California State University, Long Beach.

  9. Expertise Amiss: Interactivity Fosters Learning but Expert Tutors Are Less Interactive than Novice Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herppich, Stephanie; Wittwer, Jörg; Nückles, Matthias; Renkl, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which tutors are interactive and engage in dialogue with a student tends to depend on their pedagogical expertise. Normally, tutors with pedagogical expertise are more interactive than tutors without pedagogical expertise. This finding, however, has largely been obtained when examining tutoring in procedural domains such as…

  10. AutoTutor and Family: A Review of 17 Years of Natural Language Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Benjamin D.; Graesser, Arthur C.; Hu, Xiangen

    2014-01-01

    AutoTutor is a natural language tutoring system that has produced learning gains across multiple domains (e.g., computer literacy, physics, critical thinking). In this paper, we review the development, key research findings, and systems that have evolved from AutoTutor. First, the rationale for developing AutoTutor is outlined and the advantages…

  11. Making Good Physics Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2017-01-01

    Online videos are an increasingly important way technology is contributing to the improvement of physics teaching. Students and teachers have begun to rely on online videos to provide them with content knowledge and instructional strategies. Online audiences are expecting greater production value, and departments are sometimes requesting educators…

  12. Creating Photomontage Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzberg, Kevan

    2008-01-01

    Several years ago, the author began exploring the use of digital film and video as an art-making media when he took over instructing the video computer art class at the high school where he teaches. He found numerous ways to integrate a variety of multimedia technologies and software with more traditional types of visual art processes and…

  13. Combining video instruction followed by voice feedback in a self-learning station for acquisition of Basic Life Support skills: a randomised non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpotos, Nicolas; Lemoyne, Sabine; Calle, Paul A; Deschepper, Ellen; Valcke, Martin; Monsieurs, Koenraad G

    2011-07-01

    Current computerised self-learning (SL) stations for Basic Life Support (BLS) are an alternative to instructor-led (IL) refresher training but are not intended for initial skill acquisition. We developed a SL station for initial skill acquisition and evaluated its efficacy. In a non-inferiority trial, 120 pharmacy students were randomised to IL small group training or individual training in a SL station. In the IL group, instructors demonstrated the skills and provided feedback. In the SL group a shortened Mini Anne™ video, to acquire the skills, was followed by Resusci Anne Skills Station™ software (both Laerdal, Norway) with voice feedback for further refinement. Testing was performed individually, respecting a seven week interval after training for every student. One hundred and seventeen participants were assessed (three drop-outs). The proportion of students achieving a mean compression depth 40-50mm was 24/56 (43%) IL vs. 31/61 (51%) SL and 39/56 (70%) IL vs. 48/61 (79%) SL for a mean compression depth ≥ 40 mm. Compression rate 80-120/min was achieved in 49/56 (88%) IL vs. 57/61 (93%) SL and any incomplete release (≥ 5 mm) was observed in 31/56 (55%) IL and 35/61 (57%) SL. Adequate mean ventilation volume (400-1000 ml) was achieved in 29/56 (52%) IL vs. 36/61 (59%) SL. Non-inferiority was confirmed for depth and although inconclusive, other areas came close to demonstrate it. Compression skills acquired in a SL station combining video-instruction with training using voice feedback were not inferior to IL training. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Virtual Environments for the Transfer of Navigation Skills in the Blind: A Comparison of Directed Instruction Versus Video Game Based Learning Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin C Connors

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available For profoundly blind individuals, navigating in an unfamiliar building can represent a significant challenge. We investigated the use of an audio-based, virtual environment called Audio-based Environment Simulator (AbES that can be explored for the purposes of learning the layout of an unfamiliar, complex indoor environment. Furthermore, we compared two modes of interaction with AbES. In one group, blind participants implicitly learned the layout of a target environment while playing an exploratory, goal-directed video game. By comparison, a second group was explicitly taught the same layout following a standard route and instructions provided by a sighted facilitator. As a control, a third group interacted with AbES while playing an exploratory, goal-directed video game however, the explored environment did not correspond to the target layout. Following interaction with AbES, a series of route navigation tasks were carried out in the virtual and physical building represented in the training environment to assess the transfer of acquired spatial information. We found that participants from both modes of interaction were able to transfer the spatial knowledge gained as indexed by their successful route navigation performance. This transfer was not apparent in the control participants. Most notably, the game-based learning strategy was also associated with enhanced performance when participants were required to find alternate routes and short cuts within the target building suggesting that a ludic-based training approach may provide for a more flexible mental representation of the environment. Furthermore, outcome comparisons between early and late blind individuals suggested that greater prior visual experience did not have a significant effect on overall navigation performance following training. Finally, performance did not appear to be associated with other factors of interest such as age, gender, and verbal memory recall. We conclude that the

  15. Joining the Conversation: Scaffolding and Tutoring Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkenburg, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Tutoring is one of those skills which require the ability to communicate an in-depth understanding of the subject. This article is about scaffolding while tutoring, and the tutoring talents described can be applied across the curriculum. Lev Vygotsky's ideas about communication and education play a key role in the development of scaffolding…

  16. Building a Computer Tutor: Design Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Beverly; McDonald, David D.

    1985-01-01

    Description of several computerized tutoring systems is organized around types of knowledge any tutor must possess--subject area, student's information, and how to teach and communicate. Data and control structures of Meno-tutor are described to illustrate use of artificial intelligence to model the student, a domain, and teaching strategies. (MBR)

  17. Teaching styles of tutors in a problem-based curriculum: students' and tutors' perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Salah; Al-Shboul, Qasim; Abu-Hijleh, Marwan; Hamdy, Hossam

    2006-08-01

    This study compared the self-rated with student-rated teaching styles of PBL tutors. We also examined the relationship between teaching styles of tutors' and students' evaluation of tutor effectiveness in tutorials. The study included 48 tutors and 276 medical students. Tutors, and students' were given a teaching style inventory with a 5-point scale consisting of 21 items that comprise four domains of teaching styles (facilitative, collaborative, suggestive and assertive). In addition, quantitative and qualitative evaluations of tutor effectiveness by students were analyzed. Tutors perceived themselves in the facilitative-collaborative end of the spectrum of styles In contrast, students perceived tutors as less 'facilitative-collaborative' and more 'suggestive-assertive' than tutors self-ratings (p teaching styles. However, other tutor attributes such as establishing rapport with students, providing academic help for them and having content expertise were considered important criteria of an effective tutor. We conclude that there is a mismatch between students' and tutors' perceptions about teaching styles of tutor. Tutor attributes other than teaching styles are important determinants of an effective tutor.

  18. Effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's use of prompts and children's adaptive responses during one-to-one training in children with severe to profound intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vonderen, Annemarie; de Swart, Charlotte; Didden, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Although relatively many studies have addressed staff training and its effect on trainer behavior, the effects of staff training on trainee's adaptive behaviors have seldom been examined. We therefore assessed effectiveness of staff training, consisting of instruction and video feedback, on (a) staff's response prompting, and (b) staff's trainer behavior during one-to-one training with four direct-care staff who acted as trainers. Next to this, we evaluated the effects of staff training on adaptive skills in four children with severe to profound intellectual disability. A non-concurrent multiple baseline design across staff-trainee dyads was used. Intervention resulted in an immediate and substantial increase in percentage correct response prompting and percentage correct trainer behavior by staff. The intervention was also effective in increasing percentage of trainee's correct responses. Staff rated instruction and video feedback as effective and acceptable. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for future research. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A multimedia adult literacy program: Combining NASA technology, instructional design theory, and authentic literacy concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jerry W.

    1993-01-01

    For a number of years, the Software Technology Branch of the Information Systems Directorate has been involved in the application of cutting edge hardware and software technologies to instructional tasks related to NASA projects. The branch has developed intelligent computer aided training shells, instructional applications of virtual reality and multimedia, and computer-based instructional packages that use fuzzy logic for both instructional and diagnostic decision making. One outcome of the work on space-related technology-supported instruction has been the creation of a significant pool of human talent in the branch with current expertise on the cutting edges of instructional technologies. When the human talent is combined with advanced technologies for graphics, sound, video, CD-ROM, and high speed computing, the result is a powerful research and development group that both contributes to the applied foundations of instructional technology and creates effective instructional packages that take advantage of a range of advanced technologies. Several branch projects are currently underway that combine NASA-developed expertise to significant instructional problems in public education. The branch, for example, has developed intelligent computer aided software to help high school students learn physics and staff are currently working on a project to produce educational software for young children with language deficits. This report deals with another project, the adult literacy tutor. Unfortunately, while there are a number of computer-based instructional packages available for adult literacy instruction, most of them are based on the same instructional models that failed these students when they were in school. The teacher-centered, discrete skill and drill-oriented, instructional strategies, even when they are supported by color computer graphics and animation, that form the foundation for most of the computer-based literacy packages currently on the market may not

  20. A multi-method study to determine the effectiveness of, and student attitudes to, online instructional videos for teaching clinical nursing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mary; Lyng, Colette; McGrath, Mary; Cannon, Gerald

    2009-04-01

    E-learning is regularly promoted in higher education settings as a way of fostering more flexible approaches to learning. It has been argued however that the 'potential benefits of new information and communication technology instruments in education' have not been subjected to critical scrutiny (Debande, O., 2004. ICTs and the development of e-learning in Europe: the role of the public and private sectors. European Journal of Education 39 (2), 191-208, p. 192). This paper outlines a multi-method evaluation of an e-learning innovation designed to teach clinical skills to student nurses. Responding to the challenges of teaching clinical skills to large class sizes, we developed a set of instructional videos for one undergraduate skills-based module, which are now integral to the module and available online to students on a continuous basis. Evaluation suggests that students' performance outcomes are unchanged. The students view the flexible and self-management aspects of this method of learning positively, with some attitudinal differences between male and female, and mature and non-mature students. However, it is best used to complement rather than replace lecturer demonstration, lending support to a 'blended' model (Collis, B., van der Wende, M., 2002. Models of Technology and Change in Higher Education: An International Comparative Survey on The Current and Future Use of ICT in Higher Education, University of Twente, Center for Higher Education Policy Studies, The Netherlands).

  1. Using low-cost Android tablets and instructional videos to teach clinical skills to medical students in Kenya: a prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Roy; Nelson, Brett D; Kagan, Calvin; Burke, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and impact of using a low-cost Android tablet to deliver clinical skills training to third-year medical students in Kenya. Design A prospective study using a low cost tablet called ‘connecTAB’, which was designed and manufactured specifically for areas with low bandwidth. Instructional video tutorials demonstrating techniques of cardiovascular and abdominal clinical examinations were pre-loaded onto the tablet. Setting Maseno University School of Medicine, Western Kenya. Participants Fifty-one third-year medical students from Maseno University School of Medicine were subjects in the study. Twenty-five students were assigned to the intervention group and 26 to the control group. Main outcome measures At the start of the study, students from both groups completed an Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) of the cardiovascular and abdominal evaluations. Students who were allocated to the intervention group then received the connecTAB, whereas students in the control group did not. After a period of three weeks, students from both groups completed a post-study OSCE for both the cardiovascular and abdominal evaluations. Results There were significantly higher improvements in the scores for both cardiovascular and abdominal examinations (p clinical education and efficacy and holds promise for international training in both medical and allied healthcare professional spheres in resource-limited settings. PMID:27540487

  2. Instructional DVD video lesson with code switching: its effect on the performance level in dancing social dance among grade 10 special program in the art students of the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capilitan Fernando T.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that the experimental group who are exposed to DVD Video Lesson that uses code switching language has an average mean score in the pretest of 1.56, and this increased to an average mean of 3.50 in the posttest. The control group that uses DVD Video Lesson that uses purely English language got an average mean of 1.06 in the pretest and increased to 1.53 in the posttest. Based on the results of the performance posttest taken by the two groups, the experimental group has a dramatic increase in scores from the pretest to posttest. Although both groups had increased in their performance scores from pretest to posttest, the experimental group (code switching language performs well in the posttest than the control group. As revealed in this findings , there is a significant difference in the posttest scores between the experimental group who are exposed to DVD lesson that uses code switching as a medium of instruction and the control group who are exposed to DVD lesson that uses English. The students who are exposed to the Video Lesson that uses code switching perform well than those students who are exposed in DVD video lesson that uses purely English language. DVD Video lesson that uses code switching as a medium of instruction in teaching social dance is the useful approach in teaching Grade 10 Special Program in the Art students. The language used (code switching is the powerful medium of instruction that enhances the learning outcomes of the students to perform well. This paper could be an eye opener to the Department of Education to inculcate the used of first language/local language or MTB-MLE, not only in Grade I to III but all level in K to 12 programs, since education is a key factor for building a better nation.

  3. Efficient Use of Interactive Video with Large Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Reports on ways in which interactive video-based courseware is being used with students studying for vocational qualifications at Thames Valley University (United Kingdom). Two alternative models using interactive video are described, one using multiple workstations and one using a single workstation led by a tutor. (Contains six references.) (LRW)

  4. Intelligent Educational Systems for Anchored Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David D.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the potential for using Intelligent Educational Systems (IES) for anchoring instruction in macro contexts in science education. Topics include anchored instruction; situated cognition; problem solving; cognitivism; interactive video environments; and examples of combining IES and anchored instruction. (LRW)

  5. Intelligent Educational Systems for Anchored Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David D.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the potential for using Intelligent Educational Systems (IES) for anchoring instruction in macro contexts in science education. Topics include anchored instruction; situated cognition; problem solving; cognitivism; interactive video environments; and examples of combining IES and anchored instruction. (LRW)

  6. Evolution of an Intelligent Deductive Logic Tutor Using Data-Driven Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Behrooz; Barnes, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Deductive logic is essential to a complete understanding of computer science concepts, and is thus fundamental to computer science education. Intelligent tutoring systems with individualized instruction have been shown to increase learning gains. We seek to improve the way deductive logic is taught in computer science by developing an intelligent,…

  7. Evolution of an Intelligent Deductive Logic Tutor Using Data-Driven Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Behrooz; Barnes, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Deductive logic is essential to a complete understanding of computer science concepts, and is thus fundamental to computer science education. Intelligent tutoring systems with individualized instruction have been shown to increase learning gains. We seek to improve the way deductive logic is taught in computer science by developing an intelligent,…

  8. An Artificial Intelligence Tutor: A Supplementary Tool for Teaching and Practicing Braille

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Tessa; Rosenblum, L. Penny; Johnson, Benny G.; Dittel, Jeffrey; Kearns, Devin M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study evaluated the usability and effectiveness of an artificial intelligence Braille Tutor designed to supplement the instruction of students with visual impairments as they learned to write braille contractions. Methods: A mixed-methods design was used, which incorporated a single-subject, adapted alternating treatments design…

  9. Learning Through Tutoring: Low-Achieving Childern as Tutors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Vernon L.; Feldman, Robert S.

    Low-achieving fifth-grade children either taught a third grader or studied alone for a series of daily sessions. At the end of the two-week period, the low-achievers' performance was significantly better in the tutoring condition than in the studying condition. This showed a reversal in the direction from the initial difference between conditions.…

  10. Is peer tutoring beneficial in the context of school resuscitation training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, C; Donnelly, P; Weston, C

    1997-09-01

    First year pupils at a Cardiff comprehensive school were trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 106 by the teacher only and 137 by the teacher assisted by older pupils (peer tutoring). Scores in a multiple choice theory test and in practical skill assessment showed no significant difference between instruction methods, but boys taught by the teacher assisted by older pupils expressed less willingness to resuscitate in an emergency than girls instructed by either method (P novice trainees (P < 0.025).

  11. Emergency skills learning on video (ESLOV): A single-blinded randomized control trial of teaching common emergency skills using self-instruction video (SIV) versus traditional face-to-face (FTF) methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Saiboon, Ismail; Jaafar, Mohd Johar; Ahmad, Nurul Saadah; Nasarudin, Nazhatul Muna Ahmad; Mohamad, Nabishah; Ahmad, Mohd Radhi; Gilbert, John H V

    2014-03-01

    Self-instruction video (SIV) has been widely explored as a teaching mode for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillation (AED), but not with other basic emergency skills. To evaluate the effectiveness of SIV in teaching other basic emergency skill in comparison with traditional face-to-face (FTF) methods. Participants were randomized into SIV and FTF groups. Each group was assigned to learn basic airway management (BAM), cervical collar application (CCA), manual cardiac defibrillation (MCD), and emergency extremity splinting (EES) skills. Confidence level was assessed using questionnaires, and skills performances were assessed using calibrated-blinded assessors through an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Forty-five participants took part in the assessment exercises. There were no significant differences between both groups, on all four skill categories. The mean OSCE-score of an individual category between the FTF-group vs. the SIV-group were as follows: BAM (10.23 ± 1.04 vs. 10.04 ± 1.49; p = 0.62); CCA (7.86 ± 4.39 vs. 7.13 ± 4.12; p = 0.57); MCD (8.24 ± 0.89 vs. 7.58 ± 1.14; p = 0.39); EES (5.43 ± 2.11 vs. 4.63 ± 2.30; p = 0.23). The composite mean score for the FTF-group was 6.85, and for the SIV-group was 6.20 (p < 0.05). There was no significant different in the level of confidence for both groups. SIV is as effective as FTF in teaching and learning basic emergency skills.

  12. Instructional Psychology 1976 - 1981,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    phoneme analysis and blending is reviewed by Resnick (1981) and by Williams (1980), and is discussed in terms of an interactive theory of reading...academically oriented. In a study of student ratings of instruction, Williams & Ware (1976) show that college students who received the most substantive...Rosen et al, 1977; Rosen et al, 1978; Bargh & Schul, 1980). Peer tutoring has been employed as a component of many forms of Personalized Systems of

  13. Using an Animated Cartoon Hero in Video Instruction to Improve Bathroom-Related Skills of a Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Ayaka; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effectiveness of video hero modeling (VHM) for building four bathroom-related behaviors of an elementary-aged student with autism spectrum disorder. In the VHM intervention, the participant watched a video immediately before going to the bathroom he typically used. In the video, an animated face of a cartoon hero…

  14. Using an Animated Cartoon Hero in Video Instruction to Improve Bathroom-Related Skills of a Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Ayaka; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effectiveness of video hero modeling (VHM) for building four bathroom-related behaviors of an elementary-aged student with autism spectrum disorder. In the VHM intervention, the participant watched a video immediately before going to the bathroom he typically used. In the video, an animated face of a cartoon hero…

  15. Virtual environments for the transfer of navigation skills in the blind: a comparison of directed instruction vs. video game based learning approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Erin C.; Chrastil, Elizabeth R.; Sánchez, Jaime; Merabet, Lotfi B.

    2014-01-01

    For profoundly blind individuals, navigating in an unfamiliar building can represent a significant challenge. We investigated the use of an audio-based, virtual environment called Audio-based Environment Simulator (AbES) that can be explored for the purposes of learning the layout of an unfamiliar, complex indoor environment. Furthermore, we compared two modes of interaction with AbES. In one group, blind participants implicitly learned the layout of a target environment while playing an exploratory, goal-directed video game. By comparison, a second group was explicitly taught the same layout following a standard route and instructions provided by a sighted facilitator. As a control, a third group interacted with AbES while playing an exploratory, goal-directed video game however, the explored environment did not correspond to the target layout. Following interaction with AbES, a series of route navigation tasks were carried out in the virtual and physical building represented in the training environment to assess the transfer of acquired spatial information. We found that participants from both modes of interaction were able to transfer the spatial knowledge gained as indexed by their successful route navigation performance. This transfer was not apparent in the control participants. Most notably, the game-based learning strategy was also associated with enhanced performance when participants were required to find alternate routes and short cuts within the target building suggesting that a ludic-based training approach may provide for a more flexible mental representation of the environment. Furthermore, outcome comparisons between early and late blind individuals suggested that greater prior visual experience did not have a significant effect on overall navigation performance following training. Finally, performance did not appear to be associated with other factors of interest such as age, gender, and verbal memory recall. We conclude that the highly interactive

  16. Virtual environments for the transfer of navigation skills in the blind: a comparison of directed instruction vs. video game based learning approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Erin C; Chrastil, Elizabeth R; Sánchez, Jaime; Merabet, Lotfi B

    2014-01-01

    For profoundly blind individuals, navigating in an unfamiliar building can represent a significant challenge. We investigated the use of an audio-based, virtual environment called Audio-based Environment Simulator (AbES) that can be explored for the purposes of learning the layout of an unfamiliar, complex indoor environment. Furthermore, we compared two modes of interaction with AbES. In one group, blind participants implicitly learned the layout of a target environment while playing an exploratory, goal-directed video game. By comparison, a second group was explicitly taught the same layout following a standard route and instructions provided by a sighted facilitator. As a control, a third group interacted with AbES while playing an exploratory, goal-directed video game however, the explored environment did not correspond to the target layout. Following interaction with AbES, a series of route navigation tasks were carried out in the virtual and physical building represented in the training environment to assess the transfer of acquired spatial information. We found that participants from both modes of interaction were able to transfer the spatial knowledge gained as indexed by their successful route navigation performance. This transfer was not apparent in the control participants. Most notably, the game-based learning strategy was also associated with enhanced performance when participants were required to find alternate routes and short cuts within the target building suggesting that a ludic-based training approach may provide for a more flexible mental representation of the environment. Furthermore, outcome comparisons between early and late blind individuals suggested that greater prior visual experience did not have a significant effect on overall navigation performance following training. Finally, performance did not appear to be associated with other factors of interest such as age, gender, and verbal memory recall. We conclude that the highly interactive

  17. Intelligent Tutoring Systems as Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Albert K. W.; Lee, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Proposes the notion of intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) as design in order to engage ITS development with more rigor. Topics include engineering design versus ITS design; systems approach; design as problem solving; a hierarchy of paradigms; the emergence of an agent-theoretic approach; and the need for an ITS design notation. (Author/LRW)

  18. A New Intelligent Tutoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Lindsey

    2008-01-01

    Early in 1984, Logica started an ICAI research contract with MoD (Procurement Executive), which was to be undertaken in collaboration with the technical authority at the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Malvern. A prototype system, which has become known as TUTOR, was scheduled for delivery to the client later in 1985. Initially, and for…

  19. A New Intelligent Tutoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Lindsey

    2008-01-01

    Early in 1984, Logica started an ICAI research contract with MoD (Procurement Executive), which was to be undertaken in collaboration with the technical authority at the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Malvern. A prototype system, which has become known as TUTOR, was scheduled for delivery to the client later in 1985. Initially, and for…

  20. Acquisition and retention of basic life support skills in an untrained population using a personal resuscitation manikin and video self-instruction (VSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Henriksen, Mikael J V; Isbye, Dan Lou; Lippert, Freddy K; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2010-09-01

    Video-based self-instruction (VSI) with a 24-min DVD and a personal resuscitation manikin solves some of the barriers associated with traditional basic life support (BLS) courses. No accurate assessment of the actual improvement in skills after attending a VSI course has been determined, and in this study we assess the skill improvement in laypersons undergoing VSI. The BLS skills of 68 untrained laypersons (high school students, their teachers and persons excluded from mainstream society) were assessed using the Laerdal ResusciAnne and PC Skill Reporting System 2.0 in a 3 min test. A total score (12-48 points) was calculated and 12 different variables were recorded. The participants attended a 24-min VSI course (MiniAnne, Laerdal) and took home the DVD and manikin for optional subsequent self-training. We repeated the test 3 1/2-4 months later. There was a significant increase in the total score (p<0.0001) from 26.5 to 34 points. The participants performed significantly better in checking responsiveness, opening the airway, checking for respiration and using the correct compression/ventilation ratio (all p-values<0.001). The compression depth improved from 38 mm to 49.5 mm and the total number of compressions increased from 67 to 141. The ventilation volume and the total number of ventilations increased, and total "hands-off" time decreased from 120.5 s to 85 s. Untrained laypersons attending a 24 min DVD-based BLS course have a significantly improved BLS performance after 3 1/2-4 months compared to pre-test skill performance. Especially the total number of compressions improved and the hands-off time decreased. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 高校运用有限摄编媒体资源实现多机位摄制高质量教学影片探析%On Manufacturing High -quality Instructional Videos with Multi- camera by Limited Video Editing Resources in University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锐; 黄燕

    2012-01-01

    摄制高质量的教学影片是各高校追求的重要目标,部分题材的影片摄制要实现高质量,必须以多台摄影机、多景别、多视角拍摄来实现,然而,部分高校由于经费的原因,不具备这样的条件,这是个矛盾。本文以摄、编、导等多个环节较为详细的阐述了运用有限的摄编媒体资源来实现多机位(15机位)摄制高质量教学影片的思路、方法与技巧,并以实例佐证,以求与同行们切磋。%Manufacturing high - quality instructional videos is an important goal by all colleges and universities, and to achieve high quality video, some subject matter of the film must be based on multi- cameras, multi- scenes, multi -angle shooting. However, owing to financial reasons some colleges and universities can not have these conditions. This is a contradiction. This paper expounds ideas, methods and techniques of manufacturing high - quality instructional videos with multi - camera ( 15 angles) by limited video editing resources.

  2. Somos Todos Ayudantes y Estudiantes: A Demonstration of a Classwide Peer Tutoring Program in a Modified Spanish Class for Secondary Students Identified as Learning Disabled or Academically At-Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jane E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Sixteen students with learning disabilities or at risk of failure in foreign language study participated in a peer tutoring program with Spanish vocabulary. The classwide reciprocal peer tutoring system was found to be a feasible component of foreign language instruction, as high levels of Spanish words were learned and maintained, and incidental…

  3. Two approaches to physics tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomaniuck, Tania

    One in two first-year students at science or biomedical faculties fail in basic subjects such as mathematics, chemistry or physics. Course-specific tutoring is one of the available means for improving their performance. In the present research, two tutoring models are developed. Both incorporate independent learning, but from different perspectives and priorities. A pragmatic tutoring approach. The first part of the thesis describes the search process for an optimal course-specific tutoring strategy for a standard first-year physics course in life sciences curricula. After a number of empirical research rounds, a pragmatic compromise emerged as the most suitable form of tutoring. The approach is characterised by: (1) priority to questions from students; (2) a high degree of interactivity with the tutor and among students; (3) due consideration to the number of questions to be dealt with and the depth in which they should be discussed. Most students participating in the tutoring sessions expressed their satisfaction and performed sufficiently well in their exams. However, there was still a problem: the students' insight into the course material was restricted to first-order processing of the syllabus. While this would be satisfactory in non-scientific study programmes, it is deemed insufficient in programmes where deeper insight is required in order that students be able to deal adequately with new conceptual questions or problems. In-depth tutoring. In science programmes, the core objective is for students to acquire in-depth knowledge. Therefore, science educators are designing and studying teaching methods that are geared not only to the acquisition of in-depth knowledge as such, but also to the motivation of students to take a more in-depth approach to learning. Some of the crucial notions in their research are: the extent to which the course content ties in with students' prior knowledge, problem-setting strategies and concept-context linking. 'In

  4. Computer assisted tutoring in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffery, N

    1997-02-01

    The computer-based tutoring of visual concepts such as radiological images is a largely unexplored area. A review of the literature highlights limited use of computers as a means of radiological education, with the majority of systems being little more than hypermedia prototypes, on-line teaching files, and passive CD-Roms. Very few of the systems discussed in the research literature draw on the work from cognitive science and educational psychology for tutoring visual concepts. This thesis details and evaluates a method for indexing and retrieving images from large image databases via a cognitively informed graphical representation of visual concepts. This representation is derived using Multiple Correspondence Analysis from a statistical analysis of features present in the images. It is intended that this representation be used to assist in the computer based teaching of any discipline that requires the tutoring of visual concepts. The domain used as a test bed for this research is Magnetic Resonance Imaging in neuroradiology. Tutoring the interpretation of MR scans of the head represents a real practical problem due to the inherent complexity of the brain and variations in tissue contrast within image sequence and disease/pathology. The literature of concept categorisation and representation is critically reviewed to inform the design of a graphical representation of a concept (a pathology in the application domain). A specification for the design of an explicit representation of visual concepts is drawn from this literature review, together with methods of tutoring based around this model. A methodology for producing this representation is described, and implemented in the development of an overview plot for the concept of a disease of the brain, with associated statistical measures derived and operationalised for typicality and similarity of cases within a disease. These measures are precursors to the development of computer based tutoring strategies for image

  5. Peer feedback on complex tasks by tutors trained in content knowledge or tutoring skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Amy; Brouns, Francis; Van Bruggen, Jan; Sloep, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., Van Bruggen, J., & Sloep, P. B. (2013, 7 November). Peer feedback on complex tasks by tutors trained in content knowledge or tutoring skills. Presentation at ICO Fall School, The Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

  6. Peer feedback on complex tasks by tutors trained in content knowledge or tutoring skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Amy; Brouns, Francis; Van Bruggen, Jan; Sloep, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., Van Bruggen, J., & Sloep, P. B. (2013, 7 November). Peer feedback on complex tasks by tutors trained in content knowledge or tutoring skills. Presentation at ICO Fall School, The Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

  7. Interactive Video and Artificial Intelligence: A Convenient Marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midoro, V.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes the theoretical framework of a research project aimed at exploring the new potentials for instructional systems offered by videodisc technology and artificial intelligence. A prototype of an intelligent tutoring system, "Earth," is described, and types of interactions in instructional systems are discussed as they relate to the learning…

  8. The Face of Private Tutoring in Russia: Evidence from Online Marketing by Private Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring is a common and worldwide phenomenon. However, there is a dearth of up-to-date research on private tutoring compared with that on institutional one-to-one teaching, which could be explained by challenges associated with data collection. This article proposes using publicly available online advertisements of private tutors as a…

  9. Consumers as tutors – legitimate teachers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Cathy

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to research the feasibility of training mental health consumers as tutors for 4th year medical students in psychiatry. Methods A partnership between a consumer network and an academic unit in Psychological Medicine was formed to jointly develop a training package for consumer tutors and a curriculum in interviewing skills for medical students. Student attitudes to mental health consumers were measured pre and post the program. All tutorial evaluation data was analysed using univariate statistics. Both tutors and students evaluated the teaching program using a 4 point rating scale. The mean scores for teaching and content for both students and tutors were compared using an independent samples t-test. Results Consumer tutors were successfully trained and accredited as tutors and able to sustain delivery of tutorials over a 4 year period. The study found that whilst the medical students started with positive attitudes towards consumers prior to the program, there was a general trend towards improved attitude across all measures. Other outcomes for tutors and students (both positive and negative are described. Conclusions Consumer tutors along with professional tutors have a place in the education of medical students, are an untapped resource and deliver largely positive outcomes for students and themselves. Further possible developments are described.

  10. Electronic Algebra and Calculus Tutor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Fradkin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern undergraduates join science and engineering courses with poorer mathematical background than most contemporaries of the current faculty had when they were freshers. The problem is very acute in the United Kingdom but more and more countries adopt less resource intensive models of teaching and the problem spreads. University tutors and lecturers spend more and more time covering the basics. However, most of them still rely on traditional methods of delivery which presuppose that learners have a good memory and considerable time to practice, so that they can memorize disjointed facts and discover for themselves various connections between the underlying concepts. These suppositions are particularly unrealistic when dealing with a large number of undergraduates who are ordinary learners with limited mathematics background. The first author has developed a teaching system that allows such adult learners achieve relatively deep learning of mathematics – and remarkably quickly – through a teacher-guided (often called Socratic dialog, which aims at the frequent reinforcement of basic mathematical abstractions through Eulerian sequencing. These ideas have been applied to create a prototype of a Cognitive Mathematics Tutoring System aimed at teaching basic mathematics to University freshers., an electronic Personal Algebra and Calculus Tutor (e- PACT.

  11. Self-Directed Interactive Video-Based Instruction Versus Instructor-Led Teaching for Myanmar House Surgeons: A Randomized, Noninferiority Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, Albert Thein; Lwin, Thein; Naing, Phyu; Oo, Yee; Kidd, David; Cerullo, Marcelo; Posen, Joshua; Hlaing, Kyaw; Yenokyan, Gayane; Thinn, Kyi Kyi; Soe, Zaw Wai; Stevens, Kent A

    2017-06-29

    To compare self-directed interactive video-based instruction (IVBI) with instructor-led teaching in the acquisition of basic surgical skills by House Surgeons at University of Medicine 1, Yangon. A prospective, 1:1 randomized controlled trial was conducted. Participants were randomized into 2 teaching arms: (1) self-directed IVBI or (2) instructor-led teaching. Self-directed IVBI participants were provided with a portable DVD player that could play, fast forward, rewind, and skip through skills modules. Participants in the instructor-led teaching group were taught in small groups by standardized instructors. Pretesting and posttesting of 1-handed knot tie, 2-handed knot tie, vertical mattress suture, and instrument tie was performed using the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). Students randomized to self-directed IVBI completed an exit survey to assess satisfaction. Demographic data were collected of all participants. University of Medicine 1, Yangon, Myanmar. Fifty participants were randomly selected from 78 eligible House Surgeons who were enrolled in their basic surgery rotation. Demographic characteristics and baseline skills were comparable in participants randomized to IVBI and instructor-led teaching. Mean OSATS score increased from pretest to posttest in both groups (p < 0.001). The mean posttest OSATS score of the IVBI group was 0.72 points below that of the instructor-led teaching group (90% CI: -3.8 to 5.2), with the 90% CI falling below the a priori noninferiority margin, satisfying criteria for noninferiority. More than 90% of students marked either "agree" or "strongly agree" to the following statements on the exit survey: further expansion of IVBI into other skills modules and integration of IVBI into training curriculum. IVBI is noninferior to instructor-led teaching of surgical skills based on OSATS scores. House Surgeons highly rated self-directed IVBI. Self-directed IVBI has the potential to significantly reduce the

  12. Digital Video Teach Yourself VISUALLY

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Lonzell

    2010-01-01

    Tips and techniques for shooting and sharing superb digital videos. Never before has video been more popular-or more accessible to the home photographer. Now you can create YouTube-worthy, professional-looking video, with the help of this richly illustrated guide. In a straightforward, simple, highly visual format, Teach Yourself VISUALLY Digital Video demystifies the secrets of great video. With colorful screenshots and illustrations plus step-by-step instructions, the book explains the features of your camera and their capabilities, and shows you how to go beyond "auto" to manually

  13. A Comparison of Peer and Tutor Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, John; Purchase, Helen; Luxton-Reilly, Andrew; Denny, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We report on a study comparing peer feedback with feedback written by tutors on a large, undergraduate software engineering programming class. Feedback generated by peers is generally held to be of lower quality to feedback from experienced tutors, and this study sought to explore the extent and nature of this difference. We looked at how…

  14. Electronic Tutoring: Long Distance and Long Term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Denise R.; Mayberry, Bob

    Electronic tutoring can be valuable for writers and should be offered in more university settings, not just in computer labs. Among its advantages is the speed with which commentary can be returned by e-mail. Other advantages were evident in a reciprocal tutoring relationship carried on by two academics in different states. They chose not to edit…

  15. Analysis of Cognitive Tutor Geometry Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Tauqir

    2010-01-01

    The Carnegie Learning Cognitive Tutor curricula are based on cognitive models, which include a representation of the learner's thinking, strategies, and misconceptions. The Cognitive Tutor curricula typically speed up learning and yield greater learning as compared to traditional math curricula (Morgan & Ritter, 2002; Sarkis, 2004; Koedinger,…

  16. Summative Evaluation of the SINCGARS Tutor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orey, Michael; Zhao, Ruimin; Fan, Huey-Ling; Keenan, Ron

    1998-01-01

    Describes the results of an effectiveness evaluation of an "intelligently coached simulation," the SINCGARS Tutor, that was developed to train military officers how to operate a SINCGARS radio. Posttests showed officers trained on the computerized tutor performed more accurately than a group trained on the actual equipment. (Author/LRW)

  17. Rules of engagement: developing the online tutor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Golden

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers professional development in a context that is familiar and problematic to teaching teams in tertiary education everywhere, that of delivering online programmes with an ever-decreasing complement of staff. The Teaching Qualification Further Education (TQFE teaching team at University of Dundee confronted the reality of reduced staff numbers by centralising tutoring and support for programme participants. The new system involves standardising tutoring as far as possible through generic email, blog and microblog accounts, all badged “TQFE-Tutor” and staffed on a roster basis. Once the new “rules of engagement” via TQFE-Tutor were in place, it became clear that in addition to benefits in terms of student support, there were other unintended positive consequences: opportunities for informal professional development for staff and the promotion of effective team working. The experience of collective tutoring has facilitated collaboration on a range of innovations within online learning. This paper describes the evolution of the TQFE-Tutor innovation and reports upon a small scale study which was carried out to gather the views of the tutor team working with TQFE-Tutor. The authors conclude that the centralisation of communication and tutoring on the TQFE programme has been highly beneficial in terms of professional development for the team.

  18. Bridge: Intelligent Tutoring with Intermediate Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    Research and Development Center and Psychology Department University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA. 15260 The Artificial Intelligence and Psychology...problem never introduces more than one unfamiliar plan. Inteligent Tutoring With Intermediate Representations - Bonar and Cunniigbam 4 You must have a... Inteligent Tutoring With ntermediate Representations - Bonar and Cunningham 7 The requirements are specified at four differcnt levels, corresponding to

  19. Concentrating on Affective Feedforward in Online Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Ting; Chou, Yung-Hsin; Cowan, John

    2014-01-01

    With considerable input from the student voice, the paper centres on a detailed account of the experiences of Western academic, tutoring Eastern students online to develop their critical thinking skills. From their online experiences together as tutor and students, the writers present a considered case for the main emphasis in facilitative online…

  20. Matching tutors and students: effective strategies for information transfer between circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesileanu, Tiberiu; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Olveczky, Bence

    Many neural circuits transfer learned information to downstream circuits: hippocampal-dependent memories are consolidated into long-term memories elsewhere; motor cortex is essential for skill learning but dispensable for execution; anterior forebrain pathway (AFP) in songbirds drives short-term improvements in song that are later consolidated in pre-motor area RA. We show how to match instructive signals from tutor circuits to synaptic plasticity rules in student circuits to achieve effective two-stage learning. We focus on learning sequential patterns where a timebase is transformed into motor commands by connectivity with a `student' area. If the sign of the synaptic change is given by the magnitude of tutor input, a good teaching strategy uses a strong (weak) tutor signal if student output is below (above) its target. If instead timing of tutor input relative to the timebase determines the sign of synaptic modifications, a good instructive signal accumulates the errors in student output as the motor program progresses. We demonstrate song learning in a biologically-plausible model of the songbird circuit given diverse plasticity rules interpolating between those described above. The model also reproduces qualitative firing statistics of RA neurons in juveniles and adults. Also affiliated to CUNY - Graduate Center.

  1. Tutoring System for Dance Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Kannan, Rajkumar; Ramadoss, Balakrishnan

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in hardware sophistication related to graphics display, audio and video devices made available a large number of multimedia and hypermedia applications. These multimedia applications need to store and retrieve the different forms of media like text, hypertext, graphics, still images, animations, audio and video. Dance is one of the important cultural forms of a nation and dance video is one such multimedia types. Archiving and retrieving the required semantics from these dance media collections is a crucial and demanding multimedia application. This paper summarizes the difference dance video archival techniques and systems. Keywords: Multimedia, Culture Media, Metadata archival and retrieval systems, MPEG-7, XML.

  2. A Conversational Intelligent Tutoring System to Automatically Predict Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Annabel; Crockett, Keeley; McLean, David; Edmonds, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a generic methodology and architecture for developing a novel conversational intelligent tutoring system (CITS) called Oscar that leads a tutoring conversation and dynamically predicts and adapts to a student's learning style. Oscar aims to mimic a human tutor by implicitly modelling the learning style during tutoring, and…

  3. Learning from a Computer Tutor with Natural Language Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Joel; Rovick, Allen; Glass, Michael; Zhou, Yujian; Evens, Martha

    2003-01-01

    CIRCSIM-Tutor is a computer tutor designed to carry out a natural language dialogue with a medical student. Its domain is the baroreceptor reflex, the part of the cardiovascular system that is responsible for maintaining a constant blood pressure. CIRCSIM-Tutor's interaction with students is modeled after the tutoring behavior of two experienced…

  4. USE OF EXPLORATORY RESEARCH AND INDIVIDUAL TUTORING TECHNIQUES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAMING METHODS AND THEORY, FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SILBERMAN, H.; AND OTHERS

    FOUR SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS WERE STUDIED AND REVISED BY USE OF TUTORING TECHNIQUES WITH INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS TO CREATE MODIFIED PROGRAMS SUPERIOR TO THE ORIGINAL ONES. THE PROGRAMS USED IN THE STUDY WERE FIRST-GRADE READING, FIRST-GRADE ARITHMETIC, JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH, AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL GEOMETRY. PROGRAMS THAT LED TO IMPROVED…

  5. The Nature of a Literacy-Based Tutoring Program for At-Risk Youth: Mentorship, Professional Development, and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Guerra, Maria Asusena

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to gain and provide an in-depth, holistic description and interpretation of the knowledge and literacy instruction tutors at Readers Advance provide students. Guided by a post-positivist realist framework and grounded theory methodology, qualitative inquiry design strategies were used to guide this research. This…

  6. Private English Tutoring and Adolescents' Motivation to Learn English as a Foreign Language: A Self System Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Tzu

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated how self-related English learning motivation among Taiwanese adolescent learners differs between students who only receive English instruction in formal schooling and those who have additional private tutoring. A total of 1,698 teenage English learners in public secondary schools across Taiwan completed a…

  7. Funciones y perfil del tutor

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, Maria da Nazare Mesquita Martins dos Santos; Universidade Lusofona de Lisboa

    2011-01-01

    Após uma curta introdução relativa ao conceito de educação – formação, são abordadas as características e as funções inerentes à figura do professor tutor. É igualmente salientada a importância que deve ser dada à formação dos professores para que a escola possa fornecer uma resposta eficaz aos desafios constantes impostos pela sociedade. This paper intends to explain...

  8. An investigation comparing traditional recitation instruction to computer tutorials which combine three-dimensional animation with varying levels of visual complexity, including digital video in teaching various chemistry topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, A. Palmer

    This study examines the effect of increasing the visual complexity used in computer assisted instruction in general chemistry. Traditional recitation instruction was used as a control for the experiment. One tutorial presented a chemistry topic using 3-D animation showing molecular activity and symbolic representation of the macroscopic view of a chemical phenomenon. A second tutorial presented the same topic but simultaneously presented students with a digital video movie showing the phenomena and 3-D animation showing the molecular view of the phenomena. This experimental set-up was used in two different experiments during the first semester of college level general chemistry course. The topics covered were the molecular effect of heating water through the solid-liquid phase change and the kinetic molecular theory used in explaining pressure changes. The subjects used in the experiment were 236 college students enrolled in a freshman chemistry course at a large university. The data indicated that the simultaneous presentation of digital video, showing the solid to liquid phase change of water, with a molecular animation, showing the molecular behavior during the phase change, had a significant effect on student particulate understanding when compared to traditional recitation. Although the effect of the KMT tutorial was not statistically significant, there was a positive effect on student particulate understanding. The use of computer tutorial also had a significant effect on student attitude toward their comprehension of the lesson.

  9. Methods, forms and facilities of professional preparation of teachers-tutors in the conditions of the controlled from distance form of teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osadchiy V.V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems of professional preparation of teachers-tutors are studied. The features of application of methods are considered, forms and facilities of professional preparation of teachers-tutors in the conditions of the controlled from distance form of teaching. As expedient methods are selected: method of lecture, video trainings, interactive methods (role-playing, case studies, brainstorming, methods of reflection, control methods, exercises, laboratory method. By the forms of organization are electronic seminars, web-seminars, videos-seminars. By teaching facilities are electronic educational resources and services of network the Internet.

  10. Tutoring in problem-based learning medical curricula: the influence of tutor background and style on effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régo Patricia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence for the superiority of particular characteristics in PBL tutors in medical curricula is generally inconclusive. Most studies have investigated the effectiveness of content experts compared with that of non-experts as measured either by student satisfaction or academic achievement. A few have compared academic staff tutors with student tutors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between students' perception of overall tutor effectiveness, particular tutor behaviours, clinical qualifications and academic appointment. Method A questionnaire designed to evaluate particular aspects of PBL tutoring technique, related either to subject-matter knowledge or to process-facilitation skill, as well as overall effectiveness, was distributed to students in first year of a PBL medical program at the end of each of three tutor terms. A total of 76 tutor terms were included in the study. Data analysis compared clinical with non-clinical tutors, and staff with non-staff tutors. Results Clinically qualified tutors used their subject-matter knowledge significantly more than non-clinical tutors and were seen as being more empathic with their students. Staff tutors placed more emphasis on assessment than non-staff tutors and were seen as having greater skill in establishing and maintaining an environment of cooperation within their PBL groups than non-staff tutors. Conclusion These results suggest that both subject-matter knowledge and process-facilitation skills are necessary but not individually sufficient characteristics of effective tutors.

  11. Effects of training peer tutors in content knowledge versus tutoring skills on giving feedback to help tutees’ complex tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Amy; Brouns, Francis; Van Bruggen, Jan; Sloep, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of training tutors in content knowledge of a particular domain versus training them in tutoring skills of pedagogical knowledge when tutoring on a complex tutee task. Forty-seven tutor-tutee pairs of fourth year secondary school students were created

  12. A literacy tutoring experience for prospective special educators and struggling second graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear-Swerling, Louise

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the learning of teacher candidates taking a language arts course in a special-educator preparation program and that of the second graders they tutored in a supervised field component of the course. Teacher candidates' knowledge of literacy instruction was assessed using five knowledge tasks; children were assessed on several measures of basic reading and spelling skills as well as on their knowledge of phonics concepts such as syllable types. Teacher candidates generally had inaccurate perceptions of their knowledge at pretest, but their knowledge improved significantly on all tasks after course instruction. Tutored children improved significantly from pre- to posttest on all assessments. The study suggests that carefully designed literacy coursework with field experiences can benefit both prospective special educators and struggling readers.

  13. The Reliability of Using Peers in Drill Type Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Mada Kay

    The reliability of using peers in drill type instruction was investigated with 57 students (in grades 4 through 8). Quality of tutor-student interaction during multiplication drills was based on the pace or rate at which students interacted with the material and the accuracy level at which they performed. Ss were instructed to listen to cassette…

  14. Video Analysis and Repackaging for Distance Education

    CERN Document Server

    Ram, A Ranjith

    2012-01-01

    This book presents various video processing methodologies that are useful for distance education. The motivation is to devise new multimedia technologies that are suitable for better representation of instructional videos by exploiting the temporal redundancies present in the original video. This solves many of the issues related to the memory and bandwidth limitation of lecture videos. The various methods described in the book focus on a key-frame based approach which is used to time shrink, repackage and retarget instructional videos. All the methods need a preprocessing step of shot detecti

  15. Domain-based Teaching Strategy for Intelligent Tutoring System Based on Generic Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kseibat, Dawod; Mansour, Ali; Adjei, Osei; Phillips, Paul

    In this paper we present a framework for selecting the proper instructional strategy for a given teaching material based on its attributes. The new approach is based on a flexible design by means of generic rules. The framework was adapted in an Intelligent Tutoring System to teach Modern Standard Arabic language to adult English-speaking learners with no pre-knowledge of Arabic language is required.

  16. A Virtual Commanding Officer, Intelligent Tutor for the Underway Replenishment Ship-handling Virtual Environment Simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Tenney, Karl R.

    1999-01-01

    While developing a Virtual Environment (VE) Ship-handling simulator for the Surface Warfare Officer School (SWOS) in Newport, RI, researchers at the Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division (NAWCTSD) in Orlando, FL recognized the idea of integrating an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) to provide feedback to the student The system, known as a Virtual Commanding Officer (VCO), would provide instructional feedback to the student to ensure that beneficial training occurs. The VCO would...

  17. Effectiveness of Interactive Video to Teach CPR Theory and Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, Ann L.

    This study investigated whether an interactive video system of instruction taught cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as effectively as traditional instruction. Using standards of the American Heart Association, the study was designed with two randomized groups to be taught either by live instruction or by interactive video. Subjects were 100…

  18. Peer Tutors Improve Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGue, Kristina M.; Wilson, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    The influential report "Teaching Children to Read: An Evidenced-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and Its Implications for Reading Instruction," published by the National Reading Panel in 2000, presented recommendations for daily literacy instruction in five key areas: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency,…

  19. Effects of Video Prompting Techniques on Teaching Daily Living Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Sarah C.; Wolfe, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Video-based instruction is becoming a common intervention in today's classrooms. Previous research has focused primarily on video modeling techniques that required the student to watch an entire video of the task before attempting to complete the task independently. Video prompting is a form of video instruction that breaks down target skills…

  20. Effects of Video Prompting Techniques on Teaching Daily Living Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Sarah C.; Wolfe, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Video-based instruction is becoming a common intervention in today's classrooms. Previous research has focused primarily on video modeling techniques that required the student to watch an entire video of the task before attempting to complete the task independently. Video prompting is a form of video instruction that breaks down target skills…

  1. Interactive Video Technology: Enhancing Professional Learning in Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Brian; Mitchell, Nick; Adamczyk, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The University of Sussex In-School Teacher Education Project (InSTEP) uses interactive video technologies to enhance initial teacher education programmes for science trainee teachers. With four Internet Protocol cameras and mounted microphones in both school laboratories and the university teaching room, trainees and their tutors have access to…

  2. Modeling Skills, Signs and Lettering for Children with Down Syndrome, Autism and Other Severe Developmental Delays by Video Instruction in Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biederman, G. B.; Freedman, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses optimal strategies in teaching essential life and communication skills to children with Down syndrome, autism and other developmental delays. Evidence from the literature concerning the relative efficacy of hand-over-hand (self-modeling) in contrast to passive observational teaching techniques (e.g., video modeling) shows the…

  3. Fostering Teacher Candidates' Reflective Practice through Video Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Margaret; Gurvitch, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Recently, interest in using video to promote the reflective practice in preservice teacher education has increased. Video recordings of teaching incidents inspire the reflective practice in preservice teachers by allowing them to analyze instruction and view teaching in an objective light. As an extension of video recording, video editing has…

  4. Can student-produced video transform university teaching?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    produced three types of videos during the course: Video 1 was independently produced by the students, guided by online tasks and instructions. These videos were student produced learning material, showing cases from all over Europe. The videos was collected and presented in a "visual database" in Google...

  5. Fostering Teacher Candidates' Reflective Practice through Video Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Margaret; Gurvitch, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Recently, interest in using video to promote the reflective practice in preservice teacher education has increased. Video recordings of teaching incidents inspire the reflective practice in preservice teachers by allowing them to analyze instruction and view teaching in an objective light. As an extension of video recording, video editing has…

  6. Dashboard Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleue, Alan D.; Depcik, Chris; Peltier, Ted

    2012-01-01

    Last school year, I had a web link emailed to me entitled "A Dashboard Physics Lesson." The link, created and posted by Dale Basier on his "Lab Out Loud" blog, illustrates video of a car's speedometer synchronized with video of the road. These two separate video streams are compiled into one video that students can watch and analyze. After seeing…

  7. Detention Home Teens as Tutors: A Cooperative Cross-Age Tutoring Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazerson, David B.

    2005-01-01

    Concerned professionals in the juvenile justice field frequently express concern for effective programs that help youth offenders successfully rejoin society. This mixed-method pilot study involved detention home teens functioning as tutors for special education students in a public school. Tutors were selected who, based on previous assessment as…

  8. Cross-Age Peer Tutoring in Physics: Tutors, Tutees, and Achievement in Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korner, Marianne; Hopf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    International comparisons reveal that lower-secondary-level students in Austria perform below the OECD mean in science. Guided by the search for remedies and improvements in science teaching, this study investigates whether cross-age peer tutoring is an appropriate method for teaching physics. A modern and concise definition of peer tutoring is…

  9. Cross-Age Peer Tutoring in Physics: Tutors, Tutees, and Achievement in Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korner, Marianne; Hopf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    International comparisons reveal that lower-secondary-level students in Austria perform below the OECD mean in science. Guided by the search for remedies and improvements in science teaching, this study investigates whether cross-age peer tutoring is an appropriate method for teaching physics. A modern and concise definition of peer tutoring is…

  10. Who Am I as a Distance Tutor? An Investigation of Distance Tutors' Professional Identity in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junhong

    2016-01-01

    Much research has been conducted in the area of teacher professional identity in the past decades. Nonetheless, very little attention has been paid to the professional identity of tutors in distance education. Using interviews, this study set out to investigate distance tutors' claimed and assigned professional identities, their actual, ought and…

  11. Selection-Based Instruction with Touch-Screen Video and the Emergence of Exact, Recombinative, and Novel Topography-Based Responses to Interview Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, John; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to replicate and extend the literature on using selection-based instruction to teach responses to interview questions by (a) evaluating the emergence of recombinative (i.e., combinations of taught) and novel (i.e., untaught) topography-based intraverbal responses, in addition to exact repetitions of taught…

  12. Exploring Instructional Coaches' Attitudes and Use of the DataCapture Mobile Application to Collect Video-Based Evidence in Teacher Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewell, Justin Reed

    2013-01-01

    An integral part of teacher development are teacher observations. Many teachers are observed once or twice a year to evaluate their performance and hold them accountable for meeting standards. Instructional coaches, however, observe and work with teachers to help them reflect on their performance, with the goal of improving their practice.…

  13. From Generating in the Lab to Tutoring Systems in Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Danielle S; Jacovina, Matthew E; Snow, Erica L; Allen, Laura K

    2015-01-01

    Work in cognitive and educational psychology examines a variety of phenomena related to the learning and retrieval of information. Indeed, Alice Healy, our honoree, and her colleagues have conducted a large body of groundbreaking research on this topic. In this article we discuss how 3 learning principles (the generation effect, deliberate practice and feedback, and antidotes to disengagement) discussed in Healy, Schneider, and Bourne (2012) have influenced the design of 2 intelligent tutoring systems that attempt to incorporate principles of skill and knowledge acquisition. Specifically, this article describes iSTART-2 and the Writing Pal, which provide students with instruction and practice using comprehension and writing strategies. iSTART-2 provides students with training to use effective comprehension strategies while self-explaining complex text. The Writing Pal provides students with instruction and practice to use basic writing strategies when writing persuasive essays. Underlying these systems are the assumptions that students should be provided with initial instruction that breaks down the tasks into component skills and that deliberate practice should include active generation with meaningful feedback, all while remaining engaging. The implementation of these assumptions is complicated by the ill-defined natures of comprehension and writing and supported by the use of various natural language processing techniques. We argue that there is value in attempting to integrate empirically supported learning principles into educational activities, even when there is imperfect alignment between them. Examples from the design of iSTART-2 and Writing Pal guide this argument.

  14. New Ways of Using Video Technology in English Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliacci, Naomi

    2002-01-01

    Examines the different uses of video technologies in English language teaching, including content and instructional presentation, planning for instruction, designing tasks for students, assessment, and using new technologies. (Author/VWL)

  15. Mathematics Synchronous Peer Tutoring System for Students with Learning Disabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mengping Tsuei

    2014-01-01

      The purpose of this study was to develop and explore the impact of a synchronous peer tutoring system, which integrated a structured peer tutoring strategy with technological advances, for students...

  16. Video demystified

    CERN Document Server

    Jack, Keith

    2004-01-01

    This international bestseller and essential reference is the "bible" for digital video engineers and programmers worldwide. This is by far the most informative analog and digital video reference available, includes the hottest new trends and cutting-edge developments in the field. Video Demystified, Fourth Edition is a "one stop" reference guide for the various digital video technologies. The fourth edition is completely updated with all new chapters on MPEG-4, H.264, SDTV/HDTV, ATSC/DVB, and Streaming Video (Video over DSL, Ethernet, etc.), as well as discussions of the latest standards throughout. The accompanying CD-ROM is updated to include a unique set of video test files in the newest formats. *This essential reference is the "bible" for digital video engineers and programmers worldwide *Contains all new chapters on MPEG-4, H.264, SDTV/HDTV, ATSC/DVB, and Streaming Video *Completely revised with all the latest and most up-to-date industry standards.

  17. An Intelligent Tutoring System Approach to Adaptive Instructional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Myers-Briggs Type Indicator ( MBTI ) defines sixteen different personality types through the use of four factors. The factors used by this model are...perceivers (Felder, 1996). Felder also describes some examples of students’ classifications and their associated learning blind spots. The MBTI usually...Keirsey Temperament Sorter is a test that is freely available online and is correlated with, but not a substitute for, the MBTI (Kiersey, 2000). Despite

  18. Tutorial Instruction in Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Miles

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to examine the tutorial practices of in-service teachers to address the underachievement in the science education of K-12 students. Method: In-service teachers in Virginia and North Carolina were given a survey questionnaire to examine how they tutored students who were in need of additional instruction. Results: When these teachers were asked, “How do you describe a typical one-on-one science tutorial session?” the majority of their responses were categorized as teacher-directed. Many of the teachers would provide a science tutorial session for a student after school for 16-30 minutes, one to three times a week. Respondents also indicated they would rely on technology, peer tutoring, scientific inquiry, or themselves for one-on-one science instruction. Over half of the in-service teachers that responded to the questionnaire stated that they would never rely on outside assistance, such as a family member or an after school program to provide tutorial services in science. Additionally, very few reported that they incorporated the ethnicity, culture, or the native language of ELL students into their science tutoring sessions.

  19. Design and development of physics simulations in the field of oscillations and waves suitable for k-12 and undergraduate instruction using video game technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomesh, Trevor; Price, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Using the scripting language for the Unreal Tournament 2004 Engine, Unreal Script, demonstrations in the field of oscillations and waves were designed and developed. Variations on Euler's method and the Runge-Kutta method were used to numerically solve the equations of motion for seven different physical systems which were visually represented in the immersive environment of Unreal Tournament 2004. Data from each system was written to an output file, plotted and analyzed. The over-arching goal of this research is to successfully design and develop useful teaching tools for the k-12 and undergraduate classroom which, presented in the form of a video game, is immersive, engaging and educational.

  20. Developmental Process Model for the Java Intelligent Tutoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Edward

    2007-01-01

    The Java Intelligent Tutoring System (JITS) was designed and developed to support the growing trend of Java programming around the world. JITS is an advanced web-based personalized tutoring system that is unique in several ways. Most programming Intelligent Tutoring Systems require the teacher to author problems with corresponding solutions. JITS,…

  1. Effectiveness of Intelligent Tutoring Systems: A Meta Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Michigan J. D. Fletcher Institute for Defense Analyses This review describes a meta- analysis of findings from 50 controlled evaluations of intelligent ...requirements for the meta- analysis : six evaluations with nonconventional control groups and four with flawed implementations of intelligent tutoring...hour of intelligent tutoring; the longest provided intelligent tutoring for three semesters, or 48 weeks. Overall Effects For our primary analysis , we

  2. A Training Model for Peer Tutoring with Mentally Retarded Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacc, Nicholas

    A program in which mentally retarded persons are trained to tutor their peers is described. Considered are selection and training aspects of such a program, and emphasized is the importance of the relationship between tutor and student. Tutors are explained to learn principles of establishing specific plans and keeping basic records. (CL)

  3. International Students as Peer Tutors: Is It Lawful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach-López, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Students enrolled in Principles of Accounting courses might require peer tutoring services. Accounting Departments (schools) can assist these students by maintaining a list of students offering tutoring services for a fee. The opportunity to be included in the list of tutors must be offered to all university students, both domestic and foreign.…

  4. Unpacking Corrections in Mobile Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lene; Broth, Mathias; Cromdal, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the organisation of correction in mobile instructional settings. Five sets of video data (>250 h) documenting how learners were instructed to fly aeroplanes, drive cars and ride bicycles in real life traffic were examined to reveal some common features of correction exchan...

  5. Distance Education Instructional Model Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of graduate students involved in distance education on North Dakota State University's Interactive Video Network included 80 on campus and 13 off. The instructional models rated most effective were role playing, simulation, jurisprudential (Socratic method), memorization, synectics, and inquiry. Direct instruction was rated least…

  6. Analysis of the Dynamics among Tutors in an After-School Tutoring Program in a Homeless Shelter for Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGillivray, Laurie; Goode, Gretchen S.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers of after-school tutoring primarily focus on educational outcomes with little attention to the social dynamics of such programs. In our qualitative case study, we examined the nature of interactions among tutors in a tutoring program at a homeless shelter for families. Employing Bourdieu's concepts of "social capital" and…

  7. Analysis of the Dynamics among Tutors in an After-School Tutoring Program in a Homeless Shelter for Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGillivray, Laurie; Goode, Gretchen S.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers of after-school tutoring primarily focus on educational outcomes with little attention to the social dynamics of such programs. In our qualitative case study, we examined the nature of interactions among tutors in a tutoring program at a homeless shelter for families. Employing Bourdieu's concepts of "social capital" and…

  8. Some Experiences with Two Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teaching Computer Programming: PROUST and the LISP-Tutor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merrienboer, J.; Maaswinkel, D.; van den Berg, Klaas; Pieters, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this article, we report on our experiences with PROUST and the LISP-Tutor, which are intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) for teaching introductory programming in respectively Pascal and LISP. After a brief discussion of the history of intelligent programming tutors, and the presentation of a

  9. The Impact of Ideology on the Interaction between Tutors and Students in the Education of Industrial Design: A Case Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hsi-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Shin

    2006-01-01

    This paper applies the concept of ideology to the field of design education. Specifically, this study explores the potential impact of ideology on the interaction between tutors and students involved in the education of industrial design in Taiwan. Particular emphasis is placed upon the instruction of the core curriculum. The present investigation…

  10. The Impact of Ideology on the Interaction between Tutors and Students in the Education of Industrial Design: A Case Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hsi-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Shin

    2006-01-01

    This paper applies the concept of ideology to the field of design education. Specifically, this study explores the potential impact of ideology on the interaction between tutors and students involved in the education of industrial design in Taiwan. Particular emphasis is placed upon the instruction of the core curriculum. The present investigation…

  11. A tutoring package to teach pronunciation of Mandarin Chinese characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hang; Miller, L Keith

    2007-01-01

    We examined the effects of a tutoring package (verbal modeling, prompts, and contingent praise/ Chinese conversations with the tutor) on the performance of a college student's Mandarin Chinese pronunciation. The effects of the tutoring package were analyzed using a multiple baseline design across two sets of 50 Chinese characters. The tutoring package produced improvement in the student's correct pronunciation of Chinese characters from 48% (pretutoring) to 90% (posttutoring). Results suggested that the tutoring package produced mastery pronunciation of targeted Mandarin Chinese vocalizations by a nonnative speaker.

  12. Artificial Video for Video Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of video analysis software and computer-generated animations for student activities. The use of artificial video affords the opportunity for students to study phenomena for which a real video may not be easy or even possible to procure, using analysis software with which the students are already familiar. We will…

  13. Pygmalion effects among outreach supervisors and tutors: extending sex generalizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natanovich, Gloria; Eden, Dov

    2008-11-01

    Students who supervised other students who tutored grade-school pupils in a university-based outreach program were randomly assigned to Pygmalion and control conditions. Experimental supervisors were told that their tutors were ideally qualified for their tutoring role; control supervisors were told nothing about their tutors' qualifications. A manipulation check revealed that the experimental supervisors expected more of their tutors. Analysis of variance of tutorial success measures confirmed the Pygmalion effect among supervisors of both sexes. No main effect or interaction involving either supervisor sex or tutor sex was significant. As predicted, the experimental supervisors also provided better leadership and the experimental tutors increased their self-efficacy. This was the first demonstration of the Pygmalion effect among women leading men. Pygmalion effects may be produced without regard for sex.

  14. Challenges facing PBL tutors: 12 tips for successful group facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Samy A

    2005-12-01

    One of the main tasks of a problem-based learning (PBL) tutor is to facilitate group discussion. Group facilitation is about process rather than content. In this process, a tutor helps the group increase their skills and progress in their discussion. Several studies have highlighted strategies and training used in preparing PBL tutors. However, PBL tutors usually feel that it is not that easy to change their teaching style to the PBL format. They are sometimes unsure about their role or what strategy they might use to facilitate their students' discussion. This article in the '12 Tips' series is a detailed description of, and provides answers to, common challenges faced by PBL tutors. The tips provided in this manuscript should help tutors with practical answers. The article may be useful to PBL tutors, medical and health educators and those responsible for PBL training workshops.

  15. The effect of peer tutoring on interaction behaviors in inclusive physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavina, Aija; Block, Martin E

    2008-04-01

    This study assessed the effect of peer tutoring on physical, instructional, and social interaction behaviors between elementary school age students with severe and multiple disabilities (SMD) and peers without disabilities. Additional measures addressed the activity time of students with SMD. The study was conducted in inclusive general physical education settings under three instructional support conditions for students with SMD: (a) teacher-directed, (b) peer-mediated, and (c) voluntary peer support. During peer-mediated and voluntary peer support conditions, the instructional and physical interaction behaviors between students with SMD and their peers increased, while social interactions remained low. The activity engagement time data increased for all target students throughout intervention sessions. Interactions between students with SMD and teachers decreased toward the end of intervention.

  16. Video Games as Tillers of Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Video games are pervasive in today's culture, and the time kids spend playing them may seem, from a teacher's perspective, as time that is lost to education. Sometimes, sadly, this is true. But many good video games, although not explicitly educational in focus, provide powerful experiences that are rich fodder for subsequent instruction. Looking…

  17. Linking Video Conferencing to the Desktop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ronald; Gillan, Robert

    Video conferencing for use in education has included the development of expensive yet sophisticated technology capable of delivering quality instruction to multiple sites. Limitations arise from using a closed network; factors such as cost to establish and operate the network with video compression or satellite technology can potentially affect…

  18. An Intelligent Tutoring System for Conceptual Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschetti, Donald R.

    2007-11-01

    AutoTutor is an intelligent tutoring system (ITS) in which students can learn a variety of subjects through conversation in natural language with a software agent. The agent appears as a face on the screen, with a synthesized voice, and responds to typed input from the student. Student understanding is modeled from student responses, which are matched to high quality essay responses and known misconceptions and bad answers using one of several computational linguistic techniques. With ONR and NSF support a version of AutoTutor covering Newtonian dynamics at the level of Hewitt's Conceptual Physics has been developed and extensively tested. As a byproduct of this work, several thousand student responses to a small number of conceptual physics questions have been collated and mined for misconceptions. Recent work has allowed a comparison of latent semantic analysis and inverse word frequency measures of text match with expert answers. Some results from this process will be presented along with a demonstration of AutoTutor-Physics at work.

  19. Professionalizing tutors and tutorials in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colunga, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the necessity of professionalizing training of university teachers performing tutorial activities in higher education as a response to the demands of pupils following a part-time model. Permanent training of tutor is emphasized as a way to enhance professional and personal accomplishments. This training gives priority to educative orientation and interventional actions.

  20. Intelligent tutoring agent for settlers of Catan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuze, Jeroen; Broek, van den Egon L.; Schobbens, P.-Y.; Vanhoof, W.; Schwanen, G.

    2006-01-01

    An Intelligent Tutoring Agent (ITA) for the board game Settlers of Catan (SoC) is introduced. It uses CLIPS knowledge bases, connected by JCLIPS to a JAVA implementation of SoC. It is founded on a new theoretical framework that describes the development of negotiation skills in children. Using this

  1. Evaluation Methods for Intelligent Tutoring Systems Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Jim; Mark, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The 1993 paper in "IJAIED" on evaluation methods for Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) still holds up well today. Basic evaluation techniques described in that paper remain in use. Approaches such as kappa scores, simulated learners and learning curves are refinements on past evaluation techniques. New approaches have also arisen, in…

  2. Does Artificial Tutoring Foster Inquiry Based Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoelz, Alexander; Swertz, Christian; Forstner, Alexandra; Barberi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    This contribution looks at the Intelligent Tutoring Interface for Technology Enhanced Learning, which integrates multistage-learning and inquiry-based learning in an adaptive e-learning system. Based on a common pedagogical ontology, adaptive e-learning systems can be enabled to recommend learning objects and activities, which follow inquiry-based…

  3. Improving the Efficiency of Dialogue in Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Kristopher J.; Britt, M. Anne; Millis, Keith; Graesser, Arthur C.

    2012-01-01

    The current studies investigated the efficient use of dialogue in intelligent tutoring systems that use natural language interaction. Such dialogues can be relatively time-consuming. This work addresses the question of how much dialogue is needed to produce significant learning gains. In Experiment 1, a full dialogue condition and a read-only…

  4. A Review of BioTutor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhrkopf, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A review of BioTutor which is software to accompany the third edition of Neil Campbell's textbook, "Biology," is provided. The review includes a brief description of the software and a discussion of good and bad features of the software. In the closing words, the reviewer expresses a considerable amount of concern regarding the quality of this…

  5. Learning Software Component Model for Online Tutoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Duraiswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Web services are interface elements which allow applications to render functional services to requesting clients using open standard protocols. A lecture method combines both social association and urban processing as course design and delivery is termed as Interface Learning. Many Interface learning services is presenting through online. To make an online tutoring scheme more effective, the previous study used web services and application programs like instant messaging based on environments in which students reside. But the downside is that it is difficult to maintain the service request queues online. The services and data storage processes are inefficient. Approach: To overcome all the above issues, a Learning Software Component Model (LSCM framework is formed in the present study to build a component model based on communication services available on the network. In addition to this, the proposed software component modeled with Learning Object (LO aspects integrates the related sub hierarchical components with the main component object framework. Based on LSCM, training schedules are identified efficiently. Results: The proposed LSCM framework is experimented to show the performance improvement with the previous online tutoring scheme based on web services in terms of delivery report, maintenance of tutoring sessions and reliability. Conclusion: Compared to an existing online tutoring through web services, the proposed LSCM framework performance is 75% better in providing learning services to the providers.

  6. Immersive video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moezzi, Saied; Katkere, Arun L.; Jain, Ramesh C.

    1996-03-01

    Interactive video and television viewers should have the power to control their viewing position. To make this a reality, we introduce the concept of Immersive Video, which employs computer vision and computer graphics technologies to provide remote users a sense of complete immersion when viewing an event. Immersive Video uses multiple videos of an event, captured from different perspectives, to generate a full 3D digital video of that event. That is accomplished by assimilating important information from each video stream into a comprehensive, dynamic, 3D model of the environment. Using this 3D digital video, interactive viewers can then move around the remote environment and observe the events taking place from any desired perspective. Our Immersive Video System currently provides interactive viewing and `walkthrus' of staged karate demonstrations, basketball games, dance performances, and typical campus scenes. In its full realization, Immersive Video will be a paradigm shift in visual communication which will revolutionize television and video media, and become an integral part of future telepresence and virtual reality systems.

  7. Peer Tutors in the School of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado Vegap

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 2003 the School of Medicine at theUniversidad del Rosario in Bogotá, Colombia,offers to the students a program named PeerTutors. The program’s objectives are: to generatea social interaction mechanism that favorsknowledge construction side by side withadvanced peers; to promote the development ofRecibido:Aceptado:* M.D., MSc (est.. Profesor Asistente de Cirugía. Coordinadordel Grupo de Investigación en Educación Médica.Universidad del Rosario. anisaza@urosario.edu.co** M.D. Coordinador de Tutores Pares, I semestre de2003. Universidad del Rosario.+ M.D. Coordinadora de Tutores Pares, II semestre de2003. Universidad del Rosario.+ M.D. Coordinadora de Tutores Pares, 2004. Universidaddel Rosario.§ M.D. Coordinadora de Tutores Pares, I semestre de2005. Universidad del RosarioDescargos de responsabilidad: Las ideas expuestasen el presente artículo son responsabilidad exclusivade los autores y no comprometen a ninguna institución.Disclaimer: the ideas expressed in this article areexclusively the author’s responsibility and do notcompromise any institution.Artículo originalethical, moral and coexistence oriented valuesthrough an academic experience, and to generatea space to explore specific academic interests andteacher´s potential. This article presents thetheoretic frame that supports the importance ofsocial interaction in knowledge construction, aswell as some indicators that allow a first appraisalof the program. Several achievements thataccount for the synergic value of an experiencethat not only fulfills the function of initiating aprocess of teaching formation and academicsupport, but that also builds a proactive attitudebefore learning, are highlighted.

  8. An innovative blended learning approach using virtual patients as preparation for skills laboratory training: perceptions of students and tutors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Ronny; Bosse, Hans Martin; Simon, Anke; Nikendei, Christoph; Huwendiek, Sören

    2013-02-12

    Currently only a few reports exist on how to prepare medical students for skills laboratory training. We investigated how students and tutors perceive a blended learning approach using virtual patients (VPs) as preparation for skills training. Fifth-year medical students (N=617) were invited to voluntarily participate in a paediatric skills laboratory with four specially designed VPs as preparation. The cases focused on procedures in the laboratory using interactive questions, static and interactive images, and video clips. All students were asked to assess the VP design. After participating in the skills laboratory 310 of the 617 students were additionally asked to assess the blended learning approach through established questionnaires. Tutors' perceptions (N=9) were assessed by semi-structured interviews. From the 617 students 1,459 VP design questionnaires were returned (59.1%). Of the 310 students 213 chose to participate in the skills laboratory; 179 blended learning questionnaires were returned (84.0%). Students provided high overall acceptance ratings of the VP design and blended learning approach. By using VPs as preparation, skills laboratory time was felt to be used more effectively. Tutors perceived students as being well prepared for the skills laboratory with efficient uses of time. The overall acceptance of the blended learning approach was high among students and tutors. VPs proved to be a convenient cognitive preparation tool for skills training.

  9. Peer-tutoring educational experiences about meteorological and climatological issues in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordio, Sergio; Flapp, Federica

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work is to present some experiences of intergenerational education about meteorology and climatology issues carried out with school pupils from 6 to 19 years old, through peer-tutoring methodology. These experiences started in 2003 and each year the project involves about 500 students in Friuli Venezia Giulia region (about 8.000 km2) in northeastern Italy. A group of volunteers (older students from upper secondary school, 17-19 years old) play the role of "tutor": they receive supplementary training on meteorology and climatology, and then, during students' meetings and/or public events, they teach younger pupils how to use meteorological instruments (thermometer, hygrometer, barometer, anemometer, rain gages, etc.) and they carry out interactive experiences such as "game-experiments", to better understand some meteorological concepts, like density of fluids, and some climatological notions, like the effects of climate change with an exhibit that simulates the greenhouse effect. They also do some meteorological forecasting exercises, using meteorological maps, as if they were actual forecasters. All these activities are addressed to pupils from primary (age 6-11) and lower secondary schools (age 11-14), and both tutors and their younger "apprentices" are not only cognitively, but also emotionally involved in such learning experiences. As a second step of this educational process, after consolidating the above mentioned peer-tutoring activities, high school students hare being actively involved in developing visual tools - e.g. video-clips, interviews and cartoons - in order to communicate climate change issues in the most effective way to younger pupils. Keywords: meteorology, climatology, climate change, schools, education, communication.

  10. Method and Tools for Development of Advanced Instructional Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arend, J. van der; Riemersma, J.B.J.

    1994-01-01

    The application of advanced instructional systems (AISs), like computer-based training systems, intelligent tutoring systems and training simulators, is widely spread within the Royal Netherlands Army. As a consequence there is a growing interest in methods and tools to develop effective and

  11. The Cognitive Transfer and the Tutor's Role in a CBL Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasis KAROULIS

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on a longitudinal study of a Leonardo da Vinci program regarding the application of a Computer Based Learning environment in three EU countries, Greece, Germany, and Holland. The `` Orestis''CD-ROM was a multimedia CBL environment aimed at teaching young offenders the basic and advanced skills for the use and maintenance of a photo-copy shop. The complete project consisted of three phases: construction of the CD-ROM, application of the instructional methodology in the participating countries and evaluation of the outcome. In this paper we firstly clarify the notion of CBL environments, in comparison to multimedia and distance learning ones, and then we provide some theoretical background on these environments. The main research question we tried to answer was whether the application of the environment under real circumstances could perform adequately without the presence of a domain expert as a ``teacher'', but rely on a ``tutor'' who had five main tasks to perform during the instructional phase, as described in the paper. In order to answer this question, we designed and constructed the aforementioned integrated CBL environment and, in addition to this, an instructional methodology in order to apply it effectivelly in the participating countries. The application of the environment by the partners showed our hypothesis about the tutor to be correct, moreover we elicited results about the different user groups that worked with the environment and their performance under different circumstances. We studied also the combination of CBL training and real practice in real environments, among some other issues concerning the application of CBL environments in general, and we provide some statistical facts as observed and reported during the two pilot studies and the five applications of the environment in the three participating European countries. We conclude by arguing that the tutor, as described in this paper, performs more

  12. Effectiveness of Video Modeling Provided by Mothers in Teaching Play Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besler, Fatma; Kurt, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Video modeling is an evidence-based practice that can be used to provide instruction to individuals with autism. Studies show that this instructional practice is effective in teaching many types of skills such as self-help skills, social skills, and academic skills. However, in previous studies, videos used in the video modeling process were…

  13. A Case Study for Teaching Quantitative Biochemical Buffer Problems Using Group Work and "Khan Style" Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Jose; Reilly, John; Brown, David; Frost. Laura; Coticone, Sulekha Rao; Dubetz, Terry Ann; Beharry, Zanna; Davis-McGibony, C. Michele; Ramoutar, Ria; Rudd, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    New technological developments have minimized training, hardware expense, and distribution problems for the production and use of instructional videos, and any science instructor can now make instructional videos for their classes. We created short "Khan style" videos for the topic of buffers in biochemistry and assigned them as…

  14. A Case Study for Teaching Quantitative Biochemical Buffer Problems Using Group Work and "Khan Style" Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Jose; Reilly, John; Brown, David; Frost. Laura; Coticone, Sulekha Rao; Dubetz, Terry Ann; Beharry, Zanna; Davis-McGibony, C. Michele; Ramoutar, Ria; Rudd, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    New technological developments have minimized training, hardware expense, and distribution problems for the production and use of instructional videos, and any science instructor can now make instructional videos for their classes. We created short "Khan style" videos for the topic of buffers in biochemistry and assigned them as…

  15. PC Tutor. Bericht uber ein PC-gestutzes Tutorensystem = PC Tutor. Report on a Tutoring System with Personal Computer. ZIFF Papiere 75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Helmut

    A project was conducted to increase as well as to professionalize communication between tutors and learners in a West German university's distance education program by the use of personal computers. Two tutors worked on the systematic development of a PC-based correcting system. The goal, apart from developing general language skills in English,…

  16. Creating and Editing Video to Accompany Manuscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Shayna L; Porto, Dennis A; Ozog, David M; Council, M Laurin

    2016-02-01

    The use of video can enhance the learning experience by demonstrating procedural techniques that are difficult to relay in writing. Several peer-reviewed journals allow publication of videos alongside articles to complement the written text. The purpose of this article is to instruct the dermatologic surgeon on how to create and edit a video using a smartphone, to accompany a article. The authors describe simple tips to optimize surgical videography. The video that accompanies this article further demonstrates the techniques described. Creating a surgical video requires little experience or equipment and can be completed in a modest amount of time. Making and editing a video to accompany a article can be accomplished by following the simple recommendations in this article. In addition, the increased use of video in dermatologic surgery education can enhance the learning opportunity.

  17. Peer Tutoring: Developing Writing in College Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIS BERNARDO PEÑA-BORRERO

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents partial results of a qualitative research on the Project of Inquiry (PRIN that takes place in the Psychology Degree Program at Javeriana University. This project is a formative experience focused on the importance of learning investigative abilities, through academic writing. The research was based on peer-tutoring interactions with 85 ethnographic records, which were subjected to an open and axial codification, in accordance to guidelines developed by Strauss and Corbin. The recordswere organized in emerging categories for their interpretation, in order to establish the potential significance of the pedagogic interaction. The results established the advantages of peer-tutoring in the integral progress of students and specifically the promotion of reading and writing abilities at a College level.

  18. "It's a Bit Like Star Trek": The Effectiveness of Video Conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carville, Sheelagh; Mitchell, Denise R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an evaluation of the effectiveness of video conferencing as a teaching and learning medium in early childhood studies, based on experiences at Stranmillis University College (Northern Ireland) with women who are new to higher education and live in a disadvantaged area. Discusses interactivity, tutor responses, and student responses.…

  19. Cybermentoring: Evolving High-End Video Conferencing Practices to Support Preservice Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Todd E.; Maring, Gerald H.; Doty, John H.; Fickle, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This article is a descriptive study of an evolving cybermentoring videoconferencing practice and tool developed to support preservice teacher training. Cybermentoring projects are synchronous distance learning collaborations using high-end video conferencing to foster interactive learning and tutoring among preservice teachers and K-12 students,…

  20. Case-Based Tutoring with Concept Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Sørmo, Frode

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to investigate methods for computerized tutoring support that is adapted to the individual student. In particular, we are concerned with providing such assistance to students solving exercises in domains where a complete or accurate problem-solving model is infeasible. We propose to do this by using concept maps as a means for students to model their own knowledge. Combined with results from earlier exercises, the concept map can form a student model that can be use...

  1. Intelligent tutoring agent for settlers of Catan

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    An Intelligent Tutoring Agent (ITA) for the board game Settlers of Catan (SoC) is introduced. It uses CLIPS knowledge bases, connected by JCLIPS to a JAVA implementation of SoC. It is founded on a new theoretical framework that describes the development of negotiation skills in children. Using this framework, the ITA helps children in developing negotiation skills through play, which makes it unique in its kind.

  2. Learning Software Component Model for Online Tutoring

    OpenAIRE

    Duraiswamy, K.; Balakrishnan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Web services are interface elements which allow applications to render functional services to requesting clients using open standard protocols. A lecture method combines both social association and urban processing as course design and delivery is termed as Interface Learning. Many Interface learning services is presenting through online. To make an online tutoring scheme more effective, the previous study used web services and application programs like instant messaging ba...

  3. Using Video Modeling and Video Prompting to Teach Core Academic Content to Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellems, Ryan O.; Edwards, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners are constantly searching for evidence-based practices that are effective in teaching academic skills to students with learning disabilities (LD). Video modeling (VM) and video prompting have become popular instructional interventions for many students across a wide range of different disability classifications, including those with…

  4. Using Video Modeling and Video Prompting to Teach Core Academic Content to Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellems, Ryan O.; Edwards, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners are constantly searching for evidence-based practices that are effective in teaching academic skills to students with learning disabilities (LD). Video modeling (VM) and video prompting have become popular instructional interventions for many students across a wide range of different disability classifications, including those with…

  5. Making Sense of Video Analytics: Lessons Learned from Clickstream Interactions, Attitudes, and Learning Outcome in a Video-Assisted Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail N. Giannakos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Online video lectures have been considered an instructional media for various pedagogic approaches, such as the flipped classroom and open online courses. In comparison to other instructional media, online video affords the opportunity for recording student clickstream patterns within a video lecture. Video analytics within lecture videos may provide insights into student learning performance and inform the improvement of video-assisted teaching tactics. Nevertheless, video analytics are not accessible to learning stakeholders, such as researchers and educators, mainly because online video platforms do not broadly share the interactions of the users with their systems. For this purpose, we have designed an open-access video analytics system for use in a video-assisted course. In this paper, we present a longitudinal study, which provides valuable insights through the lens of the collected video analytics. In particular, we found that there is a relationship between video navigation (repeated views and the level of cognition/thinking required for a specific video segment. Our results indicated that learning performance progress was slightly improved and stabilized after the third week of the video-assisted course. We also found that attitudes regarding easiness, usability, usefulness, and acceptance of this type of course remained at the same levels throughout the course. Finally, we triangulate analytics from diverse sources, discuss them, and provide the lessons learned for further development and refinement of video-assisted courses and practices.

  6. The influence of tutor training for peer tutors in the dissection course on the learning behavior of students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, T; Hirt, B; Lammerding-Koeppel, M

    2016-11-01

    Student tutors in the dissection course are expected to meet high demands in their job, to fulfill these expectations they receive training. Combined tutor training is well accepted by tutors and tutees, however, it is not known how tutor training influences student learning. Deduced from the learning goals of the tutor training, a randomized, controlled, single-blinded study was set up with a quantitative cross-sectional analysis to compare student learning behavior. A total of 197 medical students, coached either by ten trained or ten untrained tutors, were enlisted in the study. To assess the students' learning behavior we employed the LIST questionnaire. A common factor analysis was calculated to extract dimensions. Factor scores of the extracted dimensions were calculated for both groups to estimate differences in learning behavior. Factor analysis of the LIST questionnaire revealed eight factors explaining 47.57% of the overall variance. The eight factors comprise: deep learning, attention, learning organization, cooperative learning, time management, learning effort, superficial learning and learning environment. Comparing the factor scores of the extracted dimensions, students coached by trained tutors learned significantly more with their fellow students (factor score in cooperative learning 0.194 vs. -0.205, ptrained by untrained tutors. Students coached by trained tutors also tend to be better organized in their learning (factor score in learning organization 0.115 vs. -0.122, p=0.16). The learning behavior of students coached by trained tutors differs from the learning behavior of students coached by untrained tutors. Students coached by trained tutors learn significantly more often in teams than their colleagues and are better organized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effects of ExcelTutor Software Desing an Intelligent Tutoring Sysytem on Learning

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of ExcelTUTOR drill software on achievement of students, which was design as computer based intelligent tutoring system, developed by the researcher. In this study, pretest- post test with control group, which is one of the experimental research designs, was used. The experimental and control groups of the study were composed of 20 students for each group, totally 40 students who went to Gazi University, Kırşehir Faculty of Education, Social...

  8. Developing Instructional Videotapes Step by Step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the eight steps in developing an instructional videotape: planning, brainstorming content, sequencing the storyline, defining the treatment, developing the introduction and conclusion, scripting the video and audio, controlling the production, and specifying the postproduction. (DMM)

  9. Using Video-Based Modeling to Promote Acquisition of Fundamental Motor Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrusnikova, Iva; Rattigan, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Video-based modeling is becoming increasingly popular for teaching fundamental motor skills to children in physical education. Two frequently used video-based instructional strategies that incorporate modeling are video prompting (VP) and video modeling (VM). Both strategies have been used across multiple disciplines and populations to teach a…

  10. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    As noted in part I of this article (published in "TechTrends 54"(3)), advances in technology continue to outpace research on the design and effectiveness of instructional (digital video) games. In general, instructional designers know little about game development, commercial video game developers know little about training, education and…

  11. What Do Distance Language Tutors Say about Teacher Motivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Research into motivation in education mainly centres on students' learning motivation. This article reports on an interview study of teacher motivation with the aim of investigating the effects of student-related factors and tutors' personal factors on the motivation of language tutors in the distance learning context. Findings from the study…

  12. Corruption Risks of Private Tutoring: Case of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobakhidze, Magda Nutsa

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on teacher-supplied private tutoring in the context of post-Soviet Georgia, and elucidates the ways in which teacher-supplied private tutoring can be related to educational corruption. The paper draws on data from in-depth interviews of 18 school teachers in different parts of Georgia in 2013. The findings of the qualitative…

  13. Effectiveness of Intelligent Tutoring Systems: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, James A.; Fletcher, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    This review describes a meta-analysis of findings from 50 controlled evaluations of intelligent computer tutoring systems. The median effect of intelligent tutoring in the 50 evaluations was to raise test scores 0.66 standard deviations over conventional levels, or from the 50th to the 75th percentile. However, the amount of improvement found in…

  14. What Do Distance Language Tutors Say about Teacher Motivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Research into motivation in education mainly centres on students' learning motivation. This article reports on an interview study of teacher motivation with the aim of investigating the effects of student-related factors and tutors' personal factors on the motivation of language tutors in the distance learning context. Findings from the…

  15. Household Expenditures on Private Tutoring: Emerging Evidence from Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring has been a burgeoning phenomenon in Malaysia for decades. This study examines the determinants of private tutoring expenditures in Malaysia using the 2004/2005 Household Expenditures Survey and applies hurdle regression models to the data. The results indicate that total household expenditures, household head's level of…

  16. Corruption Risks of Private Tutoring: Case of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobakhidze, Magda Nutsa

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on teacher-supplied private tutoring in the context of post-Soviet Georgia, and elucidates the ways in which teacher-supplied private tutoring can be related to educational corruption. The paper draws on data from in-depth interviews of 18 school teachers in different parts of Georgia in 2013. The findings of the qualitative…

  17. Stepwise Advice Negotiation in Writing Center Peer Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Innhwa

    2014-01-01

    While the delivery and reception of advice is a practice integral to a wide range of settings, little attention has been given to the detailed practices of advice resistance and how it leads to advice negotiation. Based on 7 hours of videotaped tutoring interactions among 6 tutors and 11 tutees, this conversation analytic study examines the…

  18. Implementing CBM: SQL-Tutor after Fifteen Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Antonija; Ohlsson, Stellan

    2016-01-01

    SQL-Tutor is the first constraint-based tutor. The initial conference papers about the system were published in 1998 (Mitrovic 1998a, 1998b, 1998c), with an "IJAIED" paper published in 1999 (Mitrovic and Ohlsson, "International Journal Artificial Intelligence in Education," 10(3-4), 238-256, 1999). We published another…

  19. Learners' Experiences of Peer Tutoring in the Context of Outdoor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Learners' Experiences of Peer Tutoring in the Context of Outdoor Learning: The ... its effectiveness in promoting learning in large class sizes which characterise ... 104 Class 6 learners as tutors, 86 Class 2 learners as tutees, and 8 teachers as ...

  20. Private Tutoring through the Internet: Globalization and "Offshoring"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Alexandre; Jang, Sunhwa

    2010-01-01

    The private tutoring industry has come forward as the third great sector of education. The common sense representation about private tutoring is changing. The growing search for supplementary educational support services and the technological innovation have created a new paradigm. This paper focuses on one of the most interesting faces of this…

  1. Household Expenditures on Private Tutoring: Emerging Evidence from Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring has been a burgeoning phenomenon in Malaysia for decades. This study examines the determinants of private tutoring expenditures in Malaysia using the 2004/2005 Household Expenditures Survey and applies hurdle regression models to the data. The results indicate that total household expenditures, household head's level of education,…

  2. Conceptual Tutoring Software for Promoting Deep Learning: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Angela; Hattingh, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a case study of the use of conceptual tutoring software to promote deep learning of the scientific concept of density among 50 final year pre-service student teachers in a natural sciences course in a South African university. Individually-paced electronic tutoring is potentially an effective way of meeting the students' varied…

  3. Household Expenditures on Private Tutoring: Emerging Evidence from Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring has been a burgeoning phenomenon in Malaysia for decades. This study examines the determinants of private tutoring expenditures in Malaysia using the 2004/2005 Household Expenditures Survey and applies hurdle regression models to the data. The results indicate that total household expenditures, household head's level of education,…

  4. A Hypermedia Computer-Aided Parasitology Tutoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoropoulos, Georgios; Loumos, Vassili

    A hypermedia tutoring system for teaching parasitology to college students was developed using an object oriented software development tool, Knowledge Pro. The program was designed to meet four objectives: knowledge incorporation, tutoring, indexing of key words for Boolean search, and random generation of quiz questions with instant scoring. The…

  5. What Are Tutors' Experiences with Online Teaching? A Phenomenographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Cvetanka

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks an understanding of how tutors perceived the online part of a blended learning course in the context of teaching English as a foreign language at a German university. To gain knowledge about the ways in which the tutors experienced the phenomenon, a phenomenographic methodological framework was employed. Identified were four…

  6. Teaching Database Design with Constraint-Based Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Antonija; Suraweera, Pramuditha

    2016-01-01

    Design tasks are difficult to teach, due to large, unstructured solution spaces, underspecified problems, non-existent problem solving algorithms and stopping criteria. In this paper, we comment on our approach to develop KERMIT, a constraint-based tutor that taught database design. In later work, we re-implemented KERMIT as EER-Tutor, and…

  7. Going Blended: New Challenges for Second Generation L2 Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Elke; Tea, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This study explores how second generation tutors within blended learning courses link the face-to-face and online course modalities--in their representations as well as through their pedagogical activities--and which aspects help them to feel involved in the course. The methodology used is a qualitative analysis of interviews with seven tutors of…

  8. Conceptual Tutoring Software for Promoting Deep Learning: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Angela; Hattingh, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a case study of the use of conceptual tutoring software to promote deep learning of the scientific concept of density among 50 final year pre-service student teachers in a natural sciences course in a South African university. Individually-paced electronic tutoring is potentially an effective way of meeting the students' varied…

  9. Federal Law Spurs Private Companies to Market Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Karla Scoon

    2004-01-01

    For-profit education companies are ramping up their businesses to tap into millions of federal dollars set aside to provide tutoring for students attending struggling schools. Under the federal No Child Left Behind Act, Title I schools that fail to reach state achievement goals three years in a row are required to offer free tutoring to students…

  10. Relationships with undergraduate nursing exchange students--a tutor perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2003-03-01

    Student exchange has been used increasingly in nursing education throughout Europe as a method of learning intercultural sensitivity. In the host country, each foreign student is assigned a personal tutor to enhance learning. The aim of this study was to describe tutor-student relationships between Finnish nurse teachers and British exchange students from the tutors' perspective. The researcher's close relationship with the study context and participants caused some ethical concerns, which will be discussed. The data consisted of tutorial session observations, research diary notes, group interviews and background questionnaires. They were analysed using Spradley's developmental research sequence method for ethnographic data. The tutoring relationship was pastoral and clinical rather than academic. The pastoral aspect of the relationship was essential in assisting the students to adjust to the stress of studying in a foreign country. On the other hand, tutors were unable to support all the students to overcome their culture shock. Tutors were uncertain about their role and did not integrate Finnish culture or practice into theory, but found their role pleasant. A dialogic tutor-student relationship is important for learning intercultural sensitivity. Tutoring strategies should be developed to assist students' adjustment to the differences in the host culture and to encourage their reflection on personal, experiential and scientific cultural knowledge during their study abroad.

  11. What Do Distance Language Tutors Say about Teacher Motivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Research into motivation in education mainly centres on students' learning motivation. This article reports on an interview study of teacher motivation with the aim of investigating the effects of student-related factors and tutors' personal factors on the motivation of language tutors in the distance learning context. Findings from the study…

  12. Federal Law Spurs Private Companies to Market Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Karla Scoon

    2004-01-01

    For-profit education companies are ramping up their businesses to tap into millions of federal dollars set aside to provide tutoring for students attending struggling schools. Under the federal No Child Left Behind Act, Title I schools that fail to reach state achievement goals three years in a row are required to offer free tutoring to students…

  13. Affective feedback in a tutoring system for procedural tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heylen, D.K.J.; Vissers, M.; Akker, op den H.J.A.; Nijholt, A.; André, E.; Dybkjaer, L.; Minker, W.; Heisterkamp, P.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the affective aspects of tutoring dialogues in an ITS -called INES- that helps students to practice nursing tasks using a haptic device and a virtual environment. Special attention is paid to affective control in the tutoring process by means of selecting the appropriate feedback, taking

  14. 39 Peer tutors as learning and teaching partners: a cumulative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peer tutors in higher education are frequently given vital teaching and ... with knowledge and learning, the role of peer tutors needs to be recognised .... able to break down difficult concepts, unpack and explain dense knowledge clearly, and ..... of the issues you have noticed in students' writing - some of the common ...

  15. Peer Tutoring Effects on Omani Students' English Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrajhi, Marwa N.; Aldhafri, Said S.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the social cognitive learning theory (1997), peer learning can be viewed as an effective way of enhancing learning. In this study, peer tutoring, a form of peer learning, was examined. The current study investigated the influence of a peer tutoring program implemented at Sultan Qaboos University on students' English self-concept. 125…

  16. Peer Tutoring in the CIS Sandbox: Does It Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenberg, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a student-created and facilitated peer-tutoring activity to assist first-year students in preparing for their final exam in an introductory information technology course. Tutors at the CIS Sandbox, a collaborative learning lab at an American university, offered a series of "Crunch Sessions" to their peers. This…

  17. Expertise in Swiss mathematics instruction

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This chapter draws on data and findings from several video studies to describe the quality of mathematics teaching in Switzerland. The focus is on features of instructional practice and quality as core components of classroom behavior that reflect the teacher’s expertise in creating optimal learning opportunities. The didactic triangle is used as the basis for describing the profile of expertise in Swiss mathematics instruction in terms of three interdependent dimensions of ins...

  18. Tutors' Influence on Distance Language Students' Learning Motivation: Voices from Learners and Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junhong

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' influence on students' learning motivation is a well-researched topic. Nevertheless, the majority of such studies are situated in the conventional learning context despite the rapid growth of distance language learning. This study set out to investigate tutors' influence on students' learning motivation in the Chinese distance language…

  19. The INTELLIGENT RuleTutor: A Structured Approach to Intelligent Tutoring. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandura, Alice B.

    This final report describes a general purpose system for developing intelligent tutors based on the Structural Learning Theory. The report opens with a discussion of the rules and related constructs that underlie cognitive constructs in all structural learning theories. The remainder of the text provides: (1) an introduction to the Structural…

  20. Tutors' Influence on Distance Language Students' Learning Motivation: Voices from Learners and Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junhong

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' influence on students' learning motivation is a well-researched topic. Nevertheless, the majority of such studies are situated in the conventional learning context despite the rapid growth of distance language learning. This study set out to investigate tutors' influence on students' learning motivation in the Chinese distance language…

  1. The Effects of ExcelTutor Software Desing an Intelligent Tutoring Sysytem on Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan KAYA

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of ExcelTUTOR drill software on achievement of students, which was design as computer based intelligent tutoring system, developed by the researcher. In this study, pretest- post test with control group, which is one of the experimental research designs, was used. The experimental and control groups of the study were composed of 20 students for each group, totally 40 students who went to Gazi University, Kırşehir Faculty of Education, Social Sciences Teaching Program in 2004-2005 term and they attended “Using Computer in Social Sciences” selective course. Experimental and control group students were chosen randomly. To collect the data, two tests were developed by the researcher. One of the tests was named pre-test and the other was called as post-test. Both of which included 25 multiple choice questions. While testing the hypotheses, one way variance analysis and covariance were used. The analysis was done at 0.05 significance level. As a result, ExcelTUTOR drill software design as computer based intelligent tutoring system was found contributing to learning.

  2. Instructable autonomous agents. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Scott Bradley

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to current intelligent systems, which must be laboriously programmed for each task they are meant to perform, instructable agents can be taught new tasks and associated knowledge. This thesis presents a general theory of learning from tutorial instruction and its use to produce an instructable agent. Tutorial instruction is a particularly powerful form of instruction, because it allows the instructor to communicate whatever kind of knowledge a student needs at whatever point it is needed. To exploit this broad flexibility, however, a tutorable agent must support a full range of interaction with its instructor to learn a full range of knowledge. Thus, unlike most machine learning tasks, which target deep learning of a single kind of knowledge from a single kind of input, tutorability requires a breadth of learning from a broad range of instructional interactions. The theory of learning from tutorial instruction presented here has two parts. First, a computational model of an intelligent agent, the problem space computational model, indicates the types of knowledge that determine an agent's performance, and thus, that should be acquirable via instruction. Second, a learning technique, called situated explanation specifies how the agent learns general knowledge from instruction. The theory is embodied by an implemented agent, Instructo-Soar, built within the Soar architecture. Instructo-Soar is able to learn hierarchies of completely new tasks, to extend task knowledge to apply in new situations, and in fact to acquire every type of knowledge it uses during task performance - control knowledge, knowledge of operators' effects, state inferences, etc. - from interactive natural language instructions. This variety of learning occurs by applying the situated explanation technique to a variety of instructional interactions involving a variety of types of instructions (commands, statements, conditionals, etc.). By taking seriously the requirements of flexible

  3. EFEKTIVITAS PEMBELAJARAN TUTOR SEBAYA DALAM PEMBELAJARAN AKUNTANSI BIAYA I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Nurkhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of bilingual classroom was the manifestation of internationalization vision of the institution (Unnes to response to the progress of International Schools (SBI / RSBI. Cost Accounting I was a subject in bilingual class of FE Unnes in 2010/2011. The objective of the study was to explain the effectiveness of peer tutor learning method in Cost Accounting I in Bilingual Class. It was a class action research done in 2 months with 2 cycles. The type of peer tutor learning was tutor to student. The result of research showed that peer tutor learning method of Cost Accounting I in Bilingual Class of FE Unnes was effective. Students’ achievement increased significantly in the first and second cycle. It passes the effectiveness indicator which stated that at least 75% students could get 71. Thus, it is suggested that other types of peer tutor learning method can be investigated empirically for further researches in different designs.

  4. The role of a PBL tutor: a personal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Li Chong

    2008-03-01

    Based on my experience as a PBL tutor in the Faculty of Medicine since 1997, it is clear that the role of a PBL tutor is one of a master of many trades. Whilst the primary role of a PBL tutor is to ensure, as a facilitator and a guide, that students engage in self-directed learning within the tutorial setting, he or she should be able to identify issues within and outside the tutorial setting that impact on learning. A PBL tutor should know the case well before the tutorial starts, establish ground rules and recognize that the quality of learning which takes place prior to and after the tutorial by students affect personal and group dynamics within the tutorial setting. The PBL tutor occupies a central and unique role in influencing students' learning and as a mentor to students' development.

  5. Volunteers Tutoring Reading-Disabled Adult Literacy Learners: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman-Hurley, Kelli

    2008-01-01

    Library-based adult literacy programs rely on volunteers to provide tutoring services to adult learners. A high percentage of volunteer tutors are matched with a reading-disabled adult literacy learner. Although all tutors are required to complete preservice tutor training, there is a limited amount of research that documents whether they utilize…

  6. The Multiple Demands of a Tutor Coordinator: How To Balance a Very Split-Personality Job.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thot, Iris Dolores

    The author of this article describes the various aspects of her job as the Modern Language Tutor Coordinator at Santa Monica College. The author writes that, in general, her days consist of wearing a number of different hats each day, including that of budget and payroll administrator, grant writer, tutor screener, tutor trainer, tutor employer,…

  7. Video classification for video quality prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yu-xin; KURCEREN Ragip; BUDHIA Udit

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel method for video quality prediction using video classification. In essence, our approach can serve two goals: (1) To measure the video quality of compressed video sequences without referencing to the original uncompressed videos, i.e., to realize No-Reference (NR) video quality evaluation; (2) To predict quality scores for uncompressed video sequences at various bitrates without actually encoding them. The use of our approach can help realize video streaming with ideal Quality of Service (QoS). Our approach is a low complexity solution, which is specially suitable for application to mobile video streaming where the resources at the handsets are scarce.

  8. Modelo de sistemas tutores inteligentes multiagente

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer, Alejandro; Vallejos, Félix Anibal; Jiménez Rey, Elizabeth Miriam; Grossi, María Delia; Servetto, Arturo Carlos; Perichinsky, Gregorio

    2006-01-01

    Se presenta una línea de investigación del Proyecto de la Facultad de Ingeniería de la Universidad de Buenos Aires I015: Manufactura Integrada por Computadora en Sistemas Complejos para el Desarrollo Social, Industrial y de Tecnología. Se introduce conceptos básicos de los campos en los que incursiona esta línea de investigación: Sistemas Tutores Inteligentes (STI) y Sistemas Multiagentes (SMA). Se describe los aspectos esenciales que se deben considerar en el modelado de un sistema ...

  9. Do-It-Yourself Whiteboard-Style Physics Video Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott Samuel; Aiken, John Mark; Greco, Edwin; Schatz, Michael; Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Video lectures are increasingly being used in physics instruction. For example, video lectures can be used to "flip" the classroom, i.e., to deliver, via the Internet, content that is traditionally transmitted by in-class lectures (e.g., presenting concepts, working examples, etc.), thereby freeing up classroom time for more interactive instruction. To date, most video lectures are live lecture recordings or screencasts. The hand-animated "whiteboard" video is an alternative to these more common styles and affords unique creative opportunities such as stop-motion animation or visual "demonstrations" of phenomena that would be difficult to demo in a classroom. In the spring of 2013, a series of whiteboard-style videos were produced to provide video lecture content for Georgia Tech introductory physics instruction, including flipped courses and a MOOC. This set of videos (which also includes screencasts and live recordings) can be found on the "Your World is Your Lab" YouTube channel. In this article, we describe this method of video production, which is suitable for an instructor working solo or in collaboration with students; we explore students' engagement with these videos in a separate work. A prominent example of whiteboard animation is the "Minute Physics" video series by Henry Reich, whose considerable popularity and accessible, cartoony style were the original inspiration for our own video lectures.

  10. Video doorphone

    OpenAIRE

    Horyna, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Tato diplomová práce se zabývá návrhem dveřního video telefonu na platformě Raspberry Pi. Je zde popsána platforma Raspberry Pi, modul Raspberry Pi Camera, operační systémy pro Raspberry Pi a popis instalace a nastavení softwaru. Dále je zde popsán návrh a popis programů vytvořených pro dveřní video telefon a návrh přídavných modulů. This thesis deals with door video phone on the platform Raspberry Pi. There is described the platform Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Camera module, operating syst...

  11. Video Podcasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne Mette; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2016-01-01

    This project’s aim was to support and facilitate master’s students’ preparation and collaboration by making video podcasts of short lectures available on YouTube prior to students’ first face-to-face seminar. The empirical material stems from group interviews, from statistical data created through...... YouTube analytics and from surveys answered by students after the seminar. The project sought to explore how video podcasts support learning and reflection online and how students use and reflect on the integration of online activities in the videos. Findings showed that students engaged actively...... in podcasts that included designed activities, and moreover – although to a lesser degree – that students engaged actively in podcasts that did not include additional activities, suggesting that learning via podcast does not always mean learning by passive listening....

  12. The Multimodal Possibilities of Online Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2006-01-01

    The WWW simplifies the process of delivering online instructions through multimodal channels because of the ease of use for voice, video, pictures, and text modes of communication built into it.  Given that instructions are being produced in multimodal format for the WWW, how do multi-modal analy...

  13. Instructional Models Effective in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    The purpose of this study was to identify which instructional models based on the framework of Joyce, Weil, and Showers, could be used effectively in distance education over the Interactive Video Network (IVN) system in North Dakota. Instructional models have been organized into families such as Information Processing, Social, Personal, and…

  14. Effects of Media Attributes in Anchored Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Hsin-Yih

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the effects of computer-assisted video-based anchored instruction on promoting students' attitudes toward mathematical instruction and problem-solving skills. Examines the effects of different media attributes on students' mathematical achievement and attitudes in a situated learning environment. Findings suggest that anchored…

  15. Video animation system operators manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mareda, J.F.

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the components necessary to put together a video animation system. It is primarily intended for use at Sandia National Laboratories as it describes the components used in systems at Sandia. The main document covers the operation of the equipment in some detail and is intended for either the system maintainer or an advanced user. There is an appendix for each of the three systems in use by the Engineering Sciences Directorate which contain instructions for the general user.

  16. A Peer Mentor Tutor Program in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Jacob, A. T.; Buehlman, J. D.; Middlecamp, C. H.

    2001-05-01

    The Peer Mentor Tutor (PMT) program in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Physics Department matches upper level undergraduate physics majors in small groups with students potentially at-risk for having academic trouble with their gateway introductory non-calculus physics course or for feeling isolated at the University. The program enhances students'learning and confidence by providing an emphasis on problem solving, a supportive environment for asking questions, and opportunities for acquiring missing math skills. The students assisted include, among others, returning adults, students of color,students with English as a second language, and students who have never taken physics in high school. The tutors acquire teaching and leadership experience with ongoing training throughout the year. The Physics PMT program is run in collaboration with a similar program in Chemistry. The peer model is also being applied to other science courses at the University of Wisconsin. We will describe the structure of the Physics PMT program and our current efforts to expand the program into a broader Physics Learning Center that may serve multiple purposes and courses.

  17. How experienced tutors facilitate tutorial dynamics in PBL groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gin-Hong; Lin, Chaou-Shune; Lin, Yu-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial are conducted in small groups, and successful learning in such groups requires good group facilitating skills. There is a lack of research on actual skills employed by tutors in facilitating the group dynamics. To explore the process of PBL tutorial small groups, focusing on the tutors' actual behavior in facilitating group dynamics. Eight experienced tutors from various departments in medical colleges participated in this research. Forty tutorial group sessions were videotaped. Among the 636 tutorial intervention episodes, 142 of them were associated with facilitating group dynamics. Tutors interventions as well as their recalls were transcribed verbatim. Qualitative research methods were utilized to analyze the data. There were 10 tutorial group dynamic situations and 48 tutorial skills. Analysis of the tutors' intentions employing these skills in the 10 situations showed that tutors were trying to achieve the following aims: (1) iteration of PBL principles, (2) delegation of responsibility to the students, (3) creation of a good discussion forum, and (4) the generation of a good learning atmosphere. Results from this study provide PBL tutors with a practical frame of reference on group dynamic facilitating skills and stimulate further research on this topic.

  18. Akademisk video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    Dette kapitel har fokus på metodiske og systemiske problemstillinger vedrørende forskerens positionering i forhold til at formidle på digitale medier, særligt med video. De systemiske problemer omfatter en Janus dobbelthed; forskeren vil måske gerne formidle på digitale platforme, men er tynget...... indadtil af ansvar, tidspres, renomé, kvalitetskrav, og digitale platformes flygtighed. De metodiske problemer inkluderer at videoanalyse trækker på mange traditioner, men er underudviklet i forhold til den digitale kontekst. Empirien består af eksempler på online formidling i form af “akademisk video......”. Analysen anvender narrativ, multimodal analyse af video, primært to videoer på platformen audiovisualthinking.org, hvor forskeren optræder som fortæller eller “storyteller”. En video er lavet af forfatteren. Videoanalysen er valideret gennem kollaboration med en af audiovisualthinking.org stifterne. De...

  19. HIGHER EDUCATION, ONLINE TUTORING AND THE TEACHING PROFESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Roberto de Camargo Ribeiro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article brings the analysis of a study—of a descriptive-analytical nature—about online tutoring, some of its characteristics and peculiarities as compared to face-to-face education. To this end it analyzes the results of an online questionnaire answered by 222 tutors pertaining to programs offered at Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar in partnership with Universidade Aberta do Brasil (UAB and Brazilian townships. The analysis focused on tutors’ characteristics (e.g., sex, education background and teaching experience, their work organization and activities, the division of labor (between tutors and teachers responsible for subjects, and their perceptions about the nature of tutoring and education at a distance (DE. This study is chiefly based on authors such as Lortie, Tardif, and Shulman—about face-to-face teaching—and Mill, Maggio, and Kenski—on distance education. The results of this study point to the predominance of female tutors, which resembles the makeup of the teaching body in face-to-face education at the lower levels, and indicate the respondents’ high levels of schooling and considerable face-to-face teaching experience. Despite the difficulties encountered by the tutors in this study, mainly due to their lack of experience in DE and varied technical problems, most of the tutors found it easy and pleasurable to work online. The dada also suggest that the tutors enjoyed comparative autonomy as regards actions associated with content transmission as well as actions related to (virtual classroom management. This autonomy may be the basis for the respondents’ perception that the online tutor, in the context under consideration, performs a genuine teaching function.

  20. Learning Science Through Digital Video: Views on Watching and Creating Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In science, the use of digital video to document phenomena, experiments and demonstrations has rapidly increased during the last decade. The use of digital video for science education also has become common with the wide availability of video over the internet. However, as with using any technology as a teaching tool, some questions should be asked: What science is being learned from watching a YouTube clip of a volcanic eruption or an informational video on hydroelectric power generation? What are student preferences (e.g. multimedia versus traditional mode of delivery) with regard to their learning? This study describes 1) the efficacy of watching digital video in the science classroom to enhance student learning, 2) student preferences of instruction with regard to multimedia versus traditional delivery modes, and 3) the use of creating digital video as a project-based educational strategy to enhance learning. Undergraduate non-science majors were the primary focus group in this study. Students were asked to view video segments and respond to a survey focused on what they learned from the segments. Additionally, they were asked about their preference for instruction (e.g. text only, lecture-PowerPoint style delivery, or multimedia-video). A majority of students indicated that well-made video, accompanied with scientific explanations or demonstration of the phenomena was most useful and preferred over text-only or lecture instruction for learning scientific information while video-only delivery with little or no explanation was deemed not very useful in learning science concepts. The use of student generated video projects as learning vehicles for the creators and other class members as viewers also will be discussed.

  1. PENGGUNAAN TUTOR SEBAYA UNTUK PENINGKATAN AKTIVITAS DAN HASIL BELAJAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakimahwati -

    2014-06-01

    Abstrak: Penggunaan Tutor Sebaya untuk Peningkatan Aktivitas dan Hasil Belajar. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan aktivitas dan hasil belajar mahasiswa dengan menerapkan metode tutor sebaya pada perkuliahan Perencanaan Pembelajaran TK. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian adalah penelitian tindakan kelas. Pelaksanaan tindakan dilakukan dua siklus terhadap mahasiswa reguler Pendidikan Guru Pendidikan Anak Usia Dini (PG-PAUD Universitas Negeri Padang. Data diperoleh melalui observasi, angket dan penilaian akhir kegiatan. Data kuantitatif dianalisis dengan rerata dan persentase, dan dikom­parasikan dengan data kualitatif. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa penggunaan metode tutor sebaya dapat meningkatkan aktivitas dan hasil belajar mahasiswa.

  2. Tutors' opinions of suitability of online learning programmes in continuing professional development for midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dinah; Papadopoulos, Irena; Kelly, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Online learning is frequently used in continuing professional development for qualified nurses and midwives. It is frequently assumed that the same package is appropriate for different groups of learners and that by reducing the need for tutorial input, tutorial time is saved. We evaluated the suitability of an online learning resource for suitability in continuing professional development for midwives. Originally developed for use as part of a work-based package for a specific audience, there had always been plans for more general use of the resource with other groups of health workers. Sequential mixed methods study. English universities. Seventy university tutors. Online questionnaire and in-depth interviews. Tutors did not consider that the online learning materials would be suitable for a wider audience without significant adaptation. They thought that uptake would increase need for tutorial input. Our findings demonstrate the pitfalls of removing learning from the context of practice. Technology customised to meet the needs of one group of learners probably does not have the potential for transfer to another group without significant adaptation. Those responsible for designing e-learning should take into account the needs of all the different audiences for whom the resource is intended from the outset, with consideration for the context in which learning will be applied to practice and how students will be supported. If the same package is to be used by different audiences and in different settings, tutors and students will require explicit instructions of how they should use the resource and depth of knowledge and level of competency that should be attained at the conclusion of the programme. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Using Concept Mapping in Video-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Faruk VURAL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Video-based learning has been extensively incorporated to enhance instruction. The advanced communication technology has greatly increased the possibilities and relative value of delivering instructional video content in onlineeducation applications. Simple watching instructional video often results in poor learning outcomes. Therefore, current video-based learning resources are used in combination with other teaching methods. Concept mapping, one of teaching methods, can provide another form of this type of interactivity and may enhance the active learning capacity. The new learning tool, which consisted of video viewer, supporting text, and interactive concept map, was developed to investigate the effect of time spent interacting with the learning tool by creating concept maps relate to student achievement. The study results showed that there was no relationship found between student achievement and time spent interacting with the learning tool

  4. Peer tutors as learning and teaching partners: a cumulative approach to building peer tutoring capacity in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherran Clarence

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Peer tutors in higher education are frequently given vital teaching and learning work to do, but the training or professional development and support opportunities they are offered vary, and more often than not peer tutors are under-supported. In order to create and sustain teaching and learning environments that are better able to facilitate students’ engagement with knowledge and learning, the role of peer tutors needs to be recognised differently, as that of learning and teaching partners to both lecturers and students. Tutors then need to be offered opportunities for more in-depth professional academic development in order to fully realise this role. This paper explores a tutor development programme within a South African writing centre that aimed at offering tutors such ongoing and cumulative opportunities for learning and growth using a balanced approach, which included scholarly research and practice-based training. Using narrative data tutors provided in reflective written reports, the paper explores the kinds of development in tutors’ thinking and action that are possible when training and development is theoretically informed, coherent, and oriented towards improving practice. 

  5. Dynamic Visual Displays in Media-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ok-choon

    1994-01-01

    Defines instructional roles of dynamic visual displays (DVDs), including animation and interactive video, and provides guidelines for using them in media-based instruction. Topics addressed include theoretical bases; examples of strategic applications of DVDs; six instructional conditions for using DVDs; and considerations for the design and…

  6. Adaptive Tutoring for Self-Regulated Learning: A Tutorial on Tutoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    learning (SRL) per the Army Learning Model • ontology • tools • methods • standards • exemplars Adaptive Tutoring Systems • Adaptive • Affordable... Ontology -based Student model in Semantic-oriented Access to the Knowledge in Digital Libraries. In proc. of HUBUSKA Fourth Open Workshop “Semantic Web...support or direct). This team state model is a compound model of the trust states existing between team members. The trust relationships are bi -direction

  7. Does the Model Matter? Comparing Video Self-Modeling and Video Adult Modeling for Task Acquisition and Maintenance by Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihak, David F.; Schrader, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of learning and maintaining vocational chain tasks using video self-modeling and video adult modeling instruction. Four adolescents with autism spectrum disorders were taught vocational and prevocational skills. Although both video modeling conditions were effective for…

  8. Using Peer Tutors to Improve Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGue, Kristina M.; Wilson, Katrina

    2010-01-01

    The influential report "Teaching Children to Read: An Evidenced-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and Its Implications for Reading Instruction" presented recommendations for daily literacy instruction in five key areas: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Applying techniques to…

  9. Teaching Game Programming using Video Tutorials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Gunver

    Background. What are the learning potentials of using online video tutorials as educational tools in game programming of Mixed Reality? The paper reports on the first experiences of teaching third semester engineering students design of Mixed Reality using online step-by-step programming video...... tutorials. Mixed Reality covers in this case both Augmented and Virtual Reality. Until recently, most of the instructional support for the software and game development came from paper tutorials (van der Meij et al, 2016:332). YouTube’s rapid growth in popularity and easy to use programs for video...... and emerging topics such as Mixed Reality. Students tend to use video tutorial on their own initiative as supplementary tutorials for new and hard topics. This motivated me to use existing video tutorials as teaching materials in the course titled Mixed Reality for third semester engineering students...

  10. Assessing the impact of tutors on first- year academic performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    language and the language of learning and teaching (LOLT); students lacking the socio- ... In this case, the tutorials and the tutors created a learning environment in which students ...... Communities of practice: Learning, meaning, and identity.

  11. Tutoring Literature Students in Dr. Frankenstein's Writing Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Uses Frankenstein's monster as an analogy for understanding the relationship of student, teacher, and literary work in an academic community, and the difficult role of the tutor in helping to make the relationship work. (PRA)

  12. Multimedia in the Writing Center: Visual Rhetoric and Tutor Training

    OpenAIRE

    Conard-Salvo, Tammy

    2006-01-01

    This presentation at the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) discusses the impact that multimedia projects have on writing centers and offers one model for integrating a visual rhetoric unit in an undergraduate tutor training course.

  13. Tutorías virtuales en tiempo real.

    OpenAIRE

    Vigneron Tenorio, Alberto; Fernández Barcell, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    En la actualidad, gracias a los avances de las herramientas informáticas y la mejora en la velocidad de trasmisión de datos por Internet, podemos realizar parte de nuestras tutorías por Internet. La versión más básica de este tipo de tutorías es la atención mediante el correo electrónico. En esta presentación vamos abordar la realización de tutorías virtuales en tiempo real. Estas tutorías, sin sustituir a las presenciales, son un útil complemento. Además, es un método eficaz para la ...

  14. Tutoring Literature Students in Dr. Frankenstein's Writing Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Uses Frankenstein's monster as an analogy for understanding the relationship of student, teacher, and literary work in an academic community, and the difficult role of the tutor in helping to make the relationship work. (PRA)

  15. The school failure as tutor: An exploratory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, F; Olesker, W

    1973-09-01

    This paper describes a pilot program in the use of high school near dropouts as tutors for young children. The work is set in the context of adolescent developmental tasks and draws its rationale from the general human tendency to reach mastery by turning passivity into activity. We ask whether adolescents who have experienced a decade of school failure and misery might use the opportunity for a new form of more active contact with the schools to master old failures. We reasoned that the very area of failure, where these adolescents show apparent uninterest through truancy and minimal work, must be a highly emotionally charged one (albeit negatively) precisely because it is an area of failure. After describing the setting and the rationale, we analyze the experience for several tutors from the point of view of their relationship to (1) the tutees, (2) the tutor-supervisor, (3) the group of adolescent tutors, and (4) the social system of the elementary school.

  16. User documentation for the MSK and OMS intelligent tutoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Pamela K.; Herren, L. Tandy; Lincoln, David T.

    1991-01-01

    This user's guide describes how to use the Intelligent Tutoring Systems for the Manual Select Keyboard (MSK) and the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) and how to use the C code that runs the mockup version of the MSK.

  17. Video-based cases disrupt deep critical thinking in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu Roy, Robindra; McMahon, Graham T

    2012-04-01

    Video is a popular tool in problem-based learning (PBL), although its production requires resources and time. Few studies have examined the impact of the use of video in PBL upon cognitive processes and critical thinking. Those that have done focused on cases involving physical signs, where video has natural advantages.   This study aimed to investigate preferences for video- or text-based cases and the effects of each format upon medical students' deep thinking in PBL. Tutorials were based on material portraying interviews with patients with conditions that include psychosocial elements but no physical signs.   Four tutorial groups of students in a Year 2 endocrine and reproductive pathophysiology course participated in a crossover study using one video-based and one text-based case. Transcripts of tutorials were coded for depth of thinking by a blinded coder. A generalised estimating equation model was used to adjust for potential differences among groups, cases, and tutor participation. The distribution of cognitive activity within the crossover groups and the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for deep versus superficial thinking were calculated. A prior cohort of 165 students and 18 tutors completed a survey of learning preferences.   Of 5224 student utterances, the majority referred to problem exploration (2622, 50%) and description (1479, 28%). Overall, the odds of deep thinking versus superficial thinking were significantly lower using video-based cases compared with text-based cases (2045 deep/2454 for video versus 1961 deep/2218 for text; OR 0.663, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.582-0.754; p deep/1365 for video versus 1178 deep/1257 for text; OR 0.559, 95% CI 0.355-0.882; p = 0.0125). The majority of students (59%) and tutors (78%) indicated a preference for video-based cases over text-based cases.   Students and their tutors prefer video-based cases in PBL. However, compared with text-based material, the use of video-based material that refers

  18. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    include: re-identification, consumer behavior analysis, utilizing pupillary response for task difficulty measurement, logo detection, saliency prediction, classification of facial expressions, face recognition, face verification, age estimation, super-resolution, pose estimation, and pain recognition......This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real...

  19. A Program Evaluation of Intersession Tutoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandang Kosasih Ananda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined one program which was in place in a multi-track year-round elementary school, a tutoring program delivered during the students' intersession. Through interviews, surveys, and analysis of grades recorded on report cards, the program was evaluated to determine whether goals for the program were met. Survey data revealed that students, parents, and teachers all felt overwhelmingly that the program was effective at meeting stated program goals. Report card data did not show a statistically significant increase in grades after students attended the program, but many intervening variables were not controlled for. Additional convenience factors, such as transportation, cost, and timing contributed to the program benefits

  20. Modelado del estudiante en sistemas tutores inteligentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cataldi, Zulma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En la producción de los STI convergen las distintas epistemológicas que quedan evidenciadas en la práctica docente. Se busca una nueva opción de diseño de STI que sea más versátil centrada en la forma en que los estudiantes mantienen, organizan y adquieren los nuevos conocimientos. Las diferentes formas de pensar de los estudiantes, constituyen los estilos de aprendizaje, a través de los cuales se puede establecer el modo en que estos conocimientos se almacenan, se relacionan y se utilizan con los adquiridos anteriormente. Es necesario caracterizar a los estudiantes además considerando el tipo de inteligencia preponderante en cada uno, ya que permitirá soluciones más individualizadas. Esto conlleva a rediseñar los componentes de cada módulo del sistema tutor.

  1. Central catheter dressing in a simulator: the effects of tutor's assistance or self-learning tutorial Parche de catéter central en simulador: efecto de la presencia del tutor o del aprendizaje auto-instruccional Curativo de cateter central em simulador: efeito da presença do tutor ou da aprendizagem autoinstrucional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene Thaís Marmol

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: to compare the performance of undergraduate students concerning semi-implanted central venous catheter dressing in a simulator, with the assistance of a tutor or of a self-learning tutorial. METHOD: Randomized controlled trial. The sample consisted of 35 undergraduate nursing students, who were divided into two groups after attending an open dialogue presentation class and watching a video. One group undertook the procedure practice with a tutor and the other with the assistance of a self-learning tutorial. RESULTS: in relation to cognitive knowledge, the two groups had lower performance in the pre-test than in the post-test. The group that received assistance from a tutor performed better in the practical assessment. CONCLUSION: the simulation undertaken with the assistance of a tutor showed to be the most effective learning strategy when compared to the simulation using a self-learning tutorial. Advances in nursing simulation technology are of upmost importance and the role of the tutor in the learning process should be highlighted, taking into consideration the role this professional plays in knowledge acquisition and in the development of critical-reflexive thoughts and attitudes. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT 01614314.OBJETIVO: comparar el desempeño de graduandos en la realización del parche del catéter venoso central semi-implantado, en simulador, con el auxilio del tutor o de un guía auto-instruccional. MÉTODO: estudio experimental controlado hecho aleatorio. La muestra fue compuesta por 35 alumnos de Graduación en Enfermería que fueron asignados en dos grupos después de asistir a una clase expositiva dialogada y a un vídeo. Un grupo realizó el entrenamiento del procedimiento con el tutor y el otro con el auxilio de un guía auto- instruccional. RESULTADOS: con relación al conocimiento cognoscitivo, los dos grupos presentaron desempeño menor en la pre-prueba comparada al pos-prueba. El grupo con presencia del tutor

  2. PENERAPAN MODEL PEMBELAJARAN TUTOR SEBAYA PADA MATA PELAJARAN SOSIOLOGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningrum Pusporini Anggorowati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pelaksanaannya model pembelajaran tutor sebaya (peer teaching di SMAN I Brebes. Subjek dalam penelitian ini adalah guru sosiologi kelas XI IPS 1 dan siswa kelas XI IPS 1. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan peer teaching memerlukan persiapan yang matang, dan setiap tahap pelaksanaan hendaknya dievaluasi untuk mendapatkan hasil yang baik. Faktor pendukung dalam pelaksanaan model pembelajaran tutor sebaya antara lain yaitu adanya interaksi antara guru dengan siswa, minat belajar siswa cukup tinggi, guru dan siswa lebih akrab dalam kegiatan pembelajaran, keterlibatan tutor sebaya dalam kelompok belajar membuat suasana pembelajaran lebih menarik, sedangkan faktor penghambatnya antara lain yaitu kurangnya persiapan dari para tutor, sarana dan prasarana kurang memadai, kegiatan pembelajaran kurang kondusif, dan sumber belajar kurang memadai. The objective of this study is to examine the implementation of peer tutoring learning model (peer teaching in SMAN I Brebes. Subjects in this study were teachers sociology class XI IPS 1 and class XI IPS 1. Results show that the implementation of peer teaching requires preparation, and each stage of the implementation should be evaluated to obtain good results. Factors supporting the implementation of peer tutoring learning model, among others, the interaction between teachers and students, and also student interest is high; teachers and students are more familiar in learning activities, and peer tutor involvement in the study group to make the learning environment more attractive. The inhibiting factor of peer teaching strategy include among others the lack of preparation of the tutors, inadequate infrastructure, lack of conducive learning activities, and learning resources are inadequate.

  3. Do-It-Yourself Whiteboard-Style Physics Video Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott Samuel; Aiken, John Mark; Greco, Edwin; Schatz, Michael; Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Video lectures are increasingly being used in physics instruction. For example, video lectures can be used to "flip" the classroom, i.e., to deliver, via the Internet, content that is traditionally transmitted by in-class lectures (e.g., presenting concepts, working examples, etc.), thereby freeing up classroom time for more interactive…

  4. Do-It-Yourself Whiteboard-Style Physics Video Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott Samuel; Aiken, John Mark; Greco, Edwin; Schatz, Michael; Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Video lectures are increasingly being used in physics instruction. For example, video lectures can be used to "flip" the classroom, i.e., to deliver, via the Internet, content that is traditionally transmitted by in-class lectures (e.g., presenting concepts, working examples, etc.), thereby freeing up classroom time for more interactive…

  5. Crafting Instructions Collaboratively: Student Questions and Dual Addressivity in Classroom Task Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Oliver; Cromdal, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    This study examines classroom task instructions--phases traditionally associated with noninteractional objectives and operations--and reveals their composition as interactionally complex and cocrafted. Analyses of video sequences of task instructional activity from three different secondary school lessons show that student questions routinely…

  6. The influence of prior knowledge and viewing repertoire on learning from video

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jelle; Kommers, Petrus A.M.; de Brock, Bert; Tolboom, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Video is increasingly used as an instructional tool. It is therefore becoming more important to improve learning of students from video. We investigated whether student learning effects are influenced through an instruction about other viewing behaviours, and whether these learning effects depend on

  7. Library Video Tutorials to Support Large Undergraduate Labs: Will They Watch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosimo, April L.; Kasuto, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Video tutorials were designed for students working on a General Chemistry scientific inquiry laboratory in 2008, as a supplement to in-class instruction from a librarian. In 2010, with no opportunity to provide in-class instruction, one of the videos was redesigned and offered to assist students with the exercise. In both years, students were…

  8. The influence of prior knowledge and viewing repertoire on learning from video

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de Jelle; Kommers, Piet A.M.; Brock, de Bert; Tolboom, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Video is increasingly used as an instructional tool. It is therefore becoming more important to improve learning of students from video. We investigated whether student learning effects are influenced through an instruction about other viewing behaviours, and whether these learning effects depend on

  9. Education Program of peer tutors: tutoring in the process of school inclusion in the Physical Education class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joslei Viana de Souza

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to analyze the effect of peer tutoring for a student with disability in Physical Education classes. This study was supported by the qualitative methodological approach, characterized as a case study. The research was conducted in a Municipal public school located in the State of Bahia. The participants in this research were: a student with intellectual disability associated with autism spectrum disorder and five peer tutors. For data collection instrument, systematic or structured observation was employed, not participant, in a natural environment. The Physical Education classes were filmed, before and after the training of tutors. The results showed that the intervention of the peer tutors, with teaching strategies, culminated in increasing the participation level of the student with disabilities, contributing to the process of inclusion in Physical Education classes.

  10. The student tutor experience in a problem-based learning course: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tricia Susan

    This case study, conducted from an interpretive paradigm, illuminates contextual factors related to the tutor experience when senior undergraduate dental hygiene students served as tutors for beginning undergraduate dental hygiene students, or sophomores, in a 1-semester, 2-hour long problem-based learning (PBL) course in a Baccalaureate Dental Hygiene (BDH) curriculum during the spring semester of 2008. Data were collected using various sources and methods. Six tutors and three administrators were interviewed, tutees completed an anonymous questionnaire, the tutorial process and tutor training sessions were observed, and related documents were examined. Data analysis included open and axial coding, creation of tutor profiles, and identification of patterns. Tutor behaviors varied with respect to the nature of intervention (e.g., telling, asking, clarifying, acknowledging), emphasis (process, content, social), and facilitation style (directive, suggestive, empowering). Patterns in tutor behavior and attitudes emerged related to comfort and growth, persistence and lenience, and compliance, resistance, and innovation. Differences in tutor understanding and perception of their role and the purpose of PBL influenced the role the tutor assumed. Other factors that influenced tutor behavior included tutor intentions, tutor training, and environmental factors such as the nature of problems, allotted time, and tutorial group characteristics. The influence of these factors can be understood by applying Fishbein's integrated model of behavior prediction (Fishbein, 2008). Tutor training included experiencing the PBL student role, attending class, and sharing experiences with other tutors in weekly seminar sessions facilitated by a tutor supervisor. Tutor's gained confidence, knowledge, skills, and friendship. They also had the opportunity to see things from a new perspective, that of a teacher encouraging self-direction rather than a student depending on others for direction

  11. Strategies for Teaching Children with Autism to Imitate Response Chains Using Video Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshko, Lisa; MacDonald, Rebecca; Ahearn, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Video modeling has been found to be an effective procedure for teaching a variety of skills to persons with autism, however, some individuals do not learn through video instruction. The purpose of the current investigation was to teach children with autism, who initially did not imitate a video model, to construct three toy structures through the…

  12. Use of Student Created Video Podcasts to Promote Foreign Language Grammar Acquisition in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The use of video podcasts in education has emerged as a phenomenon that has gained a considerable amount of attention over the last few years. Although video podcasting is becoming a well-established technology in higher education, new multimedia instructional strategies such as student-created video podcasts in grades K-12 are under-researched.…

  13. How Useful Are Closed Captions for Learning Mathematics via Online Video?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Chris; Loch, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Closed captioning of instructional videos is a topic that has not seen much discussion despite its importance for hearing-impaired students and recent legal ramifications if videos are not appropriately captioned. In particular, it is unclear what best practice in captioning videos should be to benefit all learners in disciplines such as…

  14. Using Video Modeling to Teach Young Children with Autism Developmentally Appropriate Play and Connected Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheflen, Sarah Clifford; Freeman, Stephanny F. N.; Paparella, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    Four children with autism were taught play skills through the use of video modeling. Video instruction was used to model play and appropriate language through a developmental sequence of play levels integrated with language techniques. Results showed that children with autism could successfully use video modeling to learn how to play appropriately…

  15. Strategies for Teaching Children with Autism to Imitate Response Chains Using Video Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshko, Lisa; MacDonald, Rebecca; Ahearn, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Video modeling has been found to be an effective procedure for teaching a variety of skills to persons with autism, however, some individuals do not learn through video instruction. The purpose of the current investigation was to teach children with autism, who initially did not imitate a video model, to construct three toy structures through the…

  16. Using Video Modeling to Teach Young Children with Autism Developmentally Appropriate Play and Connected Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheflen, Sarah Clifford; Freeman, Stephanny F. N.; Paparella, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    Four children with autism were taught play skills through the use of video modeling. Video instruction was used to model play and appropriate language through a developmental sequence of play levels integrated with language techniques. Results showed that children with autism could successfully use video modeling to learn how to play appropriately…

  17. Automated Identification and Reconstruction of YouTube Video Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Patterson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available YouTube is one of the most popular video-sharing websites on the Internet, allowing users to upload, view and share videos with other users all over the world. YouTube contains many different types of videos, from homemade sketches to instructional and educational tutorials, and therefore attracts a wide variety of users with different interests. The majority of YouTube visits are perfectly innocent, but there may be circumstances where YouTube video access is related to a digital investigation, e.g. viewing instructional videos on how to perform potentially unlawful actions or how to make unlawful articles.When a user accesses a YouTube video through their browser, certain digital artefacts relating to that video access may be left on their system in a number of different locations. However, there has been very little research published in the area of YouTube video artefacts.The paper discusses the identification of some of the artefacts that are left by the Internet Explorer web browser on a Windows system after accessing a YouTube video. The information that can be recovered from these artefacts can include the video ID, the video name and possibly a cached copy of the video itself. In addition to identifying the artefacts that are left, the paper also investigates how these artefacts can be brought together and analysed to infer specifics about the user’s interaction with the YouTube website, for example whether the video was searched for or visited as a result of a suggestion after viewing a previous video.The result of this research is a Python based prototype that will analyse a mounted disk image, automatically extract the artefacts related to YouTube visits and produce a report summarising the YouTube video accesses on a system.

  18. Unpacking Corrections in Mobile Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lena; Cromdal, Jakob; Broth, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the organisation of correction in mobile instructional settings. Five sets of video data (>250 h) documenting how learners were instructed to fly aeroplanes, drive cars and ride bicycles in real life traffic were examined to reveal some common features of correction...... exchanges. Through detailed multimodal analysis of participants’ actions, it is shown how instructors systematically elaborate their corrective instructions to include relevant information about the trouble and remedial action – a practice we refer to as unpacking corrections. It is proposed...... that the practice of unpacking the local particulars of corrections (i) provides for the instructional character of the interaction, and (ii) is highly sensitive to the relevant physical and mobile contingencies. These findings contribute to the existing literature on the interactional organisation of correction...

  19. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ANA's First 25 Years Video Support Group Video Library Mark Ruffalo Story Patient Journeys ANA Public Webinars ... Groups Map Scheduled Meetings Support Group Meeting Video Library Start a Support Group ANA Discussion Forum ANetwork, ...

  20. Marketing through Video Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhart, Donna

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using video presentations as marketing tools. Includes information about video news releases, public service announcements, and sales/marketing presentations. Describes the three stages in creating a marketing video: preproduction planning; production; and postproduction. (JOW)