WorldWideScience

Sample records for tuscan glass samples

  1. Chemical Composition Measurements of LAWA44 Glass Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-11-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) has requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide expert evaluation and experimental work in support of the River Protection Project vitrification technology development. DOE is building the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. The low-activity waste (LAW) fraction will be partitioned from the high-level waste (HLW). Both the LAW and HLW will then be vitrified into borosilicate glass using Joule-heated ceramic melters. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in the glass while conforming to processing requirements and product quality regulations. DOE-ORP has requested that SRNL support the advancement of glass formulations and process control strategies in key technical areas, as defined in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). One of these areas is enhancing waste glass composition/property models and broadening the compositional regions over which those models are applicable. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analysis results for several samples of a simulated LAW glass, designated LAWA44, provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of an ongoing development task. The objective of the PNNL task is to determine the durability of this glass using EPA Method 1313, which will include test participants at Vanderbilt University and the University of Sheffield. A report on the compositions of similar glasses (referred to as the EPA-series glasses) was issued in March 2016.

  2. Multivariate models to classify Tuscan virgin olive oils by zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandri, Stefano

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study and classify Tuscan virgin olive oils, 179 samples were collected. They were obtained from drupes harvested during the first half of November, from three different zones of the Region. The sampling was repeated for 5 years. Fatty acids, phytol, aliphatic and triterpenic alcohols, triterpenic dialcohols, sterols, squalene and tocopherols were analyzed. A subset of variables was considered. They were selected in a preceding work as the most effective and reliable, from the univariate point of view. The analytical data were transformed (except for the cycloartenol to compensate annual variations, the mean related to the East zone was subtracted from each value, within each year. Univariate three-class models were calculated and further variables discarded. Then multivariate three-zone models were evaluated, including phytol (that was always selected and all the combinations of palmitic, palmitoleic and oleic acid, tetracosanol, cycloartenol and squalene. Models including from two to seven variables were studied. The best model shows by-zone classification errors less than 40%, by-zone within-year classification errors that are less than 45% and a global classification error equal to 30%. This model includes phytol, palmitic acid, tetracosanol and cycloartenol.

    Para estudiar y clasificar aceites de oliva vírgenes Toscanos, se utilizaron 179 muestras, que fueron obtenidas de frutos recolectados durante la primera mitad de Noviembre, de tres zonas diferentes de la Región. El muestreo fue repetido durante 5 años. Se analizaron ácidos grasos, fitol, alcoholes alifáticos y triterpénicos, dialcoholes triterpénicos, esteroles, escualeno y tocoferoles. Se consideró un subconjunto de variables que fueron seleccionadas en un trabajo anterior como el más efectivo y fiable, desde el punto de vista univariado. Los datos analíticos se transformaron (excepto para el cicloartenol para compensar las variaciones anuales, rest

  3. Trends in overweight and obesity prevalence in Tuscan schoolchildren (2002–2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Lazzeri, Giacomo; Panatto, Donatella; Pammolli, Andrea; Azzolini, Elena; Simi, Rita; Meoni, Veronica; Giacchi, Mariano V; Amicizia, Daniela; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence and time trends in childhood overweight including obesity and obesity among Tuscan children from 2002 to 2012. Design Cross-sectional study at five time points (Tuscan Nutritional Surveillance Surveys conducted in the years of 2002, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012). Trained personnel directly measured the height and weight of the subjects. BMI was assessed by means of the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) and WHO cut-offs. S...

  4. Mitogenomes from The 1000 Genome Project reveal new Near Eastern features in present-day Tuscans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Gómez-Carballa

    Full Text Available Genetic analyses have recently been carried out on present-day Tuscans (Central Italy in order to investigate their presumable recent Near East ancestry in connection with the long-standing debate on the origins of the Etruscan civilization. We retrieved mitogenomes and genome-wide SNP data from 110 Tuscans analyzed within the context of The 1000 Genome Project. For phylogeographic and evolutionary analysis we made use of a large worldwide database of entire mitogenomes (>26,000 and partial control region sequences (>180,000.Different analyses reveal the presence of typical Near East haplotypes in Tuscans representing isolated members of various mtDNA phylogenetic branches. As a whole, the Near East component in Tuscan mitogenomes can be estimated at about 8%; a proportion that is comparable to previous estimates but significantly lower than admixture estimates obtained from autosomal SNP data (21%. Phylogeographic and evolutionary inter-population comparisons indicate that the main signal of Near Eastern Tuscan mitogenomes comes from Iran.Mitogenomes of recent Near East origin in present-day Tuscans do not show local or regional variation. This points to a demographic scenario that is compatible with a recent arrival of Near Easterners to this region in Italy with no founder events or bottlenecks.

  5. Mitogenomes from The 1000 Genome Project Reveal New Near Eastern Features in Present-Day Tuscans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Amigo, Jorge; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic analyses have recently been carried out on present-day Tuscans (Central Italy) in order to investigate their presumable recent Near East ancestry in connection with the long-standing debate on the origins of the Etruscan civilization. We retrieved mitogenomes and genome-wide SNP data from 110 Tuscans analyzed within the context of The 1000 Genome Project. For phylogeographic and evolutionary analysis we made use of a large worldwide database of entire mitogenomes (>26,000) and partial control region sequences (>180,000). Results Different analyses reveal the presence of typical Near East haplotypes in Tuscans representing isolated members of various mtDNA phylogenetic branches. As a whole, the Near East component in Tuscan mitogenomes can be estimated at about 8%; a proportion that is comparable to previous estimates but significantly lower than admixture estimates obtained from autosomal SNP data (21%). Phylogeographic and evolutionary inter-population comparisons indicate that the main signal of Near Eastern Tuscan mitogenomes comes from Iran. Conclusions Mitogenomes of recent Near East origin in present-day Tuscans do not show local or regional variation. This points to a demographic scenario that is compatible with a recent arrival of Near Easterners to this region in Italy with no founder events or bottlenecks. PMID:25786119

  6. Production of a High-Level Waste Glass from Hanford Waste Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Farrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.; Bibler, N.E.

    1998-09-01

    The HLW glass was produced from a HLW sludge slurry (Envelope D Waste), eluate waste streams containing high levels of Cs-137 and Tc-99, solids containing both Sr-90 and transuranics (TRU), and glass-forming chemicals. The eluates and Sr-90/TRU solids were obtained from ion-exchange and precipitation pretreatments, respectively, of other Hanford supernate samples (Envelopes A, B and C Waste). The glass was vitrified by mixing the different waste streams with glass-forming chemicals in platinum/gold crucibles and heating the mixture to 1150 degree C. Resulting glass analyses indicated that the HLW glass waste form composition was close to the target composition. The targeted waste loading of Envelope D sludge solids in the HLW glass was 30.7 wt percent, exclusive of Na and Si oxides. Condensate samples from the off-gas condenser and off-gas dry-ice trap indicated that very little of the radionuclides were volatilized during vitrification. Microstructure analysis of the HLW glass using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX) showed what appeared to be iron spinel in the HLW glass. Further X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of nickel spinel trevorite (NiFe2O4). These crystals did not degrade the leaching characteristics of the glass. The HLW glass waste form passed leach tests that included a standard 90 degree C Product Consistency Test (PCT) and a modified version of the United States Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

  7. Investigation of Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch 4) Glass Sample Anomalous Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J.; Bibler, N. E.; Peeler, D. K.

    2005-08-15

    Two Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass samples from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) (Macrobatch 4) were received by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on February 23, 2005. One sample, S02244, was designated for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and elemental and radionuclide analyses. The second sample, S02247, was designated for archival storage. The samples were pulled from the melter pour stream during the feeding of Melter Feed Tank (MFT) Batch 308 and therefore roughly correspond to feed from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Batches 306-308. During the course of preparing sample S02244 for PCT and other analyses two observations were made which were characterized as ''unusual'' or anomalous behavior relative to historical observations of glasses prepared for the PCT. These observations ultimately led to a series of scoping tests in order to determine more about the nature of the behavior and possible mechanisms. The first observation was the behavior of the ground glass fraction (-100 +200 mesh) for PCT analysis when contacted with deionized water during the washing phase of the PCT procedure. The behavior was analogous to that of an organic compound in the presence of water: clumping, floating on the water surface, and crawling up the beaker walls. In other words, the glass sample did not ''wet'' normally, displaying a hydrophobic behavior in water. This had never been seen before in 18 years SRNL PCT tests on either radioactive or non-radioactive glasses. Typical glass behavior is largely to settle to the bottom of the water filled beaker, though there may be suspended fines which result in some cloudiness to the wash water. The typical appearance is analogous to wetting sand. The second observation was the presence of faint black rings at the initial and final solution levels in the Teflon vessels used for the mixed acid digestion of S02244 glass conducted for compositional analysis. The digestion is composed

  8. Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Tani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of the following book: Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014, ISBN 9780804791595

  9. ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F.

    2012-01-20

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7), in June 2010. SB6 is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), H-Canyon Np transfers and SB6 that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51.1 SB6 was processed using Frit 418. Sludge is received into the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and is processed through the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Tank (SME). The treated sludge slurry is then transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and fed to the melter. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP) and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. The DWPF requested various analyses of radioactive glass samples obtained from the melter pour stream during processing of SB6 as well as reduction/oxidation (REDOX) analysis of MFT samples to determine the impact of Argon bubbling. Sample analysis followed the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and an Analytical Study Plan (ASP). Four Pour Stream (PS) glass samples and two MFT slurry samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from the DWPF. Table 1-1 lists the sample information for each pour stream glass sample. SB6 PS3 (S03472) was selected as the official pour stream sample for SB6 and full analysis was requested. This report details the visual observations of the as-received SB6 PS No.3 glass sample as well as results for the chemical composition, Product Consistency Test (PCT), radionuclide content, noble metals, and glass density. REDOX results will be provided for all four pour stream samples and vitrified samples of MFT-558 and MFT-568A. Where appropriate, data from other pour stream samples will be provided.

  10. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  11. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  12. Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F. C.; Crawford, C. L.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2013-11-18

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9), in January 2012. SB7b is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and the SB7b material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7b was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Form Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Two pour stream glass samples were collected while processing SB7b. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where one was analyzed and the other was archived. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The sum of oxides for the official SB7b pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%); The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7b is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7b pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7b Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample; As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the SB7b pour stream sample; The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7b pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.8 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass; The measured density of the SB7b pour stream glass was 2.70 g/cm{sup 3}; The Fe{sup 2+}/ΣFe ratio of the SB7b pour stream samples was 0.07.

  13. Preparation and microbiological analysis of Tuscan sausage with added propolis extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Bordin VIERA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to obtain hydroethanolic extract of propolis by extraction, assisted by focused microwave, and to apply it in Tuscan-style sausage. The extract was used at concentrations of 0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0% (w/v in the manufacture of the sausage, which was then analyzed in cold storage at 4 °C for 56 days. The following analyses were performed: mesophilic and psychotrophic organisms; coliforms at 35 and 45 °C; positive and negative-coagulase Staphylococcus, sulfite-reducing Clostridium, and Salmonella spp. The results were below the limits established by the Brazilian legislation, with some changes at the end of the study. Consequently, propolis extract prolonged the shelf life of the Tuscan-style sausage for 56 days and it is therefore an ingredient that can be potentially used in the preparation of this product.

  14. Experimental investigation of photoluminescence spectra of Yb3+ sensitized Er3+-doped glass samples in series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengren Li (李成仁); Changlie Song (宋昌烈); Shufeng Li (李淑凤); Jingsheng Gao (高景生)

    2003-01-01

    Fabrication technology of the Yb3+:Er3+ co-doped glass samples is introduced. Photoluminescence (PL)characteristics of a single sample were experimentally investigated. The PL peak intensities of two samples in series were measured and discussed. The results show that the PL peak intensities of two samples in series depend on pump manners and arrangement of the samples. The better amplification ability can be obtained by two samples in series doped with low-concentration ytterbium instead of a single sample doped with high-concentration ytterbium.

  15. Characterization of high level nuclear waste glass samples following extended melter idling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.

    2015-06-16

    The Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter was recently idled with glass remaining in the melt pool and riser for approximately three months. This situation presented a unique opportunity to collect and analyze glass samples since outages of this duration are uncommon. The objective of this study was to obtain insight into the potential for crystal formation in the glass resulting from an extended idling period. The results will be used to support development of a crystal-tolerant approach for operation of the high level waste melter at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Two glass pour stream samples were collected from DWPF when the melter was restarted after idling for three months. The samples did not contain crystallization that was detectible by X-ray diffraction. Electron microscopy identified occasional spinel and noble metal crystals of no practical significance. Occasional platinum particles were observed by microscopy as an artifact of the sample collection method. Reduction/oxidation measurements showed that the pour stream glasses were fully oxidized, which was expected after the extended idling period. Chemical analysis of the pour stream glasses revealed slight differences in the concentrations of some oxides relative to analyses of the melter feed composition prior to the idling period. While these differences may be within the analytical error of the laboratories, the trends indicate that there may have been some amount of volatility associated with some of the glass components, and that there may have been interaction of the glass with the refractory components of the melter. These changes in composition, although small, can be attributed to the idling of the melter for an extended period. The changes in glass composition resulted in a 70-100 °C increase in the predicted spinel liquidus temperature (TL) for the pour stream glass samples relative to the analysis of the melter feed prior to

  16. Characterization of high level nuclear waste glass samples following extended melter idling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peeler, David K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-16

    The Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter was recently idled with glass remaining in the melt pool and riser for approximately three months. This situation presented a unique opportunity to collect and analyze glass samples since outages of this duration are uncommon. The objective of this study was to obtain insight into the potential for crystal formation in the glass resulting from an extended idling period. The results will be used to support development of a crystal-tolerant approach for operation of the high-level waste melter at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Two glass pour stream samples were collected from DWPF when the melter was restarted after idling for three months. The samples did not contain crystallization that was detectible by X-ray diffraction. Electron microscopy identified occasional spinel and noble metal crystals of no practical significance. Occasional platinum particles were observed by microscopy as an artifact of the sample collection method. Reduction/oxidation measurements showed that the pour stream glasses were fully oxidized, which was expected after the extended idling period. Chemical analysis of the pour stream glasses revealed slight differences in the concentrations of some oxides relative to analyses of the melter feed composition prior to the idling period. While these differences may be within the analytical error of the laboratories, the trends indicate that there may have been some amount of volatility associated with some of the glass components, and that there may have been interaction of the glass with the refractory components of the melter. These changes in composition, although small, can be attributed to the idling of the melter for an extended period. The changes in glass composition resulted in a 70-100 °C increase in the predicted spinel liquidus temperature (TL) for the pour stream glass samples relative to the analysis of the melter feed prior to

  17. Groundwater sampling methods using glass wool filtration to trace human enteric viruses in Madison, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses have been detected in the Madison, Wisconsin deep municipal well system. Earlier projects by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS) have used glass wool filters to sample groundwater for these viruses directly from the deep municipal wells. Polymerase chain...

  18. Acupuncture injection for field amplified sample stacking and glass microchip-based capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ji Won; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2017-02-01

    Acupuncture sample injection is a simple method to deliver well-defined nanoliter-scale sample plugs in PDMS microfluidic channels. This acupuncture injection method in microchip CE has several advantages, including minimization of sample consumption, the capability of serial injections of different sample solutions into the same microchannel, and the capability of injecting sample plugs into any desired position of a microchannel. Herein, we demonstrate that the simple and cost-effective acupuncture sample injection method can be used for PDMS microchip-based field amplified sample stacking in the most simplified straight channel by applying a single potential. We achieved the increase in electropherogram signals for the case of sample stacking. Furthermore, we present that microchip CGE of ΦX174 DNA-HaeⅢ digest can be performed with the acupuncture injection method on a glass microchip while minimizing sample loss and voltage control hardware. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Glass bottle sampling solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry for breath analysis of drug metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Niu, Wenqi; Zou, Xue; Shen, Chengyin; Xia, Lei; Huang, Chaoqun; Wang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Haihe; Chu, Yannan

    2017-03-23

    Breath analysis is a non-invasive approach which may be applied to disease diagnosis and pharmacokinetic study. In the case of offline analysis, the exhaled gas needs to be collected and the sampling bag is often used as the storage vessel. However, the sampling bag usually releases some extra compounds, which may interfere with the result of the breath test. In this study, a novel breath sampling glass bottle was developed with a syringe needle sampling port for solid phase microextraction (SPME). Such a glass bottle scarcely liberates compounds and can be used to collect exhaled gas for ensuing analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The glass bottle sampling SPME-GC-MS analysis was carried out to investigate the breath metabolites of myrtol, a multicompound drug normally used in the treatment of bronchitis and sinusitis. Four compounds, α-pinene, 2,3-dehydro-1,8-cineole, d-limonene and 1,8-cineole were found in the exhaled breath of all eight volunteers who had taken the myrtol. While for other ten subjects who had not used the myrtol, these compounds were undetectable. In the SPME-GC-MS analysis of the headspace of myrtol, three compounds were detected including α-pinene, d-limonene and 1,8-cineole. Comparing the results of breath and headspace analysis, it indicates that 2,3-dehydro-1,8-cineole in the breath is the metabolite of 1,8-cineole. It is the first time that this metabolite was identified in human breath. The study demonstrates that the glass bottle sampling SPME-GC-MS method is applicable to exhaled gas analysis including breath metabolites investigation of drugs like myrtol.

  20. Electrical switching in bulk samples of 0. 15As-0. 12Ge-0. 73Te glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckels, D.E.

    1976-06-01

    Switching in bulk samples of 0.15As--0.12Ge--0.73Te glass is found to be caused predominantly by the thermal switching mechanism for near threshold applied voltages. Switching also occurred by the thermal mechanism even for applied voltages an order of magnitude above the threshold voltage of the sample. In order to investigate a switching event in this glass sample, a constant voltage pulse was applied to the sample and the delay time and the electrical energy input to the sample during the delay time measured. A log--log plot of the energy input to the sample during a delay time of 1.00 s as a function of the electrode spacing on the sample's surface was found to have a slope of approximately 1.6. For the theoretical study of the thermal switching mechanism, a one-dimensional calculation of the heat balance equation with radial heat flow was made and the results of the calculation followed the same trends as the experimental data. The large scatter in parts of the data and the increase in the average resistance of the sample for a switching event with near threshold applied voltages could not be explained by the thermal switching mechanism. These effects could be a manifestation of the structural changes which probably occur in the sample as a result of the high temperatures present at the moment of switching. 33 fig.

  1. Novel gram-scale production of enantiopure R-sulforaphane from Tuscan black kale seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Rollin, Patrick; Mazzon, Emanuela; Iori, Renato

    2014-05-27

    Dietary R-sulforaphane is a highly potent inducer of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway. Furthermore, sulforaphane is currently being used in clinical trials to assess its effects against different tumour processes. This study reports an efficient preparation of enantiopure R-sulforaphane based on the enzymatic hydrolysis of its natural precursor glucoraphanin. As an alternative to broccoli seeds, we have exploited Tuscan black kale seeds as a suitable source for gram-scale production of glucoraphanin. The defatted seed meal contained 5.1% (w/w) of glucoraphanin that was first isolated through an anion exchange chromatographic process, and then purified by gel filtration. The availability of glucoraphanin (purity≈95%, weight basis) has allowed us to develop a novel simple hydrolytic process involving myrosinase (EC 3.2.1.147) in a biphasic system to directly produce R-sulforaphane. In a typical experiment, 1.09 g of enantiopure R-sulforaphane was obtained from 150 g of defatted Tuscan black kale seed meal.

  2. Novel Gram-Scale Production of Enantiopure R-Sulforaphane from Tuscan Black Kale Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Rosalinda De Nicola

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary R-sulforaphane is a highly potent inducer of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway. Furthermore, sulforaphane is currently being used in clinical trials to assess its effects against different tumour processes. This study reports an efficient preparation of enantiopure R-sulforaphane based on the enzymatic hydrolysis of its natural precursor glucoraphanin. As an alternative to broccoli seeds, we have exploited Tuscan black kale seeds as a suitable source for gram-scale production of glucoraphanin. The defatted seed meal contained 5.1% (w/w of glucoraphanin that was first isolated through an anion exchange chromatographic process, and then purified by gel filtration. The availability of glucoraphanin (purity ≈ 95%, weight basis has allowed us to develop a novel simple hydrolytic process involving myrosinase (EC 3.2.1.147 in a biphasic system to directly produce R-sulforaphane. In a typical experiment, 1.09 g of enantiopure R-sulforaphane was obtained from 150 g of defatted Tuscan black kale seed meal.

  3. A Genome-Wide Study of Modern-Day Tuscans: Revisiting Herodotus's Theory on the Origin of the Etruscans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Amigo, Jorge; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Background The origin of the Etruscan civilization (Etruria, Central Italy) is a long-standing subject of debate among scholars from different disciplines. The bulk of the information has been reconstructed from ancient texts and archaeological findings and, in the last few years, through the analysis of uniparental genetic markers. Methods By meta-analyzing genome-wide data from The 1000 Genomes Project and the literature, we were able to compare the genomic patterns (>540,000 SNPs) of present day Tuscans (N = 98) with other population groups from the main hypothetical source populations, namely, Europe and the Middle East. Results Admixture analysis indicates the presence of 25–34% of Middle Eastern component in modern Tuscans. Different analyses have been carried out using identity-by-state (IBS) values and genetic distances point to Eastern Anatolia/Southern Caucasus as the most likely geographic origin of the main Middle Eastern genetic component observed in the genome of modern Tuscans. Conclusions The data indicate that the admixture event between local Tuscans and Middle Easterners could have occurred in Central Italy about 2,600–3,100 years ago (y.a.). On the whole, the results validate the theory of the ancient historian Herodotus on the origin of Etruscans. PMID:25230205

  4. Inconel crucibles - an alternative to quartz glass crucibles when analysing problematic samples by EA-IRMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Kemp, Helen; Neal, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Anecdotal evidence as well as observations made in our own stable isotope laboratory suggest for samples with either a high halogen content (such as marine samples) or a high carbon and oxygen content (such as carbohydrates) to result in flash combustion temperatures exceeding temperature or burn time or both of flash combustion under typical conditions. Whatever the exact circumstances during combustion of such samples, they weaken the wall of the quartz glass reactors in the combustion zone and ultimately lead to pin-prick holes being formed through which carrier gas escapes thus resulting in a dramatic loss of carrier gas flow. Occasionally these pin-prick holes get plugged or "sealed" by molten tin thus restoring carrier gas flow but at the other end of the spectrum these pin-prick holes can become so wide for molten tin being able to pass through and to run down the outside of the reactor tube. In the latter event, a catastrophic failure of the reactor tube is inevitable with carrier gas flow downstream of the holes dropping to almost zero. While pin-prick holes (going unnoticed during an autosampler run of a large batch of samples) typically result in the loss of 3 or 4 samples until the hole/s "self-sealed" with molten tin, in a worst case scenario a catastrophic failure of the reactor tube can result in the loss of 40 or more samples (depending on number of samples in a batch run and when the failure occurred). Here we present examples of combustion reactor failure as well as observations made with crucibles made of quartz glass, stainless steel or inconel alloy during experiments to see if crucible design can mitigate against the effects of problematic samples.

  5. Intensity-value corrections for integrating sphere measurements of solid samples measured behind glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy J; Bernacki, Bruce E; Redding, Rebecca L; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S; Myers, Tanya L; Stephan, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and calibrated directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra of solids are important for both in situ and remote sensing. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass for the ultraviolet (UV), visible, or near-infrared spectral regions. Using both experimental methods and a simple optical model, we demonstrate that glass (fused quartz in our case) leads to artifacts in the reflectance values. We report our observations that the measured reflectance values, for both hemispherical and diffuse reflectance, are distorted by the additional reflections arising at the air-quartz and sample-quartz interfaces. The values are dependent on the sample reflectance and are offset in intensity in the hemispherical case, leading to measured values up to ~6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, ~3.8% too high for 10% reflecting surfaces, approximately correct for 40-60% diffuse-reflecting surfaces, and ~1.5% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon® surfaces. For the case of diffuse-only reflectance, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the polished glass, with differences of nearly 6% for a 99% reflecting matte surface. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces, as verified by both theory and experiment, and depend on sphere design. Empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300-2300 nm range.

  6. Silicate melt inclusions and glasses in lunar soil fragments from the Luna 16 core sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1972-01-01

    More than 2000 fragments were studied microscopically, and electron microprobe analyses were made of 39 selected areas, from a few square mm of polished surface, through 75- to 425-??m fragments of lunar soil from two samples of the Luna 16 core. The silicate melt inclusions and glasses differ in important details from those observed earlier in the Apollo samples. Melt inclusions in olivine contain epitaxially oriented daughter crystals, but also show a similar epitaxy around the outside of the crystals not observed in previous lunar samples. Melt inclusions in ilmenite suggest trapping at successive stages in a differentiation sequence. There is abundant evidence for late-stage silicate liquid immiscibility, with melt compositions similar but not identical to those from Apollo 11 and 12. A comparison of the alkali ratio of any given bulk rock analysis with that of its late-stage, high-silica melt shows gross differences for different rocks. This is pertinent to understanding late-stage differentiation processes. Glass fragments and spherules exhibit a wide range of crystallization textures, reflecting their wide range of compositions and cooling histories. No significant differences were found between the two portions of core examined (Zones A and D). ?? 1972.

  7. Effect of Water-Glass Coating on HA and HA-TCP Samples for MSCs Adhesion, Proliferation, and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Bajpai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ca-P and silicon based materials have become very popular as bone tissue engineering materials. In this study, water-glass (also known as sodium silicate glass was coated on sintered hydroxyapatite (HA and HA-TCP (TCP stands for tricalcium phosphate samples and subsequently heat-treated at 600°C for 2 hrs. X-rays diffraction showed the presence of β- and α-TCP phases along with HA in the HA-TCP samples. Samples without coating, with water-glass coating, and heat-treated after water-glass coating were used to observe the adhesion and proliferation response of bone marrow derived-mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Cell culture was carried out for 4 hrs, 1 day, and 7 days. Interestingly, all samples showed similar response for cell adhesion and proliferation up to 7-day culture but fibronectin, E-cadherin, and osteogenic differentiation related genes (osteocalcin and osteopontin were significantly induced in heat-treated water-glass coated HA-TCP samples. A water-glass coating on Ca-P samples was not found to influence the cell proliferation response significantly but activated some extracellular matrix genes and induced osteogenic differentiation in the MSCs.

  8. The Tuscan Artist - Images of Galileo in Milton’s works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toscano Fabio

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In The Areopagitica, his most important work of prose, John Milton mentions Galileo as the illustrious martyr who fought for the freedom of thought. The name of the great scientist is repeated several times in the English poet’s epic masterpiece: Paradise Lost. In three different passages of the poem, Milton in fact celebrates the “Tuscan Artist” and his crucial achievements in astronomy. Nevertheless, in a subsequent passage, the poet addresses the Copernican issue without openly defending the heliocentric theory confirmed by Galileo’s discoveries. In fact, he neither embraces the Copernican system nor the Ptolemaic one, but instead compares them, following a dialectic method where one cannot fail to notice an echo of Galileo’s Dialogue Concerning the two Chief World Systems. Milton’s literary work presents images of astronomy at that time, thus offering a valuable historical example of scientific communication through art.

  9. Identification and characterization of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts of PDO Tuscan bread sourdough by culture dependent and independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Michela; Cristani, Caterina; Giovannetti, Manuela; Agnolucci, Monica

    2017-06-05

    Sourdough fermentation has been increasingly used worldwide, in accordance with the demand of consumers for tasty, natural and healthy food. The high diversity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeast species, detected in sourdoughs all over the world, may affect nutritional, organoleptic and technological traits of leavened baked goods. A wide regional variety of traditional sourdough breads, over 200 types, has been recorded in Italy, including special types selected as worthy of either Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) or Protected Designation of Origin (PDO), whose sourdough microbiota has been functionally and molecularly characterized. As, due to the very recent designation, the microbiota of Tuscan bread sourdough has not been investigated so far, the aim of the present work was to isolate and characterize the species composition of LAB and yeasts of PDO Tuscan bread sourdough by culture-independent and dependent methods. A total of 130 yeasts from WLN medium and 193 LAB from both mMRS and SDB media were isolated and maintained to constitute the germplasm bank of PDO Tuscan bread. Ninety six LAB from mMRS medium and 68 yeasts from WLN medium were randomly selected and molecularly identified by ARDRA (Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis) and PCR-RFLP analysis of the ITS region, respectively, and sequencing. The yeast identity was confirmed by 26S D1/D2 sequencing. All bacterial isolates showed 99% identity with Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, 65 yeast isolates were identified as Candida milleri, and 3 as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Molecular characterization of PDO Tuscan bread sourdough by PCR-DGGE confirmed such data. The distinctive tripartite species association, detected as the microbiota characterizing the sourdough used to produce PDO Tuscan bread, encompassed a large number of L. sanfranciscensis and C. milleri strains, along with a few of S. cerevisiae. The relative composition and specific physiological characteristics of such microbiota

  10. ELIMINATION OF THE CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF POUR STREAM SAMPLE AND THE GLASS FABRICATION AND TESTING OF THE DWPF SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

    2012-05-11

    A recommendation to eliminate all characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification sample was made by a Six-Sigma team chartered to eliminate non-value-added activities for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) sludge batch qualification program and is documented in the report SS-PIP-2006-00030. That recommendation was supported through a technical data review by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is documented in the memorandums SRNL-PSE-2007-00079 and SRNL-PSE-2007-00080. At the time of writing those memorandums, the DWPF was processing sludge-only waste but, has since transitioned to a coupled operation (sludge and salt). The SRNL was recently tasked to perform a similar data review relevant to coupled operations and re-evaluate the previous recommendations. This report evaluates the validity of eliminating the characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification samples based on sludge-only and coupled operations. The pour stream sample has confirmed the DWPF's ability to produce an acceptable waste form from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) blending and product composition/durability predictions for the previous sixteen years but, ultimately the pour stream analysis has added minimal value to the DWPF's waste qualification strategy. Similarly, the information gained from the glass fabrication and PCT of the sludge batch qualification sample was determined to add minimal value to the waste qualification strategy since that sample is routinely not representative of the waste composition ultimately processed at the DWPF due to blending and salt processing considerations. Moreover, the qualification process has repeatedly confirmed minimal differences in glass behavior from actual radioactive waste to glasses fabricated from simulants or batch chemicals. In

  11. [Disposal of waste glass in sanitary departments: a sample survey in the Lazio region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sole, A; Fonda, A

    2004-01-01

    As a result of Italian law, DPR 15/7/2003 n. 254, about hospital waste, and given that little has been written about recycling waste glass in hospitals, a survey of 28 health departments in Lazio was performed. The objectives were: to estimate the mean quantity of clear vitreous waste in one year, to estimate how vitreous waste is administered, to estimate the extent of the use of plastic instead of glass, to analyse the costs and benefits of glass use and/or plastic use and to evaluate staff training about hospital waste disposal. The average production of clear vitreous waste was 0.28 kilogram per day per hospital bed occupied. (This would be the theoretical maximum quantity of glass to be recycled). Among the 28 departments studied, 82% separated waste products but only 36% disposed of glass in accordance with the law. The estimated possible savings on glass phleboclysis in 2002 year were 35,000 euro. Staff training could avoid this conspicuous waste of money. Fifteen departments also used plastic phleboclysis; of these, in 2 departments plastic waste is separated in the wards, but unfortunately this material is later disposed of in the bins for general solid urban waste. The other thirteen hospitals dispose of waste plastic as infectious material. Using glass phleboclysis instead of plastic phleboclysis would save about 680,000 euros per year. The disposal of glass waste material in practice was not found to follow the principles taught in the training courses. Theoretic data about glass production, estimated in this survey, refers only to clear glass and it is an underestimate of that of all glass used in departments. The quantity of glass actually recycled has been about 0.14 kilogram per day per hospital bed occupied and thus only 50% of the theoretical quantity (0.28 kilogram per day per hospital bed occupied). This percentage could be improved by effective training. Ideally, the disposal of waste glass would follow the legal requirements and be monitored

  12. PDMS glass serpentine microchannel chip for time domain PCR with bubble suppression in sample injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chul-Ho; Cho, Woong; Ahn, Yoomin; Hwang, Seung-Yong

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports on the development of a low-cost microreactor (10 µl) biochip for DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The microbiochip (20 mm × 28 mm) is a hybrid type that is composed of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer with a serpentine microchannel (360 µm × 100 µm) chamber and glass substrate integrated with a microheater and thermal microsensor. Because of the hydrophobic chip surface, bubbles are usually created during sample loading in the PMDS-based microchip. These bubbles disrupt the stable biochemical reaction. An improved microreactor chamber was designed using microfluidic simulation. The reactor has a rounded-corner serpentine channel architecture, which enables stable injection into the hydrophobic surface using only a micropipette. The reactor temperature needed for the PCR reaction is controlled within ±0.5 °C by the LabVIEW software proportional-integrative-derivative (PID) controller. PCR analyses of the sex-determining Y chromosome (SRY) gene and mouse GAPDH gene were successfully performed in less than 54 min by the fabricated microreactor chip.

  13. Investigation of reagent distributions on glass fiber membrane filters used in air sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Samuel P

    2007-10-01

    This project has arisen from the need to produce GFFs (glass fiber filters) bearing a thin and evenly distributed coating of a selected reagent in the equatorial plane for breakthrough studies. However, it has been discovered that today's two general techniques for coating GFFs (total immersion and application of reagent solution to GFFs) have usually produced unevenly distributed coatings of reagent in the equatorial plane. In addition, quantities of reagent on GFFs from commercial sources may vary widely in the same lot of coated GFFs. Consequences are variability in capacity of coated filters at the point of breakthrough and, perhaps, wasted reagent. Although today's reagent-coated filters may be satisfactory for routine air sampling, such filters may be unacceptable for precise breakthrough studies. Research has been conducted successfully to produce nearly evenly distributed coatings of reagents in the equatorial plane of GFFs by application of reagent solutions to the centers of GFFs which are resting on crisscrossing, fine, stainless-steel wire. Distributions of coatings have been determined by punching out twenty-one 5-mm circles from each GFF and analyzing each circle by flow-injection with a UV detector. Lowest achievable relative standard deviations of measurement (RSDs) for reagents in 5-mm circles have been 5 to 7%. Reagents studied have included 1-(2-pyridyl)piperazine (1-2PP), 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), and 1-(9-anthracenylmethyl)piperazine (MAP). Factors affecting the distribution of such coatings include choice of reagent and choice of solvent for the reagent solution.

  14. A project of environmental improvement for Red deer on the Tuscan-Emilian Apennines, Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoloso S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Red deer (Cervus elaphus L. population living on the Tuscan-Emilian Apennines had in 2006 an estimated minimum size of approximately 2275 individuals, which occur in two Regions (Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna and four Provinces (Pistoia, Prato, Florence and Bologna. Since 2000 the population has been target of selective hunting, also in order to respond to the increasing request for concrete solutions against species impact on human activities. In this note we describe a pilot experience of projecting environmental improvement actions - such as restoration and preservation of open areas - purposely intended for Red deer. Surveys concentrated on the mountainous area of Pistoia and Sambuca Pistoiese Communes and in the territories belonging to Tuscany Regional Public Property within the competence of the Pistoiese Apennines Mountain Community or within general public competence. Here, the once pastured zones are affected by the invasion and progressive colonization of arbustive and herbaceous vegetation. Areas which are currently covered by shrubs and/or other pioneer vegetation forms have been located by means of GPS technology. For each area a descriptive paper has been realized, whose aim is including the main information recollected during field surveys jointly with data inferred from the Plan for the Forest Resource Assessment in force. 16 areas we considered fitting this project’s goals have been located, for a total extent of 21 ha: on this surface extensive vegetation cutting by mowing and mulching using mechanical machinery will be carried out in the summer 2007. Where soil position allows, superficial tillage activities with subsequent sowing of autochthonous herbaceous species are planned. In the end we evaluated intervention and correct application terms of Tuscany Forest Law no. 39/00 and Tuscany Forest Regulations (D.P.G.R. no. 48/R/03.

  15. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: findings from Tuscan FADOI Stroke Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite vitamin K antagonists (VKAs are considered the first choice treatment for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF, literature shows their underuse in this context. Since data about VKAs use prior and after acute stroke lack, the aim of this study was to focus on management of anticoagulation with VKAs in this context. Data were retrieved from Tuscan FADOI Stroke Registry, an online data bank aimed to report on characteristics of stroke patients consecutively admitted in Internal Medicine wards in 2010 and 2011. In this period 819 patients with mean age 76.5±12.3 years were enrolled. Data on etiology were available for 715 of them (88.1%, 87% being ischemic and 13% hemorrhagic strokes. AF was present in 238 patients (33%, 165 (69.3% having a known AF before hospitalization, whereas 73 patients (31.7% received a new diagnosis of AF. A percentage of 89% of strokes in patients with known AF were ischemic and 11% hemorrhagic. A percentage of 86.7% of patients with known AF had a CHADS2 ≥2, but only 28.3% were on VKAs before hospitalization. A percentage of 78.8% of patients treated with VKAs before stroke had an international normalized ratio (INR ≤2.0; 68.7% of patients with VKAs-related hemorrhagic strokes had INR ≤3.0. Combined endpoint mortality or severe disability in patients with ischemic stroke associated with AF was present in 47%, while it was present in 19.30% and 19.20% of atherothrombotic and lacunar strokes, respectively. At hospital discharge, VKAs were prescribed in 25.9% of AF related ischemic stroke patients. AF related strokes are burdened by severe outcome but VKAs are dramatically underused in patients with AF, even in higher risk patients. Efforts to improve anticoagulation in this stroke subtype are warranted.

  16. Comparison between different types of glass and aluminum as containers for irradiation samples by neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroor, A; El-Dine, N W; El-Shershaby, A; Abdel-Haleem, A S

    2000-01-01

    Three different types of glass and four different kinds of aluminum sheet have been analyzed using neutron activation analysis. The irradiation facilities of the first Egyptian research reactor (ET-RR-1) and a hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detection system were used for the analysis. Among the 34 identified elements, the isotopes 60Co, 65Zn, 110mAg, 123mTe, 134Cs, 152Eu and 182Ta are of special significance because of their long half-lives, providing a background interference for analyzed samples. A comparison between the different types of containers was made to select the preferred one for sample irradiation.

  17. The role of collective labor contracts and individual characteristics on job satisfaction in Tuscan nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainieri, Milena; Smaldone, Pierluigi; Rosa, Antonella; Carroll, Kathleen

    2017-08-23

    The role played by remuneration strategies in motivating health care professionals is one of the most studied factors. Some studies of nursing home (NH) services, while considering wages and labor market characteristics, do not explicitly account for the influence of the contract itself. This study investigates the relationship between the labor contracts applied in 62 Tuscan NHs and NH aides' job satisfaction with two aims: to investigate the impact of European contracts on employee satisfaction in health care services and to determine possible limitations of research not incorporating these contracts. We apply a multilevel model to data gathered from a staff survey administered in 2014 to all employees of 62 NHs to analyze two levels: individual and NH. Labor contracts were introduced into the model as a variable of NH. Findings show that the factors influencing nursing aides' satisfaction occur at both the individual and NH levels. Organizational characteristics explain 16% of the variation. For individual characteristics, foreign and temporary workers emerge as more satisfied than others. For NH variables, results indicate that the labor contract with the worst conditions is not associated with lower workers' satisfaction. Although working conditions play a relevant role in the job satisfaction of aides, labor contracts do not seem to affect it. Interestingly, aides of the NHs with the contract having the best conditions register a significantly lower level of satisfaction compared to the NHs with the worst contract conditions. This suggests that organizational factors such as culture, team work, and other characteristics, which were not explicitly considered in this study, may be more powerful sources of worker satisfaction than labor contracts. Our analysis has value as a management tool to consider alternative sources as well as the labor contract for employee incentives.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons

  18. A little island with significant groundwater resources: hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical features of the Pianosa aquifer (Tuscan Archipelago, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannecchini, R.; Doveri, M.; Mussi, M.; Nicotra, I.; Puccinelli, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Pianosa Island is one of the seven islands of the Tuscan Archipelago, particularly known for its typical flat morphological structure. It is formed by Neogenic-Quaternary sedimentary rocks, mainly represented by superficial calcarenite and underlying marl and clayey marl. Despite the small extension of the island (just 10,2 km2 wide, coastal perimeter of approximately 18 km, maximum altitude of 29 m a.s.l.) and poor rainfall amount (the annual average is 480,7 mm in 1951-2002 period), the Pianosa aquifer is characterized by significant groundwater resources, which supported the presence of approximately 2,000 people at the end of Eighties. Nevertheless, the groundwater overexploitation and the land use (agricultural activity and cattle-breeding, associated to the local penal settlement activity) caused important sea-water intrusion and pollution phenomena. An improvement of such situation occurs since 1998, owing to the closing of the penal settlement and its activities. This pilot research intends to describe the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical features of the Pianosa Island aquifer system and the groundwater quality several years after the penal settlement closing. The results of a multidisciplinary approach (hydrogeological, geochemical, isotopic) show that the groundwater recharge and circulation are substantially controlled by the hydro-structural conditions. The flat and permeable superficial calcarenite allows a high infiltration rate. The water table flow direction is generally W-E, in accordance with the dip direction of the stratigraphic contact between the calcarenite and the underlying impermeable marly-clayey rocks. However, the latter present conglomerate and sandstone intercalations, sometimes in contact (by angular unconformity) with the calcarenite, determining a general continuity in groundwater circulation, which is phreatic in the calcarenite, and confined in the conglomerate and sandstone horizons. A piezometric depression with values

  19. X-ray fluorescence analysis with micro glass beads using milligram-scale siliceous samples for archeology and geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Shintaro, E-mail: sichi@meiji.ac.jp [Organization for the Strategic Coordination of Research and Intellectual Properties, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Nakamura, Toshihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    A micro glass bead technique was developed to assay precious siliceous samples for geochemical and archeological analyses. The micro-sized (approximately 3.5 mm in diameter and 0.8 mm in height) glass beads were prepared by mixing and fusing 1.1 mg of the powdered sample and 11.0 mg of the alkali lithium tetraborate flux for wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence determination of major oxides (Na{sub 2}O, MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, K{sub 2}O, CaO, TiO{sub 2}, MnO, and total Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The preparation parameters, including temperature and agitation during the fusing process, were optimized for the use of a commercial platinum crucible rather than a custom-made crucible. The procedure allows preparation of minute sample amounts of siliceous samples using conventional fusing equipment. Synthetic calibration standards were prepared by compounding chemical reagents such as oxides, carbonates, and diphosphates. Calibration curves showed good linearity with r values > 0.997, and the lower limits of detection were in the 10s to 100s of μg g{sup −1} range (e.g., 140 μg g{sup −1} for Na{sub 2}O, 31 μg g{sup −1} for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 8.9 μg g{sup −1} for MnO). Using the present method, we determined ten major oxides in igneous rocks, stream sediments, ancient potteries, and obsidian. This was applicable to siliceous samples with various compositions, because of the excellent agreement between the analytical and recommended values of six geochemical references. This minimal-scale analysis may be available for precious and limited siliceous samples (e.g., rock, sand, soil, sediment, clay, and archeological ceramics) in many fields such as archeology and geochemistry. - Highlights: • X-ray fluorescence determination of major oxides was performed using 1.1 mg of sample. • Preparation and measurement techniques of the XRF micro glass bead specimen were optimized. • Calibration curves using synthetic standards showed good

  20. Characteristics and clinical management of acute pulmonary embolism in real world: findings from TUSCAN-PE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism (PE remains one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in cardiovascular setting. Despite much information about clinical aspects and recommendations or clinical guidelines is available from literature, few data exist about the management of PE in real world of internal medicine scenario. Therefore the aim of the present study was to report on characteristics and management of PE patients admitted in this setting. TUSCAN-PE study was a multicenter, observational, retrospective, cohort study aimed to analyze data of PE patients admitted in Internal Medicine wards of Tuscany. Each center was invited to submit anonymously data of at least ten patients consecutively discharged for acute PE in 2012. Data were referred to demographic, clinical, instrumental, prognostic and therapeutic characteristics. A total of 452 patients from 28 Tuscan centers (60.2% F, with mean age 76.01±12.34 years, were enrolled. A total of 87% of patients was admitted from Emergency Department, but only 65.2% of patients with diagnosis of PE. Around one third of diagnoses of PE was performed by internists. In 14.8% of diagnoses was incidental. In 86% of patients, diagnosis was performed by computer tomography pulmonary angiography. Overall mortality was 9.5%, 5.75% being PE-related. Main risk factors enclosed recent respiratory tract infections (55.3%, immobility (42.25%, recent hospital admissions (33.6% and cancer (30.3%. In 65.8% of patients, PE was associated with deep vein thrombosis. 16.6% of patients had a shock index ≥1 and 84.75% simplified pulmonary embolism severity index (PESI score ≥1. A number of 51.5% of patients presented echocardiographic right heart dysfunction, 50.6% and 55.9% of patients presented increased values of troponins and natriuretic peptides, respectively. The following percentage, 6.5%, 71.1% and 22.4%, were defined as high, intermediate and low risk according to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC

  1. Numerical Study of the Effect of the Sample Aspect Ratio on the Ductility of Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) Under Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng

    2016-05-01

    In this article, a systematic numerical study was conducted to study the detailed shear banding evolution in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with various sample aspect ratios under uniaxial compression, and whereby the effect of the sample aspect ratio on the compressive ductility was elucidated. A finite strain viscoelastic model was employed to describe the shear banding nucleation, growth, and coalescence in BMG samples with the help of Anand and Su's theory, which was incorporated into the ABAQUS finite element method code as a user material subroutine VUMAT. The present numerical method was first verified by comparing with the corresponding experimental results, and then parameter analysis was performed to discuss the impact of microstructure parameters on the predicted results. The present modeling will shed some light on enhancing the toughness of BMG structures in the engineering applications.

  2. Investigation of synthesized Be-bearing silicate glass as laboratory reference sample at X-ray electron probe microanalysis of silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belozerova, Olga Yu.; Mikhailov, Mikhail A.; Demina, Tamara V.

    2017-01-01

    The article discusses estimates of the stability and homogeneity in Be-Mg-Al-silicate glass produced by the authors and its applicability as a laboratory reference sample for X-ray electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) of Be-bearing silicate matters: crystals and quenching melt (glasses), silicates and oxides. The results were obtained using Superprobe-733 and Superprobe JXA-8200 (JEOL Ltd, Japan) devices. The sample homogeneity was studied on macro (10-100 μm) and micro (1-10 μm) levels and was evaluated by the scheme of dispersion analysis. The applicability of Be-bearing silicate glass as a reference sample for Mg, Al, Si determinations was tested on the international certified reference glasses and laboratory reference samples of minerals with a known composition. The obtained experimental metrological characteristics correspond to the "applied geochemistry" type of analysis (second category) and suggest that Be-bearing silicate glass is appropriate as a laboratory reference sample for EPMA of Be-bearing silicate matters, silicates and oxides. Using Be-Mg-Al-silicate glass as a reference sample we obtained satisfactory data on the composition of both some minerals including cordierite and beryllium cordierite, beryllium indialite, beryl and metastable phases (chrysoberyl, compounds with structure of β-quartz and petalite).

  3. Measuring primary care services performance: issues and opportunities from a home care pilot experience in the Tuscan health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquini, Lino; Vainieri, Milena

    2008-08-01

    In recent years in Italy, as in other European countries, profound changes have been introduced in health care both at central and regional levels. Most of them were oriented towards a shift from 'hospital-centred' health care to health care based more on primary care services. This transition pursues two objectives: giving more effective responses to citizens' needs and reducing public health expenditure. Changes that involve organizational structure must also be carried out with the introduction of measurement tools that can help in planning and can control the changes. The paper provides the results obtained through the experience of modelling a measurement system for primary care carried out in 2004 and 2005 by some territorial managers and controllers in the Tuscan Health system, and the main issues in measuring primary care services emerging from this pilot experience focused on integrated home care services.

  4. Above the glass ceiling? A comparison of matched samples of female and male executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, K S; Thompson, D E

    1997-06-01

    In this study the authors compare career and work experiences of executive women and men. Female (n = 51) and male (n = 56) financial services executives in comparable jobs were studied through archival information on organizational outcomes and career histories, and survey measures of work experiences. Similarities were found in several organizational outcomes, such as compensation, and many work attitudes. Important differences were found, however, with women having less authority, receiving fewer stock options, and having less international mobility than men. Women at the highest executive levels reported more obstacles than lower level women. The gender differences coupled with women's lower satisfaction with future career opportunities raise questions about whether women are truly above the glass ceiling or have come up against a 2nd, higher ceiling.

  5. Comparison between different types of glass and aluminum as containers for irradiation samples by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sroor, A.; El-Dine, N. Walley; El-Shershaby, A.; Abdel-Haleem, A.S

    2000-01-01

    Three different types of glass and four different kinds of aluminum sheet have been analyzed using neutron activation analysis. The irradiation facilities of the first Egyptian research reactor (ET-RR-1) and a hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detection system were used for the analysis. Among the 34 identified elements, the isotopes {sup 60}Co, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 123m}Te, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 182}Ta are of special significance because of their long half-lives, providing a background interference for analyzed samples. A comparison between the different types of containers was made to select the preferred one for sample irradiation.

  6. Shear modulus of simulated glass-forming model systems: Effects of boundary condition, temperature, and sampling time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Xu, H.; Polińska, P.; Weysser, F.; Baschnagel, J.

    2013-03-01

    The shear modulus G of two glass-forming colloidal model systems in d = 3 and d = 2 dimensions is investigated by means of, respectively, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Comparing ensembles where either the shear strain γ or the conjugated (mean) shear stress τ are imposed, we compute G from the respective stress and strain fluctuations as a function of temperature T while keeping a constant normal pressure P. The choice of the ensemble is seen to be highly relevant for the shear stress fluctuations μF(T) which at constant τ decay monotonously with T following the affine shear elasticity μA(T), i.e., a simple two-point correlation function. At variance, non-monotonous behavior with a maximum at the glass transition temperature Tg is demonstrated for μF(T) at constant γ. The increase of G below Tg is reasonably fitted for both models by a continuous cusp singularity, G(T)∝(1 - T/Tg)1/2, in qualitative agreement with recent theoretical predictions. It is argued, however, that longer sampling times may lead to a sharper transition.

  7. Locating the acoustic source in thin glass plate using low sampling rate data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini Sabzevari, S Amir; Moavenian, Majid

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic source localization is an important step for structural health monitoring (SHM). There are many research studies dealing with localization based on high sampling rate data. In this paper, for the first time, acoustic source is localized on an isotropic plate using low sampling rate data. Previous studies have mainly used a cluster of specific sensors to easily record high sampling rate signals containing qualitative time domain features. This paper proposes a novel technique to localize the acoustic source on isotropic plates by simply implementing a combination of two simple electret microphones and Loci of k-Tuple Distances (LkTD) from the two sensors with low sampling rate data. In fact the method proposes substitution of previous methods based on solving the system of equations and increasing the number of sensors by implementing the selection of LkTD. Unlike most previous studies, estimation of time difference of arrival (TDOA) is based on the frequency properties of the signal rather than it's time properties. An experimental set-up is prepared and experiments are conducted to validate the proposed technique by prediction of the acoustic source location. The experimental results show that TDOA estimations based on low sampling rate data can produce more accurate predictions in comparison with previous studies. It is also shown that the selection of LkTD on the plate has noticeable effects on the performance of this technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Numerically exact correlations and sampling in the two-dimensional Ising spin glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Creighton K; Middleton, A Alan

    2013-04-01

    A powerful existing technique for evaluating statistical mechanical quantities in two-dimensional Ising models is based on constructing a matrix representing the nearest-neighbor spin couplings and then evaluating the Pfaffian of the matrix. Utilizing this technique and other more recent developments in evaluating elements of inverse matrices and exact sampling, a method and computer code for studying two-dimensional Ising models is developed. The formulation of this method is convenient and fast for computing the partition function and spin correlations. It is also useful for exact sampling, where configurations are directly generated with probability given by the Boltzmann distribution. These methods apply to Ising model samples with arbitrary nearest-neighbor couplings and can also be applied to general dimer models. Example results of computations are described, including comparisons with analytic results for the ferromagnetic Ising model, and timing information is provided.

  9. Radiological results for samples collected on paired glass- and cellulose-fiber filters at the Sandia complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig A. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Airborne particulates are collected at U.S. Department of Energy sites that exhibit radiological contamination on the soil surface to help assess the potential for wind to transport radionuclides from the contamination sites. Collecting these samples was originally accomplished by drawing air through a cellulose-fiber filter. These filters were replaced with glass-fiber filters in March 2011. Airborne particulates were collected side by side on the two filter materials between May 2013 and May 2014. Comparisons of the sample mass and the radioactivity determinations for the side-by-side samples were undertaken to determine if the change in the filter medium produced significant results. The differences in the results obtained using the two filter types were assessed visually by evaluating the time series and correlation plots and statistically by conducting a nonparametric matched-pair sign test. Generally, the glass-fiber filters collect larger samples of particulates and produce higher radioactivity values for the gross alpha, gross beta, and gamma spectroscopy analyses. However, the correlation between the radioanalytical results for the glass-fiber filters and the cellulose-fiber filters was not strong enough to generate a linear regression function to estimate the glass-fiber filter sample results from the cellulose-fiber filter sample results.

  10. TL and OSL dose response and stability properties of various commercially glass samples obtained from Turkey for dosimetric purposes in the UV emission spectral region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahiner, Eren

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports Thermoluminescence (TL) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dose response characteristics of ten different commercial glass samples collected from Turkey. Nowadays, glass samples are widely used mostly in objects of everyday life. The study focuses to both TL and OSL dose responses, through a dose region within 1 and 512Gy. Lowest detectable dose limit (LDDL) as well as the respective linearity features of the corresponding dose response curves were studied for both TL and OSL. Moreover, signal reproducibility and fading behaviors have also been studied in detail. For specific samples, the lowest detectable dose was yielded at 2Gy, making thus these samples appropriate for retrospective dosimetry applications. Nevertheless, based on the features reported in the present study, the majority of the samples could be possibly used effectively for dosimetric applications of higher doses in the UV region emission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sampling membrane potential, membrane resistance and electrode resistance with a glass electrode impaled into a single cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebe, M; Jaeger, U

    1980-04-01

    A method is demonstrated to measure membrane resistances and membrane potentials of single cells during impalement by a single glass microelectrode. The intention was to develop a procedure which would provide data almost continuously. Therefore, a frequency-dependent voltage divider network has been chosen to represent the basic electrical properties of the electrode and cell membrane, and used to explore its voltage response to a current stimulus, consisting of two rectangular pulses of different widths. It can be shown that the resolution of the method can be improved by inverting this stimulus so that each polarization becomes a relaxation and vice versa. In order to generate, analyze and display this signal continuously, a device has been designed which has been called 'Electrophysiological Monitor, (E1M2)'. E1M2 provides a current stimulus as input into a standard bridge network and can analyze the summed response of the electrode and cell by a set of sample-hold amplifiers. It then decodes and displays the data continuously, as membrane potential (Em), input resistance of the cell (Rinp) and the electrode resistance (Re) respectively. From Rinp the membrane resistance (Rm) can be deduced. The validity of the method has been examined by measuring these parameters in frog muscle cells. Technical design considerations, the accuracy and possible pitfalls with the suggested procedure are discussed.

  12. Levels and spatial distribution of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in superficial sediments from the marine reserves of the Tuscan Archipelago National Park (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perra, Guido; Focardi, Silvano Ettore; Guerranti, Cristiana

    2013-11-15

    Surface sediments from marine reserves of the Tuscan Archipelago National Park (Italy), including remote islands not directly affected by anthropogenic influences, were analyzed for two dominant perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), namely perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), using LC-ESI-MS/MS. The concentrations of PFOS were low, with medians ranging from 0.25 to 1.50 ng/g dry wt, whereas PFOA was always below the detection limit of 0.1 ng/g dry wt. The present paper can be considered a baseline study useful in future environmental monitoring programs.

  13. Phytochemical composition and antioxidant activity of Tuscan bee pollen of different botanic origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Domenici

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the apicultural products, the honey bee-pollen is growing in commercial interest due to its high nutritional properties. For the first time, bee-pollen samples from Tuscany (Italy were studied to evaluate botanical origin, phytochemical composition and antioxidant activity. The investigated pollen loads were composed of three botanical families: Castanea, Rubus and Cistus.The highest levels of proteins and lipids were detected in Rubus pollen. Castanea pollen contained greater polyphenols, flavonoids and anthocyanins content, while the highest flavonols level wasdetected in Cistus pollen. These results were also confirmed by front-face fluorescence spectroscopy, used here, for the first time, as a fast tool to characterize bee-pollens.

  14. Bioactivity of 1.25CaO.SiO2 glass: an FTIR and X-ray study on powdered samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branda, F; Fresa, R; Costantini, A; Buri, A

    1996-12-01

    Powdered samples (170-230 mesh) of a glass of composition 1.25CaO.SiO2 were soaked in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The powders were submitted to Fourier transform infrared transmission spectroscopy as coarse powders (such as drawn out from the SBF) and as fine powders (soaked and subsequently ground). Soaked samples were submitted to differential thermal analysis (DTA) and the crystalline phases formed during heating in the DTA apparatus were identified by means of X-ray diffraction analysis. The method appears to be useful in studying the mechanism of deposition of the hydroxyapatite layer. It is documented, by using the same method, that the mechanism involves the reactions of hydrolysis and successive condensation and repolymerization of the silicate substrate. These reactions are very fast. Extensive Ca2+ cation depletion occurs, but appears to be slower.

  15. Quantification of VX vapor in ambient air by liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometric analysis of glass bead filled sampling tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald A; Smith, Wendy L; Nguyen, Nam-Phuong; Crouse, Kathy L; Crouse, Charles L; Norman, Steven D; Jakubowski, E Michael

    2011-02-15

    An analysis method has been developed for determining low parts-per-quadrillion by volume (ppqv) concentrations of nerve agent VX vapor actively sampled from ambient air. The method utilizes glass bead filled depot area air monitoring system (DAAMS) sampling tubes with isopropyl alcohol extraction and isotope dilution using liquid chromatography coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS) with positive ion electrospray ionization for quantitation. The dynamic range was from one-tenth of the worker population limit (WPL) to the short-term exposure limit (STEL) for a 24 L air sample taken over a 1 h period. The precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated using liquid-spiked tubes, and the collection characteristics of the DAAMS tubes were assessed by collecting trace level vapor generated in a 1000 L continuous flow chamber. The method described here has significant improvements over currently employed thermal desorption techniques that utilize a silver fluoride pad during sampling to convert VX to a higher volatility G-analogue for gas chromatographic analysis. The benefits of this method are the ability to directly analyze VX with improved selectivity and sensitivity, the injection of a fraction of the extract, quantitation using an isotopically labeled internal standard, and a short instrument cycle time.

  16. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  17. Optimized Synthesis of Foam Glass from Recycled CRT Panel Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Most of the panel glass from cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is landfilled today. Instead of landfilling, the panel glass can be turned into new environment-friendly foam glass. Low density foam glass is an effective heat insulating material and can be produced just by using recycle glass and foaming...... additives. In this work we recycle the CRT panel glass to synthesize the foam glass as a crucial component of building and insulating materials. The synthesis conditions such as foaming temperature, duration, glass particle size, type and concentrations of foaming agents, and so on are optimized...... by performing systematic experiments. In particular, the concentration of foaming agents is an important parameter that influences the size of bubbles and the distribution of bubbles throughout the sample. The foam glasses are characterised regarding density and open/closed porosity. Differential scanning...

  18. Determination of major, minor and trace elements in rock samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Progress in the utilization of borate glasses as targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Tácito Dantas F.; Escalfoni, Rainério, Jr.; da Fonseca, Teresa Cristina O.; Miekeley, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The present work is a continuation of a research study performed at our laboratory aiming at the multielement analysis of rock samples (basalts and shale) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in combination with laser ablation using borate glasses as analytical targets. Argon, nitrogen-argon mixtures and helium were evaluated as cell gases, the latter confirming its better performance. Different operational parameters of the laser, such as gas flow, energy, focus, scanning speed and sampling frequency were optimized. External calibration was made with standards prepared by fusion of geological reference materials (basalts 688 and BCR-2, obsidian SRM 278, and shale SGR-1) of different mass fractions in the meta-tetra borate matrix. Coefficients of determination ( R2) were > 0.99 for 30 elements from o total of 40 determined. Method validation was then performed using additional certified reference materials (BHVO-2, BIR-1, SCo-1) produced as borate targets in a similar way. Accuracies were better than 10% for most of the elements studied and analytical precisions, calculated from the residual standard deviations of calibration curves were, typically, between 6% and 10%. Additionally, the semiquantitative TotalQuant® technique was applied, which gave, within the expected uncertainty for this calibration technique, concordant results when compared to the quantitative external calibration procedure. Both methods were then used for the analysis of marine shale samples, which are of great geological interest in petroleum prospecting.

  19. Determination of major, minor and trace elements in rock samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Progress in the utilization of borate glasses as targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Tacito Dantas F. [Departmento de Quimica da Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG) (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Brasilia (IFB) (Brazil); Escalfoni, Rainerio [Departmento de Quimica da Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Centro de Pesquisas Leopoldo A. Miguez de Mello da Petrobras (CENPES) (Brazil); Fonseca, Teresa Cristina O. da [Centro de Pesquisas Leopoldo A. Miguez de Mello da Petrobras (CENPES) (Brazil); Miekeley, Norbert, E-mail: miekeley@puc-rio.br [Departmento de Quimica da Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    The present work is a continuation of a research study performed at our laboratory aiming at the multielement analysis of rock samples (basalts and shale) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in combination with laser ablation using borate glasses as analytical targets. Argon, nitrogen-argon mixtures and helium were evaluated as cell gases, the latter confirming its better performance. Different operational parameters of the laser, such as gas flow, energy, focus, scanning speed and sampling frequency were optimized. External calibration was made with standards prepared by fusion of geological reference materials (basalts 688 and BCR-2, obsidian SRM 278, and shale SGR-1) of different mass fractions in the meta-tetra borate matrix. Coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}) were > 0.99 for 30 elements from o total of 40 determined. Method validation was then performed using additional certified reference materials (BHVO-2, BIR-1, SCo-1) produced as borate targets in a similar way. Accuracies were better than 10% for most of the elements studied and analytical precisions, calculated from the residual standard deviations of calibration curves were, typically, between 6% and 10%. Additionally, the semiquantitative TotalQuant (registered) technique was applied, which gave, within the expected uncertainty for this calibration technique, concordant results when compared to the quantitative external calibration procedure. Both methods were then used for the analysis of marine shale samples, which are of great geological interest in petroleum prospecting.

  20. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  1. Comparison of three different sample preparation procedures for the determination of traffic-related elements in airborne particulate matter collected on glass fiber filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Ivan N B; Welz, Bernhard; Vale, Maria Goreti R; de Andrade, Jailson B; Smichowski, Patricia; Shaltout, Abdallah A; Colares, Lígia; Carasek, Eduardo

    2012-01-15

    Three different procedures for sample preparation have been compared for the determination of Cu, Mo and Sb in airborne particulate matter (APM) collected on glass fiber filters using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). Direct solid sample analysis of the ground filters was compared with microwave-assisted acid leaching with aqua regia and ultrasound-assisted extraction also using aqua regia. The main absorption line at 324.754 nm or the secondary line at 216.509 nm was used for the determination of Cu, depending on the analyte content in the samples. The primary absorption line at 313.259 nm was used for Mo and the secondary line at 212.739 nm for Sb determination. The limits of detection (LOD, 3σ) found for the direct solid sampling method, based on ten atomizations of an unused filter were 15 μg g(-1) for all three analytes, corresponding to 40 ng m(-3) for a typical air volume of 1,440 m(3) collected over a period of 24h. The LOD for the other two methods were less than a factor of two inferior, but the total time required for an analysis was significantly longer. The repeatability of the measurements was between 3 and 9% (n=5), and the results obtained with the three methods did not show any significant difference. The ratio between the three analytes on the filters from areas of intense traffic was found to be around Cu:Mo:Sb≈4:1:1.4, which suggests that the source of all three elements is brake linings, i.e., related to automobile traffic. When the ratio deviated significantly from the above values, the source of contamination was assumed to be of different origin.

  2. Determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter collected on glass fiber filters using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Rennan G.O., E-mail: rgoa01@terra.com.br [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica Ambiental, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Campus Sao Cristovao, 49.100-000, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Vignola, Fabiola; Castilho, Ivan N.B. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G.; Welz, Bernhard [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Smichowski, Patricia [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ferreira, Sergio L.C. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-290, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker-Ross, Helmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V., Department Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    A study has been undertaken to assess the capability of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter (APM) collected on glass fiber filters using direct solid sampling. The main Hg absorption line at 253.652 nm was used for all determinations. The certified reference material NIST SRM 1648 (Urban Particulate Matter) was used to check the accuracy of the method, and good agreement was obtained between published and determined values. The characteristic mass was 22 pg Hg. The limit of detection (3{sigma}), based on ten atomizations of an unexposed filter, was 40 ng g{sup -1}, corresponding to 0.12 ng m{sup -3} in the air for a typical air volume of 1440 m{sup 3} collected within 24 h. The limit of quantification was 150 ng g{sup -1}, equivalent to 0.41 ng m{sup -3} in the air. The repeatability of measurements was better than 17% RSD (n = 5). Mercury concentrations found in filter samples loaded with APM collected in Buenos Aires, Argentina, were between < 40 ng g{sup -1} and 381 {+-} 24 ng g{sup -1}. These values correspond to a mercury concentration in the air between < 0.12 ng m{sup -3} and 1.47 {+-} 0.09 ng m{sup -3}. The proposed procedure was found to be simple, fast and reliable, and suitable as a screening procedure for the determination of mercury in APM samples.

  3. Imaging spectroscopy based strategies for ceramic glass contaminants removal in glass recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    The presence of ceramic glass contaminants in glass recycling plants reduces production quality and increases production costs. The problem of ceramic glass inspection is related to the fact that its detectable physical and pictorial properties are quite similar to those of glass. As a consequence, at the sorting plant scale, ceramic glass looks like normal glass and is detectable only by specialized personnel. In this paper an innovative approach for ceramic glass recognition, based on imaging spectroscopy, is proposed and investigated. In order to define suitable inspection strategies for the separation between useful (glass) and polluting (ceramic glass) materials, reference samples of glass and ceramic glass presenting different colors, thicknesses, shapes and manufacturing processes have been selected. Reflectance spectra have been obtained using two equipment covering the visible and near infrared wavelength ranges (400-1000 and 1000-1700 nm). Results showed as recognition of glass and ceramic glass is possible using selected wavelength ratios, in both visible and near infrared fields.

  4. Heliostat glass survey and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, M. A.; Russin, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The glass characterization and specification task included a comprehensive survey of both foreign and domestic sources of low distortion, low iron, .125 nominal flat glass for use in heliostat applications. PNL attempted to determine the availability of production lines, estimate industry interest, lead times, and costs for producing glass for second surface heliostat mirrors for the Barstow pilot plant and future commercial plants. Glass samples representative of the industry production capability were collected and characterized. The results of the survey and analysis were used to generate a specification for the Barstow Pilot Plant glass procurement.

  5. Kinematic reconstruction of a thin-skinned, deep-water fold and thrust belt: the case of the Outer Tuscan Nappe (Umbria, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carboni, Filippo; Barchi, Massimiliano; Brozzetti, Francesco; Cruciani, Francesco; Ercoli, Maurizio; Mirabella, Francesco; Porreca, Massimiliano

    2017-04-01

    Fold-and-Thrust Belts occur worldwide in a variety of tectonic settings. Most of them develop in a deepwater environment (Deep Water Fold-and-Thrust Belts, DWFTBs), at both continental passive and active margins, driven by gravity (near-field stresses) and tectonic forces (far-field stresses) respectively. Here we present a multidisciplinary geological study of the Outer Tuscan Nappe (OTN), an imbricate thrust system in the Northern Apennines of Italy, emplaced in Early Miocene times in deep water environment. Despite the wide scientific literature, the geometry and the kinematic evolution of the OTN were never reconstructed in detail. Furthermore, its total amount of shortening and then its shortening rate, were never measured and calculated through proper restoration techniques. The OTN involves a 2000 m thick, Late Cretaceous-Tertiary "Tuscan" succession, consisting of arenaceous turbidites (Macigno Fm.), overlying a thick level of marls and calcarenites (Scaglia Toscana Fm.), which form the major basal décollement of the imbricate system. Along this basal décollement, the OTN overthrusts eastward younger turbidite units (Mt. Rentella and Marnoso-Arenacea successions). In this study we interpreted a set of 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with a deep borehole, crossing transversally (WSW-ENE) and longitudinally (NNW-SSE) the OTN. To better constrain the interpretation, selected controls of key outcrops was performed, mainly aimed at reconstructing: i) the actual transport direction during the OTN emplacement; ii) the position of the subsequent, NNW-SSE trending, extensional faults dissecting the tectonic wedge; iii) the role of transversal faults, longitudinally segmenting the thrust system. Combining the aforesaid data, we drew an integrated 20 km long geological cross section showing the internal geometry of the imbricate thrust system, down to the main basal décollement. The integrated section was successively restored in 2D using the software

  6. (RS)-glucoraphanin purified from Tuscan black kale and bioactivated with myrosinase enzyme protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoppo, Sabrina; Galuppo, Maria; Iori, Renato; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2014-12-01

    Ischemic stroke is the result of a transient or permanent reduction in cerebral blood flow caused by the occlusion of a cerebral artery via an embolus or local thrombosis. Restoration of blood supply to ischemic tissues can cause additional damage known as reperfusion injury that can be more damaging than the initial ischemia. This study was aimed to examine the possible neuroprotective role of (RS)-glucoraphanin, bioactivated with myrosinase enzyme (bioactive RS-GRA), in an experimental rat model of brain ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R). RS-GRA is a thiosaccharidic compound found in Brassicaceae, notably in Tuscan black kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala sabellica). The mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of bioactive RS-GRA on inflammatory and apoptotic responses, induced by carotid artery occlusion in rats, was carefully examined. Cerebral I/R was induced by the clamping of carotid artery for 1h, followed by 40 min of reperfusion through the release of clamp. Our results have clearly shown that administration of bioactive RS-GRA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) 15 min after ischemia, significantly reduces proinflammatory parameters, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase expression (iNOS), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), nuclear factor (NF)-kB traslocation as well as the triggering of the apoptotic pathway (TUNEL and Caspase 3 expression). Taken together our data have shown that bioactive RS-GRA possesses beneficial neuroprotective effects in counteracting the brain damage associated to I/R. Therefore, bioactive RS-GRA, could be a useful treatment in the cerebral ischemic stroke.

  7. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  8. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne.......The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  9. Protection of window glass from acoustic leakage

    OpenAIRE

    Lych, Sergij; Rakobovchuk, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    In a survey was presented an analysis of the most common glass samples on the Ukrainian market on their protection level against leakage of acoustic information. The glass samples were studied by means of roentgen analysis, and the impact of elemental composition of glass according to a laser beam reflection factor was defined.

  10. Glass Glimpsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  11. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  12. Contact solid-phase microextraction with uncoated glass and polydimethylsiloxane-coated fibers versus solvent sampling for the determination of hydrocarbons in adhesion secretions of Madagascar hissing cockroaches Gromphadorrhina portentosa (Blattodea) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Heike; Schmitt, Christian; Betz, Oliver; Albert, Klaus; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2015-04-03

    Molecular profiles of adhesion secretions of Gromphadorrhina portentosa (Madagascar hissing cockroach, Blattodea) were investigated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with particular focus on a comprehensive analysis of linear and branched hydrocarbons. For this purpose, secretions from the tarsi (feet), possibly contributing to adhesion on smooth surfaces, and control samples taken from the tibiae (lower legs), which contain general cuticular hydrocarbons that are supposed to be not involved in the biological adhesion function, were analyzed and their molecular fingerprints compared. A major analytical difficulty in such a study constitutes the representative, spatially controlled, precise and reproducible sampling from a living insect as well as the minute quantities of insect secretions on both tarsi and tibiae. Thus, three different in vivo sampling methods were compared in terms of sampling reproducibility and extraction efficiency by replicate measurement of samples from tarsi and tibiae. While contact solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber showed higher peak intensities, a self-made uncoated glass fiber had the best repeatability in contact-SPME sampling. Chromatographic profiles of these two contact-SPME sampling methods were statistically not significantly different. Inter-individual variances were larger than potentially existing minor differences in molecular patterns of distinct sampling methods. Sampling by solvent extraction was time consuming, showed lower sensitivities and was less reproducible. In general, sampling by contact-SPME with a cheap glass fiber turned out to be a viable alternative to PDMS-SPME sampling. Hydrocarbon patterns of the tarsal adhesion secretions were qualitatively similar to those of epicuticular hydrocarbon profiles of the tibiae. However, hydrocarbons were in general less abundant in tarsal secretions than secretions from tibiae.

  13. Conceptual design and sample preparation of electrode covered single glass macro-capillaries for studying the effect of an external electric field on particle guiding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wartak, A. [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Bereczky, R.J., E-mail: bereczky.reka@atomki.mta.hu [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen, P.O. Box 51 (Hungary); Kowarik, G. [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Tőkési, K. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen, P.O. Box 51 (Hungary); Aumayr, F. [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    We present the design and construction of a macroscopic glass capillary covered by electrodes on the outside. With these new capillary targets it will be possible to study the influence of an external electric field on the process of guiding of charged particles through a capillary. The new degrees of freedoms will contribute to both a better fundamental understanding of the guiding phenomenon but might also be of use in practical applications.

  14. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to a combination of Tuscan black cabbage, “tri-coloured” Swiss chard, “bicoloured” spinach and “blu savoy” cabbage and maintenance of normal blood LDL-cholesterol concentration pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    related to a combination of Tuscan black cabbage, “tri-coloured” Swiss chard, “bi-coloured” spinach and “blu savoy” cabbage and maintenance of normal blood cholesterol concentration. The food that is the subject of the health claim, a combination of Tuscan black cabbage (Brassica Oleracea botrytis L.......), “tri-coloured” Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris ciclaL.), “bi-coloured” spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and “blu savoy” cabbage (Brassica oleracea convar. capitata var. sabauda L.), is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect, maintenance of normal blood LDL-cholesterol concentration, is a beneficial...... physiological effect. No human intervention studies from which conclusions could be drawn for the scientific substantiation of the claim were provided by the applicant. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between consumption of a combination of Tuscan black cabbage...

  15. Investigation of magnetic spin glass property in La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} sample using non-linear AC susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Punith V., E-mail: drvldayal@gmail.com; Manju, M. R., E-mail: drvldayal@gmail.com; Dayal, Vijaylakshmi, E-mail: drvldayal@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Maharaja Institute of Technology, Mysore-571438, Karnataka (India)

    2014-04-24

    We present a comprehensive study on origin of Spin Glass (SG) property in polycrystalline La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} perovskite oxide using linear and higher order ac susceptibility (χ) measurements. The third order harmonic susceptibility (χ{sub 3}) vs. temperature (K) with varying magnetic fields from 0.95 to 9.45 Oe and the divergence in their χ{sub 3} (max) allows us to infer the SG behavior occurring in the sample possibly due to co-operative freezing of the spins.

  16. Energetics of glass fragmentation: Experiments on synthetic and natural glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.; Kennedy, L. A.

    2013-11-01

    Natural silicate glasses are an essential component of many volcanic rock types including coherent and pyroclastic rocks; they span a wide range of compositions, occur in diverse environments, and form under a variety of pressure-temperature conditions. In subsurface volcanic environments (e.g., conduits and feeders), melts intersect the thermodynamically defined glass transition temperature to form glasses at elevated confining pressures and under differential stresses. We present a series of room temperature experiments designed to explore the fundamental mechanical and fragmentation behavior of natural (obsidian) and synthetic glasses (Pyrex™) under confining pressures of 0.1-100 MPa. In each experiment, glass cores are driven to brittle failure under compressive triaxial stress. Analysis of the load-displacement response curves is used to quantify the storage of energy in samples prior to failure, the (brittle) release of elastic energy at failure, and the residual energy stored in the post-failure material. We then establish a relationship between the energy density within the sample at failure and the grain-size distributions (D-values) of the experimental products. The relationship between D-values and energy density for compressive fragmentation is significantly different from relationships established by previous workers for decompressive fragmentation. Compressive fragmentation is found to have lower fragmentation efficiency than fragmentation through decompression (i.e., a smaller change in D-value with increasing energy density). We further show that the stress storage capacity of natural glasses can be enhanced (approaching synthetic glasses) through heat treatment.

  17. OPTICALLY HOMOGENEOUS PHOSPHATE GLASSES DOPED WITH METAL NANOPARTICLES

    OpenAIRE

    Shakhgil'dyan, Georgiy; Savinkov, Vitaliy; Konev, Denis; Paleari, A.; Sigaev, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The technique of batch preparation, melting, glass working and nanoscale modification of the structure of phosphate glass doped with gold nanoparticles was developed. Glass samples containing different amounts of phosphorus oxide were synthesized. Heat treatments of the samples were held in a gradient furnace. Physical, spectral-luminescent and nonlinear optical properties of the samples were studied.

  18. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to a combination of Tuscan black cabbage, “tri-coloured” Swiss chard, “bicoloured” spinach and “blu savoy” cabbage and protection of blood lipids from

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Italsur s.r.l., submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Italy, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim...... related to a combination of Tuscan black cabbage, “tri-coloured” Swiss chard, “bi-coloured” spinach and “blu savoy” cabbage and protection of blood lipids from oxidative damage. The food that is the subject of the health claim, a combination of Tuscan black cabbage (Brassica Oleracea botrytis L.), “tri......-coloured” Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris ciclaL.), “bi-coloured” spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and “blu savoy” cabbage (Brassica oleracea convar. capitata var. sabauda L.), is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect, protection of blood lipids from oxidative damage, may be a beneficial physiological effect...

  19. Volcanic glasses, their origins and alteration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Long, W.

    1984-01-01

    Natural glass can be formed by volcanic processes, lightning (fulgarites) burning coal, and by meteorite impact. By far the most common process is volcanic - basically the glass is rapidly chilled molten rock. All natural glasses are thermodynamically unstable and tend to alter chemically or to crystallize. The rate of these processes is determined by the chemical composition of the magma. The hot and fluid basaltic melts have a structure that allows for rapid crystal growth, and seldom forms glass selvages greater than a few centimeters thick, even when the melt is rapidly cooled by extrusion in the deep sea. In contrast the cooler and very viscous rhyolitic magmas can yield bodies of glass that are tens of meters thick. These highly polymerized magmas have a high silica content - often 71-77% SiO2. Their high viscosity inhibits diffusive crystal growth. Basalt glass in sea water forms an alteration zone called palagonite whose thickness increases linearly with time. The rate of diffusion of water into rhyolitic glass, which follows the relationship - thickness = k (time) 1 2, has been determined as a function of the glass composition and temperature. Increased SiO2 increases the rate, whereas increased CaO, MgO and H2O decrease the rate. The activation energy of water diffusion varies from about 19 to 22 kcal/mol. for the glasses studied. The diffusion of alkali out of rhyolite glass occurs simultaneously with water diffusion into the glass. The rate of devitrification of rhyolitic glass is a function of the glass viscosity, which in turn is a function of water content and temperature. Although all of the aforementioned processes tend to destroy natural glasses, the slow rates of these processes, particularly for rhyolitic glass, has allowed samples of glass to persist for 60 million years. ?? 1984.

  20. Rotating sample method to measure thickness of transparent glass wafer using Michelson interferometer%迈克耳孙干涉仪旋转样品法测量透明玻璃厚度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王仁洲; 杨涛

    2014-01-01

    A rotating sample method to measure the thickness of transparent glass wafer was pro-posed using a Michelson interferometer .In comparison to the traditional method based on the interfer-ence of white beams ,the different interference fringes were generated by changing the angle between the wafer and the light .The thickness of the transparent glass wafer was accurately measured accord-ing to the changes of the fringes and the rotation angle .%使用迈克耳孙干涉仪通过旋转样品测量透明玻璃厚度。与白光干涉原理测薄片厚度不同,实验通过改变在光的传播路径上垂直放置的透明玻璃与光传播方向的角度,使相干光的干涉条纹发生变化,利用干涉条纹与转过角度、透明玻璃厚度之间的关系,通过实验准确测量出透明玻璃的厚度。

  1. Lunar glass compositions - Apollo 16 core sections 60002 and 60004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H. O. A.; Tsai, H.-M.

    1975-01-01

    Approximately 500 glasses between 1 mm and 125 microns in size have been analyzed from fourteen samples from the Apollo 16 core sections 60002 and 60004. The majority of glasses have compositions comparable to those found in previous studies of lunar surface soils; however, two new and distinct glass compositions that are probably derived in part from mare material occur in the core samples. The major glass composition in all samples is that of Highland Basalt glass, but it also appears that high-K Fra Mauro Basalt (KREEP) glass is more common at the Apollo 16 site than was previously thought. The relative abundance of glasses within the core samples is random in distribution: each sample is characterized by a particular assemblage and distribution of the constituent glass compositions.

  2. Interfacial investigation and mechanical properties of glass-Al-glass anodic bonding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lifang; Xue, Yongzhi; Shi, Fangrong

    2017-10-01

    Glass-Al-glass with Al as common anode was successfully bonded together through the anodic bonding process. SEM and EDS were conducted to investigate the interfacial structure of the glass-Al-glass samples. Special attention was given to the element distribution after the bonding process. The element profile of the transitional layer was investigated by glow discharge optical emission microscopy. The results showed that ion migration played an important role during the anodic bonding process, Na+ would precipitate from the back of the glass, and a Na+ depletion region formed at the bonding interface. At the same time, O2‑ diffused into the bonding interface and reacted with the Al, which resulted in a successful bonding process. Furthermore, Al migrated into the glass, which could enhance the bonding process. The peak current of the glass-Al-glass bonding was two times larger than that of the Al-glass bonding, which meant that the glass-Al-glass bonding process could be considered equivalent to two individual Al-glass bonding processes. Tensile strength tests showed that the glass was fractured, and the fractures propagated into the bonding interface, which indicated a reliable bonding process.

  3. Heliostat glass survey and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, M.A.; Rusin, J.M.

    1978-09-01

    A comprehensive survey of both foreign and domestic sources of low distortion, high transmission flat glass with a nominal thickness of 3 mm was undertaken. The purpose of the survey was to determine the characteristics, availability and cost of glass for use in second surface heliostat mirrors for the Barstow pilot plant and future commercial central receiver plants. Information obtained from the manufacturers and the results of investigations performed at Sandia Laboratories at Albuquerque and Livermore were compiled with the PNL characterization data to generate the specifications for the GFE glass to be used in the Barstow pilot plant. During the course of the survey, nine of the major glass manufacturers were contacted for information and assistance. These manufacturers were PPG, Corning, Ford, LOF, CE, ASG, Fourco, Schott, and Guardian. Eleven different flat glass samples from seven of the domestic sources and one foreign source were characterized for solar transmittance, flatness and durability. The samples were representative of four different manufacturing processes: float, fusion, rolled, and twin ground. The results and implications of these glass characterization studies and a brief summary of the manufacturer survey are presented.

  4. Glass Fibers: Quo Vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Mäder

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1930s, the process of melting glass and subsequently forming fibers, in particular discontinuous fiber glass or continuous glass filaments, evolved into commercial-scale manufacturing.[...

  5. Influence of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) on paleomagnetic sampling in volcanic glasses: a case study on rheomorphic ignimbrites of the Yellowstone hotspot-track, southern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, D.; Coe, R. S.; Murphy, J.; Bodiford, S.; Kelly, H.; Foster, S.; Spinardi, F.; Reichow, M. K.; Knott, T.; Branney, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale explosive volcanism, associated with the Yellowstone hotspot, occurred in the central Snake River Plain between 12.5-8 Ma. It is characterized by unusually high-temperature, intensely welded, rheomorphic rhyolitic ignimbrites, typical of what is now known as 'Snake River (SR)-type volcanism'. Individual eruption volumes likely exceed 450 km3 but are poorly known due to the difficulty of correlating units between widely spaced (50-200 km) exposures along the north and south of the plain, when some occurred too close-spaced in time for radiometric resolution. Our goal is to use a combination of paleomagnetic, petrographic, chemical and field characterization to establish robust correlations, allowing us to develop a regional stratigraphy, and constrain ignimbrite eruption volumes and frequencies. This presentation focuses on how to sample rheomorphic, SR-type ignimbrites for paleomagnetic studies given the potential effects of hot, rheomorphic deformation. Individual SR-type ignimbrite cooling-units have an upper and lower glassy margins (vitrophyre) enclosing a lithoidal (microcrystalline) zone. We have sampled dozens of ignimbrites in detail and have observed that the lithoidal interiors are preferable to the glassy margins for paleomagnetic studies. We hypothesize that the glassy margins retain an anisotropic fabric related to emplacement compaction and/or shearing that affects their ability to accurately record the magnetic field during cooling. In the lithoidal interiors this anisotropic fabric was overprinted by continued grain growth and/or alteration and, therefore, may accurately record the paleomagnetic field. Paleomagnetic samples from vitrophyres generally have a higher anisotropy in magnetic susceptibility than lithoidal samples. The remanent magnetic directions recorded in samples with high anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility are often deflected away from the site mean and closer to the plane of easy magnetic susceptibility. Since the

  6. Investigation of influencing parameters during diesel-soot sampling on glass-wool or ceramic filters. Einfluss der Stoerkomponenten beim Sammeln von Dieselruss auf Glasfaser- und Keramikfiltern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel, G.; Mollenhauer, K.; Beckmann, C.; Bollmann-Weiss, R.

    1990-07-01

    The nitrification of pyrene during particulate sampling on filters depends on sampling time, NO[sub 2] concentration and the humidity of dilution air. The 1N-pyrene content was doubled during 60 minutes sampling time at 1 ppm NO[sub 2]. The nitrification rates increased with decreasing water content of the samling air. The formation of 1N-pyrene can be calculated by the contents of pyrene, NO[sub 2] and H[sub 2]O: dm(1NPyr)/dt=k x NO[sub 2]/H[sub 2]O = x f x m(Pyr), with k = 15.7 and f = 1.22. The collection efficiency of the ceramic particulate trap exceeds 90% at engine conditions below regeneration temperature. At this condition the sulfate emission was also considerably reduced. During regeneration the efficiency decreases to 65% where by both sulfate and volatile particle mass increase. The particulate trap changes the composition of the emitted particulates and reduces the emissions of pyrene and 1N-pyrene. There is no increase in the emission of pyrene or 1N-pyrene during trap regeneration. (orig.) With 57 refs., 20 tabs., 45 figs.

  7. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  8. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production......Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  9. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  10. Reinforcement of conventional glass-ionomer restorative material with short glass fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammouda, Ibrahim M

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the strengthening effect of glass fibers when added to conventional glass-ionomer restorative material. Glass fibers were incorporated into glass-ionomer powder in 3 wt% and 5 wt%. The fibers used had 1 mm length and 10 microm thickness. These criteria of fiber length, diameter, and concentration represent a new approach for reinforcing conventional glass-ionomer [Medifill, conventional restorative glass-ionomer]. The mechanical properties tested were diametral tensile strength, hardness, flexural strength, flexural modulus and fracture toughness after 24-h and 7-days of storage in deionized water. Glass short fibers were mixed thoroughly into the glass-ionomer powder before mixing with the cement liquid. Samples of specific dimensions were prepared for each time interval and fiber loading according to the manufacturer's instructions and international standards. Hardness was measured using a micro-hardness tester at 100 gram applied load for 15 s. The other mechanical properties were measured using a Lloyd universal testing machine. The results showed increased diametral tensile strength, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and fracture toughness by the addition of glass fibers. There was an appreciable increase of the tested mechanical properties of glass-ionomer restorative material as a result of increasing fiber loading and water storage for 1 week. It was concluded that conventional glass-ionomer can be reinforced by the addition of short glass fibers.

  11. Modification of resin modified glass ionomer cement by addition of bioactive glass nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valanezhad, Alireza; Odatsu, Tetsuro; Udoh, Koichi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Sawase, Takashi; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, sol-gel derived nanoparticle calcium silicate bioactive glass was added to the resin-modified light cure glass-ionomer cement to assess the influence of additional bioactive glass nanoparticles on the mechanical and biological properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. The fabricated bioactive glass nanoparticles added resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (GICs) were immersed in the phosphate buffer solution for 28 days to mimic real condition for the mechanical properties. Resin-modified GICs containing 3, 5 and 10 % bioactive glass nanoparticles improved the flexural strength compared to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement and the samples containing 15 and 20 % bioactive glass nanoparticles before and after immersing in the phosphate buffer solution. Characterization of the samples successfully expressed the cause of the critical condition for mechanical properties. Cell study clarified that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement with high concentrations of bioactive glass nanoparticles has higher cell viability and better cell morphology compare to control groups. The results for mechanical properties and toxicity approved that the considering in selection of an optimum condition would have been a more satisfying conclusion for this study.

  12. Phase Stability Determinations of DWPF Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, S.L.

    1999-10-22

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. To fulfill this requirement, glass samples were heat treated at various times and temperatures. These results will provide guidance to the repository program about conditions to be avoided during shipping, handling and storage of DWPF canistered waste forms.

  13. Phase separation in an ionomer glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Thostrup; Tian, K.V.; Dobó-Nagy, C.

    2015-01-01

    conclusively determined. In this work, we identify these phases by performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses on both the as-received glass and heat-treated samples. We detected three glass transitions in the as-received G338 glass during DSC upscaning, implying...... amorphous phases in G388 are Ca/Na-Al-Si-O, Ca-Al-F and Ca-P-O-F phases, respectively. However, the exact chemical compositions of the three phases still require further exploration. The results of this work are important for understanding the impact of phase separation within ionomer glasses on the setting...

  14. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inès M. M. M. Ponsot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900–1000 °C, whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C. The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests.

  15. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsot, Inès M. M. M.; Pontikes, Yiannis; Baldi, Giovanni; Chinnam, Rama K.; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Bernardo, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900–1000 °C), whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C). The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests. PMID:28788146

  16. Glass Formation Ability and Kinetics of the Gd55Al20Ni25 Bulk Metallic Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JO Chol-Lyong; XIA Lei; DING Ding; DONG Yuan-Da

    2006-01-01

    @@ We report a new bulk glass-forming alloy Gd55Al20Ni25. The bulk sample of the alloy is prepared in the shape of rods in diameter 2mm by suction casting. The rod exhibits typical amorphous characteristics in the xray diffraction pattern, paramagnetic property at 300K, distinct glass transition and multi-step crystallization behaviour in differential scanning calorimetry traces. The glass formation ability of the alloy is investigated by using the reduced glass transition temperature Tγg and the parameter γ. Kinetics of glass transition and primary crystallization is also studied. The fragility parameter m obtained from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann dependence of glass transition temperature Tg on ln φ (φ is the heating rate) classifies the bulk metallic glasses into the intermediate category according to Angells classification.

  17. Glass-silicon column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  18. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. OLUFOWOBI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the results, the soil sample obtained corresponded to Group A-6 soils identified as ‘fair to poor’ soil type in terms of use as drainage and subgrade material. This justified stabilisation of the soil. Thereafter, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR and direct shear tests were carried out on the soil with and without the addition of the powdered glass. The results showed improvement in the maximum dry density values on addition of the powdered glass and with corresponding gradual increase up to 5% glass powder content after which it started to decrease at 10% and 15% powdered glass content. The highest CBR values of 14.90% and 112.91% were obtained at 5% glass powder content and 5mm penetration for both the unsoaked and soaked treated samples respectively. The maximum cohesion and angle of internal friction values of 17.0 and 15.0 respectively were obtained at 10% glass powder content.

  19. Determination of Reactive Surface Area of Melt Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier,W.L.; Roberts, S.; Smith, D.K.; Hulsey, S.; Newton,L.; Sawvel, A.; Bruton, C.; Papelis, C.; Um, W.; Russell, C. E.; Chapman,J.

    2000-10-01

    A comprehensive investigation of natural and manmade silicate glasses, and nuclear melt glass was undertaken in order to derive an estimate of glass reactive surface area. Reactive surface area is needed to model release rates of radionuclides from nuclear melt glass in the subsurface. Because of the limited availability of nuclear melt glasses, natural volcanic glass samples were collected which had similar textures and compositions as those of melt glass. A flow-through reactor was used to measure the reactive surface area of the analog glasses in the presence of simplified NTS site ground waters. A measure of the physical surface area of these glasses was obtained using the BET gas-adsorption method. The studies on analog glasses were supplemented by measurement of the surface areas of pieces of actual melt glass using the BET method. The variability of the results reflect the sample preparation and measurement techniques used, as well as textural heterogeneity inherent to these samples. Based on measurements of analog and actual samples, it is recommended that the hydraulic source term calculations employ a range of 0.001 to 0.01 m{sup 2}/g for the reactive surface area of nuclear melt glass.

  20. Experimental studies of glass refining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.; Kondos, P.

    1984-01-01

    The basic components of the experimental apparatus were selected and acquired. Techniques were developed for the fabrication of the special crucibles necessary for the experiments. Arrangements were made for the analysis of glass and gas bubble samples for composition information. Donations of major equipment were received for this project from Owens, Illinois where a similar study had been conducted a few year ago. Decisions were made regarding the actual glass composition to be used, the gas to be used in the first experiments, and the temperatures at which the experiments should be conducted. A microcomputer was acquired, and work was begun on interfacing the video analyzer to it.

  1. Stress Optical Coefficient, Test Methodology, and Glass Standard Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    it can be used as an additional glass characterization method . If the SOC of a glass sample is known, the stress state of a glass specimen can be...evaluated through photoelastic methods both qualitatively and quantitatively. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 11 8...ARL-TN-0756 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stress Optical Coefficient, Test Methodology, and Glass Standard Evaluation

  2. STRESS RELAXATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECTED COMMERCIALLY PRODUCED GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chocholoušek J.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a quantitative method of stress relaxation measurement in prismatic glass samples during two different time-temperature regimes using the Sénarmont compensator. Four types of glass (Barium crystal glass, Eutal, Simax, and Container glass were subjected to observation in an assembled measuring device. Results will be used for parameterization of the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Mazurin model and consequently implemented in a finite element method code.

  3. High density fluoride glass calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Q.; Scheltzbaum, J.; Akgun, U.

    2014-04-01

    The unprecedented radiation levels in current Large Hadron Collider runs, and plans to even increase the luminosity creates a need for new detector technologies to be investigated. Quartz plates to replace the plastic scintillators in current LHC calorimeters have been proposed in recent reports. Quartz based Cherenkov calorimeters can solve the radiation damage problem, however light production and transfer have proven to be challenging. This report summarizes the results from a computational study on the performance of a high-density glass calorimeter. High-density, scintillating, fluoride glass, CHG3, was used as the active material. This glass has been developed specifically for hadron collider experiments, and is known for fast response time, in addition to high light yield. Here, the details of a Geant4 model for a sampling calorimeter prototype with 20 layers, and its hadronic as well as electromagnetic performances are reported.

  4. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  5. Kinetic competition during glass formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perepezko, J.H., E-mail: perepezk@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 1509 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Santhaweesuk, C.; Wang, J.Q. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 1509 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Imhoff, S.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • The kinetics of glass formation has been elucidated in an Fe and Au-base alloy. • A critical cooling rate range should be considered for glass formation. • Wedge casting, calorimetry and upquenching data are used to model TTT curves. - Abstract: For vitrification of an alloy melt during cooling there is a kinetic competition with the nucleation and growth of metastable and stable crystalline phases. Many of the measures of glass forming ability (GFA) attempt to capture some of the features of the kinetic competition, but the GFA metrics are static measures and the kinetic processes are dynamic in nature. In fact, the critical cooling rate for glass formation should be viewed in terms of a critical cooling rate range to acknowledge the stochastic nature of crystal nucleation behavior. Direct measurements of the critical cooling rate range confirm this behavior and also provide useful input for kinetics analysis. Usually kinetics analyses are based upon crystallization behavior that is measured either isothermally or upon heating to temperatures near the crystallization onset, T{sub x} and the results are extrapolated to much higher temperatures. This practice is based upon a number of assumptions about transport behavior in the undercooled liquid. With rapid up-quenching of amorphous samples, the high temperature crystallization behavior can be measured and used to refine the kinetics analysis and provide useful insight on the kinetic competition and glass forming ability.

  6. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-04-19

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  7. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schibille

    Full Text Available The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS. The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  8. Electrical conduction and glass relaxation in alkali- silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Paul William

    Electrical response measurements from 1 Hz to 1 MHz between 50o and 540oC were made on potassium, sodium and lithium-silicate glasses with low alkali oxide contents. Conductivity and electrical relaxation responses for both annealed and air quenched glasses of the same composition were compared. Quenching was found to lower the dc conductivity, σdc, and activation energy as well as increase the pre-exponential term when compared to the corresponding annealed glass of the same composition. All of the glasses exhibited Arrhenius behavior in the log σdc against 1/T plots. A sharp decrease in σdc was observed for glasses containing alkali concentrations of 7 mol% or less. The σdc activation energy exhibited similar behavior when plotted as a function of alkali composition and was explained in terms of a mixture of the weak and strong electrolyte models. The depression angle for fits to the complex impedance data were also measured as a function of thermal history, alkali concentration and alkali species. These results were interpreted in terms of changes in the distribution of relaxation times. Annealed samples from a single melt of a 10 mol% K2O-90SiO2 glass were reheated to temperatures ranging from 450o to 800oC, held isothermally for 20 min, and then quenched in either air or silicon oil. The complex impedance of both an annealed and the quenched samples were then measured as a function of temperature from 120o to 250oC. The σdc was found to be remain unaffected by heat treatments below 450oC, to increase rapidly over an approximate 200oC range of temperatures that was dependent on cooling rate and to be constant for heat treatments above this range. This behavior is interpreted in terms of the mean structural relaxation time as a function of temperature and cooling rate near the glass transition temperature and glass transformation ranges. A more detailed definition for the transition and transformation temperatures and ranges was also provided.

  9. Elastic modulus measurements of LDEF glasses and glass-ceramics using a speckle technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedlocher, D. E.; Kinser, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Elastic moduli of five glass types and the glass-ceramic Zerodur, exposed to a near-earth orbit environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), were compared to that of unexposed samples. A double exposure speckle photography technique utilizing 633 nm laser light was used in the production of the speckle pattern. Subsequent illumination of a double exposed negative using the same wavelength radiation produces Young's fringes from which the in-plane displacements are measured. Stresses imposed by compressive loading produced measurable strains in the glasses and glass-ceramic.

  10. Microstructuring of glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  11. Degradation of glass in the soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romich, H.; Gerlach, S.; Mottner, P. [Fraunhofer-Institut fur Silicatforschung (ISC), Wertheim-Bronnbach (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Glass has been produced and used in Europe for over 2000 years. Glass objects from the Roman period onwards have been excavated during the last centuries. In general, Roman glass is chemically quite stable, and often the only sign of chemical alteration is an iridescent surface, caused by the leaching of cations, which leads to the formation of a hydrated silica-rich layer. Medieval potash glasses are much less durable, and their surfaces are often found deeply leached, sometimes to a point that no unaltered glass remains. These surfaces may be coherent, though fragile, or they are laminar, with no cohesion between the layers at all. In this study an analytical examination of a series of fragments of archaeological glass retrieved from different sites near Cologne and Stuttgart (Germany) has been carried out. Samples of corroded glasses were analysed by optical microscopy and SEM/EDX (surface and cross sections) in order to obtain information about the chemical composition of the bulk glass and the weathered layers. Since the environmental parameters have constantly varied for archaeological objects, mechanistic studies have to rely on laboratory experiments under controlled conditions. For an extensive exposure programme standardised soil or natural garden earth was used, for which the pH was modified. Several corrosion sensitive potash-lime silicate glasses have been designed to study the effect of glass composition. A model glass consisting of SiO{sub 2} (54.2), CaO (28.8) and K{sub 2}O (17.0 weight-%) mostly lead to the formation of a crust on the leached layer, with a total thickness of 100 micrometer (for soil with pH 7 to 8, 12 months exposure). Model glasses also containing Al, Mg and P have built up preferably laminated structures (total thickness up to 200 micrometer). This presentation will give an overview about the variety of degradation phenomena observed on originals and compare the results with controlled laboratory

  12. Infrared Transparent Selenide Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-14

    crystalline halides, silica and fluoride glasses, and chalcogenide glasses. Crystalline halides undergo plastic deformation and are hygroscopic...mainly for applications operating at wavelengths less than 3 microns. Silicate and fluoride glasses have been developed as optical fiber amplifiers...activity. Preferred rare earths includes praseodymium, neodymium, erbium, cerium , dysprosium, holmium, thulium, terbium, ytterbium or mixtures of

  13. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions

  14. Enhanced Luminescent Properties in Tm3+/Dy3+ Co-doped Transparent Phosphate Glass Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao L. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glass and glass ceramic samples for white light emitting diodes were prepared by melt quenching method. Under 353 nm excitation, the colors of the luminescence of the glass and glass ceramic samples are white. The CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.338, 0.328 of the emission from the glass ceramic is close to the standard white-light illumination (0.333, 0.333. Compared to the glass, the fluorescence intensity in the glass ceramic is greatly enhanced.

  15. 艳阳下的新生——《托斯卡纳艳阳下》的审美意象研究%Rebirth under the Sun——On Aesthetic Images of the Movie Under the Tuscan Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑兰

    2012-01-01

    The movie Under the Tuscan Sun narrates a story about an American writer France, who suffers from marriage failure. France walks out of the shadows gradually and regains her own career, happiness, affection and love with the help of friends and neighbors in Tuscan. The movie enhances the aesthetic effect by the images of sunflower, water, pigeon,home, snake, and ladybug in order to highlight France' s new female image of persisting courage, optimism, unremitting efforts.%电影《托斯卡纳艳阳下》讲述了一个遭受婚姻背叛打击的美国女作家弗朗西丝,在托斯卡纳邻居和朋友的帮助下,渐渐走出阴霾,重新收获了事业、友情、亲情和爱情的故事。影片通过向日葵、水、鸽子、家、蛇、七星瓢虫等意象来加强电影的审美效果,凸显女主角弗朗西丝勇敢坚持、乐观向上,不懈努力的新女性形象。

  16. Glass dissolution rate measurement and calculation revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Maxime; Ull, Aurélien; Nicoleau, Elodie; Inagaki, Yaohiro; Odorico, Michaël; Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous dissolution rate measurements of nuclear glasses are a key step in the long-term behavior study of such waste forms. These rates are routinely normalized to the glass surface area in contact with solution, and experiments are very often carried out using crushed materials. Various methods have been implemented to determine the surface area of such glass powders, leading to differing values, with the notion of the reactive surface area of crushed glass remaining vague. In this study, around forty initial dissolution rate measurements were conducted following static and flow rate (SPFT, MCFT) measurement protocols at 90 °C, pH 10. The international reference glass (ISG), in the forms of powders with different particle sizes and polished monoliths, and soda-lime glass beads were examined. Although crushed glass grains clearly cannot be assimilated with spheres, it is when using the samples geometric surface (Sgeo) that the rates measured on powders are closest to those found for monoliths. Overestimation of the reactive surface when using the BET model (SBET) may be due to small physical features at the atomic scale-contributing to BET surface area but not to AFM surface area. Such features are very small compared with the thickness of water ingress in glass (a few hundred nanometers) and should not be considered in rate calculations. With a SBET/Sgeo ratio of 2.5 ± 0.2 for ISG powders, it is shown here that rates measured on powders and normalized to Sgeo should be divided by 1.3 and rates normalized to SBET should be multiplied by 1.9 in order to be compared with rates measured on a monolith. The use of glass beads indicates that the geometric surface gives a good estimation of glass reactive surface if sample geometry can be precisely described. Although data clearly shows the repeatability of measurements, results must be given with a high uncertainty of approximately ±25%.

  17. Spectral chemistry of green glass-bearing 15426 regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R. G.; Dyar, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    The detection of appreciable concentrations of ferric iron in a synthetic green glass equilibrated at an oxygen fugacity of 10 to the -11th atm prompted a Moessbauer spectral study of pristine emerald-green glass spherules carefully handpicked from regolith sample 15426. No Fe(3+) ions were detected in this lunar sample or in a synthetic green glass simulant equilibrated at fO2 = 10 to the -14th atm, suggesting that the green glass clods in rock 15426 formed under conditions of correspondingly low oxygen fugacities. The Moessbauer spectra indicated the presence of olivine crystallites in the lunar emerald green glass spherules. Measurements of homogeneous and partially devitrified synthetic silicate glasses revealed that significant changes of coordination environment about Fe(2+) ions in the glass structure occur during crystallization of olivine crystals from the melt.

  18. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  19. Multiple Glass Ceilings

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Giovanni; Hassink, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Both vertical (between job levels) and horizontal (within job levels) mobility can be sources of wage growth. We find that the glass ceiling operates at both margins. The unexplained part of the wage gap grows across job levels (glass ceiling at the vertical margin) and across the deciles of the intra-job-level wage distribution (glass ceiling at the horizontal margin). This implies that women face many glass ceilings, one for each job level above the second, and that the glass ceiling is a p...

  20. Liquidus Temperature Data for DWPF Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Vienna, John D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Mika, Martin (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Crum, Jarrod V.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Piepel, Gregory F.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    1998-12-01

    A liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) database has been developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNNL) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass composition region to support DWPF process control schemes. A test matrix consisting of 53 glasses (including two duplicates) was generated at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) using statistical experimental design methods. To ensure homogeneity, glasses were melted twice. Both melts were performed at T = T{sub 5} + {Delta}T, where T{sub 5} is the temperature at which the melt viscosity is 5 Pa{center_dot}s and {Delta}T {ge} 100 C. The T{sub 5} value was estimated using a PNNL viscosity database. Its span for the test matrix was 1007 C to 1284 C. Melting at T > T{sub 5} (from 1107 C to 1400 C) was necessary to dissolve (and possibly volatilize) some of the RuO{sub 2}. All glasses contained a large fraction of 0.09 mass% RuO{sub 2}, which prevented a reliable detection of spinel near the liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) when the melting temperature was T{sub 5}. T{sub L} was measured by heat-treating glass samples over a range of constant temperatures. They used optical microscopy to detect the presence or absence of crystals in the samples. T{sub L} was determined from observing crystallization within the bulk glass (more than 0.5 mm from the glass surface). The T{sub L} values were adjusted by measuring the T{sub L} of an internal PNNL standard glass in each furnace and checked by a National Bureau of Stands (NBS) standard glass. All measured T{sub L} values are summarized in Table I-S. The accuracy of values is estimated at {+-} 10 C, based on the accuracy of calibrated thermocouples and the ability to discern spinel crystals in glass near T{sub L}. Another possible source of error is glass redox connected with the difference between the melting temperature and T{sub L}. The heat treatment period of samples was long enough to ensure equilibrating the glass with atmospheric air. However, repeated

  1. Crystal growth in zinc borosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg, Ana T. G.; Lopes, Andreia A. S.; Veiga, João P. B.; Monteiro, Regina C. C.

    2017-01-01

    Glass samples with a molar composition (64+x)ZnO-(16-x)B2O3-20SiO2, where x=0 or 1, were successfully synthesized using a melt-quenching technique. Based on differential thermal analysis data, the produced glass samples were submitted to controlled heat-treatments at selected temperatures (610, 615 and 620 °C) during various times ranging from 8 to 30 h. The crystallization of willemite (Zn2SiO4) within the glass matrix was confirmed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Under specific heat-treatment conditions, transparent nanocomposite glass-ceramics were obtained, as confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy. The influence of temperature, holding time and glass composition on crystal growth was investigated. The mean crystallite size was determined by image analysis on SEM micrographs. The results indicated an increase on the crystallite size and density with time and temperature. The change of crystallite size with time for the heat-treatments at 615 and 620 °C depended on the glass composition. Under fixed heat-treatment conditions, the crystallite density was comparatively higher for the glass composition with higher ZnO content.

  2. Glass cullet as a new supplementary cementitious material (SCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzahosseini, Mohammadreza

    Finely ground glass has the potential for pozzolanic reactivity and can serve as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). Glass reaction kinetics depends on both temperature and glass composition. Uniform composition, amorphous nature, and high silica content of glass make ground glass an ideal material for studying the effects of glass type and particle size on reactivity at different temperature. This study focuses on how three narrow size ranges of clear and green glass cullet, 63--75 mum, 25--38 mum, and smaller than 25 mum, as well as combination of glass types and particle sizes affects the microstructure and performance properties of cementitious systems containing glass cullet as a SCM. Isothermal calorimetry, chemical shrinkage, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD), and analysis of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images in backscattered (BS) mode were used to quantify the cement reaction kinetics and microstructure. Additionally, compressive strength and water sorptivity experiments were performed on mortar samples to correlate reactivity of cementitious materials containing glass to the performance of cementitious mixtures. A recently-developed modeling platform called "muic the model" was used to simulated pozzolanic reactivity of single type and fraction size and combined types and particle sizes of finely ground glass. Results showed that ground glass exhibits pozzolanic properties, especially when particles of clear and green glass below 25 mum and their combination were used at elevated temperatures, reflecting that glass cullet is a temperature-sensitive SCM. Moreover, glass composition was seen to have a large impact on reactivity. In this study, green glass showed higher reactivity than clear glass. Results also revealed that the simultaneous effect of sizes and types of glass cullet (surface area) on the degree of hydration of glass particles can be accounted for through a linear addition

  3. Glass and glass-ceramic photonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Lidia; Thi Ngoc Tran, Lam; Meneghetti, Marcello; Varas, Stefano; Armellini, Cristina; Ristic, Davor; Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Pelli, Stefano; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Boulard, Brigitte; Zonta, Daniele; Dorosz, Dominik; Lukowiak, Anna; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    The development of optically confined structure is a major topic in both basic and applied physics not solely ICT oriented but also concerning lighting, laser, sensing, energy, environment, biological and medical sciences, and quantum optics. Glasses and glass-ceramics activated by rare earth ions are the bricks of such structures. Glass-ceramics are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing developing new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. The dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the fabrication protocol still remain an important task of the research in material science. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters. This paper presents some results obtained by our consortium regarding glass-based photonics systems. We will comment the energy transfer mechanism in transparent glass ceramics taking as examples the up and down conversion systems and the role of SnO2 nanocrystals as sensitizers. Coating of spherical resonators by glass ceramics, 1D-Photonic Crystals for luminescence enhancement, laser action and disordered 1-D photonic structures will be also discussed. Finally, RF-Sputtered rare earth doped P2O5- SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-Er2O3 planar waveguides, will be presented.

  4. Assessing levels and seasonal variations of current-use pesticides (CUPs) in the Tuscan atmosphere, Italy, using polyurethane foam disks (PUF) passive air samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estellano, Victor H; Pozo, Karla; Efstathiou, Christos; Pozo, Katerine; Corsolini, Simonetta; Focardi, Silvano

    2015-10-01

    Polyurethane foam disks (PUF) passive air samplers (PAS) were deployed over 4 sampling periods of 3-5-months (≥ 1 year) at ten urban and rural locations throughout the Tuscany Region. The purpose was to assess the occurrence and seasonal variations of ten current-use pesticides (CUPs). PUF disk extracts were analyzed using GC-MS. The organophosphates insecticides; chlorpyrifos (3-580 pg m(-3)) and chlorpyrifos-methyl (below detection limit - to 570 pg m(-3)) presented the highest levels in air, and showed seasonal fluctuation coinciding with the growing seasons. The relative proportion urban/(urban + rural) ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 showing no differences between urban and rural concentrations. Air back trajectories analysis showed air masses passing over agricultural fields and potentially enhancing the drift of pesticides into the urban sites. This study represents the first information regarding CUPs in the atmosphere of Tuscany region using PAS-PUF disk.

  5. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base) by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the...

  6. A survey of glass found on the headwear and head hair of a random population vs. people working with glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Fiona; Maynard, Philip; Cavanagh-Steer, Karen; Dusting, Tatiana; Roux, Claude

    2013-03-10

    This study investigated the prevalence of glass particles on the headwear and head hair of two different population groups; the general public who do not work with glass, and glaziers from O'Brien(®) Glass Industries who work with glass and have regular contact with broken glass. The 232 samples collected from the head hair and headwear from the random population resulted in the recovery of 6 glass fragments in total on 6 individuals (i.e. one fragment each). All of these fragments were from head hair samples with no multiple fragments recovered. The two headwear samples that were taken revealed no fragments. These results were in contrast to the survey that was conducted on the head hair and headwear of 25 glaziers from O'Brien(®), in which 138 glass fragments were found in total on 24 of the 25 glaziers. The size and number of fragments found in each sample were also generally larger for the glaziers group. The results from this study indicate that the prevalence of glass on the head hair and head wear of the random population is very low in comparison to the head hair and headwear of those who have regular contact with breaking glass. The significance of this finding with respect to the interpretation of glass evidence is also discussed.

  7. Stress analysis of laminated glass with different interlayer materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa M. El-Shami

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of window glass in building design is becoming increasingly popular. Laminated glass has gained popularity as a suitable and practical alternative to monolithic and insulating glass in many design situations. Laminated glass plate performance is influenced by several factors such as glass thickness, glass type, temperature, aspect ratio, load duration, and hardness of the interlayer material. A new higher order finite element model (presented by the first two authors using 9-noded quadrilateral elements was applied to investigate laminated glass plates with both different interlayer materials. An experimental load-testing program is described. Two types of interlayer materials, regular polyvinyl butyral and strong formulation of polyvinyl butyral were used. First, simply supported rectangular laminated glass plates with regular polyvinyl butyral interlayer with aspect ratios 1–5 under different temperatures were tested. Second, one set of laminated glass plates with the strong formulation of polyvinyl butyral interlayer was tested under room temperature. The experimental and theoretical results are compared and discussed. In general, the performance of laminated glass with regular polyvinyl butyral interlayer is closer to that of layered glass at higher temperature. Also, laminated glass with strong formulation of polyvinyl butyral interlayer has a significantly larger load resistance than similar regular polyvinyl butyral samples.

  8. Liquid Glass: A Facile Soft Replication Method for Structuring Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Frederik; Plewa, Klaus; Bauer, Werner; Schneider, Norbert; Keller, Nico; Nargang, Tobias; Helmer, Dorothea; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Schäfer, Michael; Worgull, Matthias; Greiner, Christian; Richter, Christiane; Rapp, Bastian E

    2016-06-01

    Liquid glass is a photocurable amorphous silica nanocomposite that can be structured using soft replication molds and turned into glass via thermal debinding and sintering. Simple polymer bonding techniques allow the fabrication of complex microsystems in glass like microfluidic chips. Liquid glass is a step toward prototyping of glass microstructures at low cost without requiring cleanroom facilities or hazardous chemicals.

  9. Cooling rate calculations for silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, D. P., III; Dyar, M. D.

    1986-03-01

    Series solution calculations of cooling rates are applied to a variety of samples with different thermal properties, including an analog of an Apollo 15 green glass and a hypothetical silicate melt. Cooling rates for the well-studied green glass and a generalized silicate melt are tabulated for different sample sizes, equilibration temperatures and quench media. Results suggest that cooling rates are heavily dependent on sample size and quench medium and are less dependent on values of physical properties. Thus cooling histories for glasses from planetary surfaces can be estimated on the basis of size distributions alone. In addition, the variation of cooling rate with sample size and quench medium can be used to control quench rate.

  10. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    The use of glass as a load carrying material in structural elements is rarely seen even though glass is a popular material for many architects. This is owed to the unreliable and low tensile strength, which is due to surface flaws and high brittleness of the material. These properties lead...... to breakage without any warning or ductility, which can be catastrophic if no precautions are taken. One aspect of this issue is treated here by looking at the possibility of mechanically reinforcing glass beams in order to obtain ductile failure for such a structural component. A mechanically reinforced...... laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  11. Radiation effects in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrt, D.; Vogel, W. (Otto-Schott-Inst., Chemische Fakultaet, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany))

    1992-03-01

    Glass was produced by man about 4000 years ago. The scientific exploration of glass is very young and closely connected with Jena. Fraunhofer, Goethe, Dobereiner, Abbe, Zeiss and Schott are famous names on this field. Both crystals and glasses are solids. However, there are fundamental differences in their properties and behavior. Glass is a thermodynamically unstable state and has a defect structure compared to the crystal. Glass and its properties are subject to a variety of changes under the influence of high energy radiation. In general, effects extend from the reduction of specific ions to the collapse of the entire network. Ultraviolet and X-ray radiation effects on UV-transmitting glasses will be discussed. (orig.).

  12. Homogeneity of Inorganic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Zhang, L.; Keding, Ralf;

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneity of glasses is a key factor determining their physical and chemical properties and overall quality. However, quantification of the homogeneity of a variety of glasses is still a challenge for glass scientists and technologists. Here, we show a simple approach by which the homogeneity...... of different glass products can be quantified and ranked. This approach is based on determination of both the optical intensity and dimension of the striations in glasses. These two characteristic values areobtained using the image processing method established recently. The logarithmic ratio between...... the dimension and the intensity is used to quantify and rank the homogeneity of glass products. Compared with the refractive index method, the image processing method has a wider detection range and a lower statistical uncertainty....

  13. Homogeneity of Inorganic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Zhang, L.; Keding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneity of glasses is a key factor determining their physical and chemical properties and overall quality. However, quantification of the homogeneity of a variety of glasses is still a challenge for glass scientists and technologists. Here, we show a simple approach by which the homogeneity...... of different glass products can be quantified and ranked. This approach is based on determination of both the optical intensity and dimension of the striations in glasses. These two characteristic values areobtained using the image processing method established recently. The logarithmic ratio between...... the dimension and the intensity is used to quantify and rank the homogeneity of glass products. Compared with the refractive index method, the image processing method has a wider detection range and a lower statistical uncertainty....

  14. Comparative study of radiation shielding parameters for bismuth borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaundal, Rajinder Singh, E-mail: rajinder_apd@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, School of Physical Sciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab (India)

    2016-07-15

    Melt and quench technique was used for the preparation of glassy samples of the composition x Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3-}(1-x) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} where x= .05 to .040. XCOM computer program is used for the evaluation of gamma-ray shielding parameters of the prepared glass samples. Further the values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and half value layer for the glassy samples have been calculated in the energy range from 1KeV to 100GeV. Rigidity of the glass samples have been analyzed by molar volume of the prepared glass samples. (author)

  15. Raman Spectra of Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-30

    17), Raman spectra, plus a , . theoretical treatment of the data, f complex fluorozirconate 14 I anions in ZBLAN glasses and melts (16), and...based ZBLAN glasses ) 17. ICORS (International Conference on Raman Spectroscopy) Proceedings, London, England. Conferencf 5-9 Sep 88. (Molten silica...RESEARCH FINAL REPORT DTIC CONTRACT N00014-81-K-0501 &JELECTE 1 MAY 81 -- 30 NOV 86 EJJAN041989 V "RAMAN SPECTRA OF GLASSES " 0 During the five years of the

  16. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  17. How to analyse the typological features of stone terrace walls. A methodology applied to the rural landscape of the Tuscan Region (Central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoletti, Mauro; Conti, Leonardo; Frezza, Lorenza; Santoro, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Terraced systems currently represent an indubitable added value for Tuscany, as for other regions. This value goes beyond their original function of hosting new areas for cultivation. Indeed, the hydrological functions performed by such systems within the historic and modern agricultural matrix, including control of erosion, stabilisation of the slopes, prolongation of run-off times and the possible reduction of the volumes of surface runoff, are well-known. In addition they also play a strategic role in the conservation of biodiversity and in maintaining local identity value. These systems are evidence of the laborious knowledge built up by many generations of farmers in making the most of the territorial resources in terms of quality production through agronomic operations for the management of the crops. Within the framework of policies for the conservation and valorisation of the rural landscape, this recognised economic, environmental and historic-cultural value has engendered a growing awareness and sensitivity towards the safeguarding of such structural characteristics. Indeed, at national level the terraced agricultural systems come within the scope of actions scheduled in the National Strategic Plan for Rural Development 2007-2013, and the Cross-Compliance Decree envisages that they be maintained through the granting of economic aid as laid down in the Regional Development Plans, to be pursued through appropriate agronomic and environmental conditions in adherence to the obligatory management criteria for the protection of the soil. 18 sample areas, previously selected on the basis of the terracing intensity index (> 400 m/ha), were subjected to on-site surveys to determine the geo-typological features through the identification and measurement of the main technical-construction parameters of the dry stone walls. In view of the complexity of carrying out a census of the entire regional territory, it was essential to restrict the analysis to a limited

  18. Metal Halide Optical Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    while some of the multi- component "modified" glasses (e.g., ZBLAN ) could easily be cast into pieces several mm thick. 23 The difference between the...energy. 7-1 0 Typical plots pf 24 of log Iqi versus ]/Tf for ZB-I, ZBL, ZBLA, ZBLAN and ZBLALi glasses are presented in Fig. 3. These plots are linear... ZBLAN glasses are more resistant to devitrification than the corresponding ZBLLi or ZBLN glasses , although this does not appear to be manifested in

  19. STRESS RELAXATION AND RELIABILITY EVALUATION OF SODA-LIME GLASS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.W.Bao; Y.F.Han; F.T.Gong

    2004-01-01

    Stress relaxation of glass is a dualism effect, it often lead to strength degradation in strengthened glass, but on the other hand, it improves the reliability and stressuniformity of glasses. In this work, stress relaxation of soda-lime glass was investigated using three-point bending tests at 400-560℃ which is near the brittle to ductile transition temperature, for enhancing the safety of glass productions and exploring the most economic anneal process. The experimental results show that the speed of stress relaxation increases but the ultimate stress decreases with increasing temperature. The stress uniformity of the glass samples before and after anneal was examined using spherical indentation at arranged testing points. It indicates that the scatter of the local strength measured by the Hertzian indentation is smaller in the anneal glass than in initial specimen, so that the estimated Weibull modulus for the anneal specimen is higher. Furthermore, the strength evaluation by Hertzian indentation and statistical analysis was presented.

  20. Carbon nanotube-doped tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazali, I. O.; Chillcce, E. F.; Ferreira, O. P.; Rodriguez, E.; Jacob, G. J.; Cesar, C. L.; Barbosa, L. C.

    2008-02-01

    In the past it was observed that buck ball doped glasses showed enhanced optical nonlinearities. However, carbon nanotubes are much more stable than buck ball and should be a better choice for that purpose. Therefore we decided to investigate the possibility to produce carbon nanotubes doped tellurite glasses and measured their optical nonlinearities. Tellurite glasses already have a larger nonlinearity compared to silica, and other, glasses. We produced TeO II-ZnO tellurite family glasses doped with multi wall Carbon Nanotube (CNT). The CNTs acquired from Carbolex were vigorously mechanically mixed with the tellurite glass precursors and melted in platinum crucible around 650°C in a controlled atmosphere inside an electrical induction furnace. We used the lowest temperature possible and controlled atmosphere to avoid the CNT oxidation. The glass melt was cast in a stainless steel and thermally treated at 300°C for 5 hours to relieve internal stresses. The samples were than cutted and polished to perform the optical characterization. We measured refractive index and thermo physical properties, such as vitreous transition T g, crystallization onset T x and melting T f temperatures. Raman spectroscopy showed the possible presence of CNTs.

  1. Zinc containing borate glasses and glass-ceramics: Search for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr M. Abdelghany

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ternary soda lime borate glass and samples with ZnO replacing CaO up to 10 mol% were prepared and studied for their bone bonding ability. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR absorption spectra of the prepared glasses before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF, for one or two weeks, showed the appearance of calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite (HA which is an indication of bone bonding ability. X-ray diffraction patterns were measured for the glasses and indicated the presence of small peaks related to hydroxyapatite in the samples immersed in SBF. The glasses were heat treated with controlled two-step regime to convert them to their corresponding glass-ceramic derivatives. FTIR and X-ray diffraction measurements of the glass-ceramic samples (before and after immersion in SBF confirmed the appearance of HA which is influenced by ZnO content. The overall data are explained on the basis of current views about the corrosion behaviour of borate glasses including hydrolysis and direct dissolution mechanism.

  2. Statistical analysis of the metrological properties of float glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Brian W.; Duffy, Alan M.

    2008-08-01

    The radius of curvature, slope error, surface roughness and associated height distribution and power spectral density of uncoated commercial float glass samples have been measured in our Canadian Light Source Optical Metrology Facility, using our Micromap-570 surface profiler and long trace profilometer. The statistical differences in these parameters have been investigated between the tin and air sides of float glass. The effect of soaking the float glass in sulfuric acid to try to dissolve the tin contamination has also been investigated, and untreated and post-treatment surface roughness measurements compared. We report the results of our studies on these float glass samples.

  3. Glass and glass-ceramics along the SrTiO3-NaPO3 line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinouh H.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The xSrTiO3-(1−xNaPO3 (x = 0−0.20 mol% glasses were prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method. The amorphous state of the samples was verified by X-ray diffraction. The glass-ceramic materials were obtained by the well known thermal controlled crystallization process. It is found that several physical properties such as the density, molar volume, and the glass transition temperature depend strongly on the chemical composition. Vickers test on the glasses showed that the micro-hardness increases with the SrTiO3 content. The structural approach of the glasses was realized by IR spectroscopy. This technique has highlighted the co-existence of different phosphate and titanium structural units in the glassy-matrix. Crystallization of the glasses was enhanced by heat treatments and followed by X-ray diffraction. A mechanism for this glass crystallization was proposed.

  4. Natural glass analogues to alteration of nuclear waste glass: A review and recommendations for further study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to review previous work on the weathering of natural glasses; and to make recommendations for further work with respect to studying the alteration of natural glasses as it relates quantifying rates of dissolution. the first task was greatly simplified by the published papers of Jercinovic and Ewing (1987) and Byers, Jercinovic, and Ewing (1987). The second task is obviously the more difficult of the two and the author makes no claim of completeness in this regard. Glasses weather in the natural environment by reacting with aqueous solutions producing a rind of secondary solid phases. It had been proposed by some workers that the thickness of this rind is a function of the age of the glass and thus could be used to estimate glass dissolution rates. However, Jercinovic and Ewing (1987) point out that in general the rind thickness does not correlate with the age of the glass owing to the differences in time of contact with the solution compared to the actual age of the sample. It should be noted that the rate of glass dissolution is also a function of the composition of both the glass and the solution, and the temperature. Quantification of the effects of these parameters (as well as time of contact with the aqueous phase and flow rates) would thus permit a prediction of the consequences of glass-fluid interactions under varying environmental conditions. Defense high- level nuclear waste (DHLW), consisting primarily of liquid and sludge, will be encapsulated by and dispersed in a borosilicate glass before permanent storage in a HLW repository. This glass containing the DHLW serves to dilute the radionuclides and to retard their dispersion into the environment. 318 refs.

  5. Glass dissolution rate measurement and calculation revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.fournier@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Ull, Aurélien; Nicoleau, Elodie [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Department of Applied Quantum Physics & Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 819-0395 (Japan); Odorico, Michaël [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, BP17171, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous dissolution rate measurements of nuclear glasses are a key step in the long-term behavior study of such waste forms. These rates are routinely normalized to the glass surface area in contact with solution, and experiments are very often carried out using crushed materials. Various methods have been implemented to determine the surface area of such glass powders, leading to differing values, with the notion of the reactive surface area of crushed glass remaining vague. In this study, around forty initial dissolution rate measurements were conducted following static and flow rate (SPFT, MCFT) measurement protocols at 90 °C, pH 10. The international reference glass (ISG), in the forms of powders with different particle sizes and polished monoliths, and soda-lime glass beads were examined. Although crushed glass grains clearly cannot be assimilated with spheres, it is when using the samples geometric surface (S{sub geo}) that the rates measured on powders are closest to those found for monoliths. Overestimation of the reactive surface when using the BET model (S{sub BET}) may be due to small physical features at the atomic scale—contributing to BET surface area but not to AFM surface area. Such features are very small compared with the thickness of water ingress in glass (a few hundred nanometers) and should not be considered in rate calculations. With a S{sub BET}/S{sub geo} ratio of 2.5 ± 0.2 for ISG powders, it is shown here that rates measured on powders and normalized to S{sub geo} should be divided by 1.3 and rates normalized to S{sub BET} should be multiplied by 1.9 in order to be compared with rates measured on a monolith. The use of glass beads indicates that the geometric surface gives a good estimation of glass reactive surface if sample geometry can be precisely described. Although data clearly shows the repeatability of measurements, results must be given with a high uncertainty of approximately ±25%. - Highlights: • Initial dissolution

  6. Processing and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Mica Glass-Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Khani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to fabrication of transparent glass-ceramics with Li-mica nano crystals, the glasses with chemical composition of 94.9 mass% Li(1+xMg3AlSi3(1+xF2 (x=0.5 with 5.1 mass% MgF2 were crystallized. The glasses were fabricated via the conventional melt-quenching technique. Mica crystals were precipitated in the glass phase by later heat treatment. Glass samples had glass transition temperature (Tg, 557 ?C, softening temperature (Ts, 603 ?C, and crystallization peak temperature (Tp, 655 ?C. The fine mica crystals with size of separation. It’s confirmed that both as-quenched and heat-treated samples are transparent in the visible wave length.

  7. THE HYDRATION OF AN ION-LEACHABLE GLASS USED IN GLASS-IONOMER CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Klos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A study is reported in which the interaction between a typical ionomer glass and water was evaluation in order to evaluate the importance of hydration in the setting of glass-ionomer cements. Glass G338 was mixed with water and the slurries were allowed to harden in metal moulds to create cylindrical specimens 6 mm high x 4 mm diameter. Samples of these specimens were found to disintegrate when placed in water. Following hardening at 37 °C for 1 hour in the moulds, one series of specimens was stored at 95% RH for 23 h, 1 week and 4 weeks, and the other stored for the same lengths of time, but sealed in the moulds. Raman spectra were recorded for glass G338 and glass-water blends stored for 24 hours and 4 weeks. The cylindrical specimens were found to have a degree of structural integrity, but proved to be extremely weak in compression (all specimens of whatever age up to 4 weeks having strengths of less that 1 MPa. Specimens lost mass on storage at 95% RH. Raman spectra showed no additional bands due to glass-water interactions compared with the dry glass itself, and changes in intensity were difficult to interpret, due to Fermi resonance in the regions of interest. It is concluded that binding in these specimens is due to hydrogen bonding between layers of water adsorbed onto glass powder surfaces.

  8. Lanthanoides in Glass and Glass Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Jürgen; Kilo, Martin; Somorowsky, Ferdinand; Hopp, Werner

    2017-03-01

    Many types of glass contain lanthanoides; among them, special glass for optical applications is the one with the highest content of lanthanoides. The precise determination of the lanthanoides' concentration is performed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). However, up to now, there are no established standard processes guaranteeing a uniform approach to the lanthanoide analysis. The knowledge of the lanthanoides' concentrations is necessary on the microscale in some cases, especially if a suitable separation and recycling procedure is to be applied. Here, the analysis is performed by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) or wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) analytics in the scanning electron microscope.

  9. Silver doped nanobioactive glass particles for bone implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, M.; Kavitha, K.; Karunakaran, G.; Manivasakan, P.; Rajendran, V.

    2013-02-01

    Silica based silver doped nanobioactive glass compositions (58SiO2-33CaO-9P2O5 and 58SiO2-23CaO-9P2O5-10Ag2O(mol%)) were synthesized by a simple sol-gel route. The prepared samples were comprehensively characterised by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopic studies. The results reveal that the prepared samples have amorphous phase with spherical morphology and having a particle size less than 100 nm. The specific surface areas were 90 and 61 m2g-1 respectively. The in vitro bioactivity of glass samples were confirmed by the formation of hydroxyapatite layer on glass surfaces. The Ag2O-doped nanobioactive glasse samples shows reveal significant antibacterial activity compare with base glasses.

  10. Electric glass capturing markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, K.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Electric glass has found its place on the construction market. In public buildings, electrically heatable windows are becoming the leading option for large glass walls. Studies on detached houses, both new and renovated, show that floor heating combined with electrically heatable windowpanes is the best choice with respect to resident`s comfort. (orig.)

  11. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    As well as accelerators to boost particles up to high energy, physicists need detectors to see what happens when those particles collide. This lead glass block is part of a CERN detector called OPAL. OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  12. Glasses for photonic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, K.; Krol, D.M.; Hirao, K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of glassy materials in planar and fiber-based photonic structures have led to novel devices and components that go beyond the original thinking of the use of glass in the 1960s, when glass fibers were developed for low-loss, optical communication applications. Expl

  13. Getting Started with Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The metamorphosis of glass when heated is a magical process to students, yet teachers are often reluctant to try it in class. The biggest challenge in working with glass in the classroom is to simplify procedures just enough to ensure student success while maintaining strict safety practices so no students are injured. Project concepts and safety…

  14. Glass Sword of Damocles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A string of accidents draws attention to the safety of the gleaming glass-walled skyscrapers, now common in China’s major cities On July 8, as 19-year-old Zhu Yiyi was walking past a 23-story building in Hangzhou, east China’s Zhejiang Province, shards of glass falling

  15. Electric glass capturing markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, K.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Electric glass has found its place on the construction market. In public buildings, electrically heatable windows are becoming the leading option for large glass walls. Studies on detached houses, both new and renovated, show that floor heating combined with electrically heatable windowpanes is the best choice with respect to resident`s comfort. (orig.)

  16. Preparation of Glass Ceramic Based on Granulated Slag and Cullet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The glass-ceramic was prepared on the basis of materials of granulated slag containing high-calcium oxide and cullet.The content of granulated slag ranges from 50%-60%wt in the glass compositions. The samples were analyzed by DTA, SEM and XRD.The results show that the main crystal phase of the glass-ceramic is β-CaSiO3,Which is in scattering fiber or column form.The applying properties have also been measured.

  17. Mixed polaronic-ionic conduction in lithium borate glasses and glass-ceramics containing copper oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, M. M. I.

    2007-03-01

    The effect of electric field strength on conduction in lithium borate glasses doped with CuO with different concentration was studied and the value of the jump distance of charge carrier was calculated. The conductivity measurements indicate that the conduction is due to non-adiabatic hopping of polarons and the activation energies are found to be temperature and concentration dependent. Lithium borate glasses are subjected to carefully-programmed thermal treatments which cause the nucleation and growth of crystalline phases. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the amorphous nature for the investigated glass sample and the formation of crystalline phase for annealed samples at 650 °C. The main separated crystalline phase is Li2B8O13. The scanning electron micrographs of some selected glasses showed a significant change in the morphology of the films investigated due to heat treatment of the glass samples. It was found that the dc-conductivity decreases with an increase of the HT temperature. The decrease of dc conductivity, with an increase of the HT temperature, can be related to the decrease in the number of free ions in the glass matrix. There is deviation from linearity at high temperature regions in the logσ-1/T plots for all investigated doped samples at a certain temperature at which the transition from polaronic to ionic conduction occurs. The hopping of small polarons is dominant at low temperatures, whereas the hopping of Li+ ions dominates at high temperatures.

  18. Mixed polaronic-ionic conduction in lithium borate glasses and glass-ceramics containing copper oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, M.M.I. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Radiation Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt)

    2007-03-15

    The effect of electric field strength on conduction in lithium borate glasses doped with CuO with different concentration was studied and the value of the jump distance of charge carrier was calculated. The conductivity measurements indicate that the conduction is due to non-adiabatic hopping of polarons and the activation energies are found to be temperature and concentration dependent. Lithium borate glasses are subjected to carefully-programmed thermal treatments which cause the nucleation and growth of crystalline phases. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the amorphous nature for the investigated glass sample and the formation of crystalline phase for annealed samples at 650 C. The main separated crystalline phase is Li{sub 2}B{sub 8}O{sub 13}. The scanning electron micrographs of some selected glasses showed a significant change in the morphology of the films investigated due to heat treatment of the glass samples. It was found that the dc-conductivity decreases with an increase of the HT temperature. The decrease of dc conductivity, with an increase of the HT temperature, can be related to the decrease in the number of free ions in the glass matrix. There is deviation from linearity at high temperature regions in the log{sigma}-1/T plots for all investigated doped samples at a certain temperature at which the transition from polaronic to ionic conduction occurs. The hopping of small polarons is dominant at low temperatures, whereas the hopping of Li{sup +} ions dominates at high temperatures. (orig.)

  19. Effect of host glass matrix on structural and optical behavior of glass-ceramic nanocomposite scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke Barta, M.; Nadler, Jason H.; Kang, Zhitao; Wagner, Brent K.; Rosson, Robert; Kahn, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Composite scintillator systems have received increased attention in recent years due to their promise for merging the radioisotope discrimination capabilities of single crystal scintillators with the high throughput scanning capabilities of portal monitors. However, producing the high light yield required for good energy resolution has proven challenging as scintillation photons are often scattered by variations in refractive index and agglomerated scintillator crystals within the composite. This investigation sought to mitigate these common problems by using glass-ceramic nanocomposite materials systems in which nanoscale scintillating crystallites are precipitated in a controlled manner from a transparent glass matrix. Precipitating crystallites in situ precludes nanoparticle agglomeration, and limiting crystallite size to 50 nm or less mitigates the effect of refractive index mismatch between the crystals and host glass. Cerium-doped gadolinium bromide (GdBr3(Ce)) scintillating crystals were incorporated into sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) and alumino-borosilicate (ABS) host glass matrices, and the resulting glass-ceramic structures and luminescence behavior were characterized. The as-cast glass from the ABS system displayed a highly ordered microstructure that produced the highest luminescence intensity (light yield) of the samples studied. However, heat treating to form the glass-ceramic precipitated rare-earth oxide crystallites rather than rare-earth halides. This degraded light yield relative to the unaged sample.

  20. [Tuscan Chronic Care Model: a preliminary analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, Angelo; Meggiolaro, Angela; Rossi, Luigi; Fioravanti, C; Palermita, F; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    the aim of this study is to present a preliminary analysis of efficacy and effectiveness of a model of chronically ill care (Chronic Care Model, CCM). the analysis took into account 106 territorial modules, 1016 General Practitioners and 1,228,595 patients. The diagnostic and therapeutic pathways activated (PDTA), involved four chronic conditions, selected according to the prevalence and incidence, in Tuscany Region: Diabetes Mellitus (DM), Heart Failure (SC), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and stroke. Six epidemiological indicators of process and output were selected, in order to measure the model of care performed, before and after its application: adherence to specific follow-up for each pathology (use of clinical and laboratory indicators), annual average of expenditure per/capita/euro for diagnostic tests, in laboratory and instrumental, average expenditure per/capita/year for specialist visits; hospitalization rate for diseases related to the main pathology, hospitalization rate for long-term complications and rate of access to the emergency department (ED). Data were collected through the database; the differences before and after the intervention and between exposed and unexposed, were analyzed by method "Before-After (Controlled and Uncontrolled) Studies". The impact of the intervention was calculated as DD (difference of the differences). DM management showed an increased adhesion to follow-up (DD: +8.1%), and the use of laboratory diagnostics (DD: +4,9 €/year/pc), less hospitalization for long-term complications and for endocrine related diseases (DD respectively: 5.8/1000 and DD: +1.2/1000), finally a smaller increase of access to PS (DD: -1.6/1000), despite a slight increase of specialistic visits (DD: +0,38 €/year/pc). The management of SC initially showed a rising adherence to follow-up (DD: +2.3%), a decrease of specialist visits (DD:E 1.03 €/year/pc), hospitalization and access to PS for exacerbations (DD: -4.4/1000 and DD: -6.1/100, respectively), compared with a slight increase of diagnostic tests (DD: +2.10 €/year/pc). Stroke showed the following outcomes: increased consumption of instrumental diagnostics and imaging (DD: +1.65 €/year/pc) and growing hospitalizations for related conditions (DD 6.1/1,000). The care of patients with COPD, finally, has produced an increase in overall expenditure on medicines (DD: +39.71/year/pc) associated with the decrease of hospitalization for related conditions (DD: -2.7/1,000). the Tuscany CCM has proven a promising model of integrated management and taking care for chronic patients, can have a positive impact on the quality of life and on the total health expenditure. Additional monitoring studies are desirable in perspective of expanding the model on all over the national territory.

  1. Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Strachan

    2004-10-20

    The purpose of this report is to document the development of a model for calculating the release rate for radionuclides and other key elements from high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glasses under exposure conditions relevant to the performance of the repository. Several glass compositions are planned for the repository, some of which have yet to be identified (i.e., glasses from Hanford and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). The mechanism for glass dissolution is the same for these glasses and the glasses yet to be developed for the disposal of DOE wastes. All of these glasses will be of a quality consistent with the glasses used to develop this report.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  3. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960´s, a great interest in the use of bioceramic materials for biomedical applications has been developed. In a previous paper, the authors reviewed crystalline bioceramic materials “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials, constituted for non-metallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidates by thermal treatment of powders at high temperature. In the present review, the authors deal with those called bioactive glasses and glassceramics. Although all of them are also obtained by thermal treatment at high temperature, the first are amorphous and the second are obtained by devitrification of a glass, although the vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases. After an introduction to the concept of bioactive materials, a short historical review of the bioactive glasses development is made. Its preparation, reactivity in physiological media, mechanism of bonding to living tissues and mechanical strength of the bone-implant interface is also reported. Next, the concept of glass-ceramic and the way of its preparation are exposed. The composition, physicochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramic materials: Bioglass®, Ceravital®, Cerabone®, Ilmaplant® and Bioverit® are also reviewed. Finally, a short review on the bioactive-glass coatings and bioactive-composites and most common uses of bioactive-glasses and glass-ceramics are carried out too.

    Desde finales de los años sesenta, se ha despertado un gran interés por el uso de los materiales biocerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. En un trabajo previo, los autores hicieron una revisión de los denominados materiales biocerámicos cristalinos en sentido estricto, es decir, de aquellos materiales, constituidos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados mediante tratamientos térmicos a altas temperaturas. En el presente trabajo, los autores

  4. The effects of the glass surface area/solution volume ratio on glass corrosion: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1995-03-01

    This report reviews and summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding the effects of the glass surface area/solution volume (SA/V) ratio on the corrosion behavior of borosilicate waste glasses. The SA/V ratio affects the rate of glass corrosion through the extent of dilution of corrosion products released from the glass into the leachate solution: glass corrosion products are diluted more in tests conducted at low SA/V ratios than they are in tests conducted at high SA/V ratios. Differences in the solution chemistries generated in tests conducted at different SA/V ratios then affect the observed glass corrosion behavior. Therefore, any testing parameter that affects the solution chemistry will also affect the glass corrosion rate. The results of static leach tests conducted to assess the effects of the SA/V are discussed with regard to the effects of SA/V on the solution chemistry. Test results show several remaining issues with regard to the long-term glass corrosion behavior: can the SA/V ratio be used as an accelerating parameter to characterize the advanced stages of glass corrosion relevant to long disposal times; is the alteration of the glass surface the same in tests conducted at different SA/V, and in tests conducted with monolithic and crushed glass samples; what are the effects of the SA/V and the extent of glass corrosion on the disposition of released radionuclides? These issues will bear on the prediction of the long-term performance of waste glasses during storage. The results of an experimental program conducted at ANL to address these and other remaining issues regarding the effects of SA/V on glass corrosion are described. 288 refs., 59 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. The effects of the glass surface area/solution volume ratio on glass corrosion: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1995-03-01

    This report reviews and summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding the effects of the glass surface area/solution volume (SA/V) ratio on the corrosion behavior of borosilicate waste glasses. The SA/V ratio affects the rate of glass corrosion through the extent of dilution of corrosion products released from the glass into the leachate solution: glass corrosion products are diluted more in tests conducted at low SA/V ratios than they are in tests conducted at high SA/V ratios. Differences in the solution chemistries generated in tests conducted at different SA/V ratios then affect the observed glass corrosion behavior. Therefore, any testing parameter that affects the solution chemistry will also affect the glass corrosion rate. The results of static leach tests conducted to assess the effects of the SA/V are discussed with regard to the effects of SA/V on the solution chemistry. Test results show several remaining issues with regard to the long-term glass corrosion behavior: can the SA/V ratio be used as an accelerating parameter to characterize the advanced stages of glass corrosion relevant to long disposal times; is the alteration of the glass surface the same in tests conducted at different SA/V, and in tests conducted with monolithic and crushed glass samples; what are the effects of the SA/V and the extent of glass corrosion on the disposition of released radionuclides? These issues will bear on the prediction of the long-term performance of waste glasses during storage. The results of an experimental program conducted at ANL to address these and other remaining issues regarding the effects of SA/V on glass corrosion are described. 288 refs., 59 figs., 16 tabs.

  6. Evaluation of the effects of solar radiation on glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Four optical materials were exposed to simulated solar and particulate radiation in a space environment. Sapphire and fused silica experienced little change in transmittance while optical crown glass and ultra low expansion glass darkened appreciably. A complete analysis of the 500 hour simulated space exposure test was conducted. Additionally, studies were performed to aid in sample selection for a 100 hour simulated exposure test.

  7. Crystallization study of Te–Bi–Se glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish Saxena; P K Bhatnagar

    2003-08-01

    Crystallization studies are carried out under non-isothermal conditions with samples heated at several uniform rates. The dependence of the glass transition temperature (), the crystalline temperature () and the peak temperature of crystallization () on the composition and heating rate () has been studied. For a memory/switching material, the thermal stability and ease of glass formation are of crucial importance. The glass transition temperature, , increases slightly with the variation of Bi content. From the heating rate dependence of , the activation energy for glass transition () has been evaluated. The results are discussed on the basis of Kissinger’s approach and are interpreted using the chemically ordered network model (CONM).

  8. GLASS COMPOSITION AND SOLUTION SPECIATION EFFECTS ON STAGE III DISSOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantano, Carlo G; Trivelpiece, Cory L; Rice, Jarret A

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  9. Moessbauer spectra of tin in float glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.A. [Liverpool John Moores Univ. (United Kingdom). Sch. of the Built Environ.; Johnson, C.E. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Williams, K.F.E. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Holland, D. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Karim, M.M. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1995-03-01

    Tin is not a major constituent of window glass, but is found at high concentrations in the lower surface of float glass which has been in contact with the molten tin bath. It does not extend far into the surface, but causes the physical and chemical behaviour to differ from that of the upper surface. It is important, therefore, to understand the structural role of tin in silicate glasses and thus its effect on various properties. Moessbauer spectra were taken of three series of glassy materials, namely binary glasses (SnO and SiO{sub 2}) in varying proportions, re-melted float glass containing tin, and float glass from a production plant. The binary glasses contained between 20 and 70% tin which was found to be mainly Sn{sup 2+}, with very small amounts of Sn{sup 4+} in some of them. The spectra showed a small decrease in isomer shift with increase in tine content, which is ascribed to the change in molar volume. The re-melted samples were float glass which was mixed with stannous oxalate in appropriate conditions to try and maintain tin in the 2+ state, and contained up to 15% tin by weight. The spectra show both Sn{sup 4+} and Sn{sup 2+} with rather more in the 4+ oxidation state. The change in the spectra as a function of temperature revealed a large difference in the f-factor (and hence the chemical binding) of the two states. A series of spectra was taken between 17.5 and 900 K for the sample containing 15% tin. From the absorption as a function of temperature the f-factor was determined for both oxidation states, and hence enabled the relative amounts of Sn{sup 4+} and Sn{sup 2+} present in each sample to be estimated. Measurements of the shift as a function of temperature were also made. The float samples were surface material produced by grinding away all but 0.1 mm of the lower surface of industrially produced float glass. The Moessbauer spectra showed them to be predominantly Sn{sup 2+}, as expected from the reducing atmosphere in the float plant.

  10. Ductility and work hardening in nano-sized metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D. Z., E-mail: dzchen@caltech.edu [Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Gu, X. W. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); An, Q.; Goddard, W. A. [Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Greer, J. R. [Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); The Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    In-situ nano-tensile experiments on 70 nm-diameter free-standing electroplated NiP metallic glass nanostructures reveal tensile true strains of ∼18%, an amount comparable to compositionally identical 100 nm-diameter focused ion beam samples and ∼3 times greater than 100 nm-diameter electroplated samples. Simultaneous in-situ observations and stress-strain data during post-elastic deformation reveal necking and work hardening, features uncharacteristic for metallic glasses. The evolution of free volume within molecular dynamics-simulated samples suggests a free surface-mediated relaxation mechanism in nano-sized metallic glasses.

  11. Brittle to ductile transition in densified silica glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fenglin; Huang, Liping

    2014-05-22

    Current understanding of the brittleness of glass is limited by our poor understanding and control over the microscopic structure. In this study, we used a pressure quenching route to tune the structure of silica glass in a controllable manner, and observed a systematic increase in ductility in samples quenched under increasingly higher pressure. The brittle to ductile transition in densified silica glass can be attributed to the critical role of 5-fold Si coordination defects (bonded to 5 O neighbors) in facilitating shear deformation and in dissipating energy by converting back to the 4-fold coordination state during deformation. As an archetypal glass former and one of the most abundant minerals in the Earth's crest, a fundamental understanding of the microscopic structure underpinning the ductility of silica glass will not only pave the way toward rational design of strong glasses, but also advance our knowledge of the geological processes in the Earth's interior.

  12. High-density scintillating glasses for a proton imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, I. J.; Dettmann, M. A.; Herrig, V.; Thune, Z. L.; Zieser, A. J.; Michalek, S. F.; Been, M. O.; Martinez-Szewczyk, M. M.; Koster, H. J.; Wilkinson, C. J.; Kielty, M. W.; Jacobsohn, L. G.; Akgun, U.

    2017-06-01

    High-density scintillating glasses are proposed for a novel proton-imaging device that can improve the accuracy of the hadron therapy. High-density scintillating glasses are needed to build a cost effective, compact calorimeter that can be attached to a gantry. This report summarizes the study on Europium, Terbium, and Cerium-doped scintillating glasses that were developed containing heavy elements such as Lanthanum, Gadolinium, and Tungsten. The density of the samples reach up to 5.9 g/cm3, and their 300-600 nm emission overlaps perfectly with the peak cathode sensitivity of the commercial photo detectors. The developed glasses do not require any special quenching and can be poured easily, which makes them a good candidate for production in various geometries. Here, the glass making conditions, preliminary tests on optical and physical properties of these scintillating, high-density, oxide glasses developed for a novel medical imaging application are reported.

  13. Shattering the Glass Ceiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ "Shattering the Glass Ceiling: the Myths, Opportunities and Chal lenges of Women in Corporate China" was the theme of CEIBS'first Women in Management Forum held on December l 1 on the school's main campus in Shanghai.

  14. Glass Stronger than Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarris, Lynn

    2011-03-28

    A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech.

  15. Glass for Solar Concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    Report identifies four commercially available glasses as promising reflectors for solar concentrators. Have properties of high reflectance (80 to 96 percent), lower cost than first-surface silver metalization, and resistance to environmental forces.

  16. STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SOME HIGH CHEMICALLY RESISTANCE SILICATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Abo-Mosallam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A multi component silicate glasses based on Li₂O-MgO-P₂O₅-SiO₂ system were synthesized and modified by Na₂O /Li₂O, SrO /MgO and CaO /SrO replacements. The prepared glasses have been characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. Additionally, bulk density, microhardness, chemical durability and in vitro bioactivity were evaluated as a function of introducing different alkali and alkaline element substitutions. For comprehension the in vitro bioactivity, the glass samples were soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF solution at 37°C for 14 days. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX and (FTIR were used to characterize forming hydroxyapatite layer produced on glass specimen surfaces. The results show that Na₂O/Li₂O and CaO/SrO replacements led to enhance the bioactivity behavior of the glasses. The results are harmonious with a weaker network glass structure consequence of Na₂O/Li₂O and SrO/MgO replacement in the glasses. However, the glass network connectivity increased with addition of the higher charge to size ratio of Ca2+ instead of Sr2+. The prepared glass samples had microhardness in the range, 4920-6017 MPa; density values in the range, 2.46-2.78 g/cm³ and the weight loss percent was ranged between 0.72 and 1.67 %.

  17. Fabrication of highly insulating foam glass made from CRT panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    We prepared low-density foam glasses from cathode-ray-tube panel glass using carbon and MnO2 as the foaming agents. We investigated the influence of the carbon and MnO2 concentrations, the glass-powder preparation and the foaming conditions on the density and homogeneity of the pore structure...... and the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the foam density. The results show that the moderate foaming effect of the carbon is greatly improved by the addition of MnO2. A density as low as 131 kg m-3 can be achieved with fine glass powder. The foam density has a slight dependence on the carbon and MnO2...... concentrations, but it is mainly affected by the foaming temperature and the time. The thermal conductivity of the foam-glass samples is lower than that of commercial foam glasses with the same density. The lowest value was determined to be 42 mW m-1 K-1 for a foam glass with a density of 131 kg m-3. A further...

  18. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    to breakage without any warning or ductility, which can be catastrophic if no precautions are taken. One aspect of this issue is treated here by looking at the possibility of mechanically reinforcing glass beams in order to obtain ductile failure for such a structural component. A mechanically reinforced...... the mechanical behavior of the beam is explained. Finally, some design criterions for reinforced glass beams are discussed....

  19. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

    2013-06-13

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  20. Redox-Dependent Solubility of Technetium in Low Activity Waste Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W.; Mccloy, John S.

    2014-03-01

    The solubility of technetium was measured in a Hanford low activity waste glass simulant. The simulant glass was melted, quenched and pulverized to make a stock of powdered glass. A series of glass samples were prepared using the powdered glass and varying amounts of solid potassium pertechnetate. Samples were melted at 1000°C in sealed fused quartz ampoules. After cooling, the bulk glass and the salt phase above the glass (when present) were sampled for physical and chemical characterization. Technetium was found in the bulk glass up to 2000 ppm (using the glass as prepared) and 3000 ppm (using slightly reducing conditions). The chemical form of technetium obtained by x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy can be mainly assigned to isolated Tc(IV), with a minority of Tc(VII) in some glasses and TcO2 in two glasses. The concentration and speciation of technetium depends on glass redox and amount of technetium added. Solid crystals of pertechnetate salts were found in the salt cake layer that formed at the top of some glasses during the melt.

  1. Paleomagnetism of Lonar Crater Impact Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.; Weiss, B. P.; Maloof, A. C.; Stewart, S. T.; Louzada, K. L.; Soule, S. A.; Swanson-Hysell, N.

    2006-12-01

    The source of magnetic fields on extraterrestrial bodies is largely unknown. There is particularly little information about magnetic fields on asteroids and the Moon for the last 3 billion years because most samples from these bodies predate this time. An exception is the small amount of impact-melt which has been continuously created by hypervelocity impactors over most of solar system history. Impact melt can be used to test the controversial hypothesis that magnetic fields on extraterrestrial bodies were predominantly the product of impact-produced plasmas rather than of core dynamos. However, to date only a small amount of impact melt has been analyzed paleomagnetically. To assess the quality of impact melts as recorders of magnetic fields, in January 2004 and January 2005 we collected thousands of samples of basaltic glass from the perimeter of Lonar Crater, a 1.8 km diameter impact crater which formed approximately 50,000 years ago in the Deccan Traps in Maharashtra, India. Lonar crater is a unique extraterrestrial analog because it is the only fresh impact crater on the Earth in a basaltic target. Most glass samples have rounded features and are between 0.01 and 1 cm in size, indicating that they are fladen and impact spherules (microtektites) formed from molten ejecta that cooled in mid-air while subject to rotational and aerodynamic forces. We have found that both types of glasses are strongly magnetic (saturation remanence of ~2 A m-1), contain ferromagnetic crystals that are predominantly single domain in size, and have no significant remanence anisotropy. The glasses also carry a natural remanent magnetization (NRM) presumably acquired just after the impact. However, alternating field demagnetization results in large directional changes of the magnetic moment, with little decrease in moment intensity. We interpret this unusual behavior as progressive removal of different coercivity components that cooled while the orientation of the spinning glasses

  2. Wastes based glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the inertization, recovery and valorisation of the wastes coming from municipal and industrial processes are the most important goals from the environmental and economical point of view. An alternative technology capable to overcome the problem of the dishomogeneity of the raw material chemical composition is the vitrification process that is able to increase the homogeneity and the constancy of the chemical composition of the system and to modulate the properties in order to address the reutilization of the waste. Moreover, the glasses obtained subjected to different controlled thermal treatments, can be transformed in semy-cristalline material (named glass-ceramics with improved properties with respect to the parent amorphous materials. In this review the tailoring, preparation and characterization of glasses and glass-ceramics obtained starting from municipal incinerator grate ash, coal and steel fly ashes and glass cullet are described.

    Realmente la inertización, recuperación y valorización de residuos que proceden de los procesos de incineración de residuos municipales y de residuos industriales son metas importantes desde el punto de vista ambiental y económico. Una tecnología alternativa capaz de superar el problema de la heterogeneidad de la composición química de los materiales de partida es el proceso de la vitrificación que es capaz de aumentar la homogeneidad y la constancia de la composición química del sistema y modular las propiedades a fin de la reutilización del residuo. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de vitrificación en que los vidrios fueron sometidos a tratamientos térmicos controlados diferentes, de manera que se transforman en materiales semicristalinos (también denominados vitrocerámicos con mejores propiedades respecto a los materiales amorfos originales. En esta revisión se muestra el diseño, preparación y caracterización de vidrios y vitrocerámicos partiendo de

  3. Study of rigidity of semiconducting vanadate glasses and its importance in use of coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yasser B Saddeek; M S Gaafar

    2014-05-01

    The elastic moduli of some multicomponent vanadate based glasses were analysed in terms of the bond compression model by some physical parameters such as, the density, average stretching force constant and average atomic ring size. These parameters were calculated for all the glass series and for all the glass composition to estimate the rigidity of these glasses. The results showed that the average force constant and the elastic moduli of these glasses are sensitive to the decrease in PbO content. This behaviour was attributed to the increase in the molar volume and the role of different modifiers. These parameters along with the coordination number of the glasses affect the glass transition temperature. The correlation between the elastic moduli and thermal properties of these samples showed that 0.25MoO3–0.25PbO–0.5V2O5 glass is the most rigid and has an applicable glass transition temperature for coating.

  4. Foaming of waste cathode ray tube panel glass via CaCO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    of a TV. In general CRT consists of two types of glasses: barium/strontium containing glass (panel glass) and lead containing glass (funnel and panel glass). In this work we present the possibility to produce high quality foam glass from the recycled lead-free glass. We study the influence of foaming...... parameters on the characteristics of foam. CRT panel glass was crushed, milled and sieved below 63 m. CaCO3 was used as a foaming agent and was mixed with glass powders by means of a planetary ball mill. Preliminary results show that milling conditions and particle size have a major influence on the foaming...... process and resulting density of samples. We investigate the influence of foaming agent concentration on the foaming process, foam density, foam porosity and homogeneity. We demonstrate how milling and foaming conditions affect the foam properties for different amounts of CaCO3. A minimum in the density...

  5. A XANES study of chromophores in archaeological glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arletti, Rossella [Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Torino (Italy); Quartieri, Simona [Universita di Messina, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Messina S' Agata (Italy); Freestone, Ian C. [Institute of Archaeology, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    We applied X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) to obtain information on the origin of glass colour of several archaeological samples and on the oxidation conditions employed during their production. We studied a series of selected glass fragments - mainly from excavated primary and secondary production centres and dated to the first millennium AD - containing iron and manganese in a wide compositional range. In most of the studied samples iron is rather oxidised, while Mn K-edge XANES data show that, in all the studied glasses, Mn is mainly present in its reduced form (predominantly 2+), with the possible subordinate presence of Mn{sup 3+}. The most oxidised samples are the HIMT (high iron manganese titanium) glasses, while the less oxidised ones belong to the primary natron glass series from the early Islamic tank furnaces at Bet Eliezer (Israel), and to the series coming from a Roman glass workshop excavated in Basinghall Street, London. In these glasses, iron is approximately equally distributed over the 2+ and 3+ oxidation states. The XANES analyses of two glasses which had been deliberately decolourized using Sb- and Mn-based decolourizers demonstrate that Sb is more effective than Mn as oxidant. (orig.)

  6. Glass microsphere lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the

  7. Influence of the glass particle size on the foaming process and physical characteristics of foam glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    We have prepared low-density foam glasses from cathode-ray-tube panel glass using carbon and MnO2 as the foaming agents. The effect of the glass particle size on the foaming process, the apparent density and the pore morphology is revealed. The results show that the foaming is mainly caused...... by the reduction of manganese. Foam glasses with a density of size is ≤33 μm (D50). The foams have a homogeneous pore distribution and a major fraction of the pores are smaller than 0.5 mm. Only when using the smallest particles (13 μm) does the pore size increase to 1......–3 mm due to a faster coalescence process. However, by quenching the sample from the foaming to the annealing temperature the pore size is reduced by a factor of 5–10. The foams with an apparent density of

  8. Sinter recrystalization and properties evaluation of glass-ceramic from waste glass bottle and magnesite for extended application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    As'mau Ibrahim Gebi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In a bid to address environmental challenges associated with the management of waste Coca cola glass bottle, this study set out to develop glass ceramic materials using waste coca cola glass bottles and magnesite from Sakatsimta in Adamawa state. A reagent grade chrome (coloring agent were used to modify the composition of the coca cola glass bottle;  X-ray fluorescence(XRF, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA were used to characterize raw materials, four batches GC-1= Coca cola glass frit +1%Cr2O3, GC-2=97% Coca cola glass frit+ 2% magnesite+1%Cr2O3, GC-3=95% Coca cola glass frit+ 4%magnesite+1%Cr2O3, GC-4=93%Coca cola glass frit+ 6%magnesite+ 1%Cr2O3 were formulated and prepared. Thermal Gradient Analysis (TGA results were used as a guide in selection of three temperatures (7000C, 7500C and 8000C used for the study, three particle sizes -106+75, -75+53, -53µm and 2 hr sintering time were also used, the sinter crystallization route of glass ceramic production was adopted. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, the density, porosity, hardness and flexural strength of the resulting glass ceramics were also measured. The resulting glass ceramic materials composed mainly of wollastonite, diopside and anorthite phases depending on composition as indicated by XRD and SEM, the density of the samples increased with increasing sintering temperature and decreasing particle size. The porosity is minimal and it decreases with increasing sintering temperature and decreasing particle size. The obtained glass ceramic materials possess appreciable hardness and flexural strength with GC-3 and GC-4 having the best combination of both properties.

  9. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  10. Fabrication and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic using soda–lime–silica waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Mojtaba; Hashemi, Babak, E-mail: hashemib@shirazu.ac.ir

    2014-04-01

    Soda–lime–silica waste glass was used to synthesize a bioactive glass-ceramic through solid-state reactions. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural and thermal properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). Bioactivity assessment by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was revealed that the samples with smaller amount of crystalline phase had a higher level of bioactivity. - Highlights: • A bioactive glass-ceramic was synthesized using soda–lime–silica waste glass. • Solid-state reaction method was used to synthesize bioactive glass-ceramic. • Ca{sub 2}Na{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CaNaPO{sub 4} were formed with a one-step thermal treatment condition. • The amounts of crystalline and amorphous phases influenced the bioactivity. • The sample with a smaller amount of the crystalline phase had a higher bioactivity.

  11. Devitrification of ionomer glass and its effect on the in vitro biocompatibility of glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell-Gillingham, K; Reaney, I M; Miller, C A; Crawford, A; Hatton, P V

    2003-08-01

    The effects of devitrification of an ionomer glass with a molar composition 4.5SiO(2).3Al(2)O(3).1.5P(2)O(5).3CaO.2CaF(2) on cement formation and in vitro biocompatibility were investigated. Differential thermal analysis was used to study the phase evolution in the glass, and to determine the heat treatments for production of glass-ceramics. X-ray diffraction patterns from glass frit heat-treated at 750 degrees C for 2h contained peaks corresponding to apatite (JCPDS 15-876), whereas for samples heat-treated at 950 degrees C for 2h apatite and mullite (JCPDS 15-776) were the major phases detected. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that apatite and apatite-mullite phases were present after heat treatments at 750 degrees C and 950 degrees C respectively. Glass and glass-ceramics were ground to prepare <45microm powders and glass ionomer cements were produced using a ratio of 1g powder: 0.2g PAA: 0.3g 10% m/v tartaric acid solution in water. In vitro biocompatibility was evaluated using cultured rat osteosarcoma (ROS) cells. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that cells colonised the surfaces of cements prepared using untreated ionomer glass and glass crystallised to form apatite (750 degrees C/2h). However, quantitative evaluation using MTT and total protein assays indicated that more cell growth occurred in the presence of cements prepared using ionomer glasses crystallised to apatite than cements prepared using untreated glass. The least cell growth and respiratory activity was observed on cements made with crystallised glass containing both apatite and mullite. It was concluded that the controlled devitrification of ionomer glasses could be used to produce GIC bone cements with improved biocompatibility.

  12. Evaluation of Foaming Behavior of Glass Melts by High-Temperature Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Optical monitoring techniques can record in situ the size of glass samples during a dynamic heating process. This allowed us to study sintering and expansion rate of panel glass from cathode ray tube using MnO2 as foaming agent. We show the maximum expansion rate of glass melt foaming (in situ va...

  13. Inorganic phosphors in lead-silicate glass for white LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonorov, N. V.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Aseev, V. A.; Bibik, A. Yu.; Nekrasova, Ya. A.; Tuzova, Yu. V.; Novogran, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    Luminescent composites of the "phosphor-in-glass" type, based on a highly reflective lead-silicate matrix and fine-grained powders of YAG:Ce3+ and SiAlON:Eu2+ crystals, are developed and synthesized. Phosphor and glass powders are sintered at a temperature of 550°C to obtain phosphor samples for white LEDs. The composites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction and luminescence spectroscopy. The dependence of the light quantum yield on the SiAlON:Eu2+ content in the samples is investigated. A breadboard of a white LED is designed using a phosphor-in-glass composite based on lead-silicate glass with a low glasstransition temperature. The total emission spectra of a blue LED and glass-based composites are measured. The possibility of generating warm white light by choosing an appropriate composition is demonstrated.

  14. Spin anisotropy and slow dynamics in spin glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, F; Dupuis, V; Vincent, E; Hammann, J; Bouchaud, J-P

    2004-04-23

    We report on an extensive study of the influence of spin anisotropy on spin glass aging dynamics. New temperature cycle experiments allow us to compare quantitatively the memory effect in four Heisenberg spin glasses with various degrees of random anisotropy and one Ising spin glass. The sharpness of the memory effect appears to decrease continuously with the spin anisotropy. Besides, the spin glass coherence length is determined by magnetic field change experiments for the first time in the Ising sample. For three representative samples, from Heisenberg to Ising spin glasses, we can consistently account for both sets of experiments (temperature cycle and magnetic field change) using a single expression for the growth of the coherence length with time.

  15. Optical Properties of Bismuth Tellurite Based Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooi Ming Oo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of binary tellurite based glasses (Bi2O3x (TeO2100−x was prepared by melt quenching method. The density, molar volume and refractive index increase when bismuth ions Bi3+ increase, this is due to the increased polarization of the ions Bi3+ and the enhanced formation of non-bridging oxygen (NBO. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR results show the bonding of the glass sample and the optical band gap, Eopt decreases while the refractive index increases when the ion Bi3+ content increases.

  16. Optical properties of bismuth tellurite based glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Hooi Ming; Mohamed-Kamari, Halimah; Wan-Yusoff, Wan Mohd Daud

    2012-01-01

    A series of binary tellurite based glasses (Bi(2)O(3))(x) (TeO(2))(100-) (x) was prepared by melt quenching method. The density, molar volume and refractive index increase when bismuth ions Bi(3+) increase, this is due to the increased polarization of the ions Bi(3+) and the enhanced formation of non-bridging oxygen (NBO). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results show the bonding of the glass sample and the optical band gap, E(opt) decreases while the refractive index increases when the ion Bi(3+) content increases.

  17. Raman Spectroscopy Of Glass-Crystalline Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, E.; Balkanski, M.

    1988-01-01

    Glass-crystalline transition is induced by laser irradiation on a GeSe bulk glass sample. The structural changes are detected by Raman spectroscopy. The speed of the crystallization process depends on the laser irradiation intensity. We have studied this crystallization process for three different powers of irradiation. It is found that the speed of crystallization increases with power. Stokes and anti-Stokes spectra were recorded during the transformation. From this data temperature was inferred at different stages of crystallization. The significance of this temperature is discussed.

  18. Effect of Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) pipe filled with Geopolymer Materials for Piping Application: Compression Properties

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to achieve the highest compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with the geopolymer filler content of weight percentage that were used in glass reinforced epoxy pipe. The samples were prepared by using the filament winding method. The effect of weight percentage of geopolymer materials in epoxy hardener was studied under mechanical testing, which is using the compression test. A series of glass reinforced epoxy pipe and glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled wi...

  19. Sol-Gel Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  20. Geoenvironmental weathering/deterioration of landfilled MSWI-BA glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunmei; Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Zhao, Chun; Peng, Xuya; Gao, Junmin

    2014-08-15

    Municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI-BA) glass serves as a matrix of assorted bottom ash (BA) compounds. Deterioration of the BA glass phases is quite important as they regulate the distribution of a series of toxic elements. This paper studied landfilled MSWI-BA samples from the mineralogical and geochemical viewpoint to understand the deterioration behavior of the BA glass phases as well as mechanisms involved. Bulk analysis by PXRD as well as micro-scale analysis by optical microscopy and SEM/EDX was conducted for such purposes. The results revealed that dissolution of the BA glass phases has resulted in a deterioration layer of 10(0)-10(2)μm thickness after years of disposal. This rapid weathering process is highly relevant to the specific glass characteristics and solution pH. The BA glass phases with more embedded compounds and cracks/fissures tend to be more vulnerable. Moreover, the generally alkaline pH in ash deposit favors a rapid disruption of the glass phase. The weathering products are mainly gel phases (including Al-Si gel, Ca-Al-Si gel, Fe-Al-Si gel etc.) with iron oxide/hydroxide as accessory products. Breakdown of the BA glass phases triggers chemical evolution of the embedded compounds. Based on all the findings above, a model is proposed to illustrate a general evolution trend for the landfilled MSWI-BA glass phases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparation and elements analysis of porous fluorescent glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Dong-mei; LUO Fa; ZHOU Wan-cheng; D. E. DAY; C. S. RAY

    2006-01-01

    A large variety of porous fluorescent glasses were prepared and the concentration of different elements in these glasses was analyzed. The start porous glasses were soaked in a solution containing soluble salts and then heated at 650 ℃ for 3 h to decompose the salts in the pores into oxides. Fluorescent agents,such as UO3,Eu2O3,were impregnated into the porous glasses to prepare the fluorescent glasses. The results show that soaking is a feasible method to prepare the glass sphere with compositions distinguishable from each other and easy to be located in a complicated background. Six or more components can be impregnated together into one glass sample and the concentration of them can be analyzed accurately. UO3 and Eu2O3 can be impregnated into porous glass to make the glass strongly fluorescent. Higher concentration of Eu2O3 produces stronger fluorescence while higher concentration of UO3 reduces the fluorescence intensity because of the concentration quenching effect.

  2. Glass microfabricated nebulizer chip for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Ville; Haapala, Markus; Kostiainen, Risto; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami

    2007-05-01

    A microfluidic nebulizer chip for mass spectrometry is presented. It is an all-glass device which consists of fusion bonded Pyrex wafers with embedded flow channels and a nozzle at the chip edge. A platinum heater is located on the wafer backside. Fabrication of the chip is detailed, especially glass deep etching, wafer bonding, and metal patterning. Various process combinations of bonding and metallization have been considered (anodic bonding vs. fusion bonding; heater inside/outside channel; metallization before/after bonding; platinum lift-off vs. etching). The chip vaporizes the liquid sample (0.1-10 microL min(-1)) and mixes it with a nebulizer gas (ca. 100 sccm N2). Operating temperatures can go up to 500 degrees C ensuring efficient vaporization. Thermal insulation of the glass ensures low temperatures at the far end of the chip, enabling easy interconnections.

  3. Cooling rates for glass containing lunar compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, C. Y.; Yinnon, H.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Cooling rates required to form glassy or partly-crystalline bodies of 14 lunar compositions have been estimated using a previously introduced, simplified model. The calculated cooling rates are found to be in good agreement with cooling rates measured for the same compositions. Measurements are also reported of the liquidus temperature and glass transition temperature for each composition. Inferred cooling rates are combined with heat flow analyses to obtain insight into the thermal histories of samples 15422, 14162, 15025, 74220, 74241, 10084, 15425, and 15427. The critical cooling rates required to form glasses of 24 lunar compositions, including the 14 compositions of the present study, are suggested to increase systematically with increasing ratio of total network modifiers/total network formers in the compositions. This reflects the importance of melt viscosity in affecting glass formation.

  4. Glass injuries seen in the emergency department of a South African district hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzaumvila, Doudou; Govender, Indiran; Kramer, Efraim B

    2015-01-01

    The emergency department of Embhuleni Hospital frequently manages patients with glass-related injuries. This study assessed these injuries and the glass that caused them in more detail. The objectives of our study included determining the type of glass causing these injuries and describing the circumstances associated with different types of glass injuries. The emergency department of Embhuleni Hospital in Elukwatini, Mpumalanga province, South Africa. This was a cross-sectional study with a sample size of 104 patients. Descriptive statistics were used to assess the characteristics of the glass injuries. Five different types of glass were reported to have caused the injuries, namely car glass (7.69%), glass ampoules (3.85%), glass bottles (82.69%), glass windows (3.85%) and street glass shards (1.92%). Glass bottle injuries were mainly caused by assaults (90.47%) and most victims were mostly young males (80.23%). The assaults occurred at alcohol-licensed premises in 65.11% of cases. These injuries occurred mostly over weekends (83.72%), between 18:00 and 04:00. The face (34.23%) and the scalp (26.84%) were the sites that were injured most often. Assault is the most common cause of glass injuries, usually involving young men at alcohol-licensed premises. Glass injuries generally resulted in minor lacerations, with few complications (2.68%).

  5. Performance of a solar collector with antireflection treated glass cover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    The spectral transmittances of two different glass types have been measured in a spectrophotometer. Both glass types have been investigated with and without a Sunarc anti reflection surface (AR surface). The transmittance data for the AR treated samples have been used as input to the AR treatment...... process in order to improve the solar transmittance for the glass samples. A standard flat plate solar collector has been tested in the indoor solar simulator. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate the improvement in collector performance that can be expected by replacing the standard cover...

  6. Bio-Glasses An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Julian

    2012-01-01

    This new work is dedicated to glasses and their variants which can be used as biomaterials to repair diseased and damaged tissues. Bio-glasses are superior to other biomaterials in many applications, such as healing bone by signaling stem cells to become bone cells.   Key features:  First book on biomaterials to focus on bio-glassesEdited by a leading authority on bio-glasses trained by one of its inventors, Dr Larry HenchSupported by the International Commission on Glass (ICG)Authored by members of the ICG Biomedical Glass Committee, with the goal of creating a seamless textb

  7. Glass strengthening and patterning methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David C; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Duty, Chad E

    2015-01-27

    High intensity plasma-arc heat sources, such as a plasma-arc lamp, are used to irradiate glass, glass ceramics and/or ceramic materials to strengthen the glass. The same high intensity plasma-arc heat source may also be used to form a permanent pattern on the glass surface--the pattern being raised above the glass surface and integral with the glass (formed of the same material) by use of, for example, a screen-printed ink composition having been irradiated by the heat source.

  8. Glass formation - A contemporary view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The process of glass formation is discussed from several perspectives. Particular attention is directed to kinetic treatments of glass formation and to the question of how fast a given liquid must be cooled in order to form a glass. Specific consideration is paid to the calculation of critical cooling rates for glass formation, to the effects of nucleating heterogeneities and transients in nucleation on the critical cooling rates, to crystallization on reheating a glass, to the experimental determination of nucleation rates and barriers to crystal nucleation, and to the characteristics of materials which are most conducive to glass formation.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of lead halo borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, K. Chandra; Hameed, Abdul; Chary, M. Narasimha; Shareefuddin, Md.

    2015-06-01

    Glasses in the system xPbF2-(30-x) PbO-69B2O3-1CuO (x=5, 10, 15, 20, & 25 mole %) were prepared by melt quenching method and they are characterized by XRD to confirm the glassy nature. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies at room temperature in the X-band frequencies and FTIR studies on prepared glass systems were reported. The non-linear variation of spin-Hamiltonian parameters with PbF2 content indicated the change in the ligand field strength around Cu2+ ions in the host glass. The ground state of Cu2+ ions in the glass is designated as dx2-y2 orbital (2B1g) while the observed symmetry around it is tetragonally distorted octahedral. The molecular orbital coefficients α2, β2 and β12 are evaluated for Cu2+ doped samples. From the FTIR studies it was observed that the glass made up of BO3 and BO4 units.

  10. Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    i 2N E ihhhhh1112h MEmhhhhEEEohhhhE I.’....momo 111111111’-20 LA ’Ll2. AFWL-TR-86-37 AFWL-TR- 86-37 oT C ,l C ’-’ N HEAVY METAL FLUORIDE GLASSES 0nI...Secwrit CkasmfcationJ HEAVY METAL FLUORIDE GLASSES 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Reisfield, Renata; and Eyal, Mrek 13. TYPE OF REPORT 113b. TIME COVERED 114...glasses containing about 50 mole% of ZrF4 [which can be replaced by HfF 4 or TIF 4 (Refs. 1-3) or heavy metal fluorides based on PbF2 and on 3d-group

  11. Perspectives on spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Contucci, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Presenting and developing the theory of spin glasses as a prototype for complex systems, this book is a rigorous and up-to-date introduction to their properties. The book combines a mathematical description with a physical insight of spin glass models. Topics covered include the physical origins of those models and their treatment with replica theory; mathematical properties like correlation inequalities and their use in the thermodynamic limit theory; main exact solutions of the mean field models and their probabilistic structures; and the theory of the structural properties of the spin glass phase such as stochastic stability and the overlap identities. Finally, a detailed account is given of the recent numerical simulation results and properties, including overlap equivalence, ultrametricity and decay of correlations. The book is ideal for mathematical physicists and probabilists working in disordered systems.

  12. Glass transition temperature and conductivity in Li2O and Na2O doped borophosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwajeet, J. S.; Sankarappa, T.; Ramanna, R.; Sujatha, T.; Awasthi, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    Two alkali doped Borophosphate glasses in the composition, (B2O3)0.2. (P2O5)0.3. (Na2O)(0.5-x). (Li2O)x, where x = 0.05 to 0.50 were prepared by standard melt quenching method at 1200K. Non-crystalline nature was confirmed by XRD studies. Room temperature density was measured by Archimedes principle. DC conductivity in the temperature range from 300K to 575K has been measured. Samples were DSC studied in the temperature range from 423K to 673K and glass transition temperature was determined. Glass transition temperature passed through minima for Li2O con.2centration between 0.25 and 0.30 mole fractions. Activation energy of conduction has been determined by analyzing temperature variation of conductivity determining Arrhenius law. Conductivity passed through minimum and activation passed through maximum for Li2O content from 0.25 to 0.30 mole fractions. Glass transition temperature passed through minimum for the same range of Li2O content. These results revealed mixed alkali effect taking place in these glasses. It is for the first time borophosphate glasses doped with Li2O and Na2O have been studied for density and dc conductivity and, the mixed alkali effect (MAE) has been observed.

  13. Distribution Theory for Glass's Estimator of Effect Size and Related Estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Larry V.

    1981-01-01

    Glass's estimator of effect size, the sample mean difference divided by the sample standard deviation, is studied in the context of an explicit statistical model. The exact distribution of Glass's estimator is obtained and the estimator is shown to have a small sample bias. Alternatives are proposed and discussed. (Author/JKS)

  14. The Setting Chemistry of Glass Ionomer Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Hanting; LIU Hanxing; ZHANG Guoqing

    2005-01-01

    The setting chemistry of glass ionomer cement was investigated by using mechanical determination of compressive strength at predetermined intervals, and measurement of structure changes of corresponding fracture sample by means of IR spectra and differential scanning calorimetry ( DSC). Zinc polycarboxylate cement was used as a comparison sample. The compressive strength of glass ionomer cement (GIC) increases with aging. IR spectra and DSC of corresponding fracture sample show the structure changes of the matrix and interface layer comprising of silica gel during the predetermined intervals studied, however, no significant changes occur in the zinc polycarxyolate cement. Hence the structure changes of the matrix and/or interface layer are responsible for compressive strength increasing with aging. The structure changes include the crosslink density, the ratio of complex form to ionic form, the content ratio of Al-PAA to Ca-PAA, the forming and mauring process of the interface layer comprising of silica gel.

  15. Foam Glass for Construction Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    Foaming is commonly achieved by adding foaming agents such as metal oxides or metal carbonates to glass powder. At elevated temperature, the glass melt becomes viscous and the foaming agents decompose or react to form gas, causing a foamy glass melt. Subsequent cooling to room temperature, result...... in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is to make...... low density foam glass for thermal insulation applications. In this thesis, it is argued that the use of metal carbonates as foaming agents is not suitable for low density foam glass. A reaction mechanism is proposed to justify this result. Furthermore, an in situ method is developed to optimise...

  16. Shattering women's glass ceiling

    OpenAIRE

    Camilleri Podesta, Marie Therese; Duca, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The role of women in academia has always greatly interested me. Several years ago, when I was asked to become Gender Issues Committee chairperson at the University of Malta, I readily accepted. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/shattering-womens-glass-ceiling/

  17. Glass as matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Refraiming the Moderns - Substitute Windows and Glass. In general terms, the seminar has contributed to the growing interest in the problems concerning the restoration of Modern Movement architecture. More particularly, it has of course drawn our attention to modern windows, which are increasingly...

  18. What Glass Ceiling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael; Post, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A recent study drawing on data from the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that the wage gap between men and women has virtually disappeared, and that the so-called "glass ceiling" results more from age and qualifications than from explicit discrimination. (SLD)

  19. Supercooled Liquids and Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    In these lectures, which were presented at "Soft and Fragile Matter, Nonequilibrium Dynamics, Metastability and Flow" University of St. Andrews, 8 July - 22 July, 1999, I give an introduction to the physics of supercooled liquids and glasses and discuss some computer simulations done to investigate these systems.

  20. Microchips on glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, M.

    2007-01-01

    Microchips on glass. What about a mobile phone that uses a single microchip to receive all the available frequency bands, plus extras such as television, gps, and Internet access? Or, in due time, see-though implants that will monitor your state of health, and equipment that will let you see through

  1. Stained Glass and Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-01

    Dr. Robert Webster, an Emeritus member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, discusses his cover art story on stained glass and influenza.  Created: 2/1/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/1/2017.

  2. Triad ''Metal - Enamel - Glass''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhina, T.; Petrova, S.; Toporova, V.; Fedyaeva, T.

    2014-10-01

    This article shows how to change the color of metal and glass. Both these materials are self-sufficient, but sometimes used together. For example, enameling. In this case, the adhesion between metal substrate and stekloobraznae enamel layer, which was conducted on a stretching and a bend, was tested.

  3. Glass ceilings of professionalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Dawn L

    2016-04-01

    The term glass ceiling is a political term often used to describe an unbreakable barrier that isnot visible with the human eye, but it keeps minorities from rising up i.e. it is a barrier to minoritygroups, in the past (and sometimes still) for women, that stops them from achieving theirtrue potential.

  4. Stained-Glass Pastels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    The author has always liked the look of stained-glass windows. Usually the designs are simplified and the shapes are easier for younger students to draw. This technique seemed to be the perfect place for her fifth-graders to try their hand at color mixing. The smaller spaces and simple shapes were just what she needed for this group. Her students…

  5. Stained Glass and Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-01

    Dr. Robert Webster, an Emeritus member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, discusses his cover art story on stained glass and influenza.  Created: 2/1/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/1/2016.

  6. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  7. Aging, rejuvenation and memory phenomena in spin glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Dupuis; F Bert; J-P Bouchaud; J Hammann; F Ladieu; D Parker; E Vincent

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, we review several important features of the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of spin glasses. Starting with the simplest experiments, we discuss the scaling laws used to describe the isothermal aging observed in spin glasses after a quench down to the low-temperature phase. We report in particular new results on the sub-aging behaviour of spin glasses. We then discuss the rejuvenation and memory effects observed when a spin glass is submitted to temperature variations during aging, from the point of view of both energy landscape pictures and real-space pictures. We highlight the fact that both approaches point out the necessity of hierarchical processes involved in aging. Finally, we report an investigation of the effect of small temperature variations on aging in spin glass samples with various anisotropies which indicates that this hierarchy depends on the spin anisotropy.

  8. Electrical conductivity and viscosity of borosilicate glasses and melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrt, Doris; Keding, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    , 0 to 62·5 mol% B2O3, and 25 to 85 mol% SiO2. The glass samples were characterised by different methods. Refractive indices, density and thermal expansion were measured. Phase separation effects were investigated by electron microscopy. The electrical conductivity of glasses and melts were determined...... by impedance measurements in a wide temperature range (250 to 1450°C). The activation energies were calculated by Arrhenius plots in various temperature regions: below the glass transition temperature, Tg, above the melting point, Tl, and between Tg and Tl. Viscosity measurements were carried out...... with different methods from Tg to the melt. The measured data were fitted and the activation energies calculated. Simple exponential behaviour was found only in very narrow temperature ranges. The effect of B2O3 in sodium borosilicate glasses and melts is discussed in comparison with sodium silicate glasses...

  9. In-vitro bioactivity of zirconia doped borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samudrala, Rajkumar; Azeem, P. Abdul, E-mail: rk.satyaswaroop@gmail.com, E-mail: drazeem2002@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Warangal-506004 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Glass composition 31B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-20SiO{sub 2}-24.5Na{sub 2}O-(24.5-x) CaO-xZrO{sub 2} x=1,2,3,4,5 were prepared by melt-quenching Technique. The formation of hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of glasses after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) was explored through XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses. In this report, we observed that hydroxyapatite formation for 5days of immersion time. Also observed that with increasing the immersion time up to 15days, higher amount of hydroxyapatite layer formation on the surface of glasses. The varying composition of zirconia in glass samples influences shown by XRD, FTIR studies. The present results indicate that, in-vitro bioactivity of glasses decreased with increasing zirconia incorporation.

  10. Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate glass particles from two sets of standard reference materials using femtosecond (150fs) and nanosecond (4ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the collected particles revealed that there are more and larger agglomerations of particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation. In contrast to the earlier findings for metal alloy samples, no correlation between the concentration of major elements and the median particle size was found. When the current data on glass were compared with the metal alloy data, there were clear differences in terms of particle size, crater depth, heat affected zone, and ICP-MS response. For example, glass particles were larger than metal alloy particles, the craters in glass were less deep than craters in metal alloys, and damage to the sample was less pronounced in glass compared to metal alloys samples. The femtosecond laser generated more intense ICP-MS signals compared to nanosecond laser ablation for both types of samples, although glass sample behavior was more similar between ns and fs-laser ablation than for metals alloys.

  11. Yesterday's Trash Makes Tomorrow's "Glass"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Dale

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a glass art project inspired by Dale Chihuly. This project uses two-liter plastic soda bottles which are cut apart and trimmed. Applying heat using a hair dryer, the plastic curls and takes an uneven blown-glass quality. The "glass" is then painted using acrylic paint. (Contains 2 resources and 1 online…

  12. Yesterday's Trash Makes Tomorrow's "Glass"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Dale

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a glass art project inspired by Dale Chihuly. This project uses two-liter plastic soda bottles which are cut apart and trimmed. Applying heat using a hair dryer, the plastic curls and takes an uneven blown-glass quality. The "glass" is then painted using acrylic paint. (Contains 2 resources and 1 online…

  13. Molecular Mobility in Sugar Glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dries, van den I.J.

    2000-01-01

    Glasses are liquids that exhibit solid state behavior as a result of their extremely high viscosity. Regarding their application to foods, glasses play a role in the preservation of foods, due to their high viscosity and the concomitant low molecular mobility. This thesis focuses on sugar glasses. S

  14. Glass for Solid State Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    Glass film has low intrinsic compressive stress for isolating active layers of magnetic-bubble and other solid-state devices. Solid-state device structure incorporates low-stress glasses as barrier and spacer layers. Glass layers mechanically isolate substrate, conductor, and nickel/iron layers.

  15. Influence of hydroxyl content on selected properties of 45S5 bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew M

    2007-12-01

    Numerous material properties may be influenced by the concentration of chemically dissolved hydroxyl species within a glass. A tube furnace connected to a steam generator was used to create hydroxyl-saturated 45S5 glass under 1 atm of water at 1100 degrees C. Selected properties of as-melted and hydroxyl-saturated samples were compared to assess the sensitivity of 45S5 to excess hydroxylation. The glass transition temperature and the peak crystallization temperature of the treated 45S5 glass were reduced in comparison to the as-melted 45S5 glass. In addition, the treated glass exhibited a broad endothermic signal that may be indicative of enhanced viscous flow. A simple dissolution experiment indicated that the treated 45S5 glass was also less durable than the as-melted 45S5 glass.

  16. Comparison of glass surfaces as a countertop material to existing surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turo, Laura A.; Winschell, Abigail E.

    2011-09-01

    Gleen Glass, a small production glass company that creates countertops, was selected for the Technology Assistance Program through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Gleen Glass was seeking material property analysis comparing glass as a countertop material to current surfaces (i.e. marble, granite and engineered stone). With samples provided from Gleen Glass, testing was done on granite, marble, and 3 different glass surfaces ('Journey,' 'Pebble,' and 'Gleen'). Results showed the glass surfaces have a lower density, lower water absorption, and are stronger in compressive and flexural tests as compared to granite and marble. Thermal shock tests showed the glass failed when objects with a high thermal mass are placed directly on them, whereas marble and granite did not fracture under these conditions.

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Wear Rate of Different Riva Glass Ionomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Yaghoubi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: wear is one of the most important factors that cause loss of restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the wear rate in light-cured glass ionomers SDI. Materials and Methods: 20 samples consisted of light-cured Ionomer Glass Riva and Riva HV and Fuji II and composit Z250 to 2mm and length and width 10mm in Copper generator were prepared (n = 5 and were put in a wear device. Samples in wear cycles, in the course of 5000, 10000, 20000, 40000, 80000, 120000 respectively cycles via cobalt chrome cylindrical abrasive was under wear. Digital scale with 0.1 mg precision was used for gravimetric. Data using One Way Anova and Post hoc Tukey test and Spss software was analyzed. Results: The weight loss was as follows: Glass Ionomer light cure Riva ˂Glass Ionomer light cure Riva HV ˂Glass Ionomer light cure Fuji II ˂composite Z250. The other three groups were statistically significant weight loss between the composite Z250 and but the difference in weight loss between the groups and Glass Ionomer light cure Riva, Glass Ionomer light cure Riva HV, Glass Ionomer light cure Fuji II was found after 120,000 cycles. Conclusion: The results of this study showed the wear of glass ionomers Capsule Riva is similar Fuji II LC but the wear of glass inomers is much more than composite Z250 which seems ready to take in areas not exposed to occlusal stress.

  18. Integrated Disposal Facility FY 2012 Glass Testing Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Krogstad, Eirik J.; Burton, Sarah D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Snyder, Michelle MV; Crum, Jarrod V.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2013-03-29

    PNNL is conducting work to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility for Hanford immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessment (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program, PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. Key activities in FY12 include upgrading the STOMP/eSTOMP codes to do near-field modeling, geochemical modeling of PCT tests to determine the reaction network to be used in the STOMP codes, conducting PUF tests on selected glasses to simulate and accelerate glass weathering, developing a Monte Carlo simulation tool to predict the characteristics of the weathered glass reaction layer as a function of glass composition, and characterizing glasses and soil samples exhumed from an 8-year lysimeter test. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2012 and the first quarter of FY 2013 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of LAW glasses.

  19. Simulation of alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate glasses by ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dube, Charu L., E-mail: dubecharu@gmail.com; Stennett, Martin C.; Gandy, Amy S.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate glasses is simulated by employing ion irradiation technique. • FTIR and Raman spectroscopic measurements confirm modification of glass network. • The depolymerisation of glass network after irradiation is attributed to synergetic effect of nuclear and electronic losses. - Abstract: A surrogate approach of ion beam irradiation is employed to simulate alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses. Bismuth and helium ions of different energies have been selected for simulating glass matrix modification owing to radiolysis and ballistic damage due to recoil atoms. Structural modification and change in coordination number of network former were probed by employing Reflectance Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopies as a consequence of ion irradiation. Depolymerisation is observed in glass sample irradiated at intermediate energy of 2 MeV. Helium blisters of micron size are seen in glass sample irradiated at low helium ion energy of 30 keV.

  20. Glass Furnace Combustion and Melting Research Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connors, John J. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); McConnell, John F. (JFM Consulting, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Henry, Vincent I. (Henry Technology Solutions, LLC, Ann Arbor, MI); MacDonald, Blake A.; Gallagher, Robert J.; Field, William B. (Lilja Corp., Livermore, CA); Walsh, Peter M.; Simmons, Michael C. (Lilja Corp., Livermore, CA); Adams, Michael E. (Lilja Corp., Rochester, NY); Leadbetter, James M. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Tomasewski, Jack W. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Operacz, Walter J. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Houf, William G.; Davis, James W. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Marvin, Bart G. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Gunner, Bruce E. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Farrell, Rick G. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Bivins, David P. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Curtis, Warren (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Harris, James E. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA)

    2004-08-01

    solution of proprietary glass production problems. As a consequence of the substantial increase in scale and scope of the initial furnace concept in response to industry recommendations, constraints on funding of industrial programs by DOE, and reorientation of the Department's priorities, the OIT Glass Program is unable to provide the support for construction of such a facility. However, it is the present investigators' hope that a group of industry partners will emerge to carry the project forward, taking advantage of the detailed furnace design presented in this report. The engineering, including complete construction drawings, bill of materials, and equipment specifications, is complete. The project is ready to begin construction as soon as the quotations are updated. The design of the research melter closely follows the most advanced industrial practice, firing by natural gas with oxygen. The melting area is 13 ft x 6 ft, with a glass depth of 3 ft and an average height in the combustion space of 3 ft. The maximum pull rate is 25 tons/day, ranging from 100% batch to 100% cullet, continuously fed, with variable batch composition, particle size distribution, and raft configuration. The tank is equipped with bubblers to control glass circulation. The furnace can be fired in three modes: (1) using a single large burner mounted on the front wall, (2) by six burners in a staggered/opposed arrangement, three in each breast wall, and (3) by down-fired burners mounted in the crown in any combination with the front wall or breast-wall-mounted burners. Horizontal slots are provided between the tank blocks and tuck stones and between the breast wall and skewback blocks, running the entire length of the furnace on both sides, to permit access to the combustion space and the surface of the glass for optical measurements and sampling probes. Vertical slots in the breast walls provide additional access for measurements and sampling. The furnace and tank are to be fully

  1. Glass bead cultivation of fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droce, Aida; Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Giese, H.

    2013-01-01

    Production of bioactive compounds and enzymes from filamentous fungi is highly dependent on cultivation conditions. Here we present an easy way to cultivate filamentous fungi on glass beads that allow complete control of nutrient supply. Secondary metabolite production in Fusarium graminearum...... and Fusarium solani cultivated on agar plates, in shaking liquid culture or on glass beads was compared. Agar plate culture and glass bead cultivation yielded comparable results while liquid culture had lower production of secondary metabolites. RNA extraction from glass beads and liquid cultures was easier...... to specific nutrient factors. •Fungal growth on glass beads eases and improves fungal RNA extraction....

  2. Dy3+ doped Lithium Sodium Bismuth Borate Glasses for Yellow Luminescent Photonic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parandamaiah,

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lithium sodium bismuth borate glasses-doped with trivalent dysprosium (Dy3+ ions (LSBiB have been prepared by conventional melt-quenching technique and characterized by structural, thermal and spectroscopic measurements. XRD pattern of the host glass confirms its amorphous nature. Morphological and elemental analysis has also been carried out for Dy3+doped LSBiB glass matrix. FTIR spectral analysis confirms the glass formation of the host glass. Optical absorption spectral analysis has been carried out for 0.8 mol% Dy3+ doped LSBiB glass sample. Well defined optical absorption bands are assigned with corresponding electronic transitions. Photoluminescence spectra shows two prominent emission bands centered at 482 nm and 575 nm corresponds to the 4 F9/2 → 6H15/2 and 4 F9/2 → 6H13/2 respectively under the excitation of 452 nm. Among all the concentrations of Dy3+ ions, at 0.8 mol% Dy3+ contained glass sample exhibits prominent yellow emission at 575 nm. Lifetime decay dynamics have been systematically analyzed for all the glasses, higher lifetime is found to be 0.47 ms for 0.8 mol% Dy3+ ions doped glass. From the photoluminescence analysis, Dy3+ contained glass samples could be suggested as potential yellow luminescent glass matrix for several photonic device applications.

  3. Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Spitzer

    2011-03-11

    This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process

  4. Sample to sample fluctuations in the random energy model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrida, B. (Service de Physique Theorique, CEN Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Toulouse, G. (E.S.P.C.I., 75 - Paris (France))

    1985-03-15

    In the spin glass phase, mean field theory says that the weights of the valleys vary from sample to sample. Exact expressions for the probability laws of these fluctuations are derived, from the random energy model, without recourse to the replica method.

  5. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  6. Fast-ion conducting glass and glass-ceramics for the pH sensor Ionic conductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Niyompan, A

    2002-01-01

    Fast-ion conducting glasses of the compositions Na sub 1 sub + sub x M sub 2 sub - sub x sub / sub 3 Si sub x P sub 3 sub - sub x O sub 1 sub 2 sub - sub 2 sub x sub / sub 3 (0<= x <=3), where M = Zr, Ti, were studied to determine their structural arrangement, physical properties and ionic conductivity. Glass samples were prepared using the conventional melt-quench method in the melting temperature range, 1550 deg C to 1650 deg C. Glass products were characterised by XRD, DTA, dilatometry and density measurement. Solid state MAS NMR experiments of three accessible nuclei, sup 2 sup 3 Na, sup 2 sup 9 Si and sup 3 sup 1 P were used to determine short-range order arrangement in the glasses. XRD confirms the amorphicity of glasses for the compositions of x in range 0-3. Glass transition temperatures, T sub g , TEC, and molar volume are controlled by glass composition. The MAS NMR results suggest that glass structure could be visualised as the silicate network modified by Na sup + and Zr sup 4 sup + or Ti su...

  7. Soldering of Thin Film-Metallized Glass Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.; Glass, S.J.

    1999-03-31

    The ability to produce reliable electrical and structural interconnections between glass and metals by soldering was investigated. Soldering generally requires premetallization of the glass. As a solderable surface finish over soda-lime-silicate glass, two thin films coatings, Cr-Pd-Au and NiCr-Sn, were evaluated. Solder nettability and joint strengths were determined. Test samples were processed with Sn60-Pb40 solder alloy at a reflow temperature of 210 C. Glass-to-cold rolled steel single lap samples yielded an average shear strength of 12 MPa. Solder fill was good. Control of the Au thickness was critical in minimizing the formation of AuSn{sub 4} intermetallic in the joint, with a resulting joint shear strength of 15 MPa. Similar glass-to-glass specimens with the Cr-Pd-Au finish failed at 16.5 MPa. The NiCr-Sn thin film gave even higher shear strengths of 20-22.5 MPa, with failures primarily in the glass.

  8. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M.D.; Kramer, D.P.

    1985-01-04

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  9. Breaking the glass ceiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, A

    1997-03-01

    The glass ceiling is a form of organizational bias and discrimination that prevents qualified professionals from achieving positions of top governance and leadership. This article examines glass ceiling barriers that keep physicians from the upper reaches of management. While these factors apply mainly to women and minority physicians in academia, and are attributable to sexual harassment and discrimination, physicians as a class are frequently denied executive management positions. Such denial results from inadequate preparation for a career in health care administration. Important issues in the professional development of physician executives include mentoring, training and education, administrative experience, and cultural and personality factors. All of those must be considered when making the transition from medicine to management.

  10. Glasses for Mali

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, Bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  11. Study of the glass formation of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William F.; Rolin, Terry

    1992-01-01

    A number of compositions of ceramic oxide high T(sub c) superconductors were elevated for their glass formation ability by means of rapid thermal analysis during quenching, optical, and electron microscopy of the quenched samples, and with subsequent DSC measurements. Correlations between experimental measurements and the methodical composition changes identified the formulations of superconductors that can easily form glass. The superconducting material was first formed as a glass; then, with subsequent devitrification, it was formed into a bulk crystalline superconductor by a series of processing methods.

  12. Femtosecond laser fabrication of nanostructures in silica glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R S; Hnatovsky, C; Simova, E; Rayner, D M; Bhardwaj, V R; Corkum, P B

    2003-06-15

    A femtosecond laser beam focused inside fused silica and other glasses can modify the refractive index of the glass. Chemical etching and atomic-force microscope studies show that the modified region can have a sharp-tipped cone-shaped structure with a tip diameter as small as 100 nm. Placing the structure near the bottom surface of a silica glass sample and applying a selective chemical etch to the bottom surface produces clean, circular, submicrometer-diameter holes. Holes spaced as close to one another as 1.4 microm are demonstrated.

  13. Reversibility windows in selenide-based chalcogenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska Street, Lviv, UA 79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, PL 42200 (Poland); Hyla, M. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, PL 42200 (Poland); Boyko, V. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska Street, Lviv, UA 79031 (Ukraine); Lviv National Polytechnic University, 12, Bandera Street, Lviv, UA 79013 (Ukraine); Golovchak, R. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska Street, Lviv, UA 79031 (Ukraine)], E-mail: golovchak@novas.lviv.ua

    2008-10-01

    A simple route for the estimation of the reversibility windows in the sense of non-ageing ability is developed for chalcogenide glasses obeying '8-N' rule at the example of As-Se, Ge-Se and Ge-As-Se glass systems. The low limit of their reversibility windows is determined at the average coordination number Z=2.4 in full agreement with rigidity percolation theory, while the upper limit is shown to be related to the glass preparation conditions and samples prehistory.

  14. S tudy on Doped Fluoride Glasses for Scintillation Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaukat; S; F.; Farooq; R; 等

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the properties of fluoride glasses for use in particle calorimeters or in optical fibers.The effects of major and minor impurities in manufacturing process and ultimately on the glass properties have been investigated.Glasses in a range of compositions have been made and tested in the form of small samples as well as larger blocks of size 2× 3×14cm3.Results of measurements on these materials,using a high energy particle beam,are presented.

  15. Supersymmetric Spin Glass

    CERN Document Server

    Gukov, S G

    1997-01-01

    The evidently supersymmetric four-dimensional Wess-Zumino model with quenched disorder is considered at the one-loop level. The infrared fixed points of a beta-function form the moduli space $M = RP^2$ where two types of phases were found: with and without replica symmetry. While the former phase possesses only a trivial fixed point, this point become unstable in the latter phase which may be interpreted as a spin glass phase.

  16. Surface silver-doping of biocompatible glass to induce antibacterial properties. Part I: Massive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verné, E; Miola, M; Vitale Brovarone, C; Cannas, M; Gatti, S; Fucale, G; Maina, G; Massé, A; Di Nunzio, S

    2009-03-01

    A glass belonging to the system SiO(2)-Al(2)O(3)-CaO-Na(2)O has been subjected to a patented ion-exchange treatment to induce surface antibacterial activity by doping with silver ions. Doped samples have been characterized by means of X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) analysis, in vitro bioactivity test, Ag(+) leaching test by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS) analyses, cytotoxicity tests by fibroblasts adhesion and proliferation, adsorption of IgA and IgG on to the material to evaluate its inflammatory property and antibacterial tests (cultures with Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli). In vitro tests results demonstrated that the modified glass maintains the same biocompatibility of the untreated one and, moreover, it acquires an antimicrobial action against tested bacteria. This method can be selected to realize glass or glass-ceramic bone substitutes as well as coatings on bio-inert devices, providing safety against bacterial colonization thus reducing the risks of infections nearby the implant site. The present work is the carrying on of a previous research activity, concerning the application of an ion-exchange treatment on glasses belonging to the ternary system SiO(2)-CaO-Na(2)O. On the basis of previous results the glass composition was refined and the ion-exchange process was adapted to it, in order to tune the final material properties. The addition of Al(2)O(3) to the original glass system and the optimization of the ion-exchange conditions allowed a better control of the treatment, leading to an antibacterial material, without affecting both bioactivity and biocompatibility.

  17. Crystallization behavior of Fe- and Co-based bulk metallic glasses and their glass-forming ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louzguine-Luzgin, D.V., E-mail: dml@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Bazlov, A.I. [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); National University of Science and Technology “MISiS”, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Ketov, S.V. [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Inoue, A. [International Institute of Green Materials, Josai International University, Togane 283-8555 (Japan); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, 300072 (China); Department of Physics, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 22254 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-15

    In the present work we study and compare the crystallization behavior of Fe- and Co-based good bulk glass formers with an exceptionally high glass-forming ability leading to the critical thickness of cast samples reaching 1 cm. For Fe-based alloys we also investigate the effect of opposite C/B content ratio on the glass-forming ability and the crystallization behavior. The structure and phase composition of the glassy samples were examined by conventional X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy while thermal stability and phase transformations were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The reasons for high glass-forming ability are discussed. The glass-forming ability of the studied alloys depends on both factors: the type of crystallization reaction and characteristic temperatures. - Highlights: • Crystallization of Fe-based and Co-based bulk glass-forming alloys. • The reasons for enhanced glass-forming ability of these alloys are discussed. • Low growth rate of χ-Fe{sub 36}Cr{sub 12}Mo{sub 10} phase. • Reduced liquidus temperature of Fe{sub 48}Cr{sub 15}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 6}B{sub 15}RE{sub 2} alloys.

  18. Cavitation and pore blocking in nanoporous glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, C; Kalies, G; Enke, D; Klank, D

    2011-09-06

    In gas adsorption studies, porous glasses are frequently referred to as model materials for highly disordered mesopore systems. Numerous works suggest that an accurate interpretation of physisorption isotherms requires a complete understanding of network effects upon adsorption and desorption, respectively. The present article deals with nitrogen and argon adsorption at different temperatures (77 and 87 K) performed on a series of novel nanoporous glasses (NPG) with different mean pore widths. NPG samples contain smaller mesopores and significantly higher microporosity than porous Vycor glass or controlled pore glass. Since the mean pore width of NPG can be tuned sensitively, the evolution of adsorption characteristics with respect to a broadening pore network can be investigated starting from the narrowest nanopore width. With an increasing mean pore width, a H2-type hysteresis develops gradually which finally transforms into a H1-type. In this connection, a transition from a cavitation-induced desorption toward desorption controlled by pore blocking can be observed. Furthermore, we find concrete hints for a pore size dependence of the relative pressure of cavitation in highly disordered pore systems. By comparing nitrogen and argon adsorption, a comprehensive insight into adsorption mechanisms in novel disordered materials is provided.

  19. Organic Entrainment and Preservation in Volcanic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Ojha, Lujendra; Brunner, Anna E.; Dufek, Josef D.; Wray, James Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Unaltered pyroclastic deposits have previously been deemed to have "low" potential for the formation, concentration and preservation of organic material on the Martian surface. Yet volcanic glasses that have solidified very quickly after an eruption may be good candidates for containment and preservation of refractory organic material that existed in a biologic system pre-eruption due to their impermeability and ability to attenuate UV radiation. Analysis using NanoSIMS of volcanic glass could then be performed to both deduce carbon isotope ratios that indicate biologic origin and confirm entrainment during eruption. Terrestrial contamination is one of the biggest barriers to definitive Martian organic identification in soil and rock samples. While there is a greater potential to concentrate organics in sedimentary strata, volcanic glasses may better encapsulate and preserve organics over long time scales, and are widespread on Mars. If volcanic glass from many sites on Earth could be shown to contain biologically derived organics from the original environment, there could be significant implications for the search for biomarkers in ancient Martian environments.

  20. Study of structural, electrical, and dielectric properties of phosphate-borate glasses and glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, B. M. G.; Graça, M. P. F.; Prezas, P. R.; Valente, M. A.; Almeida, A. F.; Freire, F. N. A.; Bih, L.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, phosphate-borate based glasses with molar composition 20.7P2O5-17.2Nb2O5-13.8WO3-34.5A2O-13.8B2O3, where A = Li, Na, and K, were prepared by the melt quenching technique. The as-prepared glasses were heat-treated in air at 800 °C for 4 h, which led to the formation of glass-ceramics. These high chemical and thermal stability glasses are good candidates for several applications such as fast ionic conductors, semiconductors, photonic materials, electrolytes, hermetic seals, rare-earth ion host solid lasers, and biomedical materials. The present work endorses the analysis of the electrical conductivity of the as-grown samples, and also the electrical, dielectric, and structural changes established by the heat-treatment process. The structure of the samples was analyzed using X-Ray powder Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and density measurements. Both XRD and Raman analysis confirmed crystals formation through the heat-treatment process. The electrical ac and dc conductivities, σac and σdc, respectively, and impedance spectroscopy measurements as function of the temperature, varying from 200 to 380 K, were investigated for the as-grown and heat-treated samples. The impedance spectroscopy was measured in the frequency range of 100 Hz-1 MHz.

  1. Synthesis and Structural Studies of Er3+ Containing Lead Cadmium Fluoroborate Glasses and Glass-Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Maurício A.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The vitreous domain was established in the PbF2-CdF2-B2O 3 system from melting and quenching experiments. Er3+ containing glasses were prepared and glass ceramics were obtained by selected heat-treatments. Lead fluoride was identified (beta-PbF2 as the crystalline phase. Structural studies were performed in some glassy and partially crystallized samples by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS measurements. The role of Cd2+ and Pb2+ atoms on the glass network formation and also on the crystallization behavior was put forward by these techniques. After crystallization Er3+ atoms segregated in the crystal phase.

  2. Picometer-scale surface roughness measurements inside hollow glass fibres

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    International audience; A differential profilometry technique is adapted to the problem of measuring the roughness of hollow glass fibres by use of immersion objectives and index-matching liquid. The technique can achieve picometer level sensitivity. Cross validation with AFM measurements is obtained through use of vitreous silica step calibration samples. Measurements on the inner surfaces of fiber-sized glass capillaries drawn from high purity suprasil F300 tubes show a sub-nanometer roughn...

  3. Transferability of glass lens molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuki, Masahide

    2006-02-01

    Sphere lenses have been used for long time. But it is well known that sphere lenses theoretically have spherical aberration, coma and so on. And, aspheric lenses attract attention recently. Plastic lenses are molded easily with injection machines, and are relatively low cost. They are suitable for mass production. On the other hand, glass lenses have several excellent features such as high refractive index, heat resistance and so on. Many aspheric glass lenses came to be used for the latest digital camera and mobile phone camera module. It is very difficult to produce aspheric glass lenses by conventional process of curve generating and polishing. For the solution of this problem, Glass Molding Machine was developed and is spreading through the market. High precision mold is necessary to mold glass lenses with Glass Molding Machine. The mold core is ground or turned by high precision NC aspheric generator. To obtain higher transferability of the mold core, the function of the molding machine and the conditions of molding are very important. But because of high molding temperature, there are factors of thermal expansion and contraction of the mold and glass material. And it is hard to avoid the factors. In this session, I introduce following items. [1] Technology of glass molding and the machine is introduced. [2] The transferability of glass molding is analyzed with some data of glass lenses molded. [3] Compensation of molding shape error is discussed with examples.

  4. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  5. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

  6. Distribusi Streptococcus mutans pada Tepi Tumpatan Glass Ionomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Muthalib

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Secondary caries always occurs as a result of the filling not being hermetically. Purposes of this research is to prove whether there is a leak on the border of the tooth enamel and border between the Glass-ionomer filling with the Streptococcus mutans infection with parameter of SMAAPPI (Simplified S. mutans Approximal Plaque Index by Keeni et al, 1981. The subject of the research were 20 patients who came to the Dental Clinic at University of Indonesia with criteria possessing Glass-ionomer filling at the lower jaws. Collection of the samples were dental plaque gathered using a 1.5 mm excavator to scrape one way direction from the enamel, along the border between the enamel and Glass-ionomer filling and Glass-ionomer filling's surface. Isolation with medium transport sem-synthetic Cariostat and TSY20B and identification by using biochemical test. isolated colony strain local Streptococcus mutans from enamel, the border enamel and Glass-ionomer and the surface of the Glass-ionomer. The results were Streptococcus mutans were found from enamel 3006 colonies, on the border between the enamel and Glass-ionomer 143 colonies and on the surface of the Glss-ionomer 7291 colonies. Amoung of Streptococcus mutans colony obtained on the border of the enamel and Glass-ionomer were smaller compared to the surface of the Glass-ionomer and tooth enamel. Concluded that the leak of the filling was not caused by the number of distributed Streptooccus mutans colonies on the side, because the fluoroapatite fastener occurred due to the Glass-ionomer releasing in fluor along the border of the filling.

  7. Hierarchical Structures and Shaped Particles of Bioactive Glass and Its In Vitro Bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Boonyang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bioactive glass particles with controllable structure and porosity were prepared using dual-templating methods. Block copolymers used as one template component produced mesopores in the calcined samples. Polymer colloidal crystals as the other template component yielded either three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM products or shaped bioactive glass nanoparticles. The in vitro bioactivity of these bioactive glasses was studied by soaking the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF at body temperature (37°C for varying lengths of time and monitoring the formation of bone-like apatite on the surface of the bioactive glass. A considerable bioactivity was found that all of bioactive glass samples have the ability to induce the formation of an apatite layer on its surface when in contact with SBF. The development of bone-like apatite is faster for 3DOM bioactive glasses than for nanoparticles.

  8. Pressure-Induced Changes in Inter-Diffusivity and Compressive Stress in Chemically Strengthened Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Thirion, Lynn M.; Youngman, Randall E.;

    chamber to compress bulk glass samples isostatically up to 1 GPa at elevated temperature before or after the ion exchange treatment of an industrial sodium-magnesium aluminosilicate glass. Compression of the samples prior to ion exchange leads to a decreased Na+-K+ inter-diffusivity, increased compressive...

  9. Characterization of a silicate glass as a high dose dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, K., E-mail: k.farah@cnstn.rnrt.t [Laboratoire de Radiotraitement. Centre National des Sciences et Technologie Nucleaires, 2020 Sidi-Thabet (Tunisia); Mejri, A.; Hosni, F. [Laboratoire de Radiotraitement. Centre National des Sciences et Technologie Nucleaires, 2020 Sidi-Thabet (Tunisia); Ben Ouada, H. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Interfaces, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, 5000 Monastir (Tunisia); Fuochi, P.G.; Lavalle, M. [ISOF-CNR, Via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Kovacs, A. [Institute of Isotopes, HAS, P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-02-21

    Commercial silicate glass has been investigated as a possible high dose dosimeter using an UV-vis spectrophotometer. Glass samples were irradiated by {sup 60}Co gamma rays and the results compared with those obtained with 3.4 and 8.4 MeV electron beams. The irradiated samples showed rapid fading at room temperature immediately after irradiation. In order to improve the stability of absorbance, glass samples were submitted to post-irradiation thermal treatments (150 deg. C for 20 min). The influences of the dose, type and energy of the ionizing radiation on the fading characteristics and on the response of the irradiated and thermally treated glasses were studied. Dependence of the glass response on the temperature during gamma irradiation in the range -3 to 80 deg. C is reported. The reproducibility to reuse glass dosimeter by thermal bleaching the radiation induced colour centres at 300 deg. C for 30 min was also investigated. Calibration curves in the range 0.1-17 kGy were obtained by using in-plant calibration techniques against transfer standard alanine dosimeters in the Tunisian semi-industrial gamma irradiation facility.

  10. Luminescence property of Eu-doped fluorochlorozirconate glass-ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Zhili; WANG Yongsheng; HE Dawei; MENG Xianguo

    2009-01-01

    A series of Eu2+-doped fluorochlorozireonate glass-ceramics were prepared by solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction, pho-toluminescence, photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) and the turbidity of fluorozirconate glass containing BaCl2 nano- and micro-crystals were measured for the samples annealed at 290 ℃ for 10 min. The PSL was attributed to the characteristic emission of Eu2+ in nano-crystallites of BaCl2, which formed in the glass upon annealing. The PSL efficiency of the glass ceramic was increased by increasing the concentration of BaCl2, which, however, resulted in the decreasing in the transparency of the sample. The sample turned to a semi-transparent glass ceramic or even an opaque and milky white one from a near-transparent glass. The trade-off between optical trans-parency and PSL intensity over different concentrations of BaCl2 for X-ray imaging plate applications was briefly discussed.

  11. Composite material based on fluoroplast and low melting oxyfluoride glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatieva, L. N.; Savchenko, N. N.; Lalayan, V. M.; Zverev, G. A.; Goncharuk, V. K.; Ustinov, A. Yu.; Shaulov, A. Yu.; Berlin, A. A.; Bouznik, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    The present work summarizes the results of studies of the samples fabricated through extrusion blending of mixtures composed of the perfluorocarbon polymer (polyvinylidene fluoride, PVDF), which presently undergoes intensive studies, and the inorganic glass (BF-glass) of the composition 3B2O3-97(40SnF2-30SnO-30P2O5). It is revealed as a result of application of the suggested technique the composite material whose structure depends on the component ratio in the mixture (from individual areas formed by each component to homogeneously distributed composite particles) has been fabricated. The peculiarities of formation of composites were studied on the basis of the results of studying their morphology, molecular structure and phase composition. It was revealed the preservation of the polymer molecular structure and the absence of interaction with the glass in the fabricated samples. We found that in the process of sample fabrication there occur melting of the mixture, mixing of particles and changing of the phase compositions. The polymer partially and the glass almost completely crystallize in the process of composite fabrication. Glass crystals fill polymer cavities forming agglomerates. Along with the increase of the amount of inorganic component crystals, the polymer monolithic nature is disrupted and an inversion occurs at a certain component ratio: polymer particles are located between crystals of the inorganic component, mixing with them and covering them. The glass crystallization is facilitated through pre-crushing in extruder mill.

  12. NEW ERBIUM DOPED ANTIMONY GLASSES FOR LASER AND GLASS AMPLIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tioua

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of the special spectroscopic properties of the rare earth ions, rare earth doped glasses are widely used in bulk and fiber lasers or amplifiers. The modelling of lasers and searching for new laser transitions require a precise knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in different host glasses. In this poster will offer new doped erbium glasses synthesized in silicate crucibles were obtained in the combination Sb2O3-WO3-Na2O. Several properties are measured and correlated with glass compositions. The absorption spectral studies have been performed for erbium doped glasses. The intensities of various absorption bands of the doped glasses are measured and the Judd-Ofelt parameters have been computed. From the theory of Judd-Ofelt, various radiative properties, such as transition probability, branching ratio and radiative life time for various emission levels of these doped glasses have been determined and reported. These results confirm the ability of antimony glasses for glass amplification.

  13. NEW ERBIUM DOPED ANTIMONY GLASSES FOR LASER AND GLASS AMPLIFICATIONmplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tioua

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of the special spectroscopic properties of the rare earth ions, rare earth doped glasses are widely used in bulk and fiber lasers or amplifiers. The modelling of lasers and searching for new laser transitions require a precise knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in different host glasses. in this poster will offer new doped erbium glasses synthesized in silicate crucibles were obtained in the combination Sb2O3-WO3-Na2O. Several properties are measured and correlated with glass compositions. The absorption spectral studies have been performed for erbium doped glasses. The intensities of various absorption bands of the doped glasses are measured and the Judd-Ofelt parameters have been computed. From the theory of Judd-Ofelt, various radiative properties, such as transition probability, branching ratio and radiative life time for various emission levels of these doped glasses have been determined and reported. These results confirm the ability of antimony glasses for glass amplification.

  14. Leaching behavior of microtektite glass compositions in sea water and the effect of precipitation on glass leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The present study attempts to account for the slow corrosion rates of microtektite glass in nature by comparing the leach rates of synthetic microtektite glass samples in deionized water and in sea-water, respectively. In order to obtain systematic data about leachant composition effects, leach tests were also carried out with synthetic leachant compositions enriched with respect to silica or depleted with respect to certain major components of sea-water (Mg, Ca).

  15. Laboratory Sampling Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Polarized Light Microscopy ( PLM ). PLM with dispersion staining is used to analyze bulk samples. PLM is usually very specific, but some nonasbestiform...silicate amphiboles, such as fibrous tremolite, can compromise its specificity. PLM analysis reports an asbestos percentile range due to the subjective...Container Comments Unknown Bulk Material Characterization PLM /MC Wide mouth glass jar Polarized Light Microscopy/Materials Characterization ( PLM /MC

  16. Analysis of glass fibre sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2014-01-01

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer composites are widely used for industrial and engineering applications which include construction, aerospace, automotive and wind energy industry. During the manufacturing glass fibres, they are surface-treated with an aqueous solution. This process and the treated...... surfaces are called sizing. The sizing influences the properties of the interface between fibres and a matrix, and subsequently affects mechanical properties of composites. In this work the sizing of commercially available glass fibres was analysed so as to study the composition and chemical structures....... Soxhlet extraction was used to extract components of the sizing from the glass fibres. The glass fibres, their extracts and coated glass plates were analysed by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis combined with a mass spectrometer (TGA-MS), and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR...

  17. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  18. Who will buy smart glasses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauschnabel, Philipp; Brem, Alexander; Ivens, Bjørn S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent market studies reveal that augmented reality (AR) devices, such as smart glasses, will substantially influence the media landscape. Yet, little is known about the intended adoption of smart glasses, particularly: Who are the early adopters of such wearables? We contribute to the growing body...... of research that investigates the role of personality in predicting media usage by analyzing smart glasses, particularly Google Glass. First, we integrate AR devices into the current evolution of media and technologies. Then, we draw on the Big Five Model of human personality and present the results from two...... studies that investigate the direct and moderating effects of human personality on the awareness and innovation adoption of smart glasses. Our results show that open and emotionally stable consumers tend to be more aware of Google Glass. Consumers who perceive the potential for high functional benefits...

  19. Physical chemistry of glass fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalske, T.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Since silica glass is a brittle material, its susceptibility to fracture often limits its use in technological applications. Previous studies have demonstrated that the fracture resistance of silica glass is decreased greatly by the presence of chemically reactive species such as water. By studying the effect of controlled amounts of reactive gases on the fracture rate in silica glass, the authors have developed chemical kinetics based models to describe the molecular level processes that lead to stress corrosion fracture of glass. A key aspect of our chemical kinetics based model is the measurement of the stress dependence for the hydrolysis of siloxane bonds. The authors derive the stress dependence for hydrolysis from reaction rate studies that are conducted on strained cyclosiloxane model compounds. The chemical kinetic parameter derived from model compounds is used to successfully predict the fracture behavior of bulk silica glass and the mechanical fatigue of high-strength silica glass fibers in various reactive chemical environments.

  20. MAS-NMR study of lithium zinc silicate glasses and glass-ceramics with various ZnO content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Madhumita; Kothiyal, Govind P.; Montagne, Lionel; Delevoye, Laurent

    2008-02-01

    Lithium zinc silicate glasses of composition (mol%): 17.5Li 2O-(72- x)SiO 2- xZnO-5.1Na 2O-1.3P 2O 5-4.1B 2O 3, 5.5⩽ x⩽17.7, were prepared by conventional melt-quenched technique and converted to glass-ceramic by controlled crystallization process. 29Si and 31P MAS-NMR was used to characterize the structure of both glass and glass-ceramic samples. Despite the complex glass composition, Q2, Q3 and Q4 sites are identified from 29Si MAS-NMR, which relative intensities are found to vary with the ZnO content, indicating a network depolymerization by ZnO. Moreover, well separated Q3 and Q4 resonances for low ZnO content indicates the occurrence of phase separation. From 31P MAS-NMR, it is seen that phosphorus is mainly present in the form of ortho-( Q0) and pyro-phosphate ( Q1) structural units and variation of ZnO content did not have much effect on these resonances, which provides an additional evidence for phase separation in the glass. On conversion to glass-ceramics, lithium disilicate (Li 2Si 2O 5), lithium zinc ortho-silicate (Li 3Zn 0.5SiO 4), tridymite (SiO 2) and cristobalite (SiO 2) were identified as major silicate crystalline phases. Using 29Si MAS-NMR, quantification of these silicate crystalline phases is carried out and correlated with the ZnO content in the glass-ceramics samples. In addition, 31P spectra unambiguously revealed the presence of crystalline Li 3PO 4 and (Na,Li) 3PO 4 in the glass-ceramics.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic using soda-lime-silica waste glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Mojtaba; Hashemi, Babak

    2014-04-01

    Soda-lime-silica waste glass was used to synthesize a bioactive glass-ceramic through solid-state reactions. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural and thermal properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). Bioactivity assessment by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was revealed that the samples with smaller amount of crystalline phase had a higher level of bioactivity.

  2. Advances in Glass Ionomer Cements

    OpenAIRE

    KAYA, Dt. Tuğba; TİRALİ, Yard. Doç. Dr. Resmiye Ebru

    2013-01-01

    In recent years there have been a number of innovations and developments with respect to glass ionomer cements and their applications in clinical dentistry. This article considers some of the recent outstanding studies regarding the field of glass ionomer cement applications, adhesion and setting mechanisms, types, advantage and disadvantages among themselves and also to enhance the physical and antibacterial properties under the title of 'Advances in Glass Ionomer Cements'. As their biologic...

  3. Structural color from colloidal glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia

    When a material has inhomogeneities at a lengthscale comparable to the wavelength of light, interference can give rise to structural colors: colors that originate from the interaction of the material's microstructure with light and do not require absorbing dyes. In this thesis we study a class of these materials, called photonic glasses, where the inhomogeneities form a dense and random arrangement. Photonic glasses have angle-independent structural colors that look like those of conventional dyes. However, when this work started, there was only a handful of colors accessible with photonic glasses, mostly hues of blue. We use various types of colloidal particles to make photonic glasses, and we study, both theoretically and experimentally, how the optical properties of these glasses relate to their structure and constituent particles. Based on our observations from glasses of conventional particles, we construct a theoretical model that explains the scarcity of yellow, orange, and red photonic glasses. Guided by this model, we develop novel colloidal systems that allow a higher degree of control over structural color. We assemble glasses of soft, core-shell particles with scattering cores and transparent shells, where the resonant wavelength can be tuned independently of the reflectivity. We then encapsulate glasses of these core-shell particles into emulsion droplets of tunable size; in this system, we observe, for the first time, angle-independent structural colors that cover the entire visible spectrum. To enhance color saturation, we begin experimenting with inverse glasses, where the refractive index of the particles is lower than the refractive index of the medium, with promising results. Finally, based on our theoretical model for scattering from colloidal glasses, we begin an exploration of the color gamut that could be achieved with this technique, and we find that photonic glasses are a promising approach to a new type of long-lasting, non-toxic, and

  4. Microsheet Glass In Solar Concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1993-01-01

    Microsheet glass used as highly protective covering material for developmental concentrating reflectors for solar power systems. Together with other materials, possible to fabricate lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, and long-lived concentrators. Desirable properties include durability and smoothness. Glass not affected by ultraviolet radiation, and not degraded by atomic oxygen, found in low orbits around Earth. Though concentrators intended for use in outer space, noteworthy that terrestrial concentrator fabricated with glass sheet 0.7 mm thick.

  5. Google glass based immunochromatographic diagnostic test analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Steve; Caire, Romain; Cortazar, Bingen; Turan, Mehmet; Wong, Andrew; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Integration of optical imagers and sensors into recently emerging wearable computational devices allows for simpler and more intuitive methods of integrating biomedical imaging and medical diagnostics tasks into existing infrastructures. Here we demonstrate the ability of one such device, the Google Glass, to perform qualitative and quantitative analysis of immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) using a voice-commandable hands-free software-only interface, as an alternative to larger and more bulky desktop or handheld units. Using the built-in camera of Glass to image one or more RDTs (labeled with Quick Response (QR) codes), our Glass software application uploads the captured image and related information (e.g., user name, GPS, etc.) to our servers for remote analysis and storage. After digital analysis of the RDT images, the results are transmitted back to the originating Glass device, and made available through a website in geospatial and tabular representations. We tested this system on qualitative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and quantitative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) RDTs. For qualitative HIV tests, we demonstrate successful detection and labeling (i.e., yes/no decisions) for up to 6-fold dilution of HIV samples. For quantitative measurements, we activated and imaged PSA concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 ng/mL and generated calibration curves relating the RDT line intensity values to PSA concentration. By providing automated digitization of both qualitative and quantitative test results, this wearable colorimetric diagnostic test reader platform on Google Glass can reduce operator errors caused by poor training, provide real-time spatiotemporal mapping of test results, and assist with remote monitoring of various biomedical conditions.

  6. The Effect of Lucite Glass Reinforcement on the Properties of Conventional Glass-Ionomer Filling Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleh Kazemi Yazdi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: The usage of glass ionomer cements (GICs restorative materials are very limited due to lack of flexural strength and toughness. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of using a leucite glass on a range of mechanical and optical properties of commercially available conventional glass ionomer cement. Materials and Method: Ball milled 45μm leucite glass particles were incorporated into commercial conventional GIC, Ketac-Molar Easymix (KMEm. The characteristics of the powder particles were observed under scanning electron microscopy. The samples were made for each experimental group; KMEm and lucite- modified Ketac-Molar easy Mix (LMKMEm according to manufacturer’s instruction then were collected in damp tissue and stored in incubator for 1 hour. The samples were divided into two groups, one stored in distilled water for 24 hours and the others for 1 week.10 samples were made for testing biaxial flexural strength after 1 day and 1 week, with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min, calculated in MPa. The hardness (Vickers hardness tester of each experimental group was also tested. To evaluate optical properties, 3 samples were made for each experimental group and evaluated with a spectrophotometer. The setting time of modified GIC was measured with Gillmore machine. Result: The setting time in LMKMEm was 8 minutes. The mean biaxial flexural strength was LMKMEm/ 1day: 24.13±4.14 MPa, LMKMEm/ 1 week: 24.22±4.87 MPa KMEm/1day:28.87±6.31 MPa and KMEm/1 week: 26.65±5.82 MPa which were not statistically different from each other. The mean Vickers hardness was LMKMEm: 403±66 Mpa and KMEm: 358±22 MPa; though not statistically different from each other. The mean total transmittance (Tt was LMKMEm: 15.9±0.7, KMEm: 22.3±1.2, the mean diffuse transmittance (Td was LMKMEm: 12.2±0.5, KMEm: 18.0±0.5 which were statistically different from each other. Conclusion: Leucite glass can be incorporated with a

  7. Toughness of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantanu V. Madge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs have desirable properties like high strength and low modulus, but their toughness can show much variation, depending on the kind of test as well as alloy chemistry. This article reviews the type of toughness tests commonly performed and the factors influencing the data obtained. It appears that even the less-tough metallic glasses are tougher than oxide glasses. The current theories describing the links between toughness and material parameters, including elastic constants and alloy chemistry (ordering in the glass, are discussed. Based on the current literature, a few important issues for further work are identified.

  8. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  9. Innovated application of mechanical activation to separate lead from scrap cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenyi; Li, Jinhui; Zhang, Qiwu; Saito, Fumio

    2012-04-03

    The disposal of scrap cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass has become a global environmental problem due to the rapid shrinkage of new CRT monitor demand, which greatly reduces the reuse for remanufacturing. To detoxificate CRT funnel glass by lead recovery with traditional metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the funnel glass. As a result, substantial physicochemical changes have been observed after mechanical activation including chemical breakage and defects formation in glass inner structure. These changes contribute to the easy dissolution of the activated sample in solution. High yield of 92.5% of lead from activated CRT funnel glass by diluted nitric acid leaching and successful formation of lead sulfide by sulfur sulfidization in water have also been achieved. All the results indicate that the application of mechanical activation on recovering lead from CRT funnel glass is efficient and promising, which is also probably appropriate to detoxificate any other kind of leaded glass.

  10. The Surface Morphology and Optical Properties of Refined Glasses with Inorganic Nano-molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drajewicz, Marcin; Pytel, Maciej; Rokicki, Paweł; Góral, Marek

    2015-05-01

    New refining technology of soda-calcium-silicon glass surfaces with inorganic compounds nano-molecules has been presented in the study. In order to determine modification of the glass surface SEM observation and EDX analysis have been carried out. The UV-VIS, photo-elasticity and ellipsometry examinations were carried out on glass samples. The results of investigations that have been conducted show that refining process of the glass surface by use of nanopowder inorganic compounds deposited electrostatically on glass surface provides forming of very thin (about 50 nm) surface layers [1]. This method of surface modification improves physical and chemical glass properties. In this paper results of microhardness test of refined glass were also presented.

  11. Effect of high thermal expansion glass infiltration on mechanical properties of alumina–zirconia composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Balakrishnan; B B Panigrahi; K P Sanosh; Min-Cheol Chu; T N Kim; Seong-Jai Cho

    2009-08-01

    This work studies the effect on the mechanical properties of alumina-10 wt% zirconia (3 mol% yttria stabilized) composite by infiltrating glass of a higher thermal expansion (soda lime glass) on the surface at high temperature. The glass improved the strength of composite at room temperature as well as at high temperature. This could be attributed to the drastic drop in the coefficient of thermal expansion due to the compositional change in the soda lime glass during infiltration. There was a significant improvement in the Weibull modulus after glass infiltration. Glass infiltrated samples showed better thermal shock resistance. The magnitude of strength increment was found to be in the order of the surface residual stress generated by thermo-elastic properties mismatch between the composite and the penetrated glass.

  12. Ion transport mechanism in glasses: non-Arrhenius conductivity and nonuniversal features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugavel, S; Vaid, C; Bhadram, V S; Narayana, C

    2010-10-28

    In this article, we report non-Arrhenius behavior in the temperature-dependent dc conductivity of alkali ion conducting silicate glasses well below their glass transition temperature. In contrast to the several fast ion-conducting and binary potassium silicate glasses, these glasses show a positive deviation in the Arrhenius plot. The observed non-Arrhenius behavior is completely reproducible in nature even after prolonged annealing close to the glass transition temperature of the respective glass sample. These results are the manifestation of local structural changes of the silicate network with temperature and give rise to different local environments into which the alkali ions hop, revealed by in situ high-temperature Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, the present study provides new insights into the strong link between the dynamics of the alkali ions and different sites associated with it in the glasses.

  13. Raman microspectroscopy investigation of Ag ion-exchanged glass layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A; Giarola, M; Cattaruzza, E; Gonella, F; Mardegan, M; Trave, E; Quaranta, A; Mariotto, G

    2012-11-01

    The ion-exchange process is widely used to dope silicate glass layers with silver, aimed at controlling the Ag state in view of possible applications, ranging from light waveguide fabrication to nanostructured composite glass synthesis. The silver doped glass structure as well as its prescribed properties depend on both the preparation parameters and the subsequent treatments. Several structural aspects are still open with regard either to the modification of the glass incorporating the dopant, or to clustering phenomena silver undergoes as a function of its local concentration and state, which are in turn strongly dependent on the preparation route. Systematic characterizations of these systems are mandatory to address the role of the various synthesis parameters in giving rise to the observed features, thus pointing out the effective methodologies for the fabrication of silicate glass layers with the desired properties. In this work, the results of micro-Raman, optical absorption and photoluminescence characterizations are presented for soda-lime glass slides doped with silver by Ag(+)-Na+ exchange and subsequent thermal treatments in air. In particular, a cross-section profiling analysis by Raman micro-spectroscopy was performed on Ag ion-exchanged samples after treatment at some different temperatures. The experimental findings allow to elucidate the role of the treatment temperature in the clustering process related to the local Ag concentration inside the exchanged glass layer.

  14. Experimental approach for thermal parameters estimation during glass forming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhay, B.; Bourouga, B.; Alzetto, F.; Challita, C.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, an experimental device designed and developedto estimate thermal conditions at the Glass / piston contact interface is presented. This deviceis made of two parts: the upper part contains the piston made of metal and a heating device to raise the temperature of the piston up to 500 °C. The lower part is composed of a lead crucible and a glass sample. The assembly is provided with a heating system, an induction furnace of 6 kW for heating the glass up to 950 °C.The developed experimental procedure has permitted in a previous published study to estimate the Thermal Contact ResistanceTCR using the inverse technique developed by Beck [1]. The semi-transparent character of the glass has been taken into account by an additional radiative heat flux and an equivalent thermal conductivity. After the set-up tests, reproducibility experiments for a specific contact pressure have been carried outwith a maximum dispersion that doesn't exceed 6%. Then, experiments under different conditions for a specific glass forming process regarding the application (Packaging, Buildings and Automobile) were carried out. The objective is to determine, experimentallyfor each application,the typical conditions capable to minimize the glass temperature loss during the glass forming process.

  15. Sintering and foaming of barium silicate glass powder compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Mueller

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The manufacture of sintered glasses and glass-ceramics, glass matrix composites and glass-bounded ceramics or pastes is often affected by gas bubble formation. Against this background, we studied sintering and foaming of barium silicate glass powders used as SOFC sealants using different powder milling procedures. Sintering was measured by means of heating microscopy backed up by XPD, DTA, Vacuum Hot Extraction (VHE and optical and electron microscopy. Foaming increased significantly as milling progressed. For moderately milled glass powders, subsequent storage in air could also promote foaming. Although the powder compacts were uniaxially pressed and sintered in air, the milling atmosphere sig¬ni¬ficantly affected foaming. The strength of this effect increased in the order Ar  N2 < air < CO2. Conformingly, VHE studies revealed that the pores of foamed samples predominantly encapsulated CO2, even for powders milled in Ar and N2. Results of this study thus indicate that foaming is caused by carbonaceous species trapped on the glass powder surface. Foaming could be substantially reduced by milling in water and 10 wt% HCl.

  16. Surface effects on the crystallization of ritonavir glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kohsaku

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, initiation time of crystallization was shown to be basically expressed as a function of only the reduced temperature, which was a ratio of storage and glass transition temperatures. This conclusion was obtained using quenched glasses with minimized surface area stored under a dried atmosphere. In this study, the surface effects on the crystallization were investigated using freeze-dried ritonavir (RTV) glass. Although quenched RTV glass exhibited exceptionally long initiation time, the initiation was accelerated by using the freeze-dried glasses. Storage of the samples under humid conditions further accelerated the crystallization. These surface effects eliminated the energetic barrier for nucleation, and the RTV glass exhibited universal initiation time. In contrast, subsequent crystal growth was slower for the freeze-dried glasses relative to the quenched one, presumably because of less condensed and porous structures that would suppress molecular cooperativity. Storage under a humid atmosphere also appeared to inhibit the crystal growth, presumably because of disruption of the molecular network by water. These findings support the existence of the universal initiation time for crystallization and indicated the importance of surface effects in crystallization behavior. Also, the suppression of crystal growth because of the void structure and incorporation of water molecules were indicated.

  17. CdS/CdSSe quantum dots in glass matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Sonawane; S D Naik; S K Apte; M V Kulkarni; B B Kale

    2008-06-01

    The compositions containing 55 and 60% of silica have been formulated for preparation of glass filters having sharp cut-off at 475 and 575 nm. To achieve cut-off at these wavelengths, the glasses have been doped with CdS/CdSSe and melted at 1200–1300°C. The glass samples were transparent and pale yellow in colour due to presence of CdS/CdSSe tiny nano crystal (Q-dots). in situ growth of CdS/CdSSe nano crystals imparts the yellow/orange/red colour to these glasses. Optical study shows that as prepared glasses have optical cut-off in the range 350–370 nm. The linear crystal growth of CdS/CdSSe in glasses exhibits red shift in optical cut-off. The optical filter having cut-off at 475 nm can be prepared by doping CdS and cut-off filter of wavelength 575 nm by CdSSe. The TEM results show that the CdS/CdSSe nano crystals (Q-dots) ranging from 2–5 nm are uniformly distributed into the glass matrix.

  18. Halide laser glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.J.

    1982-01-14

    Energy storage and energy extraction are of prime importance for efficient laser action and are affected by the line strengths and linewidths of optical transitions, excited-state lifetimes, nonradiative decay processes, spectroscopic inhomogeneities, nonlinear refractive index, and damage threshold. These properties are all host dependent. To illustrate this, the spectroscopic properties of Nd/sup 3 +/ have been measured in numerous oxide, oxyhalide, and halide glasses. A table summarizes the reported ranges of stimulated emission cross sections, peak wavelengths, linewidths, and radiative lifetimes associated with the /sup 4/F/sub 3/2/ ..-->.. /sup 4/I/sub 11/2/ lasing transition.

  19. Influence of La2O3 Additions on Chemical Durability and Dielectric Properties of Boroaluminosilicate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. H.; Yue, Y. L.; Wu, H. T.

    2012-12-01

    Boroaluminosilicate glasses containing La2O3 were prepared by the normal quenching method. The glass transition temperatures (Tg) were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The structural role of RO was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Chemical durability was evaluated by weight losses of glass samples after immersion in HC1 solution. High resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) was used to examine the surface micrographs of corroded glass samples. The dielectric constant and tangent loss were measured in the frequency range 10-106 Hz. The results revealed that chemical durability and dielectric properties increased with increasing La2O3 content.

  20. Quantification of sodium in ancient Roman glasses with ion beam analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Climent-Font, A. [Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Martin, A. [Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ynsa, M.D. [Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fundacion Parque Cientifico de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Zucchiatti, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)], E-mail: zucc@ge.infn.it

    2008-02-15

    Concentrations of light elements (Na, Al, Si) in glass have been profiled by comparing the PIGE yields as a function of beam energy to those of a glass standard in combination with PIXE measurements which are used to determine the specific energy loss of protons in the unknown glasses. The technique has been tested on a known sample and applied to a few Roman natron glasses giving results compatible with the morphology of the archaeological samples, as deduced from microscopy. The results have suggested some considerations on the systematic use of the PIGE technique in the determination of bulk sodium concentration in ancient materials.

  1. Simulation of alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate glasses by ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Charu L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Gandy, Amy S.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2016-03-01

    A surrogate approach of ion beam irradiation is employed to simulate alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses. Bismuth and helium ions of different energies have been selected for simulating glass matrix modification owing to radiolysis and ballistic damage due to recoil atoms. Structural modification and change in coordination number of network former were probed by employing Reflectance Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopies as a consequence of ion irradiation. Depolymerisation is observed in glass sample irradiated at intermediate energy of 2 MeV. Helium blisters of micron size are seen in glass sample irradiated at low helium ion energy of 30 keV.

  2. XPS and ion beam scattering studies of leaching in simulated waste glass containing uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, D.P.; Pronko, P.P.; Marcuso, T.L.M.; Lam, D.J.; Paulikas, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    Glass samples (consisting of 2 mole % UO/sub 3/ dissolved in a number of complex borosilicate simulated waste glasses including Battelle 76-68) were leached for varying times in distilled water at 75/sup 0/C. The glass surfaces were examined before and after leaching using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and back-scattered ion beam profiling. Leached samples showed enhanced surface layer concentrations of several elements including uranium, titanium, zinc, iron and rare earths. An experiment involving the leaching of two glasses in the same vessel showed that the uranium surface enhancement is probably not due to redeposition from solution.

  3. Influence of foaming agents on both the structure and the thermal conductivity of silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    temperature (Tg) and the foaming temperature (corresponding to the viscosity range of 1012-106 Pa s) at 10 K/min and cool down to 773 K (below Tg) at 30 K/min and naturally down to room temperature. Upon sintering, the foaming agents are partially incorporated into the glass structure. Afterwards we measure...... the thermal conductivity of the sintered samples with Laser Flash Technique to see its dependence on the degree of incorporation of the foaming agents into the glass structure. In parallel we prepare glass samples by adding the above-mentioned foaming agents to the CRT panel glass via high temperature (about...

  4. Foaming Glass Using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    Foam glass is a high added value product which contributes to waste recycling and energy efficiency through heat insulation. The foaming can be initiated by a chemical or physical process. Chemical foaming with aid of a foaming agent is the dominant industrial process. Physical foaming has two...... microscope above maximum foaming temperature gives a suitable foaming temperature for the remaining samples. We show that the foaming kinetics depend on the type of gas and the pressure. A critical pressure of around 20 MPa is found to give the largest expansion for all gasses. Samples are obtained with 100...

  5. Examination of glass-silicon and glass-glass bonding techniques for microfluidic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raley, N.F.; Davidson, J.C.; Balch, J.W.

    1995-10-23

    We report here on the results of experiments concerning particular bonding processes potentially useful for ultimate miniaturization of microfluidic systems. Direct anodic bonding of continuous thin pyrex glass of 250 {mu}m thickness to silicon substrates gives multiple, large voids in the glass. Etchback of thick glass of 1200 {mu}m thickness bonded to silicon substrates gives thin continuous glass layers of 189 {mu}m thickness without voids over areas of 5 cm {times} 12 cm. Glass was also successfully bonded to glass by thermal bonding at 800{degrees}C over a 5 cm {times} 7 cm area. Anticipated applications include microfabricated DNA sequencing, flow injection analysis, and liquid and gas chromatography microinstruments.

  6. Comparison of Leaching Rates of Glass-Ceramic and Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>With the increase of the burn-up of the nuclear fuel, the amounts of the long-lived radionuclides increase. The solubility of actinides such as plutonium in glass is very limited. Glass-ceramic as the new

  7. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to &apos

  8. CRYSTALLIZATION KINETICS OF GLASS-CERAMICS BY DIFFERENTIAL THERMAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. NOZAD

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization behavior of fluorphlogopite, a glass-ceramic in the MgO–SiO2–Al2O3–K2O–B2O3–F system, was studied by substitution of Li2O for K2O in the glass composition. DTA, XRD and SEM were used for the study of crystallization behavior, formed phases and microstructure of the resulting glass-ceramics. Crystallization kinetics of the glass was investigated under non-isothermal conditions, using the formal theory of transformations for heterogeneous nucleation. The crystallization results were analyzed, and both the activation energy of crystallization process as well as the crystallization mechanism were characterized. Calculated kinetic parameters indicated that the appropriate crystallization mechanism was bulk crystallization for base glass and the sample with addition of Li2O. Non-isothermal DTA experiments showed that the crystallization activation energies of base glasses was in the range of 234-246 KJ/mol and in the samples with addition of Li2O was changed to the range of 317-322 KJ/mol.

  9. Characterization of structural relaxation in inorganic glasses using length dilatometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Erick

    characterization technique is comprised of three main components: experimental measurements, fitting of configurational length change, and description of glass behavior by analysis of fitting parameters. N-BK7 optical glass from Schott was used as the proof of concept glass but the main scientific interest was in three chalcogenide glasses: As40Se 60, As20Se80, and Ge17.9As19.7 Se62.4. The dilatometric experiments were carried out using a thermomechanical analyzer (TMA) on glass sample that were synthesized by the author, in all cases except N-BK7. Isothermal structural relaxation measurements were done on (12 mm tall x 3 mm x 3 mm) beams placed vertically in the TMA. The samples were equilibrated at a starting temperature (T 0) until structural equilibrium was reached then a temperature down step was initiated to the final temperature (T 1) and held isothermally until relaxation concluded. The configurational aspect of length relaxation, and therefore volume relaxation was extracted and fit with a Prony series. The Prony series parameters indicated a number of relaxation events occurring within the glass on timescales typically an order of magnitude apart in time. The data analysis showed as many as 4 discrete relaxation times at lower temperatures. The number of discrete relaxation decreased as the temperature increased until just one single relaxation was left in the temperature range just at or above Tg. In the case of N-BK7 these trends were utilized to construct a simple model that could be applied to glass manufacturing in the areas of annealing or PGM. A future development of a rather simple finite element model (FEM) would easily be able to use this model to predict the exponential-like, temperature and time dependent relaxation behaviors of the glass. The predictive model was not extended to the chalcogenide glass studied here, but could easily be applied to them in the future. The relaxation time trends versus temperature showed a definite region of transition between a

  10. Mold design with simulation for chalcogenide glass precision molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Wang, Zhibin; Li, Junqi; Zhang, Feng; Su, Ying; Wang, Zhongqiang

    2016-10-01

    Compare with the manufacturing of the traditional infrared material, such as signal crystal germanium, zinc sulfide, zinc selenide etc, chalcogenide infrared glass is suitable for precision molding for the low soften temperature to have large mass industry production. So the researches of precision glass molding are necessary, especially for the fast development of infrared product. The mold design is one of the key technologies of precision glass molding. In this paper, the mold processing of a sample chalcogenide glass from the technical drawing, mold design, molding to the lens are introduced. From the result of the precision molding, the technology of finite element simulation is a useful way to guiding the mold design. The molded lens by using mold process fit the design requirement.

  11. Crystallization in Pd40Ni40P20 glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Saksl, K.; Nishiyama, N.

    2002-01-01

    Phase segregation and the effect of pressure on crystallization of bulk and ribbon Pd40Ni40P20 glasses have been studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. The DSC measurements show only one glass transition event in the samples annealed at different...... temperatures in the supercooled liquid region. Phase analyses reveal at least five crystalline phases crystallized from the glass: monoclinic; body-centered tetragonal; orthorhombic; Ni2Pd2P and fcc-(Ni,Pd) solid solution phases. In the pressure range from 0 to 4.2 GPa, the crystallization temperature...... increases with pressure having a slope of 11 K/GPa. The eutectic crystallization reaction mode and crystalline phases formed are unchanged in the pressure range used. The enhancement of the crystallization temperature with increasing pressure in the glass can be explained by the suppression of atomic...

  12. Nucleation and crystallization behavior of RE - doped tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharuk, V.; Mamaev, A.; Silant'ev, V.; Starodubtsev, P.; Maslennikova, I.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and crystallization of the glasses with composition (100-x-y)TeO2-xPbO·P2O5-yPbF2:zMF3 (M= Er, Eu, Nd; x=42.5-30, y=5-30, z=0.5-3.0) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and luminescence methods. It was found that the doping with the rare-earth (III) fluorides promoted nucleation in the bulk glasses. The sizes of generated particles are about 2-5 nanometers and their shapes are close to spherical. The growth rate of crystallites depended on the lead fluoride content and glass forming rate. The heat treatment of the samples promotes the glass ceramic formation, where the crystalline phase is Pb2P2O7.

  13. Glass-ceramics and epoxy-composites for radiation imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.V.M. [MacDiarmid Institute, Industrial Research, P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)], E-mail: G.Williams@irl.cri.nz; Bittar, A. [MacDiarmid Institute, Industrial Research, P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Dotzler, C. [MacDiarmid Institute, Industrial Research, P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University, P.O. Box 600, Wellington (New Zealand); Beaudin, A. [MacDiarmid Institute, Industrial Research, P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Varoy, C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University, P.O. Box 600, Wellington (New Zealand); Dunford, C. [MacDiarmid Institute, Industrial Research, P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2007-04-15

    We report the results of optical, photo-luminescence and spatial resolution measurements on glass-ceramic and epoxy-composite X-ray storage phosphors. We find that the optical extinction coefficient at the stimulation and emission wavelengths is dominated by scattering for all the samples studied. However, the extinction coefficient is at least an order of magnitude lower in ZBLAN:BaCl{sub 2}:Eu{sup 2+} glass-ceramics when compared with the epoxy/BaCl{sub 2}:Eu{sup 2+} composites. Significantly reduced scattering is found in a epoxy/KBr:Eu{sup 2+} composite due to the better match between the refractive indices of the epoxy and crystallite. We show that the spatial resolution using a confocal microscope readout in a ZBLAN:BaCl{sub 2}:Eu{sup 2+} glass-ceramic is below 10{mu}m and hence this glass-ceramic has potential applications in high resolution radiation imaging.

  14. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  15. Synthesis and Optical Properties of ZnO-TeO2 Glass System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A.A. Sidek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Systematic series of ZnO-TeO2 glasses with mole fraction of 0.10-0.40 ZnO content with an interval of 0.05 were studied to obtain their physical and optical properties. Approach: All the glass samples were synthesized by rapid melting quenching method under controlled conditions, while their refractive indices (n were measured by the EL X-02C high precision ellipsometer. The room temperature absorption of all glass samples were determined using Camspec M350 double beam UV-visible spectrophotometer. The infrared (IR spectra of each glass samples were recorded with Thermo Nicolet Fourier Transform-Infrared (FT-IR spectrophotometer. Their physical properties were measured and the amorphous nature was confirmed by the x-ray diffraction technique. Results: The increase of refractive index of the TeO2-ZnO glasses with the addition of ZnO was best explained in terms of either electron density or polarizability of the ions. The absorption edge shift to higher energy (shorter wavelength with increasing ZnO content was observed in this glass. The optical band gap (Eopt of zinc tellurite glass decreases with increasing of ZnO content probably due to the increment of Non-Bridging Oxygen (NBO ion contents which eventually shifted the band edge to lower energies. Conclusion/Recommendation: The physical and optical properties of zinc tellurite glasses were found generally affected by the changes in the glass composition. FTIR spectra of zinc tellurite glass revealed broad, weak and strong absorption bands in the investigated range of wave numbers from 4000-400 cm-1 which associated with their corresponding bond modes of vibration and the glass structure. The addition of ZnO into TeO2 glass network shifted the major band from 626 cm-1 (for pure TeO2 glass to the band at around 669 cm-1.

  16. Silver doped nanobioactive glass particles for bone implant applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, M.; Kavitha, K.; Karunakaran, G.; Manivasakan, P.; Rajendran, V. [Centre for Nanoscience and Technology, K. S. Rangasamy College of Technology, Tiruchengode - 637215, Namakkal (DT), Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-02-05

    Silica based silver doped nanobioactive glass compositions (58SiO{sub 2}-33CaO-9P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 58SiO{sub 2}-23CaO-9P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-10Ag{sub 2}O(mol%)) were synthesized by a simple sol-gel route. The prepared samples were comprehensively characterised by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopic studies. The results reveal that the prepared samples have amorphous phase with spherical morphology and having a particle size less than 100 nm. The specific surface areas were 90 and 61 m{sup 2}g{sup -1} respectively. The in vitro bioactivity of glass samples were confirmed by the formation of hydroxyapatite layer on glass surfaces. The Ag{sub 2}O-doped nanobioactive glasse samples shows reveal significant antibacterial activity compare with base glasses.

  17. Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with Y addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baser, Tanya Aycan [Dipartimento di Chimica IFM and NIS, Universita di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 9-10125 Torino (Italy); Baricco, Marcello [Dipartimento di Chimica IFM and NIS, Universita di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 9-10125 Torino (Italy)]. E-mail: marcello.baricco@unito.it

    2007-05-31

    This paper aims to study the role of residual vacuum during sample preparation and of quenching rate on glass formation in Fe{sub 50-x}Cr{sub 15}Mo{sub 14}Y {sub x}C{sub 15}B{sub 6} (x = 0, 2) alloys. The equilibrium phase mixture has been clarified for both alloys, combining X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. The beneficial effects of minor addition of Y on the glass formation are evidenced. A high residual vacuum during sample preparation promotes glass formation. Glass transition temperature for amorphous sample containing 2 at.% Y is 881 K and the onset crystallization temperature is 904 K. The melting behavior for both as-cast alloys were measured with high temperature differential scanning calorimeter (HTDSC). Melting starts at 1384 K, ends at 1506 and 1470 K as liquidus temperatures for Fe{sub 50}Cr{sub 15}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 15}B{sub 6} and Fe{sub 48}Cr{sub 15}Mo{sub 14}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6} alloys, respectively. The addition of Y leads to a melting behavior of as-cast sample close to eutectic, which enhances glass formation.

  18. INORGANIC PHOSPHORS IN GLASS BASED ON LEAD SILICATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Aseev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We created and synthesized luminescent composite of the "phosphor in glass" type, based on the lead-silicate matrix and fine-dispersed powder of cerium-activated yttrium-aluminum garnet crystal. Lead-silicate system (40SiO2- 20PbO-(40-x PbF2-xAlF3, x = 0-25 was chosen as the glassy matrix. Initial glass was reduced to powder (frit for "phosphor in glass" composite with a particle size about 50 µm. Glass frit and powder of commercial YAG:Ce3+ phosphor were mixed in a ratio of 30 to 70 (wt %. Then this composite was pressed in a tablet and sintered on a quartz substrate at 823 К for 30 minutes. Thus, the plane parallel sheet for composite of the "phosphor in glass" was obtained with a diameter equal to 10 mm. For the purpose to reduce the loss of light in the presence of dispersion at a glass-phosphor boundary, optimization of glass mixture was done by adjusting the refractive index. X-ray phase and spectral-luminescent analysis of the derived composite were done. The results of these studies showed that there was no degradation of YAG: Ce powder during sintering. Dependence of luminescence intensity from temperature in the range from room temperature to 473 К was studied. It was shown, that with the phosphor in glass usage thermal quenching of luminescence was reduced in comparison with the silicone. The model of white LED was created with the "phosphor in glass" composite based on lead-silicate glasses with low temperature of vitrifying. The derived LED emits white light with a color temperature of 4370 K, and the luminous efficiency is equal to 58 lm/W. The developed luminescent composite based on the lead-silicate matrix can be used for the production of high-power white light LED.

  19. Transmission Properties of a New Glass Ceramic and Doped with Co2+ as Saturable Absorber for 1.54 μm Er Glass Short Pulse Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Chunlei; CHEN Li; FENG Suya; HE Dongbing; WANG Meng; HU Lili

    2012-01-01

    The preparation and characteristics of a new transparent glass ceramic were described.Crystal phase particles with nanometer size were successfully precipitated in glass matrix,which was confirmed to be one of indium aluminum zinc oxide compounds (InxAlyZnzO).The presence of aluminum (Al) and indium (In) impurities in the zinc oxides (ZnO) crystal lattice leads to some changes of the carrier concentration in the material and then promote the sharply changes of transmission spectra in IR range wavelength.And subsequently,the IR cut-off edge blue shifted from 5.5 μm in base glass to 3 μm in transparent glass ceramic sample.Furthermore,passive Q switched 1.54 μm Er glass laser pulses with pulse energy of 10 mJ and pulse width of 800 ns were successfully obtained by using the cobalt doped transparent glass ceramic as a saturable absorber.

  20. Effect of UV exposure on photochromic glasses doped with transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zaiat, S. Y.; Medhat, M.; Omar, Mona F.; Shirif, Marwa A.

    2016-07-01

    Silver halide photochromic glasses doped with one of the transition metal oxides, (Ti O2) , (CoO) ,(Cr2 O3) are prepared using the melt quench technique. Glass samples are exposed to a UV source for 20 min. Spectral reflectance and transmittance at normal incidence of the prepared glasses are recorded before and after UV exposure with a double beam spectrophotometer in the spectral range 200-2500 nm. Dispersion parameters such as: single oscillator energy, dispersion energy and Abbe's number are deduced and compared. Absorption dispersion parameters, like optical energy gap for direct and indirect transitions, Urbach energy and steepness parameter, are deduced for the different glass prepared. Reflection loss, molar refractivity and electronic polarizability are deduced and compared. The effect of UV light exposure of these glasses on transmittance, reflectance, the linear and the predicted nonlinear optical parameters are investigated and discussed for the three transition metals. Nonlinear parameters increase in the three glass samples after UV exposure.

  1. Methods for Measurement and Statistical Analysis of the Frangibility of Strengthened Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongzhi eTang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemically strengthened glass features a surface compression and a balancing central tension (CT in the interior of the glass. A greater CT is usually associated with a higher level of stored elastic energy in the glass. During a fracture event, release of a greater amount of stored energy can lead to frangibility, i.e., shorter crack branching distances, smaller fragment size, and ejection of small fragments from the glass. In this paper, the frangibility and fragmentation behaviors of a series of chemically strengthened glass samples are studied using two different manual testing methods and an automated tester. Both immediate and delayed fracture events were observed. A statistical method is proposed to determine the probability of frangible fracture for glasses ion exchanged under a specific set of conditions, and analysis is performed to understand the dependence of frangibility probability on sample thickness, CT, and testing method. We also propose a more rigorous set of criteria for qualifying frangibility.

  2. Recent results on the effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of DWPF glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibler, N.E.; Tosten, M.H.; Beam, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of a simulated nuclear waste glass from the Savannah River Site has been carefully investigated. Three large pieces of glass were irradiated with a Co-60 source to three doses up to a maximum dose of 3.1 {times} 10{sup 10} rad. Internal samples of the large pieces of irradiated and unirradiated glass were leached in deionized water to investigate durability changes and were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate microstructure changes. Leach tests were performed in triplicate at 90{degree}C with crushed glass samples in deionized water. A statistical analysis of the results indicated to the 95% confidence level that the radiation did not affect the glass durability. Careful examination by TEM indicated no effect of gamma radiation on the microstructure of the glass although severe damage could be induced by the electron beam from the microscope. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Recent results on the effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of DWPF glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibler, N.E.; Tosten, M.H.; Beam, D.C.

    1989-12-31

    The effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of a simulated nuclear waste glass from the Savannah River Site has been carefully investigated. Three large pieces of glass were irradiated with a Co-60 source to three doses up to a maximum dose of 3.1 {times} 10{sup 10} rad. Internal samples of the large pieces of irradiated and unirradiated glass were leached in deionized water to investigate durability changes and were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate microstructure changes. Leach tests were performed in triplicate at 90{degree}C with crushed glass samples in deionized water. A statistical analysis of the results indicated to the 95% confidence level that the radiation did not affect the glass durability. Careful examination by TEM indicated no effect of gamma radiation on the microstructure of the glass although severe damage could be induced by the electron beam from the microscope. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Identification of a Secondary Crystallized Phase formed during Nuclear Glasses Leaching - Effect of the Leached Glass Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thien, Bruno; Godon, Nicole; Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane; Ayral, André

    2010-05-01

    Silicate glass leaching in a unrenewed aqueous solution leads to gel formation at the glass water interface. This amorphous hydrated layer sometimes behaves like a diffusion barrier: the glass alteration rate decreases according to an inverse square root of time equation. In the case of Mg-containing glasses, the alteration rate usually remains quasi constant and seems to be controlled by the growth of secondary crystallized phases. These phases consume elements from solution. They can sustain gel dissolution inducing a decrease of its passivating properties. Long-term behaviour modelling of Mg-containing glasses designed for the confinement of fission products (AVM glasses, Atelier de vitrification de Marcoule, France) first requires a precise identification of these Mg-rich phases. Experimental investigations were performed on several glass samples using X-ray diffraction (XRD), 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR and elemental chemical analysis. Aluminous hectorite Na0.45(Mg2.28Li0.11Al0.39Fe0.06M0.16)(Si3.21Al0.79)O10(OH)2, with M being a divalent cation, was identified. 25 glasses were required for a full representation in term variations of AVM glasses composition range. Their residual alteration rates were proved to significantly depend on glass composition since a one order of magnitude difference was measured between the less and the most altered glasses. Nevertheless, the same crystallized phase was evidenced whatever the glass composition and whatever the initial composition of the solution (pure water or Mg-rich groundwater). Only a shift of the (060) peak between 1.521 and 1.530 Å was evidenced. It can be attributed to slight composition variations. Relations between the glass magnesium fraction, the amount of precipitated hectorite, the residual rate, and the measured pH are not obvious. However, hectorite precipitation was proved to depend on pH, being favoured between pH50°C 9 and 9.5. Moreover, the higher the amount of precipitated hectorite, the lower the

  5. FTIR of binary lead borate glass: Structural investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, H. A.; Elkholy, H. S.; Hager, I. Z.

    2016-02-01

    The glass samples were prepared according to the following formula: (100-x) B2O3 - x PbO, where x = 20-80 mol% by melt quenching method. The density of the prepared samples was measured and molar volume was calculated. IR spectra were measured for the prepared samples to investigate the glass structure. The IR spectra were deconvoluted using curves of Gaussian shape at approximately the same frequencies. The deconvoluted data were used to study the effect of PbO content on all the structural borate groups. Some structural parameters such as density, packing density, bond length and bond force constant were theoretically calculated and were compared to the obtained experimental results. Deviation between the experimental and theoretically calculated parameters reflects the dual role of PbO content on the network of borate glass.

  6. Moessbauer study of glasses in meteorites: the D'Orbigny angrite and Cachari eucrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdu, Y. A.; Souza Azevedo, I. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (Brazil); Stewart, S. J. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, IFLP, CONICET, Depto. De Fisica, Facultad de Cs. Exactas (Argentina); Lopez, A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (Brazil); Varela, M. E. [CONICET-UNS, Depto. de Geologia (Argentina); Kurat, G. [Naturhistorisches Museum (Austria); Scorzelli, R. B., E-mail: scorza@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (Brazil)

    2005-11-15

    Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements at room temperature (RT) and at liquid helium temperature (4.2 K) were carried out on bulk and glass samples from the D'Orbigny (angrite) and Cachari (eucrite) meteorites. The RT Moessbauer spectrum of the bulk sample of D'Orbigny shows the presence of Fe{sup 2+} in olivine and pyroxene and that of bulk Cachari contains only pyroxene. Very small amounts of Fe{sup 3+} are also present in the bulk samples, but are attributed to surface contamination. The RT spectra of the D'Orbigny and Cachari glasses are fitted with three doublets, which are assigned to Fe{sup 2+} at three different octahedral positions. No Fe{sup 3+} was detected in the glass samples. The spectra of the glasses measured at 4.2 K show the presence of relaxation effects. The results suggest a certain degree of structural ordering in these glasses.

  7. Internal modification of glass by ultrashort laser pulse and its application to microwelding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Isamu; Cvecek, Kristian; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Internal modification process of glass by ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) and its applications to microwelding of glass are presented. A simulation model is developed, which can determine intensity distribution of absorbed laser energy, nonlinear absorptivity and temperature distribution at different pulse repetition rates and pulse energies in internal modification of bulk glass with fs- and ps-laser pulses from experimental modified structure. The formation process of the dual-structured internal modification is clarified, which consists of a teardrop-shaped inner structure and an elliptical outer structure, corresponding to the laser-absorbing region and heat-affected molten region, respectively. Nonlinear absorptivity at high pulse repetition rates increases due to the increase in the thermally excited free electron density for avalanche ionization. USLP enables crack-free welding of glass because the shrinkage stress is suppressed by producing embedded molten pool by nonlinear absorption process, in contrast to conventional continuous wave laser welding where cracks cannot be avoided due to shrinkage stress produced in cooling process. Microwelding techniques of glass by USLP have been developed to join glass/glass and Si/glass using optically contacted sample pairs. The strength of the weld joint as high as that of base material is obtained without pre- and post-heating in glass/glass welding. In Si/glass welding, excellent joint performances competitive with anodic bonding in terms of joint strength and process throughput have been attained.

  8. Glasses in the D'Orbigny Angrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, M. E.; Kurat, G.; Brandstätter, F.; Bonnin-Mosbah, M.; Metrich, N.

    2001-03-01

    The D'Orbigny angrite contains abundant glasses, a phase which has not been previously reported from any other angrite. Glasses fill in part open druses and intersticial spaces between major silicates, or occur as glass inclusions in olivine.

  9. Fullerene-doped porous glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M.; Rustagi, K. C.

    We report the doping of C60 in porous glass by diffusion in solution phase at room temperature. The presence of C60 in the doped porous glass was confirmed spectroscopically. We also report the changes in optical absorption spectrum and intensity-dependent transmission of 30 ns laser pulses at 527 nm in these materials.

  10. Fullerene-doped porous glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, M.P. [Center for Adv. Technol., Indore (India). Nonlinear Optics Group; Kukreja, L.M. [Center for Adv. Technol., Indore (India). Nonlinear Optics Group; Rustagi, K.C. [Center for Adv. Technol., Indore (India). Nonlinear Optics Group

    1997-07-01

    We report the doping of C{sub 60} in porous glass by diffusion in solution phase at room temperature. The presence of C{sub 60} in the doped porous glass was confirmed spectroscopically. We also report the changes in optical absorption spectrum and intensity-dependent transmission of 30 ns laser pulses at 527 nm in these materials. (orig.)

  11. International Congress on Glass XII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doremus, R H; LaCourse, W C; Mackenzie, J D; Varner, J R; Wolf, W W [eds.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 158 papers are included under nine headings: structure and glass formation; optical properties; electrical and magnetic properties; mechanical properties and relaxation; mass transport; chemical durability and surfaces; nucleation; crystallization; and glass ceramics; processing; and automatic controls. Separate abstracts were prepared for eight papers; four of the remaining papers had been processed previously for the data base. (DLC)

  12. Molecular mobility in sugar glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dries, van den I.J.

    2000-01-01

    Glasses are liquids that exhibit solid state behavior as a result of their extremely high viscosity. Regarding their application to foods, glasses play a role in the preservation of foods, due to their high viscosity and the concomitant low molecular mobility. This thesis focuses on sugar g

  13. Holder for rotating glass body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolleck, Floyd W.

    1978-04-04

    A device is provided for holding and centering a rotating glass body such as a rod or tube. The device includes a tubular tip holder which may be held in a lathe chuck. The device can utilize a variety of centering tips each adapted for a particular configuration, such as a glass O-ring joint or semi-ball joint.

  14. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    CERN Multimedia

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  15. Optical spectroscopy of rare earth-doped oxyfluoro-tellurite glasses to probe local environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GAJANAN V HONNAVAR; K P RAMESH

    2017-09-01

    TeO$_2$-based glasses with a general formula 65TeO$_2$−5BaF$_2$−30ZnF$_2$ (TBZ) (in mol%) were prepared by usual melt quenching technique. Three mol% of europium (Eu) or erbium (Er) were added to the prepared glass at the expense of TeO$_2$. Raman, photoluminescence (PL), UV–visible absorption studies were carried out on the glass samples. Raman spectra of the undoped and doped glasses were analysed using the peak shift and the intensity variation along with fullwidth at half-maximum (FWHM). It was found that Eu-doped TBZ glass has a greater tendency towards depolymerizing theglass matrix by influencing the conversion of TeO$_4$ to TeO$_3$ units compared to Er-doped and undoped glasses. PL spectraof the glass samples show emission due to different possible transitions. Position of the peak of the de-convoluted spectrashows the position of the particular Stark component and the FWHM is a measure of the inhomogeneous broadening. TheUV–visible absorption spectra are used to calculate the optical density and to determine the band edge of the glass samplesby fitting to the Mott equation. It is seen that Eu-doped TBZ glass has a lesser bandgap than that of Er-doped glass.

  16. Is there a 'glass ceiling' for female managers in Singapore organizations?

    OpenAIRE

    Vlado Dimovski; Miha Škerlavaj; Mandy Mok Kim Man

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an overview of glass-ceiling type barriers in organizations based on the perceptions of a sample of Singapore mid-level women managers. Previous studies indicated the existence of a glass ceiling in organizations and presented strategic recommendations with regard to what corporations could do to remove or reduce the glass ceiling. This study investigates how women in middle management perceive their career advancement opportunities and what they consider their organizatio...

  17. Effects of varying base glass composition on the optical properties of lead borate glasses doped with rare earth ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidorn, William D.

    Rare Earth (RE) doped lead borate glasses are expected to exhibit a compositional dependence in their optical properties due to the changes induced by variations in the structure of the base glass with increasing lead oxide content. A series of lead borate glasses with the composition xPbO:(99.5 - x)B2O 3 (x = 29.5 to 69.5 in steps of 10 mol%) doped with 0.5 mol% Sm2O3, Er2O3, and Ho2O3 were prepared using the melt quench technique followed by 3 hours of annealing near the glass transition temperature. Optical absorption and fluorescence spectra of these RE doped lead borate glasses were analyzed using Judd-Ofelt theory. The compositional dependence of Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, O t (t = 2, 4, 6), were determined and were then used to calculate the radiative transition probability of the excited states, the total radiative transition probability, branching ratios, and radiative lifetime of the glasses. From the fluorescence spectra the stimulated emission cross section, and Stark splitting of the excited states were calculated as a function of glass composition. A fourth set of samples with composition xPbO:(99 - x)B2O 3(x = 29 to 69 in steps of 10 mol%) co-doped with 0.5 mol% Er2 O3 and Ho2O3 were also prepared and the effects of co-doping on the absorption and fluorescence were analyzed. In all the glass systems studied, it was found that the optical properties are strongly influenced by structural changes arising from compositional variation. Er3+ transitions exhibit large stimulated cross section suggesting the possible utilization of these materials in laser applications. Keywords: Lead and bismuth borate glasses, fluorescence, optical absorption, Sm3+, Ho3+, Er3+ ions, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, stimulated emission cross section.

  18. THE IMPACT OF KINETICS ON NEPHELINE FORMATION IN NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J.

    2011-03-07

    Sixteen glass compositions were selected to study the potential impacts of the kinetics of nepheline formation in high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass. The chosen compositions encompassed a relatively large nepheline discriminator (ND) range, 0.40-0.66, and included a relatively broad range, and amount of, constituents including high aluminum and high boron concentrations. All glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and subsequently exposed to six different cooling treatments. The cooling treatments consisted of three 'stepped' profiles and their corresponding 'smooth' profiles. Included in the cooling treatment was the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister centerline cooling (CCC) profile in addition to a 'faster' and a 'slower' total cooling line. After quenching and heat treating, x-ray diffraction confirmed the type and amount of any resultant crystallization. The target compositions were shown to be consistent with the measured compositions. Two quenched glasses and several treated glasses exhibited minor amounts of spinel and spinel-like phases. Nepheline was not observed in any of the quenched glasses but was observed in many of the treated glasses. The amount of nepheline ranged from approximately 2wt% to 30wt% for samples cooled over shorter times and longer times respectively. Differences were observed in the amount of nepheline crystallization after smooth and stepped cooling and increased with total cooling time. In some glasses, nepheline crystallization appeared to be directly proportional to total cooling time while the total amount of nepheline crystallization varied, suggesting that the nepheline crystallization rate was independent of (or at least faster than) cooling rate but, varied depending on the glass composition. On the contrary, in another glass, nepheline crystallization appeared to be inversely proportional to cooling rate. The high alumina glasses, predicted to form nepheline

  19. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R; Piepel, Gregory F; Vienna, John D; Cooley, Scott K; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L

    2001-07-24

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

  20. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

  1. Effect of F ions on physical and optical properties of fluorine substituted zinc arsenic tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareem Ahmmad, Shaik; kondaul, Edu; Rahman, Syed

    2015-02-01

    The effect of substitution of fluoride ions for oxide ions on the physical and optical properties of glass system (20-x) ZnO-xZnF2-40As2O3-40TeO2 where x = 0, 4, 8,12,16,20 mole % were investigated. The samples prepared by melt quenching method under controlled condition. The amorphous nature of these glasses was checked by X-ray diffraction technique. The density was measured according to Archimedes principle. The room temperature absorption spectra of all glass samples were determined using UV-Vis-NIR spectrometer. The thermal behaviour, glass transition temperature and stability of glass samples were studied by a differential scanning calorimetric (DSC). The density reduction of present glasses with ZnF2 concentrations may be due to the low density of ZnF2 compared with that of ZnO. Breaking the oxide network, the cross linking degree of the glass former could be reduced which results in decrease of both Tg and Tx. In the present glass system when F ions replaced by oxygen ions UV-Vis absorption cut-off wavelength decreases. This resulted form the conversion of structural unit in the glass from TeO4 to Te(O,F)4 and then to Te(O, F)3.

  2. Comprehensive Isotopic and Elemental Analysis of a Multi-Oxide Glass By Multicollector ICP-MS in Isotope Substitution Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    v, Mitroshkov; JV, Ryan

    2016-04-07

    Multicollector ICP-MS was used to comprehensively analyze different types of isotopically-modified glass created in order to investigate the processes of glass corrosion in the water. The analytical methods were developed for the analyses of synthesized, isotopically-modified solid glass and the release of glass constituents upon contact with deionized water. To validate the methods, results from an acid digestion sample of the Analytical Reference Glass (ARG) showed good agreement when compared to data from multiple prior analyses on the same glass [Smith-1]. In this paper, we present the results of this comprehensive analysis from the acid digestion of six types of isotopically-modified glass and the release of glass constituents into water corrosion after one year of aqueous corrosion.

  3. Joints in Tempered Glass Using Glass Dowel Discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    One of the major reasons for using glass in structures is its transparency; however, traditional mechanical joints such as friction joints and steel dowel pinned connections are compromising the transparency. The present paper describes a novel joint which is practically maintaining the complete...... transparency of the glass. This is achieved by using a dowel disc made entirely of tempered glass. The concept of the joint is proved by pilot tests and numerical models. From the work it is seen that the load-carrying capacity of such a connection is similar to what is found for traditionally in-plane loaded...

  4. White light emission of dysprosium doped lanthanum calcium phosphate oxide and oxyfluoride glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luewarasirikul, N.; Kim, H. J.; Meejitpaisan, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2017-04-01

    Lanthanum calcium phosphate oxide and oxyfluoride glasses doped with dysprosium oxide were prepared by melt-quenching technique with chemical composition 20La2O3:10CaO:69P2O5:1Dy2O3 and 20La2O3:10CaF2:69P2O5:1Dy2O3. The physical, optical and luminescence properties of the glass samples were studied to evaluate their potential to using as luminescence materials for solid-state lighting applications. The density, molar volume and refractive index of the glass samples were carried out. The optical and luminescence properties were studied by investigating absorption, excitation, and emission spectra of the glass samples. The absorption spectra were investigated in the UV-Vis-NIR region from 300 to 2000 nm. The excitation spectra observed under 574 nm emission wavelength showed the highest peak centered at 349 nm (6H15/2 → 6P7/2). The emission spectra, excited with 349 nm excitation wavelength showed two major peaks corresponding to 482 nm blue emission (4F9/2 → 6H15/2) and 574 nm yellow emission (4F9/2 → 6H13/2). The experimental lifetime were found to be 0.539 and 0.540 for oxide and oxyfluoride glass sample, respectively. The x,y color coordinates under 349 nm excitation wavelength were (0.38, 0.43) for both glass samples, that be plotted in white region of CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram. The CCT values obtained from the glass samples are 4204 K for oxide glass and 4228 K for oxyfluoride glass corresponding to the commercial cool white light (3100-4500 K). Judd-Ofelt theory had also been employed to obtain the J-O parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6), oscillator strength, radiative transition possibility, stimulated emission cross section and branching ratio. The Ω2 > Ω4 > Ω6 trend of J-O parameters of both glass samples may indicate the good quality of a glass host for using as optical device application. Temperature dependence of emission spectra was studied from 300 K to 10 K and found that the intensity of the emission peak was found to be increased with

  5. Production of glass-ceramics from sewage sludge and waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenstrauha, I.; Sosins, G.; Petersone, L.; Krage, L.; Drille, M.; Filipenkov, V.

    2011-12-01

    In the present study for recycling of sewage sludge and waste glass from JSC "Valmieras stikla skiedra" treatment of them to the dense glass-ceramic composite material using powder technology is estimated. The physical-chemical properties of composite materials were identified - density 2.19 g/cm3, lowest water absorption of 2.5% and lowest porosity of 5% for the samples obtained in the temperature range of sintering 1120 - 1140 °C. Regarding mineralogical composition of glass-ceramics the following crystalline phases were identified by XRD analysis: quartz (SiO2), anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) and hematite (Fe2O3), which could ensure the high density of materials and improve the mechanical properties of material - compressive strength up to 60.31±5.09 - 52.67±19.18 MPa. The physical-chemical properties of novel materials corresponds to dense glass-ceramics composite which eventually could be used as a building material, e.g. for floor covering, road pavement, exterior tiles etc.

  6. Ruby coloured lead glasses by generation of silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, C. [Fundacion Centro Nacional del Vidrio, Pocillo, 1, 40100 La Granja de San Ildefonso (Segovia) (Spain); Villegas, M.A. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM), Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: mavillegas@cenim.csic.es

    2004-11-15

    Both yellow and red superficial ruby lead crystal glasses have been obtained by Ag{sup +} ion-exchange. For red ruby colouring lead glass substrates were previously doped with reducing oxides (arsenic, antimony, cerium and tin). The best experimental conditions for silver ion-exchange were determined. The optical absorption behaviour of the samples was studied to point out the influence of the parameters involved in the ion-exchange process. Moreover, other parameters affecting the final colouring of the glasses (kind of dopant, dopant concentration, etc.) were also analysed. The dopant percentage added to the lead crystal glass is the most important factor for developing superficial red ruby colouring. Antimony oxide doped lead glass ion-exchanged with silver showed the most intense red ruby colouring, even for a doping concentration lower than those of arsenic oxide doped samples able to enhance similar colour. Spectral saturation appeared for the highest doping concentration and for the most severe ion-exchange conditions. Chromatic coordinates were calculated from the corresponding transmission visible spectra. The colour purity showed by the samples obtained satisfies the ornamental requirements that motivated this research.

  7. Improvement of mechanical properties of glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbay, Ismail Hakki Cengizhan; Budakoglu, Refika; Zayim, Esra Ozkan

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to enhance the mechanical and optical properties of glass substrates with thin films by the sol-gel method. TiO2-SiO2 binary system and Ta2O5 were deposited on glass substrates with high transparency. Ring-on-ring flexure and scratch tests were the main mechanical characterization tests. Herein, we report that the thin films can be used to enhance the mechanical properties of the glass substrates efficiently and effectively. TiO2-SiO2 binary system shows more than two times and Ta2O5 thin films show nearly three times better ultimate strength in the ring-on-ring flexure test. Besides, Ta2O5 thin film samples show superior scratch resistance. Additionally, the finite element method was also used to check the conformity in the application of mechanical properties of composite materials. It is also worth noting that, the finite element method can be used to accurately analyze the mechanical stability of composite materials. The use of the finite element method can reduce the total number of experimental trials without losing reliability.

  8. Electrostatic transfer of epitaxial graphene to glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Pan, Wei; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2010-12-01

    We report on a scalable electrostatic process to transfer epitaxial graphene to arbitrary glass substrates, including Pyrex and Zerodur. This transfer process could enable wafer-level integration of graphene with structured and electronically-active substrates such as MEMS and CMOS. We will describe the electrostatic transfer method and will compare the properties of the transferred graphene with nominally-equivalent 'as-grown' epitaxial graphene on SiC. The electronic properties of the graphene will be measured using magnetoresistive, four-probe, and graphene field effect transistor geometries [1]. To begin, high-quality epitaxial graphene (mobility 14,000 cm2/Vs and domains >100 {micro}m2) is grown on SiC in an argon-mediated environment [2,3]. The electrostatic transfer then takes place through the application of a large electric field between the donor graphene sample (anode) and the heated acceptor glass substrate (cathode). Using this electrostatic technique, both patterned few-layer graphene from SiC(000-1) and chip-scale monolayer graphene from SiC(0001) are transferred to Pyrex and Zerodur substrates. Subsequent examination of the transferred graphene by Raman spectroscopy confirms that the graphene can be transferred without inducing defects. Furthermore, the strain inherent in epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) is found to be partially relaxed after the transfer to the glass substrates.

  9. [Respiratory function in glass blowers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, E; Butković, D; Mustajbegović, J

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic and acute respiratory symptoms and diseases and changes in lung function in a group of 80 glass blowers have been investigated. In addition a group of 80 not exposed workers was used as a control group for respiratory symptoms and diseases. In glass blowers, there was significant increase in prevalence of chronic bronchitis, nasal catarrh, and sinusitis than in the controls. Glass blowers exposed for more and less than 10 years had similar prevalences of respiratory symptoms. A large number of glass blowers complained of acute across-shift symptoms. Significant increase in FVC, FEF50 and FEF25 was documented at the end of the work shift. Comparison with predicted normal values showed that glass blowers had FVC and FEF25 significantly lower than predicted. RV and RV/TLC were significantly increased compared with the predicted normal values. DLCO was within the normal values in most glass blowers. It is concluded that work in the glass blower industry is likely to lead the development of chronic respiratory disorders.

  10. Surface silver-doping of biocompatible glasses to induce antibacterial properties. Part II: Plasma sprayed glass-coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miola, M; Ferraris, S; Di Nunzio, S; Robotti, P F; Bianchi, G; Fucale, G; Maina, G; Cannas, M; Gatti, S; Massé, A; Vitale Brovarone, C; Verné, E

    2009-03-01

    A 57% SiO(2), 3% Al(2)O(3), 34% CaO and 6% Na(2)O glass (SCNA) has been produced in form of powders and deposited by plasma spray on titanium alloy and stainless steel substrates. The obtained coatings have been subjected to a patented ion-exchange treatment to introduce silver ions in the surface inducing an antibacterial behavior. Silver surface-enriched samples have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, SEM observation, EDS analysis, in vitro bioactivity tests, leaching tests by GFAAS (graphite furnace atomic adsorption spectroscopy) analyses, cells adhesion and proliferation, and antibacterial tests using Staphylococcus Aureus strain. In vitro tests results showed that the modified samples acquired an antimicrobial action against tested bacteria maintaining unaffected the biocompatibility of the glass. Furthermore the ion-exchange treatment can be successfully applied to glass-coated samples without affecting the properties of the coatings; the simplicity and reproducibility of the method make it suitable for glass or glass-ceramic coatings of different composition in order to produce coated devices for bone healing and/or prostheses, able to reduce bacterial colonization and infections risks.

  11. Structure and Chemistry in Halide Lead-Tellurite Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Windisch, Charles F.; Washton, Nancy M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.

    2013-02-11

    A series of TeO2-PbO glasses were fabricated with increasing fractions of mixed alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide chlorides. The glass and crystal structure was studied with Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. As the chloride fraction increased, the medium-range order in the glass decreased up to a critical point (~14 mass% of mixed chlorides), above which the glasses became phase-separated. Resulting phases are a TeO2/PbO-rich phase and a crystalline phase rich in alkali chlorides. The 125Te NMR indicates, contrary to previous studies, that Te site distribution did not change with increased concentrations of M+, M2+, and M3+ cations, but rather is controlled by the Te/Pb molar ratio. The 207Pb NMR shows that two Pb species exist and their relative concentration changes nearly linearly with addition of the mixed chlorides, indicating that the additives to the TeO2-PbO glass are accommodated by changing the Pb species. The 23Na and 35Cl NMR indicate that Na and Cl are distributed in the single-phase glass phase up to the critical point, and at higher concentrations partition to crystalline phases. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the sample at the critical point contains ~10 nm seed nuclei that increase in size and concentration with exposure to the electron beam.

  12. Preparation of the cast glass-coated amorphous magnetic microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, S. A.; Yaltychenko, O. V.; Kanarovskii, E. Yu.; Codescu, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, the cast glass-coated amorphous microwires manufactured by the Ulitovsky-Taylor method are studied. Interest in the cast glass-coated amorphous microwires has greatly increased in the last few years mainly due to their technological applications, in particular, as the sensor elements in the various devices. Technological aspects of the Ulitovsky-Taylor method for the preparation of the glass-coated microwires with the different radius are analyzed. It is essential that the microwires are manufactured using a rapid solidification technique. The geometrical characteristics of a microwire depend on the physical properties of a metal and of glass, the diameter of the initial glass tube, and the parameters of the heating inductor. The given method provides the microwire geometric parameters of within the wide ranges. Respectively, a metallic core diameter in these microwires can range from 0.5 to 70 μm, and their glass-coating thickness can be varied from 1 to 50 μm. Moreover, the length of the derivable samples can reach up to 104 m. The obtained microwires exhibit the magnetic properties, which are high dependent on the metallic core composition, and similarly as it was done here for the residual stresses, they can be expressed through the microwire geometric parameters.

  13. VITRAIL: Acquisition, Modeling, and Rendering of Stained Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanikachalam, Niranjan; Baboulaz, Loic; Prandoni, Paolo; Trumpler, Stefan; Wolf, Sophie; Vetterli, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Stained glass windows are designed to reveal their powerful artistry under diverse and time-varying lighting conditions; virtual relighting of stained glass, therefore, represents an exceptional tool for the appreciation of this age old art form. However, as opposed to most other artifacts, stained glass windows are extremely difficult if not impossible to analyze using controlled illumination because of their size and position. In this paper, we present novel methods built upon image based priors to perform virtual relighting of stained glass artwork by acquiring the actual light transport properties of a given artifact. In a preprocessing step, we build a material-dependent dictionary for light transport by studying the scattering properties of glass samples in a laboratory setup. We can now use the dictionary to recover a light transport matrix in two ways: under controlled illuminations the dictionary constitutes a sparsifying basis for a compressive sensing acquisition, while in the case of uncontrolled illuminations the dictionary is used to perform sparse regularization. The proposed basis preserves volume impurities and we show that the retrieved light transport matrix is heterogeneous, as in the case of real world objects. We present the rendering results of several stained glass artifacts, including the Rose Window of the Cathedral of Lausanne, digitized using the presented methods.

  14. Long-term stability of hydrogen isotope ratios in hydrated volcanic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Elizabeth J.; Breecker, Daniel O.

    2017-03-01

    The advancement of conceptual and numerical geodynamic models necessitates quantitative, orogen-scale paleoelevation data. Felsic volcanic glasses, which record the hydrogen isotope compositions (δD) of meteoric water shortly after deposition, provide several advantages as a paleoelevation proxy. Questions remain, however, about the reliability of this relatively new proxy, including the effect of hydrofluoric (HF) acid abrasion in the preparation of glass shards for hydrogen isotope analysis and the stability of hydrogen isotope ratios in hydrated glass shards over geologic time (106-107 years). HF acid abrasion of natural ancient glass shards results in systematic shifts in glass δD values away from modern water δD values. To evaluate the effectiveness of HF acid abrasion, we treated 70-150 μm glass shards separated from various natural tephras with deuterium-labeled water (DLW; δD = +18,205‰) for up to 400 days. For all glasses, this treatment resulted in elevated δD values in comparison to untreated samples. HF acid abrasion after DLW exposure, however, removed this effect and restored glass shards to their original untreated δD values in samples older than 104 years. HF acid abrasion removes hydrous alteration precipitates at the glass surface without measurably changing the δD values of the underlying hydrated glass, regardless of abrasion duration or glass composition. Additionally, 45-34 Ma glasses record δD values that directly reflect their depositional environments as determined by stratigraphy: glasses from tuffs deposited in demonstrably evaporative lacustrine environments have relatively high δD values compared to glasses from contemporaneous tuffs deposited in nearby fluvial environments, which have much lower δD values. The preservation of δD values that systematically vary with original depositional environment, despite >30 Myr of post-hydration exposure to the same meteoric water, indicates that these volcanic glasses resisted

  15. A method for making a glass supported system, such glass supported system, and the use of a glass support therefor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unnikrishnan, S.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Fazal, I.; Louwerse, M.C.; Mogulkoc, B.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; de Boer, Meint J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for making a glass supported micro or nano system, comprising the steps of: i) providing a glass support; ii) mounting at least one system on at least one glass support; and iii) bonding the system to the glass support, such that the system is circumferentially

  16. Study on borate glass system containing with Bi 2O 3 and BaO for gamma-rays shielding materials: Comparison with PbO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewkhao, J.; Pokaipisit, A.; Limsuwan, P.

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients and shielding parameters of borate glass matrices containing with Bi 2O 3 and BaO have been investigated at 662 keV, and compare with PbO in same glass structure. The theoretical values were calculated by WinXCom software and compare with experiential data. The results found that the mass attenuation coefficients were increased with increasing of Bi 2O 3, BaO and PbO concentration, due to increase photoelectric absorption of all glass samples. However, Compton scattering gives dominant contribution to the total mass attenuation coefficients for studied glass samples. Moreover the half value layers (HVL) of glass samples were also better than ordinary concretes and commercial window glass. These results reflecting that the Bi-based glass can use replace Pb in radiation shielding glass. In the case of Ba, may be can use at appropriate energy such as X-rays or lower.

  17. The molten glass sewing machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, P.-T.; Inamura, Chikara; Lizardo, Daniel; Franchin, Giorgia; Stern, Michael; Houk, Peter; Oxman, Neri

    2017-04-01

    We present a fluid-instability-based approach for digitally fabricating geometrically complex uniformly sized structures in molten glass. Formed by mathematically defined and physically characterized instability patterns, such structures are produced via the additive manufacturing of optically transparent glass, and result from the coiling of an extruded glass thread. We propose a minimal geometrical model-and a methodology-to reliably control the morphology of patterns, so that these building blocks can be assembled into larger structures with tailored functionally and optically tunable properties. This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications'.

  18. Who will buy smart glasses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauschnabel, Philipp; Brem, Alexander; Ivens, Bjørn S.

    2015-01-01

    studies that investigate the direct and moderating effects of human personality on the awareness and innovation adoption of smart glasses. Our results show that open and emotionally stable consumers tend to be more aware of Google Glass. Consumers who perceive the potential for high functional benefits...... and social conformity of smart glasses are more likely to adopt such wearables. The strength of these effects is moderated by consumers’ individual personality, particularly by their levels of openness to experience, extraversion and neuroticism. This article concludes with a discussion of theoretical...

  19. OPAL 96 Blocks Lead Glass

    CERN Multimedia

    This array of 96 lead glass bricks formed part of the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter. One half of the complete calorimeter is shown in the picture above. There were 9440 lead glass counters in the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter. These are made of Schott type SF57 glass and each block weighs about 25 kg and consists of 76% PbO by weight. Each block has a Hamamatsu R2238 photomultiplier glued on to it. The complete detector was in the form of a cylinder 7m long and 6m in diameter. It was used to measure the energy of electrons and photons produced in LEP interactions.

  20. Venous Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems. Any of these conditions may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. You will be asked to remove some of your clothes and to wear a gown during the exam. You may also be asked to remove jewelry, removable dental appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or ...

  1. Shattered glass seeking the densest matter: the color glass condensate

    CERN Multimedia

    Appell, D

    2004-01-01

    "Physicists investigating heavy-particle collisions believe they are on the track of a universal form of matter, one common to very high energy particles ranging from protons to heavy nuclei such as uranium. Some think that this matter, called a color glass condensate, may explain new nuclear properties and the process of particle formation during collisions. Experimentalists have recently reported intriguing data that suggest a color glass condensate has actually formed in past work" (1 page)

  2. Structure and transport investigations on lithium-iron-phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Azeem; Sharma, Monika; Murugavel, Sevi

    2016-05-01

    Cathode materials for Lithium Ion Batteries (LIB's) are being constantly studied and reviewed especially in the past few decades. LiFePO4 (LFP) is one of the most potential candidates in the pedigree of cathode materials and has been under extensive study ever since. In this work, we report the synthesis of amorphous analogs of crystallite LFP by conventional melt quenching method. Thermal study by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to determine the glass transition Tg and crystallization Tc temperatures on the obtained glass sample Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy is being used to investigate the structural properties of the glass sample. The intrinsic electrical conductivity measurements were done using broad-band impedance spectroscopy with wide different temperature ranges. The conduction mechanism is described by non-adiabatic small polaron hopping between nearest neighbors. Based on the obtained results, we suggest that the glassy LFP is more suitable cathode material as compared to its crystalline counterpart.

  3. Ultra-broadband supercontinuum generation in fluoride glass by filamentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meisong; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2014-10-01

    The mid-IR supercontinuum (SC) light source is in demand for many chemical, biological, medical, and astronomical applications. It is of great significance to develop a mid-IR SC light source whose spectrum is wide and flat. We obtained ultra-broadband mid-IR SC by using a piece of fluoride glass through filamentation. Though the SC generation by filamentation needs a powerful laser chain to be the pump source, it has some advantages in comparison with that based on fiber. First, the optical path length in the glass can be very short due to the adopted high pump power. The negative influence of accumulated loss can be reduced greatly, so the transparent range of glass is much larger than fiber. Secondly, it is convenient in light-coupling, and the coupling efficiency can be high. In comparison with it, the coupling of the small core (usually the core is small to ensure a high nonlinearity) mid-IR glass fiber is troublesome. Thirdly, the glass piece is cost-effective, and can be fabricated easily. We obtained a SC spectrum covering 0.2-8.0 μm by using a 32mm-thick fluoride glass sample. The 3 dB bandwidth covers 1.15-4.76 μm. The 20 dB bandwidth spans from 0.39 to 7.4 μm. The glass thickness, optical path, and pump conditions are optimized to enable the SC to be as wide as possible. This work shows that the SC generation through filamentation in bulk glass can be an effective way to obtain an ultra-broadband mid-IR light source, which will find various applications in mid-IR regions.

  4. Pb-free Radiation Shielding Glass Using Coal Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watcharin Rachniyom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Pb-free shielding glass samples were prepared by the melt quenching technique using subbituminous fly ash (SFA composed of xBi2O3 : (60-xB2O3 : 10Na2O : 30SFA (where x = 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 by wt%. The samples were investigated for their physical and radiation shielding properties. The density and hardness were measured. The results showed that the density increased with the increase of Bi2O3 content. The highest value of hardness was observed for glass sample with 30 wt% of Bi2O3 concentration. The samples were investigated under 662 keV gamma ray and the results were compared with theoretical calculations. The values of the mass attenuation coefficient (μm, the atomic cross section (σe and the effective atomic number (Zeff were found to increase with an increase of the Bi2O3 concentration and were in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. The best results for the half-value layer (HVL were observed in the sample with 35 wt% of Bi2O3 concentration, better than the values of barite concrete. These results demonstrate the viability of using coal fly ash waste for radiation shielding glass without PbO in the glass matrices.

  5. Transparent Nanoporous Glass-Polymer Composite for U.S. Army Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    a nitrogen environment until infiltration and polymerization. Infiltration and curing procedures varied for each of the prepolymers . Samples...manufacturing a nanocomposite from nanoporous glass was first tested by infiltrating Vycor glass with various prepolymers (MMA, IBA, and a low-viscosity

  6. Generation of micro-sized conductive lines on glass fibre fabrics by inkjet printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balda Irurzun, Unai; Dutschk, Victoria; Calvimontes, Alfredo; Akkerman, Remko

    2012-01-01

    Micro-sized lines were inkjet printed on glass fibre fabrics using different droplet spacing. A conductive ink containing silver nanoparticles was used in this study. Glass fibre fabrics were differently pre-treated to avoid spontaneous spreading of the ink dispersion. The sample topography was

  7. Influence of etching and annealing on evolution of surface structure of metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, Ivan V.; Feodorov, Victor A.; Permyakova, Inga J.

    2004-04-01

    Evolution of surface structure of metallic glass subjected to etching was investigated. The changes of surface structure of metallic glass 82K3XCP after chemical etching and different modes of annealing were studied. Samples of metallic glass were etched in solutions of sulphurous acid with different concentration. Corrosion-resistance was determined. The dependence of corrosion rate on acid concentration was found. Characteristic concentric circumferences on the etching surface were investigated. Their formation mechanism is discussed. Crystallization on surface stimulated by both acid and annealing was examined. The formation of first dendrites on surface of annealed metallic glass and their evolution were investigated.

  8. Observation of/β-Relaxation in Sub-Tg Isothermally Annealed A1-Based Metallic Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-Wang; TONG Wei-Ping; ZHAO Xiang; ZUO Liang; WANG Jian-Qiang

    2008-01-01

    AlssNi5 Y8 Co2 and Al85Ni5 Y6 Co2Fe2 metallic glasses are fabricated by melt spinning. A kink or a small exothermic peak is observed for both the samples isothermally annealed at sub-glass transition temperatures. Temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) data disapprove amorphous phase separation. The activation energies derived from Kissinger plots of the exothermic process on DSC curve around glass transition temperature are consistent with those of β-relaxation of metallic glasses.

  9. Study of structural, electrical, and dielectric properties of phosphate-borate glasses and glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, B. M. G.; Graça, M. P. F., E-mail: mpfg@ua.pt; Prezas, P. R.; Valente, M. A. [Physics Department (I3N), Aveiro University, Campus Universitário de Santiago, Aveiro (Portugal); Almeida, A. F.; Freire, F. N. A. [Mechanics Engineering Department, Ceará Federal University, Fortaleza (Brazil); Bih, L. [Equipe Physico-Chimie la Matière Condensée, Faculté des Sciences de Meknès, Meknès (Morocco)

    2016-08-07

    In this work, phosphate-borate based glasses with molar composition 20.7P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–17.2Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}–13.8WO{sub 3}–34.5A{sub 2}O–13.8B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where A = Li, Na, and K, were prepared by the melt quenching technique. The as-prepared glasses were heat-treated in air at 800 °C for 4 h, which led to the formation of glass-ceramics. These high chemical and thermal stability glasses are good candidates for several applications such as fast ionic conductors, semiconductors, photonic materials, electrolytes, hermetic seals, rare-earth ion host solid lasers, and biomedical materials. The present work endorses the analysis of the electrical conductivity of the as-grown samples, and also the electrical, dielectric, and structural changes established by the heat-treatment process. The structure of the samples was analyzed using X-Ray powder Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and density measurements. Both XRD and Raman analysis confirmed crystals formation through the heat-treatment process. The electrical ac and dc conductivities, σ{sub ac} and σ{sub dc}, respectively, and impedance spectroscopy measurements as function of the temperature, varying from 200 to 380 K, were investigated for the as-grown and heat-treated samples. The impedance spectroscopy was measured in the frequency range of 100 Hz–1 MHz.

  10. Potential and challenges of interdisciplinary research on historical window glass, stained glass and reverse glass paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trümpler, Stefan; Wolf, Sophie; Kessler, Cordula; Goll, Jürg

    The interdisciplinary study of ancient materials has become an increasingly common strategy, mainly because it has proved to be a highly rewarding approach to studying the age, provenance and production of archaeological objects. The results of such an approach sometimes also provide answers to questions relating not only to socio-cultural, economic or technological developments in a particular region or period (trade, innovation, production etc.), but also the conservation of the materials or artefacts in question. A number of analytical methods, ranging from microscopic to elementary analyses, have been successfully applied to determine the nature of materials and technologies used in the production, as well as to identify the provenance of ancient glass. As far as window glass and stained glass is concerned, the study of architectural context and art history - as well as the technological characteristics of materials - has proved to be most helpful in determining history, production and artistic importance of the objects under study. This paper discusses some of the multidisciplinary studies that the Vitrocentre Romont has conducted on early medieval window glass, stained glass and reverse glass paintings and illustrates the potential of a holistic approach in solving questions about materials, techniques, window design and conservation. It also addresses the limitations of the approach, which are often related to finding appropriate (i.e. non-destructive and possibly portable) methods for the analysis of sometimes extremely fragile stained glass windows.

  11. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Niobium Doped Lead-Telluride Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, M.; Eraiah, B.

    2015-02-01

    The basic glasses with composition (70-x) TeO2-30PbO-xNb2O5 (where x=0.1 mol % and 0.2 mol %) were prepared by melt quenching method and heat treated at 280°C for 30 min. The samples becoming glass ceramics was confirmed by SEM. The XRD parameters such as crystallite size of these glass ceramics decreases as increase the impurity and is the order of 184-109A°. However, micro strain (ε) and dislocation density (δ) increases. Glass transition and thermal stability estimated from DSC measurements and it has been found that both increase with increasing of impurity. Infrared Absorption spectra were measured for TeO2 glass and glass ceramic doped with Nb2O5. The recorded bands attributed to the different modes of vibration and stretching of Te-O band. Optical Absorption spectra of TeO2-PbO- Nb2O5 system shows that the absorption edge has a tail extending towards the lower energies and shifts towards for higher energies for rare earths-doped glass-ceramics. The degree of the edge shift was found to depend on the structural rearrangement and the relative concentrations of the glass basic units. The general appearance of the absorption spectra of these rare earth doped TeO2 glasses are similar to the spectra observed for other glasses doped with the same kind of rare earth oxides.

  12. Crystallinity and crystallization mechanism of lithium aluminosilicate glass by X-ray diffractometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xing-zhong; YANG hui; CAO Ming; HAN Chen; SONG Fang-fang

    2006-01-01

    The crystallinity of lithium aluminosilicate(LAS) glass after crystallization were studied at different temperatures by X-ray diffractometry and the crystallinity of the standard glass ceramic with known crystal and glass phases was examined. The crystallization mechanism of LAS glass was analyzed by the crystallinity, with a formula relating the crystallinity (Ⅹ) and temperature (7). The results show that the calculated crystallinity of LAS glass by XRD increases with the crystallization temperature,in the range of 40% -50%, which is close to the calculated ones of standard samples with spodumene quartz ratio of 40%-70%. The activation energy of LAS glass is different within different temperature ranges; nEc is 125.44 kJ/mol at 710-810 ℃ and nEc is 17.42 kJ/mol at 810-980 ℃, which indicates different crystallization mechanisms. It has been proved that the required energy for crystallization of glass in the lower temperature range includes the interfacial energy between glass and crystalline phase and the free energy difference of atoms in structures of glass and crystal, and in the higher temperature ranges only the interfacial energy between glass and crystalline phase is considered.

  13. Final Report. LAW Glass Formulation to Support AP-101 Actual Waste Testing, VSL-03R3470-2, Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, I. S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, I. L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Carranza, Isidro [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Lai, Shan-Tao T. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kruger, Albert A. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-06-22

    The main objective of the work was to develop and select a glass formulation for vitrification testing of the actual waste sample of LAW AP-101 at Battelle - Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD). Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses to demonstrate compliance with contract and processing requirements, evaluation of the ability to achieve waste loading requirements, testing to demonstrate compatibility of the glass melts with melter materials of construction, comparison of the properties of simulant and actual waste glasses, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  14. Sodalite as a vehicle to increase Re retention in waste glass simulant during vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksic, Steven A.; Riley, Brian J.; Parker, Kent E.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2016-10-01

    Technetium retention during Hanford waste vitrification can be increased by inhibiting technetium volatility from the waste glass melter. Incorporating technetium into a mineral phase, such as sodalite, is one way to achieve this. Rhenium-bearing sodalite was tested as a vehicle to transport perrhenate (ReO4-), a nonradioactive surrogate for pertechnetate (TcO4-), into high-level (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glasses. After melting feeds of these two glasses, the retention of rhenium was measured and compared with the rhenium retention in glass prepared from a feed containing Re2O7 as a standard. The rhenium retention was 21% higher for HLW glass and 85% higher for LAW glass when added to samples in the form of sodalite as opposed to when it was added as Re2O7, demonstrating the efficacy of this type of an approach.

  15. Wet and dry atmospheric deposition on TiO{sub 2} coated glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabas, Anne, E-mail: anne.chabas@lisa.univ-paris12.f [Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques, Universite Paris 12, Universite Paris 7, CNRS, 61 avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil (France); Gentaz, Lucile; Lombardo, Tiziana; Sinegre, Romain [Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques, Universite Paris 12, Universite Paris 7, CNRS, 61 avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil (France); Falcone, Roberto [Stazione Sperimentale del Vetro, Calle Briati 10, 30141 Murano, Venezia (Italy); Verita, Marco [Laboratorio di Analisi dei Materiali Antichi LAMA, Universita IUAV di Venezia, S. Polo 2648, 30125 Venezia (Italy); Cachier, Helene [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, CNRS-CEA, Orme des Merisiers, bat 701, 91191Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2010-12-15

    To prevent the soiling of glass window used in the built environment, the use TiO{sub 2} coated products appears an important application matter. To test the cleaning efficiency and the sustainability of self-cleaning glass, a field experiment was conducted under real life condition, on a site representative of the background urban pollution. Samples of float glass, used as reference, and commercialized TiO{sub 2} coated glasses were exposed to dry and wet atmospheric deposition during two years. The crossed optical, chemical and microscopic evaluations performed, after withdrawal, allowed highlighting a sensible difference between the reference and the self-cleaning substrate in terms of accumulation, nature, abundance and geometry of the deposit. This experiment conducted in real site emphasized on the efficacy of self-cleaning glass to reduce the maintenance cost. - This paper evaluates the self-cleaning glass efficiency highlighting its ability to prevent soiling and to be used as a mean of remediation.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of holmium oxide doped cadmium lead borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, A. A.; Sedghi, H.; Mirmohseni, A. R.; Golsanamlu, V.

    Holmium doped cadmium lead borate glasses were prepared from melting in appropriate proportions of a mixture of CdO, PbO2, H3BO3 and (1-2 mol %) Ho2O3 in the temperature range of 800-850 °C. The density of glass samples was measured using Archimedes Principle. The infrared spectra of the glasses in the range of 400-4000 cm-1 showed their structure systematically. No boroxol ring formation was observed in the structure of these glasses, but the conversion of 3-fold to 4-fold coordination of boron atoms in the structure of glasses was observed. The glass transition studies were done through differential scanning calorimetry. The optical analysis is done by using the Judd-Ofelt theory.

  17. Energy transfer and NIR emission in rare earth tri-doped barium lanthanum fluoro tellurite glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, J. Suresh; Pavani, K.; Graca, M.P.F.; Soares, M.J. [Department of Physics and I3N, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Venkataiah, G. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati (India); Jayasimhadri, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi (India)

    2014-09-15

    Barium lanthanum fluoro tellurite (BLFT) glasses doped with rare earth ions (ErF{sub 3}, PrF{sub 3} and YbF{sub 3}) both singly or in combinations were prepared by melt-quench technique and analysed spectroscopically. The prepared glasses were found to be mechanically strong and transparent. Optical absorption and NIR fluorescence were measured to the highly transparent and stable glass samples. Judd-Ofelt parameters and radiative properties were estimated for the single rare earth doped BLFT glasses using the optical absorption spectra. NIR fluorescence is measured using laser excitation. From the NIR emission spectra, energy transfer among the rare earth ions is analysed in the rare earth tri-doped BLFT glasses. These rare earth tri-doped BLFT glasses are found to be highly useful for the multi- wavelength emission in the NIR region for opto-electronic applications. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. The bearable lightness of all glass structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is new developments in structural engineering related especially to the use of the material glass. After a philosophical discussion about why glass is the material for the Future, all glass elements and related techniques are presented from which an all glass building can be assembled. To

  19. The Future of all glass structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is new developments in structural engineering related especially to the use of the material glass. After a philosophical discussion about why glass is the material for the Future, all glass elements and related techniques are presented from which an all glass building can be assembled. To

  20. The structural strength of glass: hidden damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, Y.M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss “hidden damage” of glass by the rolling process, which results in heterogeneous distribution of microcracks on the edge surface of glass element, which are the fracture source deteriorating glass element strength. It is shown that removal of this damage on the edges of glass elements

  1. Perceptual effects of overlapping curved glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, P.J.S.; Veer, F.A.; Carvalho, P.L.L.

    2010-01-01

    The application of glass in contemporary architecture explores perceptual phenomenon that intentionally change the way we experience space. SANAA'S recent work uses glass in a radical way, proposing a renewed approach to transparency. The Toledo Glass Pavilion, with most spaces defined by glass

  2. Perceptual effects of overlapping curved glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, P.J.S.; Veer, F.A.; Carvalho, P.L.L.

    2010-01-01

    The application of glass in contemporary architecture explores perceptual phenomenon that intentionally change the way we experience space. SANAA'S recent work uses glass in a radical way, proposing a renewed approach to transparency. The Toledo Glass Pavilion, with most spaces defined by glass wall

  3. The bearable lightness of all glass structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is new developments in structural engineering related especially to the use of the material glass. After a philosophical discussion about why glass is the material for the Future, all glass elements and related techniques are presented from which an all glass building can be assembled. To

  4. The Future of all glass structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is new developments in structural engineering related especially to the use of the material glass. After a philosophical discussion about why glass is the material for the Future, all glass elements and related techniques are presented from which an all glass building can be assembled. To

  5. The structural strength of glass: hidden damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, Y.M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss “hidden damage” of glass by the rolling process, which results in heterogeneous distribution of microcracks on the edge surface of glass element, which are the fracture source deteriorating glass element strength. It is shown that removal of this damage on the edges of glass elements incr

  6. 7 CFR 2902.30 - Glass cleaners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Glass cleaners. 2902.30 Section 2902.30 Agriculture... Glass cleaners. (a) Definition. Cleaning products designed specifically for use in cleaning glass... qualifying biobased glass cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for...

  7. Faraday Rotator Glass for Laser Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ya-si; ZHOU Bei-ming; WANG Biao; HU Li-li

    2007-01-01

    Glasses with strong Faraday rotation are interest for laser applications. The principles of diamagnetic and paramagnetic Faraday rotator glasses are described theoretically and experimentally. High performance Tb-paramagnetic glass series were developed and produced at Kigre in the US and SIOM in Shanghai. Large aperture glass disks have been used for high power laser fusion systems.

  8. Approximate chemical analysis of volcanic glasses using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgavi, Daniele; Hess, Kai‐Uwe; Neuville, Daniel R.; Borovkov, Nikita; Perugini, Diego; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of chemical composition on the Raman spectra of a series of natural calcalkaline silicate glasses has been quantified by performing electron microprobe analyses and obtaining Raman spectra on glassy filaments (~450 µm) derived from a magma mingling experiment. The results provide a robust compositionally‐dependent database for the Raman spectra of natural silicate glasses along the calcalkaline series. An empirical model based on both the acquired Raman spectra and an ideal mixing equation between calcalkaline basaltic and rhyolitic end‐members is constructed enabling the estimation of the chemical composition and degree of polymerization of silicate glasses using Raman spectra. The model is relatively insensitive to acquisition conditions and has been validated using the MPI‐DING geochemical standard glasses1 as well as further samples. The methods and model developed here offer several advantages compared with other analytical and spectroscopic methods such as infrared spectroscopy, X‐ray fluorescence spectroscopy, electron and ion microprobe analyses, inasmuch as Raman spectroscopy can be performed with a high spatial resolution (1 µm2) without the need for any sample preparation as a nondestructive technique. This study represents an advance in efforts to provide the first database of Raman spectra for natural silicate glasses and yields a new approach for the treatment of Raman spectra, which allows us to extract approximate information about the chemical composition of natural silicate glasses using Raman spectroscopy. We anticipate its application in handheld in situ terrestrial field studies of silicate glasses under extreme conditions (e.g. extraterrestrial and submarine environments). © 2015 The Authors Journal of Raman Spectroscopy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd PMID:27656038

  9. Localized rapid heating process for precision chalcogenide glass molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; He, Peng; Yu, Jianfeng; Lee, L. James; Yi, Allen Y.

    2015-10-01

    Precision glass molding is an important process for high volume optical fabrication. However, conventional glass molding is a bulk heating process that usually requires a long thermal cycle, where molding assembly and other mechanical parts are heated and cooled together. This often causes low efficiency and other heating and cooling related problems, such as large thermal expansion in both the molds and molded optics. To cope with this issue, we developed a localized rapid heating process to effectively heat only very small part of the glass. This localized rapid heating study utilized a fused silica wafer coated with a thin graphene layer to heat only the surface of the glass. The graphene coating functions as an electrical resistant heater when a power source was applied across the thin film coating, generating heat on and near the coating. The feasibility of this process was validated by both experiments and numerical simulation. To demonstrate the advantages of the localized rapid heating, both localized rapid heating process and bulk heating process were performed and carefully compared. The uniformity and quality of the molded sample by localized rapid heating process was also demonstrated. In summary, localized rapid heating process by using graphene coated fused silica wafer was characterized and can be readily implemented in replication of micro scale chalcogenide glasses. A fused silica wafer coated with a thin graphene layer was utilized for localized rapid heating only the surface of the glass. The graphene coating functions as an electrical resistant heater when a power source was applied across the thin film coating, generating high temperature on and near the coating. This process is fast and efficient since only interested areas are heated without affecting the entire glass substrate or the mold assembly. The uniformity and quality of the molded sample by localized rapid heating process was demonstrated by comparing both localized rapid heating

  10. Porous glasses for optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorosz, Dominik; Procyk, Bernadeta

    2006-03-01

    Microporous glasses from the Na II0-B II0 3-Si0 II system can be obtained by appropriate thermal and chemical treatment. During the thermal treatment the separation of the borate phase from the silicon skeleton has been occurred. The borates are in the form small drops joined to each other. In the course of chemical treatment the borates become leached in water, water solutions of acids or basis and the glass becomes porous. Microporous glasses may find application in many branches of science and engineering. The applications depend on the internal arrangement, size and shape of pores. These parameters may be in a wide range modified by a change of the chemical composition. The received porous glass was used as an element in optical fibre NO II sensor. The specific coloration reaction between organic reagents and NO II in the pores was occurred. It is possible to detection of 10-50 ppm NO II level.

  11. Spin glasses on thin graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Baillie, C F; Johnston, D A; Plechác, P

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper we found strong evidence from simulations that the Ising antiferromagnet on ``thin'' random graphs - Feynman diagrams - displayed a mean-field spin glass transition. The intrinsic interest of considering such random graphs is that they give mean field results without long range interactions or the drawbacks, arising from boundary problems, of the Bethe lattice. In this paper we reprise the saddle point calculations for the Ising and Potts ferromagnet, antiferromagnet and spin glass on Feynman diagrams. We use standard results from bifurcation theory that enable us to treat an arbitrary number of replicas and any quenched bond distribution. We note the agreement between the ferromagnetic and spin glass transition temperatures thus calculated and those derived by analogy with the Bethe lattice, or in previous replica calculations. We then investigate numerically spin glasses with a plus or minus J bond distribution fo rthe Ising and Q=3,3,10,50 state Potts models, paying particular attention t...

  12. Turning nuclear waste into glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegg, Ian L.

    2015-02-15

    Vitrification has emerged as the treatment option of choice for the most dangerous radioactive waste. But dealing with the nuclear waste legacy of the Cold War will require state-of-the-art facilities and advanced glass formulations.

  13. Assessment of nickel oxide substituted bioactive glass-ceramic on in vitro bioactivity and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar Vyas, V.; Sampath Kumar, A.; Ali, A.; Prasad, S.; Srivastava, P.; Prasanna Mallick, S.; Ershad, Md.; Prasad Singh, S.; Pyare, R.

    2016-07-01

    Many type of oxide substituted glass-ceramics like strontium, cobalt, barium and titanium have shown bioactivity with improved mechanical properties. The present work reports the in vitro bioactivity and mechanical properties of nickel oxide substituted in bioactive glass-ceramic and results were compared with 45S5 bioactive glass-ceramic. Bioactive glass ceramics were processed through controlled crystallization of their respective bioactive glasses. The formed crystalline phases in bioactive glass-ceramics were identified using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The formation of HA layer was assessed by immersing them in the simulated body fluid (SBF) for different soaking periods. The formation of hydroxyapatite was confirmed by FTIR spectrometry, SEM and pH measurement. Densities and mechanical properties of the samples were found to increase considerably with an increasing the concentration of nickel oxide. A decrease in glass transition temperature (Tg) with NiO addition showed that the nickel oxide had acted as an intermediate in smaller quantities in the bioactive glass. The cell culture studies demonstrated that the samples containing low concentration of NiO from 0 to 1.65mol% were non-cytotoxic against osteoblast cells. Finally, this investigation clearly concluded that NiO doped bioactive glass would be potential biomaterials for biomedical applications. (Author)

  14. Leachates analysis of glass from black and white and color televisions sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Kukla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of work was to determine the content of selected elements in the glass from color and black and white television (TV sets. The amount of back taken TV sets in the Czech Republic increases annualy, which is associated with higher production of the waste glass. Currently there is 1.4 television sets for each household and the number of it should increase in future, because of higher standard of living and new technologies used. Waste glass treatment or landfilling may present, because of composition of the waste glass threat to the environment. One of the indicators of the polution from waste glass is leachate analysis, which can show us the content of hazardous substances in the waste glass, which can be released to the environment. A qualitative analysis of leachate samples was carried out by UV-VIS spectrophotometer. The results showed concentration of potencionaly hazardous substances contained in leachate samples. This was especially content of aluminum, cadmium, chromium, copper, molybdenum, nickel, lead, tin and zinc. Results of analyzes of the aqueous extract of glass were confronted with the limits specified in the currently valid legislation. Based on the results there is clear that in the case of landfilling of the glass from television sets, there is possibility of the contamination of landfill leachate by the elements, which are presented in the glass.

  15. Pressure-induced changes in interdiffusivity and compressive stress in chemically strengthened glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenson, Mouritz N; Thirion, Lynn M; Youngman, Randall E; Mauro, John C; Rzoska, Sylwester J; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M

    2014-07-09

    Glass exhibits a significant change in properties when subjected to high pressure because the short- and intermediate-range atomic structures of glass are tunable through compression. Understanding the link between the atomic structure and macroscopic properties of glass under high pressure is an important scientific problem because the glass structures obtained via quenching from elevated pressure may give rise to properties unattainable under standard ambient pressure conditions. In particular, the chemical strengthening of glass through K(+)-for-Na(+) ion exchange is currently receiving significant interest due to the increasing demand for stronger and more damage-resistant glass. However, the interplay among isostatic compression, pressure-induced changes in alkali diffusivity, compressive stress generated through ion exchange, and the resulting mechanical properties are poorly understood. In this work, we employ a specially designed gas pressure chamber to compress bulk glass samples isostatically up to 1 GPa at elevated temperature before or after the ion exchange treatment of a commercial sodium-magnesium aluminosilicate glass. Compression of the samples prior to ion exchange leads to a decreased Na(+)-K(+) interdiffusivity, increased compressive stress, and slightly increased hardness. Compression after the ion exchange treatment changes the shape of the potassium-sodium diffusion profiles and significantly increases glass hardness. We discuss these results in terms of the underlying structural changes in network-modifier environments and overall network densification.

  16. Crystallization Kinetics of Barium and Strontium Aluminosilicate Glasses of Feldspar Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1994-01-01

    Crystallization kinetics of BaO.Al2O3.2SiO2 (BAS) and SrO.Al2O3.2SiO2 (SAS) glasses in bulk and powder forms have been studied by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The crystal growth activation energies were evaluated to be 473 and 451 kJ/mol for bulk samples and 560 and 534 kJ/mol for powder specimens in BAS and SAS glasses, respectively. Development of crystalline phases on thermal treatments of glasses at various temperatures has been followed by powder x-ray diffraction. Powder samples crystallized at lower temperatures than the bulk and the crystallization temperature was lower for SAS glass than BAS. Crystallization in both glasses appeared to be surface nucleated. The high temperature phase hexacelsian, MAl2Si2O8 (M = Ba or Sr), crystallized first by nucleating preferentially on the glass surface. Also, monoclinic celsian does not nucleate directly in the glass, but is formed at higher temperatures from the transformation of the metastable hexagonal phase. In SAS the transformation to monoclinic celsian occurred rapidly after 1 h at 1100 C. In contrast, in BAS this transformation is sluggish and difficult and did not go to completion even after 10 h heat treatment at 1400 C. The crystal growth morphologies in the glasses have been observed by optical microscopy. Some of the physical properties of the two glasses are also reported.

  17. Origin of Chinese ancient glasses——study on the earliest Chinese ancient glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Fuxi; CHENG Huansheng; LI Qinghui

    2006-01-01

    The earliest Chinese ancient glasses before the West Han Dynasty (200 BC) from different regions are studied. The glass samples were unearthed from Hunan, Hubei, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guizhou, Guangdong and Xinjiang of China. The chemical composition of these glasses samples is analyzed by proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) method and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). It is shown that the glass chemical compositions belong to barium-lead silicate BaO-PbO-SiO2, potash soda lime silicate K2O (Na2O)-CaO-SiO2 (K2O/Na2O>1), soda potash lime silicate Na2O (K2O)-CaO-SiO2 (K2O/Na2O<1) and potash silicate K2O-SiO2 glass systems, respectively. The origins of the earliest Chinese ancient glasses are discussed from the archaeological and historical points of view. These four types of Chinese ancient glasses were all made in Chinese territory using local raw materials. The glass preparation technology was related to the Chinese ancient bronze metallurgy and proto-porcelain glaze technology. The glass technology relationship between the East and the West is analyzed at the same time.

  18. High insulation foam glass material from waste cathode ray tube panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    . In general CRT consists of two types of glasses: barium/strontium containing glass (panel glass) and lead containing glass (funnel and panel glass). In this work we present the possibility to produce high performance insulation material from the recycled lead-free glass. We studied the influence of foaming...... parameters on the characteristics of foamed glass. CRT panel glass was crushed, milled and sieved below 63 m. Activated carbon used as a foaming agent and MnO2 as an ‘oxidizing’ agent were mixed with glass powders by means of a planetary ball mill. Foaming effect was observed in the temperature range...

  19. BRIGHT LONG AFTERGLOW PHOSPHORESCENCE GLASS MADE OF SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+ AND GLASS FRITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.Y. Zhang; Z.F. Cao; L.P. Lu; Z.H. Bai; W.Z. Wang; X.C. Wang

    2005-01-01

    Bright long afterglow phosphorescence glasses were prepared by using SrAl2O4 : Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors and suitable glass frits together. The SrAl2O4: Eu2+,Dy3+ phosphors were initially prepared by the solid reaction method. Three kinds of glass frits were prepared to match the SrAl2O4: Eu2+,Dy3+ phosphors. Effects of the compositions of the glass frits, the ratios of the phosphors to the frits as well as the firing temperature and firing times on the properties of the samples were discussed. XRD analysis indicated the samples exhibited the typical diffraction peaks of SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+. The emission spectra of the samples showed broad bands peaking at 510nm. The excitation spectra of the samples showed broad bands ranging from 300 to 480nm. These are believed due to the 5d4f-4f transitions of Eu2+ in the SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors. The afterglow luminescence of the samples excited by a 40W fluorescence lamp for 30min can be observed in the dark for more 10h with the naked eyes. It can find wide applications in many fields.

  20. Glass microspheres for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzone, Samuel David

    Radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres have been developed as biodegradable radiation delivery vehicles for the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Once injected into a diseased joint, the microspheres deliver a potent dose of radiation to the diseased tissue, while a non-uniform chemical reaction converts the glass into an amorphous, porous, hydrated dysprosium phosphate reaction product. The non-radioactive, lithium-borate component is dissolved from the glass (up to 94% weight loss), while the radioactive 165Dy reacts with phosphate anions in the body fluids, and becomes "chemically" trapped in a solid, dysprosium phosphate reaction product that has the same size as the un-reacted glass microsphere. Ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA) chelation therapy can be used to dissolve the dysprosium phosphate reaction product after the radiation delivery has subsided. The dysprosium phosphate reaction product, which formed in vivo in the joint of a Sprague-Dawley rat, was dissolved by EDTA chelation therapy in 100 Gy) of localized beta radiation to a treatment site within the body, followed by complete biodegradability. The non-uniform reaction process is a desirable characteristic for a biodegradable radiation delivery vehicle, but it is also a novel material synthesis technique that can convert a glass to a highly porous materials with widely varying chemical composition by simple, low-temperature, glass/solution reaction. The reaction product formed by nonuniform reaction occupies the same volume as the un-reacted glass, and after drying for 1 h at 300°C, has a specific surface area of ≈200 m2/g, a pore size of ≈30 nm, and a nominal crushing strength of ≈10 MPa. Finally, rhenium glass microspheres, composed of micron-sized, metallic rhenium particles dispersed within a magnesium alumino borate glass matrix were produced by sintering ReO2 powder and glass frit at 1050°C. A 50 mg injection of radioactive rhenium glass

  1. Glass composition and excitation wavelength dependence of the luminescence of Eu3+ doped lead borate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hongli; Duan, Chang-Kui; Jia, Guohua; Tanner, Peter A.; Brik, Mikhail G.

    2011-08-01

    This work explores the relationship between the bandwidth of luminescence spectral features and their relative intensities, using glasses doped with europium, Eu3+, over a wide composition range. Glasses of composition (B2O3)70(PbO)29(0.5Eu2O3)1 and (B2O3)z(PbO)99.6-z(0.5Eu2O3)0.4, (z = 20, 30, 40, 60, 70), were prepared by the melting-quenching technique. Variable-wavelength measurements by the prism-coupling method enabled interpolation of refractive index at selected wavelengths. Diffuse reflectance spectra confirmed the incorporation of Eu3+ into the glass, and scanning electron microscopy displayed that this was in a homogeneous manner. Vibrational spectra showed a change in boron coordination from BO3 to BO4 units with increase of PbO content in the glass. Multi-wavelength excited luminescence spectra were recorded for the glasses at temperatures down to 10 K and qualitative interpretations of spectral differences with change of B2O3 content are given. The quantitative analysis of 5D0 luminescence intensity-bandwidth relations showed that although samples with higher boron content closely exhibit a simple proportional relationship with band intensity ratios, as expected from theory, the expression needs to be slightly modified for those with low boron content. The Judd-Ofelt intensity analysis of the 5D0 emission spectra under laser excitations at low temperature gives Ω2 values within the range from (3.9-6.5) × 10-20 cm2, and Ω4 in the range from (4.1-7.0) × 10-20 cm2, for different values of z. However, no clear monotonic relation was found between the parameter values and composition. The Judd-Ofelt parameters are compared with those from other systems doped with Eu3+ and are found to lie in the normal ranges for Eu3+-doped glasses. The comparison of parameter values derived from the 10 K spectra with those from room temperature spectra for our glasses, which are fairly constant for different compositions, shows that site selection occurs at low

  2. Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses?

    OpenAIRE

    Zobrist, B.; Marcolli, C.; Pedernera, D. A.; Koop, T.

    2008-01-01

    A new process is presented by which water soluble organics might influence ice nucleation, ice growth, chemical reactions and water uptake of aerosols in the upper troposphere: the formation of glassy aerosol particles. Glasses are disordered amorphous (non-crystalline) solids that form when a liquid is cooled without crystallization until the viscosity increases exponentially and molecular diffusion practically ceases. The glass transition temperatures, Tg

  3. Random Fields and Spin Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dominicis, Cirano; Giardina, Irene

    2010-06-01

    1. A brief introduction; 2. The Random Field Ising model; 3. The dynamical approach; 4. The p=2 spherical model; 5. Mean field spin glasses: one-step RSB; 6. The Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model; 7. Mean field via TAP equations; 8. Spin glass above D=6; 9. Propagators, mostly replicon; 10. Ward-Takahashi identities and Goldstone modes; 11. Alternative approaches and conclusions; Appendices; Index.

  4. Rhenium volatilization in waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kai; Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hrma, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.hrma@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Kruger, Albert A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Re did not volatilize from a HLW feed until 1000 °C. • Re began to volatilize from LAW feeds at ∼600 °C. • The vigorous foaming and generation of gases from salts enhanced Re evaporation in LAW feeds. • The HLW glass with less foaming and salts is a promising medium for Tc immobilization. - Abstract: We investigated volatilization of rhenium (Re), sulfur, cesium, and iodine during the course of conversion of high-level waste melter feed to glass and compared the results for Re volatilization with those in low-activity waste borosilicate glasses. Whereas Re did not volatilize from high-level waste feed heated at 5 K min{sup −1} until 1000 °C, it began to volatilize from low-activity waste borosilicate glass feeds at ∼600 °C, a temperature ∼200 °C below the onset temperature of evaporation from pure KReO{sub 4}. Below 800 °C, perrhenate evaporation in low-activity waste melter feeds was enhanced by vigorous foaming and generation of gases from molten salts as they reacted with the glass-forming constituents. At high temperatures, when the glass-forming phase was consolidated, perrhenates were transported to the top surface of glass melt in bubbles, typically together with sulfates and halides. Based on the results of this study (to be considered preliminary at this stage), the high-level waste glass with less foaming and salts appears a promising medium for technetium immobilization.

  5. A combination of a connector for glass elements and such glass elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.

    2014-01-01

    A combination of a connector for glass elements and such glass elements to provide a loadbearing glass construc- tion that comprises at least one glass post and at least one glass beam that are arranged adjacent to each other, wherein the connector is arranged to provide a rotationally fixed

  6. Production of lightweight foam glass (invited talk)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass production allows low cost recycling of postconsumer glass and industrial waste materials as foaming agent or as melt resource. Foam glass is commonly produced by utilising milled glass mixed with a foaming agent. The powder mixture is heat-treated to around 10^3.7 – 10^6 Pa s, which...... result in viscous sintering and subsequent foaming of the glass melt. The porous glass melt is cooled down to room temperature to freeze-in the foam structure. The resulting foam glass is applied in constructions as a light weight material to reduce load bearing capacity and as heat insulating material...... in buildings and industry. We foam panel glass from old televisions with different foaming agents. We discuss the foaming ability and the foaming mechanism of different foaming systems. We compare several studies to define a viscous window for preparing low density foam glass. However, preparing foam glass...

  7. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

  8. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

  9. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

  10. Bioactive glasses: Frontiers and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry L. Hench

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses were discovered in 1969 and provided for the first time an alternative to nearly inert implant materials. Bioglass formed a rapid, strong and stable bond with host tissues. This article examines the frontiers of research crossed to achieve clinical use of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics. In the 1980’s it was discovered that bioactive glasses could be used in particulate form to stimulate osteogenesis, which thereby led to the concept of regeneration of tissues. Later, it was discovered that the dissolution ions from the glasses behaved like growth factors, providing signals to the cells. This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass®. The four eras are: a discovery; b clinical application; c tissue regeneration; and d innovation. Questions still to be answered for the fourth era are included to stimulate innovation in the field and exploration of new frontiers that can be the basis for a general theory of bioactive stimulation of regeneration of tissues and application to numerous clinical needs.

  11. Metallurgical use of glass fractions from waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghel, Sina; Samuelsson, Caisa

    2010-01-01

    Within the European Union, it is estimated that between 8 and 9 million tons of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) arises annually, of which television sets and computers account for an important part. Traditionally, Cathode Ray Tubes (CRT) have been used for TVs and computer monitors, but are rapidly being replaced by flat-screen technology. Only part of the discarded CRT glass is being recycled. Primary smelters use large amounts of silica flux to form iron-silicate slag, and can, in most cases, tolerate lead input. Use of discarded CRT glass in copper smelting is a potential alternative for utilization of the glass. The mineralogical composition of a slag sampled during ordinary slag praxis has been compared with that of a mixture of slag and CRT glass when re-melted and slowly cooled. Slag (iron-silicate slag) from Boliden Mineral AB, Sweden, was used for the experiments. Slag and glass have been mixed in various proportions: pure slag, pure glass, 90% slag-10% glass and 65% slag-35% glass, and heated in an inert atmosphere up to 1400 degrees C in a Netzsch Thermal Analysis (TA) instrument. The re-melted material has been analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine changes in mineralogical composition after mixing with glass. The results show that the main mineralogical component of the slag is fayalite; the CRT glass is amorphous. The main crystalline phases of the slag do not change with addition of glass. An amorphous phase appears when the addition of glass is increased, which gives the sample a different structure.

  12. Preparation and Optical Properties of Er3+ -Doped Gadolinium Borosilicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jiangting; Zhang Jiahua; Chen Baojiu; Lu Shaozhe; Ren Xinguang; Wang Xiaojun

    2005-01-01

    Er3+-doped Gd2 O3 -SiO2 -B2 O3 -Na2O glasses were prepared, and formation range of glass of Gd2 O3 -SiO2 -B2O3 system was experimentally obtained. It is found that the glass phase can be formed only when the content of SiO2 is 0~50%(molar fraction), Gd2O3 is 0~30%(molar fraction) and B2 O3 is above 20%(molar fraction) in this glass system. The glass can also be obtained but becomes translucent at the contents of 60%(molar fraction) SiO2 and 30% Gd2O3 , or at the contents of 60%(molar fraction) SiO2 and 30%(molar fraction) B2O3. There is no glass phase formed in other glass components. Glass forming ability for Gd2O3 content of 10%, was characterized by the value of β, the parameter of crystallization tendency, which is 0.32~1.76, obtained from the differential thermal analysis. The absorption and emission cross section, the J-O parameters Ωt(2,4,6) and radiative transition probabilities were calculated by using the theory of McCumber and Judd-Ofelt. The emission properties at 1.5 μm of the samples are discussed with the product of full width at half maximum and stimulated emission cross section. It can be seen that the value of the FWHM×σepeak product in the prepared glass is more than those of germanate, silicate and phosphate glasses. Furthermore, the maximum value of the product among these glasses reported in this work is close to that of oxyfluoride silicate glass. Therefore, the Er3+-doped gadolinium borosilicate glass in this paper is a candidate for broadband erbium doped fiber amplifiers.

  13. Er-doped and Er, Yb co-doped oxyfluoride glasses and glass-ceramics, structural and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisiecki, Radosław; Augustyn, Elżbieta; Ryba-Romanowski, Witold; Żelechower, Michał

    2011-09-01

    The selected glasses and glass-ceramics pertinent to following chemical composition in mol%:48%SiO 2-11%Al 2O 3-7%Na 2O-10%CaO-10%PbO-11%PbF 2-3%ErF 3 and 48%SiO 2-11%Al 2O 3-7%Na 2O-10%CaO-10%PbO-10%PbF 2-1%ErF 3-3%YbF 3 have been manufactured from high purity components (Aldrich) at 1450 °C in normal atmosphere. Glass optical fibers were successfully drawn. Subsequently they were subject to the heat-treatment at 700 °C in various time periods. The preceding differential thermal analysis (DTA) studies allowed estimating both the fiber drawing temperature and the controlled crystallization temperature of glass fibers. It has been observed that the controlled heat-treatment of oxyfluoride glass fibers results in the creation of Pb 5Al 3F 19, Er 4F 2O 11Si 3 and Er 3FO 10Si 3 crystalline phases. The identified phases were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and confirmed by selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The fibers consist of mixed amorphous-crystalline microstructure with nano-crystals of size even below 10 nm distributed in the glassy host. Their morphology was investigated applying high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Optical properties and excited state relaxation dynamics of optically active ions (Er 3+, Yb 3+) in glass and glass-ceramics have been studied. Based on absorption spectra the Judd-Ofelt analysis was carried out. The main attention was directed to NIR luminescence at. 1.6 μm related to 4I 13/2 → 4I 15/2 Er 3+ and less effective emission associated with 4I 11/2 → 4I 15/2 Er 3+ and 2F 5/2 → 2F 7/2 Yb 3+ transitions. The dissimilar spectroscopic properties have been revealed for glasses and glass-ceramic samples, respectively. The reduction of emission linewidth at 1.6 and 1.0 μm combined with substantial increase of 4I 13/2 lifetimes of erbium in glass-ceramics appear to be evidences that Er 3+ ions are accommodated in crystalline phases. The structural and optical characteristics of oxyfluoride glass

  14. Operational Modal Analysis on laminated glass beams

    OpenAIRE

    López Aenlle, Manuel; Fernández, Pelayo; Villa García, Luis Manuel; Barredo Egusquiza, Josu; Hermanns, Lutz Karl Heinz; Fraile de Lerma, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Laminated glass is a sandwich element consisting of two or more glass sheets, with one or more interlayers of polyvinyl butyral (PVB). The dynamic response of laminated glass beams and plates can be predicted using analytical or numerical models in which the glass and the PVB are usually modelled as linear-elastic and linear viscoelastic materials, respectively. In this work the dynamic behavior of laminated glass beams are predicted using a finite element model and the analytical model ...

  15. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Glass Fabrication Unit Operation Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Hanford Missions Programs; Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Process Technology Programs; Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Engineering Process Development; Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Engineering Process Development

    2016-07-14

    The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) design, safety basis, and technical basis by assuring waste acceptance requirements are met for each staged waste feed campaign prior to transfer from the Tank Operations Contractor to the feed receipt vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. The Waste Feed Qualification Program Plan describes the three components of waste feed qualification: 1. Demonstrate compliance with the waste acceptance criteria 2. Determine waste processability 3. Test unit operations at laboratory scale. The glass fabrication unit operation is the final step in the process demonstration portion of the waste feed qualification process. This unit operation generally consists of combining each of the waste feed streams (high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW)) with Glass Forming Chemicals (GFCs), fabricating glass coupons, performing chemical composition analysis before and after glass fabrication, measuring hydrogen generation rate either before or after glass former addition, measuring rheological properties before and after glass former addition, and visual observation of the resulting glass coupons. Critical aspects of this unit operation are mixing and sampling of the waste and melter feeds to ensure representative samples are obtained as well as ensuring the fabrication process for the glass coupon is adequate. Testing was performed using a range of simulants (LAW and HLW simulants), and these simulants were mixed with high and low bounding amounts of GFCs to evaluate the mixing, sampling, and glass preparation steps in shielded cells using laboratory techniques. The tests were performed with off-the-shelf equipment at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is similar to equipment used in the SRNL work during qualification of waste feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and other waste treatment facilities at the

  16. Hydraulic and acoustic investigation of sintered glass beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueven, Ibrahim; Luding, Stefan; Steeb, Holger

    2013-06-01

    In the present contribution, we are focussing on the hydraulical and acoustical charcterization of sintered glass beads. For the experiments sintered mono-and weakly polydisperse glass bead samples were applied. Depending on the particle size, degree of particle dispersion and sample treatment during the sintering process, the produced cylindircal samples exhibit different hydraulic and acoustic properties. The more general focus of our research lies on the physical behaviour of oil-water emulsions in porous media by means of combined electromagnetic and acoustic wave propagation. For this purpose, a hydraulic multi-task measuring cell was developed. This cell allows carrying out simple hydraulic permeability and challenging ultrasound experiments in porous materials saturated with Pickering emulsions. In the first phase of our experiments, hydraulical and acoustical measurements of cylindrical sintered glass bead samples were performed in order to determine their intrinsic permeabilities and effective ultrasound velocities. The intrinsic permeability ks, a coupling parameter between the solid matrix and the pore fluid, has a huge influence on wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media. For the assessment of permeabilities, particle size distributions and porosities of the investigated glass beads were determined.

  17. Macroporous glass monoliths prepared from powdered niobium phosphate glass by fast sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda Mauricio, Vitor; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz; Odone Mazali, Italo, E-mail: mazali@iqm.unicamp.br

    2011-03-15

    Macroporous monoliths were prepared by very fast sintering (between 3 and 15 min) of niobophosphate glass powders at low temperature (1018 K) using cellulose as a foaming agent. The porous materials were analyzed by thermal analysis, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction, and further investigated using X-ray microtomography, a non-destructive technique capable of reconstructing three-dimensional models of samples and providing structural measurements. The progression of the porosity of the monoliths depends on the sintering time (3 to 15 min) and the amount (up to 50% in mass) of cellulose used. The macroporous glass monoliths may find application in integrated chemical systems and in filtering processes.

  18. Composition, production and procurement of glass at San Vincenzo Al Volturno: an early Medieval monastic complex in Southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibille, Nadine; Freestone, Ian C

    2013-01-01

    136 glasses from the ninth-century monastery of San Vincenzo and its workshops have been analysed by electron microprobe in order to situate the assemblage within the first millennium CE glass making tradition. The majority of the glass compositions can be paralleled by Roman glass from the first to third centuries, with very few samples consistent with later compositional groups. Colours for trailed decoration on vessels, for vessel bodies and for sheet glass for windows were largely produced by melting the glass tesserae from old Roman mosaics. Some weakly-coloured transparent glass was obtained by re-melting Roman window glass, while some was produced by melting and mixing of tesserae, excluding the strongly coloured cobalt blues. Our data suggest that to feed the needs of the glass workshop, the bulk of the glass was removed as tesserae and windows from a large Roman building. This is consistent with a historical account according to which the granite columns of the monastic church were spolia from a Roman temple in the region. The purported shortage of natron from Egypt does not appear to explain the dependency of San Vincenzo on old Roman glass. Rather, the absence of contemporary primary glass may reflect the downturn in long-distance trade in the later first millennium C.E., and the role of patronage in the "ritual economy" founded upon donations and gift-giving of the time.

  19. Composition, production and procurement of glass at San Vincenzo Al Volturno: an early Medieval monastic complex in Southern Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schibille

    Full Text Available 136 glasses from the ninth-century monastery of San Vincenzo and its workshops have been analysed by electron microprobe in order to situate the assemblage within the first millennium CE glass making tradition. The majority of the glass compositions can be paralleled by Roman glass from the first to third centuries, with very few samples consistent with later compositional groups. Colours for trailed decoration on vessels, for vessel bodies and for sheet glass for windows were largely produced by melting the glass tesserae from old Roman mosaics. Some weakly-coloured transparent glass was obtained by re-melting Roman window glass, while some was produced by melting and mixing of tesserae, excluding the strongly coloured cobalt blues. Our data suggest that to feed the needs of the glass workshop, the bulk of the glass was removed as tesserae and windows from a large Roman building. This is consistent with a historical account according to which the granite columns of the monastic church were spolia from a Roman temple in the region. The purported shortage of natron from Egypt does not appear to explain the dependency of San Vincenzo on old Roman glass. Rather, the absence of contemporary primary glass may reflect the downturn in long-distance trade in the later first millennium C.E., and the role of patronage in the "ritual economy" founded upon donations and gift-giving of the time.

  20. Spectral properties of Martian and other planetary glasses and their detection in remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Kevin M.; Mustard, John F.; Parman, Stephen W.; Sklute, Elizabeth C.; Dyar, M. Darby; Cooper, Reid F.

    2017-01-01

    Thirty silicate glasses were synthesized as realistic analogs to those expected to exist on Mars, the Moon, and Mercury. Samples were measured using visible/near-infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the effects of varying bulk chemistry, oxygen fugacity, and temperature on spectral properties. For Martian glasses, the fO2 during fusion strongly affects absorption band intensities in the spectra, while bulk chemistry has noticeable secondary effects on absorption band positions. Titanium and iron content drive spectral changes in lunar glasses, where Fe3+ is effectively absent. Iron-free Mercury analog glasses have much higher albedos than all other samples, and their spectral shape is a close match to some pyroclastic deposits on Mercury. Synthetic glass spectra were used as inputs into a spectral unmixing model applied to remote orbital datasets to test for the presence of glass. The model is validated against physical laboratory mixture spectra, as well as previous detections of glass-rich pyroclastic deposits on the Moon. Remote data were then used from suspected impact deposits and possible pyroclastic deposits on Mars as a new application of the model: the results reveal spatially coherent glass-rich material, and the strong spectral match of the synthetic glasses to these remotely sensed data gives new insights into the presence and character of glasses on the Martian surface. The large library of glass spectra generated here, acquired from consistently synthesized and measured samples, can serve as a resource for further studies of volcanic and impact processes on planetary bodies.

  1. Magnesium and Silicon Isotopes in HASP Glasses from Apollo 16 Lunar Soil 61241

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, G. F.; Delaney, J. S.; Lindsay, F.; Alexander, C. M. O'D; Chakrabarti, R.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Whattam, S.; Korotev, R.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    The high-Al (>28 wt %), silica-poor (<45 wt %) (HASP) feldspathic glasses of Apollo 16 are widely regarded as the evaporative residues of impacts in the lunar regolith [1-3]. By virtue of their small size, apparent homogeneity, and high inferred formation temperatures, the HASP glasses appear to be good samples in which to study fractionation processes that may accompany open system evaporation. Calculations suggest that HASP glasses with present-day Al2O3 concentrations of up to 40 wt% may have lost 19 wt% of their original masses, calculated as the oxides of iron and silicon, via evaporation [4]. We report Mg and Si isotope abundances in 10 HASP glasses and 2 impact-glass spherules from a 64-105 m grain-size fraction taken from Apollo 16 soil sample 61241.

  2. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  3. PIXE-PIGE analysis of late roman glass fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Tubio, B. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Escuela de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)]. E-mail: tubio@us.es; Ontalba Salamanca, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Politecnica, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. de la Universidad s/n, 10071 Caceres (Spain); Ortega-Feliu, I. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Thomas A. Edison s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Respaldiza, M.A. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Thomas A. Edison s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Amores Carredano, F. [Departamento de Prehistoria y Arqueologia, Universidad de Sevilla, C/Dona Maria de Padilla s/n, 41010 Sevilla (Spain); Gonzalez-Acuna, D. [Departamento de Geografia, Historia y Filosofia, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Ctra. de Utrera Km 1, 41013 Sevilla (Spain)

    2006-08-15

    A set of Roman glass fragments, excavated at Sevilla and dated in the 5th century A.D., has been analysed by PIXE and PIGE techniques using the external beam set-up of the 3 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator of the CNA at the University of Sevilla. Using a simple quantification method, based on the indirect charge calculation on the sample by monitoring the X-ray induced by the proton beam on the exit window, the composition of the glasses has been determined. From the obtained results, the use of soda as flux has been inferred and colouring manufacture procedures have been identified.

  4. Luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses with molecular cadmium selenide clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolobkova, E. V.; Kukushkin, D. S.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Sidorov, A. I.; Shakhverdov, T. A.

    2015-02-01

    It is experimentally shown that, prior to the formation of CdSe quantum dots in fluorophosphate glasses with cadmium and selenium ions in the process of synthesis, subnanosized molecular clusters (CdSe) n are formed, which exhibit luminescence in the visible spectral region upon UV excitation. Heat treatment of the glasses increases the size of molecular clusters and makes their optical properties closer to the optical properties of CdSe semiconductor quantum dots. An increase in the sample temperature from 20 to 250°C leads to reversible thermal quenching of the luminescence.

  5. Debonding of epoxy from glass in irradiated laminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klabunde, C.E.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.

    1982-10-18

    Glass-fabric-filled epoxies irradiated at 4.7 K and examined at room temperature by 20x stereomicroscopy showed an internal flaw structure which increasingly filled the sample as the ..gamma..-dose was increased. These flaws were determined to be areas where the plastic had debonded from the glass fibers. The extent of this process correlated well with the dose-dependent loss of mechanical strength. Evidence is reported for a similar mechanism in polyimides although visible flaws have not yet been produced. Possible mechanisms for debonding are suggested. New experiments are also suggested to clarify further the failure mechanism.

  6. The research on conformal acid etching process of glass ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kepeng; Guo, Peiji

    2014-08-01

    A series of experiments have been done to explore the effect of different conditions on the hydrofluoric acid etching. The hydrofluoric acid was used to etch the glass ceramic called "ZERODUR", which is invented by SCHOTT in Germany. The glass ceramic was processed into cylindrical samples. The hydrofluoric acid etching was done in a plastic beaker. The concentration of hydrofluoric acid and the etching time were changed to measure the changes of geometric tolerance and I observed the surface using a microscope in order to find an appropriate condition of hydrofluoric acid etching.

  7. Structural features of plastic deformation in bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scudino, S., E-mail: s.scudino@ifw-dresden.de; Shakur Shahabi, H.; Stoica, M.; Kühn, U. [IFW Dresden, Institut für Komplexe Materialien, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Kaban, I.; Escher, B.; Eckert, J. [IFW Dresden, Institut für Komplexe Materialien, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut für Werkstoffwissenschaft, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Vaughan, G. B. M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facilities ESRF, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2015-01-19

    Spatially resolved strain maps of a plastically deformed bulk metallic glass (BMG) have been created by using high-energy X-ray diffraction. The results reveal that plastic deformation creates a spatially heterogeneous atomic arrangement, consisting of strong compressive and tensile strain fields. In addition, significant shear strain is introduced in the samples. The analysis of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the strain tensor indicates that considerable structural anisotropy occurs in both the magnitude and direction of the strain. These features are in contrast to the behavior observed in elastically deformed BMGs and represent a distinctive structural sign of plastic deformation in metallic glasses.

  8. Concentration Quenching in Erbium Doped Bismuth Silicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shi-Xun; XU Tie-Feng; NIE Qiu-Hua; SHEN Xiang; WANG Xun-Si

    2006-01-01

    @@ Er2 O3-doped bismuth silicate glasses are prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method, and the Er3+ : 4 I13/2 → 4I15/2 fluorescence properties are studied for different Er3+ concentrations. Infrared spectra are measured to estimate the exact content of OH- groups in the samples. Based on the electric dipole-dipole interaction theory,the interaction parameter CEr,Er for the migration rate of Er3+ :4 I13/2 → 4 I13/2 in proposed glasses is calculated.

  9. Debonding of epoxy from glass in irradiated laminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klabunde, C.E.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.

    1982-10-18

    Glass-fabric-filled epoxies irradiated at 4.7 K and examined at room temperature by 20x stereomicroscopy showed an internal flaw structure which increasingly filled the sample as the ..gamma..-dose was increased. These flaws were determined to be areas where the plastic had debonded from the glass fibers. The extent of this process correlated well with the dose-dependent loss of mechanical strength. Evidence is reported for a similar mechanism in polyimides although visible flaws have not yet been produced. Possible mechanisms for debonding are suggested. New experiments are also suggested to clarify further the failure mechanism.

  10. Cumulative overlap distribution function in realistic spin glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billoire, A.; Maiorano, A.; Marinari, E.; Martin-Mayor, V.; Yllanes, D.

    2014-09-01

    We use a sample-dependent analysis, based on medians and quantiles, to analyze the behavior of the overlap probability distribution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and 3D Edwards-Anderson models of Ising spin glasses. We find that this approach is an effective tool to distinguish between replica symmetry breaking-like and droplet-like behavior of the spin-glass phase. Our results are in agreement with a replica symmetry breaking-like behavior for the 3D Edwards-Anderson model.

  11. Short-term Mechanical Properties of Glass Ionomer Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Sanbao; XU Dongxuan

    2009-01-01

    The setting reaction of glass ionomer cement was studied by analyzing and comparing the short-tem mechanical properties of set cement stored in silicone oil,air and distilled water respectively at different temperatures.For the set cement stored at 37℃,the strength of the sample in the air reached the maximum value after 24 h,then decreased to about 210 MPa and kept steady.The strength of the sample in water increased continuously and slowly,however,the increasing rate of sample stored in silicone oil was higher than that in the water.At 20℃,the increasing rate of compressive strength for sample in air was higher than those in silicone oil and water.The diffusion speed and maintenance of water has significant effects on the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements.

  12. LUMINESCENT PROPERTIES OF SILICATE GLASSES WITH CERIUM IONS AND ANTIMONY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Klykova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the results of an experimental study of luminescence excitation spectra and luminescence of silicate glasses containing cerium ions and antimony. The aim of this work was to study the features of the luminescence and the effect of UV irradiation and heat treatment on luminescence and the state of cerium ions and antimony in glass. We investigated glass system Na2O-ZnO-Al2O3-SiO2-NaF-NaBr with additives CeO2 and Sb2O3. Synthesis was carried out in platinum crucibles in the air at 14500C. The samples were polished glass plates with a thickness of 0.5-1 mm. UV irradiation was carried out with a mercury lamp having a wide range of radiation in the spectral range 240-390 nm. It was conducted in a Nabertherm muffle furnaces. Luminescence spectra and excitation spectra were measured using a spectrofluorimeter MPF-44A (PerkinElmer at the room temperature. Measured luminescence spectra were corrected in view of the spectral sensitivity of the photodetector for spectrofluorimeter. Adjustment of the excitation spectra for the spectral dependence of the intensity of the excitation source was not carried out. During the experiments it was found that in silicate glasses Sb3+ ions can exist in two energy states, which corresponds to a different environment with oxygen ions. Heat treatment of these glasses in an oxidizing atmosphere leads to an increase in ion concentration of Sb3+ ions with a greater amount of oxygen in the environment. In glasses containing antimony and cerium ions, ultraviolet irradiation causes a change in the valence of cerium ions and antimony, which is accompanied by luminescence quenching. Subsequent heat treatment of glass leads to the inverse processes and restore luminescence excitation spectra. The study of fluorescent properties of silicate glasses with cerium and antimony ions led to the conclusion of the practical significance of this work. Promising multifunctional materials can be created on the basis of

  13. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  14. Glass phase in municipal and industrial waste incineration bottom ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafał Kowalski, Piotr; Michalik, Marek

    2015-04-01

    Waste incineration bottom ash is a material with rising significance in waste streams in numerous countries. Even if some part of them is now used as raw materials the great amount is still landfilled. High temperature of thermal processes (>1000°C) together with fast cooling results in high content of glass in bottom ash. Its chemical composition is influenced by various factors like composition of raw wastes and used incineration technique. Most of bottom ash grains are composed of glass with large amount of mineral phases and also metallic constituents embedded into it. Glass susceptibility for alteration processes together with the characteristics of glass-based grains can bring environmental risk in time of improper or long term storage on landfill site. In this study bottom ashes from thermal treatment of municipal and industrial (including hazardous and medical) wastes were studied to determine glass content, its chemical composition with emphasis on metal content (especially potentially hazardous) and its relations to metallic components of grains. Samples were collected from two thermal treatment plants in Poland. Qualitative and quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used for determination of mineral composition of studied samples. Rietveld method and addition of internal standard for determination of amorphous phase content were used. Scanning electron microscopy fitted with energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) were used for detailed analysis of glass and glass associated phases. Waste incineration bottom ash is a multi-components material rich in amorphous phase. It dominant part is represented by Si-rich glass. It is a main component of bottom ash grains but it contains minerals present in large quantities and also various forms of metallic elements. Glass within grains is often porous and cracked. In bottom ashes from thermal treatment of municipal wastes ~ 45-55 wt % of amorphous phase were present, mostly in form of glass with high

  15. Elemental analysis of forensic glasses by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jose R.; Duckworth, Douglas C.; Bayne, Charles K.; Morton, Sherman A.; Smith, David H.; Koons, Robert D.; Furton, Kenneth G.

    1999-02-01

    Flat glass is a common type of evidence collected from the scenes of crimes such as burglaries, vandalism, and hit-and- run accidents. The usefulness of such evidence lies in the ability to associate the glass from the scene (or a suspect) to the original source. Physical and chemical analysis of the glass can be used for discrimination between the possible sources of glass. If the sample is large enough, physical attributes such as fracture matches, density, color, and thickness can be employed for comparison between a recovered fragment(s) to the suspect source. More commonly, refractive index (RI) comparisons are employed. Due to the improved control over glass manufacturing processes, RI values often cannot differentiate glasses where approximately 6 - 9% of casework samples are not expected to be distinguished by RI alone even if they originated from different sources. Employing methods such as NAA, XRF, ICP-AES, and ICP-MS for the comparison of trace elemental compositions has been shown to be more discriminating than RI comparisons. The multielement capability and the sensitivity of ICP-AES and ICP-MS provide for excellent discrimination power. In this work, the sources of variability in ICP-MS of glass analysis are investigated to determine possible sources of variation. The sources of variation examined include errors due to sample preparation, instrument accuracy and precision, and interlaboratory reproducibility. Other sources of variation include inhomogeneity across a sheet of glass from the same source. Analysis of variance has been applied to our ICP-MS analysis of NIST standards and to the interlaboratory comparisons of float glass samples collected across a sheet in a production facility. The results of these experiments allows for a more accurate interpretation of forensic glass data and a better understanding of the discriminating power (absolute and practical) of ICP-MS.

  16. Refractories Quality Improvement for Glass Industry Upgrading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Dafan

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 Glass Industry and Refractories Industry Closely Connect 1.1 Glass Development Drives Refractories Progress Refractories are indispensable to glass industry; the rapid development of glass industry drives the growth of refractories industry. China's glass industry developed slowly before the mid 1980s. The kilns and furnaces were backward and small-scale with furnace life of only 2-3 years; glass was produced with extremely low efficiency and poor quality. During that period, refractories for glass melting furnaces had very limited varieties and inferior quality. The fused cast refractories for advanced glass melting furnaces were imported, for the materials made in China could not meet the requirements, which seriously restrained the technical progress of China's glass industry.

  17. Experimental design and process analysis for acidic leaching of metal-rich glass wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncuk, A; Ciftci, H; Akcil, A; Ognyanova, A; Vegliò, F

    2010-05-01

    The removal of iron, titanium and aluminium from colourless and green waste glasses has been studied under various experimental conditions in order to optimize the process parameters and to decrease the metal content in the waste glass by acidic leaching. Statistical design of experiments and ANOVA (analysis of variance) were performed in order to determine the main effects and interactions between the investigated factors (sample ratio, acid concentration, temperature and leaching time). A full factorial experiment was performed by sulphuric acid leaching of glass for metal removal. After treating, the iron content was 530 ppm, corresponding to 1880 ppm initial concentration of Fe(2)O(3) in the original colourless sample. This result is achieved using 1M H(2)SO( 4) and 30% sample ratio at 90(o)C leaching temperature for 2 hours. The iron content in the green waste glass sample was reduced from 3350 ppm initial concentration to 2470 ppm after treating.

  18. Photon echo in the ensemble of semiconductor quantum dots spread on a glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimullin, K. R.; Knyazev, M. V.; Arzhanov, A. I.; Nurtdinova, L. A.; Naumov, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    Simple procedure to prepare samples containing semiconductor quantum dots was developed. Test photon echo measurements in the ensemble of quantum dots spread on a glass substrate were performed to study optical dephasing processes.

  19. Osmium isotopes and highly siderophile elements in lunar glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, M.; Walker, R.; Shearer, C.; Papike, J.

    2003-04-01

    The absolute and relative abundances of the highly siderophile elements (HSE) present in planetary mantles are primarily controlled by silicate-metal partitioning during core-mantle differentiation and by later planetary accretion. Constraints on HSE distributions in the lunar mantle will provide insights to the formation and late accretionary history of not only the Moon, but also Earth. Because no samples of the lunar mantle have been collected, the only materials presently available for constraining mantle abundances are lunar volcanic rocks. The Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glasses are spherules derived from fire-fountain eruptions of mare basalts. These glasses are more primitive than the mare basalts, and probably were derived by the melting of cumulate assemblages from the lunar magma ocean in the deep interior (> 400 km). Despite our limited understanding of mantle-melt partitioning of the HSE, even for terrestrial systems, these glasses provide the best hope for constraining the HSE composition of the lunar interior. We report Os isotopic composition data and Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd isotope dilution concentration data for green glass (15426,164) and orange glass (74001,1217). Absolute and relative abundances of HSE are variable. The green glass has elemental ratios of the HSE and an Os isotopic composition within the range defined by chondritic meteorites, suggesting that the HSE were dominated by a meteoritic contaminant. This sample probably provides little information about the lunar interior, but may help constrain the types of meteorites impacting the lunar surface. Two size fractions (180-325 mesh and 75-180 mesh) of the orange glass were analyzed. HSE patterns for both size fractions are fractionated, having higher chondrite-normalized abundances of Pt and Pd, compared with Os and Ir. The supra-chondritic 187Os/188Os ratio (0.1339) of the finer fraction indicates modestly fractionated Re/Os relative to chondritic. The coarser size fraction

  20. Antibacterial effects of glass ionomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSchepper, E J; White, R R; von der Lehr, W

    1989-04-01

    Glass ionomer cements have been shown to possess antimicrobial activity. Proposed mechanisms of action include acidity and fluoride. It was the purpose of this study to determine the antimicrobial effect of 11 glass ionomer cements, their individual powder and liquid components and one resin-bonded liner containing high fluoride ionomer glass against Streptococcus mutans #6715. The role of fluoride and pH in the antibacterial activity was also studied. Using agar diffusion assay methodology, the following results were obtained. All of the glass ionomer cements were inhibitory against S. mutans. The antibacterial cements and slurries that were tested for fluoride, released the ion in excess of reported minimum inhibitory values. The antimicrobial activity of the liquid components, that were tested for the effects of pH changes, was totally lost when the pH was adjusted to 5. The resin bonded liner was inactive against S. mutans and did not release inhibitory concentrations of fluoride. These results indicate that freshly-mixed glass ionomer cements are antimicrobial against S. mutans and that the mechanism of action is probably a function of both fluoride and pH although additional factors may be involved.

  1. Standard test methods for determining chemical durability of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed waste glasses and multiphase glass ceramics: The product consistency test (PCT)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 These product consistency test methods A and B evaluate the chemical durability of homogeneous glasses, phase separated glasses, devitrified glasses, glass ceramics, and/or multiphase glass ceramic waste forms hereafter collectively referred to as “glass waste forms” by measuring the concentrations of the chemical species released to a test solution. 1.1.1 Test Method A is a seven-day chemical durability test performed at 90 ± 2°C in a leachant of ASTM-Type I water. The test method is static and conducted in stainless steel vessels. Test Method A can specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed glass waste forms have been consistently controlled during production. This test method is applicable to radioactive and simulated glass waste forms as defined above. 1.1.2 Test Method B is a durability test that allows testing at various test durations, test temperatures, mesh size, mass of sample, leachant volume, a...

  2. HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2012-04-02

    In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

  3. Structural and thermal studies of modified silica-strontium-barium glass from CRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelowska, I.; Kosmal, M.; Reben, M.; Pichniarczyk, P.; Sitarz, M.; Olejniczak, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Glasses were prepared by conventional melting method from 100 g batches. The influence of alumina and calcium oxide on the crystallization process of silica-strontium-barium glass from Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) were studied by means of 27Al MAS NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. This made possible to determine the influence of additives, e.g. blast furnace slag and cement dust on the structural changes of glasses (changes in the spectra shapes). The introduction of waste modifiers into the glass structure leads to the breaking of Al-O-Si and Si-O-Si bonds what causes the depolymerization of the glass network. From the FTIR spectra the narrowing of the bands at 1022 and 1027 cm-1 was observed, which may indicate on the ordering of glass network. Appearance of alumina in coordination 4 was confirmed by NMR investigations. The effects of compositional variation, thermal treatment on the nature, type and stability field of crystallizing phases and microstructure formed in CaO and/or Al2O3 silica-strontium-barium glasses were described using DTA/DSC method. Thermal characteristics of glasses like the transition temperature Tg, the temperature for the crystallization Tc, thermal stability parameter were determined. The crystalline phase was determined by the X-ray diffractometry. The microstructure of the samples was studied by SEM technique. Analysis of the local atomic interactions in the structure of glasses has been used to explain the course of the crystallization.

  4. Role and properties of the gel formed during nuclear glass alteration: importance of gel formation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, S.; Ribet, I.; Couillard, M.

    2001-09-01

    A French SON 68 nuclear glass sample was experimentally altered to assess the mechanisms limiting the glass alteration kinetics, especially during the transition phase between the initial rate r0 and the final rate under silicon saturation conditions. A glass specimen was altered at the initial rate for one week to form a silicon-depleted non-protective gel; the specimen was then leached under static conditions at a glass-surface-to-solution-volume ( S/ V) ratio of 500 m-1 and the alteration kinetics were compared with those of a pristine glass specimen altered under the same conditions. Unexpectedly, after static leaching the previously leached glass was 2.7 times as altered as the pristine specimen, and the steady-state silicon concentration was twice as high for the previously leached specimen. STEM characterization of the alteration films showed that the initial non-protective gel constituted a silicon pump with respect to the glass, and that the glass alteration kinetics were limited only when a fraction of the gel became saturated with silicon, and exhibited protective properties. This work also shows that silicon recondensation was uniform at micrometer scale: the silicon hydrolyzed at the reaction interface then diffused before recondensing over a length comparable to the gel thickness. In addition to these findings, this investigation suggests a reinterpretation of the effect of the S/ V ratio on the glass alteration kinetics and on the steady-state dissolved silicon concentration.

  5. Synthesis, thermal and photoluminescent properties of ZnSe- based oxyfluoride glasses doped with samarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, I.; Okada, G.; Pashova, T.; Tonchev, D.; Kasap, S.

    2014-12-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped glasses and glass ceramic materials have recently received considerable attention because of their potential or realized applications as X-ray intensifying screens, phosphors, detectors, waveguides, lasers etc. [1]. In this work, we present a new RE doped ZnO-ZnSe-SrF2-P2O5-B2O3-Sm2O3-SmF3 (ZSPB) glass system synthesized by melt quenching technique. The resulting glasses were visually fully transparent and stable with glass the transition temperatures around 530°C. The thermal properties of this glass system were characterized by Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry (MDSC) measurements before and after annealing at 650°C. We have characterized these glasses by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) measurements over the UV-VIS range using light emitting diodes (LED) and laser diodes (LD) excitation sources. We have also irradiated thermally treated and non-treated glass samples by X-rays and have studied the resulting PL. We discuss the results in terms of previously reported models for Sm-doped Zn-borophosphate oxide, oxyfluoride and oxyselenide glasses.

  6. Preparation and luminescence properties of Eu3+ doped oxyfluoride borosilicate glass ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yanhong; ZHAO Li; ZHANG Yongming; MA Jing

    2012-01-01

    Oxyfluoride borosilicate glass with the molar composition of60SiO2-15B2O3-15Na2O-8CaF2-2NaF-0.25Eu2O3 was synthesized by a traditional glass melting method.Glass ceramics containing CaF2 nanocrystals were preparcd by heat treating the glass samples at a temperature in the range of 620-680℃.The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the average crystallite size and the lattice constant of CaF2 nanocrystals increased with the heat treatment temperature incrcasing.The luminescence spectra showed that the emission intensity of Eu3+ doped glass ceramics was stronger than that of the glass matrix,and increased with the heat treatment temperature increasing.The left edge of excitation band shifted to shorter wavelength in the glass ceramics.The local environments of Eu3+ ions in the glass and glass ceramics were different.

  7. Crystallization Kinetics of Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of a calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) glass with composition relevant for aerospace applications, like air-breathing engines, were evaluated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) in powder and bulk forms. Activation energy and frequency factor values for crystallization of the glass were evaluated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to investigate the onset of crystallization and the phases that developed after heat treating bulk glass at temperatures ranging from 690 to 960 deg for various times. Samples annealed at temperatures below 900 deg remained amorphous, while specimens heat treated at and above 900 deg exhibited crystallinity originating at the surface. The crystalline phases were identified as wollastonite (CaSiO3) and aluminum diopside (Ca(Mg,Al) (Si,Al)2O6). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were employed to examine the microstructure and chemical compositions of crystalline phases formed after heat treatment.

  8. DSC and Raman studies of silver borotellurite glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Khanna, Atul, E-mail: atul.phy@gndu.ac.in [Sensors and Glass Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar-143005, Punjab (India); Gonzàlez, Fernando [Department of Chemistry and Process & Recourse Engineering, University of Cantabria, Santander-39005 (Spain)

    2016-05-23

    Silver borotellurite glasses of composition: xAg{sub 2}O-yB{sub 2}O{sub 3}-(100-x-y)TeO{sub 2} (x=20-mol%, y = 0, 10, 20 and 30-mol%) were prepared and characterized by density, X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD confirmed the amorphous structure of all samples. Density of glasses decreases while the glass transition temperature increases with increase in B{sub 2}O{sub 3} content from 10 to 30-mol%. Raman study shows that coordination number of Te with oxygen decreases steadily from 3.42 to 3.18 on adding B{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to the transformation of TeO{sub 4} into TeO{sub 3} units.

  9. Calorimetric Measurements at Low Temperatures in Toluene Glass and Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ney, C.; Labarga, J.; Moratalla, M.; Castilla, J. M.; Ramos, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    The specific heat of toluene in glass and crystal states has been measured both at low temperatures down to 1.8 K (using the thermal relaxation method) and in a wide temperature range up to the liquid state (using a quasiadiabatic continuous method). Our measurements therefore extend earlier published data to much lower temperatures, thereby allowing to explore the low-temperature "glassy anomalies" in the case of toluene. Surprisingly, no indication of the existence of tunneling states is found, at least within the temperature range studied. At moderate temperatures, our data either for the glass or for the crystal show good agreement with those found in the literature. Also, we have been able to prepare bulk samples of toluene glass by only doping with 2% mol ethanol instead of with higher impurity doses used by other authors.

  10. Ion beam figuring of thin glass plates: achievements and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitani, M.; Ghigo, M.; Hołyszko, J.; Vecchi, G.; Basso, S.

    2016-07-01

    Different hot slumping techniques have been developed in the last decade to shape thin glass plates in Wolter-I configuration for high angular resolution x-ray telescopes. The required high quality surface characteristic, both in terms of figure error and of micro-roughness, is challenging and the best results achieved so far are compatible with an HEW of few arcseconds. In order to push forward the technology enabling x-ray optics with final HEW below 1 arcsec, we investigate the ion beam figuring as a deterministic technology which can correct the low frequency components of the residual error directly on thin glasses. In this paper we present the tests performed so far, giving a first assessment on the deterministic process definition. In particular, we report on the results achieved on flat samples of D263 and Eagle glass, focusing on the removal function characterization, the micro-roughness evolution and the plate shape variation.

  11. On the mechanical properties of selenite glass nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Arun Kr.; Kundu, Ranadip; Roy, Debasish; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the room temperature micro-hardness of selenite glass-nanocomposites has been measured using a Vickers and Knoop micro hardness tester where the applied load varies from 0.01N to 0.98 N. A significant indentation size effect was observed for each sample at relatively low indentation test loads. The classical Meyer's law and the proportional specimen resistance model were used to analyze the micro-hardness behavior. It was found that the selenite glass-nanocomposite becomes harder with increasing CuI composition and the work hardening coefficient and mechanical properties like Young modulus, E, were also calculated. Our results open the way for the preparation, application and investigation of significant mechanical properties of new type of glass-nanocomposites.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of 20 nm planar nanofluidic channels by glass-glass and glass-silicon bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Pan; Han, Jongyoon

    2005-08-01

    We have characterized glass-glass and glass-Si bonding processes for the fabrication of wide, shallow nanofluidic channels with depths down to the nanometer scale. Nanochannels on glass or Si substrate are formed by reactive ion etching or a wet etching process, and are sealed with another flat substrate either by glass-glass fusion bonding (550 degrees C) or an anodic bonding process. We demonstrate that glass-glass nanofluidic channels as shallow as 25 nm with low aspect ratio of 0.0005 (depth to width) can be achieved with the developed glass-glass bonding technique. We also find that silicon-glass nanofluidic channels, as shallow as 20 nm with aspect ratio of 0.004, can be reliably obtained with the anodic bonding technique. The thickness uniformity of sealed nanofluidic channels is confirmed by cross-sectional SEM analysis after bonding. It is shown that there is no significant change in the depth of the nanofluidic channels due to anodic bonding and glass-glass fusion bonding processes.

  13. Evaluation of Glass Density to Support the Estimation of Fissile Mass Loadings from Iron Concentrations in SB6 Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.; Peeler, D.

    2010-12-15

    The Department of Energy - Savannah River (DOE-SR) previously provided direction to Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3}. In support of the guidance, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a technical basis and a supporting Microsoft{reg_sign} Excel{reg_sign} spreadsheet for the evaluation of fissile loading in Sludge Batch 5 glass based on the Fe concentration in glass as determined by the measurements from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability analysis. SRR has since requested that SRNL provide the necessary information to allow SRR to update the Excel spreadsheet so that it may be used to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3} during the processing of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). One of the primary inputs into the fissile loading spreadsheet includes a bounding density for SB6-based glasses. Based on the measured density data of select SB6 variability study glasses, SRNL recommends that SRR utilize the 99/99 Upper Tolerance Limit (UTL) density value at 38% WL (2.823 g/cm{sup 3}) as a bounding density for SB6 glasses to assess the fissile concentration in this glass system. That is, the 2.823 g/cm{sup 3} is recommended as a key (and fixed) input into the fissile concentration spreadsheet for SB6 processing. It should be noted that no changes are needed to the underlying structure of the Excel based spreadsheet to support fissile assessments for SB6. However, SRR should update the other key inputs to the spreadsheet that are based on fissile and Fe concentrations reported from the SB6 Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) sample. The purpose of this technical report is to present the density measurements that were determined for the SB6 variability study glasses and to conduct a statistical evaluation of these measurements to provide a bounding density value that may be used as input to the Excel{reg_sign} spreadsheet to be employed by SRR to maintain the

  14. The use of commercial glass as a potential gamma accidental dosimeter through the absorption spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharita, M.H., E-mail: prscientific1@aec.org.sy [Atomic Energy Commission, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic); Yousef, S.; Bakr, S. [Atomic Energy Commission, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2012-05-01

    Various types of commercial glass (ordinary windows, cathode ray tubes, glass kitchenware) have been studied as potential accidental radiation dosimeters. The proposed method utilizes the changes in the glasses' absorption spectra as a result of irradiation. A {sup 60}Co gamma irradiation cell has been used to irradiate samples with doses ranging from 5 to 200 Gy. The transmittance was measured using a photospectrometer (UV-visible spectrometry). The results demonstrate that the transmittance spectra of most of the glass samples change in linear proportion to the exposure dose. Moreover, the study considers the fading effect on the absorption spectra of the irradiated samples for fading times up to 100 days at room temperature. The results of this work demonstrate that several widely used types of glass can be used as high-dose accidental dosimeters for doses ranging between 8 and 200 Gy. A reasonable calibration line can be established for any irradiated glass sample by heating, re-irradiating with standard doses and measuring the related absorption coefficient. Further investigations are needed to decrease the minimum detectable dose of the proposed method and to study the effect of glass composition on radiation response.

  15. Investigation of Kinetics of crystallization Processes of S15-Se85, S15-Se81-Cu4 Chalcogenide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Kavitha; Babu Devarasetty, Suresh

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, S15-Se85, S15-Se81-Cu4 chalcogenide glasses are prepared by using conventional melt quenching technique. The as-prepared samples are studied by experimental techniques like X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). XRD studies have confirmed that the as-prepared samples are amorphous in nature. It is clear from DSC studies that the as-prepared samples are glassy in nature. Kinetic analysis of the crystallization process of as-prepared glasses is carried using DSC curves. Activation energy for glass transition and Activation energy for crystallization are determined using Kissinger method. Activation energy for glass transition of S15-Se85 and S15-Se81-Cu4 glasses is found to be 84.5076 and 275.801 KJ/Mole respectively. Activation energy for crystallization of S15-Se85 glass is found to be 106.2622 KJ/Mole for 1st peak while Activation energy for crystallization of S15-Se81-Cu4 glasses is found to be 97.93 KJ/Mole for 1st peak and 84.20 KJ/Mole for 2nd peak. Kauzmann temperature (Tk) is determined from the heating rate dependent glass transition and crystallization temperatures. Tk value for S15-Se85 glass sample is 236.680K (1st peak) and for S15-Se81-Cu4 is 283.530K (1st peak) and 286.330K (2n peak). Avrami Index (n) is also determined for as-prepared glasses. Avrami Index (n) value for S15-Se85 glass sample is 1.8 (1st peak) and for S15-Se81-Cu4 is 2.9 (1st peak) and 1.4 (2nd peak). The crystalline phases by thermal treatment of as-prepared glasses are identified using XRD patterns.

  16. The role of stress in CdTe quantum dot doped glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Pelegati, V. B.; Carvalho, H. F.; Moreira, S. G. C.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we unequivocally demonstrate the influence of matrix-related stresses on quantum dots by measuring, side by side, a CdTe quantum dot doped glass and a colloidal sample with similar sizes. We measured the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime for both samples as a function of the temperature. We show that the expansion coefficient mismatch between CdTe quantum dots and the glass host causes stresses and drastically changes its behavior compared to its colloidal counterpart, even leading to phase transitions. This finding indicates that most experimental data on glass-doped quantum dots used to validate confinement models should be revised, taking stress into account.

  17. Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fibre-reinforced polypropylene composite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phiri, G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ?C). Figure 1 shows the processing steps followed to produce composite samples. Up to 15% fibre loading could be achieved and the sisal fibres were coated with water glass to improve fire resistance. In order to improve the adhesion between sisal... preparation process: (A) WG coated fibre, (B) High speed granulator, (C) Composite granules, (D) Single screw extruder, (E) Injection moulder and (F) Composite samples (dumbbells) Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fi bre...

  18. Influence of barium substitution on bioactivity, thermal and physico-mechanical properties of bioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arepalli, Sampath Kumar, E-mail: askumar.rs.cer11@iitbhu.ac.in; Tripathi, Himanshu; Vyas, Vikash Kumar; Jain, Shubham; Suman, Shyam Kumar; Pyare, Ram; Singh, S.P., E-mail: spsinghceram@gmail.com

    2015-04-01

    Barium with low concentration in the glasses acts as a muscle stimulant and is found in human teeth. We have made a primary study by substituting barium in the bioactive glass. The chemical composition containing (46.1 − X) SiO{sub 2−}–24.3 Na{sub 2}O–26.9 CaO–2.6 P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, where X = 0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 and 1.6 mol% of BaO was chosen and melted in an electric furnace at 1400 ± 5 °C. The glasses were characterized to determine their use in biomedical applications. The nucleation and crystallization regimes were determined by DTA and the controlled crystallization was carried out by suitable heat treatment. The crystalline phase formed was identified by using XRD technique. Bioactivity of these glasses was assessed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for various time periods. The formation of hydroxy carbonate apatite (HCA) layer was identified by FTIR spectrometry, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and XRD which showed the presence of HCA as the main phase in all tested bioactive glass samples. Flexural strength and densities of bioactive glasses have been measured and found to increase with increasing the barium content. The human blood compatibility of the samples was evaluated and found to be pertinent. - Highlights: • In vitro bioactivity of soda-lime–baria-phospho-silicate glass was investigated. • HCA formed on surface of glasses was confirmed by XRD, SEM and FTIR spectrometry. • Mechanical properties of glasses were found to increase with barium addition. • Hemolysis showed that 1.2 mol% BaO bioactive glass exhibited better biocompatibility. • Barium substituted bioactive glasses can be used as bone implants.

  19. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies on alkali borate glasses: evidence of mixed alkali effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmaja, G; Kistaiah, P

    2009-03-19

    A lithium-potassium-borate glass system containing manganese and iron cations has been thoroughly investigated in order to obtain information about the mixed alkali effect and the structural role of both the manganese and iron in such glass hosts. Mixed alkali borate glasses of the (30 - x)Li(2)O - xK(2)O - 10CdO/ZnO - 59B(2)O(3) (x = 0, 10, 15, 20, and 30) doped with 1MnO(2)/1Fe(2)O(3) system were prepared by a melt quench technique. The amorphous phase of the prepared glass samples was confirmed from their X-ray diffraction. The spectroscopic properties of glass samples were studied using infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The density of all the prepared glasses was measured using Archimedes principle. Molar volumes were estimated from the density data. IR spectra of these glasses revealed a dramatic variation of three- and four-coordinated boron structures as a function of mixed alkali concentration. The vibrations due to Li-O, K-O, and MnO(4)/FeO(4) arrangements are consistent in all the compositions and show a nonlinear variation in the intensity with alkali content. Raman spectra of different alkali combinations with CdO and ZnO present drastic changes in the intensity of various Raman bands. The observation of disappearance and reappearance of IR and Raman bands as a function of various alkali concentrations is an important result pertaining to the mixed alkali effect in borate glasses. Acting as complementary spectroscopic techniques, both types of measurements, IR and Raman, revealed that the network structure of the studied glasses is mainly based on BO(3) and BO(4) units placed in different structural groups, the BO(3) units being dominant. The measured IR and Raman spectra of different glasses are used to clarify the optical properties of the present glasses correlating them with their structure and composition.

  20. INFLUENCE OF GLASS CULLET IN CEMENT PASTES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Karamberi; E.Chaniotakis; D.Papageorgiou; A.Moutsatsou

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigates glass and cement compatibility with a view to use glass as a cement replacement. Amber, flint and green glasses were chosen due to their prevalence in the Greek market as packaging materials. The factors under investigation were the pozzolanicity of the glass cullet, the hydration rate and the mechanical strength development of the cement pastes, as well as the expansion of the specimens due to alkali-silica reaction.Moreover, the potential enhancement of glass pozzolanic activity was examined. The results of the study were encouraging to show the potentiality of utilising glass cullet in cementitious products.

  1. Optical properties of Ce3+ doped fluorophosphates scintillation glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yongxin; Liu, Liwan; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Danping; Fang, Yongzheng; Zhao, Guoying

    2016-01-01

    Fluorophosphates (P2O5-BaO-BaF2-Al2O3-Gd2O3-Ce2O3) glasses with different Gd2O3 and BaF2 concentrations have been prepared by a melt quenching method. The effect of Gd2O3 and BaF2 on the glass performance including the density, absorption as well as luminescence properties under both ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray excitation was studied systematically. Energy transfer from Gd3+ to Ce3+ plays an important role in the scintillation mechanism of these glasses and the optimum concentration of Gd2O3 is found to be approximately 3 mol%. The highest integrated light emission intensity of these glass samples excited by X-ray is 25% of BGO and the decay time constants are in the range of 25-35 ns, much shorter than the 300 ns decay time of BGO. Meanwhile, replacing lighter compound BaO with the BaF2 can increase the density of the glasses and also improve the light yield.

  2. Soda-lime glass behavior under laser shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loison, D.; Guin, J.-P.; Sangleboeuf, J.-C.; Nivard, M.; Lescoute, E.; Sollier, A.; Seisson, G.; Hebert, D.; Berthe, L.; Boustie, M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding and modeling the behavior of glass is an issue for certain aeronautical, military and civil applications. For example, parts of satellites and shuttles are made of glasses. During their lifetime, they are subjected to potentially damaging high velocity impacts. To determine the behavior of these structures during and after impact we used instrumented laser driven shock loading performed on high power intensity laser facilities. Transverse shadowgraphs of the front wave propagating inside the transparent material are collected at different times. These shadowgraphs provide information regarding the shock wave velocity. PDV or VISAR measurements provide time-resolved free surface velocity to determine material velocity when the shock wave breakout occurs. For some laser shots, shock wave corresponds to elastic wave then Hugoniot elastic limit may be determined. Under high pressure conditions glass permanently densifies and traces of such a plastic deformation are looked for on the path of the shock wave. Those experimental data are necessary to characterize the material behavior under such conditions and to model the mechanical behavior of glass structures. In this presentation we will present experimental results obtained for soda-lime silica glass samples loaded by laser induced shock.

  3. Using quartzofeldspathic waste to obtain foamed glass material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Kazmina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper proposes a method for the processing of mine refuse non-ferrous metal ore in the production of foamed glass. The subject of this research is a low-temperature frit synthesis (<900 °C, allowing for the high-temperature glass melting process to be avoided. The technology for the production of frit without complete melting of the batch and without using glass-making units offers a considerable reduction in energy consumption and air pollution. It was found that material samples obtained with a density of up to 250 kg/m3 are of rigidity (up to 1.7 MPa in comparison with the conventional foamed glass (1 MPa. This increased rigidity was due to the presence of crystalline phase particles in its interpore partition of less than 2 µm in size. Material with a density of 300 kg/cm3 is recommended for thermal insulation for the industrial and construction sectors. At densities above 300 kg/cm3 and a strength of 2.5 MPa, the purpose becomes heat-insulating construction material. The proposed method for obtaining a porous material from waste widens our choice of raw materials for foamed glass, whilst saving resources and energy.

  4. Optical Characterization of Zinc Modified Bismuth Silicate Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Parmar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical characterization of glass samples in the system 40SiO2 · xZnO · (60-xBi2O3 with x=0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 prepared by conventional melt-quench technique has been carried out in the light of Hydrogenic Excitonic Model (HEM. The absorption coefficient spectra show good agreement with theoretical HEM for the present glass system and the values of different parameters like Eg, R, Γ1, Γc, and Co have been estimated from fitting of this model. The values of energy band gap estimated from fitting of HEM with experimental data are in good agreement with those obtained from Tauc’s plot for direct transitions. The band gap energy is found to increase with increase of ZnO content. The decrease in values of Urbach energy with increase in ZnO content indicates a decrease in defect concentration in the glass matrix on addition of ZnO content. Optical constants n and k obey k-k consistency and the dielectric response of the studied glass system is similar to that obtained for Classical Electron Theory of Dielectric Materials. The calculated values of the metallization criterion (M show that the synthesized glasses may be good candidates for new nonlinear optical materials.

  5. Thermal, mechanical and Raman studies on mixed alkali borotungstate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edukondalu, A. [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500007 (India); Sathe, Vasant [Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India); Rahman, Syed [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500007 (India); Siva Kumar, K., E-mail: siva193ou@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500007 (India)

    2014-04-01

    Mixed alkali borotungstate glasses with xLi{sub 2}O–(30−x)Na{sub 2}O–10WO{sub 3}–60B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 30) composition were prepared by melt quench technique. The amorphous phase of the prepared glass samples was conformed from their X-ray diffraction and SEM studies. Differential scanning calorimetry and Raman spectroscopic studies were employed to investigate the structure of all the prepared glasses. The elastic moduli and Debye temperature were calculated in terms of Makishima–Mackenzie model. Acting as complementary techniques, Raman measurement revealed that the network structure of the present glasses is mainly based on BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} units placed in different structural groups. Raman spectra confirms the presence of tungsten ions mainly as WO{sub 6} groups. In the present work, the mixed alkali effect (MAE) has been investigated in the above glass system through modulated DSC studies.

  6. Optical properties of dy doped lead and bismuth borate glasses - effect of glass composition, metal and semiconducting nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Hio Giap

    The optical properties of Dy3+ ions in lead borate and bismuth borate glasses are studied as a function of glass composition with PbO content (29.5 to 69.5mol%) and Bi2O3 content (29.5 to 59.5 mol%). We also studied the effect of metal and semiconducting nanoparticles on the absorption and fluorescence emission of Dy3+ ions in both lead and bismuth borate glasses. The absorption coefficient at each wavelength is obtained from the optical absorption spectrum of a glass sample, and the number density of rare-earth (RE) ions is calculated from the measurement of the glass density. These two parameters are then used to calculate the oscillator strength of each transition using Judd-Ofelt theory. Using the oscillator strength for each transition, we obtained the intensity parameters which represent changes in the symmetry of the ligand field at the Dy 3+ site (due to structural group changes and changes in Dy-O covalency). Radiative transition probabilities, the radiative lifetime of the excited states and the branching ratios are then obtained from these intensity parameters. The fluorescence spectra, obtained using 355 nm and 458 nm laser excitation, are analyzed by determining the area ratio of yellow/blue (Y/B) peaks and the wavelength of the hypersensitive transition (HST). The compositional dependence and effect of nanoparticles on the stimulated emission cross-section (sigmap), are then evaluated using radiative transition probability, the refractive index of the host glass, effective fluorescence linewidth, and the position of the band. In all of the glass systems, it was found that the optical properties are strongly influenced by structural changes arising from compositional variation and size of nanoparticles. Dy 3+ transitions exhibit large sigmap suggesting the possible utilization of these materials in laser applications.

  7. Physical, structural and optical characterization of silicate modified bismuth-borate-tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwal, Neelam; Dhankhar, Sunil; Sharma, Preeti; Kundu, R. S.; Punia, R.; Kishore, N.

    2017-01-01

    The quaternary glass system xSiO2-(80-x) Bi2O3sbnd 15B2O3sbnd 5TeO2 has been prepared by melt-quench technique. The amorphous nature of glass samples has been ascertained by X-ray diffraction patterns. The variations in density, molar volume and crystalline volume with glass compositions have been discussed. A non-linear change has been observed in glass transition temperature and optical band gap energy. Raman and FTIR spectral studies suggest that glass network is mainly built up of BO3, BO4, SiO4, and TeO3 structural units, whereas BiO3 exists as both network modifying [BiO6] octahedral as well as network forming [BiO3] pyramidal structural units. The values of optical band gap energy have been estimated from fitting of both Mott and Davis's model and Hydrogenic excitonic model (HEM) with experimental data of absorption spectra. The HEM model shows good agreement with experimentally observed absorption spectra, which indicates the exciton formation in studied glass system. The non-linear compositional change in optical band gap energy is related with the structural changes occurring in present glass samples. The Urbach energy has also been estimated. The range of metallization criterion suggests that prepared glasses may be considered as new nonlinear optical materials.

  8. Effect of Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE pipe filled with Geopolymer Materials for Piping Application: Compression Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Hashim Mohammad Firdaus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to achieve the highest compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with the geopolymer filler content of weight percentage that were used in glass reinforced epoxy pipe. The samples were prepared by using the filament winding method. The effect of weight percentage of geopolymer materials in epoxy hardener was studied under mechanical testing, which is using the compression test. A series of glass reinforced epoxy pipe and glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with 10 – 40 weight percentage geopolymer filler which is white clay were prepared. The compression strength of the glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled geopolymer materials is determined using Instron Universal Testing under compression mode. It was found that compressive strength for samples with white clay geopolymer filler are much higher compare to glass reinforced epoxy pipe without geopolymer filler. Moreover, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with white clay geopolymer filler was increased from 10 wt% to 30 wt% of geopolymer content. However, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with white clay geopolymer filler suddenly decreased when added to 40 wt%. The results indicated that the blending of geopolymer materials in epoxy system can be obtained in this study.

  9. Pressure Dependence of the Glass Transition Temperature in the Fragile Glass Former Cumene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raty, Jean-Yves; Baris Malcioglu, Osman; Bichara, Christophe

    2013-03-01

    The glass transition temperature, Tg, is one of the most important characteristics of glassy systems. While Tg has been measured for many systems at atmospheric pressure, direct measurement of the glass transition is difficult at high pressures due to small sample sizes and long time scales. Tg(P) measurements to date mostly involve extrapolations of high-pressure viscosity or relaxation data to η = 1013 P or t = 100 s, respectively. In this study we present direct measurement of Tg at pressures up to several GPa through a combination of pressure gradient tracking and observation of increases in the thermal expansion coefficient upon heating from the glass to the viscous liquid state. High pressures are attained through the use of a diamond anvil cell and precise temperatures are maintained via custom heating and cryogenic systems. By directly mapping this phase boundary, we can compare models for Tg(P). In addition, high-pressure analysis requiring knowledge of Tg at pressure will be greatly aided.

  10. Phase transitions and glass transition in a hyperquenched silica–alumina glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.F.; Zhao, D.H.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate phase transitions, glass transition, and dynamic behavior in the hyperquenched 69SiO2–31Al2O3 (mol%) glass (SA glass). Upon reheating, the SA glass exhibits a series of thermal responses. Subsequent to the sub-Tg enthalpy release, the glass undergoes a large jump in isobaric heat...... capacity (ΔCp) during glass transition, implying the fragile nature of the SA glass. The mullite starts to form before the end of glass transition, indicating that the SA glass is extremely unstable against crystallization. After the mullite formation, the remaining glass phase exhibits an increased Tg...... and a suppressed ΔCp. The formation of cristobalite at 1553 K indicates the dominance of silica in the remaining glass matrix. The cristobalite gradually re-melts as the isothermal heat-treatment temperature is raised from 1823 to 1853 K, which is well below the melting point of cristobalite, while the amount...

  11. SON68 glass dissolution driven by magnesium silicate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Benjamin; Godon, Nicole; Ayral, André; Gin, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    concentrations in solution for the experiment with 100 mg L-1 of Mg at t = 0, the most representative cases are 10% gel for the period between 3 h and 6 days, 30% for 3 h-10 days, and 50% for 3 h-16 days. Sampling losses are taken into account. All the results indicate that the magnesium phase which precipitated during the experiments had a Mg/Si molar ratio of about 0.2-0.4. Although the ratio was not exactly the same in each case, it is likely that the phase was of the same structural type. The Mg/Si ratio of 0.2-0.4 is low compared with the values above 0.6 expected for a phyllosilicate structure [22,25,26]. However, the structure of phyllosilicates can accommodate many elements, and it is possible that Mg was replaced in the structure by other elements of the system [22,25,26] such as Ni, Co, Zn, Al and Fe (these elements are present in the glass composition and their concentrations in solution are under the limits of quantification of ICP-AES). The precipitation kinetics: Mg cannot precipitate at a higher rate; in this case, adding Mg in solution would not accelerate the precipitation rate. The availability of Mg, which may be limited by the glass alteration rate and/or the gel dissolution rate; in this case, adding Mg in solution would accelerate the precipitation rate. The same two assumptions, but for another element than Mg incorporated in the structure of the secondary phase. Through other series of experiments [30], Advocat showed that the larger the quantity of Mg added to the composition of R7T7 and M7 glass (compensating the difference in composition by adjusting all the other elements) the greater the quantity of altered glass — probably because of a larger quantity of precipitated secondary phases. This raises another question: why did Mg contribute to a larger quantity of secondary phases in this case, although it was retained in the gel in Curti's experiments?A study published in 2012 by Thien et al. [29] provides answers, because it demonstrates two

  12. Temprature Sponses of Intelligence Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Baojun; Liu Ming; Yang Tao; Fu Li; Zhou Yao; Li Tiansi

    2004-01-01

    The windowpane is an important collecting sunlight part of building, and also a part that loses most heat.How to increase absorbing heat and decrease losing heat of the windowpane is the key problem of the construction saving energy technology. The intelligence glass can auto control transmissivity with varying temperature outside the room.When temperature outside the room is above 25 ℃, the transmissivity of the windowpane is decreased with increasing of temperature outside the room. The composition of the intelligence glass and its temperature varying cove with outside the room on the basis of testing result for the windowpane were introduced.

  13. Plate shell structures of glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne

    to their curved shape. A plate shell structure maintains a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, while facilitating the use of plane structural elements. The study focuses on using laminated glass panes for the load bearing facets. Various methods of generating a plate shell geometry are suggested. Together with Ghent......, such as facet size, imperfections, and connection characteristics. The critical load is compared to that of a similar, but smoothly curved, shell structure. Based on the investigations throughout the study, a set of guidelines for the structural design of plate shells of glass is proposed....

  14. Characteristics of radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Masashi; Shiraishi, Akemi; Murakami, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, a film badge is recently replaced by a new type radiophotoluminescent (RPL) glass dosimeter for external personal monitoring. Some fundamental characteristics of this dosimeter, such as dose dependence linearity, energy dependence, angular dependence, dose evaluation accuracy at mixed irradiation conditions, fading, etc., were examined at the Facility of Radiation Standard (FRS), JAERI. The results have proved that the RPL glass dosimeter has sufficient characteristics for practical use as a personal dosimeter for all of the items examined. (author)

  15. Structures and optical properties of tellurite glasses and glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert Theodore, Jr.

    The structures and optical properties of (K2O)15(Nb 2O5)15(TeO2)70 glass and glass ceramic have been studied in order to understand the second harmonic generation observed from the glass ceramic. We have used 93Nb NMR, Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, small angle x-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and powder x-ray and neutron scattering. We find that there is a microstructure consistent with binodal phase separation leading to spherical inclusions ˜20 nm in size. Upon heat treatment, these domains become nanocrystals of K2Te 4O9. A theory of optical heterogeneity is used to describe the observed second harmonic generation which is ˜95 times more intense that quartz. The chi(2) value for this material is 3.0 x 10-9 esu. A second project has used 125Te and 17O NMR to study alkali tellurite glasses in the system (M2O) x(TeO2)10-x, where M = Li, Na or K and x = 1, 2 or 3. The 125Te results show that complex models of network modification are needed to explain the resulting spectra that include a distribution of polyhedral tellurite units at all compositions. The 17O results show that there is a clear distinction between bridging and non-bridging oxygen sites in tellurite crystals and that sophisticated NMR experiments should be able to distinguish them in the glasses. Further, we have used Extended Huckel theory tight-binding calculations to predict the 17O NMR shifts of SiO2, GeO 2 and TeO2. We find that these calculations allow accurate predictions of the chemical shifts based solely on the trend in valence orbital size, and that expensive calculations of electron currents need not be used for this application.

  16. Recycling of post-consumer glass: energy savings, CO2 emission reduction, effects on glass quality and glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kers, G.; Santen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    This presentation shows the advantages of re-melting post-consumer glass, but also the potential risks of using contaminated cullet in the raw material batch of glass furnaces (e.g. container glass furnaces). As an example of potential advantages: increasing the cullet % in the batch of an efficient

  17. Recycling of post-consumer glass: energy savings, CO2 emission reduction, effects on glass quality and glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kers, G.; Santen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    This presentation shows the advantages of re-melting post-consumer glass, but also the potential risks of using contaminated cullet in the raw material batch of glass furnaces (e.g. container glass furnaces). As an example of potential advantages: increasing the cullet % in the batch of an efficient

  18. Laser micromachining of transparent glass using ultrafast Bessel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, Véronique; McCarthy, Nathalie; Piché, Michel

    2009-06-01

    We fabricated optical waveguides in fused silica by focusing femtosecond laser pulses with an axicon. With this technique, we also produced microholes by using chemical etching. The axicon, which is a conical lens, generates an optical beam with a transverse intensity profile that follows a zero-order Bessel function. Bessel beams produced by axicon focusing have a narrow focal line of a few micron width which is invariant along a long distance (>1 cm). By focusing femtosecond pulses with an axicon into fused silica, we induced permanent modifications over the extented focal line of the axicon without scanning axially the glass sample. The waveguides so fabricated exhibit low losses and no detectable birefringence due their excellent circular symmetry. By translating the glass sample during the inscription process, we have fabricated planar waveguides. Microfluidic channels were obtained by soaking the exposed samples into a HF solution.

  19. Study on Doped Fluoride Glasses for Scintillation Applications%闪烁氟化玻璃的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the properties of fluoride glasses for use in particle calorimeters or in optical fibers. The effects of major and minor impurities in manufacturing process and ultimately on the glass properties have been investigated. Glasses in a range of compositions have been made and tested in the form of small samples as well as larger blocks of size 2 × 3 × 14 cm3. Results of measurements on these materials, using a high energy particle beam, are presented.

  20. Room temperature gas-solid reaction of titanium on glass surfaces forming a very low resistivity layer

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Solís; Neville Clark; Daniel Azofeifa; E. Avendano

    2016-01-01

    Titanium films were deposited on quartz, glass, polyamide and PET substrates in a high vacuum system at room temperature and their electrical resistance monitored in vacuo as a function of thickness. These measurements indicate that a low electrical resistance layer is formed in a gas-solid reaction during the condensation of the initial layers of Ti on glass and quartz substrates. Layers begin to show relative low electrical resistance at around 21 nm for glass and 9nm for quartz. Samples de...

  1. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and

  2. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and

  3. Sustainable Innovation of Glass Design and Craft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre-Petersen, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Barely any research has been made into the implementation of sustainable principles in glass design and craft. A common tendency among students and practitioners is to consider it problematic if not impossible to develop a “truly sustainable practice”. Generally glass crafts people and glass...... innovation within the creative practices of glass design and craft. The paper will consist of an exploration of how introduction of sustainable principles may serve as a catalyst for aesthetic innovation in a process of experimentation with materials end techniques. A workshop for students of glass...... at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design, Bornholm, where new glass was replaced with recycled glass will provide the empirical foundation for a discussion and analysis of the issue. Background For more than 5000 years glass has been utilized by humans in numerous ways ranging from spacecraft...

  4. Packaging glass with hierarchically nanostructured surface

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-08-03

    An optical device includes an active region and packaging glass located on top of the active region. A top surface of the packaging glass includes hierarchical nanostructures comprised of honeycombed nanowalls (HNWs) and nanorod (NR) structures extending from the HNWs.

  5. The appraisal of structural glass assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Overend, M

    2002-01-01

    A design methodology is advanced primarily to determine the tensile strength of annealed and tempered glass. The proposed approach consists of an analytical method to assess the tensile strength of glass, sigma sub f , and a computer algorithm which is used to compute the applied equivalent uniform stress, sigma sub p. The glass design approach put forward endeavours to ensure that the surface tensile strength of glass is not exceeded by the equivalent uniform stress. The analytical method, referred to as the General Crack Growth Model, is related to the fundamental properties of the glass surface and incorporates all factors that are known to significantly affect the strength of glass. The General Crack Growth Model is based on the comparison of recent fracture mechanics methods and empirical formulations proposed elsewhere. The proposed glass strength equation or the derived glass strength charts may be used to determine the maximum allowable surface tension, sigma sub f. The performance of the proposed Gen...

  6. Chalcogenide Glass for Passive Infrared Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianghua Zhang; Hongli Ma; Jacques Lucas

    2003-01-01

    Chalcogenide glass fibers have been successfully used for remote spectroscopy, temperature sensing and CO2 laser power delivery. In bulk form, chalcogenide glass is the most promising candidate for replacing the expensive germanium lenses for thermal imaging.

  7. Flight Deck I-Glasses Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flight Deck i-Glasses is a color, stereoscopic 3-D display mounted on consumer style eye glass frames that will enhance operator performance and multi-modal...

  8. Energy-Efficient Glass Melting: Submerged Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-01-01

    Oxy-gas-fired submerged combustion melter offers simpler, improved performance. For the last 100 years, the domestic glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass on an industrial scale.

  9. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES TO SUPPORT SULFATE SOLUBILITY MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2014-08-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms both within the DOE complex and to some extent at U.K. sites. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerated cleanup missions. Much of the previous work on improving sulfate retention in waste glasses has been done on an empirical basis, making it difficult to apply the findings to future waste compositions despite the large number of glass systems studied. A more fundamental, rather than empirical, model of sulfate solubility in glass, under development at Sheffield Hallam University (SHU), could provide a solution to the issues of sulfate solubility. The model uses the normalized cation field strength index as a function of glass composition to predict sulfate capacity, and has shown early success for some glass systems. The objective of the current scope is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DOE waste vitrification efforts, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the current model. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for simulated waste glasses fabricated SHU in support of sulfate solubility model development. A review of the measured compositions revealed that there are issues with the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations

  10. Femtosecond Laser Ablation Multicollector ICPMS Analysis of Uranium Isotopes in NIST Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Springer, Kellen WE; Ward, Jesse D.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, John W.; Endres, Mackenzie C.; Hart, Garret L.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Oropeza, Dayana; Russo, Richard; Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Fahey, Albert J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2015-02-06

    We have utilized femtosecond laser ablation coupled to multi-collector inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry to measure the uranium isotopic content of NIST 61x (x=0,2,4,6) glasses. The uranium content of these glasses is a linear two-component mixing between isotopically natural uranium and the isotopically depleted spike used in preparing the glasses. Laser ablation results match extremely well, generally within a few ppm, with solution analysis following sample dissolution and chemical separation. In addition to isotopic data, sample utilization efficiency measurements indicate that over 1% of ablated uranium atoms reach a mass spectrometer detector, making this technique extremely efficient. Laser sampling also allows for spatial analysis and our data indicate that rare uranium concentration inhomogeneities exist in NIST 616 glass.

  11. Space-selective growth of frequency-conversion crystals in glasses with ultrashort infrared laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, K; Qiu, J; Mitsuyu, T; Hirao, K

    2000-03-15

    We report on space-selective growth of a second-harmonic-generation beta-BaB(2)O(4) (BBO) crystal inside a BaO-Al(2)O(3)-B(2)O(3) glass sample at the focal point of an 800-nm femtosecond laser beam. A spherical heated region was formed during the focused laser irradiation through observation with an optical microscope. We moved the heated region by changing the position of the focal point of the laser beam relative to the glass sample. We grew BBO crystal continuously in the glass sample by adjusting the moving speed of the heated zone. Our results demonstrate that functional crystals can be formed three dimensionally in glasses by use of a nonresonant ultrashort pulsed laser.

  12. Embedded adhesive connection for laminated glass plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Poulsen, S.H.; Bagger, A.

    2012-01-01

    The structural behavior of a new connection design, the embedded adhesive connection, used for laminated glass plates is investigated. The connection consists of an aluminum plate encapsulated in-between two adjacent triple layered laminated glass plates. Fastening between glass and aluminum...... usage in a design situation. The embedded connection shows promising potential as a future fastening system for load-carrying laminated glass plates....

  13. Fluoride glasses: properties, technology and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Poulain, M.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses (HMFG) make a group of specialty glasses that require a dry processing, purity control of starting materials and specific thermal procedures. Numerous glass compositions have been identified in different chemical systems: fluorozirconates, fluoroaluminates and fluoroindates. The most commonly used HMFG is the ZBLAN fluorozirconate glass that exhibits the largest stability against devitrification. By comparison to ZBLAN the IR cut-off wavelength is shorter in AlF3-...

  14. Optical scattering in glass ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattarelli, M.; Montagna, M.; Verrocchio, P.

    2008-01-01

    The transparency of glass ceramics with nanocrystals is generally higher than that expected from the theory of Rayleigh scattering. We attribute this ultra-transparency to the spatial correlation of the nanoparticles. The structure factor is calculated for a simple model system, the random sequentia

  15. Printing Silver Nanogrids on Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Wesley C.; Valcarce, Ron; Iles, Peter; Smith, James S.; Glass, Gabe; Gomez, Jesus; Johnson, Glen; Johnston, Dan; Morham, Maclaine; Befus, Elliot; Oz, Aimee; Tomaraei, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript describes a laboratory experiment that provides students with an opportunity to create conductive silver nanogrids using polymeric templates. A microcontact-printed polyvinylpyrrolidone grid directs the citrate-induced reduction of silver ions for the fabrication of silver nanogrids on glass substrates. In addition to…

  16. Reflectivity of metallodielectric photonic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikov, K.; Vos, W.L.; Moroz, A.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and optical properties of metallodielectric photonic glasses of colloidal silver spheres with a radius ranging from 200 to 420 nm and volume fractions around 60%. Strong modulations (∼25%) in the optical reflectivity were observed in the visible range for these structure

  17. Reflectivity of metallodielectric photonic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikov, K.P.; Vos, W.L.; Moroz, A.; Blaaderen, van A.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and optical properties of metallodielectric photonic glasses of colloidal silver spheres with a radius ranging from 200 to 420 nm and volume fractions around 60%. Strong modulations (~25%) in the optical reflectivity were observed in the visible range for these structure

  18. Passing through the Glass Ceiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Robert L.

    This paper describes personal and professional networking, discusses data on women and networking skills, and argues that women should exercise these skills in their efforts to shatter the "glass ceiling" and achieve their career potential. An introductory discussion notes that women, though they do network, may develop ties primarily with other…

  19. Spin glasses and neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parga, N. (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche; Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Inst. Balseiro)

    1989-07-01

    The mean-field theory of spin glass models has been used as a prototype of systems with frustration and disorder. One of the most interesting related systems are models of associative memories. In these lectures we review the main concepts developed to solve the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model and its application to neural networks. (orig.).

  20. Penetration Physics of Armor Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-30

    Penetration Response of Borosilicate Glass during Short Rod Impact”, Proc. 23rd Int. Symp. Ballistics, 2, 1251-1258, Graficas Couche, Madrid, Spain (2007...glass”, Proc. 23rd Int. Symp. Ballistics, 2, 1049-1056, Graficas Couche, Madrid, Spain (2007). 8D. R. Curran, “Comparison of Mesomechanical and