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Sample records for turbulent mixed convection

  1. Turbulent mixed convection in asymmetrically heated vertical channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokni Ameni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an investigation of mixed convection from vertical heated channel is undertaken. The aim is to explore the heat transfer obtained by adding a forced flow, issued from a flat nozzle located in the entry section of a channel, to the up-going fluid along its walls. Forced and free convection are combined studied in order to increase the cooling requirements. The study deals with both symmetrically and asymmetrically heated channel. The Reynolds number based on the nozzle width and the jet velocity is assumed to be 3 103 and 2.104; whereas, the Rayleigh number based on the channel length and the wall temperature difference varies from 2.57 1010 to 5.15 1012. The heating asymmetry effect on the flow development including the mean velocity and temperature the local Nusselt number, the mass flow rate and heat transfer are examined.

  2. Assessment of RANS and LES Turbulence Modeling for Buoyancy-Aided/Opposed Forced and Mixed Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Corey; Kimber, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Over the last 30 years, an industry-wide shift within the nuclear community has led to increased utilization of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to supplement nuclear reactor safety analyses. One such area that is of particular interest to the nuclear community, specifically to those performing loss-of-flow accident (LOFA) analyses for next-generation very-high temperature reactors (VHTR), is the capacity of current computational models to predict heat transfer across a wide range of buoyancy conditions. In the present investigation, a critical evaluation of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and large-eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling techniques is conducted based on CFD validation data collected from the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel (RoBuT) at Utah State University. Four different experimental flow conditions are investigated: (1) buoyancy-aided forced convection; (2) buoyancy-opposed forced convection; (3) buoyancy-aided mixed convection; (4) buoyancy-opposed mixed convection. Overall, good agreement is found for both forced convection-dominated scenarios, but an overly-diffusive prediction of the normal Reynolds stress is observed for the RANS-based turbulence models. Low-Reynolds number RANS models perform adequately for mixed convection, while higher-order RANS approaches underestimate the influence of buoyancy on the production of turbulence.

  3. Turbulent mixed convection from a large, high temperature, vertical flat surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, G.; Greif, R.; Siebers, D.; Tieszen, S.

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent mixed convection heat transfer at high temperatures and large length scales is an important and seldom studied phenomenon that can represent a significant part of the overall heat transfer in applications ranging from solar central receivers to objects in fires. This work is part of a study to validate turbulence models for predicting heat transfer to or from surfaces at large temperature differences and large length scales. Here, turbulent, three-dimensional, mixed convection heat transfer in air from a large (3m square) vertical flat surface at high temperatures is studied using two RANS turbulence models: a standard k-ε model and the v2-bar -f model. Predictions for three cases spanning the range of the experiment (Siebers, D.L., Schwind, R.G., Moffat, R.F., 1982. Experimental mixed convection from a large, vertical plate in a horizontal flow. Paper MC13, vol. 3, Proc. 7th Int. Heat Transfer Conf., Munich; Siebers, D.L., 1983. Experimental mixed convection heat transfer from a large, vertical surface in a horizontal flow. PhD thesis, Stanford University) from forced (GrH/ReL2=0.18) to mixed (GrH/ReL2=3.06) to natural (GrH/ReL2=∼) convection are compared with data. The results show a decrease in the heat transfer coefficient as GrH/ReL2 is increased from 0.18 to 3.06, for a free-stream velocity of 4.4m/s. In the natural convection case, the experimental heat transfer coefficient is approximately constant in the fully turbulent region, whereas the calculated heat transfer coefficients show a slight increase with height. For the three cases studied, the calculated and experimental heat transfer coefficients agree to within 5-35% over most of the surface with the v2-bar -f model results showing better agreement with the data. Calculated temperature and velocity profiles show good agreement with the data

  4. Experimental investigation of turbulent mixed convection in the wake of a heated sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckow, D.

    1993-11-01

    The axisymmetric wake of a heated sphere under conditions of turbulent mixed convection is investigated in the water test section FLUTMIK. The sphere is located in a vertical channel with forced convective upward flow. The influence of buoyancy forces to the flow field is studied by comparison with the unheated wake. The theoretical fundamentals describing turbulent flows and different versions of the k-ε turbulence model extended by buoyancy terms are described in detail. The quantities to be determined experimentally are derived. The temperature and the components of the velocity vector in axial and radial directions are measured simultaneously by means of a thermocouple probe and a two component, two color laser Doppler anemometer. The flow quantities are determined at axial distances between 5 and 106 sphere diameters. The functional principle and the basis of the laser Doppler anemometer are explained. The mean velocity, the mean temperature, the intensities of their fluctuations and the turbulent exchange quantities of momentum and heat transport are calculated. The decay laws of the quantities along the axis of the channel and the radial profiles are indicated and discussed. The applicability of the experimental results of the axisymmetric buoyancy influenced turbulent wake with respect to the turbulence models presented are shown. (orig.) [de

  5. Development of a system code with CFD capability for analyzing turbulent mixed convection in gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeon Il

    2010-02-01

    In order to demonstrate the accuracy of predictions in a turbulent mixed convection regime in which both inertia and buoyancy force compete with each other, we found out that assessments done using a single-dimensional system code with a recently updated heat transfer package have shown that this approach cannot give a reasonable prediction of the wall temperature in a case involving strong heating, where the regime falls into turbulent mixed convection regime. It has been known that the main reason of this deficiency comes from the degraded heat transfer in turbulent mixed convection regime, which is below that of convective heat transfer during turbulent forced convection. We investigated two mechanisms that cause this deterioration in convective heat transfer influenced by buoyancy: (1) modification of turbulence, also known as the direct (structural) effect, through the buoyancy-induced production of turbulent kinetic energy: and (2) an indirect (external) effect that occurs through modification of the mean flow. We investigated the Launder-Sharma model of turbulence whether it can appropriately represent the mechanisms causing the degraded heat transfer in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). We found out that this model can capture low Re effects such that a non-equilibrium turbulent boundary layer in turbulent mixed convection regime can be resolved. The model was verified and validated extensively initially with the commercial CFD code, Fluent with a user application package known as the User Defined Function (UDF). The results from this implementation were compared to a set of data that included (1) an experimental data commonly accepted as a standardized problem to verify a turbulent flow, (2) the results from a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) in a turbulent forced and mixed convection regime, (3) empirical correlations regarding the friction coefficient and the non-dimensional heat transfer coefficient, the Nusselt number for a turbulent forced

  6. Turbulent mixed convection in vertical and inclined flat channels with aiding flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskas, P.; Vilemas, J.; Adomaitis, J.E.; Bartkus, G.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of turbulent mixed convection heat transfer for aiding flows in a vertical ({phi}=90{degrees}), inclined ({phi}=60{degrees},30{degrees}), and horizontal ({phi}=0{degrees}) flat channels with symmetrical heating and a ratio of height h to width b of about 1:10 and with length about 4 m (x/2h about 44). The study covered Re from 4x10{sup 3} to 5x10{sup 4} and Gr{sub q} from 5x10{sup 7}to 3x10{sup 10}. For the upper wall, a region of impaired heat transfer was found for all angular positions (from vertical to horizontal) and for bottom wall the augmentation of heat transfer in comparison to forced convection was revealed in the region of {phi}=0{degrees}-60{degrees}. Different characteristic buoyancy parameters were found for regions of impaired and enhanced heat transfer. General relations are suggested to predict the heat transfer for fully-developed-flow conditions and different angular positions.

  7. Review of some experimental studies of turbulent mixed convection covering a wide range Prandtl number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    The early experimental studies of buoyancy-influenced turbulent convective heat transfer to fluids flowing upwards and downwards in long uniformly heated vertical tubes were mainly performed using water at atmospheric pressure as the working fluid. In addition, some experiments using air were reported and even some using mercury. At that time there was also quite a lot of interest in heat transfer to water at supercritical pressure and also carbon dioxide. More recently, experimental results have been obtained using liquid sodium. The Prandtl numbers in the studies referred to above cover a wide range of values, being well in excess of unity under some conditions in the case of the supercritical pressure fluids and atmospheric pressure water, just under unity in the case of air, much less than unity in the case of mercury and even lower in the case of liquid sodium. Over the years a good general understanding has gradually been achieved of the complex manner in which buoyancy affects heat transfer in conventional fluids such as water and air. Up to a point, the behaviour in the case of a liquid metal such as mercury can be reconciled with such arguments. However, this is certainly not so in the case of liquid sodium. In the present paper results from a number of experimental studies of buoyancy-influenced heat transfer in vertical tubes are reviewed. This is done with the aim of providing a picture of observed behaviour consistent with our understanding of the basic mechanisms of convective heat transfer, taking account of the complicated manner in which the mean motion, turbulence and the heat transfer are affected by buoyancy. The starting point is to view convective heat transfer in wall shear flows in terms of the local balance between diffusion of heat (turbulent and molecular) and advection of heat by the flowing fluid. Prandtl number affects the radial temperature profile and therefore the variation of density across the shear flow and, in turn, the extent

  8. A new scaling law for temperature variance profile in the mixing zone of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin; Xu, Wei; He, Xiao-Zhou; Yik, Hiu-Fai; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Schumacher, Jorg; Tong, Penger

    2017-11-01

    We report a combined experimental and numerical study of the scaling properties of the temperature variance profile η(z) along the central z axis of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a thin disk cell and an upright cylinder of aspect ratio unity. In the mixing zone outside the thermal boundary layer region, the measured η(z) is found to scale with the cell height H in both cells and obey a power law, η(z) (z/H)ɛ, with the obtained values of ɛ being very close to -1. Based on the experimental and numerical findings, we derive a new equation for η(z) in the mixing zone, which has a power-law solution in good agreement with the experimental and numerical results. Our work thus provides a common framework for understanding the effect of boundary layer fluctuations on the scaling properties of the temperature variance profile in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. This work was supported in part by Hong Kong Research Grants Council.

  9. On the factors governing water vapor turbulence mixing in the convective boundary layer over land: Concept and data analysis technique using ground-based lidar measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    The convective boundary layer (CBL) turbulence is the key process for exchanging heat, momentum, moisture and trace gases between the earth's surface and the lower part of the troposphere. The turbulence parameterization of the CBL is a challenging but important component in numerical models. In particular, correct estimation of CBL turbulence features, parameterization, and the determination of the contribution of eddy diffusivity are important for simulating convection initiation, and the dispersion of health hazardous air pollutants and Greenhouse gases. In general, measurements of higher-order moments of water vapor mixing ratio (q) variability yield unique estimates of turbulence in the CBL. Using the high-resolution lidar-derived profiles of q variance, third-order moment, and skewness and analyzing concurrent profiles of vertical velocity, potential temperature, horizontal wind and time series of near-surface measurements of surface flux and meteorological parameters, a conceptual framework based on bottom up approach is proposed here for the first time for a robust characterization of the turbulent structure of CBL over land so that our understanding on the processes governing CBL q turbulence could be improved. Finally, principal component analyses will be applied on the lidar-derived long-term data sets of q turbulence statistics to identify the meteorological factors and the dominant physical mechanisms governing the CBL turbulence features. - Highlights: • Lidar based study for CBL turbulence features • Water vapor and aerosol turbulence profiles • Processes governing boundary layer turbulence profiles using lidars

  10. On the factors governing water vapor turbulence mixing in the convective boundary layer over land: Concept and data analysis technique using ground-based lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Sandip, E-mail: sup252@PSU.EDU

    2016-06-01

    The convective boundary layer (CBL) turbulence is the key process for exchanging heat, momentum, moisture and trace gases between the earth's surface and the lower part of the troposphere. The turbulence parameterization of the CBL is a challenging but important component in numerical models. In particular, correct estimation of CBL turbulence features, parameterization, and the determination of the contribution of eddy diffusivity are important for simulating convection initiation, and the dispersion of health hazardous air pollutants and Greenhouse gases. In general, measurements of higher-order moments of water vapor mixing ratio (q) variability yield unique estimates of turbulence in the CBL. Using the high-resolution lidar-derived profiles of q variance, third-order moment, and skewness and analyzing concurrent profiles of vertical velocity, potential temperature, horizontal wind and time series of near-surface measurements of surface flux and meteorological parameters, a conceptual framework based on bottom up approach is proposed here for the first time for a robust characterization of the turbulent structure of CBL over land so that our understanding on the processes governing CBL q turbulence could be improved. Finally, principal component analyses will be applied on the lidar-derived long-term data sets of q turbulence statistics to identify the meteorological factors and the dominant physical mechanisms governing the CBL turbulence features. - Highlights: • Lidar based study for CBL turbulence features • Water vapor and aerosol turbulence profiles • Processes governing boundary layer turbulence profiles using lidars.

  11. Contribution to the analysis and the modelling of turbulent flows in mixed convection regime, application to radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecocq, Y.

    2008-12-01

    In the frame of radioactive waste management, this work aims to study the flow around a heating wall-mounted cylinder in crossflow in URANS approach. Well-known limitations of first order turbulence models lead us to consider second order turbulence modelling. In that frame, a heat transfer model is developed and validated on academic test cases. To begin with, when mixed convection regime is dominant, these simulations, completed by an isotherm one, all performed with low-Reynolds k-w SST model, give prominence to several eddy structures registered by the bibliography. One simulation is also performed with the high-Reynolds Rij-epsilon SSG model. With the k-w SST model, the heat transfer is correctly reproduced compared to the VALIDA experiment lead by the CEA, though with the Rij-epsilon SSG model, it is strongly under-estimated. It is supposed that it comes from the use of wall functions. Subsequently, when natural convection is predominant, flow topology becomes completely different and the heat transfer becomes less accurate to the VALIDA experiment. Following Durbin's approach, the Elliptic Blending-Renolds Stress Model EBRSM, consists in accounting for wall effects, and in wall blockage in particular. Following this formalism, an Elliptic Blending-Algebraic Flux Model is developed, the EBAFM. With this model, a priori tests in the three convection regimes and then simulations on the same test cases show major improvements in flow predictions. This leads to an interesting perspective to an intermediate model between SGDH and transport equations. (author)

  12. On the factors governing water vapor turbulence mixing in the convective boundary layer over land: Concept and data analysis technique using ground-based lidar measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sandip

    2016-06-01

    The convective boundary layer (CBL) turbulence is the key process for exchanging heat, momentum, moisture and trace gases between the earth's surface and the lower part of the troposphere. The turbulence parameterization of the CBL is a challenging but important component in numerical models. In particular, correct estimation of CBL turbulence features, parameterization, and the determination of the contribution of eddy diffusivity are important for simulating convection initiation, and the dispersion of health hazardous air pollutants and Greenhouse gases. In general, measurements of higher-order moments of water vapor mixing ratio (q) variability yield unique estimates of turbulence in the CBL. Using the high-resolution lidar-derived profiles of q variance, third-order moment, and skewness and analyzing concurrent profiles of vertical velocity, potential temperature, horizontal wind and time series of near-surface measurements of surface flux and meteorological parameters, a conceptual framework based on bottom up approach is proposed here for the first time for a robust characterization of the turbulent structure of CBL over land so that our understanding on the processes governing CBL q turbulence could be improved. Finally, principal component analyses will be applied on the lidar-derived long-term data sets of q turbulence statistics to identify the meteorological factors and the dominant physical mechanisms governing the CBL turbulence features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Entropy generation in turbulent mixed convection heat transfer to highly variable property pipe flow of supercritical fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohseni, Mahdi; Bazargan, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The entropy generation in supercritical fluid flows has been numerically investigated. • The mechanisms of entropy generation are different near and away from the walls. • In the near wall region, the energy dissipation is the deciding parameter. • Away from the wall, the heat transfer is the effective factor in entropy generation. • The bulk Be number is greater in the liquid-like region than in vapor-like region. - Abstract: In this study, a two dimensional CFD code has been developed to investigate entropy generation in turbulent mixed convection heat transfer flow of supercritical fluids. Since the fluid properties vary significantly under supercritical conditions, the changes of entropy generation are large. The contribution of each of the mechanisms of entropy production (heat transfer and energy dissipation) is compared in different regions of the flow. The results show that the mechanisms of entropy generation act differently in the near wall region within the viscous sub-layer and in the region away from the wall. The effects of the wall heat flux on the entropy generation are also investigated

  14. Effects of turbulence on mixed-phase deep convective clouds under different basic-state winds and aerosol concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunho; Baik, Jong-Jin; Han, Ji-Young

    2014-12-01

    The effects of turbulence-induced collision enhancement (TICE) on mixed-phase deep convective clouds are numerically investigated using a 2-D cloud model with bin microphysics for uniform and sheared basic-state wind profiles and different aerosol concentrations. Graupel particles account for the most of the cloud mass in all simulation cases. In the uniform basic-state wind cases, graupel particles with moderate sizes account for some of the total graupel mass in the cases with TICE, whereas graupel particles with large sizes account for almost all the total graupel mass in the cases without TICE. This is because the growth of ice crystals into small graupel particles is enhanced due to TICE. The changes in the size distributions of graupel particles due to TICE result in a decrease in the mass-averaged mean terminal velocity of graupel particles. Therefore, the downward flux of graupel mass, and thus the melting of graupel particles, is reduced due to TICE, leading to a decrease in the amount of surface precipitation. Moreover, under the low aerosol concentration, TICE increases the sublimation of ice particles, consequently playing a partial role in reducing the amount of surface precipitation. The effects of TICE are less pronounced in the sheared basic-state wind cases than in the uniform basic-state wind cases because the number of ice crystals is much smaller in the sheared basic-state wind cases than in the uniform basic-state wind cases. Thus, the size distributions of graupel particles in the cases with and without TICE show little difference.

  15. Two-dimensional turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzino, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    We present an overview of the most relevant, and sometimes contrasting, theoretical approaches to Rayleigh-Taylor and mean-gradient-forced Rayleigh-Bénard two-dimensional turbulence together with numerical and experimental evidences for their support. The main aim of this overview is to emphasize that, despite the different character of these two systems, especially in relation to their steadiness/unsteadiness, turbulent fluctuations are well described by the same scaling relationships originated from the Bolgiano balance. The latter states that inertial terms and buoyancy terms balance at small scales giving rise to an inverse kinetic energy cascade. The main difference with respect to the inverse energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence [R. H. Kraichnan, "Inertial ranges in two-dimensional turbulence," Phys. Fluids 10, 1417 (1967)] is that the rate of cascade of kinetic energy here is not constant along the inertial range of scales. Thanks to the absence of physical boundaries, the two systems here investigated turned out to be a natural physical realization of the Kraichnan scaling regime hitherto associated with the elusive "ultimate state of thermal convection" [R. H. Kraichnan, "Turbulent thermal convection at arbitrary Prandtl number," Phys. Fluids 5, 1374-1389 (1962)].

  16. Convective mixing in helium white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclair, G.; Fontaine, G.

    1979-01-01

    The conditions under which convective mixing episodes take place between the helium envelopes and the underlying carbon layers in helium-rich white dwarfs are investigated. It is found that, for essentially any value of the initial helium content less than the maximum mass a helium convection zone can have, mixing does occur, and leads, in the vast majority of cases, to an almost pure carbon superficial composition. Mixing products that show only traces of carbon while retaining helium-dominated envelopes are possible only if the initial helium content is quite close to the maximum possible mass of the helium convection zone. In the presence of turbulence, this restriction could be relaxed, however, and the helium-rich lambda4670 stars may possibly be explained in this fashion

  17. An experimental study of mixed convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    The aim of our study is to establish a reliable data base for improving thermal-hydraulic codes, in the field of turbulent flows with buoyancy forces. The flow considered is mixed convection in the Reynolds and Richardson number range: Re=10"3 to 6*10"4 and Ri=10"-"4 to 1. Experiments are carried out in an upward turbulent flow between vertical parallel plates at different wall temperatures. Part 1 gives a detailed data base of turbulent mixed flow of free and forced convection. Part II presents the installation and the calibration system intended for probes calibration. Part III describes the measurement technique (constant-temperature probe and cold-wire probe) and the method for measuring the position of the hot-wire anemometer from the wall surface. The measurement accuracy is within 0.001 mm in the present system. Part IV relates the development of a method for near wall measurements. This correction procedure for hot-wire anemometer close to wall has been derived on the basis of a two-dimensional numerical study. The method permits to obtain a quantitative correction of the wall influence on hot-wires and takes into account the velocity profile and the effects the wall material has on the heat loss. Part V presents the experimental data obtained in the channel in forced and mixed convection. Results obtained in the forced convection regime serve as a verification of the measurement technique close to the wall and give the conditions at the entrance of the test section. The effects of the buoyancy force on the mean velocity and temperature profiles are confirmed. The buoyancy strongly affects the flow structure and deforms the distribution of mean velocity. The velocity profiles are asymmetric. The second section of part V gives an approach of analytical wall functions with buoyancy forces, on the basis of the experimental data obtained in the test section. (author) [fr

  18. Vortex statistics in turbulent rotating convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Geurts, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The vortices emerging in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water at Rayleigh number Ra=6.0×108 are investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and by direct numerical simulation. The so-called Q criterion is used to detect the vortices from velocity fields. This

  19. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  20. Investigation on convective mixing of triple-jet. Evaluation of turbulent quantities using particle image velocimetry and direct numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Nobuyuki; Igarashi, Minoru; Kamide, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    We performed a water experiment on parallel triple-jet and a calculation using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) for a quantification of thermal striping. The local temperatures and velocities were measured by using thermocouples and the particle image velocimetry (PIV), respectively. The calculation was carried out using the quasi-DNS code, DINUS-3, which was based on the finite difference method. The oscillation of the jets obtained from the flow visualization was related to the movements of the twin vortices between the jets by using the PIV. The experimental temperatures/velocities results were close to the numerical results. The heat transportation among the jets was evaluated by using the turbulent heat fluxes obtained from the quasi-DNS. (author)

  1. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, M.

    2007-10-01

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  2. Study of mixed convection in sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhou; Chen Yan

    1995-01-01

    The mixed convection phenomena in the sodium pool of fast reactor have been studied systematically by the two dimensional modeling method. A generalized concept of circumferential line in the cylindrical coordinates was proposed to overcome the three dimensional effect induced by the pool geometry in an analysis of two dimensional modeling. A method of sub-step in time was developed for solving the turbulent equations. The treatments on the boundary condition for the auxiliary velocity field have been proposed, and the explanation of allowing the flow function method to be used in the flow field in presence of a mass source term was given. As examples of verification, the experiments were conducted with water flow in a rectangular cavity. The results from theoretical analysis were applied to the numerical computation for the mixed convection in the cavity. The mechanism of stratified flow in the cavity was studied. A numerical calculation was carried out for the mixed convection in hot plenum of a typical fast reactor

  3. Turbulent equipartitions in two dimensional drift convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isichenko, M.B.; Yankov, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Unlike the thermodynamic equipartition of energy in conservative systems, turbulent equipartitions (TEP) describe strongly non-equilibrium systems such as turbulent plasmas. In turbulent systems, energy is no longer a good invariant, but one can utilize the conservation of other quantities, such as adiabatic invariants, frozen-in magnetic flux, entropy, or combination thereof, in order to derive new, turbulent quasi-equilibria. These TEP equilibria assume various forms, but in general they sustain spatially inhomogeneous distributions of the usual thermodynamic quantities such as density or temperature. This mechanism explains the effects of particle and energy pinch in tokamaks. The analysis of the relaxed states caused by turbulent mixing is based on the existence of Lagrangian invariants (quantities constant along fluid-particle or other orbits). A turbulent equipartition corresponds to the spatially uniform distribution of relevant Lagrangian invariants. The existence of such turbulent equilibria is demonstrated in the simple model of two dimensional electrostatically turbulent plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The turbulence is prescribed, and the turbulent transport is assumed to be much stronger than the classical collisional transport. The simplicity of the model makes it possible to derive the equations describing the relaxation to the TEP state in several limits

  4. Basal melting driven by turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbanipour Esfahani, Babak; Hirata, Silvia C.; Berti, Stefano; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2018-05-01

    Melting and, conversely, solidification processes in the presence of convection are key to many geophysical problems. An essential question related to these phenomena concerns the estimation of the (time-evolving) melting rate, which is tightly connected to the turbulent convective dynamics in the bulk of the melt fluid and the heat transfer at the liquid-solid interface. In this work, we consider a convective-melting model, constructed as a generalization of the Rayleigh-Bénard system, accounting for the basal melting of a solid. As the change of phase proceeds, a fluid layer grows at the heated bottom of the system and eventually reaches a turbulent convection state. By means of extensive lattice-Boltzmann numerical simulations employing an enthalpy formulation of the governing equations, we explore the model dynamics in two- and three-dimensional configurations. The focus of the analysis is on the scaling of global quantities like the heat flux and the kinetic energy with the Rayleigh number, as well as on the interface morphology and the effects of space dimensionality. Independently of dimensionality, we find that the convective-melting system behavior shares strong resemblances with that of the Rayleigh-Bénard one, and that the heat flux is only weakly enhanced with respect to that case. Such similarities are understood, at least to some extent, considering the resulting slow motion of the melting front (with respect to the turbulent fluid velocity fluctuations) and its generally little roughness (compared to the height of the fluid layer). Varying the Stefan number, accounting for the thermodynamical properties of the material, also seems to have only a mild effect, which implies the possibility of extrapolating results in numerically delicate low-Stefan setups from more convenient high-Stefan ones. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the geophysically relevant problem of modeling Arctic ice melt ponds.

  5. Primary Issues of Mixed Convection Heat Transfer Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Myeong-Seon; Chung, Bum-Jin [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The computer code analyzing the system operating and transient behavior must distinguish flow conditions involved with convective heat transfer flow regimes. And the proper correlations must be supplied to those flow regimes. However the existing safety analysis codes are focused on the Light Water Reactor and they are skeptical to be applied to the GCRs (Gas Cooled Reactors). One of the technical issues raise by the development of the VHTR is the mixed convection, which occur when the driving forces of both forced and natural convection are of comparable magnitudes. It can be encountered as in channel of the stacked with fuel elements and a decay heat removal system and in VHTR. The mixed convection is not intermediate phenomena with natural convection and forced convection but independent complicated phenomena. Therefore, many researchers have been studied and some primary issues were propounded for phenomena mixed convection. This paper is to discuss some problems identified through reviewing the papers for mixed convection phenomena. And primary issues of mixed convection heat transfer were proposed respect to thermal hydraulic problems for VHTR. The VHTR thermal hydraulic study requires an indepth study of the mixed convection phenomena. In this study we reviewed the classical flow regime map of Metais and Eckert and derived further issues to be considered. The following issues were raised: (1) Buoyancy aided an opposed flows were not differentiated and plotted in a map. (2) Experimental results for UWT and UHF condition were also plotted in the same map without differentiation. (3) The buoyancy coefficient was not generalized for correlating with buoyancy coefficient. (4) The phenomenon analysis for laminarization and returbulization as buoyancy effects in turbulent mixed convection was not established. (5) The defining to transition in mixed convection regime was difficult.

  6. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately

  7. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  8. Frontogenesis and turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Chen, F.; Shang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    ageostrophic secondary circulation together with the cross-frontal ageostrophic speed. The mixed characteristic is weak in summer, but the large turbulent dissipation and mixing rate measured in the frontal region, which show that the front promoted exchange of material and energy in the upper ocean.

  9. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    The goals of the International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, are to expose the generic problem of non-equilibrium turbulent processes to a broad scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together researchers from different areas, which include but are not limited to fluid dynamics, plasmas, high energy density physics, astrophysics, material science, combustion, atmospheric and Earth sciences, nonlinear and statistical physics, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, data processing and computations, optics and telecommunications, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task of non-equilibrium processes. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes play a key role in a broad variety of phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales and high or low energy density regimes. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, strong shocks and explosions, material transformation under high strain rate, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, non-canonical wall-bounded flows, hypersonic and supersonic boundary layers, dynamics of atmosphere and oceanography, are just a few examples. A grip on non-equilibrium turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser micro-machining, nano-electronics, free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in the areas of aeronautics and aerodynamics. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes are anisotropic, non-local, multi-scale and multi-phase, and often are driven by shocks or

  10. Heat transfer characteristics of induced mixed convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Y.; Lahav, C.; Szanto, M.; Shai, I.

    1996-01-01

    In the present work we focus our attention on the opposed Induced Mixed Convection case, i.e. the flow field structure in a vertical cylinder, closed at its bottom, opens at the top, and being heated circumferentially. The paper reports an experimental study of this complex heat transfer process. For a better understanding of the flow field and the related heat transfer process, two different experimental systems were built. The first was a flow visualization system, with water as the working fluid, while the second system enabled quantitative measurements of the temperature field in air. All the experiments were performed in the turbulent flow regime. In order to learn about all possible flow regimes, the visualization tests were conducted in three different length-to-diameter ratios (1/d=1,5,10). Quantitative measurements of the cylindrical wall temperature, as well as the radial and axial temperature profiles in the flow field, were taken in the air system. Based on the visualization observation and the measured wall temperature profile, it was found that the OIMC can be characterized by three main regimes: a mixing regime at the top, a central turbulent core and a boundary layer type of flow adjacent to the heated wall. (authors)

  11. Natural Convection Analysis with Various Turbulent Models Using FLUENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yu Sun

    2007-01-01

    The buoyancy driven convective flow fields are steady circulatory flows which were made between surfaces maintained at two fixed temperatures. They are ubiquitous in nature and play an important role in many engineering applications. Especially, in last decades, natural convection in a close loop or cavity becomes the main issue in the molecular biology for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Application of a natural convection can reduce the costs and efforts remarkably. This paper focuses on the sensitivity study of turbulence analysis using CFD for a natural convection in a closed rectangular cavity. Using commercial CFD code, FLUENT, various turbulent models were applied to the turbulent flow. Results from each CFD model will be compared each other in the viewpoints of flow characteristics. This work will suggest the best turbulent model of CFD for analyzing turbulent flows of the natural convection in an enclosure system

  12. Large Eddy Simulations of Severe Convection Induced Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nash'at; Proctor, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Convective storms can pose a serious risk to aviation operations since they are often accompanied by turbulence, heavy rain, hail, icing, lightning, strong winds, and poor visibility. They can cause major delays in air traffic due to the re-routing of flights, and by disrupting operations at the airports in the vicinity of the storm system. In this study, the Terminal Area Simulation System is used to simulate five different convective events ranging from a mesoscale convective complex to isolated storms. The occurrence of convection induced turbulence is analyzed from these simulations. The validation of model results with the radar data and other observations is reported and an aircraft-centric turbulence hazard metric calculated for each case is discussed. The turbulence analysis showed that large pockets of significant turbulence hazard can be found in regions of low radar reflectivity. Moderate and severe turbulence was often found in building cumulus turrets and overshooting tops.

  13. Turbulence and Interfacial Mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, James; Li, Xiaolin

    2005-03-15

    The authors study mix from analytical and numerical points of view. These investigations are linked. The analytical studies (in addition to laboratory experiments) provide bench marks for the direct simulation of mix. However, direct simulation is too detailed to be useful and to expensive to be practical. They also consider averaged equations. Here the major issue is the validation of the closure assumptions. They appeal to the direct simulation methods for this step. They have collaborated with several NNSA teams; moreover, Stony Brook alumni (former students, faculty and research collaborators) presently hold staff positions in NNSA laboratories.

  14. Convective mixing and accretion in white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koester, D.

    1976-01-01

    The evolution of convection zones in cooling white dwarfs with helium envelopes and outer hydrogen layers is calculated with a complete stellar evolution code. It is shown that white dwarfs of spectral type DB cannot be formed from DA stars by convective mixing. However, for cooler temperatures (Tsub(e) [de

  15. Compressibility effects on turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panickacheril John, John; Donzis, Diego

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of compressibility on passive scalar mixing in isotropic turbulence with a focus on the fundamental mechanisms that are responsible for such effects using a large Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) database. The database includes simulations with Taylor Reynolds number (Rλ) up to 100, turbulent Mach number (Mt) between 0.1 and 0.6 and Schmidt number (Sc) from 0.5 to 1.0. We present several measures of mixing efficiency on different canonical flows to robustly identify compressibility effects. We found that, like shear layers, mixing is reduced as Mach number increases. However, data also reveal a non-monotonic trend with Mt. To assess directly the effect of dilatational motions we also present results with both dilatational and soleniodal forcing. Analysis suggests that a small fraction of dilatational forcing decreases mixing time at higher Mt. Scalar spectra collapse when normalized by Batchelor variables which suggests that a compressive mechanism similar to Batchelor mixing in incompressible flows might be responsible for better mixing at high Mt and with dilatational forcing compared to pure solenoidal mixing. We also present results on scalar budgets, in particular on production and dissipation. Support from NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Turbulence modeling of natural convection in enclosures: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong O

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a review of recent developments of turbulence models for natural convection in enclosures is presented. The emphasis is placed on the effect of the treatments of Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux on the stability and accuracy of the solution for natural convection in enclosures. The turbulence models considered in the preset study are the two-layer k -ε model, the shear stress transport (SST) model, the elliptic-relaxation (V2-f) model and the elliptic-blending second-moment closure (EBM). Three different treatments of the turbulent heat flux are the generalized gradient diffusion hypothesis (GGDH), the algebraic flux model (AFM) and the differential flux model (DFM). The mathematical formulation of the above turbulence models and their solution method are presented. Evaluation of turbulence models are performed for turbulent natural convection in a 1:5 rectangular cavity ( Ra = 4.3x10 10 ) and in a square cavity with conducting top and bottom walls ( Ra =1.58x10 9 ) and the Rayleigh-Benard convection ( Ra = 2x10 6 ∼ Ra =10 9 ). The relative performances of turbulence models are examined and their successes and shortcomings are addressed

  17. Has the ultimate state of turbulent thermal convection been observed?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skrbek, L.; Urban, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 785, DEC (2015), s. 270-282 ISSN 0022-1120 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-02005S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : turbulent convection * turbulent flows Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.514, year: 2015

  18. Mixed convection heat transfer experiments using analogy concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Bong Jin; Chung, Bum Jin; Lee, Won Jea

    2009-01-01

    A Series of the turbulent mixed convective heat transfer experiments in a vertical cylinder was carried out. In order to achieve high Gr and/or Ra with small scale test rigs, the analogy concept was adopted. Using the concept, heat transfer systems were simulated by mass transfer systems, and large Grashof numbers could be achieved with reasonable facility heights. The tests were performed with buoyancy-aided flow and opposed flow for Reynolds numbers from 4,000 to 10,000 with a constant Grashof number, Gr H of 6.2 x 10 9 and Prandtl number of about 2,000. The test results reproduced the typical of the mixed convection heat transfer phenomena in a turbulent situation and agree well with the experimental study performed by Y. Palratan et al. The analogy experimental method simulated the mixed convection heat transfer phenomena successfully and seems to be a useful tool for heat transfer studies for VHTR as well as the systems with high buoyancy condition and high Prandtl number

  19. Quantifying near-wall coherent structures in turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasegarane, G. S.; A Puthenveettil, Baburaj; K Agrawal, Yogesh; Schmeling, Daniel; Bosbach, Johannes; Arakeri, Jaywant; IIT Madras-DLR-IISc Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    We present planforms of line plumes formed on horizontal surfaces in turbulent convection, along with the length of near- wall line plumes measured from these planforms, in a six decade range of Rayleigh numbers (105 < Ra <1011) and at three Prandtl numbers (Pr = 0 . 7 , 6 , 602). Using geometric constraints on the relations for the mean plume spacings, we obtain expressions for the total length of these near-wall plumes in turbulent convection. The plume length per unit area (Lp / A), made dimensionless by the near-wall length scale in turbulent convection (Zw) remains a constant for a given fluid. The Nusselt number is shown to be directly proportional to Lp H / A for a given fluid layer of height H. Increase in Pr has a weak influence in decreasing Lp / A . These expressions match the measurements, thereby showing that the assumption of laminar natural convection boundary layers in turbulent convection is consistent with the observed total length of line plumes. We then show that similar relationships are obtained based on the assumption that the line plumes are the outcome of the instability of laminar natural convection boundary layers on the horizontal surfaces.

  20. Transient Mixed Convection Validation for NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Barton [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Schultz, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-19

    The results of this project are best described by the papers and dissertations that resulted from the work. They are included in their entirety in this document. They are: (1) Jeff Harris PhD dissertation (focused mainly on forced convection); (2) Blake Lance PhD dissertation (focused mainly on mixed and transient convection). This dissertation is in multi-paper format and includes the article currently submitted and one to be submitted shortly; and, (3) JFE paper on CFD Validation Benchmark for Forced Convection.

  1. Transient Mixed Convection Validation for NGNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Barton; Schultz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The results of this project are best described by the papers and dissertations that resulted from the work. They are included in their entirety in this document. They are: (1) Jeff Harris PhD dissertation (focused mainly on forced convection); (2) Blake Lance PhD dissertation (focused mainly on mixed and transient convection). This dissertation is in multi-paper format and includes the article currently submitted and one to be submitted shortly; and, (3) JFE paper on CFD Validation Benchmark for Forced Convection.

  2. Multifractal Modeling of Turbulent Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiee, Mehdi; Zayernouri, Mohsen; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2017-11-01

    Stochastic processes in random media are emerging as interesting tools for modeling anomalous transport phenomena. Applications include intermittent passive scalar transport with background noise in turbulent flows, which are observed in atmospheric boundary layers, turbulent mixing in reactive flows, and long-range dependent flow fields in disordered/fractal environments. In this work, we propose a nonlocal scalar transport equation involving the fractional Laplacian, where the corresponding fractional index is linked to the multifractal structure of the nonlinear passive scalar power spectrum. This work was supported by the AFOSR Young Investigator Program (YIP) award (FA9550-17-1-0150) and partially by MURI/ARO (W911NF-15-1-0562).

  3. Turbulence closure for mixing length theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermyn, Adam S.; Lesaffre, Pierre; Tout, Christopher A.; Chitre, Shashikumar M.

    2018-05-01

    We present an approach to turbulence closure based on mixing length theory with three-dimensional fluctuations against a two-dimensional background. This model is intended to be rapidly computable for implementation in stellar evolution software and to capture a wide range of relevant phenomena with just a single free parameter, namely the mixing length. We incorporate magnetic, rotational, baroclinic, and buoyancy effects exactly within the formalism of linear growth theories with non-linear decay. We treat differential rotation effects perturbatively in the corotating frame using a novel controlled approximation, which matches the time evolution of the reference frame to arbitrary order. We then implement this model in an efficient open source code and discuss the resulting turbulent stresses and transport coefficients. We demonstrate that this model exhibits convective, baroclinic, and shear instabilities as well as the magnetorotational instability. It also exhibits non-linear saturation behaviour, and we use this to extract the asymptotic scaling of various transport coefficients in physically interesting limits.

  4. Numerical simulation of turbulent convective flow over wavy terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörnbrack, A.; Schumann, U.

    1993-09-01

    By means of a large-eddy simulation, the convective boundary layer is investigated for flows over wavy terrain. The lower surface varies sinusoidally in the downstream direction while remaining constant in the other. Several cases are considered with amplitude δ up to 0.15 H and wavelength λ of H to 8 H, where H is the mean fluid-layer height. At the lower surface, the vertical heat flux is prescribed to be constant and the momentum flux is determined locally from the Monin-Obukhov relationship with a roughness length z o=10-4 H. The mean wind is varied between zero and 5 w *, where w * is the convective velocity scale. After rather long times, the flow structure shows horizontal scales up to 4 H, with a pattern similar to that over flat surfaces at corresponding shear friction. Weak mean wind destroys regular spatial structures induced by the surface undulation at zero mean wind. The surface heating suppresses mean-flow recirculation-regions even for steep surface waves. Short surface waves cause strong drag due to hydrostatic and dynamic pressure forces in addition to frictional drag. The pressure drag increases slowly with the mean velocity, and strongly with δ/ H. The turbulence variances increase mainly in the lower half of the mixed layer for U/w *>2.

  5. Turbulent convection in liquid metal with and without rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Eric M; Aurnou, Jonathan M

    2013-04-23

    The magnetic fields of Earth and other planets are generated by turbulent, rotating convection in liquid metal. Liquid metals are peculiar in that they diffuse heat more readily than momentum, quantified by their small Prandtl numbers, Pr rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection experiments in the liquid metal gallium (Pr = 0.025) over a range of nondimensional buoyancy forcing (Ra) and rotation periods (E). Our primary diagnostic is the efficiency of convective heat transfer (Nu). In general, we find that the convective behavior of liquid metal differs substantially from that of moderate Pr fluids, such as water. In particular, a transition between rotationally constrained and weakly rotating turbulent states is identified, and this transition differs substantially from that observed in moderate Pr fluids. This difference, we hypothesize, may explain the different classes of magnetic fields observed on the Gas and Ice Giant planets, whose dynamo regions consist of Pr 1 fluids, respectively.

  6. Turbulent convection in liquid metal with and without rotation

    OpenAIRE

    King, Eric M.; Aurnou, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Earth and other planets are generated by turbulent, rotating convection in liquid metal. Liquid metals are peculiar in that they diffuse heat more readily than momentum, quantified by their small Prandtl numbers, . Most analog models of planetary dynamos, however, use moderate fluids, and the systematic influence of reducing is not well understood. We perform rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection experiments in the liquid metal gallium over a range of nondimensional bu...

  7. Confinement and dynamical regulation in two-dimensional convective turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the nature of confinement improvement implied by the self-consistent generation of mean flows in two-dimensional convective turbulence is studied. The confinement variations are linked to two distinct regulation mechanisms which are also shown to be at the origin of low......-frequency bursting in the fluctuation level and the convective heat flux integral, both resulting in a state of large-scale intermittency. The first one involves the control of convective transport by sheared mean flows. This regulation relies on the conservative transfer of kinetic energy from tilted fluctuations...

  8. THE EFFECT OF SOLAR RADIATION ON AUTOMOBILE ENVIRONMENT THROUGH NATURAL CONVECTION AND MIXED CONVECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD. FAISAL KADER

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the effect of solar radiation on automobiles has been studied by both experimentally and numerically. The numerical solution is done by an operation friendly and fast CFD code – SC/Tetra with a full scale model of a SM3 car and turbulence is modeled by the standard k-ε equation. Numerical analysis of the three-dimensional model predicts a detailed description of fluid flow and temperature distribution in the passenger compartment during both the natural convection due to the incoming solar radiation and mixed convection due to the flow from defrost nozzle and radiation. It can be seen that solar radiation is an important parameter to raise the compartment temperature above the ambient temperature during summer. During natural convection, the rate of heat transfer is fast at the initial period. In the mixed convection analyses, it is found that the temperature drops down to a comfortable range almost linearly at the initial stage. Experimental investigations are performed to determine the temperature contour on the windshield and the local temperature at a particular point for further validation of the numerical results.

  9. Bursting and large-scale intermittency in turbulent convection with differential rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.

    2003-01-01

    The tilting mechanism, which generates differential rotation in two-dimensional turbulent convection, is shown to produce relaxation oscillations in the mean flow energy integral and bursts in the global fluctuation level, akin to Lotka-Volterra oscillations. The basic reason for such behavior is the unidirectional and conservative transfer of kinetic energy from the fluctuating motions to the mean component of the flows, and its dissipation at large scales. Results from numerical simulations further demonstrate the intimate relation between these low-frequency modulations and the large-scale intermittency of convective turbulence, as manifested by exponential tails in single-point probability distribution functions. Moreover, the spatio-temporal evolution of convective structures illustrates the mechanism triggering avalanche events in the transport process. The latter involves the overlap of delocalized mixing regions when the barrier to transport, produced by the mean component of the flow, transiently disappears

  10. Breakdown of large-scale circulation in turbulent rotating convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2008-01-01

    Turbulent rotating convection in a cylinder is investigated both numerically and experimentally at Rayleigh number Ra = $10^9$ and Prandtl number $\\sigma$ = 6.4. In this Letter we discuss two topics: the breakdown under rotation of the domain-filling large-scale circulation (LSC) typical for

  11. Computational simulation of turbulent natural convection in a corium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Camila B.; Su, Jian; Niceno, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    After a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, the total thermal loading on the vessel of a nuclear reactor is controlled by the convective heat transfer. Taking that fact into account, this work aimed to analyze the turbulent natural convection inside a representative lower head cavity. By means of an open-source CFD code, OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation), numerical simulations were performed to investigate a volumetrically heated fluid (Pr = 7.0) at internal Rayleigh (Ra) numbers ranging from 10 8 to 10 15 . Bearing in mind that severe accident scenario and the physical-chemical effects are many and complex, the fluid analyzed was considered Newtonian, with constant physical properties, homogeneous and single phase. Even working with that simplifications, the modeling of turbulent natural convection has posed a considerable challenge for the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations based models, not only because of the complete unsteadiness of the flow and the strong turbulence effects in the near wall regions, but also because of the correct treatment of the turbulent heat fluxes (θu i ). So, this work outlined three approaches for treating the turbulent heat fluxes: the Simple Gradient Diffusion Hypothesis (SGDH), the Generalized Gradient Diffusion Hypothesis (GGDH) and the Algebraic Flux Model (AFM). Simulations performed at BALI test based geometry with a four equations model, k-ε-v 2 -f (commonly called as v 2 -f and V2-f), showed that despite of AFM and GGDH have provided reasonable agreement with experimental data for turbulent natural convection in a differentially heated cavity, they proved to be very unstable for buoyancy-driven flows with internal source in comparison to SGDH model. (author)

  12. Computational simulation of turbulent natural convection in a corium pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Camila B.; Su, Jian, E-mail: camila@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br, E-mail: sujian@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Cursos de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Niceno, Bojan, E-mail: bojan.niceno@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Nuclear Energy and Safety

    2013-07-01

    After a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, the total thermal loading on the vessel of a nuclear reactor is controlled by the convective heat transfer. Taking that fact into account, this work aimed to analyze the turbulent natural convection inside a representative lower head cavity. By means of an open-source CFD code, OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation), numerical simulations were performed to investigate a volumetrically heated fluid (Pr = 7.0) at internal Rayleigh (Ra) numbers ranging from 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 15}. Bearing in mind that severe accident scenario and the physical-chemical effects are many and complex, the fluid analyzed was considered Newtonian, with constant physical properties, homogeneous and single phase. Even working with that simplifications, the modeling of turbulent natural convection has posed a considerable challenge for the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations based models, not only because of the complete unsteadiness of the flow and the strong turbulence effects in the near wall regions, but also because of the correct treatment of the turbulent heat fluxes (θu{sub i}). So, this work outlined three approaches for treating the turbulent heat fluxes: the Simple Gradient Diffusion Hypothesis (SGDH), the Generalized Gradient Diffusion Hypothesis (GGDH) and the Algebraic Flux Model (AFM). Simulations performed at BALI test based geometry with a four equations model, k-ε-v{sup 2} -f (commonly called as v{sup 2}-f and V2-f), showed that despite of AFM and GGDH have provided reasonable agreement with experimental data for turbulent natural convection in a differentially heated cavity, they proved to be very unstable for buoyancy-driven flows with internal source in comparison to SGDH model. (author)

  13. Turbulent boundary layer in high Rayleigh number convection in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Puits, Ronald; Li, Ling; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André; Willert, Christian

    2014-03-28

    Flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in the boundary layer of a Rayleigh-Bénard experiment are presented for the Rayleigh number Ra=1.4×1010. Our visualizations indicate that the appearance of the flow structures is similar to ordinary (isothermal) turbulent boundary layers. Our particle image velocimetry measurements show that vorticity with both positive and negative sign is generated and that the smallest flow structures are 1 order of magnitude smaller than the boundary layer thickness. Additional local measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry yield turbulence intensities up to I=0.4 as in turbulent atmospheric boundary layers. From our observations, we conclude that the convective boundary layer becomes turbulent locally and temporarily although its Reynolds number Re≈200 is considerably smaller than the value 420 underlying existing phenomenological theories. We think that, in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, the transition of the boundary layer towards turbulence depends on subtle details of the flow field and is therefore not universal.

  14. Unstable mixed convective transport in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schincariol, R.A.; Schwartz, F.W.

    1990-01-01

    This study is an experimental investigation of variable density groundwater flow in homogeneous and lenticular porous media. A solution of 500 mg/l Rhodamine WT dye served as the carrier for various concentrations of solute (NaCl) introduced into a two-dimensional flow tank at concentrations ranging from 1000 to 100,000 mg/l. At the scale of the experiments, mass transport depends upon both forced and free convection. In addition, density differences as low as 0.008 g/cm 3 (1000 mg/l NaCl) between a plume of dense water and ambient groundwater in homogeneous medium produces gravitational instabilities at realistic groundwater velocities. These instabilities are manifest by lobe-shaped protuberances that formed first along the bottom edge of the plume and later within the plume. As the density difference increases to 0.0015 g/cm 3 (2000 mg/l NaCl), 0.0037 g/cm 3 (5000 mg/l NaCl) or higher, this unstable mixing due to convective dispersion significantly alters the spreading process, resulting in a large degree of vertical spreading of the plume. In a lenticular medium the combination of convective dispersion and nonuniform flow due to heterogeneities results in relatively large dispersion. Scale considerations indicate that convective dispersion may provide an important component of mixing at the field scale. (Author) (30 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.)

  15. Temperature boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Emily S. C.; Emran, Mohammad S.; Horn, Susanne; Shishkina, Olga

    2017-11-01

    Classical boundary-layer theory for steady flows cannot adequately describe the boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection. We have developed a thermal boundary layer equation which takes into account fluctuations in terms of an eddy thermal diffusivity. Based on Prandtl's mixing length ideas, we relate the eddy thermal diffusivity to the stream function. With this proposed relation, we can solve the thermal boundary layer equation and obtain a closed-form expression for the dimensionless mean temperature profile in terms of two independent parameters: θ(ξ) =1/b∫0b ξ [ 1 +3a3/b3(η - arctan(η)) ] - c dη , where ξ is the similarity variable and the parameters a, b, and c are related by the condition θ(∞) = 1 . With a proper choice of the parameters, our predictions of the temperature profile are in excellent agreement with the results of our direct numerical simulations for a wide range of Prandtl numbers (Pr), from Pr=0.01 to Pr=2547.9. OS, ME and SH acknowledge the financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under Grants Sh405/4-2 (Heisenberg fellowship), Sh405/3-2 and Ho 5890/1-1, respectively.

  16. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Stevens, Richard J A M; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-06-04

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much-enhanced natural convection. In this article, we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection process in a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping this difference constant, we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between 2 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(9). We find a considerable enhancement of the heat transfer and study its dependence on the number of bubbles, the degree of superheat of the hot cell bottom, and the Rayleigh number. The increased buoyancy provided by the bubbles leads to more energetic hot plumes detaching from the cell bottom, and the strength of the circulation in the cell is significantly increased. Our results are in general agreement with recent experiments on boiling Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  17. Sensitivity study of CFD turbulent models for natural convection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu sun, Park

    2007-01-01

    The buoyancy driven convective flow fields are steady circulatory flows which were made between surfaces maintained at two fixed temperatures. They are ubiquitous in nature and play an important role in many engineering applications. Application of a natural convection can reduce the costs and efforts remarkably. This paper focuses on the sensitivity study of turbulence analysis using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) for a natural convection in a closed rectangular cavity. Using commercial CFD code, FLUENT and various turbulent models were applied to the turbulent flow. Results from each CFD model will be compared each other in the viewpoints of grid resolution and flow characteristics. It has been showed that: -) obtaining general flow characteristics is possible with relatively coarse grid; -) there is no significant difference between results from finer grid resolutions than grid with y + + is defined as y + = ρ*u*y/μ, u being the wall friction velocity, y being the normal distance from the center of the cell to the wall, ρ and μ being respectively the fluid density and the fluid viscosity; -) the K-ε models show a different flow characteristic from K-ω models or from the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM); and -) the y + parameter is crucial for the selection of the appropriate turbulence model to apply within the simulation

  18. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations; Convection thermique turbulente: panaches et fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibert, M

    2007-10-15

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  19. Spectrally-consistent regularization modeling of turbulent natural convection flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trias, F Xavier; Gorobets, Andrey; Oliva, Assensi; Verstappen, Roel

    2012-01-01

    The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations constitute an excellent mathematical modelization of turbulence. Unfortunately, attempts at performing direct simulations are limited to relatively low-Reynolds numbers because of the almost numberless small scales produced by the non-linear convective term. Alternatively, a dynamically less complex formulation is proposed here. Namely, regularizations of the Navier-Stokes equations that preserve the symmetry and conservation properties exactly. To do so, both convective and diffusive terms are altered in the same vein. In this way, the convective production of small scales is effectively restrained whereas the modified diffusive term introduces a hyperviscosity effect and consequently enhances the destruction of small scales. In practice, the only additional ingredient is a self-adjoint linear filter whose local filter length is determined from the requirement that vortex-stretching must stop at the smallest grid scale. In the present work, the performance of the above-mentioned recent improvements is assessed through application to turbulent natural convection flows by means of comparison with DNS reference data.

  20. Convection causes enhanced magnetic turbulence in accretion disks in outburst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Shigenobu [Department of Mathematical Science and Advanced Technology, JAMSTEC, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan); Blaes, Omer; Coleman, Matthew S. B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Krolik, Julian H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sano, Takayoshi, E-mail: shirose@jamstec.go.jp [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-05-20

    We present the results of local, vertically stratified, radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shearing box simulations of magneto-rotational instability (MRI) turbulence appropriate for the hydrogen ionizing regime of dwarf nova and soft X-ray transient outbursts. We incorporate the frequency-integrated opacities and equation of state for this regime, but neglect non-ideal MHD effects and surface irradiation, and do not impose net vertical magnetic flux. We find two stable thermal equilibrium tracks in the effective temperature versus surface mass density plane, in qualitative agreement with the S-curve picture of the standard disk instability model. We find that the large opacity at temperatures near 10{sup 4} K, a corollary of the hydrogen ionization transition, triggers strong, intermittent thermal convection on the upper stable branch. This convection strengthens the magnetic turbulent dynamo and greatly enhances the time-averaged value of the stress to thermal pressure ratio α, possibly by generating vertical magnetic field that may seed the axisymmetric MRI, and by increasing cooling so that the pressure does not rise in proportion to the turbulent dissipation. These enhanced stress to pressure ratios may alleviate the order of magnitude discrepancy between the α-values observationally inferred in the outburst state and those that have been measured from previous local numerical simulations of magnetorotational turbulence that lack net vertical magnetic flux.

  1. Thermally driven convective cells and tokamak edge turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.R.; Diamond, P.H.

    1987-07-01

    A unified theory for the dynamics of thermally driven convective cell turbulence is presented. The cells are excited by the combined effects of radiative cooling and resistivity gradient drive. The model also includes impurity dynamics. Parallel thermal and impurity flows enhanced by turbulent radial duffusion regulate and saturate overlapping cells, even in regimes dominated by thermal instability. Transport coefficients and fluctuation levels characteristic of the saturated turbulence are calculated. It is found that the impurity radiation increases transport coefficients for high density plasmas, while the parallel conduction damping, elevated by radial diffusion, in turn quenches the thermal instability. The enhancement due to radiative cooling provides a resolution to the dilemma of explaining the experimental observation that potential fluctuations exceed density fluctuations in the edge plasma (e PHI/T/sub e/ > n/n 0 )

  2. Understanding and representing the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transfer in the convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronda, R.J.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Pino, D.

    2012-01-01

    Goal of this study is to quantify the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transport in the dry Convective Boundary Layer (CBL). Questions addressed include the effect of wind shear on the depth of the mixed layer, the effect of wind shear on the depth and structure of the capping inversion, and

  3. Mixing in heterogeneous internally-heated convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limare, A.; Kaminski, E. C.; Jaupart, C. P.; Farnetani, C. G.; Fourel, L.; Froment, M.

    2017-12-01

    Past laboratory experiments of thermo chemical convection have dealt with systems involving fluids with different intrinsic densities and viscosities in a Rayleigh-Bénard setup. Although these experiments have greatly improved our understanding of the Earth's mantle dynamics, they neglect a fundamental component of planetary convection: internal heat sources. We have developed a microwave-based method in order to study convection and mixing in systems involving two layers of fluid with different densities, viscosities, and internal heat production rates. Our innovative laboratory experiments are appropriate for the early Earth, when the lowermost mantle was likely enriched in incompatible and heat producing elements and when the heat flux from the core probably accounted for a small fraction of the mantle heat budget. They are also relevant to the present-day mantle if one considers that radioactive decay and secular cooling contribute both to internal heating. Our goal is to quantify how two fluid layers mix, which is still very difficult to resolve accurately in 3-D numerical calculations. Viscosities and microwave absorptions are tuned to achieve high values of the Rayleigh-Roberts and Prandtl numbers relevant for planetary convection. We start from a stably stratified system where the lower layer has higher internal heat production and density than the upper layer. Due to mixing, the amount of enriched material gradually decreases to zero over a finite time called the lifetime. Based on more than 30 experiments, we have derived a scaling law that relates the lifetime of an enriched reservoir to the layer thickness ratio, a, to the density and viscosity contrasts between the two layers, and to their two different internal heating rates in the form of an enrichment factor beta=1+2*a*H1/H, where H1 is the heating rate of the lower fluid and H is the average heating rate. We find that the lifetime of the lower enriched reservoir varies as beta**(-7/3) in the low

  4. Molecular mixing in turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of a diffusive scalar field subject to turbulent stirring is investigated by comparing two new modeling approaches, the linear-eddy model and the clipped-laminar-profile representation, to results previously obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) and by mapping-closure analysis. The comparisons indicate that scalar field evolution is sensitive to the bandwidth of the stirring process, and they suggest that the good agreement between DNS and mapping closure reflects the narrowband character of both. The new models predict qualitatively new behaviors in the wideband stirring regime corresponding to high-Reynolds-number turbulence

  5. Convection Enhances Magnetic Turbulence in AM CVn Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Matthew S. B.; Blaes, Omer; Hirose, Shigenobu; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2018-04-01

    We present the results of local, vertically stratified, radiation magnetohydrodynamic shearing-box simulations of magnetorotational instability (MRI) turbulence for a (hydrogen poor) composition applicable to accretion disks in AM CVn type systems. Many of these accreting white dwarf systems are helium analogs of dwarf novae (DNe). We utilize frequency-integrated opacity and equation-of-state tables appropriate for this regime to accurately portray the relevant thermodynamics. We find bistability of thermal equilibria in the effective-temperature, surface-mass-density plane typically associated with disk instabilities. Along this equilibrium curve (i.e., the S-curve), we find that the stress to thermal pressure ratio α varied with peak values of ∼0.15 near the tip of the upper branch. Similar to DNe, we found enhancement of α near the tip of the upper branch caused by convection; this increase in α occurred despite our choice of zero net vertical magnetic flux. Two notable differences we find between DN and AM CVn accretion disk simulations are that AM CVn disks are capable of exhibiting persistent convection in outburst, and ideal MHD is valid throughout quiescence for AM CVns. In contrast, DNe simulations only show intermittent convection, and nonideal MHD effects are likely important in quiescence. By combining our previous work with these new results, we also find that convective enhancement of the MRI is anticorrelated with mean molecular weight.

  6. Review of Mixed Convection Flow Regime Map of a Vertical pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Myeong-Seon; Chung, Bum-Jin; Kang, Gyeong-Uk

    2015-01-01

    In a vertical pipe, the natural convective force due to buoyancy acts upward only, but forced convective force can be either upward or downward. This determines buoyancy-aided and buoyancy-opposed flows depending on the direction of forced flow with respect to the buoyancy forces. Furthermore, depending on the exchange mechanism, the flow condition is classified into laminar and turbulent. In laminar mixed convection, buoyancy-aided flow presents enhanced heat transfer compared to the pure forced convection and buoyancy-opposed flow shows impaired heat transfer as the flow velocity affected by the buoyancy forces. However, in turbulent mixed convection, buoyancy-aided flow shows an impairment of the heat transfer rate for small buoyancy, and a gradational enhancement for large buoyancy. In this study, the existing flow regime map on mixed convection in a vertical pipe was reviewed through an analysis of literatures. Using the investigated data and heat transfer correlations, the flow regime map was reconstructed independently, and compared with the existing one. This study reviewed the limitations of the classical mixed convection flow regime map. Using the existing data and heat transfer correlations by Martinelli and Boelter and Watzinger and Johnson, the flow regime map was reconstructed independently. The results revealed that the existing map used the data selectively among the experimental and theoretical results, and a detailed description for lines forming mixed convection and transition regime were not given. And the information about uncertainty analysis and the evidentiary data were given insufficiently. The flow regime map and investigator commonly used the diameter as the characteristic length for both Re and Gr in place of the height of the heated wall, though the buoyancy forces are proportional to the third power of the height of heated wall

  7. Thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of forced and mixed convection flow through vertical rectangular channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafi Abdalla S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental and numerical studies for the case of turbulent forced and mixed convection flow of water through narrow vertical rectangular channel. The channel is composed of two parallel plates which are heated at a uniform heat flux, whereas, the other two sides of the channel are thermally insulated. The plates are of 64 mm in width, 800 mm in height, and separated from each other at a narrow gap of 2.7 mm. The Nusselt number distribution along the flow direction normalized by the Nusselt number for the case of turbulent forced convection flow is obtained experimentally with a comparison with the numerical results obtained from a commercial computer code. The quantitative determination of the nor- malized Nusselt number with respect to the dimension-less number Z = (Gr/Re21/8Pr0.5 is presented with a comparison with previous experimental results. Qualitative results are presented for the normalized temperature and velocity profiles in the transverse direction with a comparison between the forced and mixed convection flow for both the cases of upward and downward flow directions. The effect of the axial locations and the parameter Gr/Re on the variation of the normalized temperature profiles in the transverse direction for both the regions of forced and mixed convection and for both of the upward and downward flow directions are obtained. The normalized velocity profiles in the transverse directions are also determined at different inlet velocity and heat fluxes for the previous cases. It is found that the normalized Nusselt number is greater than one in the mixed convection region for both the cases of upward and downward flow and correlated well with the dimension-less parameter Z for both of the forced and mixed convection regions. The temperature profiles increase with increasing the axial location along the flow direction or the parameter Gr/Re for both of the forced and mixed convection regions, but this increase is

  8. Further improvements of a new model for turbulent convection in stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.; Mazzitelli, I.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of including a variable molecular weight and of using the newest opacities of Rogers and Iglesias (1991) as inputs to a recent model by Canuto and Mazzitelli (1991) for stellar turbulent convection are studied. Solar evolutionary tracks are used to conclude that the the original model for turbulence with mixing length Lambda = z, Giuli's variable Q unequal to 1 and the new opacities yields a fit to solar T(eff) within 0.5 percent. A formulation of Lambda is proposed that extends the purely nonlocal Lambda = z expression to include local effects. A new expression for Lambda is obtained which generalizes both the mixing length theory (MLT) phenomenological expression for Lambda as well as the model Lambda = z. It is argued that the MLT should now be abandoned.

  9. Turbulent solutal convection and surface patterning in solid dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.S.; Liu, Y.; Ecke, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    We describe experiments in which crystals of NaCl, KBr, and KCl are dissolved from below by aqueous solutions containing concentrations of the respective salts from zero concentration to near saturation. The solution near the solid-liquid interface is gravitationally unstable, producing turbulent hydrodynamic motion similar to thermal convection from a single surface cooled from above. The coupling of the fluid flow with the solid dissolution produces irregular patterns at the solid-liquid interface with a distribution of horizontal length scales. The dissolution mass flux and the pattern length scales are compared with a turbulent boundary layer model. Remarkable agreement is found, showing that the fluid motion controls both the dissolution rate and the interface patterning. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. Mixed convection flow past a horizontal plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Lj.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The mixed convection flow past a horizontal plate being aligned through a small angle of attack to a uniform free stream will be considered in the limit of large Reynolds number and small Richardson number. Even a small angle of inclination of the wake is sufficient for the buoyancy force to accelerate the flow in the wake which causes a velocity overshoot in the wake. Moreover a hydrostatic pressure difference across the wake induces a correction to the potential flow which influences the inclination of the wake. Thus the wake and the correction of the potential flow have to be determined simultaneously. However, it turns out that solutions exist only if the angle of attack is sufficiently large. Solutions are computed numerically and the influence of the buoyancy on the lift coefficient is determined.

  11. Mixed convection in fluid superposed porous layers

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, John M

    2017-01-01

    This Brief describes and analyzes flow and heat transport over a liquid-saturated porous bed. The porous bed is saturated by a liquid layer and heating takes place from a section of the bottom. The effect on flow patterns of heating from the bottom is shown by calculation, and when the heating is sufficiently strong, the flow is affected through the porous and upper liquid layers. Measurements of the heat transfer rate from the heated section confirm calculations. General heat transfer laws are developed for varying porous bed depths for applications to process industry needs, environmental sciences, and materials processing. Addressing a topic of considerable interest to the research community, the brief features an up-to-date literature review of mixed convection energy transport in fluid superposed porous layers.

  12. An experimental study of mixed convection; Contribution a l'etude experimentale de la convection mixte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez, M.

    1998-10-20

    The aim of our study is to establish a reliable database for improving thermal hydraulic codes, in the field of turbulent flows with buoyancy forces. The flow considered is mixed convection in the Reynolds and Richardson number range: Re = 10{sup 3} to 6.10{sup 4} and Ri = 10{sup -4} to 1. Experiments are carried out in an upward turbulent flow between vertical parallel plates at different wall temperatures. Part 1 gives a detailed database of turbulent mixed flow of free and forced convection. Part 2 presents the installation and the calibration system intended for probes calibration. Part 3 describes the measurement technique (constant temperature probe and cold-wire probe) and the method for measuring the position of the hot-wire anemometer from the wall surface. The measurement accuracy is within 0.001 mm in the present system. Part 4 relates the development of a method for near wall measurements. This correction procedure for hot-wire anemometer close to wall has been derived on the basis of a two-dimensional numerical study. The method permits to obtain a quantitative correction of the wall influence on hot-wires and takes into account the velocity profile and the effects the wall material has on the heat loss. Part 5 presents the experimental data obtained in the channel in forced and mixed convection. Results obtained in the forced convection regime serve as a verification of the measurement technique close to the wall and give the conditions at the entrance of the test section. The effects of the buoyancy force on the mean velocity and temperature profiles are confirmed. The buoyancy strongly affects the fluid structure and deforms the distribution of mean velocity. The velocity profiles are asymmetric. The second section of part 5 gives an approach of analytical wall functions with buoyancy forces, on the basis of the experimental data obtained in the test section. (author)

  13. Heat transfer of laminar mixed convection of liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, De-Yi

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new algorithm to calculate fluid flow and heat transfer of laminar mixed convection. It provides step-by-step tutorial help to learn quickly how to set up the theoretical and numerical models of laminar mixed convection, to consider the variable physical properties of fluids, to obtain the system of numerical solutions, to create a series of formalization equations for the convection heat transfer by using a curve-fitting approach combined with theoretical analysis and derivation. It presents the governing ordinary differential equations of laminar mixed convection, equivalently transformed by an innovative similarity transformation with the description of the related transformation process. A system of numerical calculations of the governing ordinary differential equations is presented for the water laminar mixed convection. A polynomial model is induced for convenient and reliable treatment of variable physical properties of liquids. The developed formalization equations of mixed convec...

  14. Flapping model of scalar mixing in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    Motivated by the fluctuating plume model of turbulent mixing downstream of a point source, a flapping model is formulated for application to other configurations. For the scalar mixing layer, simple expressions for single-point scalar fluctuation statistics are obtained that agree with measurements. For a spatially homogeneous scalar mixing field, the family of probability density functions previously derived using mapping closure is reproduced. It is inferred that single-point scalar statistics may depend primarily on large-scale flapping motions in many cases of interest, and thus that multipoint statistics may be the principal indicators of finer-scale mixing effects

  15. Measurements of Turbulent Convection Speeds in Multistream Jets Using Time-Resolved PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    Convection speeds of turbulent velocities in jets, including multi-stream jets with and without flight stream, were measured using an innovative application of time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The paper describes the unique instrumentation and data analysis that allows the measurement to be made. Extensive data is shown that relates convection speed, mean velocity, and turbulent velocities for multiple jet cases. These data support the overall observation that the local turbulent convection speed is roughly that of the local mean velocity, biased by the relative intensity of turbulence.

  16. Measurements of Turbulence Convection Speeds in Multistream Jets Using Time-Resolved PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    Convection speeds of turbulent velocities in jets, including multi-stream jets with and without flight stream, were measured using an innovative application of time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The paper describes the unique instrumentation and data analysis that allows the measurement to be made. Extensive data is shown that relates convection speed, mean velocity, and turbulent velocities for multiple jet cases. These data support the overall observation that the local turbulent convection speed is roughly that of the local mean velocity, biased by the relative intensity of turbulence.

  17. Plume dynamics in quasi-2D turbulent convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizon, C.; Werne, J.; Predtechensky, A.A.; Julien, K.; McCormick, W.D.; Swift, J.B.; Swinney, H.L.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied turbulent convection in a vertical thin (Hele-Shaw) cell at very high Rayleigh numbers (up to 7x10 4 times the value for convective onset) through experiment, simulation, and analysis. Experimentally, convection is driven by an imposed concentration gradient in an isothermal cell. Model equations treat the fields in two dimensions, with the reduced dimension exerting its influence through a linear wall friction. Linear stability analysis of these equations demonstrates that as the thickness of the cell tends to zero, the critical Rayleigh number and wave number for convective onset do not depend on the velocity conditions at the top and bottom boundaries (i.e., no-slip or stress-free). At finite cell thickness δ, however, solutions with different boundary conditions behave differently. We simulate the model equations numerically for both types of boundary conditions. Time sequences of the full concentration fields from experiment and simulation display a large number of solutal plumes that are born in thin concentration boundary layers, merge to form vertical channels, and sometimes split at their tips via a Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Power spectra of the concentration field reveal scaling regions with slopes that depend on the Rayleigh number. We examine the scaling of nondimensional heat flux (the Nusselt number, Nu) and rms vertical velocity (the Pacute eclet number, Pe) with the Rayleigh number (Ra * ) for the simulations. Both no-slip and stress-free solutions exhibit the scaling NuRa * ∼Pe 2 that we develop from simple arguments involving dynamics in the interior, away from cell boundaries. In addition, for stress-free solutions a second relation, Nu∼√(nPe), is dictated by stagnation-point flows occurring at the horizontal boundaries; n is the number of plumes per unit length. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Theory of modulational interaction of trapped ion convective cells and drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, V.D.; Diamond, P.H.; Lebedev, V.; Soloviev, G.; Shevchenko, V.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical and computational studies of the modulational interaction between trapped ion convective cells and short wavelength drift wave turbulence are discussed. These studies are motivated by the fact that cells and drift waves are expected to coexist in tokamaks so that: (a) cells strain and modulate drift waves, and (b) drift waves open-quote ride on close-quote a background of cells. The results of the authors' investigation indicate that: (1) (nonlinear) parametric growth rates of trapped ion convective cells can exceed linear predictions (for drift wave levels at the mixing length limit); (2) a set of coupled envelope equations, akin to the Zakharov equations from Langmuir turbulence, can be derived and used to predict the formation of a dipole pair of convective cells trapped by the drift wave envelope. This dipole pair is strongly anisotropic, due to the structure of the drift wave Reynolds stress which drives the cell flow. Numerical solutions of the envelope equations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, and indicate the persistence of the structure in time; (3) strong modulation and trapping of drift waves with k perpendicular ρ > 1 occurs. Extensions to magnetically sheared systems and the broader implications of this work as a paradigm for the dynamics of persistent structures in shearing flows are discussed

  19. Mean-field theory of differential rotation in density stratified turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogachevskii, I.

    2018-04-01

    A mean-field theory of differential rotation in a density stratified turbulent convection has been developed. This theory is based on the combined effects of the turbulent heat flux and anisotropy of turbulent convection on the Reynolds stress. A coupled system of dynamical budget equations consisting in the equations for the Reynolds stress, the entropy fluctuations and the turbulent heat flux has been solved. To close the system of these equations, the spectral approach, which is valid for large Reynolds and Péclet numbers, has been applied. The adopted model of the background turbulent convection takes into account an increase of the turbulence anisotropy and a decrease of the turbulent correlation time with the rotation rate. This theory yields the radial profile of the differential rotation which is in agreement with that for the solar differential rotation.

  20. Convective equilibrium and mixing-length theory for stellarator reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    In high β stellarator and tokamak reactors, the plasma pressure gradient in some regions of the plasma may exceed the critical pressure gradient set by ballooning instabilities. In these regions, convective cells break out to enhance the transport. As a result, the pressure gradient can rise only slightly above the critical gradient and the plasma is in another state of equilibrium - ''convective equilibrium'' - in these regions. Although the convective transport cannot be calculated precisely, it is shown that the density and temperature profiles in the convective region can still be estimated. A simple mixing-length theory, similar to that used for convection in stellar interiors, is introduced in this paper to provide a qualitative description of the convective cells and to show that the convective transport is highly efficient. A numerical example for obtaining the density and temperature profiles in a stellarator reactor is given

  1. Turbulence convective heat transfer for cooling the photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arianmehr, Iman

    Solar PV (photovoltaic) is a rapidly advancing renewable energy technology which converts sunlight directly into electricity. One of the outstanding challenges of the current PV technology is the reduction in its conversion efficiency with increasing PV panel temperature, which is closely associated with the increase in solar intensity and the ambient temperature surrounding the PV panels. To more effectively capture the available energy when the sun is most intense, significant efforts have been invested in active and passive cooling research over the last few years. While integrated cooling systems can lead to the highest total efficiencies, they are usually neither the most feasible nor the most cost effective solutions. This work examines some simple passive means of manipulating the prevailing wind turbulence to enhance convective heat transfer over a heated plate in a wind tunnel.

  2. An investigation of implicit turbulence modeling for laminar-turbulent transition in natural convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunggang; Tsubokura, Makoto; Wang, Weihsiang

    2017-11-01

    The automatic dissipation adjustment (ADA) model based on truncated Navier-Stokes equations is utilized to investigate the feasibility of using implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) with ADA model on the transition in natural convection. Due to the high Rayleigh number coming from the larger temperature difference (300K), Roe scheme modified for low Mach numbers coordinating ADA model is used to resolve the complicated flow field. Based on the qualitative agreement of the comparisons with DNS and experimental results and the capability of numerically predicating a -3 decay law for the temporal power spectrum of the temperature fluctuation, this study thus validates the feasibility of ILES with ADA model on turbulent natural convection. With the advantages of ease of implementation because no explicit modeling terms are needed and nearly free of tuning parameters, ADA model offers to become a promising tool for turbulent thermal convection. Part of the results is obtained using the K computer at the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (Proposal number hp160232).

  3. Direct numerical simulation and modeling of turbulent natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudjemadi, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are the direct numerical simulation of natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot and the improvements of second-order turbulence modelling. A three-dimensional direct numerical simulation code has been developed in order to gain a better understanding of turbulence properties in natural convection flows. This code has been validated in several physical configurations: non-stratified natural convection flows (conduction solution), stratified natural convection flows (double boundary layer solution), transitional and turbulent Poiseuille flows. For the conduction solution, the turbulent regime was reached at a Rayleigh number of 1*10 5 and 5.4*10 5 . A detailed analysis of these results has revealed the principal qualities of the available models but has also pointed our their shortcomings. This data base has been used in order to improve the triple correlations transport models and to select the turbulent time scales suitable for such flows. (author). 122 refs., figs., tabs., 4 appends

  4. Turbulent thermal superstructures in Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard J. A. M.; Blass, Alexander; Zhu, Xiaojue; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2018-04-01

    We report the observation of superstructures, i.e., very large-scale and long living coherent structures in highly turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection up to Rayleigh Ra=109 . We perform direct numerical simulations in horizontally periodic domains with aspect ratios up to Γ =128 . In the considered Ra number regime the thermal superstructures have a horizontal extend of six to seven times the height of the domain and their size is independent of Ra. Many laboratory experiments and numerical simulations have focused on small aspect ratio cells in order to achieve the highest possible Ra. However, here we show that for very high Ra integral quantities such as the Nusselt number and volume averaged Reynolds number only converge to the large aspect ratio limit around Γ ≈4 , while horizontally averaged statistics such as standard deviation and kurtosis converge around Γ ≈8 , the integral scale converges around Γ ≈32 , and the peak position of the temperature variance and turbulent kinetic energy spectra only converge around Γ ≈64 .

  5. Heat Transport Enhancement of Turbulent Thermal Convection by Inserted Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Zhang, Lu

    2017-11-01

    We report an experimental study on the heat transport properties of turbulent Rayleigh Benard Convection (RBC) in a rectangular cell with two types of 3D-printed structures inserted inside. The first one splits the original rectangular cell into 60 identical sub cells whose aspect ratio is 1:1:10 (length, width, height). The second one splits the cell into 30 sub cells, each with a 1:2:10 aspect ratio and a baffle in the center. We find that for large Rayleigh numbers (Ra), the Nusselt numbers (Nu) of both structures increase compared with that of the empty rectangular cell. An enhancement in Nu as much as 20% is found for the second type of insertion at Rayleigh number 2 ×109 . Moreover, the Nu-Ra scaling shows a transition with both geometries. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement within a single sub unit indicates that the transition may be related to the laminar to turbulent transition in flow field. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) confirm the experimental results. Our results demonstrate the potential in using insertions to enhance passive heat transfer. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council (RGC) of HKSAR (Nos. CUHK404513 and CUHK14301115).

  6. Kinetic thermal structure in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yin, Ze-Xia; She, Zhen-Su; Bao, Yun

    2017-11-01

    Plumes are believed to be the most important heat carrier in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC). However, a physically sound and clear definition of plume is still absent. We report here the investigation of a definition of plume called kinetic thermal structure (KTS), based on the analysis of vertical velocity gradient (Λ = ∂w / ∂z), using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of the three-dimensional RBC in a rectangular cell for Pr = 0.7 and Ra = 1 ×108 5 ×109 . It is shown that the conditional average of temperature on Λ exhibits such a behavior that when Λ is larger than a threshold, the volume carries a constant temperature of fluid, hence defines an unambiguous thermal structure, KTS. The DNS show that the KTS behaves in a sheet-like shape near the conducting plate, and becomes slender and smaller with increasing Ra . The heat flux carried by KTS displays a scaling law, with an exponent larger than the global- Nu - Ra scaling, indicating stronger heat transport than the turbulent background. An advantage of the KTS is its connection to the balance equation allowing, for the first time, a prediction of the Ra -dependence of its vertical velocity and the characteristic Λ threshold, validated by DNS. Supported by NSFC (11172006, 11221062, 11452002), and by MOST (China) 973 project (2009CB724100).

  7. Direct numerical simulation and statistical analysis of turbulent convection in lead-bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otic, I.; Grotzbach, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institut fuer Kern-und Energietechnik (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Improved turbulent heat flux models are required to develop and analyze the reactor concept of an lead-bismuth cooled Accelerator-Driven-System. Because of specific properties of many liquid metals we have still no sensors for accurate measurements of the high frequency velocity fluctuations. So, the development of the turbulent heat transfer models which are required in our CFD (computational fluid dynamics) tools needs also data from direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows. We use new simulation results for the model problem of Rayleigh-Benard convection to show some peculiarities of the turbulent natural convection in lead-bismuth (Pr = 0.025). Simulations for this flow at sufficiently large turbulence levels became only recently feasible because this flow requires the resolution of very small velocity scales with the need for recording long-wave structures for the slow changes in the convective temperature field. The results are analyzed regarding the principle convection and heat transfer features. They are also used to perform statistical analysis to show that the currently available modeling is indeed not adequate for these fluids. Basing on the knowledge of the details of the statistical features of turbulence in this convection type and using the two-point correlation technique, a proposal for an improved statistical turbulence model is developed which is expected to account better for the peculiarities of the heat transfer in the turbulent convection in low Prandtl number fluids. (authors)

  8. Chemical Reactions in Turbulent Mixing Flows. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-02

    jet diameter F2 fluorine H2 hydrogen HF hydrogen fluoride I(y) instantaneous fluorescence intensity distribution L-s flame length measured from...virtual origin -.4 of turbulent region (L-s). flame length at high Reynolds number LIF laser induced fluorescence N2 nitrogen PI product thickness (defined...mixing is attained as a function of the equivallence ratio. For small values of the equivalence ratio f, the flame length - defined here as the

  9. Experimental study of laminar mixed convection in a rod bundle with mixing vane spacer grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanta, Lokanath, E-mail: lxm971@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Cheung, Fan-Bill [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bajorek, Stephen M.; Tien, Kirk; Hoxie, Chris L. [Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Investigated the heat transfer during mixed laminar convection in a rod bundle with linearly varying heat flux. • The Nusselt number increases downstream of the inlet with increasing Richardson number. • Developed an enhancement factor to account for the effects of mixed convection over the forced laminar heat transfer. - Abstract: Heat transfer by mixed convection in a rod bundle occurs when convection is affected by both the buoyancy and inertial forces. Mixed convection can be assumed when the Richardson number (Ri = Gr/Re{sup 2}) is on the order of unity, indicating that both forced and natural convection are important contributors to heat transfer. In the present study, data obtained from the Rod Bundle Heat Transfer (RBHT) facility was used to determine the heat transfer coefficient in the mixed convection regime, which was found to be significantly larger than those expected assuming purely forced convection based on the inlet flow rate. The inlet Reynolds (Re) number for the tests ranged from 500 to 1300, while the Grashof (Gr) number varied from 1.5 × 10{sup 5} to 3.8 × 10{sup 6} yielding 0.25 < Ri < 4.3. Using results from RBHT test along with the correlation from the FLECHT-SEASET test program for laminar forced convection, a new correlation ​is proposed for mixed convection in a rod bundle. The new correlation accounts for the enhancement of heat transfer relative to laminar forced convection.

  10. A correlation for single phase turbulent mixing in square rod arrays under highly turbulent conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Yong; Ha, Kwi Seok; Kwon, Young Min; Chang, Won Pyo; Lee, Yong Bum

    2006-01-01

    The existing experimental data related to the turbulent mixing factor in rod arrays is examined and a new definition of the turbulent mixing factor is introduced to take into account the turbulent mixing of fluids with various Prandtl numbers. The new definition of the mixing factor is based on the eddy diffusivity of energy. With this definition of the mixing factor, it was found that the geometrical parameter, δ ij /D h , correlates the turbulent mixing data better than S/d, which has been used frequently in existing correlations. Based on the experimental data for a highly turbulent condition in square rod arrays, a correlation describing turbulent mixing dependent on the parameter δ ij /D h has been developed. The correlation is insensitive to the Re number and it takes into account the effect of the turbulent Prandtl number. The proposed correlation predicts a reasonable mixing even at a lower S/d ratio

  11. Laminar Mixed Convection Heat Transfer Correlation for Horizontal Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Myeong Seon; Chung, Bum Jin

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at producing experimental results and developing a new heat transfer correlation based upon a semi-empirical buoyancy coefficient. Mixed convection mass transfers inside horizontal pipe were investigated for the pipe of various length-to-diameters with varying Re. Forced convection correlation was developed using a very short cathode. With the length of cathode increase and Re decrease, the heat transfer rates were enhanced and becomes higher than that of forced convection. An empirical buoyancy coefficient was derived from correlation of natural convection and forced convection with the addition of L/D. And the heat transfer correlation for laminar mixed convection was developed using the buoyancy coefficient, it describes not only current results, but also results of other studies. Mixed convection occurs when the driving forces of both forced and natural convections are of comparable magnitude (Gr/Re 2 ∼1). It is classical problem but is still an active area of research for various thermal applications such as flat plate solar collectors, nuclear reactors and heat exchangers. The effect of buoyancy on heat transfer in a forced flow is varied by the direction of the buoyancy force. In a horizontal pipe the direction of the forced and buoyancy forces are perpendicular. The studies on the mixed convections of the horizontal pipes were not investigated very much due to the lack of practical uses compared to those of vertical pipes. Even the definitions on the buoyancy coefficient that presents the relative influence of the forced and the natural convections, are different by scholars. And the proposed heat transfer correlations do not agree

  12. Turbulent mixing in nonreactive and reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    1975-01-01

    Turbulence, mixing and the mutual interaction of turbulence and chemistry continue to remain perplexing and impregnable in the fron­ tiers of fluid mechanics. The past ten years have brought enormous advances in computers and computational techniques on the one hand and in measurements and data processing on the other. The impact of such capabilities has led to a revolution both in the understanding of the structure of turbulence as well as in the predictive methods for application in technology. The early ideas on turbulence being an array of complicated phenomena and having some form of reasonably strong coherent struc­ ture have become well substantiated in recent experimental work. We are still at the very beginning of understanding all of the aspects of such coherence and of the possibilities of incorporating such structure into the analytical models for even those cases where the thin shear layer approximation may be valid. Nevertheless a distinguished body of "eddy chasers" has come into existence. T...

  13. Problems of mixed convection flow regime map in a vertical cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Gyeong Uk; Chung, Bum Jin

    2012-01-01

    One of the technical issues by the development of the VHTR is the mixed convection, which is the regime of heat transfer that occurs when the driving forces of both forced and natural convection are of comparable orders of magnitude. In vertical internal flows, the buoyancy force acts upward only, but forced flows can move either upward or downward. Thus, there are two types of mixed convection flows, depending on the direction of the forced flow. When the directions of the forced flow and buoyancy are the same, the flow is a buoyancy aided flow; when they are opposite, the flow is a buoyancy opposed flow. In laminar flows, buoyancy aided flow shows enhanced heat transfer compared to the pure forced convection and buoyancy opposed flow shows impaired heat transfer due to the flow velocity affected by the buoyancy forces. In turbulent flows, however, buoyancy opposed flows shows enhanced heat transfer due to increased turbulence production and buoyancy aided flow shows impaired heat transfer at low buoyancy forces and as the buoyancy increases, the heat transfer restores and at further increases of the buoyancy forces, the heat transfer is enhanced. It is of primary interests to classify which convection regime is mainly dominant. The methods most used to classify between forced, mixed and natural convection have been to refer to the classical flow regime map suggested by Meta is and Eckert. During the course of fundamental literature studies on this topic, it is found that there are some problems on the flow regime map in a vertical cylinder. This paper is to discuss problems identified through reviewing the papers composed in the classical flow regime map. We have tried to reproduce the flow regime map independently using the data obtained from the literatures and compared with the classical flow regime map and finally, the problems on this topic were discussed

  14. Turbulent forced convection of nanofluids downstream an abrupt expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimouche, Abdelali; Mataoui, Amina

    2018-03-01

    Turbulent forced convection of Nanofluids through an axisymmetric abrupt expansion is investigated numerically in the present study. The governing equations are solved by ANYS 14.0 CFD code based on the finite volume method by implementing the thermo-physical properties of each nanofluid. All results are analyzed through the evolutions of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number. For each nanofluid, the effect of both volume fraction and Reynolds number on this type of flow configuration, are examined. An increase on average Nusselt number with the volume fraction and Reynolds number, are highlighted and correlated. Two relationships are proposed. The first one, determines the average Nusselt number versus Reynolds number, volume fraction and the ratio of densities of the solid particles to that of the base fluid ( \\overline{Nu}=f(\\operatorname{Re},φ, ρ_s/ρ_f) ). The second one varies according Reynolds number, volume fraction and the conductivities ratio of solid particle to that of the base fluid ( \\overline{Nu}=f(\\operatorname{Re},φ, k_s/k_f) ).

  15. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of mixed convection flows in buildings enclosures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayne, Alexander; Agarwal, Ramesh K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In recent years Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are increasingly used to model the air circulation and temperature environment inside the rooms of residential and office buildings to gain insight into the relative energy consumptions of various HVAC systems for cooling/heating for climate control and thermal comfort. This requires accurate simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer for various types of ventilation systems using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations of fluid dynamics. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) or Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Navier-Stokes equations is computationally intensive and expensive for simulations of this kind. As a result, vast majority of CFD simulations employ RANS equations in conjunction with a turbulence model. In order to assess the modeling requirements (mesh, numerical algorithm, turbulence model etc.) for accurate simulations, it is critical to validate the calculations against the experimental data. For this purpose, we use three well known benchmark validation cases, one for natural convection in 2D closed vertical cavity, second for forced convection in a 2D rectangular cavity and the third for mixed convection in a 2D square cavity. The simulations are performed on a number of meshes of different density using a number of turbulence models. It is found that k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model with a second-order algorithm on a reasonable mesh gives the best results. This information is then used to determine the modeling requirements (mesh, numerical algorithm, turbulence model etc.) for flows in 3D enclosures with different ventilation systems. In particular two cases are considered for which the experimental data is available. These cases are (1) air flow and heat transfer in a naturally ventilated room and (2) airflow and temperature distribution in an atrium. Good agreement with the experimental data and computations of other investigators is obtained.

  16. Visualizing turbulent mixing of gases and particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu; Smith, Philip J.; Jain, Sandeep

    1995-01-01

    A physical model and interactive computer graphics techniques have been developed for the visualization of the basic physical process of stochastic dispersion and mixing from steady-state CFD calculations. The mixing of massless particles and inertial particles is visualized by transforming the vector field from a traditionally Eulerian reference frame into a Lagrangian reference frame. Groups of particles are traced through the vector field for the mean path as well as their statistical dispersion about the mean position by using added scalar information about the root mean square value of the vector field and its Lagrangian time scale. In this way, clouds of particles in a turbulent environment are traced, not just mean paths. In combustion simulations of many industrial processes, good mixing is required to achieve a sufficient degree of combustion efficiency. The ability to visualize this multiphase mixing can not only help identify poor mixing but also explain the mechanism for poor mixing. The information gained from the visualization can be used to improve the overall combustion efficiency in utility boilers or propulsion devices. We have used this technique to visualize steady-state simulations of the combustion performance in several furnace designs.

  17. An Automated System to Quantify Convectively induced Aircraft encounters with Turbulence over Europe and North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneguz, Elena; Turp, Debi; Wells, Helen

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that encounters with moderate or severe turbulence can lead to passenger injuries and incur high costs for airlines from compensation and litigation. As one of two World Area Forecast Centres (WAFCs), the Met Office has responsibility for forecasting en-route weather hazards worldwide for aviation above a height of 10,000 ft. Observations from commercial aircraft provide a basis for gaining a better understanding of turbulence and for improving turbulence forecasts through verification. However there is currently a lack of information regarding the possible cause of the observed turbulence, or whether the turbulence occurred within cloud. Such information would be invaluable for the development of forecasting techniques for particular types of turbulence and for forecast verification. Of all the possible sources of turbulence, convective activity is believed to be a major cause of turbulence. Its relative importance over the Europe and North Atlantic area has not been yet quantified in a systematic way: in this study, a new approach is developed to automate identification of turbulent encounters in the proximity of convective clouds. Observations of convection are provided from two independent sources: a surface based lightning network and satellite imagery. Lightning observations are taken from the Met Office Arrival Time Detections network (ATDnet). ATDnet has been designed to identify cloud-to-ground flashes over Europe but also detects (a smaller fraction of) strikes over the North Atlantic. Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite products are used to identify convective clouds by applying a brightness temperature filtering technique. The morphological features of cold cloud tops are also investigated. The system is run for all in situ turbulence reports received from airlines for a total of 12 months during summer 2013 and 2014 for the domain of interest. Results of this preliminary short term climatological study show significant intra

  18. Influence of convective conditions on three dimensional mixed convective hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, A., E-mail: raufamar@ciitsahiwal.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Siddiq, M.K. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Abbasi, F.M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Meraj, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Ashraf, M. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    The present work deals with the steady laminar three-dimensional mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. Similarity variables are implemented to convert the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Convective boundary conditions are utilized at surface of the sheet. A numerical technique of Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg (RFK45) is used to obtain the results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The physical dimensionless parameters are discussed through tables and graphs. - Highlights: • Mixed convective boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid is taken into account. • Impact of magnetic field is examined. • Convective heat and mass conditions are imposed. • Numerical solutions are presented and discussed.

  19. Transitions in turbulent rotating convection: A Lagrangian perspective : A Lagrangian perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajaei, H.; Joshi, P.R.; Alards, K.M.J.; Kunnen, R.P.J.; Toschi, F.; Clercx, H.J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Using measurements of Lagrangian acceleration in turbulent rotating convection and accompanying direct numerical simulations, we show that the transition between turbulent states reported earlier [e.g., S. Weiss et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 224501 (2010)] is a boundary-layer transition between the

  20. Mixed convection between horizontal plates and consequences for chemical vapor deposition flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    To simulate the fluid dynamics of VD systems, mixed convection between horizontal plates (AR = width/height = 10) heated from below was studied by laser Doppler anemometry in a range 1368 < Ra < 8300 and 15 < R3 < 170. The entrance effects were characterized by two lengths: one for the onset of bouyancy-driven instability, and one for the full development of longitudinal convection rolls. Explicit expressions for both entrance lengths are given in terms of Ra and Re. In addition, unsteady longitudinal convection rolls were observed. These are discussed in terms of the admixture of transverse convection rolls and/or contributions from upstream turbulence. For the fully developed region it is shown analytically that the transverse velocities of the longitudinal convection rolls, v and w, are independent of the forced flow and are identical to those of the two-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection rolls. These fundamental results serve as a base for the discussion of horizontal CVD flows. The entrance and sidewall effects are found to have pronounced influences on the flow patterns observed in CVD (AR = 2) reactors

  1. Turbulence model for melt pool natural convection heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, K.M.; Patankar, S.V.

    1994-01-01

    Under severe reactor accident scenarios, pools of molten core material may form in the reactor core or in the hemispherically shaped lower plenum of the reactor vessel. Such molten pools are internally heated due to the radioactive decay heat that gives rise to buoyant flows in the molten pool. The flow in such pools is strongly influenced by the turbulent mixing because the expected Rayleigh numbers under accidents scenarios are very high. The variation of the local heat flux over the boundaries of the molten pools are important in determining the subsequent melt progression behavior. This study reports results of an ongoing effort towards providing a well validated mathematical model for the prediction of buoyant flow and heat transfer in internally heated pool under conditions expected in severe accident scenarios

  2. Magnetic particle mixing with magnetic micro-convection for microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitenbergs, Guntars; Erglis, Kaspars; Perzynski, Régine; Cēbers, Andrejs

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the magnetic micro-convection phenomenon as a tool for mixing enhancement in microfluidics systems in cases when one of the miscible fluids is a magnetic particle colloid. A system of a water-based magnetic fluid and water is investigated experimentally under homogeneous magnetic field in a Hele–Shaw cell. Subsequent image analysis both qualitatively and quantitatively reveals the high enhancement of mixing efficiency provided by this method. The mixing efficiency dependence on the magnetic field and the physical limits is discussed. A suitable model for a continuous-flow microfluidics setup for mixing with magnetic micro-convection is also proposed and justified with an experiment. In addition, possible applications in improving the speed of ferrohydrodynamic sorting and magnetic label or selected tracer mixing in lab on a chip systems are noted. - Highlights: • We study the magnetic micro-convection as a mixing method in microfluidics. • We show that the method enhances mixing with magnetic field squared dependency. • We propose a flow cell setup for mixing and justify it with a sample experiment. • The mixing method can be easily implemented in an existing microfluidics setup

  3. Direct simulation of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerner, M.

    1994-11-01

    The numerical results are analysed to investigate both the structures and mechanisms of convection and the statistical features of turbulence in natural convection of liquid metals. The simulations are performed with the finite volume code TURBIT which is extended by a semi-implicit time integration scheme for the energy equation. Due to the implicit treatment of thermal diffusion the computational time for simulation of natural convection in liquid metals is reduced by about one order of magnitude, as compared to the original fully explicit code version. Results for Rayleigh-Benard convection in liquid sodium with Prandtl number Pr=0.006 are given for four different Rayleigh numbers: Ra=3 000, Ra=6 000, Ra=12 000, and Ra=24 000. At the Rayleigh number Ra=3 000 the inertial convection is identified. It is characterized by large two-dimensional vortices, which rotate like a solid body. These vortices are also observed in the simulations for Ra=6 000, Ra=12 000 and Ra=24 000, but, they only exist in certain regions and for short time intervals. The appearance of these two-dimensional structures in three-dimensional, time-dependent and turbulent convection is explained by the relative importance of the non-linear terms in the momentum and energy equation, which is totally different in both equations, and by the coupling of these equations by the buoyancy and the convective term. In order to improve and validate statistical turbulence model for application to natural convection in liquid metals, budgets of turbulence kinetic energy, turbulent heat flux and temperature variance are calculated from the numerical results. For several unknown correlations closure assumptions used in standard turbulence models are analyzed and model coefficients are determined. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Developing mixed convection in a coiled heat exchanger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillekens, J.J.M.; Rindt, C.C.M.; Steenhoven, van A.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the development of mixed convection in a helically coiled heat exchanger for Re = 500, Pr = 5 and d = 1/14 is studied. The influence of buoyancy forces (Gr = ¢O (105)) on heat transfer and secondary flow is analyzed. In the method used the parabolized equations are solved using a

  5. Developing mixed convection in a coiled heat exchanger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillekens, J.J.M.; Rindt, C.C.M.; Steenhoven, van A.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the development of mixed convection in a helically coiled heat exchanger for Re = 500, Pr = 5 and
    δ =114
    is studied. The influence of buoyancy forces ¢
    (Gr = ¢O (105))
    on heat transfer and secondary flow is analyzed. In the method used the parabolized equations are

  6. Forced convection mixing transients in the MITR core tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Lin-Wen; Meyer, J.E.; Bernard, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the results of forced convection mixing transient experiments that were studied in the core tank of the 5-MW Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) nuclear reactor as part of the studies being conducted to support a facility upgrade to 10 MW

  7. A model study of mixing and entrainment in the horizontally evolving atmospheric convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorovich, E.; Kaiser, R. [Univ. Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Hydrologie und Wasserwirtschaft (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    We present results from a parallel wind-tunnel/large-eddy simulation (LES) model study of mixing and entrainment in the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) longitudinally developing over a heated surface. The advection-type entrainment of warmer air from upper turbulence-free layers into the growing CBL has been investigated. Most of numerical and laboratory model studies of the CBL carried out so far dealt with another type of entrainment, namely the non-steady one, regarding the CBL growth as a non-stationary process. In the atmosphere, both types of the CBL development can take place, often being superimposed. (au)

  8. Magnetic particle mixing with magnetic micro-convection for microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Kitenbergs , Guntars; Erglis , Kaspars; Perzynski , Régine; Cēbers , Andrejs

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In this paper we discuss the magnetic micro-convection phenomenon as a tool for mixing enhancement in microfluidics systems in cases when one of the mis-cible fluids is a magnetic particle colloid. A system of a water-based magnetic fluid and water is investigated experimentally under homogeneous magnetic field in a Hele-Shaw cell. Subsequent image analysis both qualitatively and quan-titatively reveals the high enhancement of mixing efficiency provided by this method....

  9. Efficiency of Heat Transfer in Turbulent Rayleigh-Benard Convection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Pavel; Musilová, Věra; Skrbek, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2011), 014302:1-4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB200650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : natural convection * thermal convection Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 7.370, year: 2011

  10. Stochastic Theory of Turbulence Mixing by Finite Eddies in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.; Leeuw, G. de; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-01-01

    Turbulence mixing is treated by means of a novel formulation of nonlocal K-theory, involving sample paths and a stochastic hypothesis. The theory simplifies for mixing by exchange (strong-eddies) and is then applied to the boundary layer (involving scaling). This maps boundary layer turbulence onto

  11. Convective growth of broadband turbulence in the plasma sheet boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusenbery, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    Convective growth of slow and fast beam acoustic waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) is investigated. It has been shown previously that a could ion population must be present in order to excite beam acoustic waves in the PSBL. However, growth rates are significantly enhanced when warm plasma sheet boundary layer ions are present. Net wave growth along a ray path is determined by convective growth. This quantity is calculated for particle distribution models consistent with the PSBL where the intensity of broadband turbulence is observed to peak. Total number density dependence on beam acoustic convective growth is evaluated, and it is found that even for low density conditions of ∼0.01 cm -3 , a measurable level of broadband turbulence is expected. Relative drift effects between cold and warm ion populations are also considered. In particular, it is found that slow mode convective growth can be enhanced when slowly streaming cold ions are present, compared to fast ion streams

  12. Influences of Gravity Waves on Convectively Induced Turbulence (CIT): A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Robert D.; Trier, S. B.

    2018-03-01

    Thunderstorms are known to produce turbulence. Such turbulence is commonly referred to as convectively induced turbulence or CIT, and can be hazardous to aviation. Although this turbulence can occur both within and outside the convection, out-of-cloud CIT is particularly hazardous, since it occurs in clear air and cannot be seen by eye or onboard radar. Furthermore, due to its small scale and its ties to the underlying convection, it is very difficult to forecast. Guidelines for out-of-cloud CIT avoidance are available, but they are oversimplified and can be misleading. In the search for more appropriate and physically based avoidance guidelines, considerable research has been conducted in recent years on the nature of the phenomenon, and in particular, its connection to gravity waves generated by the convection. This paper reviews the advances in our understanding of out-of-cloud CIT and its relation to convective gravity waves, and provides several detailed examples of observed cases to elucidate some of the underlying dynamics.

  13. Anomalous Convection Reversal due to Turbulence Transition in Tokamak Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Tian-Tian; Chen Shao-Yong; Huang Jie; Mou Mao-Lin; Tang Chang-Jian; Wang Zhan-Hui; Peng Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    A critical physical model, based on the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode and the trapped electron mode (TEM), trying to explain the spatio-temporal dynamics of anomalous particle convection reversal (i.e., the particle convective flux reverses from inward to outward), is developed numerically. The dependence of density peaking and profile shape on the particle convection is studied. Only the inward pinch could lead to the increase of the density peaking. The validation of the critical model is also analyzed. A comparison of the estimates calculated by the model and the experimental results from the Tore Supra tokamak shows that they are qualitatively both consistent. (paper)

  14. Prediction of the single-phase turbulent mixing rate between two parallel subchannels using a subchannel geometry factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadatomi, M.; Kawahara, A.; Sato, Y.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for predicting the single-phase turbulent mixing rate between adjacent subchannels in nuclear fuel bundles. In this method, the mixing rate is computed as the sum of the two components of turbulent diffusion and convective transfer. Of these, the turbulent diffusion component is calculated using a newly defined subchannel geometry factor F* and the mean turbulent diffusivity for each subchannel which is computed from Elder's equation. The convective transfer component is evaluated from a mixing Stanton number correlation obtained empirically in this study. In order to confirm the validity of the proposed method, experimental data on turbulent mixing rate were obtained using a tracer technique under adiabatic conditions with three test channels, each consisting of two subchannels. The range of Reynolds number covered was 5000-66 000. From comparisons of the predicted turbulent mixing rates with the experimental data of other investigators as well as the authors, it has been confirmed that the proposed method can predict the data in a range of gap clearance to rod diameter ratio of 0.02-0.4 within about ±25% for square array bundles and about ±35% for triangular array bundles. (orig.)

  15. Development of a nonlocal convective mixing scheme with varying upward mixing rates for use in air quality and chemical transport models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T; Alapaty, Kiran; Sakradzija, Mirjana

    2008-06-01

    Asymmetrical convective non-local scheme (CON) with varying upward mixing rates is developed for simulation of vertical turbulent mixing in the convective boundary layer in air quality and chemical transport models. The upward mixing rate form the surface layer is parameterized using the sensible heat flux and the friction and convective velocities. Upward mixing rates varying with height are scaled with an amount of turbulent kinetic energy in layer, while the downward mixing rates are derived from mass conservation. This scheme provides a less rapid mass transport out of surface layer into other layers than other asymmetrical convective mixing schemes. In this paper, we studied the performance of a nonlocal convective mixing scheme with varying upward mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer and its impact on the concentration of pollutants calculated with chemical and air-quality models. This scheme was additionally compared versus a local eddy-diffusivity scheme (KSC). Simulated concentrations of NO(2) and the nitrate wet deposition by the CON scheme are closer to the observations when compared to those obtained from using the KSC scheme. Concentrations calculated with the CON scheme are in general higher and closer to the observations than those obtained by the KSC scheme (of the order of 15-20%). Nitrate wet deposition calculated with the CON scheme are in general higher and closer to the observations than those obtained by the KSC scheme. To examine the performance of the scheme, simulated and measured concentrations of a pollutant (NO(2)) and nitrate wet deposition was compared for the year 2002. The comparison was made for the whole domain used in simulations performed by the chemical European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme Unified model (version UNI-ACID, rv2.0) where schemes were incorporated.

  16. Canonical Models of Geophysical and Astrophysical Flows: Turbulent Convection Experiments in Liquid Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Ribeiro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Planets and stars are often capable of generating their own magnetic fields. This occurs through dynamo processes occurring via turbulent convective stirring of their respective molten metal-rich cores and plasma-based convection zones. Present-day numerical models of planetary and stellar dynamo action are not carried out using fluids properties that mimic the essential properties of liquid metals and plasmas (e.g., using fluids with thermal Prandtl numbers Pr < 1 and magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm ≪ 1. Metal dynamo simulations should become possible, though, within the next decade. In order then to understand the turbulent convection phenomena occurring in geophysical or astrophysical fluids and next-generation numerical models thereof, we present here canonical, end-member examples of thermally-driven convection in liquid gallium, first with no magnetic field or rotation present, then with the inclusion of a background magnetic field and then in a rotating system (without an imposed magnetic field. In doing so, we demonstrate the essential behaviors of convecting liquid metals that are necessary for building, as well as benchmarking, accurate, robust models of magnetohydrodynamic processes in Pm ≪  Pr < 1 geophysical and astrophysical systems. Our study results also show strong agreement between laboratory and numerical experiments, demonstrating that high resolution numerical simulations can be made capable of modeling the liquid metal convective turbulence needed in accurate next-generation dynamo models.

  17. Study on turbulent characteristics and transition behavior of combined-convection boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Yasuo

    2001-01-01

    The stabilizing mechanism of the turbulent combined-convection boundary layer along an isothermally-heated flat plate in air aided by a weak freestream are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The turbulent statistics of the combined-convection boundary layer measured with hot- and cold wires at different Grashof numbers indicates that with an increase in the freestream velocity, a similar change in the turbulent quantities appears independently of local Grashof number. Then based on the such experimental results, it is verified that the laminarization of the boundary layer due to an increase in freestream velocity arises at Grx / Rex 6 . Then, through the experiments with a particle image velocimetry (PIV), the spatio-temporal structure of the turbulent combined-convection boundary layer is investigated. For instantaneous velocity vectors obtained with PIV, large-scale fluid motions, which play a predominant role in the generation of turbulence, are frequently observed in the outer layer, while quasi-coherent structures do not exist in the near-wall region. Thus, it is revealed that increasing freestream restricts large-scale fluid motions in the outer layer, and consequently the generation of turbulence is suppressed and the boundary layer becomes laminar. (author)

  18. Boiling induced mixed convection in cooling loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knebel, J.U.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Mueller, U.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the SUCO program performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The SUCO program is a three-step series of scaled model experiments investigating the possibility of a sump cooling concept for future light water reactors. In case of a core melt accident, the sump cooling concept realises a decay heat removal system that is based on passive safety features within the containment. The article gives, first, results of the experiments in the 1:20 linearly scaled SUCOS-2D test facility. The experimental results are scaled-up to the conditions in the prototype, allowing a statement with regard to the feasibility of the sump cooling concept. Second, the real height SUCOT test facility with a volume and power scale of 1:356 that is aimed at investigating the mixed single-phase and two-phase natural circulation flow in the reactor sump, together with first measurement results, are discussed. Finally, a numerical approach to model the subcooled nucleate boiling phenomena in the test facility SUCOT is presented. Physical models describing interfacial mass, momentum and-heat transfer are developed and implemented in the commercial software package CFX4.1. The models are validated for an isothermal air-water bubbly flow experiment and a subcooled boiling experiment in vertical annular water flow. (author)

  19. Prediction of free turbulent mixing using a turbulent kinetic energy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsha, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    Free turbulent mixing of two-dimensional and axisymmetric one- and two-stream flows is analyzed by a relatively simple turbulent kinetic energy method. This method incorporates a linear relationship between the turbulent shear and the turbulent kinetic energy and an algebraic relationship for the length scale appearing in the turbulent kinetic energy equation. Good results are obtained for a wide variety of flows. The technique is shown to be especially applicable to flows with heat and mass transfer, for which nonunity Prandtl and Schmidt numbers may be assumed.

  20. Modeling molecular mixing in a spatially inhomogeneous turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Daniel W.; Deb, Rajdeep

    2012-02-01

    Simulations of spatially inhomogeneous turbulent mixing in decaying grid turbulence with a joint velocity-concentration probability density function (PDF) method were conducted. The inert mixing scenario involves three streams with different compositions. The mixing model of Meyer ["A new particle interaction mixing model for turbulent dispersion and turbulent reactive flows," Phys. Fluids 22(3), 035103 (2010)], the interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) model and its velocity-conditional variant, i.e., the IECM model, were applied. For reference, the direct numerical simulation data provided by Sawford and de Bruyn Kops ["Direct numerical simulation and lagrangian modeling of joint scalar statistics in ternary mixing," Phys. Fluids 20(9), 095106 (2008)] was used. It was found that velocity conditioning is essential to obtain accurate concentration PDF predictions. Moreover, the model of Meyer provides significantly better results compared to the IECM model at comparable computational expense.

  1. Mixed Convection in Technological Reservoir of Thermal Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Geniy V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of mixed convection of a viscous incompressible fluid in an open rectangular reservoir with inlet and outlet of mass with considering nonuniform heat sink at the external borders of the solution domain is solved. The region of the solution was limited by two vertical and by one horizontal walls of finite thickness and one free surface. The flat nonstationary mixed convection within the framework of Navier-Stokes model is examined for liquid and thermal conductivity for solid walls. Distributions of hydrodynamic parameters and temperatures with different intensity of heat sink on the outer contour of the cavity show a change in the intensity of heat sink on the region boundaries of the solution leads to scale changes in the structure of flow and temperature fields of the liquids.

  2. Heat transfer in a one-dimensional mixed convection loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Joon; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Yong Kyun; Kim, Jong Man; Nam, Ho Yun

    1999-01-01

    Effects of non-uniform heating in the core and additional forced circulation during decay heat removal operation are studied with a simplified mixed convection loop. The heat transfer coefficient is calculated analytically and measured experimentally. The analytic solution obtained from a one-dimensional heat equation is found to agree well with the experimental results. The effects of the non-uniform heating and the forced circulation are discussed

  3. Heat transfer and large scale dynamics in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlers, Günter; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    The progress in our understanding of several aspects of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection is reviewed. The focus is on the question of how the Nusselt number and the Reynolds number depend on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr, and on how the thicknesses of the thermal and the

  4. Non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq effects in turbulent thermal convection in ethane close to the critical point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlers, Günter; Calzavarini, E.; Fontenele Araujo Junior, F.; Funfschilling, Denis; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef; Sugiyama, K.

    2008-01-01

    As shown in earlier work [Ahlers et al., J. Fluid Mech. 569, 409 (2006)], non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq (NOB) corrections to the center temperature in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water and also in glycerol are governed by the temperature dependences of the kinematic viscosity and the thermal

  5. Non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq effects in strongly turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlers, Günter; Brown, Eric; Fontenele Araujo Junior, F.; Funfschilling, Denis; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    Non-Oberbeck–Boussinesq (NOB) effects on the Nusselt number $Nu$ and Reynolds number $\\hbox{\\it Re}$ in strongly turbulent Rayleigh–Bénard (RB) convection in liquids were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. In the experiments the heat current, the temperature difference, and the

  6. Rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection subject to harmonically forced flow reversals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, B.J.; Kunnen, R.P.J.

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of turbulent flow in a cylindrical Rayleigh–B´enard convection cell which can be modified considerably in case rotation is included in the dynamics. By incorporating the additional effects of an Euler force, i.e., effects induced by nonconstant rotation rates, a remarkably strong

  7. Rotating turbulent Rayleigh–Bénard convection subject to harmonically forced flow reversals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.; Kunnen, Rudie P.J.

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of turbulent flow in a cylindrical Rayleigh–Bénard convection cell which can be modified considerably in case rotation is included in the dynamics. By incorporating the additional effects of an Euler force, i.e., effects induced by non-constant rotation rates, a remarkably strong

  8. Random Taylor hypothesis and the behavior of local and convective accelerations in isotropic turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsinober, A.; Vedula, P.; Yeung, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    The properties of acceleration fluctuations in isotropic turbulence are studied in direct numerical simulations (DNS) by decomposing the acceleration as the sum of local and convective contributions (aL = ?u/?t and aC = u??u), or alternatively as the sum of irrotational and solenoidal contributions

  9. Effect of plumes on measuring the large scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Clercx, H.J.H.; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    We studied the properties of the large-scale circulation (LSC) in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection by using results from direct numerical simulations in which we placed a large number of numerical probes close to the sidewall. The LSC orientation is determined by either a cosine or a

  10. Bursting and large-scale intermittency in turbulent convection with differential rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.

    2003-01-01

    The tilting mechanism, which generates differential rotation in two-dimensional turbulent convection, is shown to produce relaxation oscillations in the mean flow energy integral and bursts in the global fluctuation level, akin to Lotka-Volterra oscillations. The basic reason for such behavior...

  11. Self-sustained large-scale flow in turbulent cryogenic convection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niemela, J. J.; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, K. R.; Donnelly, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 126, 1/2 (2002), s. 297-302 ISSN 0022-2291 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : thermal convection * turbulence * cryogenic Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.139, year: 2002

  12. Turbulence statistics and energy budget in rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Clercx, H.J.H.

    The strongly-modified turbulence statistics of Rayleigh–Bénard convection subject to various rotation rates is addressed by numerical investigations. The flow is simulated in a domain with periodic boundary conditions in the horizontal directions, and confined vertically by parallel no-slip

  13. Study of turbulent natural-circulation flow and low-Prandtl-number forced-convection flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.S.; Thompson, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    Calculational methods and results are discussed for the coupled energy and momentum equations of turbulent natural circulation flow and low Prandtl number forced convection flow. The objective of this paper is to develop a calculational method for the study of the thermal-hydraulic behavior of coolant flowing in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor channel under natural circulation conditions. The two-equation turbulence model is used to evaluate the turbulent momentum transport property. Because the analogy between momentum transfer and heat transfer does not generally hold for low Prandtl number fluid and natural circulation flow conditions, the turbulent thermal conductivity is calculated independently using equations similar to the two-equation turbulence model. The numerical technique used in the calculation is the finite element method

  14. Models for fluid flows with heat transfer in mixed convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mompean Munhoz da Cruz, G.

    1989-06-01

    Second order models were studied in order to predict turbulent flows with heat transfer. The equations used correspond to the characteristic scale of turbulent flows. The order of magnitude of the terms of the equation is analyzed by using Reynolds and Peclet numbers. The two-equation model (K-ε) is applied in the hydrodynamic study. Two models are developed for the heat transfer analysis: the Prt + teta 2 and the complete model. In the first model, the turbulent thermal diffusivity is calculated by using the Prandtl number for turbulent flow and an equation for the variance of the temperature fluctuation. The second model consists of three equations concerning: the turbulent heat flow, the variance of the temperature fluctuation and its dissipation ratio. The equations were validated by four experiments, which were characterized by the analysis of: the air flow after passing through a grid of constant average temperature and with temperature gradient, an axysymmetric air jet submitted to high and low heating temperature, the mixing (cold-hot) of two coaxial jets of sodium at high Peclet number. The complete model is shown to be the most suitable for the investigations presented [fr

  15. Measurements of velocity-fields and temperature-fields in laminar and turbulent free convection boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.

    1975-02-01

    This work deals with the hydrodynamics of laminar and turbulent free convection boundary layers on a vertical flat isothermal plate. Both for the laminar and turbulent region there is a good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical investigations. From these experiments one can draw important conclusions to the growth of instabilities in the transition region which lead to turbulence. (orig.) [de

  16. Stochastic model of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarzhi, S.I.; Cadjan, M.; Fedotov, S.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a stochastic model to describe the random character of the dissipation process in Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing. The parameter alpha, used conventionally to characterize the mixing growth-rate, is not a universal constant and is very sensitive to the statistical properties of the dissipation. The ratio between the rates of momentum loss and momentum gain is the statistic invariant and a robust parameter to diagnose with or without turbulent diffusion accounted for

  17. Numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poujade, O.; Lardjane, N.; Peybernes, M.; Boulet, M.

    2009-01-01

    Accelerations in actual Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are often variable. This article focuses on a particular class of variable accelerations where g(t) ∝ t n . A reference database is built from high resolution hydrodynamic numerical simulations. The successful comparison with a simple OD analytical model and the statistical 2SFK (2-Structure, 2-Fluid, 2-Turbulence) turbulence model is provided. Moreover, we show the difference between the mechanism at play in the Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing zone and Kolmogorov's in the self similar developed turbulent regime. (authors)

  18. Turbulent flow in spiral tubes and effect of Prandtl number on a convective heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shistel', R.; Goss, Zh.

    1976-01-01

    Turbulent flow is analized of the fluid in the spiral tube with a pitch which is small enough as compared to the curvature radius. The effect of the curvature and the Prandtl number on the turbulent convection is studied. A description of three-dimensional model and its application for the spiral tubes is given. The example of heat convection in curved channels reveals the opportunity for employment of three-dimensional model to calculate the recirculating flows in complex-geometry channels, description of the turbulence field, and determination of the wall friction and heat transfer. The introduction of the wall functions into the numerical method affects adversely accuracy of calculations but ensures a considerable time saving and makes it possible to study the process in the first approximation. The example illustrates possible practical application of the calculation procedure

  19. Eulerian-Lagranigan simulation of aerosol evolution in turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun; Jiang, Xiao; Sun, Ke; He, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    The formation and evolution of aerosol in turbulent flows are ubiquitous in both industrial processes and nature. The intricate interaction of turbulent mixing and aerosol evolution in a canonical turbulent mixing layer was investigated by a direct

  20. Subchannel analysis with turbulent mixing rate of supercritical pressure fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhui; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Subchannel analysis with turbulent mixing rate law of supercritical pressure fluid (SPF) is carried out. • Turbulent mixing rate is enhanced, compared with that calculated by the law of pressurized water reactor (PWR). • Increase in maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) is smaller comparing with PWR model. • The sensitivities of MCST on non-uniformity of subchannel area and power peaking are reduced by using SPF model. - Abstract: The subchannel analysis with turbulent mixing rate law of supercritical pressure fluid (SPF) is carried out for supercritical-pressurized light water cooled and moderated reactor (Super LWR). It is different from the turbulent mixing rate law of pressurized water reactor (PWR), which is widely adopted in Super LWR subchannel analysis study, the density difference between adjacent subchannels is taken into account for turbulent mixing rate law of SPF. MCSTs are evaluated on three kinds of fuel assemblies with different pin power distribution patterns, gap spacings and mass flow rates. Compared with that calculated by employing turbulent mixing rate law of PWR, the increase in MCST is smaller even when peaking factor is large and gap spacing is uneven. The sensitivities of MCST on non-uniformity of the subchannel area and power peaking are reduced

  1. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munroe, James R., E-mail: jmunroe@mun.ca [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland A1B 3X7 (Canada); Sutherland, Bruce R., E-mail: bsuther@ualberta.ca [Departments of Physics and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  2. Study of liquid metal mixed convection in cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, Philippe.

    1979-10-01

    This study has enabled some results to be obtained on the flow of liquid metals in cavities. The effects of different adimensional parameters characteristic of mixed convection flows were experimentally demonstrated. In the case of a roof heated cavity, three zones were distinguished: the mixing zone at the channel exit, a quasi constant temperature recirculation zone and a stratified zone at the top of the cavity. The thickness of this last region depends on natural convection effects: it disappears completely in a pure forced convection regime. A simple model using a critical Richardson number concept was developed in order to be able to predict the thickness of this region. Heat transfer correlation formulas were established both for the heated roof and forward direction heated wall cases. Some data was also obtained on temperature fluctuations for both cases. The different topics investigated are useful for defining heat transfers in certain regions of fast neutron sodium cooled reactors. A more extensive program is currently being developed in order to be able to investigate a wider range of variations in the above mentioned parameters and to more closely approximate reactor vessels [fr

  3. Chemical Reactions in Turbulent Mixing Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Chemically-Reacting, Gas-Phase Turbulent Jets (Gilbrech 1991), that explored Reynolds number effects on turbulent flame length and the influence of...and asymptotes to a constant value beyond the flame tip. The main result of the work is that the flame length , as estimated from the temperature...8217. Specifically, the normalized flame length Lf/d* displays a linear dependence on the stoichiometric mixture ratio 0, with a slope that decreases from Re "• 1.0

  4. 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2013-07-01

    non-equilibrium heat transfer, strong shocks and explosions, material transformation under high strain rate, supernovae and accretion discs, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, non-canonical wall-bounded flows, hypersonic and supersonic boundary layers, dynamics of atmosphere and oceanography, are just a few examples to list. A grip on non-equilibrium turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser micro-machining, nano-electronics, free-space optical telecommunications and for industrial applications in the areas of aeronautics and aerodynamics. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes are anisotropic, non-local, multi-scale and multi-phase, and often are driven by shocks or acceleration. Their scaling, spectral and invariant properties differ substantially from those of classical Kolmogorov turbulence. At atomistic and meso-scales, the non-equilibrium dynamics depart dramatically from a standard scenario given by Gibbs statistic ensemble average and quasi-static Boltzmann equation. The singular aspect and the similarity of the non-equilibrium dynamics at macroscopic scales are interplayed with the fundamental properties of the Euler and compressible Navier-Stokes equations and with the problem sensitivity to the boundary conditions at discontinuities. The state-of-the-art numerical simulations of multi-phase flows suggest new methods for predictive modelling of the multi-scale non-equilibrium dynamics in fluids and plasmas, for error estimates and uncertainty quantifications, as well as for novel data assimilation techniques. 3. International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' The First and Second International Conferences on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond found that: (i) TMB-related problems have in common a set of outstanding research issues; (ii) their solution has a potential to significantly advance a variety of disciplines in science

  5. Sensitivity study of cloud/radiation interaction using a second order turbulence radiative-convective model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, C.Y.J.; Smith, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution one-dimensional version of a second order turbulence convective/radiative model, developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, was used to conduct a sensitivity study of a stratocumulus cloud deck, based on data taken at San Nicolas Island during the intensive field observation marine stratocumulus phase of the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE IFO), conducted during July, 1987. Initial profiles for liquid water potential temperature, and total water mixing ratio were abstracted from the FIRE data. The dependence of the diurnal behavior in liquid water content, cloud top height, and cloud base height were examined for variations in subsidence rate, sea surface temperature, and initial inversion strength. The modelled diurnal variation in the column integrated liquid water agrees quite well with the observed data, for the case of low subsidence. The modelled diurnal behavior for the height of the cloud top and base show qualitative agreement with the FIRE data, although the overall height of the cloud layer is about 200 meters too high

  6. Turbulent kinetic energy equation and free mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, T.; Torda, T. P.; Bradshaw, P.

    1973-01-01

    Calculation of free shear flows was carried out to investigate the usefulness of several concepts which were previously successfully applied to wall flows. The method belongs to the class of differential approaches. The turbulence is taken into account by the introduction of one additional partial differential equation, the transport equation for the turbulent shear stress. The structure of turbulence is modeled after Bradshaw et al. This model was used successfully in boundary layers and its applicability to other flows is demonstrated. The work reported differs substantially from that of an earlier attempt to use this approach for calculation of free flows. The most important difference is that the region around the center line is treated by invoking the interaction hypothesis (concerning the structure of turbulence in the regions separated by the velocity extrema). The compressibility effects on shear layer spreading at low and moderate Mach numbers were investigated. In the absence of detailed experiments in free flows, the evidence from boundary layers that at low Mach numbers the structure of turbulence is unaffected by the compressibility was relied on. The present model was tested over a range of self-preserving and developing flows including pressure gradients using identical empirical input. The dependence of the structure of turbulence on the spreading rate of the shear layer was established.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Mechanically- and Convectively-Driven Turbulence in Planetary Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grannan, Alexander Michael

    2017-08-01

    The energy for driving turbulent flows in planetary fluid layers comes from a combination of thermocompositional sources and the motion of the boundary in contact with the fluid through mechanisms like precessional, tidal, and librational forcing. Characterizing the resulting turbulent fluid motions are necessary for understanding many aspects of the planet's dynamics and evolution including the generation of magnetic fields in the electrically conducting fluid layers and dissipation in the oceans. Although such flows are strongly inertial they are also strongly influenced by the Coriolis force whose source is in the rotation of the body and tends to constrain the inertial effects and provide support for fluid instabilities that might in-turn generate turbulence. Furthermore, the magnetic fields generated by the electrically conducting fluids act back on the fluid through the Lorentz force that also tends to constrain the flow. The goal of this dissertation is to investigate the characteristics of turbulent flows under the influence of mechanical, convective, rotational and magnetic forcing. In order to investigate the response of the fluid to mechanical forcing, I have modified a unique set of laboratory experiments that allows me to quantify the generation of turbulence driven by the periodic oscillations of the fluid containing boundary through tides and libration. These laboratory experiments replicate the fundamental ingredients found in planetary environments and are necessary for the excitation of instabilities that drive the turbulent fluid motions. For librational forcing, a rigid ellipsoidal container and ellipsoidal shell of isothermal unstratified fluid is made to rotate with a superimposed oscillation while, for tidal forcing, an elastic ellipsoidal container of isothermal unstratified fluid is made to rotate while an independently rotating perturbance also flexes the elastic container. By varying the strength and frequencies of these oscillations the

  8. Two-dimensional numerical modeling and solution of convection heat transfer in turbulent He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Burt X.; Karr, Gerald R.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical schemes are employed to investigate heat transfer in the turbulent flow of He II. FEM is used to solve a set of equations governing the heat transfer and hydrodynamics of He II in the turbulent regime. Numerical results are compared with available experimental data and interpreted in terms of conventional heat transfer parameters such as the Prandtl number, the Peclet number, and the Nusselt number. Within the prescribed Reynolds number domain, the Gorter-Mellink thermal counterflow mechanism becomes less significant, and He II acts like an ordinary fluid. The convection heat transfer characteristics of He II in the highly turbulent regime can be successfully described by using the conventional turbulence and heat transfer theories.

  9. ESTIMATION OF TURBULENT DIFFUSIVITY WITH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF STELLAR CONVECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotta, H.; Iida, Y.; Yokoyama, T., E-mail: hotta.h@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-05-20

    We investigate the value of horizontal turbulent diffusivity {eta} by numerical calculation of thermal convection. In this study, we introduce a new method whereby the turbulent diffusivity is estimated by monitoring the time development of the passive scalar, which is initially distributed in a given Gaussian function with a spatial scale d{sub 0}. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) assuming the relation {eta} = L{sub c} v{sub rms}/3, where v{sub rms} is the root-mean-square (rms) velocity, the characteristic length L{sub c} is restricted by the shortest one among the pressure (density) scale height and the region depth. (2) The value of turbulent diffusivity becomes greater with the larger initial distribution scale d{sub 0}. (3) The approximation of turbulent diffusion holds better when the ratio of the initial distribution scale d{sub 0} to the characteristic length L{sub c} is larger.

  10. Effects of elevated line sources on turbulent mixing in channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2016-11-01

    Fluids mixing in turbulent flows has been studied extensively, due to the importance of this phenomena in nature and engineering. Convection effects along with motion of three-dimensional coherent structures in turbulent flow disperse a substance more efficiently than molecular diffusion does on its own. We present here, however, a study that explores the conditions under which turbulent mixing does not happen, when different substances are released into the flow field from different vertical locations. The study uses a method which combines Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) with Lagrangian Scalar Tracking (LST) to simulate a turbulent channel flow and track the motion of passive scalars with different Schmidt numbers (Sc). The particles are released from several instantaneous line sources, ranging from the wall to the center region of the channel. The combined effects of mean velocity difference, molecular diffusion and near-wall coherent structures lead to the observation of different concentrations of particles downstream from the source. We then explore in details the conditions under which particles mixing would not happen. Results from numerical simulation at friction Reynolds number of 300 and 600 will be discussed and for Sc ranging from 0.1 to 2,400.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Convective Flow Over Wavy Terrain

    OpenAIRE

    Dörnbrack, A.; Schumann, U.

    1993-01-01

    By means of a large-eddy simulation, the convective boundary layer is investigated for flows over wavy terrain. The lower surface varies sinusoidalty in the downstream direction while remaining constant in the other. Several cases are considered with amplitude 6 up to 0.15H and wavelength A of H to 8H, where H is the mean fluid-layer height. At the lower surface, the vertical heat flux is prescribed to be constant and the momentum flux is determined locally from the Monin-Obukhov relationship...

  12. Evaluation of turbulent mixing between subchannels with a CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, H.; Ha, K.; Lee, Y.; Hahn, D.; Dunn, Floyd E.; Cahalan, James E.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the procedure to determine the turbulent mixing coefficients from the numerical simulation of subchannel flow. The turbulent mixing coefficient is important to predict the detailed flow and temperature distributions in the reactor core. The mixing coefficient for the design condition of KALIMER-600 has been evaluated and compared with the results from the existing correlations. The data determined numerically are in good agreement with the correlations based on the thermal methods or the tracer methods. However, the data shows quite large deviations from the correlations obtained with the turbulent fluctuation of momentum. This discrepancy mainly comes from the confusion in the definition of eddy diffusivity. The numerically obtained data are meaningful because the data for liquid metal are scarce. The ultimate goal of the analysis is the development of a mixing correlation to improve the accuracy of the whole core thermal hydraulics model. (author)

  13. Convective mixing length and the galactic carbon to oxygen ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, A; Peimbert, M [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City. Inst. de Astronomia

    1981-01-01

    We have studied chemical evolution models, assuming instantaneous recycling, and considering: a) the effects of mass loss both in massive stars and in intermediate mass stars, and b) the initial mass function of the solar neighbourhood (Serrano 1978). From these models we have derived the yields of carbon and oxygen. It is concluded that the condition C/O approximately 0.58 in the solar neighbourhood can only be satisfied if, during advanced stages of stellar evolution of intermediate mass stars, the ratio of the convective mixing length to the pressure scale height is > approximately 2.

  14. Impairment of Heat Transfer in the Passive Cooling System due to Mixed Convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae Myeong Seon; Chung, Bum Jin [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hwan [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In the passive cooling devices, the buoyant flows are induced. However the local Nusselt number of natural convective flow can be partly impaired due to the development of the mixed convective flows. This paper discusses impairment of heat transfer in the passive cooling system in relation to the development of mixed convection. The present work describes the preliminary plan to explore the phenomena experimentally. This paper is to discuss and make the plan to experiment the impairment of heat transfer in the passive cooling system due to mixed convection. In the sufficiently high passive cooling devices, the natural convection flow behavior can be mixed convection. The local Nusselt number distribution exhibits the non-monotonic behavior as axial position, since the buoyancy-aided with mixed convection was appeared. This is the part of the experimental work.

  15. From convection rolls to finger convection in double-diffusive turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Yantao; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Double-diffusive convection (DDC), which is the buoyancy-driven flow with fluid density depending on two scalar components, is ubiquitous in many natural and engineering environments. Of great interests are scalars’ transfer rate and flow structures. Here we systematically investigate DDC flow

  16. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing in grid-generated turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Kouji; Suzuki, Hiroki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Kubo, Takashi; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Turbulent mixing of passive scalar (heat) in grid-generated turbulence (GGT) is simulated by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS). A turbulence-generating grid, on which the velocity components are set to zero, is located downstream of the channel entrance, and it is numerically constructed on the staggered mesh arrangement using the immersed boundary method. The grid types constructed are: (a) square-mesh biplane grid, (b) square-mesh single-plane grid, (c) composite grid consisting of parallel square-bars and (d) fractal grid. Two fluids with different temperatures are provided separately in the upper and lower streams upstream of the turbulence-generating grids, generating the thermal mixing layer behind the grids. For the grid (a), simulations for two different Prandtl numbers of 0.71 and 7.1, corresponding to air and water flows, are conducted to investigate the effect of the Prandtl number. The results show that the typical grid turbulence and shearless mixing layer are generated downstream of the grids. The results of the scalar field show that a typical thermal mixing layer is generated as well, and the effects of the Prandtl numbers on turbulent heat transfer are observed.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing in grid-generated turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Kouji; Suzuki, Hiroki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Kubo, Takashi [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Hayase, Toshiyuki [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: nagata@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: hsuzuki@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: ysakai@mech.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: t-kubo@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: hayase@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp

    2008-12-15

    Turbulent mixing of passive scalar (heat) in grid-generated turbulence (GGT) is simulated by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS). A turbulence-generating grid, on which the velocity components are set to zero, is located downstream of the channel entrance, and it is numerically constructed on the staggered mesh arrangement using the immersed boundary method. The grid types constructed are: (a) square-mesh biplane grid, (b) square-mesh single-plane grid, (c) composite grid consisting of parallel square-bars and (d) fractal grid. Two fluids with different temperatures are provided separately in the upper and lower streams upstream of the turbulence-generating grids, generating the thermal mixing layer behind the grids. For the grid (a), simulations for two different Prandtl numbers of 0.71 and 7.1, corresponding to air and water flows, are conducted to investigate the effect of the Prandtl number. The results show that the typical grid turbulence and shearless mixing layer are generated downstream of the grids. The results of the scalar field show that a typical thermal mixing layer is generated as well, and the effects of the Prandtl numbers on turbulent heat transfer are observed.

  18. Reynolds number scaling in cryogenic turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in a cylindrical aspect ratio one cell

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musilová, Věra; Králík, Tomáš; La Mantia, M.; Macek, Michal; Urban, Pavel; Skrbek, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 832, OCT 26 (2017), s. 721-744 ISSN 0022-1120 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-03572S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Benard convection * turbulent convection * turbulent flows Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.821, year: 2016

  19. Heat transfer enhancement in a turbulent natural convection boundary layer along a vertical flat plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Toshihiro; Kajitani, Tsuyoshi; Nishino, Tatsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study on heat transfer enhancement for a turbulent natural convection boundary layer in air along a vertical flat plate has been performed by inserting a long flat plate in the spanwise direction (simple heat transfer promoter) and short flat plates aligned in the spanwise direction (split heat transfer promoter) with clearances into the near-wall region of the boundary layer. For a simple heat transfer promoter, the heat transfer coefficients increase by a peak value of approximately 37% in the downstream region of the promoter compared with those in the usual turbulent natural convection boundary layer. It is found from flow visualization and simultaneous measurements of the flow and thermal fields with hot- and cold-wires that such increase of heat transfer coefficients is mainly caused by the deflection of flows toward the outer region of the boundary layer and the invasion of low-temperature fluids from the outer region to the near-wall region with large-scale vortex motions riding out the promoter. However, heat transfer coefficients for a split heat transfer promoter exhibit an increase in peak value of approximately 60% in the downstream region of the promoter. Flow visualization and PIV measurements show that such remarkable heat transfer enhancement is attributed to longitudinal vortices generated by flows passing through the clearances of the promoter in addition to large-scale vortex motions riding out the promoter. Consequently, it is concluded that heat transfer enhancement of the turbulent natural convection boundary layer can be substantially achieved in a wide area of the turbulent natural convection boundary layer by employing multiple column split heat transfer promoters. It may be expected that the heat transfer enhancement in excess of approximately 40% can be accomplished by inserting such promoters

  20. Numerical simulation of turbulent forced convection in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodret, S; Di Maio, D Vitale; Caruso, G

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of the future generation of nuclear reactors, liquid metals are foreseen to be used as a primary coolant. Liquid metals are characterized by a very low Prandtl number due to their very high heat diffusivity. As such, they do not meet the so-called Reynolds analogy which assumes a complete similarity between the momentum and the thermal boundary layers via the use of the turbulent Prandtl number. Particularly, in the case of industrial fluid-dynamic calculations where a resolved computation near walls could be extremely time consuming and could need very large computational resources, the use of the classical wall function approach could lead to an inaccurate description of the temperature profile close to the wall. The first aim of the present study is to investigate the ability of a well- established commercial code (ANSYS FLUENT v.14) to deal with this issue, validating a suitable expression for the turbulent Prandtl number. Moreover, a thermal wall-function developed at Universite Catholique de Louvain has been implemented in FLUENT and validated, overcoming the limits of the solver to define it directly. Both the resolved and unresolved approaches have been carried out for a channel flow case and assessed against available direct numerical and large eddy simulations. A comparison between the numerically evaluated Nusselt number and the main correlations available in the literature has been also carried out. Finally, an application of the proposed methodology to a typical sub-channel case has been performed, comparing the results with literature correlations for tube banks

  1. Mixed Convection Heat Transfer on the Outside of a Vertical Cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, A

    1965-10-15

    An experimental study was made of turbulent heat transfer from a vertical cylinder placed in a square channel. The flow medium was water flowing upwards. Basic differential equations governing the mixed flow heat transfer phenomena in a vertical annulus are presented. A dimensional analysis is done to find the dimensionless variables affecting the relative magnitude of the effect of buoyancy on forced convection heat transfer. Dimensionless equations correlating the experimental data ana incorporating a buoyancy parameter of the form Gr/Re{sup 2} are presented. Reynolds number range covered is 690 to 129,500 and the Rayleigh num- ber range covered is 10{sup 9} to 4.2 x 10{sup 13} . Effect of different length parameters, like hydraulic diameter and distance of the measuring point from the inlet of the test section, on dimensionless equations are studied.

  2. The Dynamics of Turbulent Scalar Mixing near the Edge of a Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira, R. M. R.; da Silva, C. B.; Pereira, J. C. F.

    2011-12-01

    In free shear flows a sharp and convoluted turbulent/nonturbulent (T/NT) interface separates the outer fluid region, where the flow is essentially irrotational, from the shear layer turbulent region. It was found recently that the entrainment mechanism is mainly caused by small scale ("nibbling") motions (Westerweel et al. (2005)). The dynamics of this interface is crucial to understand important exchanges of enstrophy and scalars that can be conceived as a three-stage process of entrainment, dispersion and diffusion (Dimotakis (2005)). A thorough understanding of scalar mixing and transport is of indisputable relevance to control turbulent combustion, propulsion and contaminant dispersion (Stanley et al. (2002)). The present work uses several DNS of turbulent jets at Reynolds number ranging from Reλ = 120 to Reλ = 160 (da Silva & Taveira (2010)) and a Schmidt number Sc = 0.7 to analyze the "scalar interface" and turbulent mixing of a passive scalar. Specifically, we employ conditional statistics, denoted by langlerangleI, in order to eliminate the intermittency that affects statistics close to the jet edge. The physical mechanisms behind scalar mixing near the T/NT interfaces, their scales and topology are investigated detail. Analysis of the instantaneous fields showed intense scalar gradient sheet-like structures along regions of persistent strain, in particular at the T/NT interface. The scalar gradient transport equation, at the jet edge, showed that almost all mixing mechanisms are taking place in a confined region, beyond which they become reduced to an almost in perfect balance between production and dissipation of scalar variance. At the T/NT interface transport mechanisms are the ones responsible for the growth in the scalar fluctuations to the entrained fluid, where convection plays a dominant role, smoothing scalar gradients inside the interface and boosting them as far as

  3. The Dynamics of Turbulent Scalar Mixing near the Edge of a Shear Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taveira, R M R; Silva, C B da; Pereira, J C F

    2011-01-01

    In free shear flows a sharp and convoluted turbulent/nonturbulent (T/NT) interface separates the outer fluid region, where the flow is essentially irrotational, from the shear layer turbulent region. It was found recently that the entrainment mechanism is mainly caused by small scale ('nibbling') motions (Westerweel et al. (2005)). The dynamics of this interface is crucial to understand important exchanges of enstrophy and scalars that can be conceived as a three-stage process of entrainment, dispersion and diffusion (Dimotakis (2005)). A thorough understanding of scalar mixing and transport is of indisputable relevance to control turbulent combustion, propulsion and contaminant dispersion (Stanley et al. (2002)). The present work uses several DNS of turbulent jets at Reynolds number ranging from Re λ = 120 to Re λ = 160 (da Silva and Taveira (2010)) and a Schmidt number Sc = 0.7 to analyze the 'scalar interface' and turbulent mixing of a passive scalar. Specifically, we employ conditional statistics, denoted by I , in order to eliminate the intermittency that affects statistics close to the jet edge. The physical mechanisms behind scalar mixing near the T/NT interfaces, their scales and topology are investigated detail. Analysis of the instantaneous fields showed intense scalar gradient sheet-like structures along regions of persistent strain, in particular at the T/NT interface. The scalar gradient transport equation, at the jet edge, showed that almost all mixing mechanisms are taking place in a confined region, beyond which they become reduced to an almost in perfect balance between production and dissipation of scalar variance. At the T/NT interface transport mechanisms are the ones responsible for the growth in the scalar fluctuations to the entrained fluid, where convection plays a dominant role, smoothing scalar gradients inside the interface 0.1y I /λ to 1y I /λand boosting them as far as -2.5y I /η θ C .

  4. Numerical Simulation of Water/Al2O3 Nanofluid Turbulent Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bianco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent forced convection flow of a water-Al2O3 nanofluid in a circular tube subjected to a constant and uniform temperature at the wall is numerically analyzed. The two-phase mixture model is employed to simulate the nanofluid convection, taking into account appropriate thermophysical properties. Particles are assumed spherical with a diameter equal to 38 nm. It is found that convective heat transfer coefficient for nanofluids is greater than that of the base liquid. Heat transfer enhancement is increasing with the particle volume concentration and Reynolds number. Comparisons with correlations present in the literature are accomplished and a very good agreement is found with Pak and Cho (1998. As for the friction factor, it shows a good agreement with the classical correlation used for normal fluid, such as Blasius formula.

  5. Cell structures caused by settling particles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhoon; Park, Sangro

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent thermal convection is an important phenomenon frequently found in nature and industrial processes, often with laden particles. In the last several decades, the vast majority of studies have addressed single phase convective flow with focus on the scaling relation of flow parameters associated with heat transfer. Particle-laden Rayleigh-Bénard convection, however, has not been sufficiently studied. In this study, modulation of cell structures by settling particles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a doubly periodic square channel is investigated using direct numerical simulation with a point particle approach. Flow parameters are fixed at Rayleigh number=106, Prandtl number=0.7, the aspect ratio=6, and Froude number=0.19. We report from the simulations that settling heavy particles modulate irregular large-scale thermal plume structures into organized polygonal cell structures. Different shapes of flow structures are obtained for different particle diameters and mass loadings. We found that polygonal cell structures arise due to asymmetric feedback force exerted by particles onto hot and cold plumes. Increasing the number of particles augments the asymmetry and the polygonal cell structures become smaller, eventually going to the hexagonal structures.

  6. Planform structure and heat transfer in turbulent free convection over horizontal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerthan, S. Ananda; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2000-04-01

    This paper deals with turbulent free convection in a horizontal fluid layer above a heated surface. Experiments have been carried out on a heated surface to obtain and analyze the planform structure and the heat transfer under different conditions. Water is the working fluid and the range of flux Rayleigh numbers (Ra) covered is 3×107-2×1010. The different conditions correspond to Rayleigh-Bénard convection, convection with either the top water surface open to atmosphere or covered with an insulating plate, and with an imposed external flow on the heated boundary. Without the external flow the planform is one of randomly oriented line plumes. At large Rayleigh number Ra and small aspect ratio (AR), these line plumes seem to align along the diagonal, presumably due to a large scale flow. The side views show inclined dyelines, again indicating a large scale flow. When the external flow is imposed, the line plumes clearly align in the direction of external flow. The nondimensional average plume spacing, Raλ1/3, varies between 40 and 90. The heat transfer rate, for all the experiments conducted, represented as RaδT-1/3, where δT is the conduction layer thickness, varies only between 0.1-0.2, showing that in turbulent convection the heat transfer rates are similar under the different conditions.

  7. Influence of fluid-property variation on turbulent convective heat transfer in vertical annular CHANNEL FLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joong Hun Bae; Jung Yul Yoo; Haecheon Choi

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The influence of variable fluid property on turbulent convective heat transfer is investigated using direct numerical simulations. We consider thermally-developing flows of air and supercritical-pressure CO 2 in a vertical annular channel where the inner wall is heated with a constant heat flux and the outer wall is insulated. Turbulence statistics show that the heat and momentum transport characteristics of variable-property flows are significantly different from those of constant-property flows. The difference is mainly caused by the spatial and temporal variations of fluid density. The non-uniform density distribution causes fluid particles to be accelerated either by expansion or buoyancy force, while the temporal density fluctuations change the heat and momentum transfer via transport of turbulent mass flux, ρ'u' i . Both effects of the spatial and temporal variations of density are shown to be important in the analysis of turbulent convective heat transfer for supercritical-pressure fluids. For variable-property heated air flows, however, the effect of temporal density fluctuations can be neglected at low Mach number, which is in good accordance with the Morkovin's hypothesis. (authors)

  8. Computational simulation of turbulent natural convection in a volumetrically heated square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Camila Braga; Su, Jian; Niceno, Bojan

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to analyze the turbulent natural convection in a volumetrically heated fluid with similar characteristics of an oxide layer of a molten core in the lower head of the pressure vessel. The simulations were carried out in a square cavity with isothermal walls, for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) ranging from 10 9 to 10 11 . Different turbulence models based on Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied, such as the standard k - ε, low-Reynolds-k - ε, and Shear Stress Transport (SST), using the open-source Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code - Open FOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation). The results of the three turbulence models were compared versus the results of experimental correlations and other authors’ simulations, and the conclusion was that the most promising model proves to be the SST, due to its accuracy and robustness. (author)

  9. Experimental investigation of turbulent mixing by Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngs, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A key feature of compressible turbulent mixing is the generation of vorticity via the ∇px ∇(1/ρ) term. This source of vorticity is also present in incompressible flows involving the mixing of fluids of different density, for example Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flows. This paper gives a summary of an experimental investigation of turbulent mixing at a plane boundary between two fluids, of densities ρ 1 , and ρ 2 . (ρ 1 > ρ 2 ) due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The two fluids are near incompressible and mixing occurs when an approximately constant acceleration, g, is applied normal to the interface with direction from fluid 2 to fluid 1. Full details of the experimental programme are given in a set of three reports. Some of the earlier experiments are also described by Read. Previous experimental work and much of the theoretical research has concentrated on studying the growth of the instability from a single wavelength perturbation rather than turbulent mixing. Notable exceptions are published in the Russian literature. A related process, turbulent mixing induced by the passage of shock waves though an interface between fluids of different density is described by Andronov et al. The major purpose of the experiments described here was to study the evolution of the instability from small random perturbations where it is found that large and larger structures appear as time proceeds. A novel technique was used to provide the desired acceleration. The two fluids were enclosed in a rectangular tank, the lighter fluid 2 initially resting on top of the denser fluid 1. One or more rocket motors were then used to drive the tank vertically downwards. The aim of the experimental programme is to provide data for the calibration of a turbulence model used to predict mixing in real situations

  10. Suppression of Phase Mixing in Drift-Kinetic Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. T.; Dellar, P. J.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Highcock, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    The solar wind and interstellar medium are examples of strongly magnetised, weakly collisional, astrophysical plasmas. Their turbulent fluctuations are strongly anisotropic, with small amplitudes, and frequencies much lower than the Larmor frequency. This regime is described by gyrokinetic theory, a reduced five-dimensional kinetic system describing averages over Larmor orbits. A turbulent plasma may transfer free energy, a measure of fluctuation amplitudes, from injection at large scales, typically by an instability, to dissipation at small physical scales like a turbulent fluid. Alternatively, a turbulent plasma may form fine scale structures in velocity space via phase-mixing, the mechanism that leads to Landau damping in linear plasma theory. Macroscopic plasma properties like heat and momentum transport are affected by both mechanisms. While each is understood in isolation, their interaction is not. We study this interaction using a Hankel-Hermite velocity space representation of gyrokinetic theory. The Hankel transform interacts neatly with the Bessel functions that arise from averaging over Larmor orbits, so the perpendicular velocity space is decoupled for linearized problems. The Hermite transform expresses phase mixing as nearest-neighbor coupling between parallel velocity space scales represented by Hermite mode numbers. We use this representation to study transfer mechanisms in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence, the long wavelength limit of gyrokinetic theory. We show that phase space is divided into two regions, with one transfer mechanism dominating in each. Most energy is contained in the region where the fluid-like nonlinear cascade dominates. Moreover, in that region the nonlinear cascade interferes with phase mixing by exciting an "anti phase mixing" transfer of free energy from small to large velocity space scales. This cancels out the usual phase mixing, and renders the overall behavior fluid-like. These results profoundly change our understanding

  11. Mixed thermal convection: fundamental issues and analysis of the planar case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JACQUES PADET

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to renew interest on mixed thermal convection research and to emphasize three issues that arise from the present analysis: (i a clear definition of the reference temperature in the Boussinesq approximation; (ii a practical delimitation of the three convective modes, which are the forced convection (FC, mixed convection (MC and natural (or free convection (NC; (iii and, finally, a uniform description of the set FC/MC/NC in the similarity framework. The planar case, for which analytical solutions are available, allows a detailed illustration of the answers here advanced to the above issues.

  12. The effect of mixing-vane arrangements in a subchannel turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeno, Tsutomu; Murata, Tamotsu; Kajishima, Takeo

    2006-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of developed turbulent flows in a rod bundle was carried out for four spacer designs. The mixing-vanes attached at the spacer were inclined at 30degC or 20deg; they were arranged to promote the swirling or convective flow. These arrangements are possible elements to compose an actual rod bundle. Our LES technique with a consistent higher-order immersed boundary method and a one-equation dynamic sub-grid scale model contributed to an efficient treatment of the complex wall configurations of rods and spacers. The computational results reasonably reproduced experimental results for the drag coefficient and the decay rate of swirling flow. The profiles of the axial velocities and the turbulence intensities indicated reasonable trend for the turbulent flow in the rod bundle. The effect of mixing-vane arrangement on the lateral flows was successfully clarified: the cross flow took the longer way on the rod surface than the swirling flow and then was more significantly influenced by momentum diffusion at the no-slip wall. Therefore, the largely inclined mixing-vanes promoted the cross flow only in the neighborhood of the spacer, the swirling flow inside a subchannel could reach farther downstream than the cross flow. (author)

  13. 3. International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond - Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    The goals of this program are to expose the generic problem of non-equilibrium turbulent processes to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, in which the turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The objectives of the Third International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond were to: (i) focus the integration of theory, experiments, large-scale numerical simulations and state-of-the-art technologies on the exploration of physical mechanisms of non-equilibrium dynamics, from micro to macro-scales, in both high and low energy density regimes; (ii) foster the application of innovative approaches for tackling the fundamental aspects of turbulent mixing problems and for understanding and further extending the range of applicability of canonical considerations; (iii) encourage the development of new approaches and stimulate the application of advanced data analysis techniques for unified characterization of experimental and numerical data sets, for estimation of their quality and information capacity, and for transforming data to knowledge; (iv) further develop the 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' community via organizing a positive and constructive collaborative environment, maintaining the quality of information flux in the community and sharing research methodologies, tools and data among the community members. The objectives were accomplished at TMB-2011. (authors)

  14. Stochastic transport models for mixing in variable-density turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakosi, J.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    In variable-density (VD) turbulent mixing, where very-different- density materials coexist, the density fluctuations can be an order of magnitude larger than their mean. Density fluctuations are non-negligible in the inertia terms of the Navier-Stokes equation which has both quadratic and cubic nonlinearities. Very different mixing rates of different materials give rise to large differential accelerations and some fundamentally new physics that is not seen in constant-density turbulence. In VD flows material mixing is active in a sense far stronger than that applied in the Boussinesq approximation of buoyantly-driven flows: the mass fraction fluctuations are coupled to each other and to the fluid momentum. Statistical modeling of VD mixing requires accounting for basic constraints that are not important in the small-density-fluctuation passive-scalar-mixing approximation: the unit-sum of mass fractions, bounded sample space, and the highly skewed nature of the probability densities become essential. We derive a transport equation for the joint probability of mass fractions, equivalent to a system of stochastic differential equations, that is consistent with VD mixing in multi-component turbulence and consistently reduces to passive scalar mixing in constant-density flows.

  15. PIV measurement of turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, T; Guo, F; Chen, B; Zhang, X

    2009-01-01

    Turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives was experimentally investigated by PIV in present paper. The velocity ratio between high and low speed is 4:1 and the Reynolds number for pure water case based on the velocity differences of two steams and hydraulic diameter of the channel ranges from 14667∼73333. Flow field and turbulent quantities of turbulent mixing layer with 200ppm polymer additives were measured and compared with pure water mixing layer flow. It is shown that the dynamic development of mixing layer is greatly influenced by polymer addictives. The smaller vortices are eliminated and the coherent structure is much clearer. Similar with pure water case, Reynolds stress and vorticity still concentrate in a coniform area of central part of mixing layer and the width will increase with the Reynolds number increasing. However, compared with pure water case, the coniform width of polymer additives case is larger, which means the polymer additives will lead to the diffusion of coherent structure. The peak value of vorticity in different cross section will decrease with the development of mixing layer. Compared with pure water case, the vorticity is larger at the beginning of the mixing layer but decreases faster in the case with polymer additives.

  16. Relating large-scale subsidence to convection development in Arctic mixed-phase marine stratocumulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gillian; Connolly, Paul J.; Dearden, Christopher; Choularton, Thomas W.

    2018-02-01

    Large-scale subsidence, associated with high-pressure systems, is often imposed in large-eddy simulation (LES) models to maintain the height of boundary layer (BL) clouds. Previous studies have considered the influence of subsidence on warm liquid clouds in subtropical regions; however, the relationship between subsidence and mixed-phase cloud microphysics has not specifically been studied. For the first time, we investigate how widespread subsidence associated with synoptic-scale meteorological features can affect the microphysics of Arctic mixed-phase marine stratocumulus (Sc) clouds. Modelled with LES, four idealised scenarios - a stable Sc, varied droplet (Ndrop) or ice (Nice) number concentrations, and a warming surface (representing motion southwards) - were subjected to different levels of subsidence to investigate the cloud microphysical response. We find strong sensitivities to large-scale subsidence, indicating that high-pressure systems in the ocean-exposed Arctic regions have the potential to generate turbulence and changes in cloud microphysics in any resident BL mixed-phase clouds.Increased cloud convection is modelled with increased subsidence, driven by longwave radiative cooling at cloud top and rain evaporative cooling and latent heating from snow growth below cloud. Subsidence strengthens the BL temperature inversion, thus reducing entrainment and allowing the liquid- and ice-water paths (LWPs, IWPs) to increase. Through increased cloud-top radiative cooling and subsequent convective overturning, precipitation production is enhanced: rain particle number concentrations (Nrain), in-cloud rain mass production rates, and below-cloud evaporation rates increase with increased subsidence.Ice number concentrations (Nice) play an important role, as greater concentrations suppress the liquid phase; therefore, Nice acts to mediate the strength of turbulent overturning promoted by increased subsidence. With a warming surface, a lack of - or low - subsidence

  17. Spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations in jet mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. G.; Adrian, R. J.; Nithianandan, C. K.; Planchon, H. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Spectral similarity laws are derived for the power spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations by application of dimensional analysis in the limit of large turbulent Reynolds number. The theory predicts that pressure spectra are generated by three distinct types of interaction in the velocity fields: a fourth order interaction between fluctuating velocities, an interaction between the first order mean shear and the third order velocity fluctuations, and an interaction between the second order mean shear rate and the second order fluctuating velocity. Measurements of one-dimensional power spectra of the turbulent static pressure fluctuations in the driven mixing layer of a subsonic, circular jet are presented, and the spectra are examined for evidence of spectral similarity. Spectral similarity is found for the low wavenumber range when the large scale flow on the centerline of the mixing layer is self-preserving. The data are also consistent with the existence of universal inertial subranges for the spectra of each interaction mode.

  18. Mean shear flow in recirculating turbulent urban convection and the plume-puff eddy structure below stably stratified inversion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yifan; Hunt, Julian; Yin, Shi; Li, Yuguo

    2018-03-01

    The mean and random components of the velocity field at very low wind speeds in a convective boundary layer (CBL) over a wide urban area are dominated by large eddy structures—either turbulent plumes or puffs. In the mixed layer at either side of the edges of urban areas, local mean recirculating flows are generated by sharp horizontal temperature gradients. These recirculation regions also control the mean shear profile and the bent-over plumes across the mixed layer, extending from the edge to the center of the urban area. A simplified physical model was proposed to calculate the mean flow speed at the edges of urban areas. Water tank experiments were carried out to study the mean recirculating flow and turbulent plume structures. The mean speed at urban edges was measured by the particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the plume structures were visualized by the thermalchromic liquid crystal (TLC) sheets. The horizontal velocity calculated by the physical model at the urban edge agrees well with that measured in the water tank experiments, with a root mean square of 0.03. The experiments also show that the pattern of the mean flow over the urban area changes significantly if the shape of the heated area changes or if the form of the heated urban area becomes sub-divided, for example by the creation of nearby but separated "satellite cities." The convective flow over the square urban area is characterized as the diagonal inflow at the lower level and the side outflow at the upper level. The outflow of the small city can be drawn into the inflow region of the large city in the "satellite city" case. A conceptual analysis shows how these changes significantly affect the patterns of dispersion of pollutants in different types of urban areas.

  19. Application of the Fokker-Planck molecular mixing model to turbulent scalar mixing using moment methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madadi-Kandjani, E.; Fox, R. O.; Passalacqua, A.

    2017-06-01

    An extended quadrature method of moments using the β kernel density function (β -EQMOM) is used to approximate solutions to the evolution equation for univariate and bivariate composition probability distribution functions (PDFs) of a passive scalar for binary and ternary mixing. The key element of interest is the molecular mixing term, which is described using the Fokker-Planck (FP) molecular mixing model. The direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of Eswaran and Pope ["Direct numerical simulations of the turbulent mixing of a passive scalar," Phys. Fluids 31, 506 (1988)] and the amplitude mapping closure (AMC) of Pope ["Mapping closures for turbulent mixing and reaction," Theor. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 2, 255 (1991)] are taken as reference solutions to establish the accuracy of the FP model in the case of binary mixing. The DNSs of Juneja and Pope ["A DNS study of turbulent mixing of two passive scalars," Phys. Fluids 8, 2161 (1996)] are used to validate the results obtained for ternary mixing. Simulations are performed with both the conditional scalar dissipation rate (CSDR) proposed by Fox [Computational Methods for Turbulent Reacting Flows (Cambridge University Press, 2003)] and the CSDR from AMC, with the scalar dissipation rate provided as input and obtained from the DNS. Using scalar moments up to fourth order, the ability of the FP model to capture the evolution of the shape of the PDF, important in turbulent mixing problems, is demonstrated. Compared to the widely used assumed β -PDF model [S. S. Girimaji, "Assumed β-pdf model for turbulent mixing: Validation and extension to multiple scalar mixing," Combust. Sci. Technol. 78, 177 (1991)], the β -EQMOM solution to the FP model more accurately describes the initial mixing process with a relatively small increase in computational cost.

  20. A marketing mix model for a complex and turbulent environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Mason

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper is based on the proposition that the choice of marketing tactics is determined, or at least significantly influenced, by the nature of the company’s external environment. It aims to illustrate the type of marketing mix tactics that are suggested for a complex and turbulent environment when marketing and the environment are viewed through a chaos and complexity theory lens. Design/Methodology/Approach: Since chaos and complexity theories are proposed as a good means of understanding the dynamics of complex and turbulent markets, a comprehensive review and analysis of literature on the marketing mix and marketing tactics from a chaos and complexity viewpoint was conducted. From this literature review, a marketing mix model was conceptualised. Findings: A marketing mix model considered appropriate for success in complex and turbulent environments was developed. In such environments, the literature suggests destabilising marketing activities are more effective, whereas stabilising type activities are more effective in simple, stable environments. Therefore the model proposes predominantly destabilising type tactics as appropriate for a complex and turbulent environment such as is currently being experienced in South Africa. Implications: This paper is of benefit to marketers by emphasising a new way to consider the future marketing activities of their companies. How this model can assist marketers and suggestions for research to develop and apply this model are provided. It is hoped that the model suggested will form the basis of empirical research to test its applicability in the turbulent South African environment. Originality/Value: Since businesses and markets are complex adaptive systems, using complexity theory to understand how to cope in complex, turbulent environments is necessary, but has not been widely researched. In fact, most chaos and complexity theory work in marketing has concentrated on marketing strategy, with

  1. Fluctuations of a passive scalar in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2013-09-19

    The turbulent flow originating downstream of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a mixing layer has great relevance in many applications, ranging from atmospheric physics to combustion in technical devices. The mixing of a substance by the turbulent velocity field is usually involved. In this paper, a detailed statistical analysis of fluctuations of a passive scalar in the fully developed region of a turbulent mixing layer from a direct numerical simulation is presented. Passive scalar spectra show inertial ranges characterized by scaling exponents −4/3 and −3/2 in the streamwise and spanwise directions, in agreement with a recent theoretical analysis of passive scalar scaling in shear flows [Celani et al., J. Fluid Mech. 523, 99 (2005)]. Scaling exponents of high-order structure functions in the streamwise direction show saturation of intermittency with an asymptotic exponent ζ∞=0.4 at large orders. Saturation of intermittency is confirmed by the self-similarity of the tails of the probability density functions of the scalar increments at different scales r with the scaling factor r−ζ∞ and by the analysis of the cumulative probability of large fluctuations. Conversely, intermittency saturation is not observed for the spanwise increments and the relative scaling exponents agree with recent results for homogeneous isotropic turbulence with mean scalar gradient. Probability density functions of the scalar increments in the three directions are compared to assess anisotropy.

  2. Fluctuations of a passive scalar in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    The turbulent flow originating downstream of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a mixing layer has great relevance in many applications, ranging from atmospheric physics to combustion in technical devices. The mixing of a substance by the turbulent velocity field is usually involved. In this paper, a detailed statistical analysis of fluctuations of a passive scalar in the fully developed region of a turbulent mixing layer from a direct numerical simulation is presented. Passive scalar spectra show inertial ranges characterized by scaling exponents −4/3 and −3/2 in the streamwise and spanwise directions, in agreement with a recent theoretical analysis of passive scalar scaling in shear flows [Celani et al., J. Fluid Mech. 523, 99 (2005)]. Scaling exponents of high-order structure functions in the streamwise direction show saturation of intermittency with an asymptotic exponent ζ∞=0.4 at large orders. Saturation of intermittency is confirmed by the self-similarity of the tails of the probability density functions of the scalar increments at different scales r with the scaling factor r−ζ∞ and by the analysis of the cumulative probability of large fluctuations. Conversely, intermittency saturation is not observed for the spanwise increments and the relative scaling exponents agree with recent results for homogeneous isotropic turbulence with mean scalar gradient. Probability density functions of the scalar increments in the three directions are compared to assess anisotropy.

  3. Role of alveolar topology on acinar flows and convective mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofemeier, Philipp; Sznitman, Josué

    2014-06-01

    Due to experimental challenges, computational simulations are often sought to quantify inhaled aerosol transport in the pulmonary acinus. Commonly, these are performed using generic alveolar topologies, including spheres, toroids, and polyhedra, to mimic the complex acinar morphology. Yet, local acinar flows and ensuing particle transport are anticipated to be influenced by the specific morphological structures. We have assessed a range of acinar models under self-similar breathing conditions with respect to alveolar flow patterns, convective flow mixing, and deposition of fine particles (1.3 μm diameter). By tracking passive tracers over cumulative breathing cycles, we find that irreversible flow mixing correlates with the location and strength of the recirculating vortex inside the cavity. Such effects are strongest in proximal acinar generations where the ratio of alveolar to ductal flow rates is low and interalveolar disparities are most apparent. Our results for multi-alveolated acinar ducts highlight that fine 1 μm inhaled particles subject to alveolar flows are sensitive to the alveolar topology, underlining interalveolar disparities in particle deposition patterns. Despite the simplicity of the acinar models investigated, our findings suggest that alveolar topologies influence more significantly local flow patterns and deposition sites of fine particles for upper generations emphasizing the importance of the selected acinar model. In distal acinar generations, however, the alveolar geometry primarily needs to mimic the space-filling alveolar arrangement dictated by lung morphology.

  4. A model for near-wall dynamics in turbulent Rayleigh Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerthan, S. Ananda; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    1998-10-01

    Experiments indicate that turbulent free convection over a horizontal surface (e.g. Rayleigh Bénard convection) consists of essentially line plumes near the walls, at least for moderately high Rayleigh numbers. Based on this evidence, we propose here a two-dimensional model for near-wall dynamics in Rayleigh Bénard convection and in general for convection over heated horizontal surfaces. The model proposes a periodic array of steady laminar two-dimensional plumes. A plume is fed on either side by boundary layers on the wall. The results from the model are obtained in two ways. One of the methods uses the similarity solution of Rotem & Classen (1969) for the boundary layer and the similarity solution of Fuji (1963) for the plume. We have derived expressions for mean temperature and temperature and velocity fluctuations near the wall. In the second approach, we compute the two-dimensional flow field in a two-dimensional rectangular open cavity. The number of plumes in the cavity depends on the length of the cavity. The plume spacing is determined from the critical length at which the number of plumes increases by one. The results for average plume spacing and the distribution of r.m.s. temperature and velocity fluctuations are shown to be in acceptable agreement with experimental results.

  5. Boundary layers in turbulent convection for air, liquid gallium and liquid sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Janet; Schumacher, Joerg

    2017-11-01

    The scaling of physical quantities that characterize the shape and dynamics of the viscous and thermal boundary layers with respect to the Rayleigh number will be presented for three series of three-dimensional high-resolution direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Benard convection (RBC) in a closed cylindrical cell of aspect ratio one. The simulations have been conducted for convection in air at a Prandtl number Pr = 0.7, in liquid gallium at Pr = 0.021 and in liquid sodium at Pr = 0.005. Then we discuss three statistical analysis methods which have been developed to predict the transition of turbulent RBC into the ultimate regime. The methods are based on the large-scale properties of the velocity profile. All three methods indicate that the range of critical Rayleigh numbers is shifted to smaller magnitudes as the Prandtl number becomes smaller. This work is supported by the Priority Programme SPP 1881 of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  6. Spectral assessment of the turbulent convection velocity in a spatially developing flat plate turbulent boundary layer at Reynolds numbers up to Re θ = 13000

    OpenAIRE

    Renard , N.; Deck , S.; Sagaut , P.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; A method inspired by del Alamo et al. [1] is derived to assess the wavelength-dependent convection velocity in a zero pressure gradient spatially developing flat plate turbulent boundary layer at Retheta = 13 000 for all wavelengths and all wall distances, using only estimates of the time power spectral density of the streamwise velocity and of its local spatial derivative. The resulting global convection velocity has a least-squares interpretation and is easily relate...

  7. Turbulent thermal convection at high Rayleigh numbers for a Boussinesq fluid of constant Prandtl number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amati, G.; Koal, K.; Massaioli, F.; Sreenivasan, K.R.; Verzicco, R.

    2006-12-01

    The results from direct numerical simulations of turbulent Boussinesq convection are briefly presented. The flow is computed for a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio 1/2 in order to compare with the results from recent experiments. The results span eight decades of Ra from 2x10 6 to 2x10 14 and form the baseline data for a strictly Boussinesq fluid of constant Prandtl number (Pr=0.7). A conclusion is that the Nusselt number varies nearly as the 1/3 power of Ra for about four decades towards the upper end of the Ra range covered. (author)

  8. Turbulent Superstructures in Rayleigh-Bénard convection at different Prandtl number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Jörg; Pandey, Ambrish; Ender, Martin; Westermann, Rüdiger; Scheel, Janet D.

    2017-11-01

    Large-scale patterns of the temperature and velocity field in horizontally extended cells can be considered as turbulent superstructures in Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC). These structures are obtained once the turbulent fluctuations are removed by a finite-time average. Their existence has been reported for example in Bailon-Cuba et al.. This large-scale order obeys a strong similarity with the well-studied patterns from the weakly nonlinear regime at lower Rayleigh number in RBC. In the present work we analyze the superstructures of RBC at different Prandtl number for Prandtl values between Pr = 0.005 for liquid sodium and 7 for water. The characteristic evolution time scales, the typical spatial extension of the rolls and the properties of the defects of the resulting superstructure patterns are analyzed. Data are obtained from well-resolved spectral element direct numerical simulations. The work is supported by the Priority Programme SPP 1881 of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  9. Modeling of the thermal boundary layer in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emran, Mohammad; Shishkina, Olga

    2016-11-01

    We report modeling of the thermal boundary layer in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), which incorporates the effect of turbulent fluctuations. The study is based on the thermal boundary layer equation from Shishkina et al., and new Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of RBC in a cylindrical cell of the aspect ratio 1, for the Prandtl number variation of several orders of magnitude. Our modeled temperature profiles are found to agree with the DNS much better than those obtained with the classical Prandtl-Blasius or Falkner-Skan approaches. The work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the Grant Sh405/4 - Heisenberg fellowship and SFB963, Project A06.

  10. Stochastic scalar mixing models accounting for turbulent frequency multiscale fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulard, Olivier; Sabel'nikov, Vladimir; Gorokhovski, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Two new scalar micromixing models accounting for a turbulent frequency scale distribution are investigated. These models were derived by Sabel'nikov and Gorokhovski [Second International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear FLow Phenomena, Royal Institute of technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden, June 27-29, 2001] using a multiscale extension of the classical interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) and Langevin models. They are, respectively, called Extended IEM (EIEM) and Extended Langevin (ELM) models. The EIEM and ELM models are tested against DNS results in the case of the decay of a homogeneous scalar field in homogeneous turbulence. This comparison leads to a reformulation of the law governing the mixing frequency distribution. Finally, the asymptotic behaviour of the modeled PDF is discussed

  11. On the Role of Convection and Turbulence for Tropospheric Ozone and its Precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivie, D.J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the work in this thesis is to investigate the convective and diffusive transport in the TM chemistry transport model, and to investigate some aspects of the consequences for NOx. The large inaccuracy and uncertainty in the description of processes like convection and turbulent diffusion, the strong dependence of the radiative forcing of ozone on its vertical distribution, and the strong dependence of the ozone production on the distribution of NOx, are the main motivation. The availability of the ERA-40 data, where convective data and vertical diffusion coefficients are archived, allows a study of the effect of different convective mass flux sets, and different vertical diffusion coefficients on the model-simulated distribution of tracers. In this thesis the following questions are addressed : (1) How large is the sensitivity of the (model simulated) distribution of ozone and nitrogen oxides on (the) convection (parameterisation)?; (2) What requirements should be fulfilled by diffusive transport parameterisations in order to simulate the diurnal cycle in trace gas concentrations?; (3) How large are the differences in concentrations between simulations with archived and off-line diagnosed physical parameterisations?; (4) How do the results of different parameterisations of nitrogen oxide production by lightning compare?; (5) What is the effect of an explicit description of the effect of convective redistribution on the vertical distribution of lightning produced NOx? In Chapter 2, the first question and part of the third question are addressed. Because convection can bring reactive trace gases to the upper troposphere where they can live longer, and possibly are transported to remote regions, it is important to well describe the convective transport. The archival of convective mass fluxes in the ERA-40 data set allows us to drive the convective transport in the TM model. We compare these archived fluxes with the standard off-line diagnosed fluxes used in

  12. Resolving both entrainment-mixing and number of activated CCN in deep convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Freud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The number concentration of activated CCN (Na is the most fundamental microphysical property of a convective cloud. It determines the rate of droplet growth with cloud depth and conversion into precipitation-sized particles and affects the radiative properties of the clouds. However, measuring Na is not always possible, even in the cores of the convective clouds, because entrainment of sub-saturated ambient air deeper into the cloud lowers the concentrations by dilution and may cause partial or total droplet evaporation, depending on whether the mixing is homogeneous or extreme inhomogeneous, respectively.

    Here we describe a methodology to derive Na based on the rate of cloud droplet effective radius (Re growth with cloud depth and with respect to the cloud mixing with the entrained ambient air. We use the slope of the tight linear relationship between the adiabatic liquid water mixing ratio and Re3 (or Rv3 to derive an upper limit for Na assuming extreme inhomogeneous mixing. Then we tune Na down to find the theoretical relative humidity that the entrained ambient air would have for each horizontal cloud penetration, in case of homogeneous mixing. This allows us to evaluate both the entrainment and mixing process in the vertical dimension in addition to getting a better estimation for Na.

    We found that the derived Na from the entire profile data is highly correlated with the independent CCN measurements from below cloud base. Moreover, it was found that mixing of sub-saturated ambient air into the cloud at scales of ~100 m and above is inclined towards the extreme inhomogeneous limit, i.e. that the time scale of droplet evaporation is significantly smaller than that for turbulent mixing. This means that ambient air that entrains

  13. Influence of Turbulent Scalar Mixing Physics on Premixed Flame Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kolla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of reactive scalar mixing physics on turbulent premixed flame propagation is studied, within the framework of turbulent flame speed modelling, by comparing predictive ability of two algebraic flame speed models: one that includes all relevant physics and the other ignoring dilatation effects on reactive scalar mixing. This study is an extension of a previous work analysing and validating the former model. The latter is obtained by neglecting modelling terms that include dilatation effects: a direct effect because of density change across the flame front and an indirect effect due to dilatation on turbulence-scalar interaction. An analysis of the limiting behaviour shows that neglecting the indirect effect alters the flame speed scaling considerably when / is small and the scaling remains unaffected when / is large. This is evident from comparisons of the two models with experimental data which show that the quantitative difference between the two models is as high as 66% at /=0.3 but only 4% at /=52.4. Furthermore, neglecting the direct effect results in a poor prediction of turbulent flame speed for all values of /, and both effects are important for practically relevant values of this velocity ratio.

  14. Analysis of turbulent mixing in Dewakang Sill, Southern Makassar Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risko; Atmadipoera, A. S.; Jaya, I.; Sudjono, E. H.

    2017-01-01

    Dewakang Sill is located in southern Makassar Strait, conveying major path of Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), as a confluence region of different water masses, such as salty Pacific water and fresh Java Sea water. Its depth is about 680 m which blocks the ITF flow below this depth into Flores Sea. This research aimed to estimate turbulent mixing in the Dewakang Sill by applying Thorpe analysis using 24 hours “yoyo” CTD data sets, acquired from MAJAFLOX Cruise in August 2015. The results showed that stratification of water masses is dominated by Pacific water origin. Those are North Pacific Subtropical thermocline and Intermediate water masses. Mean dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (ɛ) and turbulent vertical diffusivity (Kρ ) value in the Dewakang Sill are of O(1.08 × 10-6)Wkg-1, and O(2.84 × 10-4) m2s-1 respectively. High correlation between epsilon and internal waves oscillation suggested that internal tidal waves activities are the major forcing for turbulent mixing in the study area.

  15. Prediction of turbulent mixing rates of both gas and liquid phases between adjacent subchannels in a two-phase slug-churn flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, A.; Sadatomi, M.; Tomino, T.; Sato, Y.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a slug-churn flow model for predicting turbulent mixing rates of both gas and liquid phase between adjacent subchannels in a BWR fuel rod bundle. In the model, the mixing rate of the liquid phase is calculated as the sum of the three components, i.e., turbulent diffusion, convective transfer and pressure difference fluctuations between the subchannels. The compenents of turbulent diffusion and convective transfer are calculated from Sadatomi et al.'s (1996) method, applicable to single-phase turbulent mixing by considering the effect of the increment of liquid velocity due to the presence of gas phase. The component of the pressure difference fluctuations is evaluated from a newly developed correlations. The mixing rate of the gas phase, on the other side, is calculated from a simple relation of mixing rate between gas and liquid phases. The validity of the proposed model has been confirmed with the turbulent mixing rates data of Rudzinski et al. as well as the present authors

  16. Prediction of gas and liquid turbulent mixing rates between rod bundle subchannels in a two-phase slug-churn flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Akimaro; Sadatomi, Michio; Tomino, Takayoshi

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a slug-churn flow model for predicting turbulent mixing rates of both gas and liquid phases between adjacent subchannels in a BWR fuel rod bundle. In the model, the mixing rate of the liquid phase is calculated as the sum of the three components, i.e., turbulent diffusion, convective transfer and pressure difference fluctuations between the subchannels. The components of turbulent diffusion and convective transfer are calculated from Sadatomi et al.'s (1996) method, applicable to single-phase turbulent mixing, by considering the effect of the increment of liquid velocity due to the presence of gas phase. The component of the pressure difference fluctuations is evaluated from a newly developed correlation. The mixing rate of the gas phase, on the other side, is calculated from a simple relation of mixing rate between gas and liquid phases. The validity of the proposed model has been confirmed with the turbulent mixing rates data of Rudzinski et al. as well as the present authors. (author)

  17. Numerical Investigation of Turbulent Natural Convection Heat Transfer in an Internally-Heated Melt Pool and Metallic Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourgaliev, R.R.; Dinh, A.T.; Dinh, T.N.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents results of numerical investigation of turbulent natural convection in an internally-heated oxidic pool, and in a metallic layer heated from below and cooled from top and sidewalls. Emphasis is placed upon applicability of the existing heat transfer correlations (obtained from simulant-material experiments) in assessments of a prototypic severe reactor accident. The objectives of this study are (i) to improve the current understanding of the physics of unstably stratified flows, and (ii) to reduce uncertainties associated with modeling and assessment of natural convection heat transfer in the above configuration. Prediction capabilities of different turbulence modeling approaches are first examined and discussed, based on extensive results of numerical investigations performed by present authors. Findings from numerical modeling of turbulent natural convection flow and heat transfer in melt pools and metallic layers are then described. (authors)

  18. Simulation of turbulent flows with and without combustion with emphasis on the impact of coherent structures on the turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha Galeazzo, Flavio Cesar

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of turbulent mixing in complex turbulent flows is a challenging task. The effective mixing of entrained fluids to a molecular level is a vital part of the dynamics of turbulent flows, especially when combustion is involved. The work has shown the limitations of the steady-state simulations and acknowledged the need of applying high-fidelity unsteady methods for the calculation of flows with pronounced unsteadiness promoted by large-scale coherent structures or other sources.

  19. Application of the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to Turbulent Czochralski Convective Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahal, S; Cerisier, P; Azuma, H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the general aspects of the convective flow instabilities in a simulated Czochralski system. We considered the influence of the buoyancy and crystal rotation. Velocity fields, obtained by an ultrasonic technique, the corresponding 2D Fourier spectra and a correlation function, have been used. Steady, quasi-periodic and turbulent flows, are successively recognized, as the Reynolds number was increased, for a fixed Rayleigh number. The orthogonal decomposition method was applied and the numbers of modes, involved in the dynamics of turbulent flows, calculated. As far as we know, this method has been used for the first time to study the Czochralski convective flows. This method provides also information on the most important modes and allows simple theoretical models to be established. The large rotation rates of the crystal were found to stabilize the flow, and conversely the temperature gradients destabilize the flow. Indeed, the increase of the rotation effects reduces the number of involved modes and oscillations, and conversely, as expected, the increase of the buoyancy effects induces more modes to be involved in the dynamics. Thus, the flow oscillations can be reduced either by increasing the crystal rotation rate to the adequate value, as shown in this study or by imposing a magnetic field

  20. A theory for natural convection turbulent boundary layers next to heated vertical surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, W.K. Jr.; Capp, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    The turbulent natural convection boundary layer next to a heated vertical surface is analyzed by classical scaling arguments. It is shown that the fully developed turbulent boundary layer must be treated in two parts: and outer region consisting of most of the boundary layer in which viscous and conduction terms are negligible and an inner region in which the mean convection terms are negligible. The inner layer is identified as a constant heat flux layer. A similarity analysis yields universal profiles for velocity and temperature in the outer and constant heat flux layers. An asymptotic matching of these profiles in an intermediate layer (the buoyant sublayer) yields analytical expressions for the buoyant sublayer profiles. Asymptotic heat transfer and friction laws are obtained for the fully developed boundary layers. Finally, conductive and thermo-viscous sublayers characterized by a linear variation of velocity and temperature are shown to exist at the wall. All predictions are seen to be in excellent agreement with the abundant experimental data. (author)

  1. Entropy Generation Analysis and Performance Evaluation of Turbulent Forced Convective Heat Transfer to Nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ji

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The entropy generation analysis of fully turbulent convective heat transfer to nanofluids in a circular tube is investigated numerically using the Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS model. The nanofluids with particle concentration of 0%, 1%, 2%, 4% and 6% are treated as single phases of effective properties. The uniform heat flux is enforced at the tube wall. To confirm the validity of the numerical approach, the results have been compared with empirical correlations and analytical formula. The self-similarity profiles of local entropy generation are also studied, in which the peak values of entropy generation by direct dissipation, turbulent dissipation, mean temperature gradients and fluctuating temperature gradients for different Reynolds number as well as different particle concentration are observed. In addition, the effects of Reynolds number, volume fraction of nanoparticles and heat flux on total entropy generation and Bejan number are discussed. In the results, the intersection points of total entropy generation for water and four nanofluids are observed, when the entropy generation decrease before the intersection and increase after the intersection as the particle concentration increases. Finally, by definition of Ep, which combines the first law and second law of thermodynamics and attributed to evaluate the real performance of heat transfer processes, the optimal Reynolds number Reop corresponding to the best performance and the advisable Reynolds number Read providing the appropriate Reynolds number range for nanofluids in convective heat transfer can be determined.

  2. Temporal direct numerical simulation of transitional natural-convection boundary layer under conditions of considerable external turbulence effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, Alexey G; Smirnov, Evgueni M; Goryachev, Valery D

    2014-01-01

    Results of direct numerical simulations for time-developing air natural-convection boundary layer are presented. Computations have been performed assuming periodicity conditions in both the directions parallel to the vertical isothermal hot plate. The contribution is mainly focused on understanding of laminar–turbulent transition peculiarities in the case of perturbation action of external turbulence that is modeled by isotropic disturbances initially introduced into the computational domain. Special attention is paid to identification and analysis of evolving three-dimensional vortices that clearly manifest themselves through the whole stages of laminar–turbulent transition in the boundary layer. A comparison of computed profiles of mean velocity, mean temperature and fluctuation characteristics for turbulent regimes of convection with experimental data is performed as well. (paper)

  3. Numerical investigation of a spatially developing turbulent natural convection boundary layer along a vertical heated plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Keisuke; Hattori, Yasuo; Suto, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A large-eddy simulation of a spatially developing natural convection boundary layer is conducted. • First- and second-order moments of the heat and momentum showed a reasonable agreement with past experiments. • Coherent structure of turbulent vortex inherent in this boundary layer is discussed. - Abstract: Large-eddy simulation (LES) on a spatially developing natural convection boundary layer along a vertical heated plate was conducted. The heat transfer rate, friction velocity, mean velocity and temperature, and second-order turbulent properties both in the wall-normal and the stream-wise direction showed reasonable agreement with the findings of past experiments. The spectrum of velocity and temperature fluctuation showed a -2/3-power decay slope and -2-power decay slope respectively. Quadrant analysis revealed the inclination on Q1 and Q3 in the Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux, changing their contribution along the distance from the plate surface. Following the convention, we defined the threshold region where the stream-wise mean velocity takes local maximum, the inner layer which is closer to the plate than the threshold region, the outer layer which is farther to the plate than the threshold region. The space correlation of stream-wise velocity tilted the head toward the wall in the propagating direction in the outer layer; on the other hand, the correlated motion had little inclination in the threshold region. The time history of the second invariant of gradient tensor Q revealed that the vortex strength oscillates both in the inner and the outer layers in between the laminar and the transition region. In the turbulent region, the vortex was often dominant in the outer layer. Instantaneous three-dimensional visualization of Q revealed the existence of high-speed fluid parcels associated with arch-shape vortices. These results were considered as an intrinsic structure in the outer layer, which is symmetrical to the structure of

  4. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially developing mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2014-06-02

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analysed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other free shear flows available in the literature, such as turbulent jets and wakes. In addition, an analysis of the passive scalar field in the vicinity of the interface is presented. It is shown that the scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number (Sc). In the present study, such a strong jump is observed for a scalar with Sc ≈ 1. Conditional statistics of kinetic energy and scalar dissipation are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterised by a strong peak very close to the interface. Finally, it is shown that the geometric features of the interfaces correlate with relatively large scale structures as visualised by low-pressure isosurfaces. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  5. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially evolving mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cristancho, Juan

    2012-12-01

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analyzed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. Velocity and passive scalar statistics are computed and compared to the results of studies addressing other shear flows, such as turbulent jets and wakes. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other types of free shear flow available in the literature. In addition, a detailed analysis of the passive scalar field (with Sc 1) in the vicinity of the interface is presented. The scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number, but it is a new result for Schmidt number of order one. Finally, the dissipation for the kinetic energy and the scalar are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterized by a strong peak very close to the interface.

  6. Convection of wall shear stress events in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Mills, David; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2017-11-01

    The fluctuating wall shear stress is measured in a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer of Reτ 1700 simultaneously with velocity measurements using either hot-wire anemometry or particle image velocimetry. These experiments elucidate the patterns of large scale structures in a single point measurement of the wall shear stress, as well as their convection velocity at the wall. The wall shear stress sensor is a CS-A05 one-dimensional capacitice floating element from Interdisciplinary Consulting Corp. It has a nominal bandwidth from DC to 5 kHz and a floating element size of 1 mm in the principal sensing direction (streamwise) and 0.2 mm in the cross direction (spanwise), allowing the large scales to be well resolved in the current experimental conditions. In addition, a two sensor array of CS-A05 aligned in the spanwise direction with streamwise separations O (δ) is utilized to capture the convection velocity of specific scales of the shear stress through a bandpass filter and peaks in the correlation. Thus, an average wall normal position for the corresponding convecting event can be inferred at least as high as the equivalent local streamwise velocity. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  7. Probability density function modeling of scalar mixing from concentrated sources in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakosi, J.; Franzese, P.; Boybeyi, Z.

    2007-11-01

    Dispersion of a passive scalar from concentrated sources in fully developed turbulent channel flow is studied with the probability density function (PDF) method. The joint PDF of velocity, turbulent frequency and scalar concentration is represented by a large number of Lagrangian particles. A stochastic near-wall PDF model combines the generalized Langevin model of Haworth and Pope [Phys. Fluids 29, 387 (1986)] with Durbin's [J. Fluid Mech. 249, 465 (1993)] method of elliptic relaxation to provide a mathematically exact treatment of convective and viscous transport with a nonlocal representation of the near-wall Reynolds stress anisotropy. The presence of walls is incorporated through the imposition of no-slip and impermeability conditions on particles without the use of damping or wall-functions. Information on the turbulent time scale is supplied by the gamma-distribution model of van Slooten et al. [Phys. Fluids 10, 246 (1998)]. Two different micromixing models are compared that incorporate the effect of small scale mixing on the transported scalar: the widely used interaction by exchange with the mean and the interaction by exchange with the conditional mean model. Single-point velocity and concentration statistics are compared to direct numerical simulation and experimental data at Reτ=1080 based on the friction velocity and the channel half width. The joint model accurately reproduces a wide variety of conditional and unconditional statistics in both physical and composition space.

  8. Reduced-Order Modeling of 3D Rayleigh-Benard Turbulent Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Grover, Piyush; Nabi, Saleh

    2017-11-01

    Accurate Reduced-Order Models (ROMs) of turbulent geophysical flows have broad applications in science and engineering; for example, to study the climate system or to perform real-time flow control/optimization in energy systems. Here we focus on 3D Rayleigh-Benard turbulent convection at the Rayleigh number of 106 as a prototype for turbulent geophysical flows, which are dominantly buoyancy driven. The purpose of the study is to evaluate and improve the performance of different model reduction techniques using this setting. One-dimensional ROMs for horizontally averaged temperature are calculated using several methods. Specifically, the Linear Response Function (LRF) of the system is calculated from a large DNS dataset using Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) and Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem (FDT). The LRF is also calculated using the Green's function method of Hassanzadeh and Kuang (2016, J. Atmos. Sci.), which is based on using numerous forced DNS runs. The performance of these LRFs in estimating the system's response to weak external forcings or controlling the time-mean flow are compared and contrasted. The spectral properties of the LRFs and the scaling of the accuracy with the length of the dataset (for the data-driven methods) are also discussed.

  9. Turbulent natural convection in an enclosure formed by an array of vertical cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEligot, D.M.; Stoots, C.M.; Christenson, W.A.; O'Brien, J.E.; Larson, T.K.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-04-01

    A number of situations can be hypothesized to occur in an advanced or special purpose nuclear reactor such that the core is filled with a gas but there is no forced flow to remove the thermal energy evolved. Typically, the dimensions are so large that the magnitudes of the governing parameters indicate that the flow regime is probably turbulent. The generic situation considered in the present work is natural convection between heated, slender, vertical, circular cylinders and a surrounding array of cooler vertical cylinders in a triangular pattern. Experiments were conducted by resistively heating a vertical circular cylinder of length-to-diameter ratio of about 160 centered inside a concentric perforated tube which was, in turn, surrounded by three larger diameter tubes cooled internally with water flow. The medium was air. In order to deduce the contribution due to thermal radiation, thermal emissivities of the tubes were determined in-situ during the experiment and the emissivities of samples of the surfaces involved were measured separately. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6 by adjusting the electrical power. The Rayleigh number, based on tube diameter and properties evaluated at the cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10 4 to 9.2 x 10 5 . Results indicate that the convective heat transfer parameters for the perforated tube are about fifteen per cent higher than for the smooth bare tube centered in the same position relative to the array. The Nusselt number for convective heat transfer across the annulus-between the heated test section and the perforated tube corresponded to parallel laminar flow. Data with water films flowing down the outside surfaces of the cooling tubes demonstrated no significant change in the convective heat transfer parameters deduced

  10. An Extended Eddy-Diffusivity Mass-Flux Scheme for Unified Representation of Subgrid-Scale Turbulence and Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhihong; Kaul, Colleen M.; Pressel, Kyle G.; Cohen, Yair; Schneider, Tapio; Teixeira, João.

    2018-03-01

    Large-scale weather forecasting and climate models are beginning to reach horizontal resolutions of kilometers, at which common assumptions made in existing parameterization schemes of subgrid-scale turbulence and convection—such as that they adjust instantaneously to changes in resolved-scale dynamics—cease to be justifiable. Additionally, the common practice of representing boundary-layer turbulence, shallow convection, and deep convection by discontinuously different parameterizations schemes, each with its own set of parameters, has contributed to the proliferation of adjustable parameters in large-scale models. Here we lay the theoretical foundations for an extended eddy-diffusivity mass-flux (EDMF) scheme that has explicit time-dependence and memory of subgrid-scale variables and is designed to represent all subgrid-scale turbulence and convection, from boundary layer dynamics to deep convection, in a unified manner. Coherent up and downdrafts in the scheme are represented as prognostic plumes that interact with their environment and potentially with each other through entrainment and detrainment. The more isotropic turbulence in their environment is represented through diffusive fluxes, with diffusivities obtained from a turbulence kinetic energy budget that consistently partitions turbulence kinetic energy between plumes and environment. The cross-sectional area of up and downdrafts satisfies a prognostic continuity equation, which allows the plumes to cover variable and arbitrarily large fractions of a large-scale grid box and to have life cycles governed by their own internal dynamics. Relatively simple preliminary proposals for closure parameters are presented and are shown to lead to a successful simulation of shallow convection, including a time-dependent life cycle.

  11. Ethiop. J. Sci. & Technol. 7(1) 49-66, 2014 49 Mixed convection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Mixed convection, viscous dissipation, buoyancy force, perturbation series ... direction parallel to the walls is X. The origin of the axes is such that the channel walls are at position Y=- ...... Canadian Journal of Physics.83:705-720.

  12. Double-diffusive mixed convection in a lid-driven cavity with non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S SIVASANKARAN

    2017-11-11

    Nov 11, 2017 ... transfer are solved using the finite-volume method. The numerical ... Keywords. Mixed convection; double diffusion; non-uniform heating; lid-driven cavity. 1. ... exhaustive research due to its importance in various engi- neering ...

  13. 2D and 3D Models of Convective Turbulence and Oscillations in Intermediate-Mass Main-Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Morgan, Taylor H.; Nelson, Nicholas J.; Lovekin, Catherine; Kitiashvili, Irina N.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    We present multidimensional modeling of convection and oscillations in main-sequence stars somewhat more massive than the sun, using three separate approaches: 1) Applying the spherical 3D MHD ASH (Anelastic Spherical Harmonics) code to simulate the core convection and radiative zone. Our goal is to determine whether core convection can excite low-frequency gravity modes, and thereby explain the presence of low frequencies for some hybrid gamma Dor/delta Sct variables for which the envelope convection zone is too shallow for the convective blocking mechanism to drive g modes; 2) Using the 3D planar ‘StellarBox’ radiation hydrodynamics code to model the envelope convection zone and part of the radiative zone. Our goals are to examine the interaction of stellar pulsations with turbulent convection in the envelope, excitation of acoustic modes, and the role of convective overshooting; 3) Applying the ROTORC 2D stellar evolution and dynamics code to calculate evolution with a variety of initial rotation rates and extents of core convective overshooting. The nonradial adiabatic pulsation frequencies of these nonspherical models will be calculated using the 2D pulsation code NRO of Clement. We will present new insights into gamma Dor and delta Sct pulsations gained by multidimensional modeling compared to 1D model expectations.

  14. Turbulent entrainment across turbulent-nonturbulent interfaces in stably stratified mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Riley, J. J.; Nagata, K.

    2017-10-01

    The entrainment process in stably stratified mixing layers is studied in relation to the turbulent-nonturbulent interface (TNTI) using direct numerical simulations. The statistics are calculated with the interface coordinate in an Eulerian frame as well as with the Lagrangian fluid particles entrained from the nonturbulent to the turbulent regions. The characteristics of entrainment change as the buoyancy Reynolds number Reb decreases and the flow begins to layer. The baroclinic torque delays the enstrophy growth of the entrained fluids at small Reb, while this effect is less efficient for large Reb. The entrained particle movement within the TNTI layer is dominated by the small dissipative scales, and the rapid decay of the kinetic energy dissipation rate due to buoyancy causes the entrained particle movement relative to the interface location to become slower. Although the Eulerian statistics confirm that there exists turbulent fluid with strong vorticity or with large buoyancy frequency near the TNTI, the entrained fluid particles circumvent these regions by passing through the TNTI in strain-dominant regions or in regions with small buoyancy frequency. The multiparticle statistics show that once the nonturbulent fluid volumes are entrained, they are deformed into flattened shapes in the vertical direction and diffuse in the horizontal direction. When Reb is large enough for small-scale turbulence to exist, the entrained fluid is able to penetrate into the turbulent core region. Once the flow begins to layer with decreasing Reb, however, the entrained fluid volume remains near the outer edge of the turbulent region and forms a stably stratified layer without vertical overturning.

  15. A priori study of subgrid-scale features in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, F.; Trias, F. X.; Gorobets, A.; Oliva, A.

    2017-10-01

    At the crossroad between flow topology analysis and turbulence modeling, a priori studies are a reliable tool to understand the underlying physics of the subgrid-scale (SGS) motions in turbulent flows. In this paper, properties of the SGS features in the framework of a large-eddy simulation are studied for a turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC). To do so, data from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent air-filled RBC in a rectangular cavity of aspect ratio unity and π spanwise open-ended distance are used at two Rayleigh numbers R a ∈{1 08,1 010 } [Dabbagh et al., "On the evolution of flow topology in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection," Phys. Fluids 28, 115105 (2016)]. First, DNS at Ra = 108 is used to assess the performance of eddy-viscosity models such as QR, Wall-Adapting Local Eddy-viscosity (WALE), and the recent S3PQR-models proposed by Trias et al. ["Building proper invariants for eddy-viscosity subgrid-scale models," Phys. Fluids 27, 065103 (2015)]. The outcomes imply that the eddy-viscosity modeling smoothes the coarse-grained viscous straining and retrieves fairly well the effect of the kinetic unfiltered scales in order to reproduce the coherent large scales. However, these models fail to approach the exact evolution of the SGS heat flux and are incapable to reproduce well the further dominant rotational enstrophy pertaining to the buoyant production. Afterwards, the key ingredients of eddy-viscosity, νt, and eddy-diffusivity, κt, are calculated a priori and revealed positive prevalent values to maintain a turbulent wind essentially driven by the mean buoyant force at the sidewalls. The topological analysis suggests that the effective turbulent diffusion paradigm and the hypothesis of a constant turbulent Prandtl number are only applicable in the large-scale strain-dominated areas in the bulk. It is shown that the bulk-dominated rotational structures of vortex-stretching (and its synchronous viscous dissipative structures) hold

  16. Spectral analysis of the turbulent mixing of two fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    The authors describe a spectral approach to the investigation of fluid instability, generalized turbulence, and the interpenetration of fluids across an interface. The technique also applies to a single fluid with large variations in density. Departures of fluctuating velocity components from the local mean are far subsonic, but the mean Mach number can be large. Validity of the description is demonstrated by comparisons with experiments on turbulent mixing due to the late stages of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, when the dynamics become approximately self-similar in response to a constant body force. Generic forms for anisotropic spectral structure are described and used as a basis for deriving spectrally integrated moment equations that can be incorporated into computer codes for scientific and engineering analyses.

  17. Mixing properties of thermal convection in the earth's mantle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmalzl, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    The structure of mantle convection will greatly influence the generation and the survival of compositional heterogeneities. Conversely, geochemical observations can be used to obtain information about heterogeneities in the mantle and then, with certain model assumptions, information about the

  18. Turbulent mixing and fluid transport within Florida Bay seagrass meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jennifer C. R.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2017-10-01

    Seagrasses serve an important function in the ecology of Florida Bay, providing critical nursery habitat and a food source for a variety of organisms. They also create significant benthic structure that induces drag, altering local hydrodynamics that can influence mixing and nutrient dynamics. Thalassia testudinum seagrass meadows were investigated to determine how shoot density and morphometrics alter local wave conditions, the generation of turbulence, and fluid exchange above and within the canopy. Sparsely vegetated and densely vegetated meadows were monitored, with shoot densities of 259 ± 26 and 484 ± 78 shoots m-2, respectively. The temporal and spatial structure of velocity and turbulence were measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeters and an in situ particle image velocimetry (PIV) system positioned both above and within the seagrass canopy. The retention of fluid within the canopy was determined by examining e-folding times calculated from the concentration curves of dye plumes released within the seagrass canopy. Results show that a shear layer with an inflection point develops at the top of the seagrass canopy, which generates instabilities that impart turbulence into the seagrass meadow. Compared to the overlying water column, turbulence was enhanced within the sparse canopy due to flow interaction with the seagrass blades, but reduced within the dense canopy. Wave generated oscillatory motion penetrated deeper into the canopy than unidirectional currents, enhancing fluid exchange. Both shoot density and the relative magnitude of wave- versus current-driven flow conditions were found to be important controls on turbulent exchange of water masses across the canopy-water interface.

  19. A mathematical model for turbulent incompressible flows through mixing grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaire, G.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model is proposed for the computation of turbulent incompressible flows through mixing grids. This model is obtained as follows: in a three-dimentional-domain we represent a mixing grid by small identical wings of size ε 2 periodically distributed at the nodes of a plane regular mesh of size ε, and we consider incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with a no-slip condition on the wings. Using an appropriate homogenization process we pass to the limit when ε tends to zero and we obtain a Brinkman equation, i.e. a Navier-Stokes equation plus a zero-order term for the velocity, in a homogeneous domain without anymore wings. The interest of this model is that the spatial discretization is simpler in a homogeneous domain, and, moreover, the new term, which expresses the grid's mixing effect, can be evaluated with a local computation around a single wing

  20. Dynamical and statistical phenomena of circulation and heat transfer in periodically forced rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterl, S.H.; Li, H.M.; Zhong, J.Q.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present results from an experimental study into turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection forced externally by periodically modulated unidirectional rotation rates. We find that the azimuthal rotation velocity θ(t) and thermal amplitude δ(t) of the large-scale circulation (LSC) are

  1. Gas mixing under the influence of thermal-dynamic parameters such as buoyancy, jet momentum and fan-induced convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.K.; Jones, S.C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Various scaling parameters for simulating mixing under the influence of buoyancy, jet momentum, and fan-induced convection were examined. Their significance was assessed by comparing the mixing of helium (a simulant for hydrogen) with air in a large-scale enclosure (1.8 m x 1.8 m x 1.8 m) to the mixing of salt-water with fresh-water in a small-scale enclosure (1/6 the size). The advantage of using the salt-water/freshwater technique is that it allows the characteristic flow regime (either turbulent or laminar flow) in the full-scale containment to be maintained in the reduced scale containment. A smoke technique for flow visualization was used to examine the mixing of the helium with air. For the small-scale salt-water/fresh-water experiment, fluorescent dye was used to provide a means to visualize the mixing process. The mixing behaviour in both sets of experiments were analyzed based on video records and concentration measurements in ten locations. Measurements showed that depending on the recirculation and jet flow rates, the injected salt-water (in small-scale experiments) and helium (in large-scale experiments) can disperse sufficiently quickly to produce an essentially 'well mixed' condition rendering the concentration measurements insensitive to the variation in the Froude or the Grashof Numbers. (author)

  2. Nusselt number and bulk temperature in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Weiss, Stephan; Shishkina, Olga; International CollaborationTurbulence Research Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    We present an algorithm to calculate the Nusselt number (Nu) in measurements of the heat transport in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection under general non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq (NOB) conditions. We further critically analyze the different ways to evaluate the dependences of Nu over the Rayleigh number (Ra) and show the sensitivity of these dependences to the reference temperatures in the bulk, top and bottom boundary layers (BLs). Finally we propose a method to predict the bulk temperature and a way to calculate the reference temperatures of the top and bottom BLs and validate them against the Göttingen measurements. The work is supported by the Max Planck Society and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the Grant Sh 405/4 - Heisenberg fellowship.

  3. Two regimes of flux scaling in axially homogeneous turbulent convection in vertical tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Shashikant S.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2016-08-01

    From experiments of axially homogeneous turbulent convection in a vertical tube using heat (Prandtl number Pr≃6 ) and brine (Pr≃600 ) we show that at sufficiently high Rayleigh numbers (Rag), the Nusselt number Nug˜(RagPr)1/2, which corresponds to the so-called ultimate regime scaling. In heat experiments below certain Rag,however,there is transition to a new regime, Nug˜(RagPr)0.3. This transition also seems to exist in earlier reported data for Pr=1 and Pr≃600 , at different Rag. However, the transition occurs at a single Grashof number, Grgc≃1.6 ×105 , and unified flux scalings for Pr≥1 , Nug/Pr˜Grg0.3, and Nug/Pr˜Grg1/2 can be given for the two regimes.

  4. Supersonic turbulent convection, inhomogeneities of chemical composition and the solar neutrino problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prentice, A.J.R.; Monash Univ., Clayton

    1976-01-01

    A new theory of the evolution of the Sun is presented to account for the present low flux of neutrinos. It is suggested that resistive segregation of grain material during the early stages of star formation, followed by a turbulent phase of planetary formation, may lead to an initial chemically inhomogeneous Sun consisting of a small metal-rich core of mass 0.03 M(Sun) surrounded by a homogeneous, but slightly metal-deficient, radiatively stable envelope. Because of its high Z we propose that the core was highly convectively unstable and a large supersonic turbulent stress was created by the motions of long and needle-like overshooting convective elements. This stress greatly expands the volume of the core causing it to become hotter at the centre but cooler at its edge. The net result is a star of quite low luminosity which consumes its central hydrogen very rapidly, via the CNO cycle, with hardly any burning taking place in the surrounding envelope. After a time tsub(0), comparable with but less than 4.7 x 10 9 yr, we propose that the core burns itself out. The whole star then undergoes a massive structural change with the luminosity suddenly increasing from about 1/2 L(Sun) to close to L(Sun). The net result at solar age is the configuration which has a small burnt-out core, a barely consumed hydrogen-rich envelope, and a greatly reduced neutrino flux of order 1 SNU. Setting tsub(0) = 4.13 x 10 9 yr, our theory provided a natural explanation of the disappearance of the Great Infra-Cambrian Ice Age and mysterious onset of the Gambrian Period, some 570 m. yr ago. It may also, possibly, account for the 'turn-off' gaps in the colour-magnitude diagram of old galactic clusters. (orig.) [de

  5. Mixed convection in a two-phase flow cooling loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Daubner, M.; Knebel, J.U.

    2002-03-01

    This report summarizes the numerical simulations using the CFD code CFX4.1 which has additional models for subcooled flow boiling phenomena and the interfacial forces. The improved CFX4.1 code can be applied to the design of boiling induced mixed convection cooling loops in a defined parameter range. The experimental part describes the geysering experiments and the instability effects on the two-phase natural circulation flow. An experimentally validated flow pattern map in the Phase Change Number - Subcooling Number (N PCh - N Sub ) diagram defines the operational range in which flow instabilities such as geysering can be expected. One important perspective of this combined experimental/numerical work, which is in the field of two-phase flow, is its application to the development of accelerator driven systems (ADS). The main objective on an ADS is its potential to transmute minor actinides and long-lived fission products, thus participating in closing the fuel cycle. The development of an ADS is an important issue within the Euratom Fifth FP on Partitioning and Transmutation. One concept of an ADS, which is investigated in more detail within the ''preliminary design study of an experimental ADS'' Project (PDS-XADS) of the Euratom Fifth FP, is the XADS lead-bismuth cooled Experimental ADS of ANSALDO. An essential feature of this concept is the natural circulation of the primary coolant within the reactor pool. The natural circulation, which is driven by the density differences between the blanket and the heat exchanger, is enhanced by the injection of the nitrogen cover gas through spargers located in a riser part just above the blanket. This so-called gas-lift pump system has not been investigated in more detail nor has this gas-lift pump system been numerically/experimentally confirmed. The knowledge gained within the SUCO Programe, i.e. the modelling of the interfacial forces, the experimental work on flow instabilities and the modelling of the interfacial area

  6. Mixed convection in a two-phase flow cooling loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Daubner, M.; Knebel, J.U.

    2002-03-01

    This report summarizes the numerical simulations using the CFD code CFX4.1 which has additional models for subcooled flow boiling phenomena and the interfacial forces. The improved CFX4.1 code can be applied to the design of boiling induced mixed convection cooling loops in a defined parameter range. The experimental part describes the geysering experiments and the instability effects on the two-phase natural circulation flow. An experimentally validated flow pattern map in the Phase Change Number - Subcooling Number (N{sub PCh} - N{sub Sub}) diagram defines the operational range in which flow instabilities such as geysering can be expected. One important perspective of this combined experimental/numerical work, which is in the field of two-phase flow, is its application to the development of accelerator driven systems (ADS). The main objective on an ADS is its potential to transmute minor actinides and long-lived fission products, thus participating in closing the fuel cycle. The development of an ADS is an important issue within the Euratom Fifth FP on Partitioning and Transmutation. One concept of an ADS, which is investigated in more detail within the ''preliminary design study of an experimental ADS'' Project (PDS-XADS) of the Euratom Fifth FP, is the XADS lead-bismuth cooled Experimental ADS of ANSALDO. An essential feature of this concept is the natural circulation of the primary coolant within the reactor pool. The natural circulation, which is driven by the density differences between the blanket and the heat exchanger, is enhanced by the injection of the nitrogen cover gas through spargers located in a riser part just above the blanket. This so-called gas-lift pump system has not been investigated in more detail nor has this gas-lift pump system been numerically/experimentally confirmed. The knowledge gained within the SUCO Programe, i.e. the modelling of the interfacial forces, the experimental work on flow instabilities and the

  7. Impact of an intense water column mixing (0-1500 m) on prokaryotic diversity and activities during an open-ocean convection event in the NW Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Tatiana; Sauret, Caroline; Boutrif, Mehdi; Duhaut, Thomas; Kessouri, Fayçal; Oriol, Louise; Caparros, Jocelyne; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Garel, Marc; Tamburini, Christian; Conan, Pascal; Ghiglione, Jean-François

    2016-12-01

    Open-ocean convection is a fundamental process for thermohaline circulation and biogeochemical cycles that causes spectacular mixing of the water column. Here, we tested how much the depth-stratified prokaryotic communities were influenced by such an event, and also by the following re-stratification. The deep convection event (0-1500 m) that occurred in winter 2010-2011 in the NW Mediterranean Sea resulted in a homogenization of the prokaryotic communities over the entire convective cell, resulting in the predominance of typical surface Bacteria, such as Oceanospirillale and Flavobacteriales. Statistical analysis together with numerical simulation of vertical homogenization evidenced that physical turbulence only was not enough to explain the new distribution of the communities, but acted in synergy with other parameters such as exported particulate and dissolved organic matters. The convection also stimulated prokaryotic abundance (+21%) and heterotrophic production (+43%) over the 0-1500 m convective cell, and resulted in a decline of cell-specific extracellular enzymatic activities (-67%), thus suggesting an intensification of the labile organic matter turnover during the event. The rapid re-stratification of the prokaryotic diversity and activities in the intermediate layer 5 days after the intense mixing indicated a marked resilience of the communities, apart from the residual deep mixed water patch. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Effects of resolved boundary layer turbulence on near-ground rotation in simulated quasi-linear convective systems (QLCSs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotarski, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Though most strong to violent tornadoes are associated with supercell thunderstorms, quasi-linear convective systems (QLCSs) pose a risk of tornadoes, often at times and locations where supercell tornadoes are less common. Because QLCS low-level mesocyclones and tornado signatures tend to be less coherent, forecasting such tornadoes remains particularly difficult. The majority of simulations of such storms rely on horizontally homogeneous base states lacking resolved boundary layer turbulence and surface fluxes. Previous work has suggested that heterogeneities associated with boundary layer turbulence in the form of horizontal convective rolls can influence the evolution and characteristics of low-level mesocyclones in supercell thunderstorms. This study extends methods for generating boundary layer convection to idealized simulations of QLCSs. QLCS simulations with resolved boundary layer turbulence will be compared against a control simulation with a laminar boundary layer. Effects of turbulence, the resultant heterogeneity in the near-storm environment, and surface friction on bulk storm characteristics and the intensity, morphology, and evolution of low-level rotation will be presented. Although maximum surface vertical vorticity values are similar, when boundary layer turbulence is included, a greater number of miso- and meso-scale vortices develop along the QLCS gust front. The source of this vorticity is analyzed using Eulerian decomposition of vorticity tendency terms and trajectory analysis to delineate the relative importance of surface friction and baroclinicity in generating QLCS vortices. The role of anvil shading in suppressing boundary layer turbulence in the near-storm environment and subsequent effects on QLCS vortices will also be presented. Finally, implications of the results regarding inclusion of more realistic boundary layers in future idealized simulations of deep convection will be discussed.

  9. Convective heat transfer characteristics in the turbulent region of molten salt in concentric tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.S.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.H.; Yuan, X.F.; Tian, J.; Tang, Z.F.; Zhu, H.H.; Fu, Y.; Wang, N.X.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand the heat transfer behavior and characteristics of molten salt in heat exchanger, the convective heat transfer characteristics of molten salt in salt-to-oil concentric tube are studied. Overall heat transfer coefficients of the heat exchanger are calculated using Wilson plots. Heat transfer coefficients of tube side molten salt with the range of Reynolds number from 10,000 to 50,000 and the Prandtl number from 11 to 27 are evaluated invoking the calculated overall heat transfer coefficients. The effects of velocity and temperature on the convective heat transfer in the turbulent region of molten salt are studied by comparing with the traditional correlations. The results show that the heat transfer characteristics of molten salt are in line with the empirical heat transfer correlation; however, Dittus–Boelter, Gnielinski, Sieder–Tate and Hausen correlations all give a larger deviation for the experimental data. Finally, based on the experimental data and Sieder–Tate correlation, a modified heat transfer correlation is proposed and good agreement is observed between the experimental data and the modified correlation. The results will also provide an important reference for the design of the heat exchangers in the Thorium-based Molten Salt Reactor.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing at very low Schmidt number with a uniform mean gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, P. K.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent direct numerical simulation (DNS) study [P. K. Yeung and K. R. Sreenivasan, "Spectrum of passive scalars of high molecular diffusivity in turbulent mixing," J. Fluid Mech. 716, R14 (2013)] with Schmidt number as low as 1/2048, we verified the essential physical content of the theory of Batchelor, Howells, and Townsend ["Small-scale variation of convected quantities like temperature in turbulent fluid. 2. The case of large conductivity," J. Fluid Mech. 5, 134 (1959)] for turbulent passive scalar fields with very strong diffusivity, decaying in the absence of any production mechanism. In particular, we confirmed the existence of the -17/3 power of the scalar spectral density in the so-called inertial-diffusive range. In the present paper, we consider the DNS of the same problem, but in the presence of a uniform mean gradient, which leads to the production of scalar fluctuations at (primarily) the large scales. For the parameters of the simulations, the presence of the mean gradient alters the physics of mixing fundamentally at low Peclet numbers. While the spectrum still follows a -17/3 power law in the inertial-diffusive range, the pre-factor is non-universal and depends on the magnitude of the mean scalar gradient. Spectral transfer is greatly reduced in comparison with those for moderately and weakly diffusive scalars, leading to several distinctive features such as the absence of dissipative anomaly and a new balance of terms in the spectral transfer equation for the scalar variance, differing from the case of zero gradient. We use the DNS results to present an alternative explanation for the observed scaling behavior, and discuss a few spectral characteristics in detail.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a vertical thin disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Yin; He, Xiao-Zhou; Yik, Hiu-Fai; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Schumacher, Jorg; Tong, Penger

    2017-11-01

    We report a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a thin vertical disk with a high-order spectral element method code NEK5000. An unstructured mesh is used to adapt the turbulent flow in the thin disk and to ensure that the mesh sizes satisfy the refined Groetzbach criterion and a new criterion for thin boundary layers proposed by Shishkina et al. The DNS results for the mean and variance temperature profiles in the thermal boundary layer region are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of the new boundary layer models proposed by Shishkina et al. and Wang et al.. Furthermore, we numerically calculate the five budget terms in the boundary layer equation, which are difficult to measure in experiment. The DNS results agree well with the theoretical predictions by Wang et al. Our numerical work thus provides a strong support for the development of a common framework for understanding the effect of boundary layer fluctuations. This work was supported in part by Hong Kong Research Grants Council.

  12. Turbulent mixing in three-dimensional droplet arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoby, M.R.G.; Navarro-Martinez, S.; Kronenburg, A.; Marquis, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The atomisation, evaporation and subsequent mixing of fuel from a liquid spray determines the effectiveness of the combustion processes in gas turbines and internal combustion engines. In the present paper, three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the evaporation of methanol droplets in hot environments are presented. The gas phase mixing is assessed by examining the scalar dissipation and the mixture fraction probability density function (PDF). Novel multi-conditional models are proposed that use mixture fraction and structural parameters as the conditioning variables for the scalar dissipation which is found to be well predicted in terms of magnitude and distribution. The β-PDF description of the mixture fraction seems to capture well the global behaviour for a laminar environment and for time-averaged results in turbulent cases. A novel model for the mixture fraction PDF is also proposed based on the multi-conditional model for scalar dissipation and an accurate representation of the PDF is achieved.

  13. Mixed convective flow of immiscible viscous fluids confined between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... finite difference methods to analyze the problem of natural convection boundary layer flow along a complex vertical surface ... analyzed the flow of two immiscible fluids in a parallel plate channel ... wavy and flat walls are maintained at constant temperatures w.

  14. Experimental study on the effects of channel gap size on mixed convection heat transfer characteristics in vertical rectangular channels heated from both sides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Y.; Kaminaga, M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of channel gap size on mixed forced and free convective heat transfer characteristics were experimentally investigated for water flowing near atmospheric pressure in a 750 mm long and 50 mm wide channel heated from both sides. The channel gap sizes investigated were 2.5, 6, 18 and 50 mm. Experiments were carried out for both aiding and opposing forced convective flows with a Reynolds number Re x of 4x10 to 6x10 6 and a Grashof number Gr x of 2x10 4 to 6x10 11 , where the distance x from the inlet of the channel is adopted as the characteristic length in Re x and Gr x . As for the results, the following were revealed for the parameters ranges investigated in this study. (1) When the dimensionless parameter, Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is less than 10 -4 , the flow shows the nature of forced convective heat transfer for a channel with any channel gap size in both aiding and opposing flows. (2) When Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is larger than 10 -2 , the flow shows the nature of free convective heat transfer for a channel with any channel gap size in both aiding and opposing flows. (3) When Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is between 10 -4 and 10 -2 for the channel with a channel gap size equal to or larger than 6 mm, the heat transfer coefficients in both aiding and opposing flows become, on the average, higher than those predicted by the previous correlations for either the pure turbulent forced convection or the pure free convection, and can be expressed in simple forms with a combination of Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 and the previous correlation for either the pure turbulent forced convection or the free convection along a flat plate. (4) When Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is between 10 -4 and 10 -2 for the channel with a channel gap size of 2.5 mm, the heat transfer coefficients in both aiding and opposing flows also become, on the average, higher than those predicted by the previous correlations for either the pure turbulent forced convection or the pure free convection. (orig./GL)

  15. Measuring mixing efficiency in experiments of strongly stratified turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augier, P.; Campagne, A.; Valran, T.; Calpe Linares, M.; Mohanan, A. V.; Micard, D.; Viboud, S.; Segalini, A.; Mordant, N.; Sommeria, J.; Lindborg, E.

    2017-12-01

    Oceanic and atmospheric models need better parameterization of the mixing efficiency. Therefore, we need to measure this quantity for flows representative of geophysical flows, both in terms of types of flows (with vortices and/or waves) and of dynamical regimes. In order to reach sufficiently large Reynolds number for strongly stratified flows, experiments for which salt is used to produce the stratification have to be carried out in a large rotating platform of at least 10-meter diameter.We present new experiments done in summer 2017 to study experimentally strongly stratified turbulence and mixing efficiency in the Coriolis platform. The flow is forced by a slow periodic movement of an array of large vertical or horizontal cylinders. The velocity field is measured by 3D-2C scanned horizontal particles image velocimetry (PIV) and 2D vertical PIV. Six density-temperature probes are used to measure vertical and horizontal profiles and signals at fixed positions.We will show how we rely heavily on open-science methods for this study. Our new results on the mixing efficiency will be presented and discussed in terms of mixing parameterization.

  16. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lim, Hyunkyung [STONY BROOK UNIV; Li, Xiao - Lin [STONY BROOK UNIV; Gilmm, James G [STONY BROOK UNIV

    2008-01-01

    We are concerned with the chaotic flow fields of turbulent mixing. Chaotic flow is found in an extreme form in multiply shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows. The goal of a converged simulation for this problem is twofold: to obtain converged solutions for macro solution features, such as the trajectories of the principal shock waves, mixing zone edges, and mean densities and velocities within each phase, and also for such micro solution features as the joint probability distributions of the temperature and species concentration. We introduce parameterized subgrid models of mass and thermal diffusion, to define large eddy simulations (LES) that replicate the micro features observed in the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Schmidt numbers and Prandtl numbers are chosen to represent typical liquid, gas and plasma parameter values. Our main result is to explore the variation of the Schmidt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers by three orders of magnitude, and the mesh by a factor of 8 per linear dimension (up to 3200 cells per dimension), to allow exploration of both DNS and LES regimes and verification of the simulations for both macro and micro observables. We find mesh convergence for key properties describing the molecular level of mixing, including chemical reaction rates between the distinct fluid species. We find results nearly independent of Reynolds number for Re 300, 6000, 600K . Methodologically, the results are also new. In common with the shock capturing community, we allow and maintain sharp solution gradients, and we enhance these gradients through use of front tracking. In common with the turbulence modeling community, we include subgrid scale models with no adjustable parameters for LES. To the authors' knowledge, these two methodologies have not been previously combined. In contrast to both of these methodologies, our use of Front Tracking, with DNS or LES resolution of the momentum equation at or near the Kolmogorov scale, but without

  17. MAGNETIC QUENCHING OF TURBULENT DIFFUSIVITY: RECONCILING MIXING-LENGTH THEORY ESTIMATES WITH KINEMATIC DYNAMO MODELS OF THE SOLAR CYCLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Nandy, Dibyendu

    2011-01-01

    The turbulent magnetic diffusivity in the solar convection zone is one of the most poorly constrained ingredients of mean-field dynamo models. This lack of constraint has previously led to controversy regarding the most appropriate set of parameters, as different assumptions on the value of turbulent diffusivity lead to radically different solar cycle predictions. Typically, the dynamo community uses double-step diffusivity profiles characterized by low values of diffusivity in the bulk of the convection zone. However, these low diffusivity values are not consistent with theoretical estimates based on mixing-length theory, which suggest much higher values for turbulent diffusivity. To make matters worse, kinematic dynamo simulations cannot yield sustainable magnetic cycles using these theoretical estimates. In this work, we show that magnetic cycles become viable if we combine the theoretically estimated diffusivity profile with magnetic quenching of the diffusivity. Furthermore, we find that the main features of this solution can be reproduced by a dynamo simulation using a prescribed (kinematic) diffusivity profile that is based on the spatiotemporal geometric average of the dynamically quenched diffusivity. This bridges the gap between dynamically quenched and kinematic dynamo models, supporting their usage as viable tools for understanding the solar magnetic cycle.

  18. Turbulent convection in an anelastic rotating sphere: A model for the circulation on the giant planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Yohai

    This thesis studies the dynamics of a rotating compressible gas sphere, driven by internal convection, as a model for the dynamics on the giant planets. We develop a new general circulation model for the Jovian atmosphere, based on the MITgcm dynamical core augmenting the nonhydrostatic model. The grid extends deep into the planet's interior allowing the model to compute the dynamics of a whole sphere of gas rather than a spherical shell (including the strong variations in gravity and the equation of state). Different from most previous 3D convection models, this model is anelastic rather than Boussinesq and thereby incorporates the full density variation of the planet. We show that the density gradients caused by convection drive the system away from an isentropic and therefore barotropic state as previously assumed, leading to significant baroclinic shear. This shear is concentrated mainly in the upper levels and associated with baroclinic compressibility effects. The interior flow organizes in large cyclonically rotating columnar eddies parallel to the rotation axis, which drive upgradient angular momentum eddy fluxes, generating the observed equatorial superrotation. Heat fluxes align with the axis of rotation, contributing to the observed flat meridional emission. We show the transition from weak convection cases with symmetric spiraling columnar modes similar to those found in previous analytic linear theory, to more turbulent cases which exhibit similar, though less regular and solely cyclonic, convection columns which manifest on the surface in the form of waves embedded within the superrotation. We develop a mechanical understanding of this system and scaling laws by studying simpler configurations and the dependence on physical properties such as the rotation period, bottom boundary location and forcing structure. These columnar cyclonic structures propagate eastward, driven by dynamics similar to that of a Rossby wave except that the restoring planetary

  19. Analysis of turbulent natural convection heat transfer in a lower plenum during external cooling using the COSMO code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, H.; Sawatari, Y.; Imada, T.

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of a large volumetrically heated melt pool is important to evaluate the feasibility of in-vessel retention by external flooding as an accident management. The COSMO (Coolability Simulation of Molten corium during severe accident) code has been developed at NUPEC to simulate turbulent natural convection heat transfer with internal heat source. The COSMO code solves thermal hydraulic conservation equations with turbulent model and can simulate melting and solidification process. The standard k-ε model has a limitation to describe the turbulent natural convection in the very high Rayleigh number condition (10 16 -10 17 ) assumed to occur in a lower plenum of RPV during a severe accident. This limitation results from the assumption of an analogy of momentum and energy transfer phenomena in the standard model. In this paper the modified turbulent model in which the turbulent number is treated, as a function of the flux Richardson number derived from the experiment, has been incorporated and verified by using the BALI experiments. It was found that the prediction of averaged Nusselt number became better than that of the standard model. In order to extend the COSMO code to the actual scale analysis under the external flooding conditions, more realistic boundary condition derived from the experiments should be treated. In this work the CHF correlation from ULPU experiment or the heat transfer coefficient correlation from CYBL experiment have been applied. The preliminary analysis of an actual scale analysis has been carried out under the condition of the TMI-2 accident. (author)

  20. Phenomenological and statistical analyses of turbulence in forced convection with temperature-dependent viscosity under non-Boussinesq condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, S M; Anwer, S F; Sanghi, S

    2013-10-01

    In this work, Thermal Large Eddy Simulation (TLES) is performed to study the behavior of weakly compressible Newtonian fluids with anisotropic temperature-dependent viscosity in forced convection turbulent flow. A systematic analysis of variable-viscosity effects, isolated from gravity, with relevance to industrial cooling/heating applications is being carried out. A LES of a planar channel flow with significant heat transfer at a low Mach number was performed to study effects of fluid property variation on the near-wall turbulence structure. In this flow configuration the top wall is maintained at a higher temperature (T hot ) than the bottom wall (T cold ). The temperature ratio (R θ = T hot /T cold ) is fixed at 1.01, 2 and 3 to study the effects of property variations at low Mach number. Results indicate that average and turbulent fields undergo significant changes. Compared with isothermal flow with constant viscosity, we observe that turbulence is enhanced in the cold side of the channel, characterized by locally lower viscosity whereas a decrease of turbulent kinetic energy is found at the hot wall. The turbulent structures near the cold wall are very short and densely populated vortices but near the hot wall there seems to be a long streaky structure or large elongated vortices. Spectral study reveals that turbulence is completely suppressed at the hot side of the channel at a large temperature ratio because no inertial zone is obtained (i.e. index of Kolmogorov scaling law is zero) from the spectra in these region.

  1. Local structure of scalar flux in turbulent passive scalar mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Aditya; Donzis, Diego

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the properties of scalar flux is important in the study of turbulent mixing. Classical theories suggest that it mainly depends on the large scale structures in the flow. Recent studies suggest that the mean scalar flux reaches an asymptotic value at high Peclet numbers, independent of molecular transport properties of the fluid. A large DNS database of isotropic turbulence with passive scalars forced with a mean scalar gradient with resolution up to 40963, is used to explore the structure of scalar flux based on the local topology of the flow. It is found that regions of small velocity gradients, where dissipation and enstrophy are small, constitute the main contribution to scalar flux. On the other hand, regions of very small scalar gradient (and scalar dissipation) become less important to the scalar flux at high Reynolds numbers. The scaling of the scalar flux spectra is also investigated. The k - 7 / 3 scaling proposed by Lumley (1964) is observed at high Reynolds numbers, but collapse is not complete. A spectral bump similar to that in the velocity spectrum is observed close to dissipative scales. A number of features, including the height of the bump, appear to reach an asymptotic value at high Schmidt number.

  2. Radiative heat transfer in a heat generating and turbulently convecting fluid layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; Chan, S.H.; Chawla, T.C.; Cho, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    The coupled problem of radiative transport and turbulent natural convection in a volumetrically heated, horizontal gray fluid medium, bounded from above by a rigid, isothermal wall and below by a rigid, adiabatic wall, is investigated analytically. An approximate method based upon the boundary layer approach is employed to obtain the dependence of heat transfer at the upper wall on the principal parameters of the problem, which, for moderate Prandtl number, are the Rayleigh number, Ra, the optical thickness, KL, and the conduction-radiation coupling parameter, N. Also obtained in this study is the behaviour of the thermal boundary layer at the upper wall. At large kL, the contribution of thermal radiation to heat transfer in the layer is found to be negligible for N > 10, moderate for N approximately 1, and overwhelming for N < 0.1. However, at small kL, thermal radiation is found to be important only for N < 0.01. While a higher level of turbulence results in a thinner boundary layer, a larger effect of radiation is found to result in a thicker one. Thus, in the presence of strong thermal radiation, a much larger value of Ra is required for the boundary layer approach to remain valid. Under severe radiation conditions, no boundary layer flow regime is found to exist even at very high Rayleigh numbers. Accordingly, the ranges of applicability of the present results are determined and the approximate method justified. In particular, the validity of the present analysis is tested in three limiting cases, ie those of kL → infinity, N → infinity, and Ra → infinity, and is further confirmed by comparison with the numerical solution (author)

  3. Numerical study of natural turbulent convection of nanofluids in a tall cavity heated from below

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mebrouk Ridha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper a numerical study of natural turbulent convection in a tall cavity filled with nanofluids. The cavity has a heat source embedded on its bottom wall, while the left, right and top walls of the cavity are maintained at a relatively low temperature. The working fluid is a water based nanofluid having three nanoparticle types: alumina, copper and copper oxid. The influence of pertinent parameters such as Rayleigh number, the type of nanofluid and solid volume fraction of nanoparticles on the cooling performance is studied. Steady forms of twodimensional Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes equations and conservation equations of mass and energy, coupled with the Boussinesq approximation, are solved by the control volume based discretisation method employing the SIMPLE algorithm for pressure-velocity coupling. Turbulence is modeled using the standard k-ε model. The Rayleigh number, Ra, is varied from 2.491009 to 2.491011. The volume fractions of nanoparticles were varied in the interval 0≤φ≤ 6% . Stream lines, isotherms, velocity profiles and Temperature profiles are presented for various combinations of Ra, the type of nanofluid and solid volume fraction of nanoparticles. The results are reported in the form of average Nusselt number on the heated wall. It is shown that for all values of Ra, the average heat transfer rate from the heat source increases almost linearly and monotonically as the solid volume fraction increases. Finally the average heat transfer rate takes on values that decrease according to the ordering Cu, CuO and Al2O3.

  4. A Comparative Experimental Study of Fixed Temperature and Fixed Heat Flux Boundary Conditions in Turbulent Thermal Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Di; Wang, Fei; Xi, Heng-Dong; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2014-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the influences of thermal boundary condition in turbulent thermal convection. Two configurations were examined: one was fixed heat flux at the bottom boundary and fixed temperature at the top (HC cells); the other was fixed temperature at both boundaries (CC cells). It is found that the flow strength in the CC cells is on average 9% larger than that in the HC ones, which could be understood as change in plume emission ability under different boundary conditions. It is further found, rather surprisingly, that flow reversals of the large-scale circulation occur more frequently in the CC cell, despite a stronger large-scale flow and more uniform temperature distribution over the boundaries. These findings provide new insights into turbulent thermal convection and should stimulate further studies, especially experimental ones. This work is supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council under Grant No. CUHK 403712.

  5. Influence of the angle between the wind and the isothermal surfaces on the boundary layer structures in turbulent thermal convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkina, Olga; Wagner, Sebastian; Horn, Susanne

    2014-03-01

    We derive the asymptotes for the ratio of the thermal to viscous boundary layer thicknesses for infinite and infinitesimal Prandtl numbers Pr as functions of the angle β between the large-scale circulation and an isothermal heated or cooled surface for the case of turbulent thermal convection with laminar-like boundary layers. For this purpose, we apply the Falkner-Skan ansatz, which is a generalization of the Prandtl-Blasius one to a nonhorizontal free-stream flow above the viscous boundary layer. Based on our direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection for Pr=0.1, 1, and 10 and moderate Rayleigh numbers up to 108 we evaluate the value of β that is found to be around 0.7π for all investigated cases. Our theoretical predictions for the boundary layer thicknesses for this β and the considered Pr are in good agreement with the DNS results.

  6. Probability density function modeling of scalar mixing from concentrated sources in turbulent channel flow

    OpenAIRE

    Bakosi, J.; Franzese, P.; Boybeyi, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Dispersion of a passive scalar from concentrated sources in fully developed turbulent channel flow is studied with the probability density function (PDF) method. The joint PDF of velocity, turbulent frequency and scalar concentration is represented by a large number of Lagrangian particles. A stochastic near-wall PDF model combines the generalized Langevin model of Haworth & Pope with Durbin's method of elliptic relaxation to provide a mathematically exact treatment of convective and viscous ...

  7. Simplified methods to assess thermal fatigue due to turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannink, M.H.C.; Timperi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal fatigue is a safety relevant damage mechanism in pipework of nuclear power plants. A well-known simplified method for the assessment of thermal fatigue due to turbulent mixing is the so-called sinusoidal method. Temperature fluctuations in the fluid are described by a sinusoidally varying signal at the inner wall of the pipe. Because of limited information on the thermal loading conditions, this approach generally leads to overconservative results. In this paper, a new assessment method is presented, which has the potential of reducing the overconservatism of existing procedures. Artificial fluid temperature signals are generated by superposition of harmonic components with different amplitudes and frequencies. The amplitude-frequency spectrum of the components is modelled by a formula obtained from turbulence theory, whereas the phase differences are assumed to be randomly distributed. Lifetime predictions generated with the new simplified method are compared with lifetime predictions based on real fluid temperature signals, measured in an experimental setup of a mixing tee. Also, preliminary steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations of the total power of the fluctuations are presented. The total power is needed as an input parameter for the spectrum formula in a real-life application. Solution of the transport equation for the total power was included in a CFD code and comparisons with experiments were made. The newly developed simplified method for generating the temperature signal is shown to be adequate for the investigated geometry and flow conditions, and demonstrates possibilities of reducing the conservatism of the sinusoidal method. CFD calculations of the total power show promising results, but further work is needed to develop the approach. (author)

  8. Radiative mixed convection over an isothermal cone embedded in a porous medium with variable permeability

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Ebrahiem, N.A.; Salama, Amgad; Sun, S.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of mixed convection with thermal radiation of an optical dense viscous fluid adjacent to an isothermal cone imbedded in a porous medium with Rosseland diffusion approximation incorporating the variation of permeability and thermal conductivity is numerically investigated. The transformed conservation laws are solved numerically for the case of variable surface temperature conditions. Numerical results are given for the dimensionless temperature profiles and the local Nusselt number for various values of the mixed convection parameter , the cone angle parameter ?, the radiation-conduction parameter R d, and the surface temperature parameter H. Copyright 2011 M. F. El-Amin et al.

  9. Turbulent Convection Insights from Small-Scale Thermal Forcing with Zero Net Heat Flux at a Horizontal Boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Ross W; Gayen, Bishakhdatta

    2015-11-13

    A large-scale circulation, a turbulent boundary layer, and a turbulent plume are noted features of convection at large Rayleigh numbers under differential heating on a single horizontal boundary. These might be attributed to the forcing, which in all studies has been limited to a unidirectional gradient over the domain scale. We instead apply forcing on a length scale smaller than the domain, and with variation in both horizontal directions. Direct numerical simulations show turbulence throughout the domain, a regime transition to a dominant domain-scale circulation, and a region of logarithmic velocity in the boundary layer, despite zero net heat flux. The results show significant similarities to Rayleigh-Bénard convection, demonstrate the significance of plume merging, support the hypothesis that the key driver of convection is the production of available potential energy without necessarily supplying total potential energy, and imply that contributions to domain-scale circulation in the oceans need not be solely from the large-scale gradients of forcing.

  10. Turbulent mixing and removal of ozone within an Amazon rainforest canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, L. S.; Gerken, T.; Ruiz-Plancarte, J.; Wei, D.; Fuentes, J. D.; Katul, G. G.; Dias, N. L.; Acevedo, O. C.; Chamecki, M.

    2017-03-01

    Simultaneous profiles of turbulence statistics and mean ozone mixing ratio are used to establish a relation between eddy diffusivity and ozone mixing within the Amazon forest. A one-dimensional diffusion model is proposed and used to infer mixing time scales from the eddy diffusivity profiles. Data and model results indicate that during daytime conditions, the upper (lower) half of the canopy is well (partially) mixed most of the time and that most of the vertical extent of the forest can be mixed in less than an hour. During nighttime, most of the canopy is predominantly poorly mixed, except for periods with bursts of intermittent turbulence. Even though turbulence is faster than chemistry during daytime, both processes have comparable time scales in the lower canopy layers during nighttime conditions. Nonchemical loss time scales (associated with stomatal uptake and dry deposition) for the entire forest are comparable to turbulent mixing time scale in the lower canopy during the day and in the entire canopy during the night, indicating a tight coupling between turbulent transport and dry deposition and stomatal uptake processes. Because of the significant time of day and height variability of the turbulent mixing time scale inside the canopy, it is important to take it into account when studying chemical and biophysical processes happening in the forest environment. The method proposed here to estimate turbulent mixing time scales is a reliable alternative to currently used models, especially for situations in which the vertical distribution of the time scale is relevant.

  11. Dynamic heterogeneity and conditional statistics of non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations in turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaozhou; Wang, Yin; Tong, Penger

    2018-05-01

    Non-Gaussian fluctuations with an exponential tail in their probability density function (PDF) are often observed in nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs) and one does not understand why they appear so often. Turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) is an example of such a NESS, in which the measured PDF P (δ T ) of temperature fluctuations δ T in the central region of the flow has a long exponential tail. Here we show that because of the dynamic heterogeneity in RBC, the exponential PDF is generated by a convolution of a set of dynamics modes conditioned on a constant local thermal dissipation rate ɛ . The conditional PDF G (δ T |ɛ ) of δ T under a constant ɛ is found to be of Gaussian form and its variance σT2 for different values of ɛ follows an exponential distribution. The convolution of the two distribution functions gives rise to the exponential PDF P (δ T ) . This work thus provides a physical mechanism of the observed exponential distribution of δ T in RBC and also sheds light on the origin of non-Gaussian fluctuations in other NESSs.

  12. Cessations and reversals of the large-scale circulation in turbulent thermal convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2007-06-01

    We present an experimental study of cessations and reversals of the large-scale circulation (LSC) in turbulent thermal convection in a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio (Gamma) 1/2 . It is found that cessations and reversals of the LSC occur in Gamma = 1/2 geometry an order-of-magnitude more frequently than they do in Gamma=1 cells, and that after a cessation the LSC is most likely to restart in the opposite direction, i.e., reversals of the LSC are the most probable cessation events. This contrasts sharply to the finding in Gamma=1 geometry and implies that cessations in the two geometries are governed by different dynamics. It is found that the occurrence of reversals is a Poisson process and that a stronger rebound of the flow strength after a reversal or cessation leads to a longer period of stability of the LSC. Several properties of reversals and cessations in this system are found to be statistically similar to those of geomagnetic reversals. A direct measurement of the velocity field reveals that a cessation corresponds to a momentary decoherence of the LSC.

  13. Simulation of cloud/radiation interaction using a second-order turbulence radiative-convective model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, C.Y.; Smith, W.S.

    1994-01-01

    Extended sheets of low-level stratus and stratocumulus clouds are a persistent feature over the eastern parts of the major ocean basins associated with the quasi-permanent subtropical high-pressure systems. These clouds exert a strong influence on climate through their high albedo, compared with the underlying surface, and their low altitude. The former leads to a reduction of the net shortwave flux entering the atmosphere, and the latter leads to an infrared loss in a way essentially the same as the cloud-free conditions. This paper is a modeling study with the current understanding of the important physical processes associated with a cloud-capped boundary layer. The numerical model is a high-resolution one-dimensional version of the second-order turbulence convective/radiative model developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Future work includes sensitivity tests to ascertain the model validity as well as to systematically include all the possible ambient atmospheric and surface conditions. Detailed budget analyses are also useful in categorizing the cloud-capped boundary layers into a few classes

  14. Numerical prediction of an axisymmetric turbulent mixing layer using two turbulence models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power, once considered and then rejected (in the U. S.) for application to space vehicle propulsion, is being reconsidered for powering space rockets, especially for interplanetary travel. The gas core reactor, a high risk, high payoff nuclear engine concept, is one that was considered in the 1960s and 70s. As envisioned then, the gas core reactor would consist of a heavy, slow moving core of fissioning uranium vapor surrounded by a fast moving outer stream of hydrogen propellant. Satisfactory operation of such a configuration would require stable nuclear reaction kinetics to occur simultaneously with a stable, coflowing, probably turbulent fluid system having a dense inner stream and a light outer stream. The present study examines the behavior of two turbulence models in numerically simulating an idealized version of the above coflowing fluid system. The two models are the standard k˜ɛ model and a thin shear algebraic stress model (ASM). The idealized flow system can be described as an axisymmetric mixing layer of constant density. Predictions for the radial distribution of the mean streamwise velocity and shear stress for several axial stations are compared with experiment. Results for the k˜ɛe predictions are broadly satisfactory while those for the ASM are distinctly poorer.

  15. Experiments and CFD Modelling of Turbulent Mass Transfer in a Mixing Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertager Osenbroch, Lene Kristin; Hjertager, Bjørn H.; Solberg, Tron

    2006-01-01

    . Three different flow cases are studied. The 2D numerical predictions of the mixing channel show that none of the k-ε turbulence models tested is suitable for the flow cases studied here. The turbulent Schmidt number is reduced to obtain a better agreement between measured and predicted mean......Experiments are carried out for passive mixing in order to obtain local mean and turbulent velocities and concentrations. The mixing takes place in a square channel with two inlets separated by a block. A combined PIV/PLIF technique is used to obtain instantaneous velocity and concentration fields...... and fluctuating concentrations. The multi-peak presumed PDF mixing model is tested....

  16. Analytical prediction of friction factors and Nusselt numbers of turbulent forced convection in rod bundles with smooth and rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Jian; Silva Freire, Atila P.

    2002-01-01

    A simple analytical method was developed for the prediction of the friction factor, f, of fully developed turbulent flow and the Nusselt number, Nu, of fully developed turbulent forced convection in rod bundles arranged in square or hexagonal arrays. The friction factor equation for smooth rod bundles was presented in a form similar to the friction factor equation for turbulent flow in a circular pipe. An explicit equation for the Nusselt number of turbulent forced convection in rod bundles with smooth surface was developed. In addition, we extended the analysis to rod bundles with rough surface and provided a method for the prediction of the friction factor and the Nusselt number. The method was based on the law of the wall for velocity and the law of the wall for the temperature, which were integrated over the entire flow area to yield algebraic equations for the prediction of f and Nu. The present method is applicable to infinite rod bundles in square and hexagonal arrays with low pitch to rod diameter ratio, P/D<1.2

  17. A DNS study of turbulent mixing of two passive scalars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juneja, A.; Pope, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    We employ direct numerical simulations to study the mixing of two passive scalars in stationary, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. The present work is a direct extension of that of Eswaran and Pope from one scalar to two scalars and the focus is on examining the evolution states of the scalar joint probability density function (jpdf) and the conditional expectation of the scalar diffusion to motivate better models for multi-scalar mixing. The initial scalar fields are chosen to conform closely to a open-quote open-quote triple-delta function close-quote close-quote jpdf corresponding to blobs of fluid in three distinct states. The effect of the initial length scales and diffusivity of the scalars on the evolution of the jpdf and the conditional diffusion is investigated in detail as the scalars decay from their prescribed initial state. Also examined is the issue of self-similarity of the scalar jpdf at large times and the rate of decay of the scalar variance and dissipation. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. Impact of chemical reaction in fully developed radiated mixed convective flow between two rotating disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Khan, M. Waleed Ahmed; Khan, M. Ijaz; Waqas, M.; Alsaedi, A.

    2018-06-01

    Flow of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) viscous fluid between two rotating disks is modeled. Angular velocities of two disks are different. Flow is investigated for nonlinear mixed convection. Heat transfer is analyzed for nonlinear thermal radiation and heat generation/absorption. Chemical reaction is also implemented. Convective conditions of heat and mass transfer are studied. Transformations used lead to reduction of PDEs into the ODEs. The impacts of important physical variables like Prandtl number, Reynold number, Hartman number, mixed convection parameter, chemical reaction and Schmidt number on velocities, temperature and concentration are elaborated. In addition velocity and temperature gradients are physically interpreted. Our obtained results indicate that radial, axial and tangential velocities decrease for higher estimation of Hartman number.

  19. Mixed convection heat transfer from confined tandem square cylinders in a horizontal channel

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Zhu; Xi, Guang; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Suping

    2013-01-01

    with four widths of the cylinder and the blockage ratio and the Prandtl number are fixed at 0.1 and 0.7 respectively. The mixed convective flow and heat transfer is simulated by high accuracy multidomain pseudospectral method. The Reynolds number (Re

  20. Mixed convection flow of nanofluid in a square enclosure with an intruded rectangular fin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong, Ran; Zhou, Xuanyu; De Souza Machado, Bruno; Das, Prodip K.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed convection flow in enclosures has been a subject of interest for many years due to their ever increasing applications in solar collectors, electronic cooling, lubrication technologies, food processing, and nuclear reactors. In comparison, little effort has been given to the problem of mixed convection in enclosures filled with nanofluids, while the addition of nanoparticles in a fluid base to alter specific material properties is considered a feasible solution for many heat transfer problems. Mixed convection of nanofluids is a challenging problem as the addition of nanoparticles changes the fluid’s thermo-physical properties as well as due to the complex interactions among inertia, viscous, and buoyancy forces. In this study, a two-dimensional steady-state numerical model has been developed to investigate mixed convection flow of nanofluids in a square enclosure with an intruded rectangular fin and to optimize the fin geometry for maximizing the heat transfer using the Constructal design. The model has been developed using ANSYS-FLUENT for various fin geometries. Flow fields, temperature fields, and heat transfer rates are examined for different values of Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers for several geometries of the fin with the aim of maximizing the heat transfer from the fin to the surrounding flow. Outcome of this study provides important insight into the heat transfer behavior of nanofluids, which will help in developing novel geometries with enhanced and controlled heat transfer for solar collectors and electronic devices.

  1. Mixed convection flow of nanofluid in a square enclosure with an intruded rectangular fin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Ran; Zhou, Xuanyu; De Souza Machado, Bruno; Das, Prodip K., E-mail: prodip.das@ncl.ac.uk [School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering Newcastle University Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-12

    Mixed convection flow in enclosures has been a subject of interest for many years due to their ever increasing applications in solar collectors, electronic cooling, lubrication technologies, food processing, and nuclear reactors. In comparison, little effort has been given to the problem of mixed convection in enclosures filled with nanofluids, while the addition of nanoparticles in a fluid base to alter specific material properties is considered a feasible solution for many heat transfer problems. Mixed convection of nanofluids is a challenging problem as the addition of nanoparticles changes the fluid’s thermo-physical properties as well as due to the complex interactions among inertia, viscous, and buoyancy forces. In this study, a two-dimensional steady-state numerical model has been developed to investigate mixed convection flow of nanofluids in a square enclosure with an intruded rectangular fin and to optimize the fin geometry for maximizing the heat transfer using the Constructal design. The model has been developed using ANSYS-FLUENT for various fin geometries. Flow fields, temperature fields, and heat transfer rates are examined for different values of Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers for several geometries of the fin with the aim of maximizing the heat transfer from the fin to the surrounding flow. Outcome of this study provides important insight into the heat transfer behavior of nanofluids, which will help in developing novel geometries with enhanced and controlled heat transfer for solar collectors and electronic devices.

  2. Mixed convection flow of nanofluid in a square enclosure with an intruded rectangular fin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Ran; Zhou, Xuanyu; De Souza Machado, Bruno; Das, Prodip K.

    2016-07-01

    Mixed convection flow in enclosures has been a subject of interest for many years due to their ever increasing applications in solar collectors, electronic cooling, lubrication technologies, food processing, and nuclear reactors. In comparison, little effort has been given to the problem of mixed convection in enclosures filled with nanofluids, while the addition of nanoparticles in a fluid base to alter specific material properties is considered a feasible solution for many heat transfer problems. Mixed convection of nanofluids is a challenging problem as the addition of nanoparticles changes the fluid's thermo-physical properties as well as due to the complex interactions among inertia, viscous, and buoyancy forces. In this study, a two-dimensional steady-state numerical model has been developed to investigate mixed convection flow of nanofluids in a square enclosure with an intruded rectangular fin and to optimize the fin geometry for maximizing the heat transfer using the Constructal design. The model has been developed using ANSYS-FLUENT for various fin geometries. Flow fields, temperature fields, and heat transfer rates are examined for different values of Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers for several geometries of the fin with the aim of maximizing the heat transfer from the fin to the surrounding flow. Outcome of this study provides important insight into the heat transfer behavior of nanofluids, which will help in developing novel geometries with enhanced and controlled heat transfer for solar collectors and electronic devices.

  3. Mixed convection flow and heat transfer in a vertical wavy channel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mixed convection flow and heat transfer in a vertical wavy channel filled with porous and fluid layers is studied analytically. The flow in the porous medium is modeled using Darcy-Brinkman equation. The coupled non-linear partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy are solved ...

  4. Effect of viscous dissipation on mixed convection flow in a vertical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology .... third kind for flow over a flat plate and in the thermal entrance region of a rectangular channel. ... on mixed convection in a vertical channel using Robin boundary conditions was ... Hajmohammadi and Nourazar (2014) studied the effect of a thin gas layer in ...

  5. Analytical solution for the convectively-mixed atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwersloot, H.G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the prognostic equations of mixed-layer theory assuming a zeroth order jump at the entrainment zone, analytical solutions for the boundary-layer height evolution are derived with different degrees of accuracy. First, an exact implicit expression for the boundary-layer height for a situation

  6. Comparison of scale analysis and numerical simulation for saturated zone convective mixing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    Scale analysis can be used to predict a variety of quantities arising from natural systems where processes are described by partial differential equations. For example, scale analysis can be applied to estimate the effectiveness of convective missing on the dilution of contaminants in groundwater. Scale analysis involves substituting simple quotients for partial derivatives and identifying and equating the dominant terms in an order-of-magnitude sense. For free convection due to sidewall heating of saturated porous media, scale analysis shows that vertical convective velocity in the thermal boundary layer region is proportional to the Rayleigh number, horizontal convective velocity is proportional to the square root of the Rayleigh number, and thermal boundary layer thickness is proportional to the inverse square root of the Rayleigh number. These scale analysis estimates are corroborated by numerical simulations of an idealized system. A scale analysis estimate of mixing time for a tracer mixing by hydrodynamic dispersion in a convection cell also agrees well with numerical simulation for two different Rayleigh numbers. Scale analysis for the heating-from-below scenario produces estimates of maximum velocity one-half as large as the sidewall case. At small values of the Rayleigh number, this estimate is confirmed by numerical simulation. For larger Rayleigh numbers, simulation results suggest maximum velocities are similar to the sidewall heating scenario. In general, agreement between scale analysis estimates and numerical simulation results serves to validate the method of scale analysis. Application is to radioactive repositories

  7. Numerical simulation of double-diffusive mixed convective flow in rectangular enclosure with insulated moving lid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teamah, M.A. [Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Mech. Eng. Dept, Alexandria (Egypt); El-Maghlany, W.M. [Faculty of Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2010-09-15

    The present study is concerned with the mixed convection in a rectangular lid-driven cavity under the combined buoyancy effects of thermal and mass diffusion. Double-diffusive convective flow in a rectangular enclosure with moving upper surface is studied numerically. Both upper and lower surfaces are being insulated and impermeable. Constant different temperatures and concentration are imposed along the vertical walls of the enclosure, steady state laminar regime is considered. The transport equations for continuity, momentum, energy and spices transfer are solved. The numerical results are reported for the effect of Richardson number, Lewis number, and buoyancy ratio on the iso-contours of stream line, temperature, and concentration. In addition, the predicted results for both local and average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are presented and discussed for various parametric conditions. This study was done for 0.1 <= Le <= 50 and Prandtl number Pr = 0.7. Through out the study the Grashof number and aspect ratio are kept constant at 10{sup 4} and 2 respectively and -10 <= N <= 10, while Richardson number has been varied from 0.01 to 10 to simulate forced convection dominated flow, mixed convection and natural convection dominated flow. (authors)

  8. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN TURBULENT CONVECTION AND STANDING ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F.; Haas, Roland; Reisswig, Christian; Mösta, Philipp; Klion, Hannah; Schnetter, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments into the nature of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics in the postbounce stalled-shock phase of core-collapse supernovae using 3D general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of a 27 M ⊙ progenitor star with a neutrino leakage/heating scheme. We vary the strength of neutrino heating and find three cases of 3D dynamics: (1) neutrino-driven convection, (2) initially neutrino-driven convection and subsequent development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and (3) SASI-dominated evolution. This confirms previous 3D results of Hanke et al. and Couch and Connor. We carry out simulations with resolutions differing by up to a factor of ∼4 and demonstrate that low resolution is artificially favorable for explosion in the 3D convection-dominated case since it decreases the efficiency of energy transport to small scales. Low resolution results in higher radial convective fluxes of energy and enthalpy, more fully buoyant mass, and stronger neutrino heating. In the SASI-dominated case, lower resolution damps SASI oscillations. In the convection-dominated case, a quasi-stationary angular kinetic energy spectrum E(ℓ) develops in the heating layer. Like other 3D studies, we find E(ℓ) ∝ℓ −1 in the “inertial range,” while theory and local simulations argue for E(ℓ) ∝ ℓ −5/3 . We argue that current 3D simulations do not resolve the inertial range of turbulence and are affected by numerical viscosity up to the energy-containing scale, creating a “bottleneck” that prevents an efficient turbulent cascade

  9. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN TURBULENT CONVECTION AND STANDING ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F.; Haas, Roland; Reisswig, Christian; Mösta, Philipp; Klion, Hannah [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schnetter, Erik, E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.edu [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-20

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments into the nature of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics in the postbounce stalled-shock phase of core-collapse supernovae using 3D general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of a 27 M{sub ⊙} progenitor star with a neutrino leakage/heating scheme. We vary the strength of neutrino heating and find three cases of 3D dynamics: (1) neutrino-driven convection, (2) initially neutrino-driven convection and subsequent development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and (3) SASI-dominated evolution. This confirms previous 3D results of Hanke et al. and Couch and Connor. We carry out simulations with resolutions differing by up to a factor of ∼4 and demonstrate that low resolution is artificially favorable for explosion in the 3D convection-dominated case since it decreases the efficiency of energy transport to small scales. Low resolution results in higher radial convective fluxes of energy and enthalpy, more fully buoyant mass, and stronger neutrino heating. In the SASI-dominated case, lower resolution damps SASI oscillations. In the convection-dominated case, a quasi-stationary angular kinetic energy spectrum E(ℓ) develops in the heating layer. Like other 3D studies, we find E(ℓ) ∝ℓ{sup −1} in the “inertial range,” while theory and local simulations argue for E(ℓ) ∝ ℓ{sup −5/3}. We argue that current 3D simulations do not resolve the inertial range of turbulence and are affected by numerical viscosity up to the energy-containing scale, creating a “bottleneck” that prevents an efficient turbulent cascade.

  10. Study on convective mixing for thermal striping phenomena. Thermal-hydraulic analyses on mixing process in parallel triple-jet and comparisons between numerical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Nobuyuki; Nishimura, Motohiko; Kamide, Hideki

    2000-03-01

    A quantitative evaluation on thermal striping, in which temperature fluctuation due to convective mixing among jets imposes thermal fatigue on structural components, is of importance for reactor safety. In the present study, a water experiment was performed on parallel triple-jet: cold jet at the center and hot jets in both sides. Three kinds of numerical analyses based on the finite difference method were carried out to compare the similarity with the experiment by use of respective different handling of turbulence such as a k-ε two equation turbulence model (k-ε Model), a low Reynolds number stress and heat flux equation model (LRSFM) and a direct numerical simulation (DNS). In the experiment, the jets were mainly mixed due to the coherent oscillation. The numerical result using k-ε Model could not reproduce the coherent oscillating motion of jets due to rolling-up fluid. The oscillations of the jets predicted by LRSFM and DNS were in good agreements with the experiment. The comparison between the coherent and random components in experimental temperature fluctuation obtained by using the phase-averaging shows that k-ε Model and LRSFM overestimated the random component and the coherent component respectively. The ratios of coherent to random components in total temperature fluctuation obtained from DNS were in good agreements with the experiment. The numerical analysis using DNS can reproduce the coherent oscillation of the jets and the coherent / random components in temperature fluctuation. The analysis using LRSFM could simulate the mixing process of the jets with the low frequency. (author)

  11. Mixed convection around calandria tubes in a ¼ scale CANDU-6 moderator circulation tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins, M.D.; Rossouw, D.J.; Boer, M. [Nuclear Science Division, School of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Kim, T., E-mail: tong.kim@wits.ac.za [Nuclear Science Division, School of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Rhee, B.W.; Kim, H.T. [Severe Accident and PHWR Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A secondary jet is formed at a stagnation region and is directed towards the center of the MCT. • The secondary jet undergoes the significant dissipation and mixing due to calandria tubes (CTs). • Its cooling effectiveness is reduced on the CTs in the bottom of the MCT. • With forced convection dominance, peak heat transfer is on the upper CT surface. • With natural convection dominance, peak heat transfer is on the lower CT surface. - Abstract: This study experimentally characterizes mixed convection around calandria tubes (CTs) in a ¼ scale CANDU-6 moderator circulation tank (MCT) that uses air as the working fluid. In a full scale CANDU-6 reactor that undergoes a postulated dual failure with a loss-of-coolant accident without the emergency core cooling system available, mixed convection heat transfer occurs around the CTs. The cooling effectiveness of the moderator is diminished as an emergency heat sink if overheating eventually leads to film boiling. To prevent the onset of film boiling, local sub-cooling margins of the moderator needs to be maintained or else the critical heat flux should be increased. Circulating the moderator which interacts with the overheated CTs increases the heat transfer into the moderator which may suppress film boiling. The present experimental results demonstrate that the cooling effectiveness of the circulating moderator, in particular the secondary jet, is attenuated substantially as it is convected away from the inner wall towards the center of the MCT. The momentum of the secondary jet is diffused through the CTs. At a low jet Reynolds number, the secondary jet becomes ineffective so that some overheated CTs positioned in the other half of the MCT are cooled only by natural convection.

  12. Design of an electromagnetic accelerator for turbulent hydrodynamic mix studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Morrison, J.J.; Dimonte, G.; Remington, B.A.

    1994-03-01

    An electromagnetic accelerator in the form of a linear electric motor (LEM) has been designed to achieve controlled acceleration profiles of a carriage containing hydrodynamically unstable fluids for the investigation of the development of turbulent mix. Key features of the design include: (1) independent control of acceleration, deceleration and augmentation currents to provide a variety of acceleration-time profiles, (2) a robust support structure to minimized deflection and dampen vibration which could create artifacts in the data interfering with the intended study and (3) a compliant, non-arcing solid armature allowing optimum electrical contact. Electromagnetic modeling codes were used to optimize the rail and augmentation coil positions within the support structure framework. Design of the driving armature and the dynamic electromagnetic braking system is based on results of contemporary studies for non-arcing sliding contact of solid armatures. A 0.6MJ electrolytic capacitor bank is used for energy storage to drive the LEM. This report will discuss a LEM and armature design which will accelerate masses of up to 3kg to a maximum of about 3000g o , where g o is acceleration due to gravity

  13. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, H; Yu, Y; Glimm, J; Li, X-L; Sharp, D H

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new method for the large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent mixing flows. The method yields convergent probability distribution functions (PDFs) for temperature and concentration and a chemical reaction rate when applied to reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable flows. Because such a mesh convergence is an unusual and perhaps original capability for LES of RM flows, we review previous validation studies of the principal components of the algorithm. The components are (i) a front tracking code, FronTier, to control numerical mass diffusion and (ii) dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) models to compensate for unresolved scales in the LES. We also review the relevant code comparison studies. We compare our results to a simple model based on 1D diffusion, taking place in the geometry defined statistically by the interface (the 50% isoconcentration surface between the two fluids). Several conclusions important to physics could be drawn from our study. We model chemical reactions with no closure approximations beyond those in the LES of the fluid variables itself, and as with dynamic SGS models, these closures contain no adjustable parameters. The chemical reaction rate is specified by the joint PDF for temperature and concentration. We observe a bimodal distribution for the PDF and we observe significant dependence on fluid transport parameters.

  14. Analysis of turbulent natural convection heat transfer in a lower plenum during external cooling using the COSMO code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, H. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Sawatari, Y.; Imada, T. [Fuji Research Institute Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    The behavior of a large volumetrically heated melt pool is important to evaluate the feasibility of in-vessel retention by external flooding as an accident management. The COSMO (Coolability Simulation of Molten corium during severe accident) code has been developed at NUPEC to simulate turbulent natural convection heat transfer with internal heat source. The COSMO code solves thermal hydraulic conservation equations with turbulent model and can simulate melting and solidification process. The standard k-{epsilon} model has a limitation to describe the turbulent natural convection in the very high Rayleigh number condition (10{sup 16}-10{sup 17}) assumed to occur in a lower plenum of RPV during a severe accident. This limitation results from the assumption of an analogy of momentum and energy transfer phenomena in the standard model. In this paper the modified turbulent model in which the turbulent number is treated, as a function of the flux Richardson number derived from the experiment, has been incorporated and verified by using the BALI experiments. It was found that the prediction of averaged Nusselt number became better than that of the standard model. In order to extend the COSMO code to the actual scale analysis under the external flooding conditions, more realistic boundary condition derived from the experiments should be treated. In this work the CHF correlation from ULPU experiment or the heat transfer coefficient correlation from CYBL experiment have been applied. The preliminary analysis of an actual scale analysis has been carried out under the condition of the TMI-2 accident. (author)

  15. [Constitutive correlations for wire-wrapped subchannel analysis under forced and mixed convection conditions]. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.K.; Todreas, N.E.

    1984-08-01

    A new version of the ENERGY series code, ENERGY-IV, was written for predicting coolant temperature distributions in wire-wrapped rod assemblies used in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor. The ENERGY-IV Code is applicable to both steady-state forced and mixed convection operation for a single isolated assembly. (The SUPERENERGY Code, [Basehore (1980)] is applicable to core wide forced convection analysis.) ENERGY-IV is an empirical code designed to be fast running. Hence the core designer can use it as an inexpensive thermal hydraulic design or diagnosis tool

  16. Simulation of the convective mixed layer in Athens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, H.P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    The region of Athens, Greece, has a highly complicated terrain with irregular coastline and mountains next to the sea. This results in complex flow fields. A case study of a simulation of a sea breeze with the Karlsruhe Atmospheric Mesoscale model KAMM is presented together with remarks on the advection of mixed layer air. The valley of Athens is open to the sea towards the south-west and surrounded by mountains on the other sides. Gaps between the mountains channel the flow into the valley. Simulations were done for 14 September 1994 to compare them with measurements at 6 masts by Risoe during the MEDCAPHOT-TRACE experiment. (au)

  17. Mixed convective heat transfer to Sisko fluid over a radially stretching sheet in the presence of convective boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Masood; Malik, Rabia, E-mail: rabiamalik.qau@gmail.com; Munir, Asif [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2015-08-15

    In this article, the mixed convective heat transfer to Sisko fluid over a radially stretching surface in the presence of convective boundary conditions is investigated. The viscous dissipation and thermal radiation effects are also taken into account. The suitable transformations are applied to convert the governing partial differential equations into a set of nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations. The analytical solution of the governing problem is obtained by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Additionally, these analytical results are compared with the numerical results obtained by the shooting technique. The obtained results for the velocity and temperature are analyzed graphically for several physical parameters for the assisting and opposing flows. It is found that the effect of buoyancy parameter is more prominent in case of the assisting flow as compared to the opposing flow. Further, in tabular form the numerical values are given for the local skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number. A remarkable agreement is noticed by comparing the present results with the results reported in the literature as a special case.

  18. Mixed convective heat transfer to Sisko fluid over a radially stretching sheet in the presence of convective boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Masood; Malik, Rabia; Munir, Asif

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the mixed convective heat transfer to Sisko fluid over a radially stretching surface in the presence of convective boundary conditions is investigated. The viscous dissipation and thermal radiation effects are also taken into account. The suitable transformations are applied to convert the governing partial differential equations into a set of nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations. The analytical solution of the governing problem is obtained by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Additionally, these analytical results are compared with the numerical results obtained by the shooting technique. The obtained results for the velocity and temperature are analyzed graphically for several physical parameters for the assisting and opposing flows. It is found that the effect of buoyancy parameter is more prominent in case of the assisting flow as compared to the opposing flow. Further, in tabular form the numerical values are given for the local skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number. A remarkable agreement is noticed by comparing the present results with the results reported in the literature as a special case

  19. Ozone mixing ratios inside tropical deep convective clouds from OMI satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Ziemke

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new technique for estimating ozone mixing ratio inside deep convective clouds. The technique uses the concept of an optical centroid cloud pressure that is indicative of the photon path inside clouds. Radiative transfer calculations based on realistic cloud vertical structure as provided by CloudSat radar data show that because deep convective clouds are optically thin near the top, photons can penetrate significantly inside the cloud. This photon penetration coupled with in-cloud scattering produces optical centroid pressures that are hundreds of hPa inside the cloud. We combine measured column ozone and the optical centroid cloud pressure derived using the effects of rotational-Raman scattering to estimate O3 mixing ratio in the upper regions of deep convective clouds. The data are obtained from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI onboard NASA's Aura satellite. Our results show that low O3 concentrations in these clouds are a common occurrence throughout much of the tropical Pacific. Ozonesonde measurements in the tropics following convective activity also show very low concentrations of O3 in the upper troposphere. These low amounts are attributed to vertical injection of ozone poor oceanic boundary layer air during convection into the upper troposphere followed by convective outflow. Over South America and Africa, O3 mixing ratios inside deep convective clouds often exceed 50 ppbv which are comparable to mean background (cloud-free amounts and are consistent with higher concentrations of injected boundary layer/lower tropospheric O3 relative to the remote Pacific. The Atlantic region in general also consists of higher amounts of O3 precursors due to both biomass burning and lightning. Assuming that O3 is well mixed (i.e., constant mixing ratio with height up to the tropopause, we can estimate the stratospheric column O3 over

  20. Experimental and Computational Studies of Turbulent Mass Transfer in a Mixing Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertager, Lene Kristin; Hjertager, Bjørn H.; Solberg, Tron

    2008-01-01

    . Three different flow cases are studied. The 2D numerical predictions of the mixing channel show that none of the k- ε turbulence models tested is suitable for the flow cases studied here. The turbulent Schmidt number is reduced to obtain a better agreement between measured and predicted mean...

  1. Planar measurements of velocity and concentration of turbulent mixing in a T-junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Meyer, Knud Erik; Nielsen, N. F.

    Turbulent mixing of two isothermal air streams in a T-junction of square ducts are investigated. Three dimensional velocity fields and turbulent kinetic energy are measured with stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The concentration field is obtained with a planar Mie scattering technique...

  2. Mixed convection in a lid-driven square cavity with partial slip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismael, Muneer A.; Pop, Ioan; Chamkha, Ali J.

    2014-01-01

    Steady laminar mixed convection inside a lid-driven square cavity filled with water is studied numerically. The lid is due to the movement of the isothermal top and bottom walls which are maintained at T c and T h , respectively, with T h is higher than T c . A partial slip condition was imposed in these two moving walls. The vertical walls of the cavity are kept adiabatic. The appliance of the numerical analysis was USR finite difference method with upwind scheme treatments of the convective terms included in the momentum and energy equations. The studied relevant parameters were: the partial slip parameter S (0-∞); Richardson number Ri (0.01-100) and the direction of the moving walls (λ t = 1, λ b = ±1). The results have showed that there are critical values for the partial slip parameter at which the convection is declined. (authors)

  3. Applied model for the growth of the daytime mixed layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1991-01-01

    numerically. When the mixed layer is shallow or the atmosphere nearly neutrally stratified, the growth is controlled mainly by mechanical turbulence. When the layer is deep, its growth is controlled mainly by convective turbulence. The model is applied on a data set of the evolution of the height of the mixed...... layer in the morning hours, when both mechanical and convective turbulence contribute to the growth process. Realistic mixed-layer developments are obtained....

  4. The Relative Influence of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing on the Adsorption of Mercury within a Gas-Sorbent Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our previous investigations demonstrated that entrained flow or in-flight adsorption can be a more effective and flexible approach to trace gas adsorption than fixed sorbent beds. The present investigation establishes the turbulent mixing that accompanies sorbent injection is an ...

  5. Density-ratio effects on buoyancy-driven variable-density turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslangil, Denis; Livescu, Daniel; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-11-01

    Density-ratio effects on the turbulent mixing of two incompressible, miscible fluids with different densities subject to constant acceleration are studied by means of high-resolution Direct Numerical Simulations. In a triply periodic domain, turbulence is generated by stirring in response to the differential buoyancy forces within the flow. Later, as the fluids become molecularly mixed, dissipation starts to overcome turbulence generation by bouyancy. Thus, the flow evolution includes both turbulence growth and decay, and it displays features present in the core region of the mixing layer of the Rayleigh-Taylor as well as Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. We extend the previous studies by investigating a broad range of density-ratio, from 1-14.4:1, corresponding to Atwood numbers of 0.05-0.87. Here, we focus on the Atwood number dependence of mixing-efficiency, that is defined based on the energy-conversion ratios from potential energy to total and turbulent kinetic energies, the decay characteristics of buoyancy-assisted variable-density homogeneous turbulence, and the effects of high density-ratios on the turbulence structure and mixing process. Authors acknowledge financial support from DOE-SSAA (DE-NA0003195) and NSF CAREER (#1453056) awards.

  6. Control over multiscale mixing in broadband-forced turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of explicit flow modulation on the dispersion of a passive scalar field are studied. Broadband forcing is applied to homogeneous isotropic turbulence to modulate the energy cascading and alter the kinetic energy spectrum. Consequently, a manipulation of turbulent flow can be achieved

  7. Level-set dynamics and mixing efficiency of passive and active scalars in DNS and LES of turbulent mixing layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Vreman, Bert; Kuerten, Hans; Luo, Kai H.

    2001-01-01

    The mixing efficiency in a turbulent mixing layer is quantified by monitoring the surface-area of level-sets of scalar fields. The Laplace transform is applied to numerically calculate integrals over arbitrary level-sets. The analysis includes both direct and large-eddy simulation and is used to

  8. Airborne measurements of turbulent trace gas fluxes and analysis of eddy structure in the convective boundary layer over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasel, M.; Kottmeier, Ch.; Corsmeier, U.; Wieser, A.

    2005-03-01

    Using the new high-frequency measurement equipment of the research aircraft DO 128, which is described in detail, turbulent vertical fluxes of ozone and nitric oxide have been calculated from data sampled during the ESCOMPTE program in the south of France. Based on airborne turbulence measurements, radiosonde data and surface energy balance measurements, the convective boundary layer (CBL) is examined under two different aspects. The analysis covers boundary-layer convection with respect to (i) the control of CBL depth by surface heating and synoptic scale influences, and (ii) the structure of convective plumes and their vertical transport of ozone and nitric oxides. The orographic structure of the terrain causes significant differences between planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights, which are found to exceed those of terrain height variations on average. A comparison of boundary-layer flux profiles as well as mean quantities over flat and complex terrain and also under different pollution situations and weather conditions shows relationships between vertical gradients and corresponding turbulent fluxes. Generally, NO x transports are directed upward independent of the terrain, since primary emission sources are located near the ground. For ozone, negative fluxes are common in the lower CBL in accordance with the deposition of O 3 at the surface. The detailed structure of thermals, which largely carry out vertical transports in the boundary layer, are examined with a conditional sampling technique. Updrafts mostly contain warm, moist and NO x loaded air, while the ozone transport by thermals alternates with the background ozone gradient. Evidence for handover processes of trace gases to the free atmosphere can be found in the case of existing gradients across the boundary-layer top. An analysis of the size of eddies suggests the possibility of some influence of the heterogeneous terrain in mountainous area on the length scales of eddies.

  9. Design of an electromagnetic accelerator for turbulent hydrodynamic mix studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susoeff, A. R.; Hawke, R. S.; Morrison, J. J.; Dimonte, G.; Remington, B. A.

    1993-12-01

    An electromagnetic accelerator in the form of a linear electric motor (LEM) has been designed to achieve controlled acceleration profiles of a carriage containing hydrodynamically unstable fluids for the investigation of the development of turbulent mix. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated by accelerating two dissimilar density fluids using the LEM to achieve a wide variety of acceleration and deceleration profiles. The acceleration profiles are achieved by independent control of rail and augmentation currents. A variety of acceleration-time profiles are possible including: (1) constant, (2) impulsive and (3) shaped. The LEM and support structure are a robust design in order to withstand high loads with deflections and to mitigate operational vibration. Vibration of the carriage during acceleration could create artifacts in the data which would interfere with the intended study of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The design allows clear access for diagnostic techniques such as laser induced fluorescence radiography, shadowgraphs and particle imaging velocimetry. Electromagnetic modeling codes were used to optimize the rail and augmentation coil positions within the support structure framework. Results of contemporary studies for non-arcing sliding contact of solid armatures are used for the design of the driving armature and the dynamic electromagnetic braking system. A 0.6MJ electrolytic capacitor bank is used for energy storage to drive the LEM. This report will discuss a LEM design which will accelerate masses of up to 3kg to a maximum of about 3000g(sub o), where g(sub o) is accelerated due to gravity.

  10. Mixed convection in inclined lid driven cavity by Lattice Boltzmann Method and heat flux boundary condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Orazio, A; Karimipour, A; Nezhad, A H; Shirani, E

    2014-01-01

    Laminar mixed convective heat transfer in two-dimensional rectangular inclined driven cavity is studied numerically by means of a double population thermal Lattice Boltzmann method. Through the top moving lid the heat flux enters the cavity whereas it leaves the system through the bottom wall; side walls are adiabatic. The counter-slip internal energy density boundary condition, able to simulate an imposed non zero heat flux at the wall, is applied, in order to demonstrate that it can be effectively used to simulate heat transfer phenomena also in case of moving walls. Results are analyzed over a range of the Richardson numbers and tilting angles of the enclosure, encompassing the dominating forced convection, mixed convection, and dominating natural convection flow regimes. As expected, heat transfer rate increases as increases the inclination angle, but this effect is significant for higher Richardson numbers, when buoyancy forces dominate the problem; for horizontal cavity, average Nusselt number decreases with the increase of Richardson number because of the stratified field configuration

  11. Periodic mixed convection in horizontal porous layer heated from below by isoflux heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeid, Nawaf H.; Pop, I.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical study for transient mixed convection in a two-dimensional horizontal porous layer heated from below by a constant heat flux source is carried out in the present paper. The transient thermal field, flow field and average Nusselt number are presented for a wide range of the Peclet number, Pe, for the particular case of Rayleigh number Ra=10x2 and the ratio of heater length to the porous layer thickness A=1, 3 and 5. It is found that for A=3 and A=5 with small values of the Peclet number, the free convection mode is dominated, while for large values, of the Peclet number, the forced convection mode is dominated. However, for moderate values the oscillatory mixed convection is observed and a periodic variation of the average Nusselt number is obtained. When the heater length is equal to the porous layer thickness (A=1) the steady-state results are obtained for the range of Pe=0.01-10. (author)

  12. Onset of solid state mantle convection and mixing during magma ocean solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Maxime; Tosi, Nicola; Samuel, Henri; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Hüttig, Christian; Breuer, Doris

    2017-04-01

    The fractional crystallization of a magma ocean can cause the formation of a compositional layering that can play a fundamental role for the subsequent long-term dynamics of the interior, for the evolution of geochemical reservoirs, and for surface tectonics. In order to assess to what extent primordial compositional heterogeneities generated by magma ocean solidification can be preserved, we investigate the solidification of a whole-mantle Martian magma ocean, and in particular the conditions that allow solid state convection to start mixing the mantle before solidification is completed. To this end, we performed 2-D numerical simulations in a cylindrical geometry. We treat the liquid magma ocean in a parametrized way while we self-consistently solve the conservation equations of thermochemical convection in the growing solid cumulates accounting for pressure-, temperature- and, where it applies, melt-dependent viscosity as well as parametrized yield stress to account for plastic yielding. By testing the effects of different cooling rates and convective vigor, we show that for a lifetime of the liquid magma ocean of 1 Myr or longer, the onset of solid state convection prior to complete mantle crystallization is likely and that a significant part of the compositional heterogeneities generated by fractionation can be erased by efficient mantle mixing.

  13. Supersonic Turbulent Fuel-Air Mixing and Evaporation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moukalled, Fadi

    2003-01-01

    .... The convergence rate will be accelerated using a full non-linear multi-grid method. The discretization will use a second order scheme for diffusion and a pseudo-third order bounded scheme for convection...

  14. Direct numerical simulation and modeling of turbulent natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot; Simulation numerique directe et modelisation de la convection naturelle turbulente dans un canal differentiellement chauffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudjemadi, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are the direct numerical simulation of natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot and the improvements of second-order turbulence modelling. A three-dimensional direct numerical simulation code has been developed in order to gain a better understanding of turbulence properties in natural convection flows. This code has been validated in several physical configurations: non-stratified natural convection flows (conduction solution), stratified natural convection flows (double boundary layer solution), transitional and turbulent Poiseuille flows. For the conduction solution, the turbulent regime was reached at a Rayleigh number of 1*10{sup 5} and 5.4*10{sup 5}. A detailed analysis of these results has revealed the principal qualities of the available models but has also pointed our their shortcomings. This data base has been used in order to improve the triple correlations transport models and to select the turbulent time scales suitable for such flows. (author). 122 refs., figs., tabs., 4 appends.

  15. Some considerations about the symmetry and evolution of chaotic Rayleigh-Bénard convection: The flywheel mechanism and the ``wind'' of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappa, Marcello

    2011-09-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection in finite-size enclosures exhibits really intricate features when turbulent states are reached and thermal plumes play a crucial role in a number of them. This complex mechanism may be regarded as a "machine" containing many different working parts: boundary layers, mixing zones, jets, and a relatively free and isothermal central region. These parts are generally regarded as the constitutive "ingredients" whose interplay leads to the emergence of a macroscopic pattern with well-defined properties. Like the Lorenz model (but with the due differences) such a complex structure has a prevailing two-dimensional nature and can be oriented clockwise or anticlockwise (both configurations are equally likely to occur and the flow can exhibit occasional and irregular "reversals" from one to the other without a change in magnitude). It is usually referred to in the literature as "wind of turbulence" or "flywheel". The present article provides insights into the possible origin of such dynamics and related patterning behavior (supported by "ad hoc" novel numerical simulations carried out for Pr=15 and O(10)⩽Ra⩽O(10)) together with a short exposition of existing theories, also illustrating open points and future directions of research.

  16. Turbulent convection experiment at high Rayleigh number to support CAP1400 IVR strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Li, E-mail: mali@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: lijing@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Ji, Shui, E-mail: jishui@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Chang, Huajian, E-mail: changhuajian@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The facility reached high Ra number at 10{sup 12} of CAP1400 working condition. • The fitting formula Nu = 0.085 × Ra{sup 0.315} was established to calculate the heat flux in the metal layer at high Ra for the CAP1400. • The coupling method can accurately and safely predict the heat flow distribution of metal layer in high Ra number conditions. • The experiment results will predict the relationship between axial and radial heat transfer well. - Abstract: The characteristics of the heat transfer and the calculation of heat flux in metal layer are both the critical problems for in-vessel retention (IVR) strategy. Turbulent convection occurs in the metal layer when the Rayleigh number (Ra) becomes sufficient high. The Globe–Dropkin (G–D) correlation (Globe and Dropkin, 1959) and Chu–Churchill (C–C) correlation (Churchill and Chu, 1975) have been widely used to calculate the heat flux in the metal layer, where the valid range of the Ra is from 1.5 × 10{sup 5} to 6.8 × 10{sup 8} in G–D correlation and less than 10{sup 12} in C–C correlation. However, with the increase of reactor power, both the Rayleigh number and the rate of heat transfer below the bottom of metal layer of the molten pool will increase, and in this case the Rayleigh number even can reach 10{sup 11} for the China Advanced Passive Plant CAP1400. Accordingly, the G–D correlation is not suitable for the CAP1400. Therefore, our experiment purposes are to establish the appropriate correlation at high Ra for the CAP1400 and predict the axial and radial distribution of the heat transfer in the metal layer with the heat transfer behavior of metal layer experiment (HELM) facility. The experiments are divided into two parts. Each part concerns 39 runs and 47 experimental conditions. Its corresponding results are obtained at middle Prandtl number (Pr = 7 for water) and the Nusselt number is found to be proportional to Ra{sup 0.315} in the range 3.93 × 10{sup 8} < Ra < 3.57

  17. Turbulent convection experiment at high Rayleigh number to support CAP1400 IVR strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Li; Li, Jing; Ji, Shui; Chang, Huajian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The facility reached high Ra number at 10 12 of CAP1400 working condition. • The fitting formula Nu = 0.085 × Ra 0.315 was established to calculate the heat flux in the metal layer at high Ra for the CAP1400. • The coupling method can accurately and safely predict the heat flow distribution of metal layer in high Ra number conditions. • The experiment results will predict the relationship between axial and radial heat transfer well. - Abstract: The characteristics of the heat transfer and the calculation of heat flux in metal layer are both the critical problems for in-vessel retention (IVR) strategy. Turbulent convection occurs in the metal layer when the Rayleigh number (Ra) becomes sufficient high. The Globe–Dropkin (G–D) correlation (Globe and Dropkin, 1959) and Chu–Churchill (C–C) correlation (Churchill and Chu, 1975) have been widely used to calculate the heat flux in the metal layer, where the valid range of the Ra is from 1.5 × 10 5 to 6.8 × 10 8 in G–D correlation and less than 10 12 in C–C correlation. However, with the increase of reactor power, both the Rayleigh number and the rate of heat transfer below the bottom of metal layer of the molten pool will increase, and in this case the Rayleigh number even can reach 10 11 for the China Advanced Passive Plant CAP1400. Accordingly, the G–D correlation is not suitable for the CAP1400. Therefore, our experiment purposes are to establish the appropriate correlation at high Ra for the CAP1400 and predict the axial and radial distribution of the heat transfer in the metal layer with the heat transfer behavior of metal layer experiment (HELM) facility. The experiments are divided into two parts. Each part concerns 39 runs and 47 experimental conditions. Its corresponding results are obtained at middle Prandtl number (Pr = 7 for water) and the Nusselt number is found to be proportional to Ra 0.315 in the range 3.93 × 10 8 < Ra < 3.57 × 10 12 . Furthermore, the experiment

  18. Doubly stratified mixed convection flow of Maxwell nanofluid with heat generation/absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, F.M., E-mail: abbasisarkar@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Hayat, T. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); NAAM Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Ahmad, B. [NAAM Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-04-15

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) doubly stratified flow of Maxwell nanofluid in presence of mixed convection is analyzed in this article. Effects of thermophoresis, Brownian motion and heat generation/absorption are present. The flow is induced due to linear stretching of sheet. Mathematical formulation is made under boundary layer approach. Expressions of velocity, temperature and nanoparticles concentration are developed. The obtained results are plotted and discussed to examine the variations in temperature and nanoparticles concentration due to different physical parameters. Numerical computations are made to obtain the values of local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. Impact of sundry parameters on the flow quantities is analyzed graphically. - Highlights: • Double stratified flow of Maxwell nanofluid with mixed convection is modeled. • Thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects are encountered. • Computations are made to obtain the solution expressions. • Numerical values of local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are computed and examined.

  19. Entropy generation in a mixed convection Poiseulle flow of molybdenum disulphide Jeffrey nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Aaiza; Khan, Ilyas; Makhanov, Stanislav S.

    2018-06-01

    Entropy analysis in a mixed convection Poiseulle flow of a Molybdenum Disulphide Jeffrey Nanofluid (MDJN) is presented. Mixed convection is caused due to buoyancy force and external pressure gradient. The problem is formulated in terms of a boundary value problem for a system of partial differential equations. An analytical solution for the velocity and the temperature is obtained using the perturbation technique. Entropy generation has been derived as a function of the velocity and temperature gradients. The solutions are displayed graphically and the relevant importance of the input parameters is discussed. A Jeffrey nanofluid (JN) has been compared with a second grade nanofluid (SGN) and Newtonian nanofluid (NN). It is found that the entropy generation decreases when the temperature increases whereas increasing the Brickman number increases entropy generation.

  20. Thermal radiation impact in mixed convective peristaltic flow of third grade nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Ayub

    Full Text Available This paper models the peristaltic transport of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD third grade nanofluid in a curved channel with wall properties. Combined effects of heat and mass transfer are retained via mixed convection. The present analysis is made in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction. No-slip effect is maintained at the boundary for the velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction. Resulting formulation is simplified by employing the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Results of axial velocity, temperature, nanoparticle mass transfer and heat transfer are studied graphically. Results reveal increment in fluid velocity for larger values of heat transfer Grashof number. There is reduction in nanoparticle mass transfer with the increase in thermophoresis parameter. Keywords: Peristalsis, Third grade nanofluid, Curved channel, Mixed convection, Thermal radiation, Chemical reaction, Flexible walls, Numerical solutions

  1. Turbulence and Mixing in a Shallow Shelf Sea From Underwater Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Larissa K. P.; Merckelbach, Lucas M.; Carpenter, Jeffrey R.

    2017-11-01

    The seasonal thermocline in shallow shelf seas acts as a natural barrier for boundary-generated turbulence, damping scalar transport to the upper regions of the water column and controlling primary production to a certain extent. To better understand turbulence and mixing conditions within the thermocline, two unique 12 and 17 day data sets with continuous measurements of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (ɛ) collected by autonomous underwater gliders under stratified to well-mixed conditions are presented. A highly intermittent ɛ signal was observed in the stratified thermocline region, which was mainly characterized by quiescent flow (turbulent activity index below 7). The rate of diapycnal mixing remained relatively constant for the majority of the time with peaks of higher fluxes that were responsible for much of the increase in bottom mixed layer temperature. The water column stayed predominantly strongly stratified, with a bulk Richardson number across the thermocline well above 2. A positive relationship between the intensity of turbulence, shear, and stratification was found. The trend between turbulence levels and the bulk Richardson number was relatively weak but suggests that ɛ increases as the bulk Richardson number approaches 1. The results also highlight the interpretation difficulties in both quantifying turbulent thermocline fluxes as well as the responsible mechanisms.

  2. Statistics and scaling of turbulence in a spatially developing mixing layer at Reλ = 250

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2012-03-21

    The turbulent flow originating from the interaction between two parallel streams with different velocities is studied by means of direct numerical simulation. Rather than the more common temporal evolving layer, a spatially evolving configuration, with perturbed laminar inlet conditions is considered. The streamwise evolution and the self-similar state of turbulence statistics are reported and compared to results available in the literature. The characteristics of the transitional region agree with those observed in other simulations and experiments of mixing layers originating from laminar inlets. The present results indicate that the transitional region depends strongly on the inlet flow. Conversely, the self-similar state of turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation agrees quantitatively with those in a temporal mixing layer developing from turbulent initial conditions [M. M. Rogers and R. D. Moser, “Direct simulation of a self-similar turbulent mixing layer,” Phys. Fluids6, 903 (1994)]. The statistical features of turbulence in the self-similar region have been analysed in terms of longitudinal velocity structure functions, and scaling exponents are estimated by applying the extended self-similarity concept. In the small scale range (60 < r/η < 250), the scaling exponents display the universal anomalous scaling observed in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The hypothesis of isotropy recovery holds in the turbulent mixing layer despite the presence of strong shear and large-scale structures, independently of the means of turbulence generation. At larger scales (r/η > 400), the mean shear and large coherent structures result in a significant deviation from predictions based on homogeneous isotropic turbulence theory. In this second scaling range, the numerical values of the exponents agree quantitatively with those reported for a variety of other flows characterized by strong shear, such as boundary layers, as well as channel and wake flows.

  3. Statistics and scaling of turbulence in a spatially developing mixing layer at Reλ = 250

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    The turbulent flow originating from the interaction between two parallel streams with different velocities is studied by means of direct numerical simulation. Rather than the more common temporal evolving layer, a spatially evolving configuration, with perturbed laminar inlet conditions is considered. The streamwise evolution and the self-similar state of turbulence statistics are reported and compared to results available in the literature. The characteristics of the transitional region agree with those observed in other simulations and experiments of mixing layers originating from laminar inlets. The present results indicate that the transitional region depends strongly on the inlet flow. Conversely, the self-similar state of turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation agrees quantitatively with those in a temporal mixing layer developing from turbulent initial conditions [M. M. Rogers and R. D. Moser, “Direct simulation of a self-similar turbulent mixing layer,” Phys. Fluids6, 903 (1994)]. The statistical features of turbulence in the self-similar region have been analysed in terms of longitudinal velocity structure functions, and scaling exponents are estimated by applying the extended self-similarity concept. In the small scale range (60 < r/η < 250), the scaling exponents display the universal anomalous scaling observed in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The hypothesis of isotropy recovery holds in the turbulent mixing layer despite the presence of strong shear and large-scale structures, independently of the means of turbulence generation. At larger scales (r/η > 400), the mean shear and large coherent structures result in a significant deviation from predictions based on homogeneous isotropic turbulence theory. In this second scaling range, the numerical values of the exponents agree quantitatively with those reported for a variety of other flows characterized by strong shear, such as boundary layers, as well as channel and wake flows.

  4. Mixed convection of nanofluids in a lid-driven rough cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhimeng; Wang, Jinyu; Mozumder, Aloke K.; Das, Prodip K.

    2017-06-01

    Mixed convection heat transfer and fluid flow of air, water or oil in enclosures have been studied extensively using experimental and numerical means for many years due to their ever-increasing applications in many engineering fields. In comparison, little effort has been given to the problem of mixed convection of nanofluids in spite of several applications in solar collectors, electronic cooling, lubrication technologies, food processing, and nuclear reactors. Mixed convection of nanofluids is a challenging problem due to the complex interactions among inertia, viscous, and buoyancy forces. In this study, mixed convection of nanofluids in a lid-driven square cavity with sinusoidal roughness elements at the bottom is studied numerically using the Navier-Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation. The numerical model is developed using commercial finite volume software ANSYS-FLUENT for Al2O3-water and CuO-water nanofluids inside a square cavity with various roughness elements. The effects of number and amplitude of roughness elements on the heat transfer and fluid flow are analysed for various volume concentrations of Al2O3 and CuO nanoparticles. The flow fields, temperature fields, and heat transfer rates are examined for different values of Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers. The outcome of this study provides some important insight into the heat transfer behaviour of Al2O3-water and CuO-water nanofluids inside a lid-driven rough cavity. This knowledge can be further used in developing novel geometries with enhanced and controlled heat transfer for solar collectors, electronic cooling, and food processing industries.

  5. An analytical solution for the Marangoni mixed convection boundary layer flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, M. A.; Kimiaeifar, Amin; Rahimpour, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an analytical solution for a Marangoni mixed convection boundary layer flow is presented. A similarity transform reduces the Navier-Stokes equations to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved analytically by means of the homotopy analysis method (HAM...... the convergence of the solution. The numerical solution of the similarity equations is developed and the results are in good agreement with the analytical results based on the HAM....

  6. Evidence for reduction of turbulent mixing at the ablation front in experiments with shell targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykov, V.A.; Avrorin, E.N.; Karlykhanov, N.G.; Murashkina, V.A.; Myalitsin, L.A.; Neuvazhaev, V.E.; Pasyukova, A.F.; Yakovlev, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the computation analysis of the turbulent mixing in the direct and indirect-driven shell targets are presented. The simulation were carried out by TURLINA-code based on phenomenological mixing model. The effects of the mixing are studied numerically for the SOKOL-laser experiments and for the indirect-driven targets. The comparison of the TURLINA-code simulations with the SOKOL experimental X-ray picture gives the evidence for reduction of turbulent mixing at the ablation front in experiments with shell targets. The estimates of the initial roughness and the effect of ablation-stabilization influence on the turbulent mixing and neutron yield from DT-filled glass microballoon are carried out. The allowable compression asymmetry for thermonuclear ignition is discussed. copyright 1994 American Institute of Physics

  7. Mixed convection heat transfer from confined tandem square cylinders in a horizontal channel

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Zhu

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on the two-dimensional laminar mixed convective flow and heat transfer around two identical isothermal square cylinders arranged in tandem and confined in a channel. The spacing between the cylinders is fixed with four widths of the cylinder and the blockage ratio and the Prandtl number are fixed at 0.1 and 0.7 respectively. The mixed convective flow and heat transfer is simulated by high accuracy multidomain pseudospectral method. The Reynolds number (Re) is studied in the range 80 ≤ Re ≤ 150, the Richardson number (Ri) demonstrating the influence of thermal buoyancy ranges from 0 to 1. Numerical results reveal that, with the thermal buoyancy effect, the mixed convective flow sheds vortex behind the cylinders and keeps periodic oscillating. The variations of characteristic quantities related to flow and heat transfer processes, such as the overall drag and lift coefficients and the Nusselt numbers, are presented and discussed. Furthermore, the influence of thermal buoyancy on the fluid flow and heat transfer are discussed and analysed. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Timescale Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Kuron, Mike; Ren, Zhuyin; Lu, Tianfeng; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-11-01

    Transported probability density function (TPDF) method features the generality for all combustion regimes, which is attractive for turbulent combustion simulations. However, the modeling of micromixing due to molecular diffusion is still considered to be a primary challenge for TPDF method, especially in turbulent premixed flames. Recently, a hybrid mixing rate model for TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed flames has been proposed, which recovers the correct mixing rates in the limits of flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime while at the same time aims to properly account for the transition in between. In this work, this model is employed in TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed methane-air slot burner flames. The model performance is assessed by comparing the results from both direct numerical simulation (DNS) and conventional constant mechanical-to-scalar mixing rate model. This work is Granted by NSFC 51476087 and 91441202.

  9. Picophytoplankton variability: Influence of winter convective mixing and advection in the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemal, Suchandan; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar; Shankar, D.; Remya, R.; Roy, Rajdeep

    2018-04-01

    The deepening of mixed layer and ensuing changes in optical and physicochemical properties of euphotic zone can influence phytoplankton community dynamics in the northeastern Arabian Sea during winter monsoon. The response of picophytoplankton community to such changes during winter convective mixing is not well understood. Herein, we have compared variations in the picophytoplankton community structure during early (November-December 2012), peak (end-January 2014) and late (mid-February 2015) winter monsoon from three separate cruises in the southern northeastern Arabian Sea. The higher Synechococcus abundance owing to entrainment of nutrients in mixed layer was observed during peak winter monsoon, while the concomitant changes in nitrate concentration, light and oxygen environment restricted Prochlorococcus growth resulting in lower abundance during the same period. This highlights the diverse responses of picophytoplankton groups to physicochemical changes of water column during winter convective mixing. The divinyl chlorophyll b/a ratio (marker for Prochlorococcus ecotypes) indicated prevalence of one low-light adapted ecotype (sensitive to light shock) in sub-surface water, one high-light adapted ecotype in surface water during early winter monsoon and both disappeared during intense mixing period in peak winter monsoon. Subsequently, a distinct low-light adapted ecotype, capable to tolerate light shock, was noticed during late winter monsoon and we argue that this ecotype is introduced to southern northeastern Arabian Sea through advection from north by sub-surface circulation. The total picophytoplankton biomass available to microbial loop is restored during late winter monsoon, when stratification begins, with a higher abundance of Synechococcus and the re-occurrence of Prochlorococcus population in the region. These inferences indicate that variability in picophytoplankton community structure and their contribution to the microbial loop are driven by

  10. Reproducing scalar mixing of turbulent jets in a 3D periodic box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rah, K. Jeff; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2017-11-01

    A triply periodic DNS is a convenient framework to analyze the turbulent mixing process, since it can produce statistically stationary turbulence. In addition, the periodic boundary condition makes it easy to compute the spatial spectra of scalars. However, it is difficult to create a realistic turbulent flow with such a geometry. In this current investigation, we aim to develop a method to simulate a realistic turbulent mixing process inside a 3D periodic box. The target real flow is an axisymmetric jet with passive scalars on its centerline. The velocity and scalar information of turbulent jets on the centerline is applied to the momentum equation and scalar transport equation in physical space. The result is the combination of a mean gradient term and a linear forcing term in the scalar equation. These new forcing terms are derived to replicate the scalar mixing properties of jets in a triply periodic DNS. The present analysis differs from other forcing schemes for their derivation process did not involve any use of the velocity or scalar information of a real turbulent flow. A set of DNS has been performed with the new forcing term, and various turbulent parameters and spectral relations are compared against experiments.

  11. Measurement of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum - Part 2: Convection record measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Buchhave, Preben; Hodzic, Azur

    2017-01-01

    A novel exact temporal to spatial mapping for point measurements in turbulence has been applied to various flow conditions existing in a round turbulent jet. The conditions range between equilibrium and non-equilibrium as well as mid to high turbulence intensities. The exact mapping applies to all...... flows, including high intensity non-equilibrium flows, since it is based on the instantaneous velocity magnitude, thereby incorporating all relevant aspects of the flow dynamics. Devel-opment of the jet turbulence along the stream, from non-equilibrium to equilibrium, is observed. In the developed...... region of the jet, Taylor’s hypothesis is tested and the spectra using the novel exact mapping is validated with excellent agreement against directly measured spatial spectra in a mapped similarity space using PIV. The method is observed to produce the expected results even at turbulence intensi...

  12. Measurement of turbulent mixing in a confined wake flow using combined PIV and PLIF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjertager, Lene K.; Hjertager, Bjorn H.; Deen, N.G.; Solberg, Tron; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulent mixing in a confined wake flow was studied by using the combined PIV/PLIF technique to measure instantaneous concentration and velocity fields. Measurements were performed at two slightly overlapping areas in the initial mixing zone and at an area at the end of the channel. The

  13. Mathematical, physical and numerical principles essential for models of turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, David Howland [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lim, Hyunkyung [STONY BROOK UNIV; Yu, Yan [STONY BROOK UNIV; Glimm, James G [STONY BROOK UNIV

    2009-01-01

    We propose mathematical, physical and numerical principles which are important for the modeling of turbulent mixing, especially the classical and well studied Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities which involve acceleration driven mixing of a fluid discontinuity layer, by a steady accerleration or an impulsive force.

  14. Eulerian-Lagranigan simulation of aerosol evolution in turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2016-09-23

    The formation and evolution of aerosol in turbulent flows are ubiquitous in both industrial processes and nature. The intricate interaction of turbulent mixing and aerosol evolution in a canonical turbulent mixing layer was investigated by a direct numerical simulation (DNS) in a recent study (Zhou, K., Attili, A., Alshaarawi, A., and Bisetti, F. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer. Physics of Fluids, 26, 065106 (2014)). In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of aerosol evolution is carried out along Lagrangian trajectories obtained in the previous simulation, in order to quantify the error of the moment method used in the previous simulation. Moreover, the particle size distribution (PSD), not available in the previous works, is also investigated. Along a fluid parcel moving through the turbulent flow, temperature and vapor concentration exhibit complex fluctuations, triggering complicate aerosol processes and rendering complex PSD. However, the mean PSD is found to be bi-modal in most of the mixing layer except that a tri-modal distribution is found in the turbulent transition region. The simulated PSDs agree with the experiment observations available in the literature. A different explanation on the formation of such PSDs is provided.

  15. Precipitation in a boiling soup: is microphysics driving the statistical properties of intense turbulent convection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, A.; von Hardenberg, J.; Provenzale, A.

    2012-04-01

    Intense precipitation events are often associated with strong convective phenomena in the atmosphere. A deeper understanding of how microphysics affects the spatial and temporal variability of convective processes is relevant for many hydro-meteorological applications, such as the estimation of rainfall using remote sensing techniques and the ability to predict severe precipitation processes. In this paper, high-resolution simulations (0.1-1 km) of an atmosphere in radiative-convective equilibrium are performed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model by prescribing different microphysical parameterizations. The dependence of fine-scale spatio-temporal properties of convective structures on microphysical details are investigated and the simulation results are compared with the known properties of radar maps of precipitation fields. We analyze and discuss similarities and differences and, based also on previous results on the dependence of precipitation statistics on the raindrop terminal velocity, try to draw some general inferences.

  16. Turbulent Convection in an Anelastic Rotating Sphere: A Model for the Circulation on the Giant Planets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaspi, Yohai

    2008-01-01

    ... (including the strong variations in gravity and the equation of state). Different from most previous 3D convection models, this model is anelastic rather than Boussinesq and thereby incorporates the full density variation of the planet...

  17. Computational and experimental studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulent mixing (Review of NVIIEF efforts)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronov, V.A.; Zhidov, I.G.; Meskov, E.E.; Nevmerzhitskii, N.V.; Nikiforov, V.V.; Razin, A.N.; Rogatchev, V.G.; Tolshmyakov, A.I.; Yanilkin, Yu.V.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes an extensive program of investigations conducted at Arzamas-16 in Russia over the past several decades. The focus of the work is on material interface instability and the mixing of two materials. Part 1 of the report discusses analytical and computational studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulent mixing. The EGAK codes are described and results are illustrated for several types of unstable flow. Semiempirical turbulence transport equations are derived for the mixing of two materials, and their capabilities are illustrated for several examples. Part 2 discusses the experimental studies that have been performed to investigate instabilities and turbulent mixing. Shock-tube and jelly techniques are described in considerable detail. Results are presented for many circumstances and configurations

  18. Experimental study of mixed convection flow through a horizontal orifice or vent linking two compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varrall, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    To answer building issues and fire safety challenges, this thesis deals with the mixed convection flow through a horizontal orifice or vent linking two compartments. The aim is to improve the understanding and the modeling of the exchange of gas through the opening. A small scale experimental study and a theoretical approach are proposed. The study focuses first on the influence of the geometrical ratio L/D of the opening on the flow rate at the vent for free convection regime. Non-intrusive measurements, via the tracking of the interface between two non miscible liquids in an isothermal approach, and thanks to the SPIV in a thermal approach, permit to describe the bidirectional exchange process and to consolidate existing correlations. Experiments for mixed convection regime aim to study the impact of mechanical ventilation (in blowing and extracting modes) on the exchanged flow rates. The comparison between existing correlations and experimental data shows large differences. A modification of the correlation of Cooper is proposed. A theoretical approach from the simplified Navier Stokes equations and with the Boussinesq approximation permits to discuss the construction of existing correlations. From this theory, a more accurate model than those available in the literature is proposed thanks to an adjustment of discharge coefficients from experimental data. (author)

  19. Multi-dimensional Imaging and Characterization of Convective Mixing in a Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, R.; Pini, R.; Crawshaw, J.; Krevor, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    The dissolution of CO2 into reservoir brines is one of the key trapping mechanisms during CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. The dissolution at the CO2-brine interface induces a buoyant instability in the aqueous phase following a local brine density increase in the range of 0.1-1% depending on pressure, temperature, and salinity. As a result the CO2 -saturated brine mixes with fresh brine to form characteristic finger-like patterns. This downward flow pushes fresh brine to the CO2-brine interface and further enhances dissolution. This phenomenon is referred to as convective mixing. A study has been undertaken to investigate convective mixing in a 3D opaque porous medium. A novel protocol is presented using X-ray Computed Tomography (X-ray CT) to image the evolution of convective mixing over time. Results are presented for experiments carried out at ambient conditions using a spherical bowl (diameter of 20 cm) packed with glass beads (diameter, 0.5 mm). Surrogate fluids are used that provide good x-ray contrast whilst maintaining a maximum density differential comparable to the one observed in a supercritical CO2-brine system (about 10 kg/m3). We use a mixture of methanol and ethylene glycol (MEG) at three different ratios (and doped with KI) and brine. We perform two repeats for each fluid pair and during a typical experiment scans are taken at regular time intervals for up to 10 hours. 3D images of the bowl are reconstructed (fig. 1) with (2x2x2) mm3 voxels. The experiments are classified by Rayleigh number covering the range Ra = 5,000-25,000. As expected, higher Ra leads to early development of instability, with the plume moving faster towards the bottom of the bowl. The computed dissolution flux supports these visual observations and confirms that dissolutions enhanced mixing produces fluxes that are significantly larger than the corresponding purely diffusive scenario. While quantitative agreement is observed from repeated experiments, we note that

  20. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Li, Shan; Wang, Hu; Ren, Zhuyin

    2015-11-01

    Predictive simulations of turbulent premixed flames over a wide range of Damköhler numbers in the framework of Probability Density Function (PDF) method still remain challenging due to the deficiency in current micro-mixing models. In this work, a hybrid micro-mixing model, valid in both the flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime, is proposed. A priori testing of this model is first performed by examining the conditional scalar dissipation rate and conditional scalar diffusion in a 3-D direct numerical simulation dataset of a temporally evolving turbulent slot jet flame of lean premixed H2-air in the thin reaction zone regime. Then, this new model is applied to PDF simulations of the Piloted Premixed Jet Burner (PPJB) flames, which are a set of highly shear turbulent premixed flames and feature strong turbulence-chemistry interaction at high Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers. Supported by NSFC 51476087 and NSFC 91441202.

  1. Transient mixed convection in a cavity. Comparison between water and sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, J.

    1983-01-01

    The basic problem studied is the interaction between a vortex and a thermal stratification. The experiments are done in a parallelepipedic cavity which bottom communicates with a rectangular channel. A forced flow in this channel induces a recirculating flow in the cavity. The transient condition is a decrease (step wise or slope) of the inlet temperature at a constant flowrate. This problem is studied with two different approaches: experiments in water or in sodium. In the sodium experiments, the dimension of the cavity ensures large values of the Peclet number (about 10 4 ) and a wide range of values for the Richardson number (from 0.1 to 3). With these experiment, all the regimes of mixed convection, from forced convection to complete stratification can be covered. These results are compared with the other approach using a water model. This comparison is very helpful for studies on the thermalhydraulic behavior of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors. (author)

  2. Toward topology-based characterization of small-scale mixing in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Sawan; Girimaji, Sharath

    2011-11-01

    Turbulent mixing rate at small scales of motion (molecular mixing) is governed by the steepness of the scalar-gradient field which in turn is dependent upon the prevailing velocity gradients. Thus motivated, we propose a velocity-gradient topology-based approach for characterizing small-scale mixing in compressible turbulence. We define a mixing efficiency metric that is dependent upon the topology of the solenoidal and dilatational deformation rates of a fluid element. The mixing characteristics of solenoidal and dilatational velocity fluctuations are clearly delineated. We validate this new approach by employing mixing data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of compressible decaying turbulence with passive scalar. For each velocity-gradient topology, we compare the mixing efficiency predicted by the topology-based model with the corresponding conditional scalar variance obtained from DNS. The new mixing metric accurately distinguishes good and poor mixing topologies and indeed reasonably captures the numerical values. The results clearly demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach for characterizing and predicting mixing in compressible flows.

  3. Alpha-modeling strategy for LES of turbulent mixing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Holm, Darryl D.; Drikakis, D.; Geurts, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    The α-modeling strategy is followed to derive a new subgrid parameterization of the turbulent stress tensor in large-eddy simulation (LES). The LES-α modeling yields an explicitly filtered subgrid parameterization which contains the filtered nonlinear gradient model as well as a model which

  4. On the Turbulent Mixing in Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Wakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lignarolo, L.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    The wake flow of a horizontal axis wind turbine is characterised by lower wind speed and higher turbulence than the free-stream conditions. When clustered in large wind farms, wind turbines regularly operate inside the wake of one or more upstream machines. This is a major cause of energy production

  5. Kolmogorov similarity hypotheses for scalar fields: sampling intermittent turbulent mixing in the ocean and galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Kolmogorov's three universal similarity hypotheses are extrapolated to describe scalar fields like temperature mixed by turbulence. The analogous first and second hypotheses for scalars include the effects of Prandtl number and rate-of-strain mixing. Application of velocity and scalar similarity hypotheses to the ocean must take into account the damping of active turbulence by density stratification and the Earth's rotation to form fossil turbulence. By the analogous Kolmogorov third hypothesis for scalars, temperature dissipation rates χ averaged over lengths r > L K should be lognormally distributed with intermittency factors σ 2 that increase with increasing turbulence energy length scales L O as σ ln r 2 approx = μ θ ln(L O /r). Tests of kolmogorovian velocity and scalar universal similarity hypotheses for very large ranges of turbulence length and timescales are provided by data from the ocean and the galactic interstellar medium. These ranges are from 1 to 9 decades in the ocean, and over 12 decades in the interstellar medium. The universal constant for turbulent mixing intermittency μ θ is estimated from oceanic data to be 0.44±0.01, which is remarkably close to estimates for Kolmorgorov's turbulence intermittency constant μ of 0.45±0.05 from galactic as well as atmospheric data. Extreme intermittency complicates the oceanic sampling problem, and may lead to quantitative and qualitative undersampling errors in estimates of mean oceanic dissipation rates and fluxes. Intermittency of turbulence and mixing in the interstellar medium may be a factor in the formation of stars. (author)

  6. Computational model for turbulent flow around a grid spacer with mixing vane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutomu Ikeno; Takeo Kajishima

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent mixing coefficient and pressure drop are important factors in subchannel analysis to predict onset of DNB. However, universal correlations are difficult since these factors are significantly affected by the geometry of subchannel and a grid spacer with mixing vane. Therefore, we propose a computational model to estimate these factors. Computational model: To represent the effect of geometry of grid spacer in computational model, we applied a large eddy simulation (LES) technique in couple with an improved immersed-boundary method. In our previous work (Ikeno, et al., NURETH-10), detailed properties of turbulence in subchannel were successfully investigated by developing the immersed boundary method in LES. In this study, additional improvements are given: new one-equation dynamic sub-grid scale (SGS) model is introduced to account for the complex geometry without any artificial modification; the higher order accuracy is maintained by consistent treatment for boundary conditions for velocity and pressure. NUMERICAL TEST AND DISCUSSION: Turbulent mixing coefficient and pressure drop are affected strongly by the arrangement and inclination of mixing vane. Therefore, computations are carried out for each of convolute and periodic arrangements, and for each of 30 degree and 20 degree inclinations. The difference in turbulent mixing coefficient due to these factors is reasonably predicted by our method. (An example of this numerical test is shown in Fig. 1.) Turbulent flow of the problem includes unsteady separation behind the mixing vane and vortex shedding in downstream. Anisotropic distribution of turbulent stress is also appeared in rod gap. Therefore, our computational model has advantage for assessing the influence of arrangement and inclination of mixing vane. By coarser computational mesh, one can screen several candidates for spacer design. Then, by finer mesh, more quantitative analysis is possible. By such a scheme, we believe this method is useful

  7. Probability density function method for variable-density pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakosi, Jozsef; Ristorcelli, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Probability density function (PDF) methods are extended to variable-density pressure-gradient-driven turbulence. We apply the new method to compute the joint PDF of density and velocity in a non-premixed binary mixture of different-density molecularly mixing fluids under gravity. The full time-evolution of the joint PDF is captured in the highly non-equilibrium flow: starting from a quiescent state, transitioning to fully developed turbulence and finally dissipated by molecular diffusion. High-Atwood-number effects (as distinguished from the Boussinesq case) are accounted for: both hydrodynamic turbulence and material mixing are treated at arbitrary density ratios, with the specific volume, mass flux and all their correlations in closed form. An extension of the generalized Langevin model, originally developed for the Lagrangian fluid particle velocity in constant-density shear-driven turbulence, is constructed for variable-density pressure-gradient-driven flows. The persistent small-scale anisotropy, a fundamentally 'non-Kolmogorovian' feature of flows under external acceleration forces, is captured by a tensorial diffusion term based on the external body force. The material mixing model for the fluid density, an active scalar, is developed based on the beta distribution. The beta-PDF is shown to be capable of capturing the mixing asymmetry and that it can accurately represent the density through transition, in fully developed turbulence and in the decay process. The joint model for hydrodynamics and active material mixing yields a time-accurate evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stress anisotropy without resorting to gradient diffusion hypotheses, and represents the mixing state by the density PDF itself, eliminating the need for dubious mixing measures. Direct numerical simulations of the homogeneous Rayleigh-Taylor instability are used for model validation.

  8. Mixing and overshooting in surface convection zones of DA white dwarfs: first results from ANTARES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupka, F.; Zaussinger, F.; Montgomery, M. H.

    2018-03-01

    We present results of a large, high-resolution 3D hydrodynamical simulation of the surface layers of a DA white dwarf (WD) with Teff = 11 800 K and log (g) = 8 using the ANTARES code, the widest and deepest such simulation to date. Our simulations are in good agreement with previous calculations in the Schwarzschild-unstable region and in the overshooting region immediately beneath it. Farther below, in the wave-dominated region, we find that the rms horizontal velocities decay with depth more rapidly than the vertical ones. Since mixing requires both vertical and horizontal displacements, this could have consequences for the size of the region that is well mixed by convection, if this trend is found to hold for deeper layers. We discuss how the size of the mixed region affects the calculated settling times and inferred steady-state accretion rates for WDs with metals observed in their atmospheres.

  9. Measuring significant inhomogeneity and anisotropy in indoor convective air turbulence in the presence of 2D temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razi, E Mohammady; Rasouli, Saifollah

    2014-01-01

    Using a novel set up, experimental study of the statistical properties of a light beam propagating horizontally through indoor convective air turbulence in the presence of a 2D temperature gradient (TG) is presented. A laser beam enters a telescope from its back focal point by virtue of an optical fiber and is expanded and recollimated by it and then passes through the turbulent area. Then the beam enters another telescope’s aperture. A mask consisting of four similar widely separated small subapertures was installed in front of the second telescope’s aperture. The subapertures were equidistant from the optical axis of the telescope and located at the corners of a square. A flat plane heater is used to produce a vertical TG in the medium. Due to the limited width of the heater, a horizontal component for the TG appeared. Near the focal plane of the second telescope, four distinct images of the source are formed and recorded by a CCD camera. Due to the turbulence all the images (spots) in the successive frames fluctuate. Using the four spot displacements we have calculated the fluctuations of the angle of arrival (AA) over the subapertures. The statistical properties of the optical turbulence are investigated using variance analysis of the AA component fluctuations at horizontal and vertical directions over the subapertures for different temperatures of the heater at different heights of the beam path from the heater. Experimental results show that when the heater is turned off, the variances of horizontal and vertical components of the AA fluctuations are approximately equal to zero over all the subapertures. When it is turned on, the variance of the horizontal component of the AA fluctuations over all of the subapertures are larger than those from the vertical one. In addition, in this case, we find a significant dependence of the variance of the AA components on the height from the heater. (paper)

  10. Effects of turbulent hyporheic mixing on reach-scale solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, K. R.; Li, A.; Packman, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulence rapidly mixes solutes and fine particles into coarse-grained streambeds. Both hyporheic exchange rates and spatial variability of hyporheic mixing are known to be controlled by turbulence, but it is unclear how turbulent mixing influences mass transport at the scale of stream reaches. We used a process-based particle-tracking model to simulate local- and reach-scale solute transport for a coarse-bed stream. Two vertical mixing profiles, one with a smooth transition from in-stream to hyporheic transport conditions and a second with enhanced turbulent transport at the sediment-water interface, were fit to steady-state subsurface concentration profiles observed in laboratory experiments. The mixing profile with enhanced interfacial transport better matched the observed concentration profiles and overall mass retention in the streambed. The best-fit mixing profiles were then used to simulate upscaled solute transport in a stream. Enhanced mixing coupled in-stream and hyporheic solute transport, causing solutes exchanged into the shallow subsurface to have travel times similar to the water column. This extended the exponential region of the in-stream solute breakthrough curve, and delayed the onset of the heavy power-law tailing induced by deeper and slower hyporheic porewater velocities. Slopes of observed power-law tails were greater than those predicted from stochastic transport theory, and also changed in time. In addition, rapid hyporheic transport velocities truncated the hyporheic residence time distribution by causing mass to exit the stream reach via subsurface advection, yielding strong exponential tempering in the in-stream breakthrough curves at the timescale of advective hyporheic transport through the reach. These results show that strong turbulent mixing across the sediment-water interface violates the conventional separation of surface and subsurface flows used in current models for solute transport in rivers. Instead, the full distribution of

  11. A turbulent mixing Reynolds stress model fitted to match linear interaction analysis predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffond, J; Soulard, O; Souffland, D

    2010-01-01

    To predict the evolution of turbulent mixing zones developing in shock tube experiments with different gases, a turbulence model must be able to reliably evaluate the production due to the shock-turbulence interaction. In the limit of homogeneous weak turbulence, 'linear interaction analysis' (LIA) can be applied. This theory relies on Kovasznay's decomposition and allows the computation of waves transmitted or produced at the shock front. With assumptions about the composition of the upstream turbulent mixture, one can connect the second-order moments downstream from the shock front to those upstream through a transfer matrix, depending on shock strength. The purpose of this work is to provide a turbulence model that matches LIA results for the shock-turbulent mixture interaction. Reynolds stress models (RSMs) with additional equations for the density-velocity correlation and the density variance are considered here. The turbulent states upstream and downstream from the shock front calculated with these models can also be related through a transfer matrix, provided that the numerical implementation is based on a pseudo-pressure formulation. Then, the RSM should be modified in such a way that its transfer matrix matches the LIA one. Using the pseudo-pressure to introduce ad hoc production terms, we are able to obtain a close agreement between LIA and RSM matrices for any shock strength and thus improve the capabilities of the RSM.

  12. The prediction of stellar effective temperatures from the mixing-length theory of convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, B.B.; Vandenberg, D.A.; Irwin, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    A generalized version of the mixing-length theory (MLT) of convection, along with simplifications in the limits of high and low convective efficiency, is described. This forms the basis for a study of the effects of proposed modifications to the original (Boehm-Vitense, 1958) form of the MLT on the predicted effective temperatures of cool stars. These modifications include the parameters y and m. It is found that none of the suggested refinements to the MLT affect the location and shape of an evolutionary track on the H-R diagram in ways that cannot be mimicked to high accuracy by a suitable choice of mixing length parameters alone. Thus, if mixing length parameters is calibrated by comparing stellar models with observed main-sequence stars with well-determined properties, then the subsequent evolutionary tracks and isochrones are uniquely defined, regardless of what version of the MLT is used in the calculations. A careful examination of the Revised Yale Isochrones suggests that the Teff scale of these isochrones is inconsistent with the assumed MLT, thereby resolving much of the known discrepancies between these calculations and those of VandenBerg and Bell (1958). 44 refs

  13. The turbulent mixing of non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demianov, A. Yu; Doludenko, A. N.; Inogamov, N. A.; Son, E. E.

    2013-07-01

    The turbulence caused by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability represents a complicated phenomenon. It is usually related to the major hydrodynamic activities, the tangling of the media contact boundary, merging, separation and intermixing of originally smoothed initial structures. An important role in the theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is played by the discontinuity of density on a contact interface between two homogeneous (in terms of density) fluids. A numerical modeling of the intermixing of two fluids with different rheology whose densities differ twice as a result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability has been carried out. The coefficients of turbulent intermixing in a multimode statement of the problem for the Bingham, dilatant and pseudo-plastic fluids have been obtained.

  14. Mixing by turbulent buoyant jets in slender containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voropayev, S.I.; Nath, C.; Fernando, H.J.S.

    2012-01-01

    A turbulent buoyant jet injected vertically into a slender cylinder containing a stratified fluid is investigated experimentally. The working fluid is water, and salt is used to change its density to obtain either a positively or negatively buoyant jet. The interest is the vertical density distribution in container and its dependence on time and other parameters. For each case (lighter or heavier jet) the experimental data could be collapsed into a ‘universal’ time dependent behavior, when properly non-dimensionalized. A theoretical model is advanced to explain the results. Possible applications include refilling of crude oil into U.S. strategic petroleum reserves caverns. -- Highlights: ► We addresses a critical issue on refill of Strategic Petroleum Reserves. ► We conduct experiments on negatively/positively buoyant turbulent jets in long cavern. ► Basing on results of experiments we developed theoretical model for refill operations.

  15. Turbulence effects on warm-rain formation in precipitating shallow convection revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Seifert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two different collection kernels which include turbulence effects on the collision rate of liquid droplets are used as a basis to develop a parameterization of the warm-rain processes autoconversion, accretion, and self-collection. The new parameterization is tested and validated with the help of a 1-D bin microphysics model. Large-eddy simulations of the rain formation in shallow cumulus clouds confirm previous results that turbulence effects can significantly enhance the development of rainwater in clouds and the occurrence and amount of surface precipitation. The detailed behavior differs significantly for the two turbulence models, revealing a considerable uncertainty in our understanding of such effects. In addition, the large-eddy simulations show a pronounced sensitivity to grid resolution, which suggests that besides the effect of sub-grid small-scale isotropic turbulence which is parameterized as part of the collection kernel also the larger turbulent eddies play an important role for the formation of rain in shallow clouds.

  16. Investigation of coolant mixing in WWER-440/213 RPV with improved turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, B.; Aszodi, A.

    2011-01-01

    A detailed and complex RPV model of WWER-440/213 type reactor was developed in Budapest University of Technology and Economics Institute of Nuclear Techniques in the previous years. This model contains the main structural elements as inlet and outlet nozzles, guide baffles of hydro-accumulators coolant, alignment drifts, perforated plates, brake- and guide tube chamber and simplified core. With the new vessel model a series of parameter studies were performed considering turbulence models, discretization schemes, and modeling methods with ANSYS CFX. In the course of parameter studies the coolant mixing was investigated in the RPV. The coolant flow was 'traced' with different scalar concentration at the inlet nozzles and its distribution was calculated at the core bottom. The simulation results were compared with PAKS NPP measured mixing factors data (available from FLOMIX project. Based on the comparison the SST turbulence model was chosen for the further simulations, which unifies the advantages of two-equation (kω and kε) models. The most widely used turbulence models are Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models that are based on time-averaging of the equations. Time-averaging filters out all turbulent scales from the simulation, and the effect of turbulence on the mean flow is then re-introduced through appropriate modeling assumptions. Because of this characteristic of SST turbulence model a decision was made in year 2011 to investigate the coolant mixing with improved turbulence model as well. The hybrid SAS-SST turbulence model was chosen, which is capable of resolving large scale turbulent structures without the time and grid-scale resolution restrictions of LES, often allowing the use of existing grids created for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. As a first step the coolant mixing was investigated in the downcomer only. Eddies are occurred after the loop connection because of the steep flow direction change. This turbulent, vertiginous flow was

  17. Non-Darcy Mixed Convection in a Doubly Stratified Porous Medium with Soret-Dufour Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Srinivasacharya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the nonsimilarity solutions for mixed convection heat and mass transfer along a semi-infinite vertical plate embedded in a doubly stratified fluid saturated porous medium in the presence of Soret and Dufour effects. The flow in the porous medium is described by employing the Darcy-Forchheimer based model. The nonlinear governing equations and their associated boundary conditions are initially cast into dimensionless forms and then solved numerically. The influence of pertinent parameters on dimensionless velocity, temperature, concentration, heat, and mass transfer in terms of the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers is discussed and presented graphically.

  18. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical surface embedded in a thermally stratified porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishak, Anuar; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2008-01-01

    The mixed convection boundary layer flow through a stable stratified porous medium bounded by a vertical surface is investigated. The external velocity and the surface temperature are assumed to vary as x m , where x is measured from the leading edge of the vertical surface and m is a constant. Numerical solutions for the governing Darcy and energy equations are obtained. The results indicate that the thermal stratification significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the surface heat transfer, besides delays the boundary layer separation

  19. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially developing mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio; Cristancho, Juan; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    available in the literature, such as turbulent jets and wakes. In addition, an analysis of the passive scalar field in the vicinity of the interface is presented. It is shown that the scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed

  20. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    Significant research has been underway for several years in NASA Glenn Research Center's nozzle branch to develop advanced computational methods for simulating turbulent flows in exhaust nozzles. The primary efforts of this research have concentrated on improving our ability to calculate the turbulent mixing layers that dominate flows both in the exhaust systems of modern-day aircraft and in those of hypersonic vehicles under development. As part of these efforts, a hybrid numerical method was recently developed to simulate such turbulent mixing layers. The method developed here is intended for configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. Interest in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods have increased in recent years, but applying an LES method to calculate the wide range of turbulent scales from small eddies in the wall-bounded regions to large eddies in the mixing region is not yet possible with current computers. As a result, the hybrid method developed here uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall-bounded regions entering a mixing section and uses a LES procedure to calculate the mixing-dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. With this technique, closure for the RANS equations is obtained by using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The LES equations are closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. Although the function of the Cebeci-Smith model to replace all of the turbulent stresses is quite different from that of the Smagorinsky subgrid model, which only replaces the small subgrid turbulent stresses, both are eddy viscosity models and both are derived at least in part from mixing-length theory. The similar formulation of these two models enables the RANS

  1. Effect of turbulent natural convection on sodium pool combustion in the steam generator building of a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karthikeyan, S.; Sundararajan, T.; Shet, U.S.P.; Selvaraj, P.

    2009-01-01

    A computational model is proposed to simulate sodium pool combustion considering the effect of turbulent natural convection in a vented enclosure of the steam generator building (SGB) of a fast breeder reactor. The model is validated by comparing the simulated results with the experimental results available in literature for sodium pool combustion in a CSTF vessel. After validation, the effects of vents and the location of the pool on the burning rate of sodium and the associated heat transfer to the walls are studied in an enclosure comparable in size to one floor of the steam generator building. In the presence of ventilation, the burning rate of sodium increases, but the total heat transferred to the walls of the enclosure is reduced. It is also found that the burning rate of sodium pool and the heat transfer to the walls of the enclosures vary significantly with the location of sodium pool.

  2. Determination of the rate of crystal growth from the gas phase under conditions of turbulent free convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alad'Ev, S. I.

    1987-04-01

    Crystal growth in vertical and horizontal cylindrical vials, with the substrate and the source serving as the vial ends, is investigated analytically, assuming that the medium consists of a binary mixture of an active and an inert gas. The active gas is made up of the gaseous products of reactions taking place at the substrate and at the source. It is shown that turbulent free convection leads to an increase in crystal growth rate. All other conditions being equal, crystal growth in vertical vials is greater than that in horizontal ones; in both cases crystal growth rate increases with the vial radius, temperature gradient in the gas phase, and gas phase density. The results are compared with experimental data on the growth of Ge crystals in the Ge-GeI4 system.

  3. Extreme concentration fluctuations due to local reversibility of mixing in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua; Francois, Nicolas; Punzmann, Horst; Szewc, Kamil; Shats, Michael

    2018-05-01

    Mixing of a passive scalar in a fluid (e.g. a radioactive spill in the ocean) is the irreversible process towards homogeneous distribution of a substance. In a moving fluid, due to the chaotic advection [H. Aref, J. Fluid Mech. 143 (1984) 1; J. M. Ottino, The Kinematics of Mixing: Stretching,Chaos and Transport (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1989)] mixing is much faster than if driven by molecular diffusion only. Turbulence is known as the most efficient mixing flow [B. I. Shraiman and E. D. Siggia, Nature 405 (2000) 639]. We show that in contrast to spatially periodic flows, two-dimensional turbulence exhibits local reversibility in mixing, which leads to the generation of unpredictable strong fluctuations in the scalar concentration. These fluctuations can also be detected from the analysis of the fluid particle trajectories of the underlying flow.

  4. Tomographic and Geodynamic Constraints on Convection-Induced Mixing in Earth's Deep Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafter, D. P.; Forte, A. M.; Bremner, P. M.; Glisovic, P.

    2017-12-01

    Seismological studies reveal two large low-shear-velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lowermost mantle (e.g., Su et al. 1994; Wang & Wen 2007; He & Wen 2012), which may represent accumulations of subducted slabs at the CMB (Tan & Gurnis 2005; Christensen & Hoffman 1994) or primordial material generated in the early differentiation of Earth (e.g. Li et al. 2014). The longevity or stability of these large-scale heterogeneities in the deep mantle depends on the vigor and spatial distribution of the convective circulation, which is in turn dependent on the distribution of mantle buoyancy and viscosity (e.g. Glisovic & Forte 2015). Here we explore the state of convective mixing in the mantle using the ASPECT convection code (Kronbichler et al. 2012). A series of experiments are conducted to consider the geochemical and dynamical contributions of LLSVPs to deep-mantle upwellings and corresponding plume-sourced volcanism. The principal feature of these experiments is the use of particle tracers to track geochemical changes in the LLSVPs and mantle plumes in addition to identifying those parts of the mantle that may remain unmixed. We employ 3-D mantle density anomalies derived from joint inversions of seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics constraints and geodynamically-constrained viscosity distributions (Glisovic et al. 2015) to ensure that the predicted flow fields yield a good match to key geophysical constraints (e.g. heat flow, global gravity anomalies and plate velocities).

  5. Time-dependent mixed convection heat transfer from a sphere in a micro-gravity environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hommel, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    A fundamental problem of interest for crystal growth in micro-gravity applications involves the mixed convection heat transfer from a sphere in a uniform flow of fluid at a differing temperature. Under the combined influence of the imposed free stream as well as an induced buoyancy force due to thermal expansion of the fluid, the heat transfer from the sphere will be different from that of either the pure forced convection flow or the pure free convection flow. For the present study, the method of matched asymptotic expansions is applied to the laminar flow problem of an impulsively heated, impulsively started sphere in an originally quiescent fluid. Time series expansions are developed for the dependent variables by acknowledging the existence of two district regions: one, an inner region, near the sphere, in which viscous effects are significant; and two, an outer region in which the fluid may be treated as inviscid. The time series expansions are developed in terms of the Reynolds number and Richardson number (Buoyancy Parameter), and the relevant heat transfer and drag coefficients are calculated and plotted

  6. Radiation and heat generation effects in magnetohydrodynamic mixed convection flow of nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Aaiza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation and heat generation effects in unsteady magnetohydrodynamic mixed convection flow of nanofluids along a vertical channel are investigated. Silver nanoparticles of spherical shapes and of different sizes in water as a convection-al base fluid are incorporated. The purpose of this study is to measure the effect of different sizes of nanoparticles on velocity and temperature. Keeping in mind the size, particle material, shape, clustering and Brownian motion of nanoparticles, Koo and Kleinstreuer model is used. The problem is modeled in terms of partial differential equations with physical boundary conditions. Analytical solutions are obtained for velocity and temperature, plotted and discussed. It is concluded that increasing the size of Ag nanoparticles (up to specific size, 30 nm, results in a very small velocity increment while for large particle size (30-100 nm, no change in velocity is observed. As the small size of nanoparticles has the highest thermal conductivity and viscosity. This change in velocity with size of nano-particles is found only in water-based nanofluids with low volume fraction 0.01 while at low volume concentration, no change is observed.

  7. Turbulent Mixing of Primary and Secondary Flow Streams in a Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, J. M.; Greene, M. U.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the turbulent mixing of primary and secondary flow streams in a rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine. A significant RBCC ejector mode database has been generated, detailing single and twin thruster configurations and global and local measurements. On-going analysis and correlation efforts include Marshall Space Flight Center computational fluid dynamics modeling and turbulent shear layer analysis. Potential follow-on activities include detailed measurements of air flow static pressure and velocity profiles, investigations into other thruster spacing configurations, performing a fundamental shear layer mixing study, and demonstrating single-shot Raman measurements.

  8. Swirl effect on flow structure and mixing in a turbulent jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Z. D.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Dulin, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper reports on experimental study of turbulent transport in the initial region of swirling turbulent jets. The particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence techniques are used to investigate the flow structure and passive scalar concentration, respectively, in free air jet with acetone vapor. Three flow cases are considered, viz., non-swirling jets and swirling jets with and without vortex breakdown and central recirculation zone. Without vortex breakdown, the swirl is shown to promote jet mixing with surrounding air and to decrease the jet core length. The vortex core breakdown further enhances mixing as the jet core disintegrates at the nozzle exit.

  9. Exact statistical results for binary mixing and reaction in variable density turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2017-02-01

    We report a number of rigorous statistical results on binary active scalar mixing in variable density turbulence. The study is motivated by mixing between pure fluids with very different densities and whose density intensity is of order unity. Our primary focus is the derivation of exact mathematical results for mixing in variable density turbulence and we do point out the potential fields of application of the results. A binary one step reaction is invoked to derive a metric to asses the state of mixing. The mean reaction rate in variable density turbulent mixing can be expressed, in closed form, using the first order Favre mean variables and the Reynolds averaged density variance, ⟨ρ2⟩ . We show that the normalized density variance, ⟨ρ2⟩ , reflects the reduction of the reaction due to mixing and is a mix metric. The result is mathematically rigorous. The result is the variable density analog, the normalized mass fraction variance ⟨c2⟩ used in constant density turbulent mixing. As a consequence, we demonstrate that use of the analogous normalized Favre variance of the mass fraction, c″ ⁣2˜ , as a mix metric is not theoretically justified in variable density turbulence. We additionally derive expressions relating various second order moments of the mass fraction, specific volume, and density fields. The central role of the density specific volume covariance ⟨ρ v ⟩ is highlighted; it is a key quantity with considerable dynamical significance linking various second order statistics. For laboratory experiments, we have developed exact relations between the Reynolds scalar variance ⟨c2⟩ its Favre analog c″ ⁣2˜ , and various second moments including ⟨ρ v ⟩ . For moment closure models that evolve ⟨ρ v ⟩ and not ⟨ρ2⟩ , we provide a novel expression for ⟨ρ2⟩ in terms of a rational function of ⟨ρ v ⟩ that avoids recourse to Taylor series methods (which do not converge for large density differences). We have derived

  10. Temperature oscillation and the sloshing motion of the large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Chen, Xin; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2017-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the temperature oscillation and the sloshing motion of the large-scale circulation (LSC) in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water. Temperature measurements were made in aspect ratio one cylindrical cell by probes put in fluid and embedded in the sidewall simultaneously, and located at the 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 heights of the convection cell. The results show that the temperature measured in fluid contains information of both the LSC and the signature of the hot and cold plumes, while the temperature measured in sidewall only contains information of the LSC. It is found that the sloshing motion of the LSC can be measured by both the temperatures in fluid and in sidewall. We also studies the effect of cell tilting on the temperature oscillation and sloshing motion of the LSC. It is found that both the amplitude and the frequency of the temperature oscillation (and the sloshing motion) increase when the tilt angle increases, while the off-center distance of the sloshing motion of the LSC remains unchanged. This work is supported by the NSFC of China (Grant Nos. 11472094 and U1613227), the RGC of Hong Kong SAR (Grant No. 403712) and the 111 project of China (Grant No. B17037).

  11. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  12. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2011-12-22

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor\\'s frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  13. A Simple Parameterization of Mixing of Passive Scalars in Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithianantham, Ajithshanthar; Venayagamoorthy, Karan

    2015-11-01

    A practical model for quantifying the turbulent diascalar diffusivity is proposed as Ks = 1 . 1γ'LTk 1 / 2 , where LT is defined as the Thorpe length scale, k is the turbulent kinetic energy and γ' is one-half of the mechanical to scalar time scale ratio, which was shown by previous researchers to be approximately 0 . 7 . The novelty of the proposed model lies in the use of LT, which is a widely used length scale in stably stratified flows (almost exclusively used in oceanography), for quantifying turbulent mixing in unstratified flows. LT can be readily obtained in the field using a Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) profiler. The turbulent kinetic energy is mostly contained in the large scales of the flow field and hence can be measured in the field or modeled in numerical simulations. Comparisons using DNS data show remarkably good agreement between the predicted and exact diffusivities. Office of Naval Research and National Science Foundation.

  14. Development of two phase turbulent mixing model for subchannel analysis relevant to BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, M.P.; Nayak, A.K.; Kannan, Umasankari

    2014-01-01

    A two phase flow model is presented, which predicts both liquid and gas phase turbulent mixing rate between adjacent subchannels of reactor rod bundles. The model presented here is for slug churn flow regime, which is dominant as compared to the other regimes like bubbly flow and annular flow regimes, since turbulent mixing rate is the highest in slug churn flow regime. In this paper, we have defined new dimensionless parameters i.e. liquid mixing number and gas mixing number for two phase turbulent mixing. The liquid mixing number is a function of mixture Reynolds number whereas the gas phase mixing number is a function of both mixture Reynolds number and volumetric fraction of gas. The effect of pressure, geometrical influence of subchannel is also included in this model. The present model has been tested against low pressure and temperature air-water and high pressure and temperature steam-water experimental data found that it shows good agreement with available experimental data. (author)

  15. Nanofluid heat transfer under mixed convection flow in a tube for solar thermal energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Y Raja; Sharma, K V; Kamal, Subhash

    2016-05-01

    The solar flat plate collector operating under different convective modes has low efficiency for energy conversion. The energy absorbed by the working fluid in the collector system and its heat transfer characteristics vary with solar insolation and mass flow rate. The performance of the system is improved by reducing the losses from the collector. Various passive methods have been devised to aid energy absorption by the working fluid. Also, working fluids are modified using nanoparticles to improve the thermal properties of the fluid. In the present work, simulation and experimental studies are undertaken for pipe flow at constant heat flux boundary condition in the mixed convection mode. The working fluid at low Reynolds number in the mixed laminar flow range is undertaken with water in thermosyphon mode for different inclination angles of the tube. Local and average coefficients are determined experimentally and compared with theoretical values for water-based Al2O3 nanofluids. The results show an enhancement in heat transfer in the experimental range with Rayleigh number at higher inclinations of the collector tube for water and nanofluids.

  16. Double stratification effects in chemically reactive squeezed Sutterby fluid flow with thermal radiation and mixed convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A current analysis is carried out to study theoretically the mixed convection characteristics in squeezing flow of Sutterby fluid in squeezed channel. The constitutive equation of Sutterby model is utilized to characterize the rheology of squeezing phenomenon. Flow characteristics are explored with dual stratification. In flowing fluid which contains heat and mass transport, the first order chemical reaction and radiative heat flux affect the transport phenomenon. The systems of non-linear governing equations have been modulating which then solved by mean of convergent approach (Homotopy Analysis Method. The graphs are reported and illustrated for emerging parameters. Through graphical explanations, drag force, rate of heat and mass transport are conversed for different pertinent parameters. It is found that heat and mass transport rate decays with dominant double stratified parameters and chemical reaction parameter. The present two-dimensional examination is applicable in some of the engineering processes and industrial fluid mechanics. Keywords: Squeezing flow, Sutterby fluid model, Mixed convection, Double stratification, Thermal radiation, Chemical reaction

  17. Numerical investigation on mixed convection flow in a trapezoidal cavity heated from below

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tmartnhad, Ilham; El Alami, Mustapha; Najam, Mostafa; Oubarra, Abdelaziz

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study of mixed convection from a trapezoidal cavity is carried out. Two openings are adjusted on the plates of the cavity. The inlet opening is horizontal or vertical, while the outlet one is placed horizontally on the bottom wall. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a control volume method and the SIMPLEC algorithm is used for the treatment of pressure-velocity coupling. Special emphasis is given to detail the effect of the Reynolds number on the heat transfer generated by mixed convection. The results are given for the parameters of control as, Rayleigh number (Ra = 10 5 ), Prandtl number (Pr = 0.72), the inlet and outlet opening width are respectively (C 1 = 0.38 and C 2 = 0.25), the inclination of the tilted wall (θ = 22 deg. ) and Reynolds number (10 ≤ Re ≤ 1000). The results show that the flow structure and the heat transfer depends significantly on the inlet opening site. Two principal kinds of the problem solution are raised

  18. Variable-property effects in laminar aiding and opposing mixed convection of air in vertical tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesreddine, H.; Galanis, N.; Nguyen, C.T.

    1997-01-01

    Mixed convection flow in tubes is encountered in many engineering applications, such as solar collectors, nuclear reactors, and compact heat exchangers. Here, a numerical investigation has been conducted in order to determine the effects of variable properties on the flow pattern and heat transfer performances in laminar developing ascending flow with mixed convection for two cases: in case 1 the fluid is heated, and in case 2 it is cooled. Calculations are performed for air at various Grashof numbers with a fixed entrance Reynolds number of 500 using both the Boussinesq approximation (constant-property model) and a variable-property model. In the latter case, the fluid viscosity and thermal conductivity are allowed to vary with absolute temperature according to simple power laws, while the density varies linearly with the temperature, and the heat capacity is assumed to be constant. The comparison between constant- and variable-property models shows a substantial difference in the temperature and velocity fields when the Grashof number |Gr| is increased. The friction factor is seen to be underpredicted by the Boussinesq approximation when the fluid is heated (case 1), while it is overpredicted for the cooling case (case 2). However, the effects on the heat transfer performance remain negligible except for cases with reverse flow. On the whole, the variable-property model predicts flow reversal at lower values of |Gr|, especially for flows with opposing buoyancy forces. The deviation in results is associated to the difference between the fluid bulk and the wall temperature

  19. Investigation of thermo-fluid behavior of mixed convection heat transfer of different dimples-protrusions wall patterns to heat transfer enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, M.; Behzadmehr, A.

    2018-05-01

    This study is a numerical investigation of the effect of improving heat transfer namely, modified rough (dimples and protrusions) surfaces on the mixed convective heat transfer of a turbulent flow in a horizontal tube. The effects of different dimples-protrusions arrangements on the improving the thermal performance of a rough tube are investigated at various Richardson numbers. Three dimensional governing equations are discretized by the finite-volume technique. Based on the obtained results the dimples-protrusions arrangements are modified to find a suitable configuration for which heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop to be balanced. Modified dimples-protrusions arrangements that shows higher performance is presented. Its average thermal performance 18% and 11% is higher than the other arrangements. In addition, the results show that roughening a smooth tube is more effective at the higher Richardson number.

  20. On the Computation of Turbulent Mixing Processes with Application to EGR in IC-engines

    OpenAIRE

    Sakowitz, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with turbulent mixing processes occuring in internal combustion engines, when applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). EGR is a very efficient way to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in internal combustion engines. Exhaust gases are recirculated and mixed with the intake air of the engine, thus reducing the oxygen concentration of the combustion gas and the maximum combustion tempera- ture. This temperature decrease results in a reduction of NOx emissions, since NO...

  1. Steady state RANS simulations of temperature fluctuations in single phase turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kickhofel, J.; Fokken, J.; Kapulla, R.; Prasser, H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Single phase turbulent mixing in nuclear power plant circuits where a strong temperature gradient is present is known to precipitate pipe failure due to thermal fatigue. Experiments in a square mixing channel offer the opportunity to study the phenomenon under simple and easily reproducible boundary conditions. Measurements of this kind have been performed extensively at the Paul Scherrer Inst. in Switzerland with a high density of instrumentation in the Generic Mixing Experiment (GEMIX). As a fundamental mixing phenomena study closely related to the thermal fatigue problem, the experimental results from GEMIX are valuable for the validation of CFD codes striving to accurately simulate both the temperature and velocity fields in single phase turbulent mixing. In the experiments two iso-kinetic streams meet at a shallow angle of 3 degrees and mix in a straight channel of square cross-section under various degrees of density, temperature, and viscosity stratification over a range of Reynolds numbers ranging from 5*10 3 to 1*10 5 . Conductivity measurements, using wire-mesh and wall sensors, as well as optical measurements, using particle image velocimetry, were conducted with high temporal and spatial resolutions (up to 2.5 kHz and 1 mm in the case of the wire mesh sensor) in the mixing zone, downstream of a splitter plate. The present paper communicates the results of RANS modeling of selected GEMIX tests. Steady-state CFD calculations using a RANS turbulence model represent an inexpensive method for analyzing large and complex components in commercial nuclear reactors, such as the downcomer and reactor pressure vessel heads. Crucial to real world applicability, however, is the ability to model turbulent heat fluctuations in the flow; the Turbulent Heat Flux Transport model developed by ANSYS CFX is capable, by implementation of a transport equation for turbulent heat fluxes, of readily modeling these values. Furthermore, the closure of the turbulent heat flux

  2. Turbulent mixing layers in supersonic protostellar outflows, with application to DG Tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. C.; Bicknell, G. V.; Sutherland, R. S.; Salmeron, R.; McGregor, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent entrainment processes may play an important role in the outflows from young stellar objects at all stages of their evolution. In particular, lateral entrainment of ambient material by high-velocity, well-collimated protostellar jets may be the cause of the multiple emission-line velocity components observed in the microjet-scale outflows driven by classical T Tauri stars. Intermediate-velocity outflow components may be emitted by a turbulent, shock-excited mixing layer along the boundaries of the jet. We present a formalism for describing such a mixing layer based on Reynolds decomposition of quantities measuring fundamental properties of the gas. In this model, the molecular wind from large disc radii provides a continual supply of material for entrainment. We calculate the total stress profile in the mixing layer, which allows us to estimate the dissipation of turbulent energy, and hence the luminosity of the layer. We utilize MAPPINGS IV shock models to determine the fraction of total emission that occurs in [Fe II] 1.644 μm line emission in order to facilitate comparison to previous observations of the young stellar object DG Tauri. Our model accurately estimates the luminosity and changes in mass outflow rate of the intermediate-velocity component of the DG Tau approaching outflow. Therefore, we propose that this component represents a turbulent mixing layer surrounding the well-collimated jet in this object. Finally, we compare and contrast our model to previous work in the field.

  3. Model for transversal turbulent mixing in axial flow in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carajilescov, P.

    1990-01-01

    The present work consists in the development of a model for the transversal eddy diffusivity to account for the effect of turbulent thermal mixing in axial flows in rod bundles. The results were compared to existing correlations that are currently being used in reactor thermalhydraulic analysis and considered satisfactory. (author)

  4. Nonlocal stochastic mixing-length theory and the velocity profile in the turbulent boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.; Leeuw, G. de; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-01-01

    Turbulence mixing by finite size eddies will be treated by means of a novel formulation of nonlocal K-theory, involving sample paths and a stochastic closure hypothesis, which implies a well defined recipe for the calculation of sampling and transition rates. The connection with the general theory

  5. Two-phase turbulent mixing and buoyancy drift in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, L.N.; Hammouda, N.; Rowe, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of generalized relationships for single- and two-phase inter subchannel turbulent mixing in vertical and horizontal flows, and lateral buoyancy drift in horizontal flows. The relationships for turbulent mixing, together with a recommended one for void drift, have been implemented in a subchannel thermal hydraulics code, and assessed using a range of data on enthalpy migration in vertical steam-water lows under BWR and PWR diabatic conditions. The intent of this assessment as to optimize these relationships to give the best agreement with the enthalpy migration data for vertical flows. The optimized turbulent mixing relationships were then used as a basis to benchmark a proposed buoyancy rift model to give the best predictions of void and enthalpy migration data n horizontal flows typical of PHWR CANDU reactor operation under normal and off-normal conditions. Overall, the optimized turbulent mixing and buoyancy drift relationships have been found to predict the available data quite well, nd generally better and more consistently than currently used models. This is expected to result in more accurate calculations of subchannel distributions of phasic flows, and hence, in improved predictions of critical heat flux (CHF)

  6. Mixing in 3D Sparse Multi-Scale Grid Generated Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usama, Syed; Kopec, Jacek; Tellez, Jackson; Kwiatkowski, Kamil; Redondo, Jose; Malik, Nadeem

    2017-04-01

    Flat 2D fractal grids are known to alter turbulence characteristics downstream of the grid as compared to the regular grids with the same blockage ratio and the same mass inflow rates [1]. This has excited interest in the turbulence community for possible exploitation for enhanced mixing and related applications. Recently, a new 3D multi-scale grid design has been proposed [2] such that each generation of length scale of turbulence grid elements is held in its own frame, the overall effect is a 3D co-planar arrangement of grid elements. This produces a 'sparse' grid system whereby each generation of grid elements produces a turbulent wake pattern that interacts with the other wake patterns downstream. A critical motivation here is that the effective blockage ratio in the 3D Sparse Grid Turbulence (3DSGT) design is significantly lower than in the flat 2D counterpart - typically the blockage ratio could be reduced from say 20% in 2D down to 4% in the 3DSGT. If this idea can be realized in practice, it could potentially greatly enhance the efficiency of turbulent mixing and transfer processes clearly having many possible applications. Work has begun on the 3DSGT experimentally using Surface Flow Image Velocimetry (SFIV) [3] at the European facility in the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization located in Gottingen, Germany and also at the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) in Spain, and numerically using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) at King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (KFUPM) in Saudi Arabia and in University of Warsaw in Poland. DNS is the most useful method to compare the experimental results with, and we are studying different types of codes such as Imcompact3d, and OpenFoam. Many variables will eventually be investigated for optimal mixing conditions. For example, the number of scale generations, the spacing between frames, the size ratio of grid elements, inflow conditions, etc. We will report upon the first set of findings

  7. Large Eddy Simulation and the effect of the turbulent inlet conditions in the mixing Tee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndombo, Jean-Marc; Howard, Richard J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → LES of Tee junctions can easily reproduce the bulk flow. → The presence or absence of a turbulent inlet condition has an affect on the wall heat transfer. → The maximum heat transfer moves 1 cm and reduces by 10% when a turbulent inlet is used. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue in Pressurized Water Reactor plants has been found to be very acute in some hot/cold Tee junction mixing zones. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) can be used to capture the unsteadiness which is responsible for the large mechanical stresses associated with thermal fatigue. Here one LES subgrid model is studied, namely the Dynamic Smagorinsky model. This paper has two goals. The first is to demonstrate some results obtained using the EDF R and D Code Saturne applied to the Vattenfall Tee junction benchmark (version 2006) and the second is to look at the effect of including synthetic turbulence at the Tee junction pipe inlets. The last goal is the main topic of this paper. The Synthetic Eddy Method is used to create the turbulent inlet conditions and is applied to two kinds of grids. One contains six million cells and the other ten million. The addition of turbulence at the inlet does not seem to have much effect on the bulk flow and all computations are in good agreement with the experimental data. However, the inlet turbulence does have an effect on the near wall flow. All cases show that the wall temperature fluctuation and the wall temperature/velocity correlation are not the same when a turbulent inlet condition is used. Inclusion of the turbulent inlet condition moves the downstream location of the maximum temperature/velocity correlation by 1 cm and reduces its magnitude by 10%. This result is very important because the temperature/velocity correlation is closely related to the turbulent heat transfer in the flow, which is in turn responsible for the mechanical stresses on the structure. Finally we have studied in detail the influence of the turbulent inlet condition just

  8. Simulation of Turbulent Wake at Mixing of Two Confined Horizontal Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Krpan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a turbulent mixing layer at mixing of two horizontal water streams with slightly different densities is studied by the means of numerical simulation. The mixing of such flows can be modelled as the flow of two components, where the concentration of one component in the mixing region is described as a passive scalar. The velocity field remains common over the entire computational domain, where the density and viscosity difference due to the concentration mainly affects the turbulent fluctuations in the mixing region. The numerical simulations are performed with the open source code OpenFOAM using two different approaches for turbulence modelling, Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations (RANS and Large Eddy Simulation (LES. The simulation results are discussed and compared with the benchmark experiment obtained within the frame of OECD/NEA benchmark test. A good agreement with experimental results is obtained in the case of the single liquid experiment. A high discrepancy between the simulated and the experimental velocity fluctuations in the case of mixing of the flows with the slightly different densities and viscosities triggered a systematic investigation of the modelling approaches that helped us to find out and interpret the main reasons for the disagreement.

  9. Effect of turbulence models on predicting convective heat transfer to hydrocarbon fuel at supercritical pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A variety of turbulence models were used to perform numerical simulations of heat transfer for hydrocarbon fuel flowing upward and downward through uniformly heated vertical pipes at supercritical pressure. Inlet temperatures varied from 373 K to 663 K, with heat flux ranging from 300 kW/m2 to 550 kW/m2. Comparative analyses between predicted and experimental results were used to evaluate the ability of turbulence models to respond to variable thermophysical properties of hydrocarbon fuel at supercritical pressure. It was found that the prediction performance of turbulence models is mainly determined by the damping function, which enables them to respond differently to local flow conditions. Although prediction accuracy for experimental results varied from condition to condition, the shear stress transport (SST and launder and sharma models performed better than all other models used in the study. For very small buoyancy-influenced runs, the thermal-induced acceleration due to variations in density lead to the impairment of heat transfer occurring in the vicinity of pseudo-critical points, and heat transfer was enhanced at higher temperatures through the combined action of four thermophysical properties: density, viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat. For very large buoyancy-influenced runs, the thermal-induced acceleration effect was over predicted by the LS and AB models.

  10. Detailed experimental study of a highly compressible supersonic turbulent plane mixing layer and comparison with most recent DNS results: “Towards an accurate description of compressibility effects in supersonic free shear flows”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, S.; Bonnet, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We performed a careful experiment on a highly compressible mixing layer. • We validated the most recent DNS with the present results. • We discuss some aspects of the thermodynamics of the turbulent flow. • We performed a comparison between a computed and a measured turbulent kinetic energy budget. - Abstract: A compressible supersonic mixing layer at convective Mach number (Mc) equal to 1 has been studied experimentally in a dual stream supersonic/subsonic wind-tunnel. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (L.D.V.) measurements were performed making possible a full estimation of the mean and turbulent 3D velocity fields in the mixing layer. The Reynolds stress tensor was described. In particular, some anisotropy coefficients were obtained. It appears that the structure of the Reynolds tensor is almost not affected by compressibility at least up to Mc = 1. The turbulent kinetic energy budget was also experimentally estimated. Reynolds analogies assumptions were used to obtain density/velocity correlations in order to build the turbulent kinetic energy budget from LDV measurements. Results have been compared to other experimental and numerical results. Compressibility effects on the turbulent kinetic energy budget have been detected and commented. A study about thermodynamics flow properties was also performed using most recent DNS results experimentally validated by the present data. A non-dimensional number is then introduced in order to quantify the real effect of pressure fluctuations on the thermodynamics quantities fluctuations

  11. Turbulent mixing induced by Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivets, V. V.; Ferguson, K. J.; Jacobs, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is studied in shock tube experiments with an Atwood number of 0.7. The interface is formed in a vertical shock tube using opposed gas flows, and three-dimensional random initial interface perturbations are generated by the vertical oscillation of gas column producing Faraday waves. Planar Laser Mie scattering is used for flow visualization and for measurements of the mixing process. Experimental image sequences are recorded at 6 kHz frequency and processed to obtain the time dependent variation of the integral mixing layer width. Measurements of the mixing layer width are compared with Mikaelian's [1] model in order to extract the growth exponent θ where a fairly wide range of values is found varying from θ ≈ 0.2 to 0.6.

  12. Controls on turbulent mixing on the West Antarctic Peninsula shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brearley, J. Alexander; Meredith, Michael P.; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.; Venables, Hugh J.; Inall, Mark E.

    2017-05-01

    The ocean-to-atmosphere heat budget of the West Antarctic Peninsula is controlled in part by the upward flux of heat from the warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) layer that resides below 200 m to the Antarctic Surface Water (AASW), a water mass which varies strongly on a seasonal basis. Upwelling and mixing of CDW influence the formation of sea ice in the region and affect biological productivity and functioning of the ecosystem through their delivery of nutrients. In this study, 2.5-year time series of both Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data are used to quantify both the diapycnal diffusivity κ and the vertical heat flux Q at the interface between CDW and AASW. Over the period of the study, a mean upward heat flux of 1 W m-2 is estimated, with the largest heat fluxes occurring shortly after the loss of winter fast ice when the water column is first exposed to wind stress without being strongly stratified by salinity. Differences in mixing mechanisms between winter and summer seasons are investigated. Whilst tidally-driven mixing at the study site occurs year-round, but is likely to be relatively weak, a strong increase in counterclockwise-polarized near-inertial energy (and shear) is observed during the fast-ice-free season, suggesting that the direct impact of storms on the ocean surface is responsible for much of the observed mixing at the site. Given the rapid reduction in sea-ice duration in this region in the last 30 years, a shift towards an increasingly wind-dominated mixing regime may be taking place.

  13. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  14. Large-eddy simulation in a mixing tee junction: High-order turbulent statistics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Richard J.A.; Serre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Mixing and thermal fluctuations in a junction are studied using large eddy simulation. • Adiabatic and conducting steel wall boundaries are tested. • Wall thermal fluctuations are not the same between the flow and the solid. • Solid thermal fluctuations cannot be predicted from the fluid thermal fluctuations. • High-order turbulent statistics show that the turbulent transport term is important. - Abstract: This study analyses the mixing and thermal fluctuations induced in a mixing tee junction with circular cross-sections when cold water flowing in a pipe is joined by hot water from a branch pipe. This configuration is representative of industrial piping systems in which temperature fluctuations in the fluid may cause thermal fatigue damage on the walls. Implicit large-eddy simulations (LES) are performed for equal inflow rates corresponding to a bulk Reynolds number Re = 39,080. Two different thermal boundary conditions are studied for the pipe walls; an insulating adiabatic boundary and a conducting steel wall boundary. The predicted flow structures show a satisfactory agreement with the literature. The velocity and thermal fields (including high-order statistics) are not affected by the heat transfer with the steel walls. However, predicted thermal fluctuations at the boundary are not the same between the flow and the solid, showing that solid thermal fluctuations cannot be predicted by the knowledge of the fluid thermal fluctuations alone. The analysis of high-order turbulent statistics provides a better understanding of the turbulence features. In particular, the budgets of the turbulent kinetic energy and temperature variance allows a comparative analysis of dissipation, production and transport terms. It is found that the turbulent transport term is an important term that acts to balance the production. We therefore use a priori tests to evaluate three different models for the triple correlation

  15. Turbulent natural convection between a perforated vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEligot, D.M.; Stoots, C.M.; Christenson, W.A.; O'Brien, J.E.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-01-01

    A number of situations can be hypothesized to occur in an advanced or special purpose nuclear reactor such that the core is filled with a gas but there is no forced flow to remove the thermal energy evolved. Experiments were conducted by resistively hearing a vertical circular cylinder of length-to-diameter ratio of about 160 centered inside a concentric perforated tube which was, in turn, surrounded by three larger diameter tubes cooled internally with water flow. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6; and the Rayleigh number, based on tube diameter and properties evaluated at the cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10 4 to 9.2 x 10 5 . Results indicate that the convective heat transfer parameters for the perforated tube are about fifteen per cent higher than for the smooth bare tube centered in the same position relative to the array. The Nusselt number for convective heat transfer across the annulus between the heated test section and the perforated tube corresponded to parallel laminar flow

  16. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2014-06-25

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  17. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun; Attili, Antonio; Alshaarawi, Amjad; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  18. The effect of turbulent mixing models on the predictions of subchannel codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapucu, A.; Teyssedou, A.; Tye, P.; Troche, N.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the predictions of the COBRA-IV and ASSERT-4 subchannel codes have been compared with experimental data on void fraction, mass flow rate, and pressure drop obtained for two interconnected subchannels. COBRA-IV is based on a one-dimensional separated flow model with the turbulent intersubchannel mixing formulated as an extension of the single-phase mixing model, i.e. fluctuating equal mass exchange. ASSERT-4 is based on a drift flux model with the turbulent mixing modelled by assuming an exchange of equal volumes with different densities thus allowing a net fluctuating transverse mass flux from one subchannel to the other. This feature is implemented in the constitutive relationship for the relative velocity required by the conservation equations. It is observed that the predictions of ASSERT-4 follow the experimental trends better than COBRA-IV; therefore the approach of equal volume exchange constitutes an improvement over that of the equal mass exchange. ((orig.))

  19. Transient mixed convection in a channel with an open cavity filled with porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonomo, B; Cresci, G; Manca, O; Mesolella, P; Nardini, S

    2012-01-01

    In this work transient mixed convection in a porous medium in a horizontal channel with a open cavity below is studied numerically. The cavity presents a heated wall at uniform heat flux and the other walls of the cavity and the channel are assumed adiabatic. Air flows through the horizontal channel. The heated wall of the cavity experiences a uniform heat flux in such a way that the forced flow is perpendicular to the motion due to natural convection. The study is carried out employing Brinkman-Forchheimer-extended Darcy model and two energy equations due to the local thermal non-equilibrium assumption. The flow in the channel is assumed to be two-dimensional, laminar, incompressible. Boussinesq approximation is considered. The thermophysical properties of the fluid are evaluated at the ambient temperature. The results for stream function and temperature distribution given at different times are obtained. Wall temperature value are given and also, the velocity and temperature profiles in several sections of the cavity are presented. In addition, the Nusselt number, both local and average, is presented along with the temporal variations of the average Nusselt number.

  20. Numerical Study of Mixed Convection of Nanofluid in a Concentric Annulus with Rotating Inner Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Sheikhzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the steady and laminar mixed convection of nanofluid in horizontal concentric annulus withrotating inner cylinder is investigated numerically. The inner and outer cylinders are kept at constanttemperature Ti and To respectively, where Ti>To. The annular space is filled with Alumina-water nanofluid.The governing equations with the corresponded boundary conditions in the polar coordinate are discretizedusing the finite volume method where pressure-velocity coupling is done by the SIMPLER algorithm.Numerical results have been obtained for Rayleigh number ranging from 102 to 105, Reynolds number from 1 to 300 and nanoparticles volume fraction from 0.01 to 0.06. The effects of the Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers, average diameter of nanoparticles and the volume fraction of the nanoparticles on the fluid flow and heat transfer inside the annuli are investigated. According to the results, the average Nusselt number decreases with increasing the Reynolds number. However, the average Nusselt number increases by increasing the Rayleigh number. Moreover, the maximum average Nusselt number occurs for an optimal nanoparticle volume fraction except situations that heat conduction predominates over the heat convection. In these conditions the average Nusselt number is close to unity.

  1. Heat Transfer to Supercritical Water in Gaseous State or Affected by Mixed Convection in Vertical Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pis'menny, E.N.; Razumovskiy, V.G.; Maevskiy, E.M.; Koloskov, A.E.; Pioro, I.L.

    2006-01-01

    The results on heat transfer to supercritical water heated above the pseudo-critical temperature or affected by mixed convection flowing upward and downward in vertical tubes of 6.28-mm and 9.50-mm inside diameter are presented. Supercritical water heat-transfer data were obtained at a pressure of 23.5 MPa, mass flux within the range from 250 to 2200 kg/(m 2 s), inlet temperature from 100 to 415 deg. C and heat flux up to 3.2 MW/m 2 . Temperature regimes of the tubes cooled with supercritical water in a gaseous state (i.e., supercritical water at temperatures beyond the pseudo-critical temperature) were stable and easily reproducible within a wide range of mass and heat fluxes. An analysis of the heat-transfer data for upward and downward flows enabled to determine a range of Gr/Re 2 values corresponding to the maximum effect of free convection on the heat transfer. It was shown that: 1) the heat transfer coefficient at the downward flow of water can be higher by about 50% compared to that of the upward flow; and 2) the deteriorated heat-transfer regime is affected with the flow direction, i.e., at the same operating conditions, the deteriorated heat transfer may be delayed at the downward flow compared to that at the upward flow. These heat-transfer data are applicable as the reference dataset for future comparison with bundle data. (authors)

  2. Mixed layer depth calculation in deep convection regions in ocean numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Peggy; Hu, Xianmin; Pennelly, Clark; Spence, Paul; Myers, Paul G.

    2017-12-01

    Mixed Layer Depths (MLDs) diagnosed by conventional numerical models are generally based on a density difference with the surface (e.g., 0.01 kg.m-3). However, the temperature-salinity compensation and the lack of vertical resolution contribute to over-estimated MLD, especially in regions of deep convection. In the present work, we examined the diagnostic MLD, associated with the deep convection of the Labrador Sea Water (LSW), calculated with a simple density difference criterion. The over-estimated MLD led us to develop a new tool, based on an observational approach, to recalculate MLD from model output. We used an eddy-permitting, 1/12° regional configuration of the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) to test and discuss our newly defined MLD. We compared our new MLD with that from observations, and we showed a major improvement with our new algorithm. To show the new MLD is not dependent on a single model and its horizontal resolution, we extended our analysis to include 1/4° eddy-permitting simulations, and simulations using the Modular Ocean Model (MOM) model.

  3. DNS of spark ignition and edge flame propagation in turbulent droplet-laden mixing layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neophytou, A.; Mastorakos, E.; Cant, R.S. [Hopkinson Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    A parametric study of forced ignition at the mixing layer between air and air carrying fine monosized fuel droplets is done through one-step chemistry direct numerical simulations to determine the influence of the size and volatility of the droplets, the spark location, the droplet-air mixing layer initial thickness and the turbulence intensity on the ignition success and the subsequent flame propagation. The propagation is analyzed in terms of edge flame displacement speed, which has not been studied before for turbulent edge spray flames. Spark ignition successfully resulted in a tribrachial flame if enough fuel vapour was available at the spark location, which occurred when the local droplet number density was high. Ignition was achieved even when the spark was offset from the spray, on the air side, due to the diffusion of heat from the spark, provided droplets evaporated rapidly. Large kernels were obtained by sparking close to the spray, since fuel was more readily available. At long times after the spark, for all flames studied, the probability density function of the displacement speed was wide, with a mean value in the range 0.55-0.75S{sub L}, with S{sub L} the laminar burning velocity of a stoichiometric gaseous premixed flame. This value is close to the mean displacement speed in turbulent edge flames with gaseous fuel. The displacement speed was negatively correlated with curvature. The detrimental effect of curvature was attenuated with a large initial kernel and by increasing the thickness of the mixing layer. The mixing layer was thicker when evaporation was slow and the turbulence intensity higher. However, high turbulence intensity also distorted the kernel which could lead to high values of curvature. The edge flame reaction component increased when the maximum temperature coincided with the stoichiometric contour. The results are consistent with the limited available experimental evidence and provide insights into the processes associated with

  4. Mixed Convection Flow along a Stretching Cylinder in a Thermally Stratified Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Mukhopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis for the axisymmetric laminar boundary layer mixed convection flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid towards a stretching cylinder immersed in a thermally stratified medium is presented in this paper. Similarity transformation is employed to convert the governing partial differential equations into highly nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Numerical solutions of these equations are obtained by a shooting method. It is found that the heat transfer rate at the surface is lower for flow in a thermally stratified medium compared to that of an unstratified medium. Moreover, both the skin friction coefficient and the heat transfer rate at the surface are larger for a cylinder compared to that for a flat plate.

  5. Entropy Generation in Magnetohydrodynamic Mixed Convection Flow over an Inclined Stretching Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Idrees Afridi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on entropy generation rate per unit volume in magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD mixed convection boundary layer flow of a viscous fluid over an inclined stretching sheet. Analysis has been performed in the presence of viscous dissipation and non-isothermal boundary conditions. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations by an appropriate similarity transformation. The transformed coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations are then solved numerically by a shooting technique along with the Runge-Kutta method. Expressions for entropy generation (Ns and Bejan number (Be in the form of dimensionless variables are also obtained. Impact of various physical parameters on the quantities of interest is seen.

  6. Mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic flow in a vertical channel filled with nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Das

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The fully developed mixed convection flow in a vertical channel filled with nanofluids in the presence of a uniform transverse magnetic field has been studied. Closed form solutions for the fluid temperature, velocity and induced magnetic field are obtained for both the buoyancy-aided and -opposed flows. Three different water-based nanofluids containing copper, aluminium oxide and titanium dioxide are taken into consideration. Effects of the pertinent parameters on the nanofluid temperature, velocity, and induced magnetic field as well as the shear stress and the rate of heat transfer at the channel wall are shown in figures and tables followed by a quantitative discussion. It is found that the magnetic field tends to enhance the nanofluid velocity in the channel. The induced magnetic field vanishes in the cental region of the channel. The critical Rayleigh number at onset of instability of flow is strongly dependent on the volume fraction of nanoparticles and the magnetic field.

  7. Double stratification effects in chemically reactive squeezed Sutterby fluid flow with thermal radiation and mixed convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Farooq, M.; Javed, M.; Anjum, Aisha

    2018-03-01

    A current analysis is carried out to study theoretically the mixed convection characteristics in squeezing flow of Sutterby fluid in squeezed channel. The constitutive equation of Sutterby model is utilized to characterize the rheology of squeezing phenomenon. Flow characteristics are explored with dual stratification. In flowing fluid which contains heat and mass transport, the first order chemical reaction and radiative heat flux affect the transport phenomenon. The systems of non-linear governing equations have been modulating which then solved by mean of convergent approach (Homotopy Analysis Method). The graphs are reported and illustrated for emerging parameters. Through graphical explanations, drag force, rate of heat and mass transport are conversed for different pertinent parameters. It is found that heat and mass transport rate decays with dominant double stratified parameters and chemical reaction parameter. The present two-dimensional examination is applicable in some of the engineering processes and industrial fluid mechanics.

  8. Study on mixed convective flow penetration into subassembly from reactor hot plenum in FBRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, J.; Ohshima, H.; Kamide, H.; Ieda, Y. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Fundamental experiments using water were carried out in order to reveal the phenomenon of mixed convective flow penetration into subassemblies from a reactor`s upper plenum of fast breeder reactors. This phenomenon appears under a certain natural circulation conditions during the operation of the direct reactor auxiliary cooling system for decay heat removal and might influence the natural circulation head which determines the core flow rate and therefore affects the core coolability. In the experiment, a simplified model which simulates an upper plenum and a subassembly was used and the ultrasonic velocity profile monitor as well as thermocouples were applied for the simultaneous measurement of velocity and temperature distributions in the subassembly. From the measured data, empirical equations related to the penetration flow onset condition and the penetration depth were obtained using relevant parameters which were derived from dimensional analysis.

  9. Unsteady Mixed Convection Boundary Layer from a Circular Cylinder in a Micropolar Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anati Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Most industrial fluids such as polymers, liquid crystals, and colloids contain suspensions of rigid particles that undergo rotation. However, the classical Navier-Stokes theory normally associated with Newtonian fluids is inadequate to describe such fluids as it does not take into account the effects of these microstructures. In this paper, the unsteady mixed convection boundary layer flow of a micropolar fluid past an isothermal horizontal circular cylinder is numerically studied, where the unsteadiness is due to an impulsive motion of the free stream. Both the assisting (heated cylinder and opposing cases (cooled cylinder are considered. Thus, both small and large time solutions as well as the occurrence of flow separation, followed by the flow reversal are studied. The flow along the entire surface of a cylinder is solved numerically using the Keller-box scheme. The obtained results are compared with the ones from the open literature, and it is shown that the agreement is very good.

  10. Constitutive correlations for wire-wrapped subchannel analysis under forced and mixed convection conditions. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.K.; Todreas, N.E.

    1984-08-01

    A simple subchannel analysis method based on the ENERGY series of codes, ENERGY-IV, has been established for predicting the temperature field in a single isolated wire-wrapped Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) subassembly under steady state forced and mixed convection conditions. The ENERGY-IV is a totally empirical code employed for fast running purposes and requires well calibrated lead length averaged input parameters to achieve satisfactory predictions. These input parameters were identified to be the inlet flow split parameters, the subchannel friction factors, the interchannel mixing parameters, the conduction shape factor, and the transverse velocity at the edge gap. Experiments were performed in a 37-pin wire-wrapped rod bundle with a geometry between that of a typical LMFBR fuel subassembly and blanket subassembly for filling the gap in the available data base for the input parameters. The isokinetic extraction method for measuring subchannel velocity, the pitot-static probe for measuring pressure drop, and the salt tracer injection method for estimating the interchannel mixing, were used in these experiments

  11. Convective overshoot at the solar tachocline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Anders, Evan H.; Lecoanet, Daniel; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2017-08-01

    At the base of the solar convection zone lies the solar tachocline. This internal interface is where motions from the unstable convection zone above overshoot and penetrate downward into the stiffly stable radiative zone below, driving gravity waves, mixing, and possibly pumping and storing magnetic fields. Here we study the dynamics of convective overshoot across very stiff interfaces with some properties similar to the internal boundary layer within the Sun. We use the Dedalus pseudospectral framework and study fully compressible dynamics at moderate to high Peclet number and low Mach number, probing a regime where turbulent transport is important, and where the compressible dynamics are similar to those of convective motions in the deep solar interior. We find that the depth of convective overshoot is well described by a simple buoyancy equilibration model, and we consider implications for dynamics at the solar tachocline and for the storage of magnetic fields there by overshooting convection.

  12. Progress in understanding turbulent mixing induced by Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ye; Remington, B.A.; Robey, H.F.; Cook, A.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Dimits, A.; Buckingham, A.C.; Zimmerman, G.B.; Burke, E.W.; Peyser, T.A.; Cabot, W.; Eliason, D.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulent hydrodynamic mixing induced by the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities occurs in settings as varied as exploding stars (supernovae), inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions, and macroscopic flows in fluid dynamics facilities such as shock tubes. Turbulence theory and modeling have been applied to RT and RM induced flows and developed into a quantitative description of turbulence from the onset to the asymptotic end-state. The treatment, based on a combined approach of theory, direct numerical simulation (DNS), and experimental data analysis, has broad generality. Three areas of progress will be reported. First, a robust, easy to apply criteria will be reported for the mixing transition in a time-dependent flow. This allows an assessment of whether flows, be they from supernova explosions or ICF experiments, should be mixed down to the molecular scale or not. Second, through DNS, the structure, scaling, and spectral evolution of the RT instability induced flow will be inspected. Finally, using these new physical insights, a two-scale, dynamic mix model has been developed that can be applied to simulations of ICF experiments and astrophysics situations alike

  13. Energy-1: a computer code for thermohydraulic analysis of a LMBFR rod bundles, in a mixed convection regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braz Filho, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    A code was set up in which velocity, temperature and pressure distributions are calculated, using the porous body model, for a rod bundle where mixed convection regime plays an important role. Results show satisfactory agreement with experimental data, as well as a reduction in computational time when compared to ENERGY-III code. (author) [pt

  14. Thermal and solutal stratification in mixed convection three-dimensional flow of an Oldroyd-B nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the double stratified effects in mixed convection three-dimensional flow of an Oldroyd-B nanofluid. The flow is due to a bidirectional stretching surface. Mathematical analysis is carried out using the temperature and concentration stratification effects. Brownian motion, thermophoresis and chemical reaction effects are also considered. The governing nonlinear boundary layer equations are first converted into the dimensionless ordinary differential equations and then solved for the convergent series solutions of velocity, temperature and nanoparticles concentration. Convergence analysis of the obtained series solutions is also checked and verified. Effects of various emerging parameters are studied in details. Numerical values of local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are tabulated and analyzed. It is noticed that the impact of mixed convection parameter on temperature and nanoparticles concentration is quite similar. Both temperature and nanoparticles concentration are reduced for larger mixed convection parameter. Keywords: Three-dimensional flow, Oldroyd-B fluid, Nanoparticles, Mixed convection, Thermal and solutal stratification, Chemically reactive species

  15. A conceptual framework to quantify the influence of convective boundary layer development on carbon dioxide mixing ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Peters, W.; Schröter, J.; van Heerwaarden, C. C.; Krol, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Interpretation of observed diurnal carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios near the surface requires knowledge of the local dynamics of the planetary boundary layer. In this paper, we study the relationship between the boundary layer dynamics and the CO2 budget in convective conditions through a newly

  16. Hybrid lattice Boltzmann finite difference simulation of mixed convection flows in a lid-driven square cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettaibi, Soufiene, E-mail: Bettaibisoufiene@gmail.com [UR: Rayonnement Thermique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Kuznik, Frédéric [INSA-Lyon, CETHIL, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Université de Lyon, CNRS, UMR5008, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Sediki, Ezeddine [UR: Rayonnement Thermique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • Mixed convection heat transfer in 2D lid-driven cavity is studied numerically. • Hybrid scheme with multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method is used to obtain the velocity field. • Finite difference method is used to compute the temperature. • Effect of both Richardson and Reynolds numbers for mixed convection is studied. - Abstract: Mixed convection heat transfer in two-dimensional lid-driven rectangular cavity filled with air (Pr=0.71) is studied numerically. A hybrid scheme with multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) is used to obtain the velocity field while the temperature field is deduced from energy balance equation by using the finite difference method (FDM). The main objective of this work is to investigate the model effectiveness for mixed convection flow simulation. Results are presented in terms of streamlines, isotherms and Nusselt numbers. Excellent agreement is obtained between our results and previous works. The different comparisons demonstrate the robustness and the accuracy of our proposed approach.

  17. The dispersal of phytoplankton populations by enhanced turbulent mixing in a shallow coastal sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jaimie; Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.; Hosegood, Philip J.; Torres, Ricardo

    2014-08-01

    A single tidal cycle survey in a Lagrangian reference frame was conducted in autumn 2010 to evaluate the impact of short-term, episodic and enhanced turbulent mixing on large chain-forming phytoplankton. Observations of turbulence using a free-falling microstructure profiler were undertaken, along with near-simultaneous profiles with an in-line digital holographic camera at station L4 (50° 15‧ N 4° 13‧ W, depth 50 m) in the Western English Channel. Profiles from each instrument were collected hourly whilst following a drogued drifter. Results from an ADCP attached to the drifter showed pronounced vertical shear, indicating that the water column structure consisted of two layers, restricting interpretation of the Lagrangian experiment to the upper ~ 25 m. Atmospheric conditions deteriorated during the mid-point of the survey, resulting in values of turbulent dissipation reaching a maximum of 10- 4 W kg- 1 toward the surface in the upper 10 m. Chain-forming phytoplankton > 200 μm were counted using the data from the holographic camera for the two periods, before and after the enhanced mixing event. As mixing increased phytoplankton underwent chain breakage, were dispersed by advection through their removal from the upper to lower layer and subjected to aggregation with other suspended material. Depth averaged counts of phytoplankton were reduced from a maximum of around 2050 L- 1 before the increased turbulence, to 1070 L- 1 after, with each of these mechanisms contributing to this reduction. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of phytoplantkon populations to moderate increases in turbulent activity, yielding consequences for accurate forecasting of the role played by phytoplankton in climate studies and also for the ecosystem in general in their role as primary producers.

  18. Role of stochasticity in turbulence and convective intermittent transport at the scrape off layer of Ohmic plasma in QUEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Ishiguro, M.; Tashima, S.; Mishra, K.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Nishino, N.; Liu, H. Q.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical features of fluctuations are investigated using the fast camera imaging technique in the scrape of layer (SOL) of electron cyclotron resonance heated Ohmic plasma. Fluctuations in the SOL towards low field side are dominated by coherent convective structures (blobs). Two dimensional structures of the higher order moments (skewness s and kurtosis k) representing the shape of probability density function (PDF) are studied. s and k are seen to be functions of the magnetic field lines. s and k are consistently higher towards the bottom half of the vessel in the SOL showing the blob trajectory along the field lines from the top towards bottom of the vessel. Parabolic relation (k=As 2 +C) is observed between s and k near the plasma boundary, featuring steep density gradient region and at the far SOL. The coefficient A, obtained experimentally, indicates a shift of prominence from pure drift-wave instabilities towards fully developed turbulence. Numerical coefficients characterizing the Pearson system are derived which demonstrates the progressive deviation of the PDF from Gaussian towards gamma from the density gradient region, towards the far SOL. Based on a simple stochastic differential equation, a direct correspondence between the multiplicative noise amplitude, increased intermittency, and hence change in PDF is discussed

  19. Dynamical and statistical phenomena of circulation and heat transfer in periodically forced rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterl, Sebastian; Li, Hui-Min; Zhong, Jin-Qiang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present results from an experimental study into turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection forced externally by periodically modulated unidirectional rotation rates. We find that the azimuthal rotation velocity θ ˙(t ) and thermal amplitude δ (t ) of the large-scale circulation (LSC) are modulated by the forcing, exhibiting a variety of dynamics including increasing phase delays and a resonant peak in the amplitude of θ ˙(t ) . We also focus on the influence of modulated rotation rates on the frequency of occurrence η of stochastic cessation or reorientation events, and on the interplay between such events and the periodically modulated response of θ ˙(t ) . Here we identify a mechanism by which η can be amplified by the modulated response, and these normally stochastic events can occur with high regularity. We provide a modeling framework that explains the observed amplitude and phase responses, and we extend this approach to make predictions for the occurrence of cessation events and the probability distributions of θ ˙(t ) and δ (t ) during different phases of a modulation cycle, based on an adiabatic approach that treats each phase separately. Last, we show that such periodic forcing has consequences beyond influencing LSC dynamics, by investigating how it can modify the heat transport even under conditions where the Ekman pumping effect is predominant and strong enhancement of heat transport occurs. We identify phase and amplitude responses of the heat transport, and we show how increased modulations influence the average Nusselt number.

  20. Under-Ice Phytoplankton Blooms Inhibited by Spring Convective Mixing in Refreezing Leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Kate E.; Pickart, Robert S.; Selz, Virginia; Mills, Matthew M.; Pacini, Astrid; Lewis, Kate M.; Joy-Warren, Hannah L.; Nobre, Carolina; van Dijken, Gert L.; Grondin, Pierre-Luc; Ferland, Joannie; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2018-01-01

    Spring phytoplankton growth in polar marine ecosystems is limited by light availability beneath ice-covered waters, particularly early in the season prior to snowmelt and melt pond formation. Leads of open water increase light transmission to the ice-covered ocean and are sites of air-sea exchange. We explore the role of leads in controlling phytoplankton bloom dynamics within the sea ice zone of the Arctic Ocean. Data are presented from spring measurements in the Chukchi Sea during the Study of Under-ice Blooms In the Chukchi Ecosystem (SUBICE) program in May and June 2014. We observed that fully consolidated sea ice supported modest under-ice blooms, while waters beneath sea ice with leads had significantly lower phytoplankton biomass, despite high nutrient availability. Through an analysis of hydrographic and biological properties, we attribute this counterintuitive finding to springtime convective mixing in refreezing leads of open water. Our results demonstrate that waters beneath loosely consolidated sea ice (84-95% ice concentration) had weak stratification and were frequently mixed below the critical depth (the depth at which depth-integrated production balances depth-integrated respiration). These findings are supported by theoretical model calculations of under-ice light, primary production, and critical depth at varied lead fractions. The model demonstrates that under-ice blooms can form even beneath snow-covered sea ice in the absence of mixing but not in more deeply mixed waters beneath sea ice with refreezing leads. Future estimates of primary production should account for these phytoplankton dynamics in ice-covered waters.

  1. Mixed convection heat transfer enhancement in a cubic lid-driven cavity containing a rotating cylinder through the introduction of artificial roughness on the heated wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareem, Ali Khaleel; Gao, Shian

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present numerical investigation is to comprehensively analyse and understand the heat transfer enhancement process using a roughened, heated bottom wall with two artificial rib types (R-s and R-c) due to unsteady mixed convection heat transfer in a 3D moving top wall enclosure that has a central rotating cylinder, and to compare these cases with the smooth bottom wall case. These different cases (roughened and smooth bottom walls) are considered at various clockwise and anticlockwise rotational speeds, -5 ≤ Ω ≤ 5, and Reynolds numbers of 5000 and 10 000. The top and bottom walls of the lid-driven cavity are differentially heated, whilst the remaining cavity walls are assumed to be stationary and adiabatic. A standard k-ɛ model for the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations is used to deal with the turbulent flow. The heat transfer improvement is carefully considered and analysed through the detailed examinations of the flow and thermal fields, the turbulent kinetic energy, the mean velocity profiles, the wall shear stresses, and the local and average Nusselt numbers. It has been concluded that artificial roughness can strongly affect the thermal fields and fluid flow patterns. Ultimately, the heat transfer rate has been dramatically increased by involving the introduced artificial rips. Increasing the cylinder rotational speed or Reynolds number can enhance the heat transfer process, especially when the wall roughness exists.

  2. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced flow, turbulence, and mixing. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye

    2017-12-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities play an important role in a wide range of engineering, geophysical, and astrophysical flows. They represent a triggering event that, in many cases, leads to large-scale turbulent mixing. Much effort has been expended over the past 140 years, beginning with the seminal work of Lord Rayleigh, to predict the evolution of the instabilities and of the instability-induced mixing layers. The objective of Part I of this review is to provide the basic properties of the flow, turbulence, and mixing induced by RT, RM, and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. Historical efforts to study these instabilities are briefly reviewed, and the significance of these instabilities is discussed for a variety of flows, particularly for astrophysical flows and for the case of inertial confinement fusion. Early experimental efforts are described, and analytical attempts to model the linear, and nonlinear regimes of these mixing layers are examined. These analytical efforts include models for both single-mode and multi-mode initial conditions, as well as multi-scale models to describe the evolution. Comparisons of these models and theories to experimental and simulation studies are then presented. Next, attention is paid to the issue of the influence of stabilizing mechanisms (e.g., viscosity, surface tension, and diffuse interface) on the evolution of these instabilities, as well as the limitations and successes of numerical methods. Efforts to study these instabilities and mixing layers using group-theoretic ideas, as well as more formal notions of turbulence cascade processes during the later stages of the induced mixing layers, are inspected. A key element of the review is the discussion of the late-time self-similar scaling for the RT and RM growth factors, α and θ. These parameters are influenced by the initial conditions and much of the observed variation can be explained by this. In some cases, these instabilities

  3. Comparative study of turbulent mixing in jet in cross-flow configurations using LES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, B.; Huai, Y.; Sadiki, A.

    2004-01-01

    Mixing processes in turbulent fluid motion are of fundamental interest in many situations in engineering practice. Due to its practical importance in a vast number of applications, the generic configuration of the jet in cross-flow has been studied extensively in the past. Recently, the question has received a lot of attention, whether the unsteady behavior of the jet in cross-flow can be influenced by either active or passive means in order to control and enhance the mixing process. In the present paper, we use the large eddy simulation (LES) methodology to investigate how turbulent mixing can be enhanced by varying the angle between the jet and the oncoming cross-flow. After validating the computations against measurements by Andreopoulos and Rodi, we analyze qualitatively and quantitatively the mixing process for three configurations with different angles. It is shown that the inclination influences the characteristics of vortical structures and secondary motion which in turn have an effect on the mixing process. Besides a PDF of the passive scalar and a scalar energy spectrum, a mixedness parameter is used to provide information with respect to the quality and rate of mixing

  4. Turbulent convective heat transfer of methane at supercritical pressure in a helical coiled tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Sun, Baokun; Lin, Wei; He, Fan; You, Yingqiang; Yu, Jiuyang

    2018-02-01

    The heat transfer of methane at supercritical pressure in a helically coiled tube was numerically investigated using the Reynolds Stress Model under constant wall temperature. The effects of mass flux ( G), inlet pressure ( P in) and buoyancy force on the heat transfer behaviors were discussed in detail. Results show that the light fluid with higher temperature appears near the inner wall of the helically coiled tube. When the bulk temperature is less than or approach to the pseudocritical temperature ( T pc ), the combined effects of buoyancy force and centrifugal force make heavy fluid with lower temperature appear near the outer-right of the helically coiled tube. Beyond the T pc , the heavy fluid with lower temperature moves from the outer-right region to the outer region owing to the centrifugal force. The buoyancy force caused by density variation, which can be characterized by Gr/ Re 2 and Gr/ Re 2.7, enhances the heat transfer coefficient ( h) when the bulk temperature is less than or near the T pc , and the h experiences oscillation due to the buoyancy force. The oscillation is reduced progressively with the increase of G. Moreover, h reaches its peak value near the T pc . Higher G could improve the heat transfer performance in the whole temperature range. The peak value of h depends on P in. A new correlation was proposed for methane at supercritical pressure convective heat transfer in the helical tube, which shows a good agreement with the present simulated results.

  5. Large eddy simulation of turbulent mixing in a T-junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Woo

    2010-12-01

    In this report, large eddy simulation was performed in order to further improve our understanding the physics of turbulent mixing in a T-junction, which is recently regarded as one of the most important problems in nuclear thermal-hydraulics safety. Large eddy simulation technique and the other numerical methods used in this study were presented in Sec. 2, and the numerical results obtained from large eddy simulation were described in Sec. 3. Finally, the summary was written in Sec. 4

  6. Preliminary experimentally-validated forced and mixed convection computational simulations of the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, Corey E.; Kimber, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Although computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been directly utilized to perform safety analyses of nuclear reactors in the United States, several vendors are considering adopting commercial numerical packages for current and future projects. To ensure the accuracy of these computational models, it is imperative to validate the assumptions and approximations built into commercial CFD codes against physical data from flows analogous to those in modern nuclear reactors. To this end, researchers at Utah State University (USU) have constructed the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel (RoBuT) test facility, which is designed to provide flow and thermal validation data for CFD simulations of forced and mixed convection scenarios. In order to evaluate the ability of current CFD codes to capture the complex physics associated with these types of flows, a computational model of the RoBuT test facility is created using the ANSYS Fluent commercial CFD code. The numerical RoBuT model is analyzed at identical conditions to several experimental trials undertaken at USU. Each experiment is reconstructed numerically and evaluated with the second-order Reynolds stress model (RSM). Two different thermal boundary conditions at the heated surface of the RoBuT test section are investigated: constant temperature (isothermal) and constant surface heat flux (isoflux). Additionally, the fluid velocity at the inlet of the test section is varied in an effort to modify the relative importance of natural convection heat transfer from the heated wall of the RoBuT. Mean velocity, both in the streamwise and transverse directions, as well as components of the Reynolds stress tensor at three points downstream of the RoBuT test section inlet are compared to results obtained from experimental trials. Early computational results obtained from this research initiative are in good agreement with experimental data obtained from the RoBuT facility and both the experimental data and numerical method can be used

  7. Special Features In Turbulent Mixing. Comparison between Periodic and Non Periodic Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Costescu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available After hundreds of years of stability study, the problems of flow kinematics are far from complete solving. A modern theory appears in this field: the mixing theory. Its mathematical methods and techniques developed the significant relation between turbulence and chaos. The turbulence is an important feature of dynamic systems with few freedom degrees, the so-called far from equilibrium systems. These are widespread between the models of excitable media.Studying a mixing for a flow implies the analysis of successive stretching and folding phenomena for its particles, the influence of parameters and initial conditions. In the previous works, the study of the 3D non-periodic models exhibited a quite complicated behavior, involving some significant events - the so-called rare events. The variation of parameters had a great influence on the length and surface deformations. The 2D (periodic case is simpler, but significant events can also issue for irrational values of the length and surface versors, as was the situation in 3D case.The comparison between 2D and 3D case revealed interesting properties; therefore a modified 2D (periodic model is tested. The numerical simulations were realized in MapleVI, for searching special mathematical events. Continuing this work both from analytical and numeric standpoint would relieve useful properties for the turbulent mixing. A proximal target is to test some special functions for the periodic model, and to study the behavior of the structures realized by the model.

  8. Numerical methods for the prediction of thermal fatigue due to turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannink, M.H.C.; Blom, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Thermal fatigue due to turbulent mixing is caused by moving temperature spots on the pipe wall. → Passing temperature spots cause temperature fluctuations of sinusoidal nature. → Input parameters for a sinusoidal model can be obtained by linking it with a coupled CFD-FEM model. → Overconservatism of the sinusoidal method can be reduced, having more knowledge on thermal loads. - Abstract: Turbulent mixing of hot and cold flows is one of the possible causes of thermal fatigue in piping systems. Especially in primary pipework of nuclear power plants this is an important, safety related issue. Since the frequencies of the involved temperature fluctuations are generally too high to be detected well by common plant instrumentation, accurate numerical simulations are indispensable for a proper fatigue assessment. In this paper, a link is made between two such numerical methods: a coupled CFD-FEM model and a sinusoidal model. By linking these methods, more insight is obtained in the physical phenomenon causing thermal fatigue due to turbulent mixing. Furthermore, useful knowledge is acquired on the determination of thermal loading parameters, essential for reducing overconservatism, as currently present in simplified fatigue assessment methods.

  9. Single-phase and two-phase gas-liquid turbulent mixing between subchannels in a simulated rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadatomi, Michio; Kawahara, Akimaro; Sato, Yoshifusa; Tomino, Takayoshi.

    1996-01-01

    This study is concerned with turbulent mixing which is one of the three mechanisms of cross flows between subchannels in a nuclear fuel rod bundle. The channel used in this experiments was a vertical simulated rod bundle having two subchannels connected through 1 to 3 gaps between two rods and/or rod and channel wall. The number of the gaps was changed to investigate the effect of the number on the turbulent mixing. Turbulent mixing rates of air and water and fluctuations of pressure difference between the subchannels were measured for single-phase and two-phase gas-liquid flows under hydrodynamic equilibrium flow conditions. It has been confirmed that the turbulent mixing rate is affected strongly by the fluctuations especially for liquid phase in two-phase slug or churn flow. (author)

  10. The roles of convection, extratropical mixing, and in-situ freeze-drying in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Read

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms for transporting and dehydrating air across the tropical tropopause layer (TTL are investigated with a conceptual two dimensional (2-D model. The 2-D TTL model combines the Holton and Gettelman cold trap dehydration mechanism (Holton and Gettelman, 2001 with the two column convection model of Folkins and Martin (2005. We investigate 3 possible transport scenarios through the TTL: 1 slow uniform ascent across the level of zero radiative heating without direct convective mixing, 2 convective mixing of H2O vapor at 100% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi with no ice retention, and 3 convective mixing of extremely subsaturated air (100% RHi following the moist adiabatic temperature above the level of neutral buoyancy with sufficient ice retention such that total H2O is 100%RHi. The three mechanisms produce similar seasonal cycles for H2O that are in good quantitative agreement with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS measurements. We use Aura MLS measurement of CO and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer measurement of HDO to distinguish among the transport mechanisms. Model comparisons with the observations support the view that H2O is predominantly controlled by regions having the lowest cold point tropopause temperature but the trace species CO and HDO support the convective mixing of dry air and lofted ice. The model provides some insight into the processes affecting the long term trends observed in stratospheric H2O.

  11. Numerical investigation on turbulent natural convection in partially connected cylindrical enclosures for analysing SFR safety under core meltdown scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Dijo K.; Mangarjuna Rao, P.; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    Under the unlikely event of severe core meltdown accident in pool type SFR, the molten core materials may rupture the grid plate which supports the fuel subassemblies and it can get relocated in to the lower pool. These debris may eventually settle on the debris collector (i.e., core catcher) installed above the bottom wall of the lower pool. The bed thus formed generates heat due to radioactive decay which has to be passively removed for maintaining the structural integrity of main vessel. By means of natural convection, the heat generated in the debris bed will be transferred to the top pool where the heat sink (i.e., Decay heat exchanger (DHX)) is installed. Heat transfer to the DHX (which is a part of safety grade decay heat removal system) can take place through the opening created in the grid plate which connects the two liquid pools (i.e., the top pool and the lower pool). Heat transfer can also take place through the lateral wall of the lower cylindrical pool to the side pool and eventually to the top pool, and thus to the DHX. This study numerically investigates the effectiveness of heat transfer between lower pool and top pool during PARR by considering them as partially connected cylindrical enclosures. The governing equations have been numerically solved using finite volume method in cylindrical co-ordinates using SIMPLE algorithm. Turbulence has been modeled using k-ω model and the model is validated against benchmark problems of natural convection found in literature. The effect of parameters such as the heat generation rate in the bed and the size of the grid plate opening are evaluated. Also PAHR in SFR pool is modeled using an axi-symmetric model to fund out the influence of grid plate opening on heat removal from core catcher. The results obtained are useful for improving the cooling capability of in-vessel tray type core catcher for handling the whole core meltdown scenarios in SFR. (author)

  12. Study on effects of turbulence promoter on fluid mixing in T-junction piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Akihiro; Hibara, Hideki; Ochi, Junji; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2004-07-01

    Flows in T-junction piping system with turbulence promoter have been investigated experimentally using flow visualization techniques (the dye injection method) and velocity measurement by LDV. Effects of turbulent promoter on characteristics of fluid mixing and thermal-striping phenomena are examined. From the experiment, following results are obtained. (1) Arch vortex is formed further than the case without promoter in the upstream station and is rapidly transported to the downstream direction. (2) Secondary flow induced in the cross section become stronger and the diffusion of axial momentum is promoted, as the height of turbulence promoter is higher. (3) Main flow deflects towards to the opposite side of branch pipe at the T-junction, as the height of turbulence promoter is higher, and as velocity ratio becomes smaller, and the flow continues to deflect to a considerably downstream station. (4) Velocity fluctuation is observed in the position where the vortex is formed, and it becomes a maximum at z/Dm=2. In the further downstream, velocity fluctuation decreases with the vortex breakdown, and it considerably remains to the downstream. (author)

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of Passive Scalar Mixing in Shock Turbulence Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiangyu; Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Larsson, Johan

    2017-11-01

    Passive scalar mixing in the canonical shock-turbulence interaction configuration is investigated through shock-capturing Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). Scalar fields with different Schmidt numbers are transported by an initially isotropic turbulent flow field passing across a nominally planar shock wave. A solution-adaptive hybrid numerical scheme on Cartesian structured grids is used, that combines a fifth-order WENO scheme near shocks and a sixth-order central-difference scheme away from shocks. The simulations target variations in the shock Mach number, M (from 1.5 to 3), turbulent Mach number, Mt (from 0.1 to 0.4, including wrinkled- and broken-shock regimes), and scalar Schmidt numbers, Sc (from 0.5 to 2), while keeping the Taylor microscale Reynolds number constant (Reλ 40). The effects on passive scalar statistics are investigated, including the streamwise evolution of scalar variance budgets, pdfs and spectra, in comparison with their temporal evolution in decaying isotropic turbulence.

  14. Logarithmic spatial variations and universal f-1 power spectra of temperature fluctuations in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaozhou; van Gils, Dennis P M; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Ahlers, Guenter

    2014-05-02

    We report measurements of the temperature variance σ(2)(z,r) and frequency power spectrum P(f,z,r) (z is the distance from the sample bottom and r the radial coordinate) in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) for Rayleigh numbers Ra = 1.6 × 10(13) and 1.1 × 10(15) and for a Prandtl number Pr ≃ 0.8 for a sample with a height L = 224 cm and aspect ratio D/L=0.50 (D is the diameter). For z/L ≲ 0.1 σ(2)(z,r) was consistent with a logarithmic dependence on z, and there was a universal (independent of Ra, r, and z) normalized spectrum which, for 0.02 ≲ fτ(0) ≲ 0.2, had the form P(fτ(0)) = P(0)(fτ(0))(-1) with P(0) = 0.208 ± 0.008 a universal constant. Here τ(0) = sqrt[2R] where R is the radius of curvature of the temperature autocorrelation function C(τ) at τ = 0. For z/L ≃ 0.5 the measurements yielded P(fτ(0))∼(fτ(0))(-α) with α in the range from 3/2 to 5/3. All the results are similar to those for velocity fluctuations in shear flows at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, suggesting the possibility of an analogy between the flows that is yet to be determined in detail.

  15. Scalar mixing in LES/PDF of a high-Ka premixed turbulent jet flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jiaping; Yang, Yue

    2016-11-01

    We report a large-eddy simulation (LES)/probability density function (PDF) study of a high-Ka premixed turbulent flame in the Lund University Piloted Jet (LUPJ) flame series, which has been investigated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiments. The target flame, featuring broadened preheat and reaction zones, is categorized into the broken reaction zone regime. In the present study, three widely used mixing modes, namely the Interaction by Exchange with the Mean (IEM), Modified Curl (MC), and Euclidean Minimum Spanning Tree (EMST) models are applied to assess their performance through detailed a posteriori comparisons with DNS. A dynamic model for the time scale of scalar mixing is formulated to describe the turbulent mixing of scalars at small scales. Better quantitative agreement for the mean temperature and mean mass fractions of major and minor species are obtained with the MC and EMST models than with the IEM model. The multi-scalar mixing in composition space with the three models are analyzed to assess the modeling of the conditional molecular diffusion term. In addition, we demonstrate that the product of OH and CH2O concentrations can be a good surrogate of the local heat release rate in this flame. This work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11521091 and 91541204).

  16. Turbulent mixed buoyancy driven flow and heat transfer in lid driven enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Sharma, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent mixed buoyancy driven flow and heat transfer of air in lid driven rectangular enclosure has been investigated for Grashof number in the range of 10 8 to 10 11 and for Richardson number 0.1, 1 and 10. Steady two dimensional Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes equations and conservation equations of mass and energy, coupled with the Boussinesq approximation, are solved. The spatial derivatives in the equations are discretized using the finite-element method. The SIMPLE algorithm is used to resolve pressure-velocity coupling. Turbulence is modeled with the k-ω closure model with physical boundary conditions along with the Boussinesq approximation, for the flow and heat transfer. The predicted results are validated against benchmark solutions reported in literature. The results include stream lines and temperature fields are presented to understand flow and heat transfer characteristics. There is a marked reduction in mean Nusselt number (about 58%) as the Richardson number increases from 0.1 to 10 for the case of Ra=10 10 signifying the effect of reduction of top lid velocity resulting in reduction of turbulent mixing. (author)

  17. Mixed convection of ferrofluids in a lid driven cavity with two rotating cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Selimefendigil

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mixed convection of ferrofluid filled lid driven cavity in the presence of two rotating cylinders were numerically investigated by using the finite element method. The cavity is heated from below, cooled from driven wall and rotating cylinder surfaces and side vertical walls of the cavity are assumed to be adiabatic. A magnetic dipole source is placed below the bottom wall of the cavity. The study is performed for various values of Reynolds numbers (100 ≤ Re ≤ 1000, angular rotational speed of the cylinders (−400 ≤ Ω ≤ 400, magnetic dipole strengths (0 ≤ γ ≤ 500, angular velocity ratios of the cylinders (0.25≤Ωi/Ωj≤4 and diameter ratios of the cylinders (0.5≤Di/Dj≤2. It is observed that flow patterns and thermal transport within the cavity are affected by variation in Reynolds number and magnetic dipole strength. The results of this investigation revealed that cylinder angular velocities, ratio of the angular velocities and diameter ratios have profound effect on heat transfer enhancement within the cavity. Averaged heat transfer enhancements of 181.5 % is achieved for clockwise rotation of the cylinder at Ω = −400 compared to motionless cylinder case. Increasing the angular velocity ratio from Ω2/Ω1=0.25 to Ω2/Ω1=4 brings about 91.7 % of heat transfer enhancement.

  18. Mixed Convection Flow of Magnetic Viscoelastic Polymer from a Nonisothermal Wedge with Biot Number Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abdul Gaffar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic polymers are finding increasing applications in diverse fields of chemical and mechanical engineering. In this paper, we investigate the nonlinear steady boundary layer flow and heat transfer of such fluids from a nonisothermal wedge. The incompressible Eyring-Powell non-Newtonian fluid model is employed and a magnetohydrodynamic body force is included in the simulation. The transformed conservation equations are solved numerically subject to physically appropriate boundary conditions using a second-order accurate implicit finite difference Keller Box technique. The numerical code is validated with previous studies. The influence of a number of emerging nondimensional parameters, namely, the Eyring-Powell rheological fluid parameter (ε, local non-Newtonian parameter based on length scale (δ, Prandtl number (Pr, Biot number (γ, pressure gradient parameter (m, magnetic parameter (M, mixed convection parameter (λ, and dimensionless tangential coordinate (ξ, on velocity and temperature evolution in the boundary layer regime is examined in detail. Furthermore, the effects of these parameters on surface heat transfer rate and local skin friction are also investigated.

  19. Modelling and experimental studies on a mixed-mode natural convection solar crop-dryer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forson, F.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana); Nazha, M.A.A.; Rajakaruna, H. [School of Engineering and Technology, De Montfort University, Queens Building, Leicester LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-15

    A mathematical model for drying agricultural products in a mixed-mode natural convection solar crop dryer (MNCSCD) using a single-pass double-duct solar air-heater (SPDDSAH) is presented. The model was developed in parallel with experimental work. The model comprises the air-heating process model, the drying model and the technical performance criteria model. The governing equations of the drying air temperature and humidity ratio; the material temperature and its moisture content; and performance criteria indicators are derived. The model requires the solution of a number of interrelated non-linear equations and a set of simultaneous differential equations. Results from experimental studies used for generating the required experimental data for validating the model are presented. Results of simulation runs using the model are presented and compared with the experimental data. It is shown that the model can predict the performance of the MNCSCD fairly accurately and therefore can be used as a design tool for prototype development. (author)

  20. Non-gray gas radiation effect on mixed convection in lid driven square cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherifi, Mohammed, E-mail: production1998@yahoo.fr; Benbrik, Abderrahmane, E-mail: abenbrik@umbb.dz; Laouar-Meftah, Siham, E-mail: laouarmeftah@gmail.com [M’Hamed Bougara University, Faculty of Hydrocarbons and Chemistry, 35000 Boumerdes (Algeria); Lemonnier, Denis, E-mail: denis.lemonnier@ensma.fr [Institut Pprime, CNRS, ENSMA, University of Poitiers, Poitiers Futuroscope (France)

    2016-06-02

    A numerical study is performed to investigate the effect of non-gray radiation on mixed convection in a vertical two sided lid driven square cavity filled with air-H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} gas mixture. The vertical moving walls of the enclosure are maintained at two different but uniform temperatures. The horizontal walls are thermally insulated and considered as adiabatic walls. The governing differential equations are solved by a finite-volume method and the SIMPLE algorithm was adopted to solve the pressure–velocity coupling. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is solved by the discrete ordinates method (DOM). The spectral line weighted sum of gray gases model (SLW) is used to account for non-gray radiation properties. Simulations are performed in configurations where thermal and shear forces induce cooperating buoyancy forces. Streamlines, isotherms, and Nusselt number are analyzed for three different values of Richardson’s number (from 0.1 to 10) and by considering three different medium (transparent medium, gray medium using the Planck mean absorption coefficient, and non-gray medium assumption).

  1. Mixed convection of magnetohydrodynamic nanofluids inside microtubes at constant wall temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshizi, S.A. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Neyshabur Branch, Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamani, M. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Gonabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gonabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, S.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Malvandi, A., E-mail: amirmalvandi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Neyshabur Branch, Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Laminar fully developed mixed convection of magnetohydrodynamic nanofluids inside microtubes at a constant wall temperature (CWT) under the effects of a variable directional magnetic field is investigated numerically. Nanoparticles are assumed to have slip velocities relative to the base fluid owing to thermophoretic diffusion (temperature gradient driven force) and Brownian diffusion (concentration gradient driven force). The no-slip boundary condition is avoided at the fluid-solid mixture to assess the non-equilibrium region at the fluid-solid interface. A scale analysis is performed to estimate the relative significance of the pertaining parameters that should be included in the governing equations. After the effects of pertinent parameters on the pressure loss and heat transfer enhancement were considered, the figure of merit (FoM) is employed to evaluate and optimize the thermal performance of heat exchange equipment. The results indicate the optimum thermal performance is obtained when the thermophoresis overwhelms the Brownian diffusion, which is for larger nanoparticles. This enhancement boosts when the buoyancy force increases. In addition, increasing the magnetic field strength and slippage at the fluid-solid interface enhances the thermal performance. - Highlights: • Thermally fully developed flow of nanofluid in circular microchannels at constant wall temperature. • Effect of nanoparticle migration on fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics. • Investigating the Figure of merit of thermal performance. • Performance of system grows when the thermophoresis overwhelms the Brownian diffusion.

  2. Mixed convection flow and heat transfer over different geometries of backward-facing step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BADER SHABEEB ALSHURAIAAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed convective flow and heat transfer characteristics for two-dimensional laminar flow in a channel with different geometries of a backward-facing step are presented for various Grashof numbers. The wall downstream of the step was maintained at a constant temperature; TH, while the upper wall was considered isothermal at TC. The wall upstream of the step and the backward-facing step were considered as adiabatic surfaces. Navier-Stokes equations were employed to represent the transport phenomena in the channel. Further, the governing equations were solved using a finite element formulation based on the Galerkin method of weighted residuals. The numerical results of the reattachement lengths for recirculation region in a vertical channel with a backward-facing step (Re = 100 were validated by comparing them against documented studies in the literature. The results of this investigation show that the local skin friction coefficient increases with an increase in Grashof numbers. The results of this investigation show that configuration II of the backward-facing step (inclined exhibited an absence of vortices for all values of Grashof numbers and consequently the minimum skin friction coefficient. However, configuration I is found to have the largest local skin friction coefficient.

  3. Effect of Induced Magnetic Field on MHD Mixed Convection Flow in Vertical Microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, B. K.; Aina, B.

    2017-08-01

    The present work presents a theoretical investigation of an MHD mixed convection flow in a vertical microchannel formed by two electrically non-conducting infinite vertical parallel plates. The influence of an induced magnetic field arising due to motion of an electrically conducting fluid is taken into consideration. The governing equations of the motion are a set of simultaneous ordinary differential equations and their exact solutions in dimensionless form have been obtained for the velocity field, the induced magnetic field and the temperature field. The expressions for the induced current density and skin friction have also been obtained. The effects of various non-dimensional parameters such as rarefaction, fluid wall interaction, the Hartmann number and the magnetic Prandtl number on the velocity, the induced magnetic field, the temperature, the induced current density, and skin friction have been presented in a graphical form. It is found that the effect of the Hartmann number and magnetic Prandtl number on the induced current density is found to have a decreasing nature at the central region of the microchannel.

  4. One-Dimensional Convective Thermal Evolution Calculation Using a Modified Mixing Length Theory: Application to Saturnian Icy Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Shunichi

    2018-01-01

    Solid-state thermal convection plays a major role in the thermal evolution of solid planetary bodies. Solving the equation system for thermal evolution considering convection requires 2-D or 3-D modeling, resulting in large calculation costs. A 1-D calculation scheme based on mixing length theory (MLT) requires a much lower calculation cost and is suitable for parameter studies. A major concern for the MLT scheme is its accuracy due to a lack of detailed comparisons with higher dimensional schemes. In this study, I quantify its accuracy via comparisons of thermal profiles obtained by 1-D MLT and 3-D numerical schemes. To improve the accuracy, I propose a new definition of the mixing length (l), which is a parameter controlling the efficiency of heat transportation due to convection, for a bottom-heated convective layer. Adopting this new definition of l, I investigate the thermal evolution of Saturnian icy satellites, Dione and Enceladus, under a wide variety of parameter conditions. Calculation results indicate that each satellite requires several tens of GW of heat to possess a thick global subsurface ocean suggested from geophysical analyses. Dynamical tides may be able to account for such an amount of heat, though the reference viscosity of Dione's ice and the ammonia content of Dione's ocean need to be very high. Otherwise, a thick global ocean in Dione cannot be maintained, implying that its shell is not in a minimum stress state.

  5. Convective and nonconvective rainfall partitioning over a mixed Sudanian Savanna Agriculture Catchment: Use of a distributed sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceperley, N. C.; Mande, T.; Barrenetxea, G.; Repetti, A.; Yacouba, H.; Tyler, S. W.; Parlange, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    A hydro-meteorological field campaign (joint EPFL-2iE) in a mixed agricultural and forest region in the southern Burkina Faso Savanna aims to identify and understand convective rainfall processes and the link to soil moisture. A simple slab Mixed Layer and Lifting Condensation Level model is implemented to separate convective and nonconvective rainfall. Data for this research were acquired during the 2010 rainy season using an array of wireless weather stations (SensorScope) as well as surface energy balance stations that based upon eddy correlation heat flux measurements. The precipitation was found to be variable over the basin with some 200 mm of difference in total seasonal rainfall between agricultural fields and savanna forest. Convective rainfall represents more than 30% of the total rainfall. The convective rainfall events are short (less than hour), intense (greater than 3 mm/minute) and occur both in the early morning and in the afternoons. These events can have an important impact on soil erosion, which we discuss in more detail along with seasonal stream-aquifer interactions.

  6. Numerical analysis of the turbulent natural convection in a solar chimney; Analise numerica da conveccao natural turbulenta em uma chamine solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasil, Cristiana S.; Valle, Ramon M.; Cortez, Marcio F.B.; Ferreira, Andre G. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: tite@demec.ufmg.br; ramon@demec.ufmg.br; fonteboa@demec.ufmg.br; ferreira@demec.ufmg.br

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the turbulent natural convection in a solar chimney operating in steady flow, with prescribed conditions of temperature in the ground. The solar radiation heats the air under the cover, which flows to the tower without artificial pumping. The hot air produced may be used to dry several agricultural products. The numerical analysis of the natural convection in this kind of dryer has fundamental importance on the design and building of this device. The mathematical model includes the conservation laws for mass, momentum and thermal energy and the transport equations for the turbulence model variables (k and e ). The k- e model of turbulence with wall functions was used. A computational code using the Finite Volume Method in Generalized Coordinates was developed to solve the system of equations that describes thermal and hydro dynamically the flow. The velocity and temperature fields are shown to the flow in the solar chimney. With geometrical alterations on the device, one can obtain a detailed description of the flow, which allow the guideline for a suitable configuration to build an experimental prototype. (author)

  7. Experimental study on the Reynolds number dependence of turbulent mixing in a rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, Nicolas; Juanico, Luis

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study for Reynolds number dependence of the turbulent mixing between fuel-bundle subchannels, was performed. The measurements were done on a triangular array bundle with a 1.20 pitch to diameter relation and 10 mm rod diameter, in a low-pressure water loop, at Reynolds numbers between 1.4 x 10 3 and 1.3 x 10 5 . The high accuracy of the results was obtained by improving a thermal tracing technique recently developed. The Reynolds exponent on the mixing rate correlation was obtained with two-digit accuracy for Reynolds numbers greater than 3 x 10 3 . It was also found a marked increase in the mixing rate for lower Reynolds numbers. The weak theoretical base of the accepted Reynolds dependence was pointed out in light of the later findings, as well as its ambiguous supporting experimental data. The present results also provide indirect information about dominant large scale flow pulsations at different flow regimes

  8. Superluminal travel, UV/IR mixing, and turbulence in a (1+1)-dimensional world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Gorbenko, Victor

    2011-01-01

    We study renormalizable Lorentz invariant stable quantum field theories in two space-time dimensions with instantaneous causal structure (causal ordering induced by the light 'cone' time ordering). These models provide a candidate UV completion of the two-dimensional ghost condensate. They exhibit a peculiar UV/IR mixing - energies of all excitations become arbitrarily small at high spatial momenta. We discuss several phenomena associated with this mixing. These include the impossibility to reach a thermal equilibrium and metastability of all excitations towards decay into short-wavelength modes resulting in an indefinite turbulent cascade. In spite of the UV/IR mixing in many cases the UV physics can still be decoupled from low-energy phenomena. However, a patient observer in the Lineland is able to produce arbitrarily heavy particles simply by waiting for a long enough time.

  9. Mixed convection boundary-layer flow from a horizontal circular cylinder with a constant surface heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazar, R.; Amin, N. [Department of Mathematics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Pop, I. [Faculty of Mathematics, University of Cluj, R-3400 Cluj, CP 253 (Romania)

    2004-02-01

    The laminar mixed convection boundary-layer flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid past a horizontal circular cylinder, which is maintained at a constant heat flux and is placed in a stream flowing vertically upward has been theoretically studied in this paper. The solutions for the flow and heat transfer characteristics are evaluated numerically for different values of the mixed convection parameter {lambda} with the Prandtl number Pr = 1 and 7, respectively. It is found, as for the case of a heated or cooled cylinder, considered by Merkin [5], that assisting flow delays separation of the boundary-layer and can, if the assisting flow is strong enough, suppress it completely. The opposing flow, on the other side, brings the separation point nearer to the lower stagnation point and for sufficiently strong opposing flows there will not be a boundary-layer on the cylinder. (orig.)

  10. MHD mixed convection flow and heat transfer in an open C-shaped enclosure using water-copper oxide nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaghani, T.; Esmaeili, H.; Mohammadpoor, Y. A.; Pop, I.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the steady mixed convection flow and heat transfer of water-copper oxide nanofluid in an open C-shaped enclosure is investigated numerically. The enclosure is under constant magnetic field. Effects of Richardson number, magnetic and nanofluid volume fraction parameters are studied and discussed. The nanofluid with a cold temperature of T C and a velocity of u c enters the enclosure from the top right corner and exits from the bottom right corner. The vertical wall of the left side is subjected to a hot and constant temperature T h . Also, other walls are insulated. It is found that the heat transfer is increased via increasing the Hartmann and Reynolds numbers. For low Reynolds numbers, the enhances of the Hartman number leads to a slightly increases of the average Nusselt number, but for high Reynolds numbers, the average Nusselt number gets an ascending trend and the increase in the Hartmann number shows its effect more pronounced. Also, with increase in Ri, the effect of nanofluid on the heat transfer increases. Due to practical impotence, the study of mixed convection heat transfer in enclosures and various shaped of cavities has attracted remarkable attentions in the past few decades. Significant applications of the mixed convection flow can be found in atmospheric flows, solar energy storage, heat exchangers, lubrication technology, drying technologies, cooling of the electronic devices, etc. The present results are original and new for the problem of MHD mixed convection flow and heat transfer in an open C-shaped enclosure using water-copper oxide nanofluid. Comparison of the obtained results with those from the open literature (Mahmoodi et al. [24]) is acceptable.

  11. The effect of heat generation on mixed convection flow in nano fluids over a horizontal circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliyanto, Bagus; Widodo, Basuki; Imron, Chairul

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the effect of heat generation on mixed convection flow on Nano fluids over a horizontal circular cylinder of a heated in two dimension form. A stream of fluids are steady and incompressible, a stream flowing vertically upwards for circular cylinder and the boundary layer at the stagnation point. Three different types of nanoparticles considered are Cu, Al2O3, and TiO2. Mixed convection flow in Nano fluids on the surface of a circular cylinder will cause the boundary layer. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into a non-dimensional form, and then the non-dimensional forms are transformed into a similar boundary equations by using stream function. Furthermore, an implicit finite-difference scheme known as the Keller-box method is applied to solve numerically the resulting similar boundary layer equations. The result of the research by varying the non-dimensional parameters are mixed convection, Prandtl number, nanoparticle volume fraction, heat generation, and radius of a cylinder are as follows. First, the velocity profile increase and temperature profile decrease when mixed convection parameter increase. Second, the velocity and temperature profiles decrease when Prandtl number parameter increase. Third, the velocity profile with the variation of nanoparticle volume fraction (χ) is increased when the value of χ is 0,1 ≤ χ ≤ 0,15 and the velocity profile decreases when the value of χ is 0,19 ≤ χ ≤ 0,5 while the temperature profile is increasing when the value of χ is 0,1 ≤ χ ≤ 0,5. Fourth, the velocity and temperature profiles increase when heat generation and the radius of the cylinder increase. The last, Cu, Al 2 O 3, and TiO 2 nanoparticles produce the same velocity and temperature profiles, but the three types of nanoparticles are different at the velocity and temperature values.

  12. Two-equation and multi-fluid turbulence models for Rayleigh–Taylor mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokkinakis, I.W.; Drikakis, D.; Youngs, D.L.; Williams, R.J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a new improved version of the K–L model. • The improved K–L is found in good agreement with the multi-fluid model and ILES. • The study concerns Rayleigh–Taylor flows at initial density ratios 3:1 and 20:1. - Abstract: This paper presents a new, improved version of the K–L model, as well as a detailed investigation of K–L and multi-fluid models with reference to high-resolution implicit large eddy simulations of compressible Rayleigh–Taylor mixing. The accuracy of the models is examined for different interface pressures and specific heat ratios for Rayleigh–Taylor flows at initial density ratios 3:1 and 20:1. It is shown that the original version of the K–L model requires modifications in order to provide comparable results to the multi-fluid model. The modifications concern the addition of an enthalpy diffusion term to the energy equation; the formulation of the turbulent kinetic energy (source) term in the K equation; and the calculation of the local Atwood number. The proposed modifications significantly improve the results of the K–L model, which are found in good agreement with the multi-fluid model and implicit large eddy simulations with respect to the self-similar mixing width; peak turbulent kinetic energy growth rate, as well as volume fraction and turbulent kinetic energy profiles. However, a key advantage of the two-fluid model is that it can represent the degree of molecular mixing in a direct way, by transferring mass between the two phases. The limitations of the single-fluid K–L model as well as the merits of more advanced Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes models are also discussed throughout the paper.

  13. Characterising the structure of quasi-periodic mixing events in stratified turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwar Nain; Partridge, Jamie; Dalziel, Stuart; Caulfield, C. P.; Mathematical Underpinnings of Stratified Turbulence (MUST) Team

    2017-11-01

    We present results from experiments conducted to study mixing in a two-layer stably-stratified turbulent Taylor-Couette flow. It has previously been observed that there is a quasi-periodic mixing event located at the interface separating the layers. We observe, through conductivity probe measurements, that the power of the mixing event in the frequency spectrum of the density data at the interface is higher when measured near the inner cylinder than in the middle of the annular gap. This is consistent with Oglethorpe's (2014) hypothesis that the mixing structure is triggered near the inner cylinder, and then advects and decays or disperses radially. We also observe that at Ri =g/'Ro (RiΩi)2 7 , where Ri, Ro are the inner and outer cylinder radius, respectively, g ' the reduced gravity characterising the density jump between the layers and Ωi is the rotation rate of the inner cylinder, the power drops significantly at all radial locations, which is reminiscent of the onset of the enhanced flux regime as observed by Oglethorpe et al. (2013). We perform experiments to characterise the spatial extent and dynamics of this mixing structure using particle image velocimetry (PIV) giving further insights into this important mixing process. EPSRC programme Grant EP/K034529/1 & SGPC-CCT Scholarship.

  14. PIV measurement of turbulent bubbly mixing layer flow with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, T; Guo, F; Chen, B; Zhang, X

    2009-01-01

    Based on experimental investigation of single-phase turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives, bubbly mixing layer was experimentally investigated by PIV. The velocity ratio between high and low speed is 4:1 and the Reynolds number based on the velocity difference of two steams and hydraulic diameter of the channel ranges is 73333. Gas bubbles with about 0.5% gas fraction were injected into pure water mixing layer with/without polymer additives from three different parts at the end of the splitter plate. The comparison between single phase and bubbly mixing layer shows clearly that the dynamic development of mixing layer is great influenced by the bubble injection. Similar with single phase, the Reynolds stress and vorticity still concentrate in a coniform area of central mixing flow field part and the width will increase with increasing the Reynolds number. Mean Reynolds stress will decrease with bubble injection in high Reynolds numbers and the decreasing of Reynolds stress with polymer additives is much more than pure water case.

  15. On ternary species mixing and combustion in isotropic turbulence at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Hong; Miller, Richard S.

    2004-05-01

    Effects of Soret and Dufour cross-diffusion, whereby both concentration and thermal diffusion occur in the presence of mass fraction, temperature, and pressure gradients, are investigated in the context of both binary and ternary species mixing and combustion in isotropic turbulence at large pressure. The compressible flow formulation is based on a cubic real-gas state equation, and includes generalized forms for heat and mass diffusion derived from nonequilibrium thermodynamics and fluctuation theory. A previously derived formulation of the generalized binary species heat and mass fluxes is first extended to the case of ternary species, and appropriate treatment of the thermal and mass diffusion factors is described. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are then conducted for both binary and ternary species mixing and combustion in stationary isotropic turbulence. Mean flow temperatures and pressures of =700 K and =45 atm are considered to ensure that all species mixtures remain in the supercritical state such that phase changes do not occur. DNS of ternary species systems undergoing both pure mixing and a simple chemical reaction of the form O2+N2→2NO are then conducted. It is shown that stationary scalar states previously observed for binary mixing persist for the ternary species problem as well; however, the production and magnitude of the scalar variance is found to be altered for the intermediate molecular weight species as compared to the binary species case. The intermediate molecular weight species produces a substantially smaller scalar variance than the remaining species for all flows considered. For combustion of nonstoichiometric mixtures, a binary species mixture, characterized by stationary scalar states, results at long times after the lean reactant is depleted. The form of this final scalar distribution is observed to be similar to that found in the binary flow situation. A series of lower resolution simulations for a variety of species is then

  16. Turbulent mixing and wave radiation in non-Boussinesq internal bores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borden, Zac; Koblitz, Tilman; Meiburg, Eckart

    2012-01-01

    Bores, or hydraulic jumps, appear in many natural settings and are useful in many industrial applications. If the densities of the two fluids between which a bore propagates are very different (i.e., water and air), the less dense fluid can be neglected when modeling a bore analytically-a single...... ratio, defined as the ratio of the density of the lighter fluid to the heavier fluid, is greater than approximately one half. For smaller density ratios, undular waves generated at the bore's front dominate over the effects of turbulent mixing, and the expanding layer loses energy across the bore. Based...

  17. Mixing by rotary jet heads: Indications of the benefits of head rotation under turbulent and transitional flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Mikkel; Vognsen, Marie; Nienow, Alfred W.

    2008-01-01

    Mixing times were obtained by the iodine-thiosulphate decolorization technique using rotary jet heads (RJH) for mixing in a Perspex tank with an inner diameter of 0.75 m and an aspect ratio of 2.5 using both water (turbulent flow) and shear-thinning, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) solutions...

  18. Rayleigh- and Prandtl-number dependence of the large-scale flow-structure in weakly-rotating turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent thermal convection under rotation shows a remarkable variety of different flow states. The Nusselt number (Nu) at slow rotation rates (expressed as the dimensionless inverse Rossby number 1/Ro), for example, is not a monotonic function of 1/Ro. Different 1/Ro-ranges can be observed with different slopes ∂Nu / ∂ (1 / Ro) . Some of these ranges are connected by sharp transitions where ∂Nu / ∂ (1 / Ro) changes discontinuously. We investigate different regimes in cylindrical samples of aspect ratio Γ = 1 by measuring temperatures at the sidewall of the sample for various Prandtl numbers in the range 3 Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  19. Turbulent natural convection in a differentially heated cavity of aspect ratio 5 filled with non-participating and participating grey media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevila, R; Trias, F X; Perez-Segarra, C D [Centre Tecnologic de Transferencia de Calor (CTTC), Lab.Termotecnia i Energetica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), C/Colom, 11, E08222 Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain); Lehmkuhl, O; Colomer, G, E-mail: cttc@cttc.upc.edu, E-mail: termofluids@termofluids.com [Termofluids, S. L., Magi Colet 8, E08204 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-12-22

    In the present work, turbulent natural convection in a tall differentially heated cavity of aspect ratio 5:1, filled with air (Pr = 0.7) under a Rayleigh number based on the height of 4.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 10}, is studied numerically. Two different situations have been analysed. In the first one, the cavity is filled with a transparent medium. In the second one, the cavity contains a grey participating gas. The turbulent flow is described by means of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using symmetry-preserving discretizations. Simulations are compared with experimental data available in the literature and with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). Surface and gas radiation have been simulated using the Discrete Ordinates Method (DOM). The influence of radiation on fluid flow behaviour has also been analysed.

  20. Study of turbulent natural convection in a tall differentially heated cavity filled with either non-participating, participating grey and participating semigrey media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, R; Perez-Segarra, C D; Lehmkuhl, O; Colomer, G

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent natural convection in a tall differentially heated cavity of aspect ratio 5:1, filled with air under a Rayleigh number based on the height of 4.5·10 10 is studied numerically. Three different situations have been analysed. In the first one, the cavity is filled with a transparent medium. In the second one, the cavity is filled with a semigrey participating mixture of air and water vapour. In the last one the cavity contains a grey participating gas. The turbulent flow is described by means of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using symmetry-preserving discretizations. Simulations are compared with experimental data available in the literature and with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). Surface and gas radiation have been simulated using the Discrete Ordinates Method (DOM). The influence of radiation on fluid flow behaviour has been analysed.

  1. Turbulent natural convection in a differentially heated cavity of aspect ratio 5 filled with non-participating and participating grey media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, R; Trias, F X; Pérez-Segarra, C D; Lehmkuhl, O; Colomer, G

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, turbulent natural convection in a tall differentially heated cavity of aspect ratio 5:1, filled with air (Pr = 0.7) under a Rayleigh number based on the height of 4.5 · 10 10 , is studied numerically. Two different situations have been analysed. In the first one, the cavity is filled with a transparent medium. In the second one, the cavity contains a grey participating gas. The turbulent flow is described by means of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using symmetry-preserving discretizations. Simulations are compared with experimental data available in the literature and with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). Surface and gas radiation have been simulated using the Discrete Ordinates Method (DOM). The influence of radiation on fluid flow behaviour has also been analysed.

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of Entropy Generation in a Turbulent Mixing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Reza H.; Safari, Mehdi; Hadi, Fatemeh

    2013-11-01

    Entropy transport equation is considered in large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows. The irreversible entropy generation in this equation provides a more general description of subgrid scale (SGS) dissipation due to heat conduction, mass diffusion and viscosity effects. A new methodology is developed, termed the entropy filtered density function (En-FDF), to account for all individual entropy generation effects in turbulent flows. The En-FDF represents the joint probability density function of entropy, frequency, velocity and scalar fields within the SGS. An exact transport equation is developed for the En-FDF, which is modeled by a system of stochastic differential equations, incorporating the second law of thermodynamics. The modeled En-FDF transport equation is solved by a Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. The methodology is employed to simulate a turbulent mixing layer involving transport of passive scalars and entropy. Various modes of entropy generation are obtained from the En-FDF and analyzed. Predictions are assessed against data generated by direct numerical simulation (DNS). The En-FDF predictions are in good agreements with the DNS data.

  3. Modelling turbulent vertical mixing sensitivity using a 1-D version of NEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reffray, G.; Bourdalle-Badie, R.; Calone, C.

    2015-01-01

    Through two numerical experiments, a 1-D vertical model called NEMO1D was used to investigate physical and numerical turbulent-mixing behaviour. The results show that all the turbulent closures tested (k+l from Blanke and Delecluse, 1993, and two equation models: generic length scale closures from Umlauf and Burchard, 2003) are able to correctly reproduce the classical test of Kato and Phillips (1969) under favourable numerical conditions while some solutions may diverge depending on the degradation of the spatial and time discretization. The performances of turbulence models were then compared with data measured over a 1-year period (mid-2010 to mid-2011) at the PAPA station, located in the North Pacific Ocean. The modelled temperature and salinity were in good agreement with the observations, with a maximum temperature error between -2 and 2 °C during the stratified period (June to October). However, the results also depend on the numerical conditions. The vertical RMSE varied, for different turbulent closures, from 0.1 to 0.3 °C during the stratified period and from 0.03 to 0.15 °C during the homogeneous period. This 1-D configuration at the PAPA station (called PAPA1D) is now available in NEMO as a reference configuration including the input files and atmospheric forcing set described in this paper. Thus, all the results described can be recovered by downloading and launching PAPA1D. The configuration is described on the NEMO site (PAPA">http://www.nemo-ocean.eu/Using-NEMO/Configurations/C1D_PAPA). This package is a good starting point for further investigation of vertical processes.

  4. Mixed convective heat transfer from a vertical plate embedded in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Melting effect with heat and mass transfer in porous media has much ... convection boundary layer flow about a vertical surface embedded in a porous medium, ..... Salama A 2008 Combined effect of thermal dispersion and radiation on free.

  5. Tropical cyclone turbulent mixing as observed by autonomous oceanic profilers with the high repetition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranowski, D B; Malinowski, S P; Flatau, P J

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the ocean mixed layer caused by passage of two consecutive typhoons in the Western Pacific are presented. Ocean profiles were measured by a unique Argo float sampling the upper ocean in high repetition cycle with a period of about one day. It is shown that the typhoon passage coincides with cooling of the mixed layer and variations of its salinity. Independent data from satellite measurements of surface winds were used to set-up an and idealized numerical simulation of mixed layer evolution. Results, compared to Argo profiles, confirm known effect that cooling is a result of increased entrainment from the thermocline due to enhancement of turbulence in the upper ocean by the wind stress. Observed pattern of salinity changes in the mixed layer suggest important role of typhoon precipitation. Fast changes of the mixed layer in course of typhoon passage show that fast profiling (at least once a day) is crucial to study response of the upper ocean to tropical cyclone.

  6. Preliminary investigation of turbulent reactive mixing in PCRV/CV gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccio, J.L.

    1978-08-01

    Relaxation of the prima facie assumption of complete mixing of primary containment and secondary containment gases during postulated depressurization accidents within gas cooled reactors has led to a study program designed to identify and selectively quantify the relevant gas dynamic processes which are manifest during the depressurization event. Uncertainty in the degree of gas mixedness naturally leads to uncertainty in containment vessel design pressure and heat loads and possible combustion hazards therein. This report details an analytical approach in the modeling of the exhaust-jet structure during a penetration failure. A chemical kinetics model is also described for the possibility of examining diffusive flame structure assuming the exhaust jet is composed of combustibles as well. The salient features of the mixing model and associated reaction kinetics are embodied in the classical problem of a turbulent, chemically reacting jet exhausting into a stationary ambient atmosphere capable of supporting combustion. A so-called ''two equation'' turbulence model is linked to a chemical kinetics code describing the production of CO 2 and H 2 O with He and N 2 considered as inert diluents. The usefulness of the model is exemplified by experimental/numerical comparisons presented in the open literature and within this report. The need for such a calculational tool in HTGR safety research is stressed as well

  7. Coherent fine scale eddies in turbulence transition of spatially-developing mixing layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Tanahashi, M.; Miyauchi, T.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between characteristics of the coherent fine scale eddy and a laminar-turbulent transition, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a spatially-developing turbulent mixing layer with Re ω,0 = 700 was conducted. On the onset of the transition, strong coherent fine scale eddies appears in the mixing layer. The most expected value of maximum azimuthal velocity of the eddy is 2.0 times Kolmogorov velocity (u k ), and decreases to 1.2u k , which is an asymptotic value in the fully-developed state, through the transition. The energy dissipation rate around the eddy is twice as high compared with that in the fully-developed state. However, the most expected diameter and eigenvalues ratio of strain rate acting on the coherent fine scale eddy are maintained to be 8 times Kolmogorov length (η) and α:β:γ = -5:1:4 in the transition process. In addition to Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers, rib structures do not disappear in the transition process and are composed of lots of coherent fine scale eddies in the fully-developed state instead of a single eddy observed in early stage of the transition or in laminar flow

  8. R-HPDC Process with Forced Convection Mixing Device for Automotive Part of A380 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The continuing quest for cost-effective and complex shaped aluminum castings with fewer defects for applications in the automotive industries has aroused the interest in rheological high pressure die casting (R-HPDC. A new machine, forced convection mixing (FCM device, based on the mechanical stirring and convection mixing theory for the preparation of semisolid slurry in convenience and functionality was proposed to produce the automotive shock absorber part by R-HPDC process. The effect of barrel temperature and rotational speed of the device on the grain size and morphology of semi-solid slurry were extensively studied. In addition, flow behavior and temperature field of the melt in the FCM process was investigated combining computational fluid dynamics simulation. The results indicate that the microstructure and pore defects at different locations of R-HPDC casting have been greatly improved. The vigorous fluid convection in FCM process has changed the temperature field and composition distribution of conventional solidification. Appropriately increasing the rotational speed can lead to a uniform temperature filed sooner. The lower barrel temperature leads to a larger uniform degree of supercooling of the melt that benefits the promotion of nucleation rate. Both of them contribute to the decrease of the grain size and the roundness of grain morphology.

  9. Mixed convection and stratification phenomena in a heavy liquid metal pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarantino, Mariano, E-mail: mariano.tarantino@enea.it [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, C.R. ENEA Brasimone (Italy); Martelli, Daniele; Barone, Gianluca [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Industriale, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino, 1-56100 Pisa Italy (Italy); Di Piazza, Ivan [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, C.R. ENEA Brasimone (Italy); Forgione, Nicola [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Industriale, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino, 1-56100 Pisa Italy (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Results related to experiments reproducing PLOHS + LOF accident in CIRCE pool facility. • Vertical thermal stratification in large HLM pool. • Transition from forced to natural circulation in HLM pool under DHR conditions. • Heat transfer coefficient measurement in HLM pin bundle. • Nusselt numbers calculations and comparison with correlations. - Abstract: This work deals with an analysis of the first experimental series of tests performed to investigate mixed convection and stratification phenomena in CIRCE HLM large pool. In particular, the tests concern the transition from nominal flow to natural circulation regime, typical of decay heat removal (DHR) regime. To this purpose the CIRCE pool facility has been updated to host a suitable test section in order to reproduce the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of a HLM pool-type reactor. The test section basically consists of an electrical bundle (FPS) made up of 37 pins arranged in a hexagonal wrapped lattice with a pitch diameter ratio of 1.8. Along the FPS active length, three sections were instrumented to monitor the heat transfer coefficient along the bundle as well as the cladding temperatures at different ranks of the sub-channels. This paper reports the experimental data as well as a preliminary analysis and discussion of the results, focusing on the most relevant tests of the campaign, namely Test I (48 h) and Test II (97 h). Temperatures along three sections of the FPS and at inlet and outlet sections of the main components were reported and the Nusselt number in the FPS sub-channels was investigated together with the void fraction in the riser. Concerning the investigation of in-pool thermal stratification phenomena, the temperatures in the whole LBE pool were monitored at different elevations and radial locations. The analysis of experimental data obtained from Tests I and II underline the occurrence of thermal stratification phenomena in the region placed between the outlet sections of

  10. Quasi-Geostrophic Diagnosis of Mixed-Layer Dynamics Embedded in a Mesoscale Turbulent Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanne, C. P.; Klein, P.

    2016-02-01

    A new quasi-geostrophic model has been developed to diagnose the three-dimensional circulation, including the vertical velocity, in the upper ocean from high-resolution observations of sea surface height and buoyancy. The formulation for the adiabatic component departs from the classical surface quasi-geostrophic framework considered before since it takes into account the stratification within the surface mixed-layer that is usually much weaker than that in the ocean interior. To achieve this, the model approximates the ocean with two constant-stratification layers : a finite-thickness surface layer (or the mixed-layer) and an infinitely-deep interior layer. It is shown that the leading-order adiabatic circulation is entirely determined if both the surface streamfunction and buoyancy anomalies are considered. The surface layer further includes a diabatic dynamical contribution. Parameterization of diabatic vertical velocities is based on their restoring impacts of the thermal-wind balance that is perturbed by turbulent vertical mixing of momentum and buoyancy. The model skill in reproducing the three-dimensional circulation in the upper ocean from surface data is checked against the output of a high-resolution primitive-equation numerical simulation. Correlation between simulated and diagnosed vertical velocities are significantly improved in the mixed-layer for the new model compared to the classical surface quasi-geostrophic model, reaching 0.9 near the surface.

  11. Numerical simulation of a plane turbulent mixing layer, with applications to isothermal, rapid reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P.; Pratt, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for the numerical prediction of turbulent mixing in a spatially-developing, free shear layer. Most significantly, the computation incorporates the effects of large-scale structures, Schmidt number and Reynolds number on mixing, which have been overlooked in the past. In flow field prediction, large-eddy simulation was conducted by a modified 2-D vortex method with subgrid-scale modeling. The predicted mean velocities, shear layer growth rates, Reynolds stresses, and the RMS of longitudinal velocity fluctuations were found to be in good agreement with experiments, although the lateral velocity fluctuations were overpredicted. In scalar transport, the Monte Carlo method was extended to the simulation of the time-dependent pdf transport equation. For the first time, the mixing frequency in Curl's coalescence/dispersion model was estimated by using Broadwell and Breidenthal's theory of micromixing, which involves Schmidt number, Reynolds number and the local vorticity. Numerical tests were performed for a gaseous case and an aqueous case. Evidence that pure freestream fluids are entrained into the layer by large-scale motions was found in the predicted pdf. Mean concentration profiles were found to be insensitive to Schmidt number, while the unmixedness was higher for higher Schmidt number. Applications were made to mixing layers with isothermal, fast reactions. The predicted difference in product thickness of the two cases was in reasonable quantitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  12. Time resolved flow-field measurements of a turbulent mixing layer over a rectangular cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Shiyao; Driscoll, James F.; Elbing, Brian R.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2011-07-01

    High Reynolds number, low Mach number, turbulent shear flow past a rectangular, shallow cavity has been experimentally investigated with the use of dual-camera cinematographic particle image velocimetry (CPIV). The CPIV had a 3 kHz sampling rate, which was sufficient to monitor the time evolution of large-scale vortices as they formed, evolved downstream and impinged on the downstream cavity wall. The time-averaged flow properties (velocity and vorticity fields, streamwise velocity profiles and momentum and vorticity thickness) were in agreement with previous cavity flow studies under similar operating conditions. The time-resolved results show that the separated shear layer quickly rolled-up and formed eddies immediately downstream of the separation point. The vortices convect downstream at approximately half the free-stream speed. Vorticity strength intermittency as the structures approach the downstream edge suggests an increase in the three-dimensionality of the flow. Time-resolved correlations reveal that the in-plane coherence of the vortices decays within 2-3 structure diameters, and quasi-periodic flow features are present with a vortex passage frequency of ~1 kHz. The power spectra of the vertical velocity fluctuations within the shear layer revealed a peak at a non-dimensional frequency corresponding to that predicted using linear, inviscid instability theory.

  13. Resolving the stratification discrepancy of turbulent natural convection in differentially heated air-filled cavities. Part III: A full convection–conduction–surface radiation coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin, Shihe; Salat, Jacques; Joubert, Patrice; Sergent, Anne; Penot, François; Quéré, Patrick Le

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Turbulent natural convection is studied numerically and experimentally. ► DNS of full conduction–convection–radiation coupling is performed. ► Spectral methods are combined with domain decomposition. ► Considering surface radiation improves strongly numerical results. ► Surface radiation is responsible for the weak stratification. -- Abstract: The present study concerns an air-filled differentially heated cavity of 1 m × 0.32 m × 1 m (width × depth × height) subject to a temperature difference of 15 K and is motivated by the need to understand the persistent discrepancy observed between numerical and experimental results on thermal stratification in the cavity core. An improved experiment with enhanced metrology was set up and experimental data have been obtained along with the characteristics of the surfaces and materials used. Experimental temperature distributions on the passive walls have been introduced in numerical simulations in order to provide a faithful prediction of experimental data. By means of DNS using spectral methods, heat conduction in the insulating material is first coupled with natural convection in the cavity. As heat conduction influences only the temperature distribution on the top and bottom surfaces and in the near wall regions, surface radiation is added to the coupling of natural convection with heat conduction. The temperature distribution in the cavity is strongly affected by the polycarbonate front and rear walls of the cavity, which are almost black surfaces for low temperature radiation, and also other low emissivity walls. The thermal stratification is considerably weakened by surface radiation. Good agreement between numerical simulations and experiments is observed on both time-averaged fields and turbulent statistics. Treating the full conduction–convection–radiation coupling allowed to confirm that experimental wall temperatures resulted from the coupled phenomena and this is another way to

  14. Spatial distribution of turbulent mixing in the upper ocean of the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-D. Shang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of the dissipation rate (ε and diapycnal diffusivity (κ in the upper ocean of the South China Sea (SCS is presented from a measurement program conducted from 26 April to 23 May 2010. In the vertical distribution, the dissipation rates below the surface mixed layer were predominantly high in the thermocline where shear and stratification were strong. In the regional distribution, high dissipation rates and diapycnal diffusivities were observed in the region to the west of the Luzon Strait, with an average dissipation rate and diapycnal diffusivity of 8.3  ×  10−9 W kg−1 and 2.7  ×  10−5 m2 s−1, respectively, almost 1 order of magnitude higher than those in the central and southern SCS. In the region to the west of the Luzon Strait, the water column was characterized by strong shear and weak stratification. Elevated dissipation rates (ε > 10−7 W kg−1 and diapycnal diffusivities (κ > 10−4 m2 s−1, induced by shear instability, occurred in the water column. In the central and southern SCS, the water column was characterized by strong stratification and weak shear and the turbulent mixing was weak. Internal waves and internal tides generated near the Luzon Strait are expected to make a dominant contribution to the strong turbulent mixing and shear in the region to the west of the Luzon Strait. The observed dissipation rates were found to scale positively with the shear and stratification, which were consistent with the MacKinnon–Gregg model used for the continental shelf but different from the Gregg–Henyey scaling used for the open ocean.

  15. Spatial distribution of turbulent mixing in the upper ocean of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiao-Dong; Liang, Chang-Rong; Chen, Gui-Ying

    2017-06-01

    The spatial distribution of the dissipation rate (ɛ) and diapycnal diffusivity (κ) in the upper ocean of the South China Sea (SCS) is presented from a measurement program conducted from 26 April to 23 May 2010. In the vertical distribution, the dissipation rates below the surface mixed layer were predominantly high in the thermocline where shear and stratification were strong. In the regional distribution, high dissipation rates and diapycnal diffusivities were observed in the region to the west of the Luzon Strait, with an average dissipation rate and diapycnal diffusivity of 8.3 × 10-9 W kg-1 and 2.7 × 10-5 m2 s-1, respectively, almost 1 order of magnitude higher than those in the central and southern SCS. In the region to the west of the Luzon Strait, the water column was characterized by strong shear and weak stratification. Elevated dissipation rates (ɛ > 10-7 W kg-1) and diapycnal diffusivities (κ > 10-4 m2 s-1), induced by shear instability, occurred in the water column. In the central and southern SCS, the water column was characterized by strong stratification and weak shear and the turbulent mixing was weak. Internal waves and internal tides generated near the Luzon Strait are expected to make a dominant contribution to the strong turbulent mixing and shear in the region to the west of the Luzon Strait. The observed dissipation rates were found to scale positively with the shear and stratification, which were consistent with the MacKinnon-Gregg model used for the continental shelf but different from the Gregg-Henyey scaling used for the open ocean.

  16. Planar isotropy of passive scalar turbulent mixing with a mean perpendicular gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaila, L; Dusek, J; Le Gal, P; Anselmet, F; Brun, C; Pumir, A

    1999-08-01

    A recently proposed evolution equation [Vaienti et al., Physica D 85, 405 (1994)] for the probability density functions (PDF's) of turbulent passive scalar increments obtained under the assumptions of fully three-dimensional homogeneity and isotropy is submitted to validation using direct numerical simulation (DNS) results of the mixing of a passive scalar with a nonzero mean gradient by a homogeneous and isotropic turbulent velocity field. It is shown that this approach leads to a quantitatively correct balance between the different terms of the equation, in a plane perpendicular to the mean gradient, at small scales and at large Péclet number. A weaker assumption of homogeneity and isotropy restricted to the plane normal to the mean gradient is then considered to derive an equation describing the evolution of the PDF's as a function of the spatial scale and the scalar increments. A very good agreement between the theory and the DNS data is obtained at all scales. As a particular case of the theory, we derive a generalized form for the well-known Yaglom equation (the isotropic relation between the second-order moments for temperature increments and the third-order velocity-temperature mixed moments). This approach allows us to determine quantitatively how the integral scale properties influence the properties of mixing throughout the whole range of scales. In the simple configuration considered here, the PDF's of the scalar increments perpendicular to the mean gradient can be theoretically described once the sources of inhomogeneity and anisotropy at large scales are correctly taken into account.

  17. Experiments on mixing and combustion with low heat release in a turbulent shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mungel, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    A new blowdown facility was built to study mixing and combustion in a turbulent shear layer. The system is capable of 100 m/s for three seconds in a 5 x 20 cm exit area on the high speed side, and 50 m/s in a 10 x 20 cm exit area on the low speed side. Dilute concentrations of hydrogen and fluorine, carried in an inert gas, react when both fluid streams meet at the tip of a splitter plate. The reaction is spontaneous, rapid, and highly exothermic. The resulting temperature field was studied using a rake of eight fast response thermometers placed across the width of the layer. Runs were performed for low heat release over a wide range of equivalence (concentration) ratios, at a Reynolds number of 30,800 based on velocity difference and vorticity thickness. The heat release is sufficiently low so that the overall properties of the mixing layer are not significantly changed from the cold case. The results show the presence of large, hot structures within the flow together with cool, irrotational tongues of freestream fluid that penetrate deep into the layer. Thus, it is possible for the entire width of the layer to be quite hot, owing to the passage of a large structure, or for the layer to be quite cool, owing to the presence of the cool fluid tongues. The mean temperature results from a duty cycle whereby a given point in the flow sees alternating hot and cool fluid which averages into the local mean. The results compare favorably with the recent theoretical model of Broadwell and Breidenthal for mixing and chemical reaction in a turbulent shear layer. With this model it is possible to bring the results for gases and liquids into quantitative agreement

  18. Effect of periodic bottom plate heating on large scale flow in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuqali, M.; Babuin, Simone; Niemela, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2015), 483-489 ISSN 1735-3572 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Rayleigh-Bénard convection * Reynolds number Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.888, year: 2015

  19. Effect of rotation on the formation of longitudinal vortices in mixed convection flow over a flat plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ming-Han [Ta-Hwa Institute of Technology, Department of Automation Engineering, Hsinchu (Taiwan); Chen, Chin-Tai [Ta-Hwa Institute of Technology, Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Hsinchu (Taiwan)

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the effect of rotation on the formation of longitudinal vortices in mixed convection flow over a flat plate. The criterion on the position of marking the onset of longitudinal vortices is defined in this paper. The onset position characterized by the Goertler number G{sub {delta}} depends on the Grashof number, the rotation number Ro, the Prandtl number Pr and the wave number. The results show that negative rotation stabilizes the boundary layer flow on the surface. On the contrary, positive rotation destabilizes the flow. The numerical data are compared with the experimental results. (orig.)

  20. Mixing and Turbulence Statistics in an Inclined Interface Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Akshay; Lele, Sanjiva

    2016-11-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.55 shockwave with a nominally inclined interface is considered. Unlike the classical Richtmyer-Meshkov problem, the interface evolution is non-linear from early time and large highly correlated vortical structures are observed even after reshock. The simulations target the experiment of McFarland et al. (2014). Simulations are performed using the Miranda code (Cook et al., 2005) that uses high-order spectral-like numerics (Lele, 1992). Results from multiple grid resolutions up to 4 billion grid points establish grid convergence. Comparisons to the experiments show that the simulations adequately capture the physics of the problem. Analysis of the data from the simulations based on variable density turbulence equations in the Favre averaged form will be presented. Statistics of unclosed terms in the variable density RANS equations will also be presented and compared to standard closure models. It is observed that the Reynolds Stresses have a non-monotonic return to isotropy after reshock and that compressibility effects are important long after reshock. The effect of numerics are also quantified and presented. Computer time for this work was provided by NSF PRAC award "Multi-material turbulent mixing" on the Blue Waters system.

  1. Controls on Turbulent Mixing in a Strongly Stratified and Sheared Tidal River Plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurisa, Joseph T.; Nash, Jonathan D.; Moum, James N.; Kilcher, Levi F.

    2016-08-01

    Considerable effort has been made to parameterize turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rate ..epsilon.. and mixing in buoyant plumes and stratified shear flows. Here, a parameterization based on Kunze et al. is examined, which estimates ..epsilon.. as the amount of energy contained in an unstable shear layer (Ri < Ric) that must be dissipated to increase the Richardson number Ri = N2/S2 to a critical value Ric within a turbulent decay time scale. Observations from the tidal Columbia River plume are used to quantitatively assess the relevant parameters controlling ..epsilon.. over a range of tidal and river discharge forcings. Observed ..epsilon.. is found to be characterized by Kunze et al.'s form within a factor of 2, while exhibiting slightly decreased skill near Ri = Ric. Observed dissipation rates are compared to estimates from a constant interfacial drag formulation that neglects the direct effects of stratification. This is found to be appropriate in energetic regimes when the bulk-averaged Richardson number Rib is less than Ric/4. However, when Rib > Ric/4, the effects of stratification must be included. Similarly, ..epsilon.. scaled by the bulk velocity and density differences over the plume displays a clear dependence on Rib, decreasing as Rib approaches Ric. The Kunze et al. ..epsilon.. parameterization is modified to form an expression for the nondimensional dissipation rate that is solely a function of Rib, displaying good agreement with the observations. It is suggested that this formulation is broadly applicable for unstable to marginally unstable stratified shear flows.

  2. Laminar mixed convection heat transfer in a vertical circular tube under buoyancy-assisted and opposed flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Hussein A.

    2008-01-01

    Laminar mixed convection heat transfer for assisted and opposed air flows in the entrance region of a vertical circular tube with the using of a uniform wall heat flux boundary condition has been experimentally investigated. The experimental setup was designed for determining the effect of flow direction and the effect of tube inclination on the surface temperature, local and average Nusselt numbers with Reynolds number ranged from 400 to 1600 and Grashof number from 2.0 x 10 5 to 6.2 x 10 6 . It was found that the circumferential surface temperature along the dimensionless tube length for opposed flow would be higher than that both of assisted flow and horizontal tube [Mohammed HA, Salman YK. Experimental investigation of combined convection heat transfer for thermally developing flow in a horizontal circular cylinder. Appl Therm Eng 2007;27(8-9):1522-33] due to the stronger free convective currents within the cross-section. The Nusselt number values would be lower for opposed flow than that for assisted flow. It was inferred that the behaviour of Nu x for opposed flow to be strongly dependent on the combination of Re and Gr numbers. Empirical equations expressing the average Nusselt numbers in terms of Grashof and Reynolds numbers were proposed for both assisted and opposed flow cases. The average heat transfer results were compared with previous literature and showed similar trend and satisfactory agreement

  3. Mixed convection heat transfer between a steam/non-condensable gas mixture and an inclined finned tube bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Cachard, F.; Lompersky, S.; Monauni, G.R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Thermal Hydraulic Lab.

    1999-07-01

    An experimental and analytical program was performed at PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute) to study the performance of a finned-tube condenser in the presence of non-condensable gases at low gas mass fluxes. The model developed for this application includes mixed convection heat transfer between the vapour/non-condensable mixture and the finned tubes, heat conduction through the fins and tubes, and evaporative heat transfer inside the tubes. On the gas, heat transfer correlations are used, and the condensation rate is calculated using the heat/mass transfer analogy. A combination of various available correlations for forced convection in staggered finned tube bundles is used, together with a correction accounting for superimposed natural convection. For the condensate heat transfer resistance, the beatty and Katz model for gravity driven liquid films on the tubes is used. The fine efficiency is accounted for using classical iterative calculations. Evaporative heat transfer inside the tubes is predicted using the Chen correlation. The finned tube condenser model has been assessed against data obtained at the PSI LINX facility with two test condensers. For the 62 LINX experiments performed, the model predictions are very good, i.e., less then 10% standard deviation between experimental and predicted results.

  4. Evaluation of scalar mixing and time scale models in PDF simulations of a turbulent premixed flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoellinger, Michael; Heinz, Stefan [Department of Mathematics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Numerical simulation results obtained with a transported scalar probability density function (PDF) method are presented for a piloted turbulent premixed flame. The accuracy of the PDF method depends on the scalar mixing model and the scalar time scale model. Three widely used scalar mixing models are evaluated: the interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) model, the modified Curl's coalescence/dispersion (CD) model and the Euclidean minimum spanning tree (EMST) model. The three scalar mixing models are combined with a simple model for the scalar time scale which assumes a constant C{sub {phi}}=12 value. A comparison of the simulation results with available measurements shows that only the EMST model calculates accurately the mean and variance of the reaction progress variable. An evaluation of the structure of the PDF's of the reaction progress variable predicted by the three scalar mixing models confirms this conclusion: the IEM and CD models predict an unrealistic shape of the PDF. Simulations using various C{sub {phi}} values ranging from 2 to 50 combined with the three scalar mixing models have been performed. The observed deficiencies of the IEM and CD models persisted for all C{sub {phi}} values considered. The value C{sub {phi}}=12 combined with the EMST model was found to be an optimal choice. To avoid the ad hoc choice for C{sub {phi}}, more sophisticated models for the scalar time scale have been used in simulations using the EMST model. A new model for the scalar time scale which is based on a linear blending between a model for flamelet combustion and a model for distributed combustion is developed. The new model has proven to be very promising as a scalar time scale model which can be applied from flamelet to distributed combustion. (author)

  5. Turbulent mixing over a shelf sea bank: linking physics to fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Matthew; Davis, Clare; Sharples, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    The interaction between stratified flow and topography has previously been seen to generate enhanced vertical mixing both locally and far field by breaking of an intensified wave field close to the generation point and from waves propagating energy away from the source. Here we present a new series of measurements made during the summer of 2008 that includes transect data from a Scanfish towed CTD that provides a snapshot of the vertical density structure and distribution of chlorophyll over the Celtic Sea from beyond the shelf break to 250km onshelf. The transect supports previous findings of a persistent level of primary production identifiable as a subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM). Intensification of chlorophyll is seen at the shelf break region and provides a biological indicator of mixing. Similarly, we identify a high concentration of chlorophyll over Jones Bank 200km from the shelf break in 120m depth. Measurements from an array of acoustic current profilers, thermistor stings and a turbulence profiler reveal that the shallow sloping bank and strong tides regularly interact to produce hydraulic jumps in the lee of the bank during spring periods identifying Jones Bank as a mixing hotspot. The energy dissipated during these events act to erode the base of the strong thermocline and result in a vertical flux of nutrients into the stable, stratified environment. We suggest that it is the spring-neap modulation of this process which promotes intensified mixing over the bank. Nutrient measurements made during the experiment reveal that the ever changing mixing environment has significant influence on the phytoplankton community at the bank and is likely the key component in promoting enhanced biological production.

  6. A mapping closure for turbulent scalar mixing using a time-evolving reference field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1992-01-01

    A general mapping-closure approach for modeling scalar mixing in homogeneous turbulence is developed. This approach is different from the previous methods in that the reference field also evolves according to the same equations as the physical scalar field. The use of a time-evolving Gaussian reference field results in a model that is similar to the mapping closure model of Pope (1991), which is based on the methodology of Chen et al. (1989). Both models yield identical relationships between the scalar variance and higher-order moments, which are in good agreement with heat conduction simulation data and can be consistent with any type of epsilon(phi) evolution. The present methodology can be extended to any reference field whose behavior is known. The possibility of a beta-pdf reference field is explored. The shortcomings of the mapping closure methods are discussed, and the limit at which the mapping becomes invalid is identified.

  7. Mixed convection in a nanofluid filled-cavity with partial slip subjected to constant heat flux and inclined magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismael, Muneer A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Engineering College, University of Basrah, Basrah (Iraq); Mansour, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Assuit University, Faculty of Science, Assuit (Egypt); Chamkha, Ali J. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University, Al-Khobar 31952 (Saudi Arabia); Prince Sultan Endowment for Energy and Environment, Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University, Al-Khobar 31952 (Saudi Arabia); Rashad, A.M., E-mail: am_rashad@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Aswan University, Faculty of Science, Aswan 81528 (Egypt)

    2016-10-15

    Mixed convection in a lid-driven square cavity filled with Cu-water nanofluid and subjected to inclined magnetic field is investigated in this paper. Partial slip effect is considered along the lid driven horizontal walls. A constant heat flux source on the left wall is considered, meanwhile the right vertical wall is cooled isothermally. The remainder cavity walls are thermally insulted. A control finite volume method is used as a numerical appliance of the governing equations. Six pertinent parameters were studied these; the orientation of the magnetic field (Φ=0–360°), Richardson number (Ri=0.001–1000), Hartman number (Ha=0–100), the size and position of the heat source (B=0.2–0.8, D=0.3–0.7, respectively), nanoparticles volume fraction (ϕ=0.0–0.1), and the lid-direction of the horizontal walls (λ=±1) where the positive sign means lid-driven to the right while the negative sign means lid-driven to the left. The results show that the orientation and the strength of the magnetic field can play a significant role in controlling the convection under the effect of partial slip. It is also found that the natural convection decreases with increasing the length of the heat source for all ranges of the studied parameters, while it is do so due to the vertical distance up to Hartman number of 50, beyond this value the natural convection decreases with lifting the heat source narrower to the top wall. - Highlights: • Partial slip along moving walls of MHD cavity filled with nanofluid is considered. • The suppression exerted by the magnetic field decreases with its orientation. • Nusselt number is enhanced slightly with nanoparticles at shortest heat source. • Nusselt number is enhanced with nanoparticles at stronger magnetic field.

  8. Mixed convection in a nanofluid filled-cavity with partial slip subjected to constant heat flux and inclined magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismael, Muneer A.; Mansour, M.A.; Chamkha, Ali J.; Rashad, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed convection in a lid-driven square cavity filled with Cu-water nanofluid and subjected to inclined magnetic field is investigated in this paper. Partial slip effect is considered along the lid driven horizontal walls. A constant heat flux source on the left wall is considered, meanwhile the right vertical wall is cooled isothermally. The remainder cavity walls are thermally insulted. A control finite volume method is used as a numerical appliance of the governing equations. Six pertinent parameters were studied these; the orientation of the magnetic field (Φ=0–360°), Richardson number (Ri=0.001–1000), Hartman number (Ha=0–100), the size and position of the heat source (B=0.2–0.8, D=0.3–0.7, respectively), nanoparticles volume fraction (ϕ=0.0–0.1), and the lid-direction of the horizontal walls (λ=±1) where the positive sign means lid-driven to the right while the negative sign means lid-driven to the left. The results show that the orientation and the strength of the magnetic field can play a significant role in controlling the convection under the effect of partial slip. It is also found that the natural convection decreases with increasing the length of the heat source for all ranges of the studied parameters, while it is do so due to the vertical distance up to Hartman number of 50, beyond this value the natural convection decreases with lifting the heat source narrower to the top wall. - Highlights: • Partial slip along moving walls of MHD cavity filled with nanofluid is considered. • The suppression exerted by the magnetic field decreases with its orientation. • Nusselt number is enhanced slightly with nanoparticles at shortest heat source. • Nusselt number is enhanced with nanoparticles at stronger magnetic field.

  9. The Radius and Entropy of a Magnetized, Rotating, Fully Convective Star: Analysis with Depth-dependent Mixing Length Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Lewis G.; Browning, Matthew K.

    2018-04-01

    Some low-mass stars appear to have larger radii than predicted by standard 1D structure models; prior work has suggested that inefficient convective heat transport, due to rotation and/or magnetism, may ultimately be responsible. We examine this issue using 1D stellar models constructed using Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). First, we consider standard models that do not explicitly include rotational/magnetic effects, with convective inhibition modeled by decreasing a depth-independent mixing length theory (MLT) parameter α MLT. We provide formulae linking changes in α MLT to changes in the interior specific entropy, and hence to the stellar radius. Next, we modify the MLT formulation in MESA to mimic explicitly the influence of rotation and magnetism, using formulations suggested by Stevenson and MacDonald & Mullan, respectively. We find rapid rotation in these models has a negligible impact on stellar structure, primarily because a star’s adiabat, and hence its radius, is predominantly affected by layers near the surface; convection is rapid and largely uninfluenced by rotation there. Magnetic fields, if they influenced convective transport in the manner described by MacDonald & Mullan, could lead to more noticeable radius inflation. Finally, we show that these non-standard effects on stellar structure can be fabricated using a depth-dependent α MLT: a non-magnetic, non-rotating model can be produced that is virtually indistinguishable from one that explicitly parameterizes rotation and/or magnetism using the two formulations above. We provide formulae linking the radially variable α MLT to these putative MLT reformulations.

  10. Preliminary Investigation on Turbulent Flow in Tight-lattice Rod Bundle with Twist-mixing Vane Spacer Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chiyoung; Kwack, Youngkyun; Park, Juyong; Shin, Changhwan; In, Wangkee

    2013-01-01

    Our research group has investigated the effect of P/D difference on the behavior of turbulent rod bundle flow without the mixing vane spacer grid, using PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and MIR (Matching Index of Refraction) techniques for tight lattice fuel rod bundle application. In this work, using the tight-lattice rod bundle with a twist-mixing vane spacer grid, the turbulent rod bundle flow is preliminarily examined to validate the PIV measurement and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation. The turbulent flow in the tight-lattice rod bundle with a twist-mixing vane spacer grid was preliminarily examined to validate the PIV measurement and CFD simulation. Both were in agreement with each other within a reasonable degree of accuracy. Using PIV measurement and CFD simulation tested in this work, the detailed investigations on the behavior of turbulent rod bundle flow with the twist-mixing vane spacer grid will be performed at various conditions, and reported in the near future

  11. Modeling Macro- and Micro-Scale Turbulent Mixing and Chemistry in Engine Exhaust Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Suresh

    1998-01-01

    Simulation of turbulent mixing and chemical processes in the near-field plume and plume-vortex regimes has been successfully carried out recently using a reduced gas phase kinetics mechanism which substantially decreased the computational cost. A detailed mechanism including gas phase HOx, NOx, and SOx chemistry between the aircraft exhaust and the ambient air in near-field aircraft plumes is compiled. A reduced mechanism capturing the major chemical pathways is developed. Predictions by the reduced mechanism are found to be in good agreement with those by the detailed mechanism. With the reduced chemistry, the computer CPU time is saved by a factor of more than 3.5 for the near-field plume modeling. Distributions of major chemical species are obtained and analyzed. The computed sensitivities of major species with respect to reaction step are deduced for identification of the dominant gas phase kinetic reaction pathways in the jet plume. Both the near field plume and the plume-vortex regimes were investigated using advanced mixing models. In the near field, a stand-alone mixing model was used to investigate the impact of turbulent mixing on the micro- and macro-scale mixing processes using a reduced reaction kinetics model. The plume-vortex regime was simulated using a large-eddy simulation model. Vortex plume behind Boeing 737 and 747 aircraft was simulated along with relevant kinetics. Many features of the computed flow field show reasonable agreement with data. The entrainment of the engine plumes into the wing tip vortices and also the partial detrainment of the plume were numerically captured. The impact of fluid mechanics on the chemical processes was also studied. Results show that there are significant differences between spatial and temporal simulations especially in the predicted SO3 concentrations. This has important implications for the prediction of sulfuric acid aerosols in the wake and may partly explain the discrepancy between past numerical studies

  12. Numerical Study of Mixed Convective Peristaltic Flow through Vertical Tube with Heat Generation for Moderate Reynolds and Wave Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Tariq; Ahmed, B.; Sajid, M.

    2018-04-01

    The current study focuses on the numerical investigation of the mixed convective peristaltic mechanism through a vertical tube for non-zero Reynolds and wave number. In the set of constitutional equations, energy equation contains the term representing heat generation parameter. The problem is formulated by dropping the assumption of lubrication theory that turns the model mathematically into a system of the nonlinear partial differential equations. The results of the long wavelength in a creeping flow are deduced from the present analysis. Thus, the current study explores the neglected features of peristaltic heat flow in the mixed convective model by considering moderate values of Reynolds and wave numbers. The finite element based on Galerkin’s weighted residual scheme is applied to solve the governing equations. The computed solution is presented in the form of contours of streamlines and isothermal lines, velocity and temperature profiles for variation of different involved parameters. The investigation shows that the strength of circulation for stream function increases by increasing the wave number and Reynolds number. Symmetric isotherms are reported for small values of time-mean flow. Linear behavior of pressure is noticed by vanishing inertial forces while the increase in pressure is observed by amplifying the Reynolds number.

  13. Mixed convection flow of couple stress nanofluid over oscillatory stretching sheet with heat absorption/generation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ullah Khan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to highlight the unsteady mixed convective couple stress nanoliquid flow passed through stretching surface. The flow is generated due to periodic oscillations of sheet. An appropriate set of dimensionless variables are used to reduce the independent variables in governing equations arising from mathematical modeling. An analytical solution has been computed by employing the technique of homotopy method. The outcomes of various sundry parameters like couple stress parameter, the ratio of angular velocity to stretching rate, thermophoresis parameter, Hartmann number, Prandtl number, heat source/sink parameter, Schmidt number described graphically and in tabular form. It is observed that the velocity profile increases by increasing mixed convection parameter and concentration buoyancy parameter. The temperature enhances for larger values of Hartmann number and Brownian. The concentration profile increases by increasing thermophoresis parameter. Results show that wall shear stress increases by increasing couple stress parameter and ratio of oscillating frequency to stretching rate. Keywords: Oscillatory surface, Couple stress fluid, Nanoparticles, Heat absorption/generation

  14. Numerical investigation of pure mixed convection in a ferrofluid-filled lid-driven cavity for different heater configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Md. Rabbi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mixed convection has been a center point of attraction to the heat transfer engineers for many years. Here, pure mixed convection analysis in cavity is carried out for two different geometric heater configurations under externally applied magnetic field. Ferrofluid (Fe3O4–water is considered as working fluid and modeled as single phase fluid. The heaters at the bottom wall are kept at constant high temperature while vertical side walls are adiabatic. The top wall is moving at a constant velocity in both geometric configurations and is kept at constant low temperature. Galerkin weighted residuals method of finite element analysis is implemented to solve the governing equations. The analysis has been carried out for a wide range of Richardson number (Ri = 0.1–10, Reynolds number (Re = 100–500, Hartmann number (Ha = 0–100 and solid volume fraction (φ = 0–0.15 of ferrofluid. The overall heat transfer performance for both the configurations is quantitatively investigated by average Nusselt number at the heated boundary wall. It is observed that higher Ri enhances the heat transfer rate, although higher Ha decreases heat transfer rate. Moreover, at higher Ri and lower Ha, semi-circular notched cavity shows significantly better (more than 30% heat transfer rate.

  15. MHD mixed convection in a vertical annulus filled with Al2O3–water nanofluid considering nanoparticle migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malvandi, A.; Safaei, M.R.; Kaffash, M.H.; Ganji, D.D.

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, an MHD mixed convection of alumina/water nanofluid inside a vertical annular pipe is investigated theoretically. The model used for the nanofluid mixture involves Brownian motion and thermophoretic diffusivities in order to take into account the effects of nanoparticle migration. Since the thermophoresis is the main mechanism of the nanoparticle migration, different temperature gradients have been imposed using the asymmetric heating. Considering hydrodynamically and thermally fully developed flow, the governing equations have been reduced to two-point ordinary boundary value differential equations and they have been solved numerically. It is revealed that the imposed thermal asymmetry would change the direction of nanoparticle migration and distorts the velocity, temperature and nanoparticle concentration profiles. Moreover, it is shown that the advantage of nanofluids in heat transfer enhancement is reduced in the presence of a magnetic field. - Highlights: • MHD mixed convection of alumina/water nanofluid inside a vertical annulus. • The effects of nanoparticle migration on rheological and thermophysical characteristics. • The effects of asymmetric heating on nanoparticle migration. • The effects of asymmetric heating on the heat transfer enhancement. • Inclusion of nanoparticles in presence of a magnetic field has a negative effect on performance

  16. Flow Reversal of Fully-Developed Mixed MHD Convection in Vertical Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, H.; Hashim, I.

    2010-01-01

    The present analysis is concerned with flow reversal phenomena of the fully-developed laminar combined free and forced MHD convection in a vertical parallel-plate channel. The effect of viscous dissipation is taken into account. Flow reversal adjacent to the cold (or hot) wall is found to exist within the channel as Gr/Re is above (or below) a threshold value. Parameter zones for the occurrence of reversed flow are presented. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  17. Sensitivity of the two-dimensional shearless mixing layer to the initial turbulent kinetic energy and integral length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathali, M.; Deshiri, M. Khoshnami

    2016-04-01

    The shearless mixing layer is generated from the interaction of two homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT) fields with different integral scales ℓ1 and ℓ2 and different turbulent kinetic energies E1 and E2. In this study, the sensitivity of temporal evolutions of two-dimensional, incompressible shearless mixing layers to the parametric variations of ℓ1/ℓ2 and E1/E2 is investigated. The sensitivity methodology is based on the nonintrusive approach; using direct numerical simulation and generalized polynomial chaos expansion. The analysis is carried out at Reℓ 1=90 for the high-energy HIT region and different integral length scale ratios 1 /4 ≤ℓ1/ℓ2≤4 and turbulent kinetic energy ratios 1 ≤E1/E2≤30 . It is found that the most influential parameter on the variability of the mixing layer evolution is the turbulent kinetic energy while variations of the integral length scale show a negligible influence on the flow field variability. A significant level of anisotropy and intermittency is observed in both large and small scales. In particular, it is found that large scales have higher levels of intermittency and sensitivity to the variations of ℓ1/ℓ2 and E1/E2 compared to the small scales. Reconstructed response surfaces of the flow field intermittency and the turbulent penetration depth show monotonic dependence on ℓ1/ℓ2 and E1/E2 . The mixing layer growth rate and the mixing efficiency both show sensitive dependence on the initial condition parameters. However, the probability density function of these quantities shows relatively small solution variations in response to the variations of the initial condition parameters.

  18. Horizontal structures of velocity and temperature boundary layers in two-dimensional numerical turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Quan; Sugiyama, K.; Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef; Xia, K.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the structures of the near-plate velocity and temperature profiles at different horizontal positions along the conducting bottom (and top) plate of a Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell, using two-dimensional (2D) numerical data obtained at the Rayleigh number Ra = 108 and the Prandtl

  19. Numerical study of magnetic field on mixed convection and entropy generation of nanofluid in a trapezoidal enclosure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Alireza, E-mail: AlirezaAghaei21@gmail.com; Khorasanizadeh, Hossein, E-mail: khorasan@kashanu.ac.ir; Sheikhzadeh, Ghanbarali, E-mail: Sheikhz@kashanu.ac.ir; Abbaszadeh, Mahmoud, E-mail: abbaszadeh.mahmoud@gmail.com

    2016-04-01

    The flow under influence of magnetic field is experienced in cooling electronic devices and voltage transformers, nuclear reactors, biochemistry and in physical phenomenon like geology. In this study, the effects of magnetic field on the flow field, heat transfer and entropy generation of Cu–water nanofluid mixed convection in a trapezoidal enclosure have been investigated. The top lid is cold and moving toward right or left, the bottom wall is hot and the side walls are insulated and their angle from the horizon are 15°, 30°, 45° and 60°. Simulations have been carried out for constant Grashof number of 10{sup 4}, Reynolds numbers of 30, 100, 300 and 1000, Hartmann numbers of 25, 50, 75 and 100 and nanoparticles volume fractions of zero up to 0.04. The finite volume method and SIMPLER algorithm have been utilized to solve the governing equations numerically. The results showed that with imposing the magnetic field and enhancing it, the nanofluid convection and the strength of flow decrease and the flow tends toward natural convection and finally toward pure conduction. For this reason, for all of the considered Reynolds numbers and volume fractions, by increasing the Hartmann number the average Nusselt number decreases. Furthermore, for any case with constant Reynolds and Hartmann numbers by increasing the volume fraction of nanoparticles the maximum stream function decreases. For all of the studied cases, entropy generation due to friction is negligible and the total entropy generation is mainly due to irreversibility associated with heat transfer and variation of the total entropy generation with Hartmann number is similar to that of the average Nusselt number. With change in lid movement direction at Reynolds number of 30 the average Nusselt number and total entropy generation are changed, but at Reynolds number of 1000 it has a negligible effect. - Highlights: • effects of magnetic field on the flow field, heat transfer and entropy generation. • mixed

  20. Numerical study of magnetic field on mixed convection and entropy generation of nanofluid in a trapezoidal enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghaei, Alireza; Khorasanizadeh, Hossein; Sheikhzadeh, Ghanbarali; Abbaszadeh, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    The flow under influence of magnetic field is experienced in cooling electronic devices and voltage transformers, nuclear reactors, biochemistry and in physical phenomenon like geology. In this study, the effects of magnetic field on the flow field, heat transfer and entropy generation of Cu–water nanofluid mixed convection in a trapezoidal enclosure have been investigated. The top lid is cold and moving toward right or left, the bottom wall is hot and the side walls are insulated and their angle from the horizon are 15°, 30°, 45° and 60°. Simulations have been carried out for constant Grashof number of 10"4, Reynolds numbers of 30, 100, 300 and 1000, Hartmann numbers of 25, 50, 75 and 100 and nanoparticles volume fractions of zero up to 0.04. The finite volume method and SIMPLER algorithm have been utilized to solve the governing equations numerically. The results showed that with imposing the magnetic field and enhancing it, the nanofluid convection and the strength of flow decrease and the flow tends toward natural convection and finally toward pure conduction. For this reason, for all of the considered Reynolds numbers and volume fractions, by increasing the Hartmann number the average Nusselt number decreases. Furthermore, for any case with constant Reynolds and Hartmann numbers by increasing the volume fraction of nanoparticles the maximum stream function decreases. For all of the studied cases, entropy generation due to friction is negligible and the total entropy generation is mainly due to irreversibility associated with heat transfer and variation of the total entropy generation with Hartmann number is similar to that of the average Nusselt number. With change in lid movement direction at Reynolds number of 30 the average Nusselt number and total entropy generation are changed, but at Reynolds number of 1000 it has a negligible effect. - Highlights: • effects of magnetic field on the flow field, heat transfer and entropy generation. • mixed

  1. Two-step simulation of velocity and passive scalar mixing at high Schmidt number in turbulent jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rah, K. Jeff; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    Simulation of passive scalar in the high Schmidt number turbulent mixing process requires higher computational cost than that of velocity fields, because the scalar is associated with smaller length scales than velocity. Thus, full simulation of both velocity and passive scalar with high Sc for a practical configuration is difficult to perform. In this work, a new approach to simulate velocity and passive scalar mixing at high Sc is suggested to reduce the computational cost. First, the velocity fields are resolved by Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Then, by extracting the velocity information from LES, the scalar inside a moving fluid blob is simulated by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). This two-step simulation method is applied to a turbulent jet and provides a new way to examine a scalar mixing process in a practical application with smaller computational cost. NSF, Samsung Scholarship.

  2. Experimental investigation of effect of spacer on two phase turbulent mixing rate in subchannels of pressure tube type BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Shashi Kant; Sinha, S.L. [National Institute of Technology, Raipur (India). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Chandraker, D.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Reactor Design and Development Group

    2017-11-15

    Turbulent mixing rate between adjacent subchannels in a two-phase flow has been known to be strongly dependent on the flow pattern. The most important aspect of turbulent motion is that the velocity and pressure at a fixed point do not remain constant with time even in steady state but go through very irregular high frequency fluctuations. These fluctuations influence the diffusion of scalar and vector quantities. The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a vertical pressure tube type, heavy water moderated and boiling light water cooled natural circulation based reactor. The fuel bundle of AHWR contains 54 fuel rods set in three concentric rings of 12, 18 and 24 fuel rods. This fuel bundle is divided into number of imaginary interacting flow channel called subchannels. Alteration from single phase to two phase flow situation occurs in reactor rod bundle with raise in power. The two phase flow regimes like bubbly, slug-churn, and annular flow are generally encountered in reactor rod bundle. Prediction of thermal margin of the reactor has necessitated the investigation of turbulent mixing rate of coolant between these subchannels under these flow regimes. Thus, it is fundamental to estimate the effect of spacer grids on turbulent mixing between subchannels of AHWR rod bundle.

  3. Modelling of large-scale structures arising under developed turbulent convection in a horizontal fluid layer (with application to the problem of tropical cyclone origination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Levina

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is concerned with the results of theoretical and laboratory modelling the processes of the large-scale structure generation under turbulent convection in the rotating-plane horizontal layer of an incompressible fluid with unstable stratification. The theoretical model describes three alternative ways of creating unstable stratification: a layer heating from below, a volumetric heating of a fluid with internal heat sources and combination of both factors. The analysis of the model equations show that under conditions of high intensity of the small-scale convection and low level of heat loss through the horizontal layer boundaries a long wave instability may arise. The condition for the existence of an instability and criterion identifying the threshold of its initiation have been determined. The principle of action of the discovered instability mechanism has been described. Theoretical predictions have been verified by a series of experiments on a laboratory model. The horizontal dimensions of the experimentally-obtained long-lived vortices are 4÷6 times larger than the thickness of the fluid layer. This work presents a description of the laboratory setup and experimental procedure. From the geophysical viewpoint the examined mechanism of the long wave instability is supposed to be adequate to allow a description of the initial step in the evolution of such large-scale vortices as tropical cyclones - a transition form the small-scale cumulus clouds to the state of the atmosphere involving cloud clusters (the stage of initial tropical perturbation.

  4. Numerical Investigations of Mixed Convection of Incompressible Viscous Fluid in LNG Storage with a Various Locations of Input and Output Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sklyarenko Kristina A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the results of mathematical simulation of mixed convection in the low-temperature storage of liquefied natural gas with a regenerative cooling. The regimes of mixed convection in a closed area with the different arrangement of the input and output sections of the masses are investigated. Two-dimensional nonstationary problem in the model of the Navier-Stokes in dimensionless variables “vorticity - stream function - temperature” was examined. Are obtained distributions of the hydrodynamic parameters and temperatures, characteristic basic laws governing the processes being investigated. Detailed circulating currents and carried out analysis of the mechanism of vortices formation and the temperature distribution in the solution for mixed convection mode with low Reynolds and Grashof numbers (Gr = 106, 100

  5. CFD simulation and validation of turbulent mixing in a rod bundle with vaned spacer grids based on LDV test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xi; Li Songwei; Li Zhongchun; Du Sijia; Zhang Yu; Peng Huanhuan

    2017-01-01

    Spacer grids with mixing vanes are generally used in fuel assemblies of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), because that mixing vanes could enhance the lateral turbulent mixing in subchannels. Thus, heat exchangements are more efficient, and the value of departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) is greatly increased. Actually turbulent mixing is composed of two kinds of flows: swirling flow inside the subchannel and cross flow between subchannels. Swirling flow could induce mixing between hot water near the rod and cold water in the center of the subchannel, and may accelerate deviation of the bubbles from the rod surface. Besides, crossing flow help to mixing water between hot subchannels and cold subchannels, which impact relatively large flow area. As a result, how to accurately capture and how to predict the complicated mixing phenomenon are of great concernments. Recently many experimental studies has been conducted to provide detailed turbulent mixing in rod bundle, among which Laser Doppler Velocimetry method is widely used. With great development of Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD has been validated as an analysis method for nuclear engineering, especially for single phase calculation. This paper presents the CFD simulation and validation of the turbulent mixing induced by spacer grid with mixing vanes in rod bundles. Experiment data used for validation came from 5 x 5 rod bundle test with LDV technology, which is organized by Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Laboratory. A 5 x 5 rod bundle with two spacer grids were used. Each rod has dimension of 9.5 mm in outer diameter and distance between rods is 12.6 mm. Two axial bulk velocities were conducted at 3.0 m/s for high Reynolds number and 1.0 m/s for low Reynolds number. Working pressure was 1.0 bar, and temperature was about 25degC. Two different distances from the downstream of the mixing spacer grid and one from upstream were acquired. Mean axial velocities and turbulent intensities

  6. Conjugate Heat Transfer of Mixed Convection for Viscoelastic Fluid Past a Stretching Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Long Hsiao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A conjugate heat transfer problem of a second-grade viscoelastic fluid past a stretching sheet has been studied. Governing equations include heat conduction equation of a stretching sheet, continuity equation, momentum equation, and energy equation of a second-grade fluid, analyzed by a combination of a series expansion method, the similarity transformation, and a second-order accurate finite-difference method. These solutions are used to iterate with the heat conduction equation of the stretching sheet to obtain distributions of the local convective heat transfer coefficient and the stretching sheet temperature. Ranges of dimensionless parameters, the Prandtl number Pr, the elastic number E and the conduction-convection coefficient Ncc are from 0.001 to 10, 0.0001 to 0.01, and 0.5 to 2.0, respectively. A parameter G, which is used to represent the dominance of the buoyant effect, is present in governing equations. Results indicated that elastic effect in the flow could increase the local heat transfer coefficient and enhance the heat transfer of a stretching sheet. In addition, same as the results from Newtonian fluid flow and conduction analysis of a stretching sheet, a better heat transfer is obtained with a larger Ncc, G, and E.

  7. Modeling of Multicomponent Diffusions and Natural Convection in Unfractured and Fractured Media by Discontinuous Galerkin and Mixed Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Hoteit, Hussein

    2017-12-29

    Computation of the distribution of species in hydrocarbon reservoirs from diffusions (thermal, molecular, and pressure) and natural convection is an important step in reservoir initialization. Current methods, which are mainly based on the conventional finite difference approach, may not be numerically efficient in fractured and other media with complex heterogeneities. In this work, the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method combined with the mixed finite element (MFE) method is used for the calculation of compositional variation in fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs. The use of unstructured gridding allows efficient computations for fractured media when the crossflow equilibrium concept is invoked. The DG method has less numerical dispersion than the upwind finite difference (FD) methods. The MFE method ensures continuity of fluxes at the interface of the grid elements. We also use the local discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) method instead of the MFE calculate the diffusion fluxes. Results from several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency, robustness, and accuracy of the model. Various features of convection and diffusion in homogeneous, layered, and fractured media are also discussed.

  8. Mixed Convective Fully Developed Flow in a Vertical Channel in the Presence of Thermal Radiation and Viscous Dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad K.V.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal radiation and viscous dissipation on a combined free and forced convective flow in a vertical channel is investigated for a fully developed flow regime. Boussinesq and Roseseland approximations are considered in the modeling of the conduction radiation heat transfer with thermal boundary conditions (isothermal-thermal, isoflux-thermal, and isothermal-flux. The coupled nonlinear governing equations are also solved analytically using the Differential Transform Method (DTM and regular perturbation method (PM. The results are analyzed graphically for various governing parameters such as the mixed convection parame