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Sample records for turbulent methane combustion

  1. Numerical simulation of premixed turbulent methane combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we study the behavior of a premixed turbulent methane flame in three dimensions using numerical simulation. The simulations are performed using an adaptive time-dependent low Mach number combustion algorithm based on a second-order projection formulation that conserves both species mass and total enthalpy. The species and enthalpy equations are treated using an operator-split approach that incorporates stiff integration techniques for modeling detailed chemical kinetics. The methodology also incorporates a mixture model for differential diffusion. For the simulations presented here, methane chemistry and transport are modeled using the DRM-19 (19-species, 84-reaction) mechanism derived from the GRIMech-1.2 mechanism along with its associated thermodynamics and transport databases. We consider a lean flame with equivalence ratio 0.8 for two different levels of turbulent intensity. For each case we examine the basic structure of the flame including turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The results indicate that flame wrinkling is the dominant factor leading to the increased turbulent flame speed. Joint probability distributions are computed to establish a correlation between heat release and curvature. We also investigate the effect of turbulent flame interaction on the flame chemistry. We identify specific flame intermediates that are sensitive to turbulence and explore various correlations between these species and local flame curvature. We identify different mechanisms by which turbulence modulates the chemistry of the flame

  2. Turbulent methane combustion in a laboratory-scale furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksanen, A.; Maeki-Mantila, E. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Methane combustion in the 400 rotational symmetric test chamber by ENEL was investigated. The prediction of the reaction rates of methane and carbon monoxide was based on the models which are taking into consideration the effect of turbulence on the oxidation phenomena namely the eddy dissipation concept model (EDC) and the eddy dissipation model (EDM). The experimental results of the distributions of the different species concentrations, temperature, velocities, turbulence quantities etc. were measured in the chamber cross-sections. The formation of nitric oxide was modelled using the thermal- and prompt-NO formation mechanisms and the formulation was based on the chemical kinetics and the probability density function (pdf) with the {beta}- and {delta}-distributions. If more than one variable is taken into consideration in the use of pdf it is very difficult to find distribution for different variables and especially to solve them with the moderate amount of the computing time. Therefore, in this presentation the amount of the pdf variables was limited as small as possible i.e. only one variable namely the mixture fraction was used the variance of which was solved from the transport equation. The computational domain which was divided into about seven thousand cells includes areas where the mean values of the variables can be supposed to be known and where the distribution of the probability is very narrow. Because in every computational cell the probability distribution as accurate as possible is wanted the linearization of the integration was made. The effect of the local extinction on the reaction rates was also included in the paper

  3. Turbulent methane combustion in a laboratory-scale furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksanen, A; Maeki-Mantila, E [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Methane combustion in the 400 rotational symmetric test chamber by ENEL was investigated. The prediction of the reaction rates of methane and carbon monoxide was based on the models which are taking into consideration the effect of turbulence on the oxidation phenomena namely the eddy dissipation concept model (EDC) and the eddy dissipation model (EDM). The experimental results of the distributions of the different species concentrations, temperature, velocities, turbulence quantities etc. were measured in the chamber cross-sections. The formation of nitric oxide was modelled using the thermal- and prompt-NO formation mechanisms and the formulation was based on the chemical kinetics and the probability density function (pdf) with the {beta}- and {delta}-distributions. If more than one variable is taken into consideration in the use of pdf it is very difficult to find distribution for different variables and especially to solve them with the moderate amount of the computing time. Therefore, in this presentation the amount of the pdf variables was limited as small as possible i.e. only one variable namely the mixture fraction was used the variance of which was solved from the transport equation. The computational domain which was divided into about seven thousand cells includes areas where the mean values of the variables can be supposed to be known and where the distribution of the probability is very narrow. Because in every computational cell the probability distribution as accurate as possible is wanted the linearization of the integration was made. The effect of the local extinction on the reaction rates was also included in the paper

  4. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    .... The PDF approach to turbulent combustion has the advantages of fully representing the turbulent fluctuations of species and temperature, and of allowing realistic combustion chemistry to be implemented...

  5. Manifold methods for methane combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Pope, S.B. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Great progresses have been made in combustion research, especially, the computation of laminar flames and the probability density function (PDF) method in turbulent combustion. For one-dimensional laminar flames, by considering the transport mechanism, the detailed chemical kinetic mechanism and the interactions between these two basic processes, today it is a routine matter to calculate flame velocities, extinction, ignition, temperature, and species distributions from the governing equations. Results are in good agreement with those obtained for experiments. However, for turbulent combustion, because of the complexities of turbulent flow, chemical reactions, and the interaction between them, in the foreseeable future, it is impossible to calculate the combustion flow field by directly integrating the basic governing equations. So averaging and modeling are necessary in turbulent combustion studies. Averaging, on one hand, simplifies turbulent combustion calculations, on the other hand, it introduces the infamous closure problems, especially the closure problem with chemical reaction terms. Since in PDF calculations of turbulent combustion, the averages of the chemical reaction terms can be calculated, PDF methods overcome the closure problem with the reaction terms. It has been shown that the PDF method is a most promising method to calculate turbulent combustion. PDF methods have been successfully employed to calculate laboratory turbulent flames: they can predict phenomena such as super equilibrium radical levels, and local extinction. Because of these advantages, PDF methods are becoming used increasingly in industry combustor codes.

  6. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent lean premixed combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R; Chen, Jacqueline H; Lu Tianfeng; Law, Chung K

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, due to the advent of high-performance computers and advanced numerical algorithms, direct numerical simulation (DNS) of combustion has emerged as a valuable computational research tool, in concert with experimentation. The role of DNS in delivering new Scientific insight into turbulent combustion is illustrated using results from a recent 3D turbulent premixed flame simulation. To understand the influence of turbulence on the flame structure, a 3D fully-resolved DNS of a spatially-developing lean methane-air turbulent Bunsen flame was performed in the thin reaction zones regime. A reduced chemical model for methane-air chemistry consisting of 13 resolved species, 4 quasi-steady state species and 73 elementary reactions was developed specifically for the current simulation. The data is analyzed to study possible influences of turbulence on the flame thickness. The results show that the average flame thickness increases, in qualitative agreement with several experimental results

  7. Turbulence Generation in Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-22

    flame length . This work is summarized in this section. I1.1 Model for Turbulent Burning Velocity For a range of turbulence conditions including...Variable density effects have been added in an approximation, and an expression for the length of jet flames has been developed. The flame length expression...of jet mixing and jet flame length data using fractals, College of Engineering, Energy Report E-86-02, Comell University, Ithaca, NY, 1986. Results

  8. Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

  9. The PDF method for turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    Probability Density Function (PDF) methods provide a means of calculating the properties of turbulent reacting flows. They have been successfully applied to many turbulent flames, including some with finite rate kinetic effects. Here the methods are reviewed with an emphasis on computational issues and their application to turbulent combustion.

  10. Reaction and diffusion in turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, S.B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The motivation for this project is the need to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the technologically-important phenomenon of turbulent combustion. In nearly all applications in which fuel is burned-for example, fossil-fuel power plants, furnaces, gas-turbines and internal-combustion engines-the combustion takes place in a turbulent flow. Designers continually demand more quantitative information about this phenomenon-in the form of turbulent combustion models-so that they can design equipment with increased efficiency and decreased environmental impact. For some time the PI has been developing a class of turbulent combustion models known as PDF methods. These methods have the important virtue that both convection and reaction can be treated without turbulence-modelling assumptions. However, a mixing model is required to account for the effects of molecular diffusion. Currently, the available mixing models are known to have some significant defects. The major motivation of the project is to seek a better understanding of molecular diffusion in turbulent reactive flows, and hence to develop a better mixing model.

  11. Numerical simulation of turbulent combustion: Scientific challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, ZhuYin; Lu, Zhen; Hou, LingYun; Lu, LiuYan

    2014-08-01

    Predictive simulation of engine combustion is key to understanding the underlying complicated physicochemical processes, improving engine performance, and reducing pollutant emissions. Critical issues as turbulence modeling, turbulence-chemistry interaction, and accommodation of detailed chemical kinetics in complex flows remain challenging and essential for high-fidelity combustion simulation. This paper reviews the current status of the state-of-the-art large eddy simulation (LES)/prob-ability density function (PDF)/detailed chemistry approach that can address the three challenging modelling issues. PDF as a subgrid model for LES is formulated and the hybrid mesh-particle method for LES/PDF simulations is described. Then the development need in micro-mixing models for the PDF simulations of turbulent premixed combustion is identified. Finally the different acceleration methods for detailed chemistry are reviewed and a combined strategy is proposed for further development.

  12. Fundamentals of Turbulent and Multi-Phase Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Kenneth Kuan-yun

    2012-01-01

    Detailed coverage of advanced combustion topics from the author of Principles of Combustion, Second Edition Turbulence, turbulent combustion, and multiphase reacting flows have become major research topics in recent decades due to their application across diverse fields, including energy, environment, propulsion, transportation, industrial safety, and nanotechnology. Most of the knowledge accumulated from this research has never been published in book form-until now. Fundamentals of Turbulent and Multiphase Combustion presents up-to-date, integrated coverage of the fundamentals of turbulence

  13. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Turbulence, Radiation, and Combustion Models for Natural Gas Combustion Burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yik Siang Pang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD study of a natural gas combustion burner focusing on the effect of combustion, thermal radiation and turbulence models on the temperature and chemical species concentration fields. The combustion was modelled using the finite rate/eddy dissipation (FR/EDM and partially premixed flame models. Detailed chemistry kinetics CHEMKIN GRI-MECH 3.0 consisting of 325 reactions was employed to model the methane combustion. Discrete ordinates (DO and spherical harmonics (P1 model were employed to predict the thermal radiation. The gas absorption coefficient dependence on the wavelength is resolved by the weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model (WSGGM. Turbulence flow was simulated using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS based models. The findings showed that a combination of partially premixed flame, P1 and standard k-ε (SKE gave the most accurate prediction with an average deviation of around 7.8% of combustion temperature and 15.5% for reactant composition (methane and oxygen. The results show the multi-step chemistry in the partially premixed model is more accurate than the two-step FR/EDM. Meanwhile, inclusion of thermal radiation has a minor effect on the heat transfer and species concentration. SKE turbulence model yielded better prediction compared to the realizable k-ε (RKE and renormalized k-ε (RNG. The CFD simulation presented in this work may serve as a useful tool to evaluate a performance of a natural gas combustor. Copyright © 2018 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 26th July 2017; Revised: 9th October 2017; Accepted: 30th October 2017; Available online: 22nd January 2018; Published regularly: 2nd April 2018 How to Cite: Pang, Y.S., Law, W.P., Pung, K.Q., Gimbun, J. (2018. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Turbulence, Radiation, and Combustion Models for Natural Gas Combustion Burner. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 13 (1: 155-169 (doi:10.9767/bcrec

  14. Low emission turbulent technology for fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finker, F. Z.; Kubyshkin, I. B.; Zakharov, B. Yu.; Akhmedov, D. B.; Sobchuk, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    The company 'POLITEKHENERGO' in co-operation and the Russian-Poland firm 'EnergoVIR' have performed investigations for modernization of the current existing boilers. A low emission turbulent technology has been used for the modernization of 10 industrial boilers. The reduction of NO x emissions is based on the following processes: 1) multistage combustion assured by two counter-deviated fluxes; 2) Some of the combustion facilities have an abrupt slope and a reduced air supply which leads to an intense separation of the fuel in the bottom part and a creation of a low-temperature combustion zone where the active restoration of the NO x takes part; 3) The influence of the top high-temperature zone on the NO x formation is small. Thus the 'sandwich' consisting of 'cold' and'hot' combustion layers provides a full rate combustion. This technique permits to: decrease of the NO x and CO x down to the European standard values;increase of the efficiency in 1-2%; obtain a stable coal combustion up to 97-98%; assure the large loading range (30 -100%); modernize and use the old boilers

  15. Simulation of lean premixed turbulent combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J; Day, M; Almgren, A; Lijewski, M; Rendleman, C; Cheng, R; Shepherd, I

    2006-01-01

    There is considerable technological interest in developing new fuel-flexible combustion systems that can burn fuels such as hydrogen or syngas. Lean premixed systems have the potential to burn these types of fuels with high efficiency and low NOx emissions due to reduced burnt gas temperatures. Although traditional Scientific approaches based on theory and laboratory experiment have played essential roles in developing our current understanding of premixed combustion, they are unable to meet the challenges of designing fuel-flexible lean premixed combustion devices. Computation, with its ability to deal with complexity and its unlimited access to data, has the potential for addressing these challenges. Realizing this potential requires the ability to perform high fidelity simulations of turbulent lean premixed flames under realistic conditions. In this paper, we examine the specialized mathematical structure of these combustion problems and discuss simulation approaches that exploit this structure. Using these ideas we can dramatically reduce computational cost, making it possible to perform high-fidelity simulations of realistic flames. We illustrate this methodology by considering ultra-lean hydrogen flames and discuss how this type of simulation is changing the way researchers study combustion

  16. Flow Field Measurements of Methane-Oxygen Turbulent Nonpremixed Flames at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Kimio; Kikkawa, Hoshitaka; Akamatsu, Fumiteru; Katsuki, Masashi

    We carried out the flow field measurement of methane-oxygen turbulent nonpremixed flame in non-combusting and combusting situations at high pressures using LDV. The main objectives are to study the influences of combustion on the turbulence structure at high pressures and to provide detailed data on which numerical predictions on such flows can rely. Direct observation and CH* chemiluminescence detection are conducted at high pressures up to 1.0MPa. It was found that the flame length at elevated pressures became constant. From flow field measurements, the following features of flames at elevated pressure were found: (1) the existence of flame suppressed turbulence in the upstream region of the jet and enhanced it in the downstream region with increasing pressure; (2) Turbulence in the flame was more anisotropic than in the corresponding cold jet in all regions of the flow with increasing pressure; (3) Reynolds shear stresses did not change at elevated pressure; (4) Combustion processes had a marked influence on the turbulence macroscale under high pressures, however, the turbulence macroscale was not changed even with the increase in pressure.

  17. Turbulent Combustion Modeling Advances, New Trends and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Echekki, Tarek

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent combustion sits at the interface of two important nonlinear, multiscale phenomena: chemistry and turbulence. Its study is extremely timely in view of the need to develop new combustion technologies in order to address challenges associated with climate change, energy source uncertainty, and air pollution. Despite the fact that modeling of turbulent combustion is a subject that has been researched for a number of years, its complexity implies that key issues are still eluding, and a theoretical description that is accurate enough to make turbulent combustion models rigorous and quantitative for industrial use is still lacking. In this book, prominent experts review most of the available approaches in modeling turbulent combustion, with particular focus on the exploding increase in computational resources that has allowed the simulation of increasingly detailed phenomena. The relevant algorithms are presented, the theoretical methods are explained, and various application examples are given. The book ...

  18. Thermal Radiation Properties of Turbulent Lean Premixed Methane Air Flames

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ji, Jun; Sivathanu, Y. R; Gore, J. P

    2000-01-01

    ... of turbulent premixed flames. Reduced cooling airflows in lean premixed combustors, miniaturization of combustors, and the possible use of radiation sensors in combustion control schemes are some of the practical reasons...

  19. Investigation of combustion characteristics of methane-hydrogen fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetkin, A. V.; Suris, A. L.; Litvinova, O. A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical investigations of combustion characteristics of methane-hydrogen fuel used at present in tube furnaces of some petroleum refineries are carried out and possible problems related to change-over of existing furnaces from natural gas to methane-hydrogen fuel are analyzed. The effect of the composition of the blended fuel, associated temperature and emissivity of combustion products, temperature of combustion chamber walls, mean beam length, and heat release on variation in the radiation heat flux is investigated. The methane concentration varied from 0 to 100%. The investigations were carried out both at arbitrary given gas temperatures and at effective temperatures determined based on solving a set of equations at various heat-release rates of the combustion chamber and depended on the adiabatic combustion temperature and the temperature at the chamber output. The approximation dependence for estimation of the radiation heat exchange rate in the radiant chamber of the furnace at change-over to fuel with a greater hydrogen content is obtained. Hottel data were applied in the present work in connection with the impossibility to use approximated formulas recommended by the normative method for heat calculation of boilers to determine the gas emissivity, which are limited by the relationship of partial pressures of water steam and carbon dioxide in combustion products . The effect of the methane-hydrogen fuel on the equilibrium concentration of nitrogen oxides is also investigated.

  20. Aerodynamic properties of turbulent combustion fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, C. C.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    Flow fields involving turbulent flames in premixed gases under a variety of conditions are modeled by the use of a numerical technique based on the random vortex method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations and a flame propagation algorithm to trace the motion of the front and implement the Huygens principle, both due to Chorin. A successive over-relaxation hybrid method is applied to solve the Euler equation for flows in an arbitrarily shaped domain. The method of images, conformal transformation, and the integral-equation technique are also used to treat flows in special cases, according to their particular requirements. Salient features of turbulent flame propagation in premixed gases are interpreted by relating them to the aerodynamic properties of the flow field. Included among them is the well-known cellular structure of flames stabilized by bluff bodies, as well as the formation of the characteristic tulip shape of flames propagating in ducts. In its rudimentary form, the mechanism of propagation of a turbulent flame is shown to consist of: (1) rotary motion of eddies at the flame front, (2) self-advancement of the front at an appropriate normal burning speed, and (3) dynamic effects of expansion due to exothermicity of the combustion reaction. An idealized model is used to illustrate these fundamental mechanisms and to investigate basic aerodynamic features of flames in premixed gases. The case of a confined flame stabilized behind a rearward-facing step is given particular care and attention. Solutions are shown to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental results, especially with respect to global properties such as the average velocity profiles and reattachment length.

  1. Comparison of Combustion properties of simulated biogas and methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Gonzalez, Carlos; Arrieta, Andres Amell; Suarez, Jose Luis

    2009-01-01

    The utilization of new renewable energy sources has been of special interest during the past years, seeking to decrease our dependence on fossil fuels and the corresponding environmental impact derived from their use. The combustion properties of a simulated gas composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide in volume are determined in this paper by means of calculation algorithms developed by the GASURE team, comparing them to pure methane properties. Furthermore, the effect of these properties on premixed flame characteristic phenomena is demonstrated. These properties were determined by theoretical estimations. The characteristic phenomena (laminar deflagration velocity, flame structure, radiation pattern) are determined experimentally. Results show a high effect of carbon dioxide in the combustion properties and characteristic parameters of a biogas premixed flame such as laminar deflagration velocity, flame structure and gas-methane exchangeability problems. The difference regarding flame structure and combustion properties lead to a difference in radiation pattern of the gases studied.

  2. Comparison of combustion properties of simulated biogas and methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz G, Carlos; Amell, Andres; Suarez, Jose

    2010-01-01

    The utilization of new renewable energy sources has been of special interest during the past years, seeking to decrease our dependence on fossil fuels and the corresponding environmental impact derived from their use. The combustion properties of a simulated gas composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide in volume are determined in this paper by means of calculation algorithms developed by the GASURE team, comparing them to pure methane properties. Furthermore, the effect of these properties on premixed flame characteristic phenomena is demonstrated. These properties were determined by theoretical estimations. The characteristic phenomena (laminar deflagration velocity, flame structure, radiation pattern) are determined experimentally. Results show a high effect of carbon dioxide in the combustion properties and characteristic parameters of a biogas premixed flame such as laminar deflagration velocity, flame structure and gas-methane exchangeability problems. The difference regarding flame structure and combustion properties lead to a difference in radiation pattern of the gases studied.

  3. Radiative heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This introduction reviews why combustion and radiation are important, as well as the technical challenges posed by radiation. Emphasis is on interactions among turbulence, chemistry and radiation (turbulence-chemistry-radiation interactions – TCRI) in Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulations. Subsequent chapters cover: chemically reacting turbulent flows; radiation properties, Reynolds transport equation (RTE) solution methods, and TCRI; radiation effects in laminar flames; TCRI in turbulent flames; and high-pressure combustion systems. This Brief presents integrated approach that includes radiation at the outset, rather than as an afterthought. It stands as the most recent developments in physical modeling, numerical algorithms, and applications collected in one monograph.

  4. Comparison of different chemical kinetic mechanisms of methane combustion in an internal combustion engine configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Ennetta Ridha; Hamdi Mohamed; Said Rachid

    2008-01-01

    Three chemical kinetic mechanisms of methane combustion were tested and compared using the internal combustion engine model of Chemkin 4.02 [1]: one-step global reaction mechanism, four-step mechanism, and the standard detailed scheme GRIMECH 3.0. This study shows good concordances, especially between the four-step and the detailed mechanisms in the prediction of temperature and main species profiles. But reduced schemes were incapables to predict pollutant emissions in an internal combustion...

  5. Interaction between combustion and turbulence in modelling of emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksanen, A.; Maeki-Mantila, E.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study the combustion models taking into account the coupling between gas phase reactions and turbulence the modelling of emissions, especially of nitric oxide, when temperature and species concentrations are fluctuating by turbulence. The principal tools to model turbulent gas phase combustion were methods based on the probability density function (pdf) with β and γ-distributions the practice of which can take into consideration the stochastic nature of turbulence and, on the other hand, the models which also include the effect turbulence on the reaction rates in the flames e.g. the Eddy Dissipation Model (EDM), the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC), the kinetic mod and the combinations of those ones, respectively. Besides these models effect of the different turbulence models (standard, RNG and CHENKIM k-ε models) on the combustion phenomena, especially on the formation emissions was also studied. Same kind of modelling has been done by the teams in the Special Interest Group of ERCOFTAC (European Research Community On Flow Turbulence And Combustion) under the title of Aerodynamics and Steady State Combustion Chambers and Furnaces (A.S.C.F.) with which we have co-operated during some years with success. (author)

  6. Ammonia chemistry in oxy-fuel combustion of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendiara, Teresa; Glarborg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation of NH3 during oxy-fuel combustion of methane, i.e., at high [CO2], has been studied in a flow reactor. The experiments covered stoichiometries ranging from fuel rich to very fuel lean and temperatures from 973 to 1773 K. The results have been interpreted in terms of an updated detai...

  7. Computational Modeling of Turbulent Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is development and validation of predictive models or modeling approaches of liquid fuel combustion (spray combustion) in hot-diluted environments, known as flameless combustion or MILD combustion. The goal is to combine good physical insight,

  8. Analysis of Turbulent Combustion in Simplified Stratified Charge Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyoshi, Yasuo; Morikawa, Hideaki; Komatsu, Eiji

    The stratified charge combustion system has been widely studied due to the significant potentials for low fuel consumption rate and low exhaust gas emissions. The fuel-air mixture formation process in a direct-injection stratified charge engine is influenced by various parameters, such as atomization, evaporation, and in-cylinder gas motion at high temperature and high pressure conditions. It is difficult to observe the in-cylinder phenomena in such conditions and also challenging to analyze the following stratified charge combustion. Therefore, the combustion phenomena in simplified stratified charge conditions aiming to analyze the fundamental stratified charge combustion are examined. That is, an experimental apparatus which can control the mixture distribution and the gas motion at ignition timing was developed, and the effects of turbulence intensity, mixture concentration distribution, and mixture composition on stratified charge combustion were examined. As a result, the effects of fuel, charge stratification, and turbulence on combustion characteristics were clarified.

  9. Interaction between combustion and turbulence in modelling of emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksanen, A.; Maeki-Mantila, E.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the work is to study the combustion models which are taking into account the coupling between gas phase chemistry and turbulence in the modelling of emissions, especially of nitric oxide, when temperature and species concentrating are fluctuating by turbulence. The principal tools to model turbulent gas phase combustion are the probability density function (pdf) and the other models which are taking into consideration the effect of turbulence on the chemical reactions in flames. Such other models to use in the modelling are many e.g. Eddy Dissipation Model (EDM), Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC), Eddy Dissipation Kinetic model (EDK), Eddy Break Up model (EBU), kinetic models and the combinations of those ones, respectively. Besides these models the effect of the different turbulence models on the formation of emissions will be also studied. Same kind of modelling has been done also by the teams in the Special Interest Group of ERCOFTAC (European Research Community On Flow Turbulence And Combustion) under the name of Aerodynamics and Steady State Combustion Chambers and Furnaces (A.S.C.F.). Combustion measurements are also tried to do if only the practical conditions take it possible. (author)

  10. Methane combustion over lanthanum-based perovskite mixed oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arandiyan, Hamidreza [New South Wales Univ., Sydney (Australia). School of Chemical Engineering

    2015-11-01

    This book presents current research into the catalytic combustion of methane using perovskite-type oxides (ABO{sub 3}). Catalytic combustion has been developed as a method of promoting efficient combustion with minimum pollutant formation as compared to conventional catalytic combustion. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have recommended that noble metals supported on (ABO{sub 3}) with well-ordered porous networks show promising redox properties. Three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) materials with interpenetrated and regular mesoporous systems have recently triggered enormous research activity due to their high surface areas, large pore volumes, uniform pore sizes, low cost, environmental benignity, and good chemical stability. These are all highly relevant in terms of the utilization of natural gas in light of recent catalytic innovations and technological advances. The book is of interest to all researchers active in utilization of natural gas with novel catalysts. The research covered comes from the most important industries and research centers in the field. The book serves not only as a text for researcher into catalytic combustion of methane, 3DOM perovskite mixed oxide, but also explores the field of green technologies by experts in academia and industry. This book will appeal to those interested in research on the environmental impact of combustion, materials and catalysis.

  11. Effect of hydrogen on hydrogen-methane turbulent non-premixed flame under MILD condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardani, Amir; Tabejamaat, Sadegh [Department of Aerospace engineering, Amirkabir university of technology (Tehran polytechnic), Hafez Ave., PO. Box: 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran)

    2010-10-15

    Energy crises and the preservation of the global environment are placed man in a dilemma. To deal with these problems, finding new sources of fuel and developing efficient and environmentally friendly energy utilization technologies are essential. Hydrogen containing fuels and combustion under condition of the moderate or intense low-oxygen dilution (MILD) are good choices to replace the traditional ones. In this numerical study, the turbulent non-premixed CH{sub 4}+H{sub 2} jet flame issuing into a hot and diluted co-flow air is considered to emulate the combustion of hydrogen containing fuels under MILD conditions. This flame is related to the experimental condition of Dally et al. [Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 1147-1154]. In general, the modelling is carried out using the EDC model, to describe turbulence-chemistry interaction, and the DRM-22 reduced mechanism and the GRI2.11 full mechanism to represent the chemical reactions of H{sub 2}/methane jet flame. The effect of hydrogen content of fuel on flame structure for two co-flow oxygen levels is studied by considering three fuel mixtures, 5%H{sub 2}+95%CH{sub 4}, 10%H{sub 2}+90%CH{sub 4} and 20% H{sub 2}+80%CH{sub 4}(by mass). In this study, distribution of species concentrations, mixture fraction, strain rate, flame entrainment, turbulent kinetic energy decay and temperature are investigated. Results show that the hydrogen addition to methane leads to improve mixing, increase in turbulent kinetic energy decay along the flame axis, increase in flame entrainment, higher reaction intensities and increase in mixture ignitability and rate of heat release. (author)

  12. Turbulence-combustion interaction in direct injection diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bencherif Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental measures of chemical species and turbulence intensity during the closed part of the engine combustion cycle are today unattainable exactly. This paper deals with numerical investigations of an experimental direct injection Diesel engine and a commercial turbocharged heavy duty direct injection one. Simulations are carried out with the kiva3v2 code using the RNG (k-ε model. A reduced mechanism for n-heptane was adopted for predicting auto-ignition and combustion processes. From the calibrated code based on experimental in-cylinder pressures, the study focuses on the turbulence parameters and combustion species evolution in the attempt to improve understanding of turbulence-chemistry interaction during the engine cycle. The turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate are taken as representative parameters of turbulence. The results indicate that chemistry reactions of fuel oxidation during the auto-ignition delay improve the turbulence levels. The peak position of turbulent kinetic energy coincides systematically with the auto-ignition timing. This position seems to be governed by the viscous effects generated by the high pressure level reached at the auto-ignition timing. The hot regime flame decreases rapidly the turbulence intensity successively by the viscous effects during the fast premixed combustion and heat transfer during other periods. It is showed that instable species such as CO are due to deficiency of local mixture preparation during the strong decrease of turbulence energy. Also, an attempt to build an innovative relationship between self-ignition and maximum turbulence level is proposed. This work justifies the suggestion to determine otherwise the self-ignition timing.

  13. A parametric study of microjet assisted methane/air turbulent flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouaieb, Sirine; Kriaa, Wassim; Mhiri, Hatem; Bournot, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Microjet assisted methane/air turbulent flames are numerically investigated. • A parametric study concerning the microjet velocity and diameter is carried out. • Previous validation of temperature, mixture fraction and soot is enhanced. • Mixing and soot emission are controlled for higher velocities and lower diameters. • Soot production is reduced by 94% for a microjet velocity equal to 1 m/s. - Abstract: A parametric study of microjet assisted methane/air turbulent flames characteristics is numerically investigated. The Presumed Probability Density Function model and the Discrete Ordinates model are respectively considered for combustion and radiation modeling. The k-epsilon Standard model with Pope Correction is adopted as a turbulence closure model. The two step Tesner model is used to quantify the soot particle production in the flame configuration. Comparison with our previous work using the k-epsilon Realizable model shows that the k-epsilon Standard model with Pope Correction ensures better predictions. The microjet velocity and diameter effects on thermal field, mixing process and soot emission are then discussed. Numerical findings show that the microjet can be used as an efficient tool controlling methane/air turbulent flames. On the one hand, it is shown that the microjet creates an inner flame in the vicinity of the central nozzle exit but does not globally alter the methane/air flame shape. On the other hand, mixing process can be enhanced for high microjet Reynolds number either by increasing the microjet velocity or by decreasing its nozzle diameter for a constant microjet mass flow rate. Soot production can be consequently reduced for low microjet diameter and high velocity values.

  14. Methane combustion in catalytic premixed burners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, I.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, V.

    1999-01-01

    Catalytic premixed burners for domestic boiler applications were developed with the aim of achieving a power modularity from 10 to 100% and pollutant emissions limited to NO x 2 , where the combustion took place entirely inside the burner heating it to incandescence and allowing a decrease in the flame temperature and NO x emissions. Such results were confirmed through further tests carried out in a commercial industrial-scale boiler equipped with the conical panels. All the results, by varying the excess air and the heat power employed, are presented and discussed [it

  15. Turbine Burners: Turbulent Combustion of Liquid Fuels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sirignano, William A; Liu, Feng; Dunn-Rankin, Derek

    2006-01-01

    The proposed theoretical/computational and experimental study addresses the vital two-way coupling between combustion processes and fluid dynamic phenomena associated with schemes for burning liquid...

  16. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent piloted methane/air diffusion flame (Sandia flame D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitsch, H.; Steiner, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Lagrangian Flamelet Model is formulated as a combustion model for large-eddy simulations of turbulent jet diffusion flames. The model is applied in a large-eddy simulation of a piloted partially premixed methane/air diffusion flame (Sandia flame D). The results of the simulation are compared to experimental data of the mean and RMS of the axial velocity and the mixture fraction and the unconditional and conditional averages of temperature and various species mass fractions, including CO and NO. All quantities are in good agreement with the experiments. The results indicate in accordance with experimental findings that regions of high strain appear in layer like structures, which are directed inwards and tend to align with the reaction zone, where the turbulence is fully developed. The analysis of the conditional temperature and mass fractions reveals a strong influence of the partial premixing of the fuel. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  17. Numerical prediction of flow, heat transfer, turbulence and combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Spalding, D Brian; Pollard, Andrew; Singhal, Ashok K

    1983-01-01

    Numerical Prediction of Flow, Heat Transfer, Turbulence and Combustion: Selected Works of Professor D. Brian Spalding focuses on the many contributions of Professor Spalding on thermodynamics. This compilation of his works is done to honor the professor on the occasion of his 60th birthday. Relatively, the works contained in this book are selected to highlight the genius of Professor Spalding in this field of interest. The book presents various research on combustion, heat transfer, turbulence, and flows. His thinking on separated flows paved the way for the multi-dimensional modeling of turbu

  18. Numerical simulations of turbulent jet ignition and combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Irannejad, Abolfazl; Jaberi, Farhad

    2013-11-01

    The ignition and combustion of a homogeneous lean hydrogen-air mixture by a turbulent jet flow of hot combustion products injected into a colder gas mixture are studied by a high fidelity numerical model. Turbulent jet ignition can be considered as an efficient method for starting and controlling the reaction in homogeneously charged combustion systems used in advanced internal combustion and gas turbine engines. In this work, we study in details the physics of turbulent jet ignition in a fundamental flow configuration. The flow and combustion are modeled with the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) approach, in which the filtered form the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity and the FMDF transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar (temperature and species mass fractions) field. The hydrogen oxidation is described by a detailed reaction mechanism with 37 elementary reactions and 9 species.

  19. Combustion and emissions control in diesel-methane dual fuel engines: The effects of methane supply method combined with variable in-cylinder charge bulk motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, Antonio P.; Laforgia, Domenico; Saracino, Roberto; Toto, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    presence and to calculate an average luminance value over the whole frame. These luminance values, chosen as indicators of the combustion intensity, were represented over crank angle position and, then, an analysis of the resulting curves was performed. Results showed that the charge bulk motion associated to the swirl port, improving the charge mixing of the diesel spray and the propagation of the turbulent flame fronts, is capable to enhance the oxidation of air-methane mixture, both at low and high engine loads. Furthermore, at low loads, the analysis of combustion images and luminance curves showed that methane port injection can significantly affect the intensity and the spreading of the flame during dual fuel combustion, especially when a suitable in-cylinder bulk motion is obtained. Concerning the engine emissions, some correlations with what observed during the analysis of the combustion development were found. Furthermore, it was revealed that, for several combinations of the engine operating parameters, methane port injection was always associated to the lowest emission levels, demonstrating that this methane supply method is a very effective strategy to reduce unburned hydrocarbons and nitric oxides concentrations, especially when implemented with variable intake geometry systems.

  20. Models for turbulent flows with variable density and combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.P.

    1980-01-01

    Models for transport processes and combustion in turbulent flows are outlined with emphasis on the situation where the fuel and air are injected separately. Attention is restricted to relatively simple flames. The flows investigated are high Reynolds number, single-phase, turbulent high-temperature flames in which radiative heat transfer can be considered negligible. Attention is given to the lower order closure models, algebraic stress and flux models, the k-epsilon turbulence model, the diffusion flame approximation, and finite rate reaction mechanisms

  1. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE COUPLED TURBULENT COMBUSTION-RADIATION IN AN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRAHIM ZITOUNI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A turbulent non-premixed methane-air flame was studied in an axisymmetric cylindrical combustion chamber, focusing on thermal radiation effects on temperature and soot concentration fields. The simulation is based on the solution of the mass, energy, momentum and chemical species conservation equations. The turbulence and its interaction with combustion are modelled by the standard k-ε model and eddy dissipation concept, respectively. The semiempirical model of Syed is implemented to deal with soot formation and oxidation and thus ensuring the overall efficiency of the present investigation. The radiative heat transfer is surveyed, for two cases: with and without soot radiation. The numerical resolution has been achieved using the Hottel’s zonal method and the standard weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model, to predict the real gas-soot mixture radiation effect. A new concept of optical exchange gap has been recently proposed and applied here after avoiding the singularities obviously encountered in the calculation of the direct exchange areas of volume zones self-irradiance. The obtained numerical results are compared to experimental data due to Brookes and Moss. Radiation exchange is found to noticeably affect temperature and soot volume fraction predictions and slightly the mixture fraction solutions. The present paper shows that taking into account turbulent combustion-radiation interactions leads to more accurate results by comparison to available experimental data.

  2. 3rd International Workshop on Turbulent Spray Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Gutheil, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This book reflects the results of the 2nd and 3rd International Workshops on Turbulent Spray Combustion. The focus is on progress in experiments and numerical simulations for two-phase flows, with emphasis on spray combustion. Knowledge of the dominant phenomena and their interactions allows development of predictive models and their use in combustor and gas turbine design. Experts and young researchers present the state-of-the-art results, report on the latest developments and exchange ideas in the areas of experiments, modelling and simulation of reactive multiphase flows. The first chapter reflects on flame structure, auto-ignition and atomization with reference to well-characterized burners, to be implemented by modellers with relative ease. The second chapter presents an overview of first simulation results on target test cases, developed at the occasion of the 1st International Workshop on Turbulent Spray Combustion. In the third chapter, evaporation rate modelling aspects are covered, while the fourth ...

  3. Modelling of turbulent hydrocarbon combustion. Test of different reactor concepts for describing the interactions between turbulence and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C; Kremer, H [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik, Bochum (Germany); Kilpinen, P; Hupa, M [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1998-12-31

    The detailed modelling of turbulent reactive flows with CFD-codes is a major challenge in combustion science. One method of combining highly developed turbulence models and detailed chemistry in CFD-codes is the application of reactor based turbulence chemistry interaction models. In this work the influence of different reactor concepts on methane and NO{sub x} chemistry in turbulent reactive flows was investigated. Besides the classical reactor approaches, a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), the Eddy-Dissipation Combustion Model (EDX) and the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) were included. Based on a detailed reaction scheme and a simplified 2-step mechanism studies were performed in a simplified computational grid consisting of 5 cells. The investigations cover a temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K and consider fuel-rich and fuel-lean gas mixtures as well as turbulent and highly turbulent flow conditions. All test cases investigated in this study showed a strong influence of the reactor residence time on the species conversion processes. Due to this characteristic strong deviations were found for the species trends resulting from the different reactor approaches. However, this influence was only concentrated on the `near burner region` and after 4-5 cells hardly any deviation and residence time dependence could be found. The importance of the residence time dependence increased when the species conversion was accelerated as it is the case for overstoichiometric combustion conditions and increased temperatures. The study focused furthermore on the fine structure in the EDC. Unlike the classical approach this part of the cell was modelled as a PFR instead of a PSR. For high temperature conditions there was hardly any difference between both reactor types. However, decreasing the temperature led to obvious deviations. Finally, the effect of the selective species transport between the cells on the conversion process was investigated

  4. Modelling of turbulent hydrocarbon combustion. Test of different reactor concepts for describing the interactions between turbulence and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Kremer, H. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik, Bochum (Germany); Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-12-31

    The detailed modelling of turbulent reactive flows with CFD-codes is a major challenge in combustion science. One method of combining highly developed turbulence models and detailed chemistry in CFD-codes is the application of reactor based turbulence chemistry interaction models. In this work the influence of different reactor concepts on methane and NO{sub x} chemistry in turbulent reactive flows was investigated. Besides the classical reactor approaches, a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), the Eddy-Dissipation Combustion Model (EDX) and the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) were included. Based on a detailed reaction scheme and a simplified 2-step mechanism studies were performed in a simplified computational grid consisting of 5 cells. The investigations cover a temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K and consider fuel-rich and fuel-lean gas mixtures as well as turbulent and highly turbulent flow conditions. All test cases investigated in this study showed a strong influence of the reactor residence time on the species conversion processes. Due to this characteristic strong deviations were found for the species trends resulting from the different reactor approaches. However, this influence was only concentrated on the `near burner region` and after 4-5 cells hardly any deviation and residence time dependence could be found. The importance of the residence time dependence increased when the species conversion was accelerated as it is the case for overstoichiometric combustion conditions and increased temperatures. The study focused furthermore on the fine structure in the EDC. Unlike the classical approach this part of the cell was modelled as a PFR instead of a PSR. For high temperature conditions there was hardly any difference between both reactor types. However, decreasing the temperature led to obvious deviations. Finally, the effect of the selective species transport between the cells on the conversion process was investigated

  5. Cyber-Based Turbulent Combustion Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    in flow-field structures between the laminar and turbulent counter-flowing fuel injection is clearly illustrated in figure 1. As a consequence , it...flame thickness by comparing with benchmark of AFRL/RZ ( UNICORN ) suppressing the oscillatory numerical behavior. These improvements in numerical...fraction with the benchmark results of AFRL/RZ. This validating base is generated by the UNICORN program on the finest mesh available and the local

  6. Multiscale methods in turbulent combustion: strategies and computational challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echekki, Tarek

    2009-01-01

    A principal challenge in modeling turbulent combustion flows is associated with their complex, multiscale nature. Traditional paradigms in the modeling of these flows have attempted to address this nature through different strategies, including exploiting the separation of turbulence and combustion scales and a reduced description of the composition space. The resulting moment-based methods often yield reasonable predictions of flow and reactive scalars' statistics under certain conditions. However, these methods must constantly evolve to address combustion at different regimes, modes or with dominant chemistries. In recent years, alternative multiscale strategies have emerged, which although in part inspired by the traditional approaches, also draw upon basic tools from computational science, applied mathematics and the increasing availability of powerful computational resources. This review presents a general overview of different strategies adopted for multiscale solutions of turbulent combustion flows. Within these strategies, some specific models are discussed or outlined to illustrate their capabilities and underlying assumptions. These strategies may be classified under four different classes, including (i) closure models for atomistic processes, (ii) multigrid and multiresolution strategies, (iii) flame-embedding strategies and (iv) hybrid large-eddy simulation-low-dimensional strategies. A combination of these strategies and models can potentially represent a robust alternative strategy to moment-based models; but a significant challenge remains in the development of computational frameworks for these approaches as well as their underlying theories. (topical review)

  7. Some aspects of numerical analysis of turbulent gaseous and spray combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, T.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper numerical calculations and analysis on turbulent non-premixed gaseous and spray combustion are reviewed. Attentions were paid to the turbulent flow and combustion modeling applicable to predicting the flow, mixing and combustion of gaseous fuels and sprays. Some of the computed results of turbulent gaseous non-premixed (diffusion) flames with and without swirl and transient spray combustion were compared with experimental ones to understand the processes in the flame and to assure how the computations predict the experiments

  8. Pd enhanced WC catalyst to promote heterogeneous methane combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terracciano, Anthony Carmine; De Oliveira, Samuel; Siddhanti, Deepti; Blair, Richard; Vasu, Subith S.; Orlovskaya, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pd enhanced WC catalyst particles were synthesized via mechanochemical alloying. • Catalyst was characterized by XRD, XRF, SEM, and EDS. • Catalyst was deposited on porous ZrO_2 and evaluated in heterogeneous combustion. • During combustion temperature profiles and spectral emissions were collected. - Abstract: The efficiency of combustion for low cost heat production could be greatly enhanced if an active and low cost catalyst would be used to facilitate the chemical reactions occurring during combustor operation. Within this work an experimental study of palladium (Pd) enhanced tungsten carbide (WC) catalyst, synthesized via high energy ball milling and deposited by dip coating onto a magnesia partially stabilized zirconia (MgO-ZrO_2) porous matrix of 10 ppin was evaluated in heterogeneous methane combustion. The synthesized powder was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, as well as by X-ray Fluorescence (XRF); and the morphology of the deposited WC-Pd coating was also characterized using SEM and EDS. Performance evaluation of the heterogeneous combustor with WC-Pd coated MgO-ZrO_2 porous media was conducted at constant air flow rate and various equivalence ratios of methane/air gaseous mixtures, while monitoring axial temperature profiles within the combustion chamber using thermocouples, as well as thermal radiative and acoustic emissions from the combustor exhaust using an externally placed CCD camera and a microphone. It was found that there is a strong dependence of flame position and maximum temperature on equivalence ratio (φ) over the range of 0.47 ± 0.02 ⩽ φ ⩽ 0.75 ± 0.02. Additionally it was found that over the same equivalence ratio range, there is a characteristic 4 peak acoustic signature between 200 and 500 Hz. It was found that at higher equivalence ratios 0.51 ± 0.02 ⩽ φ ⩽ 0.75 ± 0.02 the performance of combustor

  9. Interaction between combustion and turbulence in modelling of emissions; Palamisen ja turbulenssin vuorovaikutus paeaestoejen mallinnuksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksanen, A.; Maeki-Mantila, E. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Inst. of Energy and Process Technology

    1997-10-01

    The aim of the project has been to model and simulate gas phase combustion taking into account the interaction between the chemical reactions and turbulence, respectively. Especially the modelling of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide were included in the computations which were applied into two laboratory-scale test cases namely into the about 300 kW natural gas burner by International Flame Research Foundation and into the smaller natural gas jet flame by delft University of Technology. Both test cases were calculated in two dimensional axially symmetric chambers with the swirl numbers equal to 0.56 and zero in the IFRF and Delft flames, respectively. In this study it was necessary to take into account as well as possible the effect of turbulence on the chemical reactions. Therefore, the Eddy Dissipation Concept Model (EDC) together with the local extinction was chosen to describe both the combustion reactions of methane and carbon monoxide and the formation and reduction of nitric oxide, too. In this study two different turbulent time scales were used namely the Kolmogorov time scale in the fine structure conditions without and with the factor taking more into account the fine structure conditions, respectively. It can be noticed the computational results are more similar with the experimental data when the factor was used. The prediction of chemical time scale was based on the principle by Gran et Melaaen and Magnussen. (orig.)

  10. Study on Characteristics of Co-firing Ammonia/Methane Fuels under Oxygen Enriched Combustion Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua; Wang, Zhaolin; Valera-Medina, Agustin; Bowen, Philip J.

    2018-06-01

    Having a background of utilising ammonia as an alternative fuel for power generation, exploring the feasibility of co-firing ammonia with methane is proposed to use ammonia to substitute conventional natural gas. However, improvement of the combustion of such fuels can be achieved using conditions that enable an increase of oxygenation, thus fomenting the combustion process of a slower reactive molecule as ammonia. Therefore, the present study looks at oxygen enriched combustion technologies, a proposed concept to improve the performance of ammonia/methane combustion. To investigate the characteristics of ammonia/methane combustion under oxygen enriched conditions, adiabatic burning velocity and burner stabilized laminar flame emissions were studied. Simulation results show that the oxygen enriched method can help to significantly enhance the propagation of ammonia/methane combustion without changing the emission level, which would be quite promising for the design of systems using this fuel for practical applications. Furthermore, to produce low computational-cost flame chemistry for detailed numerical analyses for future combustion studies, three reduced combustion mechanisms of the well-known Konnov's mechanism were compared in ammonia/methane flame simulations under practical gas turbine combustor conditions. Results show that the reduced reaction mechanisms can provide good results for further analyses of oxygen enriched combustion of ammonia/methane. The results obtained in this study also allow gas turbine designers and modellers to choose the most suitable mechanism for further combustion studies and development.

  11. Design of a High Intensity Turbulent Combustion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    mixing of the reactants in chemical reactors, boilers , furnaces and mixing of fuel and air in engines take place in turbulent flow. One of the most...determining flame speed. When a tube containing combustible mixture, the flame speed is the propagation speed of the flame front towards the unburned...stress criteria is effective when the material is ductile in nature. This stress theory is developed from the 44 ’distortion energy failure theory

  12. Numerical modeling of turbulent combustion and flame spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Zhenghua

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical models have been developed to address several important aspects of numerical modeling of turbulent combustion and flame spread. The developed models include a pyrolysis model for charring and non-charring solid materials, a fast narrow band radiation property evaluation model (FASTNB) and a turbulence model for buoyant flow and flame. In the pyrolysis model, a completely new algorithm has been proposed, where a moving dual mesh concept was developed and implemented. With this new concept, it provides proper spatial resolution for both temperature and density and automatically considers the regression of the surface of the non-charring solid material during its pyrolysis. It is simple, very efficient and applicable to both charring and non-charring materials. FASTNB speeds up significantly the evaluation of narrow band spectral radiation properties and thus provides a potential of applying narrow band model in numerical simulations of practical turbulent combustion. The turbulence model was developed to improve the consideration of buoyancy effect on turbulence and turbulent transport. It was found to be simple, promising and numerically stable. It has been tested against both plane and axisymmetric thermal plumes and an axisymmetric buoyant diffusion flame. When compared with the widely used standard buoyancy-modified {kappa} - {epsilon} model, it gives significant improvement on numerical results. These developed models have been fully incorporated into CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code and coupled with other CFD sub-models, including the DT (Discrete Transfer) radiation model, EDC (Eddy Dissipation Concept) combustion model, flamelet combustion model, various soot models and transpired wall function. Comprehensive numerical simulations have been carried out to study soot formation and oxidation in turbulent buoyant diffusion flames, flame heat transfer and flame spread in fires. The gas temperature and velocity, soot volume fraction, wall

  13. Effect of hydrogen addition on burning rate and surface density of turbulent lean premixed methane-air flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, H.; Tayebi, B.; Galizzi, C.; Escudie, D.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen (H 2 ) is a clean burning component, but relatively expensive. Mixing a small amount of hydrogen with other fuels is an effective way to use H 2 . H 2 enriched combustion significantly improves fuel efficiency and reduces pollutant (nitrogen oxide and particulate matter) emissions. This presentation discussed the effect of hydrogen addition on burning rate and surface density of turbulent lean premixed methane-air flames. The presentation discussed flame configuration; the experimental methodology using laser tomography; and results for typical images, burning velocity, ratio of turbulent to laminar burning velocities, flame surface density, curvature, flame brush thickness, and integrated flame surface area. It was concluded that the increase of turbulent burning velocity was faster than that of laminar burning velocity, which contradicted traditional theory. figs.

  14. Monte-Carlo computation of turbulent premixed methane/air ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmen, Christina Lieselotte

    The present work describes the results obtained by a time dependent numerical technique that simulates the early flame development of a spark-ignited premixed, lean, gaseous methane/air mixture with the unsteady spherical flame propagating in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. The algorithm described is based upon a sub-model developed by an international automobile research and manufacturing corporation in order to analyze turbulence conditions within internal combustion engines. Several developments and modifications to the original algorithm have been implemented including a revised chemical reaction scheme and the evaluation and calculation of various turbulent flame properties. Solution of the complete set of Navier-Stokes governing equations for a turbulent reactive flow is avoided by reducing the equations to a single transport equation. The transport equation is derived from the Navier-Stokes equations for a joint probability density function, thus requiring no closure assumptions for the Reynolds stresses. A Monte-Carlo method is also utilized to simulate phenomena represented by the probability density function transport equation by use of the method of fractional steps. Gaussian distributions of fluctuating velocity and fuel concentration are prescribed. Attention is focused on the evaluation of the three primary parameters that influence the initial flame kernel growth-the ignition system characteristics, the mixture composition, and the nature of the flow field. Efforts are concentrated on the effects of moderate to intense turbulence on flames within the distributed reaction zone. Results are presented for lean conditions with the fuel equivalence ratio varying from 0.6 to 0.9. The present computational results, including flame regime analysis and the calculation of various flame speeds, provide excellent agreement with results obtained by other experimental and numerical researchers.

  15. The effect of fan-induced turbulence on the combustion of hydrogen-air mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.K.; Tamm, H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of fan-induced turbulence on the combustion of hydrogen-air mixtures has been studied in a 2.3-m diameter sphere over a hydrogen concentration range of 4 to 42% (by volume). Two fans were used to produce the turbulence, which was measured at various lacations by hot-wire anemometry. For low hydrogen concentrations (< 7%), turbulence increases the rate and extent of combustion; for large turbulence intensities the extent of combustion approaches 100%, and combustion times are reduced by factors of 8 to 10 from those observed under quiescent conditions. At high hydrogen concentrations, the effect of turbulence on combustion time is less pronounced than at low hydrogen concentrations. Flame-generated turbulence has a significant effect on the combustion rate. (orig.)

  16. Gasdynamic Model of Turbulent Combustion in TNT Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2010-01-08

    A model is proposed to simulate turbulent combustion in confined TNT explosions. It is based on: (i) the multi-component gasdynamic conservation laws, (ii) a fast-chemistry model for TNT-air combustion, (iii) a thermodynamic model for frozen reactants and equilibrium products, (iv) a high-order Godunov scheme providing a non-diffusive solution of the governing equations, and (v) an ILES approach whereby adaptive mesh refinement is used to capture the energy bearing scales of the turbulence on the grid. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of explosion fields from 1.5-g PETN/TNT charges were performed. Explosions in six different chambers were studied: three calorimeters (volumes of 6.6-l, 21.2-l and 40.5-l with L/D = 1), and three tunnels (L/D = 3.8, 4.65 and 12.5 with volumes of 6.3-l) - to investigate the influence of chamber volume and geometry on the combustion process. Predicted pressures histories were quite similar to measured pressure histories for all cases studied. Experimentally, mass fraction of products, Y{sub p}{sup exp}, reached a peak value of 88% at an excess air ratio of twice stoichiometric, and then decayed with increasing air dilution; mass fractions Y{sub p}{sup calc} computed from the numerical simulations followed similar trends. Based on this agreement, we conclude that the dominant effect that controls the rate of TNT combustion with air is the turbulent mixing rate; the ILES approach along with the fast-chemistry model used here adequately captures this effect.

  17. Effect of carbon black nanoparticles on methane/air explosions: Influence at low initial turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, David; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Dufaud, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Nanoparticles are widely used in industrial applications as additives to modify materials properties such as resistance, surface, rheology or UV-radiation. As a consequence, the quantification and characterization of nanoparticles have become almost compulsory, including the understanding of the risks associated to their use. Since a few years ago, several studies of dust explosion properties involving nano-sized powder have been published. During the production and industrial use of nanoparticles, simultaneous presence of gas / vapor / solvents and dispersed nanoparticles mixtures might be obtained, increasing the risk of a hybrid mixture explosion. The aim of this work is to study the severity of the explosion of carbon black nanoparticles/methane mixtures and understand the influence of adding nanopowders on the behavior of the gas explosions. These results are also useful to understand the influence of soot on the efficiency of the gas combustion. Two grades of carbon black nanoparticles (ranging from 20 to 300 nm average diameter) have been mixed with methane. Tests have been performed on these mixtures in a standard 20 L explosion sphere. Regarding the scale precision, the lowest concentration of carbon black nanoparticles was set at 0.5 g.m-3. Tests were also performed at 2.5 g.m-3, which is still far below 60 g.m-3, the minimum explosive concentration of such powders previously determined in our laboratory. The influence of carbon black particles on the severity of the explosions has been compared to that of pure gas. It appears that the use of carbon black nanoparticles increases the explosion overpressure for lean methane mixtures at low initial turbulences by c. 10%. Similar results were obtained for high initial turbulent systems. Therefore, it seems that carbon black nanoparticles have an impact on the severity of the explosion even for quiescent systems, as opposed to systems involving micro-sized powders that require dispersion at high turbulence

  18. SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caughey, David

    2010-10-08

    A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

  19. Transient combustion modeling of an oscillating lean premixed methane/air flam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withag, J.A.M.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; Syed, Khawar

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the present study is to demonstrate accurate low frequency transient turbulent combustion modeling. For accurate flame dynamics some improvements were made to the standard TFC combustion model for lean premixed combustion. With use of a 1D laminar flamelet code, predictions

  20. Frequency-resolved interferometric measurement of local density fluctuations for turbulent combustion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köberl, S; Giuliani, F; Woisetschläger, J; Fontaneto, F

    2010-01-01

    A validation of a novel interferometric measurement technique for the frequency-resolved detection of local density fluctuation in turbulent combustion analysis was performed in this work. Two laser vibrometer systems together with a signal analyser were used to obtain frequency spectra of density fluctuations across a methane-jet flame. Since laser vibrometry is based on interferometric techniques, the derived signals are path-integrals along the measurement beam. To obtain local frequency spectra of density fluctuations, long-time-averaged measurements from each of the two systems were performed using correlation functions and cross spectra. Results were compared to data recorded by standard interferometric techniques for validation purposes. Additionally, Raman scattering and laser Doppler velocimetry were used for flame characterization

  1. An Experimental Investigation of Premixed Combustion in Extreme Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabel, Timothy Michael

    This work has explored various aspects of high Reynolds number combustion that have received much previous speculation. A new high-Reynolds number premixed Bunsen burner, called Hi-Pilot, was designed to produce turbulence intensities in the extreme range of turbulence. The burner was modified several times in order to prevent boundary layer separation in the nozzle, and a large co-flow was designed that was capable of maintaining reactions over the entire flame surface. Velocity and turbulence characteristics were measured using a combination of Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Flame structure was studied using a combination of formaldehyde (CH2O), hydroxyl (OH), and the CH radical. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). The spatial Overlap of formaldehyde and OH PLIF qualitatively measures the reaction rate between formaldehyde molecules and OH radicals, and is a measure of the reaction layers of the flame. CH PLIF provides an alternative measure of the reaction zone, and was measured to compare with the Overlap PLIF results. Reaction layers are the full-width at half-maximum of the Overlap or CH PLIF signal, and extinction events were defined as regions where the PLIF signal drops below this threshold. Preheat structures were measured using formaldehyde PLIF, and are defined as beginning at 35% of the local maximum PLIF signal, and continue up to the leading edge of the reaction layer. Previous predictions of regime diagram boundaries were tested at the largest values of turbulent Reynolds number to date. The Overlap and CH PLIF diagnostics allowed extensive testing of the predicted broken reaction zones boundary of Peters. Measurements indicated that all run conditions are in the Broadened Preheat - Thin Reaction layers regime, but several conditions are expected to display a broken reaction zone structure. Therefore the work shows that Peters's predicted boundary is not correct, and therefore a Karlovitz number of 100 is

  2. An experimental study on turbulent lifted flames of methane in coflow jets at elevated temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted on the effects of initial temperature variation on the stabilization characteristics of turbulent nonpremixed flames in coflow jets of methane fuel diluted by nitrogen. The typical behavior seen in the study

  3. Investigation of particle-laden turbulent flow in free shear turbulent combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Ellzey, J.; Daily, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Explicit numerical mixed phase simulations are described which couple random gasdynamic motions to inertiallly interactive gas borne particles. Theses simulations are numerical experiments intended to provide data for investigating the interaction between a developing turbulent free shear layer and gas borne solid particles it entrains. The simulations predict most probable distributions of dispersed phase trajectories, standard deviations, and gas phase mixing dynamics which include the concomitant back-influences of the particle phase on the carrier gas flow. Data for refinement of the computational scheme and physical verification are provided by experiment. The experimental evidence is developed in a splitter plate divided, two-channel free shear mixing combustion tube. A variety of particle concentrations and particle size distributions are admitted into non-combusting or combusting flows with selected heat release levels. The computations, in turn, provide guidance on design and selection of new experiments

  4. Catalytic combustion for the elimination of methane, BTEX and other VOC : IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, R.E.; Wanke, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    Options for volatile organic compound combustion include homogeneous combustion (flaring) or catalytic combustion involving a flameless combustion process that uses a solid catalyst to promote the combustion reaction. This presentation discussed relative reactivity testing for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over commercial catalysts. Several commercial pad catalysts were tested, as well as other powders. The relative reactivity of methane as well as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) were investigated. The purpose of the project was to evaluate combustion of concentrated methane streams that contained BTEX compounds; evaluate catalytic combustion using a counter diffusive radiant heater; develop mathematical models for the reactor to enhance design and understanding; improve the catalyst for BTEX combustion; and target application-dehydrator units. Topics that were addressed in the presentation included methane and benzene conversion; catalytic radiant heaters; small industrial and commercial units; measured temperature distribution; fuel slippage, methane conversion; the effect of water and hydrocarbons; the effect of water-liquid injection; and water addition as vapour. Several observations were offered, including that high percentages of injected liquid water can reduce reactor operating temperature; combustion of BTEX remained highly efficient, however liquid injection could also cause temperature reductions and ultimately the reactor would extinguish; and pre-heating the feed can eliminate the temperature drop and pad wetness problem. It was concluded that BTEX compounds are reactive, and the technology appears promising. 19 figs

  5. Catalytic combustion for the elimination of methane, BTEX and other VOC : IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, R.E.; Wanke, S.E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Options for volatile organic compound combustion include homogeneous combustion (flaring) or catalytic combustion involving a flameless combustion process that uses a solid catalyst to promote the combustion reaction. This presentation discussed relative reactivity testing for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over commercial catalysts. Several commercial pad catalysts were tested, as well as other powders. The relative reactivity of methane as well as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) were investigated. The purpose of the project was to evaluate combustion of concentrated methane streams that contained BTEX compounds; evaluate catalytic combustion using a counter diffusive radiant heater; develop mathematical models for the reactor to enhance design and understanding; improve the catalyst for BTEX combustion; and target application-dehydrator units. Topics that were addressed in the presentation included methane and benzene conversion; catalytic radiant heaters; small industrial and commercial units; measured temperature distribution; fuel slippage, methane conversion; the effect of water and hydrocarbons; the effect of water-liquid injection; and water addition as vapour. Several observations were offered, including that high percentages of injected liquid water can reduce reactor operating temperature; combustion of BTEX remained highly efficient, however liquid injection could also cause temperature reductions and ultimately the reactor would extinguish; and pre-heating the feed can eliminate the temperature drop and pad wetness problem. It was concluded that BTEX compounds are reactive, and the technology appears promising. 19 figs.

  6. Thermodynamic characteristics of a low concentration methane catalytic combustion gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Juan; Su, Shi; Yu, Xin Xiang; Weng, Yiwu

    2010-01-01

    Low concentration methane, emitted from coal mines, landfill, animal waste, etc. into the atmosphere, is not only a greenhouse gas, but also a waste energy source if not utilised. Methane is 23 times more potent than CO 2 in terms of trapping heat in the atmosphere over a timeframe of 100 years. This paper studies a novel lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine, which can be powered with about 1% methane (volume) in air. When this technology is successfully developed, it can be used not only to mitigate the methane for greenhouse gas reduction, but also to utilise such methane as a clean energy source. This paper presents our study results on the thermodynamic characteristics of this new lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine system by conducting thermal performance analysis of the turbine cycle. The thermodynamic data including thermal efficiencies and exergy loss of main components of the turbine system are presented under different pressure ratios, turbine inlet temperatures and methane concentrations.

  7. Dynamic-Stability Characteristics of Premixed Methane Oxy-Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Shroll, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    This work explores the dynamic stability characteristics of premixed CH 4/O 2/CO 2 mixtures in a 50 kW swirl stabilized combustor. In all cases, the methane-oxygen mixture is stoichiometric, with different dilution levels of carbon dioxide used to control the flame temperature (T ad). For the highest T ad\\'s, the combustor is unstable at the first harmonic of the combustor\\'s natural frequency. As the temperature is reduced, the combustor jumps to fundamental mode and then to a low-frequency mode whose value is well below the combustor\\'s natural frequency, before eventually reaching blowoff. Similar to the case of CH 4/air mixtures, the transition from one mode to another is predominantly a function of the T ad of the reactive mixture, despite significant differences in laminar burning velocity and/or strained flame consumption speed between air and oxy-fuel mixtures for a given T ad. High speed images support this finding by revealing similar vortex breakdown modes and thus similar turbulent flame geometries that change as a function of flame temperature. Copyright © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  8. Modelling of turbulent combustion in the blast furnace raceway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karvinen, R; Maekiranta, R [Tampere Univ. (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1997-12-31

    The phenomena concerning coke-gas -suspension and simultaneous combustion of solid coke particles and residual fuel oil in a blast furnace raceway are modelled. The flow field of suspension is predicted by using the two fluid model, which is based on the Eulerian method, in the Phoenics code. The standard k-e -model of turbulence is used. Pyrolysis of oil droplets is calculated with the own coded subroutine, which is based on the Lagrangian approach. Gas phase reaction rate is assumed to be controlled by chemical kinetics. Radiative heat transfer is calculated by using the six-flux method. Heterogenous surface reactions are used for the coke particles. Calculations without coke combustion show that due to a poor mixing in the hot blast, pyrolysis gases of residual fuel oil have not time enough to react with oxygen. It is obvious that if combustion of coke particles is taken into account, the oxygen content in the blast decreases to such a level, that unburnt pyrolysis gases can flow out of the raceway causing problems. The distribution of coke void fraction has been succeeded to predict in the raceway domain. Coke particles fall from the upper part of the raceway to the hot blast forming locally high concentrations, which affect very strongly the oxygen distribution of the hot blast. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 10 refs.

  9. Modelling of turbulent combustion in the blast furnace raceway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karvinen, R.; Maekiranta, R. [Tampere Univ. (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The phenomena concerning coke-gas -suspension and simultaneous combustion of solid coke particles and residual fuel oil in a blast furnace raceway are modelled. The flow field of suspension is predicted by using the two fluid model, which is based on the Eulerian method, in the Phoenics code. The standard k-e -model of turbulence is used. Pyrolysis of oil droplets is calculated with the own coded subroutine, which is based on the Lagrangian approach. Gas phase reaction rate is assumed to be controlled by chemical kinetics. Radiative heat transfer is calculated by using the six-flux method. Heterogenous surface reactions are used for the coke particles. Calculations without coke combustion show that due to a poor mixing in the hot blast, pyrolysis gases of residual fuel oil have not time enough to react with oxygen. It is obvious that if combustion of coke particles is taken into account, the oxygen content in the blast decreases to such a level, that unburnt pyrolysis gases can flow out of the raceway causing problems. The distribution of coke void fraction has been succeeded to predict in the raceway domain. Coke particles fall from the upper part of the raceway to the hot blast forming locally high concentrations, which affect very strongly the oxygen distribution of the hot blast. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 10 refs.

  10. Simulation of turbulent flows with and without combustion with emphasis on the impact of coherent structures on the turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha Galeazzo, Flavio Cesar

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of turbulent mixing in complex turbulent flows is a challenging task. The effective mixing of entrained fluids to a molecular level is a vital part of the dynamics of turbulent flows, especially when combustion is involved. The work has shown the limitations of the steady-state simulations and acknowledged the need of applying high-fidelity unsteady methods for the calculation of flows with pronounced unsteadiness promoted by large-scale coherent structures or other sources.

  11. Comparison methods between methane and hydrogen combustion for useful transfer in furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiea, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of hydrogen use by industrial combustion are critically presented. Greenhouse effect due natural water vapors from atmosphere and these produced by hydrogen industrial combustion is critically analyzed, together with problems of gas fuels containing hydrogen as the relative largest component. A comparison method between methane and hydrogen combustion for pressure loss in burner feeding pipe, is conceived. It is deduced the ratio of radiation useful heat transfer characteristics and convection heat transfer coefficients from combustion gases at industrial furnaces and heat recuperators for hydrogen and methane combustion, establishing specific comparison methods. Using criterial equations special processed for convection heat transfer determination, a calculation generalizing formula is established. The proposed comparison methods are general valid for different gaseous fuels. (author)

  12. Working group report: methane emissions from fuel combustion and industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdowski, J.J.M.; Beck, L.; Piccot, S.; Olivier, J.G.J.; Veldt, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper lists the source categories which are currently recognised as minor sources of methane. These fall into five broad groups: stationary fuel combustion (residential combustion of fuels, solid waste incineration at home sites, on-site agricultural waste burning, industrial and utility combustion of coal, wood, oil and gas, commercial and industrial waste incineration); mobile fuel combustion; non-combustion industrial processes (primary metals production, chemical manufacturing processes, petroleum refining, commercial charcoal manufacturing waste treatments); minor energy production sources (storage and distribution of automotive fuels, geothermal energy production; peat mining operations, oil shale mining operations); and miscellaneous sources. The paper also presents a preliminary estimate of global methane emissions from these minor sources and the results of the working group's discussion on recommendations for the IPCC/OECD methodology and specific research needs. A list of control options for emissions from minor sources is provided. 2 tabs

  13. Catalytic combustion of methane over mixed oxides derived from Co-Mg/Al ternary hydrotalcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zheng [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Research Centre of Eco-Environmental Sciences, CAS, Beijing 100085 (China); Jesus College, University of Oxford, OX1 3DW (United Kingdom); Yu, Junjie; Cheng, Jie; Hao, Zhengping [Research Centre of Eco-Environmental Sciences, CAS, Beijing 100085 (China); Xiao, Tiancun; Edwards, Peter P. [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Jones, Martin O. [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Co{sub x}Mg{sub 3-x} /Al composite oxides (xCoMAO-800) were prepared by calcination of Co{sub x}Mg{sub 3-x}/Al hydrotalcites (x=0.0,0.5,1.0,1.5,2.0,2.5,3.0, respectively) at 800 C. The materials were characterized using XRD, TG-DSC, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and TPR. The methane catalytic combustion over the xCoMAO-800 was assessed in a fixed bed micro-reactor. The results revealed that cobalt can be homogenously dispersed into the matrices of the hydrotalcites and determines the structure, specific surface areas and porosity of the derived xCoMAO-800 oxide catalysts. The thermal stability and homogeneity of the hydrotalcites markedly depends on the cobalt concentration in the hydrotalcites. The Co-based hydrotalcite-derived oxides exhibit good activity in the catalytic combustion of methane. The catalytic activity over the xCoMAO-800 oxides enhances with increasing x up to 1.5, but subsequently decreases dramatically as cobalt loadings are further increased. The 1.5CoMAO-800 catalyst shows the best methane combustion activity, igniting methane at 450 C and completing methane combustion around 600 C. The catalytic combustion activity over the xCoMAO-800 oxides are closely related to the strong Co-Mg/Al interaction within the mixed oxides according to the TG-DSC, TPR and activity characteristics. (author)

  14. The Characteristics of Methane Combustion Suppression by Water Mist and Its Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongkun Pan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To safely mine coal, engineers must prevent gas combustion and explosions, as well as seek feasible and reasonable techniques to control for these types of incidents. This paper analyzes the causes and characteristics of methane combustion and explosions. Water mist is proposed to prevent and control methane combustion in an underground confined space. We constructed an experiment platform to investigate the suppression of methane combustion using water mist for different conditions. The experimental results showed that water mist is highly effective for methane flame inhibition. The flame was extinguished with water mist endothermic cooling. However, the annular regions of water vapor around the fire played a vital role in flame extinction. Water from the evaporating mist replaces the oxygen available to the fuel. Additionally, the time required for fuel ignition is prolonged. For these reasons, the water particle action to flame surface is reinforced and the fuel’s reaction with air is delayed. As a result, flame stretching and disturbances occur, which serve to extinguish the flame. Engineering application tests were carried out in the goaf, drill hole and upper-corner to investigate the prevention and control of methane gas combustion, with the results showing a good application effect.

  15. Investigation of Spark Ignition and Autoignition in Methane and Air Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Chemical Reaction Kinetics. A numerical Study of Ignition Processes in Internal Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordrik, R.

    1993-12-01

    The processes in the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines have received increased attention in recent years because their efficiencies are important both economically and environmentally. This doctoral thesis studies the ignition phenomena by means of numerical simulation methods. The fundamental physical relations include flow field conservation equations, thermodynamics, chemical reaction kinetics, transport properties and spark modelling. Special attention is given to the inclusion of chemical kinetics in the flow field equations. Using his No Transport of Radicals Concept method, the author reduces the computational efforts by neglecting the transport of selected intermediate species. The method is validated by comparison with flame propagation data. A computational method is described and used to simulate spark ignition in laminar premixed methane-air mixtures and the autoignition process of a methane bubble surrounded by hot air. The spark ignition simulation agrees well with experimental results from the literature. The autoignition simulation identifies the importance of diffusive and chemical processes acting together. The ignition delay times exceed the experimental values found in the literature for premixed ignition delay, presumably because of the mixing process and lack of information on low temperature reactions in the skeletal kinetic mechanism. Transient turbulent methane jet autoignition is simulated by means of the KIVA-II code. Turbulent combustion is modelled by the Eddy Dissipation Concept. 90 refs., 81 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Experimental validation of large-eddy simulation for swirling methane-air non-premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, L.Y.; Luo, Y.H.; Xu, C.S. [Shanghai Jiaotong Univ. (China). School of Mechanical Engineering; Zhou, L.X. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics

    2013-07-01

    Large-eddy simulation of swirling methane-air non-premixed combustion was carried out using a Smagorinsky-Lilly subgrid scale stress model and a presumed-PDF fast-chemistry combustion model. The LES statistical results are validated by PIV, temperature and species concentration measurements made by the present authors. The results indicate that in the present case the presumed-PDF fast-chemistry combustion model is a fairish one. The instantaneous vorticity and temperature maps show clearly the development and the interaction between coherent structures and combustion.

  17. Investigation of flame structure in plasma-assisted turbulent premixed methane-air flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hualei, ZHANG; Liming, HE; Jinlu, YU; Wentao, QI; Gaocheng, CHEN

    2018-02-01

    The mechanism of plasma-assisted combustion at increasing discharge voltage is investigated in detail at two distinctive system schemes (pretreatment of reactants and direct in situ discharge). OH-planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique is used to diagnose the turbulent structure methane-air flame, and the experimental apparatus consists of dump burner, plasma-generating system, gas supply system and OH-PLIF system. Results have shown that the effect of pretreatment of reactants on flame can be categorized into three regimes: regime I for voltage lower than 6.6 kV; regime II for voltage between 6.6 and 11.1 kV; and regime III for voltage between 11.1 and 12.5 kV. In regime I, aerodynamic effect and slower oxidation of higher hydrocarbons generated around the inner electrode tip plays a dominate role, while in regime III, the temperature rising effect will probably superimpose on the chemical effect and amplify it. For wire-cylinder dielectric barrier discharge reactor with spatially uneven electric field, the amount of radicals and hydrocarbons are decreased monotonically in radial direction which affects the flame shape. With regard to in situ plasma discharge in flames, the discharge pattern changes from streamer type to glow type. Compared with the case of reactants pretreatment, the flame propagates further in the upstream direction. In the discharge region, the OH intensity is highest for in situ plasma assisted combustion, indicating that the plasma energy is coupled into flame reaction zone.

  18. Bioenergy potential of Ulva lactuca: Biomass yield, methane production and combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Annette; Dahl, Jonas; Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The biomass production potential at temperate latitudes (56°N), and the quality of the biomass for energy production (anaerobic digestion to methane and direct combustion) were investigated for the green macroalgae, Ulva lactuca. The algae were cultivated in a land based facility demonstrating...... in weight specific methane production compared to wet biomass. Ash and alkali contents are the main challenges in the use of U. lactuca for direct combustion. Application of a bio-refinery concept could increase the economical value of the U. lactuca biomass as well as improve its suitability for production...

  19. Combustion of methane-oxygen and methane-oxygen-CFC mixtures initiated by a high-current slipping surface discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossyi, I.A.; Silakov, V.P.; Tarasova, N.M.

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the destruction of chlorofluorocarbon (CF 2 Cl 2 ) molecules in a methane-oxygen (air) gas mixture whose combustion is initiated by a high-current slipping surface discharge. It is found that a three-component CH 4 + O 2 (air)+ CF 2 Cl 2 gas mixture (even with a considerable amount of the third component) demonstrates properties of explosive combustion involving chain reactions that are typical of two-component CH 4 + O 2 mixtures. Experiments show the high degree of destruction (almost complete decomposition) of chlorofluorocarbons contained in the mixture during one combustion event. The combustion dynamics is studied. It is shown that the combustion initiated by a slipping surface discharge has a number of characteristic features that make it impossible to identify the combustion dynamics with the formation of a combustion or detonation wave. The features of the effects observed can be related to intense UV radiation produced by a pulsed high-current surface discharge

  20. Advances in Turbulent Combustion Dynamics Simulations in Bluff-Body Stabilized Flames-Body Stabilized Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    during combustion for GRI -Mech 1.2 reaction mechanism using LEM and CHEMKIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3.7 Comparison of temperature during...combustion for GRI -Mech 1.2 raction mechanism using LEM and CHEMKIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3.8 The methane profile along the 5 mm long...combustion process was tested using GRI -Mech 1.2 [44]. GRI -Mech is an optimized detailed chemical reaction mechanism capable of the best representation of

  1. Catalytically stabilized combustion of lean methane-air-mixtures: a numerical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogwiler, U; Benz, P; Mantharas, I [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The catalytically stabilized combustion of lean methane/air mixtures has been studied numerically under conditions closely resembling the ones prevailing in technical devices. A detailed numerical model has been developed for a laminar, stationary, 2-D channel flow with full heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms. The computations provide direct information on the coupling between heterogeneous-homogeneous combustion and in particular on the means of homogeneous ignitions and stabilization. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  2. CFD modeling of combustion processes using KIVA3V Code with partially stirred reactor model for turbulence-combustion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarnicki, R.; Sobiesiak, A.

    2002-01-01

    In order to solve the averaged conservation equations for turbulent reacting flow one is faced with a task of specifying the averaged chemical reaction rate. This is due to turbulence influence on the mean reaction rates that appear in the species concentration Reynolds-averaged equation. In order to investigate the Partially Stirred Reactor (PaSR) combustion model capabilities, a CFD modeling using KIVA3V Code with the PaSR model of two very different combustion processes, was performed. Experimental results were compared with modeling

  3. Interaction between combustion and turbulence in modelling of emissions; Palamisen ja turbulenssin vuorovaikutus paeaestoejen mallinnuksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksanen, A.; Maeki-Mantila, E. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Thermal Engineering

    1996-12-01

    The aim of the work was to study the combustion models taking into account the coupling between gas phase reactions and turbulence the modelling of emissions, especially of nitric oxide, when temperature and species concentrations are fluctuating by turbulence. The principal tools to model turbulent gas phase combustion were methods based on the probability density function (pdf) with {beta} and {gamma}-distributions the practice of which can take into consideration the stochastic nature of turbulence and, on the other hand, the models which also include the effect turbulence on the reaction rates in the flames e.g. the Eddy Dissipation Model (EDM), the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC), the kinetic mod and the combinations of those ones, respectively. Besides these models effect of the different turbulence models (standard, RNG and CHENKIM k-{epsilon} models) on the combustion phenomena, especially on the formation emissions was also studied. Same kind of modelling has been done by the teams in the Special Interest Group of ERCOFTAC (European Research Community On Flow Turbulence And Combustion) under the title of Aerodynamics and Steady State Combustion Chambers and Furnaces (A.S.C.F.) with which we have co-operated during some years with success. (author)

  4. Chemical Looping Combustion of Hematite Ore with Methane and Steam in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bayham

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical looping combustion is considered an indirect method of oxidizing a carbonaceous fuel, utilizing a metal oxide oxygen carrier to provide oxygen to the fuel. The advantage is the significantly reduced energy penalty for separating out the CO2 for reuse or sequestration in a carbon-constrained world. One of the major issues with chemical looping combustion is the cost of the oxygen carrier. Hematite ore is a proposed oxygen carrier due to its high strength and resistance to mechanical attrition, but its reactivity is rather poor compared to tailored oxygen carriers. This problem is further exacerbated by methane cracking, the subsequent deposition of carbon and the inability to transfer oxygen at a sufficient rate from the core of the particle to the surface for fuel conversion to CO2. Oxygen needs to be readily available at the surface to prevent methane cracking. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the use of steam to overcome this issue and improve the conversion of the natural gas to CO2, as well as to provide data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD validation. The steam will gasify the deposited carbon to promote the methane conversion. This work studies the performance of hematite ore with methane and steam mixtures in a 5 cm fluidized bed up to approximately 140 kPa. Results show an increased conversion of methane in the presence of steam (from 20–45% without steam to 60–95% up to a certain point, where performance decreases. Adding steam allows the methane conversion to carbon dioxide to be similar to the overall methane conversion; it also helped to prevent carbon accumulation from occurring on the particle. In general, the addition of steam to the feed gas increased the methane conversion. Furthermore, the addition of steam caused the steam methane reforming reaction to form more hydrogen and carbon monoxide at higher steam and methane concentrations, which was not completely converted at higher concentrations and

  5. Experiment and modeling of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhongqing; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Li; Guo, Mingnv; Ran, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The catalytic combustion of 0.15~3 vol. % low concentration methane in a fluidized bed was studied. • A mathematical model was proposed on the basis of gas–solid flow theory. • A comparative analysis of the established model with plug flow, mixed flow and K-L models was carried out. • The axial methane profile along fluidized bed was predicted by using the mathematical model. • The bed temperature has greater impact on methane conversion than fluidized velocity. - Abstract: This study undertakes a theoretical analysis and an experimental investigation into the characteristics of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor using 0.5 wt.% Pd/Al_2O_3 as catalytic particles. A mathematical model is established based on gas–solid flow theory and is used to study the effects of bed temperature and fluidized velocity on methane catalytic combustion, and predict the dimensionless methane concentration axial profile in reactor. It is shown that methane conversion increases with bed temperature, but decreases with increasing fluidized velocity. These theoretical results are found to correlate well with the experimental measurement, with a deviation within 5%. A comparative analysis of the developed model with plug flow, mixed flow and K-L models is also carried out, and this further verifies that the established model better reflects the characteristics of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed. Using this reaction model, it was found that the difference in methane conversion between dense and freeboard zones gradually increases with bed temperature; the dense zone reaction levels off at 650 °C, thereby minimizing the difference between the dense and freeboard regions to around 15%. With an increase in bed temperature, the dimensionless methane concentration in the dense zone decreases exponentially, while in the splash zone, it varies from an exponential decay to a slow

  6. Modeling local extinction in turbulent combustion using an embedding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, Robert; Pantano, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Local regions of extinction in diffusion flames, called ``flame holes,'' can reduce the efficiency of combustion and increase the production of certain pollutants. At sufficiently high speeds, a flame may also be lifted from the rim of the burner to a downstream location that may be stable. These two phenomena share a common underlying mechanism of propagation related to edge-flame dynamics where chemistry and fluid mechanics are equally important. We present a formulation that describes the formation, propagation, and growth of flames holes on the stoichiometric surface using edge flame dynamics. The boundary separating the flame from the quenched region is modeled using a progress variable defined on the moving stoichiometric surface that is embedded in the three-dimensional space using an extension algorithm. This Cartesian problem is solved using a high-order finite-volume WENO method extended to this nonconservative problem. This algorithm can track the dynamics of flame holes in a turbulent reacting-shear layer and model flame liftoff without requiring full chemistry calculations.

  7. Numerical and experimental investigation of NO{sub x} formation in lean premixed combustion of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, K; Benz, P; Marti, T; Schaeren, R; Schlegel, A [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    A high pressure jet-stirred reactor has been built and employed to investigate NO{sub x} formation in lean premixed combustion of methane/air. Experimental results are compared with numerical predictions using the model of a perfectly stirred reactor and elementary reaction mechanisms. Four reaction mechanisms are considered with respect to NO{sub x} formation. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  8. Taylor dispersion in premixed combustion: Questions from turbulent combustion answered for laminar flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Joel; Pearce, Philip; Al-Malki, Faisal

    2018-02-01

    We present a study of Taylor dispersion in premixed combustion and use it to clarify fundamental issues related to flame propagation in a flow field. In particular, simple analytical formulas are derived for variable density laminar flames with arbitrary Lewis number Le providing clear answers to important questions arising in turbulent combustion, when these questions are posed for the case of one-scale laminar parallel flows. Exploiting, in the context of a laminar Poiseuille flow model, a thick flame distinguished asymptotic limit for which the flow amplitude is large with the Reynolds number Re fixed, three main contributions are made. First, a link is established between Taylor dispersion [G. Taylor, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 219, 186 (1953), 10.1098/rspa.1953.0139] and Damköhler's second hypothesis [G. Damköhler, Ber. Bunsen. Phys. Chem. 46, 601 (1940)] by describing analytically the enhancement of the effective propagation speed UT due to small flow scales. More precisely, it is shown that Damköhler's hypothesis is only partially correct for one-scale parallel laminar flows. Specifically, while the increase in UT due to the flow is shown to be directly associated with the increase in the effective diffusivity as suggested by Damköhler, our results imply that UT˜Re (for Re≫1 ) rather than UT˜√{Re} , as implied by Damköhler's hypothesis. Second, it is demonstrated analytically and confirmed numerically that, when UT is plotted versus the flow amplitude for fixed values of Re, the curve levels off to a constant value depending on Re. We may refer to this effect as the laminar bending effect as it mimics a similar bending effect known in turbulent combustion. Third, somewhat surprising implications associated with the dependence of UT and of the effective Lewis number Leeff on the flow are reported. For example, Leeff is found to vary from Le to Le-1 as Re varies from small to large values. Also, UT is found to be a monotonically increasing function

  9. An investigation of turbulent catalytically stabilized channel flow combustion of lean hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantzaras, I; Benz, P; Schaeren, R; Bombach, R [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The catalytically stabilised thermal combustion (CST) of lean hydrogen-air mixtures was investigated numerically in a turbulent channel flow configuration using a two-dimensional elliptic model with detailed heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions. Comparison between turbulent and laminar cases having the same incoming mean properties shows that turbulence inhibits homogeneous ignition due to increased heat transport away from the near-wall layer. The peak root-mean-square temperature and species fluctuations are always located outside the extent of the homogeneous reaction zone indicating that thermochemical fluctuations have no significant influence on gaseous combustion. (author) 4 figs., 6 refs.

  10. A 25 kWe low concentration methane catalytic combustion gas turbine prototype unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Shi; Yu, Xinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Low concentration methane, emitted from various industries e.g. coal mines and landfills into atmosphere, is not only an important greenhouse gas, but also a wasted energy resource if not utilized. In the past decade, we have been developing a novel VAMCAT (ventilation air methane catalytic combustion gas turbine) technology. This turbine technology can be used to mitigate methane emissions for greenhouse gas reduction, and also to utilize the low concentration methane as an energy source. This paper presents our latest research results on the development and demonstration of a 25 kWe lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine prototype unit. Recent experimental results show that the unit can be operated with 0.8 vol% of methane in air, producing about 19–21 kWe of electricity output. - Highlights: • A novel low concentration methane catalytic turbine prototype unit was developed. • The 25 kWe unit can be operated with ∼0.8 vol.% CH 4 in air with 19–21 kWe output. • A new start-up method was developed for the prototype unit

  11. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong G. Im; Arnaud Trouve; Christopher J. Rutland; Jacqueline H. Chen

    2009-02-02

    The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

  12. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Hong G [University of Michigan; Trouve, Arnaud [University of Maryland; Rutland, Christopher J [University of Wisconsin; Chen, Jacqueline H [Sandia National Laboratories

    2012-08-13

    The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

  13. Modelling the effects of heat loss and fuel/air mixing on turbulent combustion in gas turbine combustion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gövert, S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the development and validation of a simulation framework for the accurate prediction of turbulent reacting flows at reduced computational costs. Therefore, a combustion model based on the tabulation of laminar premixed flamelets is employed. By compilation of

  14. Dynamic-Stability Characteristics of Premixed Methane Oxy-Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Shroll, Andrew P.; Shanbhogue, Santosh J.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2012-01-01

    This work explores the dynamic stability characteristics of premixed CH 4/O 2/CO 2 mixtures in a 50 kW swirl stabilized combustor. In all cases, the methane-oxygen mixture is stoichiometric, with different dilution levels of carbon dioxide used

  15. DNS and LES/FMDF of turbulent jet ignition and combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Jaberi, Farhad

    2014-11-01

    The ignition and combustion of lean fuel-air mixtures by a turbulent jet flow of hot combustion products injected into various geometries are studied by high fidelity numerical models. Turbulent jet ignition (TJI) is an efficient method for starting and controlling the combustion in complex propulsion systems and engines. The TJI and combustion of hydrogen and propane in various flow configurations are simulated with the direct numerical simulation (DNS) and the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) models. In the LES/FMDF model, the filtered form of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity and the FMDF transport equation is solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar field. The DNS and LES/FMDF data are used to study the physics of TJI and combustion for different turbulent jet igniter and gas mixture conditions. The results show the very complex and different behavior of the turbulence and the flame structure at different jet equivalence ratios.

  16. Numerical analysis of hydrogen and methane propagation during testing of combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák V.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The research of gas-fuelled combustion engines using hydrogen or methane require accordingly equipped test benches which take respect to the higher dangerous of self ignition accidents. This article deals with numerical calculations of flow in laboratory during simulated leakage of gas-fuel from fuel system of tested engine. The influences of local suction and influences of roof exhausters on the flow in the laboratory and on the gas propagation are discussed. Results obtained for hydrogen and for methane are compared. Conclusions for design and performance of suction devices and test benches are deduced from these results.

  17. Basic study on the generation of RF plasmas in premixed oxy-combustion with methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osaka, Yugo; Razzak, M.A.; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Ohno, Noriyasu; Takamura, Shuichi; Uesugi, Yoshihiko

    2010-01-01

    Oxy-combustion generates a high temperature field (above 3000 K), which is applied to next generation power plants and high temperature industrial technologies because of N 2 free processes. However, the combustion temperature is so high that the furnace wall may be fatally damaged. In addition, it is very difficult to control the heat flux and chemical species' concentrations because of rapid chemical reactions. We have developed a new method for controlling the flame by electromagnetic force on this field. In this paper, we experimentally investigated the power coupling between the premixed oxy-combustion with methane and radio frequency (RF) power through the induction coil. By optimizing the power coupling, we observed that the flame can absorb RF power up to 1.5 kW. Spectroscopic measurements also showed an increase in the emission intensity from OH radicals in the flame, indicating improved combustibility. (author)

  18. Large Eddy simulation of turbulent hydrogen-fuelled supersonic combustion in an air cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenito, A.; Cecere, D.; Giacomazzi, E.

    2013-09-01

    The main aim of this article is to provide a theoretical understanding of the physics of supersonic mixing and combustion. Research in advanced air-breathing propulsion systems able to push vehicles well beyond is of interest around the world. In a scramjet, the air stream flow captured by the inlet is decelerated but still maintains supersonic conditions. As the residence time is very short , the study of an efficient mixing and combustion is a key issue in the ongoing research on compressible flows. Due to experimental difficulties in measuring complex high-speed unsteady flowfields, the most convenient way to understand unsteady features of supersonic mixing and combustion is to use computational fluid dynamics. This work investigates supersonic combustion physics in the Hyshot II combustion chamber within the Large Eddy simulation framework. The resolution of this turbulent compressible reacting flow requires: (1) highly accurate non-dissipative numerical schemes to properly simulate strong gradients near shock waves and turbulent structures away from these discontinuities; (2) proper modelling of the small subgrid scales for supersonic combustion, including effects from compressibility on mixing and combustion; (3) highly detailed kinetic mechanisms (the Warnatz scheme including 9 species and 38 reactions is adopted) accounting for the formation and recombination of radicals to properly predict flame anchoring. Numerical results reveal the complex topology of the flow under investigation. The importance of baroclinic and dilatational effects on mixing and flame anchoring is evidenced. Moreover, their effects on turbulence-scale generation and the scaling law are analysed.

  19. Numerical Study of Contaminant Effects on Combustion of Hydrogen, Ethane, and Methane in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, H. T.; Thomas, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to assess the effects of vitiated air on the chemical kinetics of hydrogen, ethane, and methane combustion with air. A series of calculations in static reacting systems was performed, where the initial temperature was specified and reactions occurred at constant pressure. Three different types of test flow contaminants were considered: NP, H2O, and a combustion of H2O and CO2. These contaminants are present in the test flows of facilities used for hypersonic propulsion testing. The results were computed using a detailed reaction mechanism and are presented in terms of ignition and reaction times. Calculations were made for a wide range of contaminant concentrations, temperatures and pressures. The results indicate a pronounced kinetic effect over a range of temperatures, especially with NO contamination and, to a lesser degree, with H2O contamination. In all cases studied, CO2 remained kinetically inert, but had a thermodynamic effect on results by acting as a third body. The largest effect is observed with combustion using hydrogen fuel, less effect is seen with combustion of ethane, and little effect of contaminants is shown with methane combustion.

  20. Modelling of turbulence and combustion for simulation of gas explosions in complex geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arntzen, Bjoern Johan

    1998-12-31

    This thesis analyses and presents new models for turbulent reactive flows for CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation of gas explosions in complex geometries like offshore modules. The course of a gas explosion in a complex geometry is largely determined by the development of turbulence and the accompanying increased combustion rate. To be able to model the process it is necessary to use a CFD code as a starting point, provided with a suitable turbulence and combustion model. The modelling and calculations are done in a three-dimensional finite volume CFD code, where complex geometries are represented by a porosity concept, which gives porosity on the grid cell faces, depending on what is inside the cell. The turbulent flow field is modelled with a k-{epsilon} turbulence model. Subgrid models are used for production of turbulence from geometry not fully resolved on the grid. Results from laser doppler anemometry measurements around obstructions in steady and transient flows have been analysed and the turbulence models have been improved to handle transient, subgrid and reactive flows. The combustion is modelled with a burning velocity model and a flame model which incorporates the burning velocity into the code. Two different flame models have been developed: SIF (Simple Interface Flame model), which treats the flame as an interface between reactants and products, and the {beta}-model where the reaction zone is resolved with about three grid cells. The flame normally starts with a quasi laminar burning velocity, due to flame instabilities, modelled as a function of flame radius and laminar burning velocity. As the flow field becomes turbulent, the flame uses a turbulent burning velocity model based on experimental data and dependent on turbulence parameters and laminar burning velocity. The laminar burning velocity is modelled as a function of gas mixture, equivalence ratio, pressure and temperature in reactant. Simulations agree well with experiments. 139

  1. Methane combustion kinetic rate constants determination: an ill-posed inverse problem analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara D. L. Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane combustion was studied by the Westbrook and Dryer model. This well-established simplified mechanism is very useful in combustion science, for computational effort can be notably reduced. In the inversion procedure to be studied, rate constants are obtained from [CO] concentration data. However, when inherent experimental errors in chemical concentrations are considered, an ill-conditioned inverse problem must be solved for which appropriate mathematical algorithms are needed. A recurrent neural network was chosen due to its numerical stability and robustness. The proposed methodology was compared against Simplex and Levenberg-Marquardt, the most used methods for optimization problems.

  2. Large eddy simulation of turbulent premixed combustion flows over backward facing step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Nam Seob [Yuhan University, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sang Cheol [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent premixed combustion flows over backward facing step has been performed using a dynamic sub-grid G-equation flamelet model. A flamelet model for the premixed flame is combined with a dynamic sub-grid combustion model for the filtered propagation of flame speed. The objective of this study is to investigate the validity of the dynamic sub-grid G-equation model in a complex turbulent premixed combustion flow. For the purpose of validating the LES combustion model, the LES of isothermal and reacting shear layer formed at a backward facing step is carried out. The calculated results are compared with the experimental results, and a good agreement is obtained.

  3. Large eddy simulation of turbulent premixed combustion flows over backward facing step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Nam Seob; Ko, Sang Cheol

    2011-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent premixed combustion flows over backward facing step has been performed using a dynamic sub-grid G-equation flamelet model. A flamelet model for the premixed flame is combined with a dynamic sub-grid combustion model for the filtered propagation of flame speed. The objective of this study is to investigate the validity of the dynamic sub-grid G-equation model in a complex turbulent premixed combustion flow. For the purpose of validating the LES combustion model, the LES of isothermal and reacting shear layer formed at a backward facing step is carried out. The calculated results are compared with the experimental results, and a good agreement is obtained

  4. Stochastic modelling of turbulent combustion for design optimization of gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehanna Ismail, Mohammed Ali

    The present work covers the development and the implementation of an efficient algorithm for the design optimization of gas turbine combustors. The purpose is to explore the possibilities and indicate constructive suggestions for optimization techniques as alternative methods for designing gas turbine combustors. The algorithm is general to the extent that no constraints are imposed on the combustion phenomena or on the combustor configuration. The optimization problem is broken down into two elementary problems: the first is the optimum search algorithm, and the second is the turbulent combustion model used to determine the combustor performance parameters. These performance parameters constitute the objective and physical constraints in the optimization problem formulation. The examination of both turbulent combustion phenomena and the gas turbine design process suggests that the turbulent combustion model represents a crucial part of the optimization algorithm. The basic requirements needed for a turbulent combustion model to be successfully used in a practical optimization algorithm are discussed. In principle, the combustion model should comply with the conflicting requirements of high fidelity, robustness and computational efficiency. To that end, the problem of turbulent combustion is discussed and the current state of the art of turbulent combustion modelling is reviewed. According to this review, turbulent combustion models based on the composition PDF transport equation are found to be good candidates for application in the present context. However, these models are computationally expensive. To overcome this difficulty, two different models based on the composition PDF transport equation were developed: an improved Lagrangian Monte Carlo composition PDF algorithm and the generalized stochastic reactor model. Improvements in the Lagrangian Monte Carlo composition PDF model performance and its computational efficiency were achieved through the

  5. NO{sub x} formation in lean premixed combustion of methane at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, K U.M.; Griebel, P; Schaeren, R [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    High pressure experiments in a jet-stirred reactor have been performed to study the NO{sub x} formation in lean premixed combustion of methane/air mixtures. The experimental results are compared with numerical predictions using four well known reaction mechanisms and a model which consists of a series of two perfectly stirred reactors and a plug flow reactor. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  6. Relation of Hydrogen and Methane to Carbon Monoxide in Exhaust Gases from Internal-Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Tessmann, Arthur M

    1935-01-01

    The relation of hydrogen and methane to carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases from internal-combustion engines operating on standard-grade aviation gasoline, fighting-grade aviation gasoline, hydrogenated safety fuel, laboratory diesel fuel, and auto diesel fuel was determined by analysis of the exhaust gases. Two liquid-cooled single-cylinder spark-ignition, one 9-cylinder radial air-cooled spark-ignition, and two liquid-cooled single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were used.

  7. PDF methods for combustion in high-speed turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Stephen B.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the research performed during the second year of this three-year project. The ultimate objective of the project is extend the applicability of probability density function (pdf) methods from incompressible to compressible turbulent reactive flows. As described in subsequent sections, progress has been made on: (1) formulation and modelling of pdf equations for compressible turbulence, in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous inert flows; and (2) implementation of the compressible model in various flow configurations, namely decaying isotropic turbulence, homogeneous shear flow and plane mixing layer.

  8. An experimental study on turbulent lifted flames of methane in coflow jets at elevated temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted on the effects of initial temperature variation on the stabilization characteristics of turbulent nonpremixed flames in coflow jets of methane fuel diluted by nitrogen. The typical behavior seen in the study showed that the liftoff height increased linearly with the jet velocity regardless of the initial temperature in the turbulent regime. Two models were investigated for predicting liftoff heights in the methane jets: the premixed flame model and the large-scale mixing model. For the premixed flame model, the liftoff heights in the methane jets were accurately predicted using the thermal diffusivity of the unburned gas temperature αst,0, instead of that of the burned gas temperature αst,b. For the large-scale mixing model, however, the prediction of liftoff heights differed slightly for the various fuel mole fractions. However, when considering the initial fuel mass fraction YF,0, the liftoff heights were successfully predicted. This result implies that the characteristics of the unburned fuel-air mixture play a crucial role for flame stabilization in coflow jets for a variety of initial conditions. In the turbulent regime, the blowout velocity and the liftoff height at blowout could be accurately predicted by the two models based on a consideration of the physical properties and the buoyancy effect of the initial temperature variation. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Accuracy improvement of the modified EDM model for non-premixed turbulent combustion in gas turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eight bluff body and swirl turbulent diffusion flames resembling the flow field and combustion inside gas turbine combustors are simulated and the simulation results are compared with experimental data. It is revealed that the original modified EDM model could not predict the temperature profile accurately. A more accurate model is developed and validated for gas turbine combustion application. However, this model under predicts the flame temperature for the regular round jet flames indicating that no universal form of the modified EDM model could be achieved for the combustion simulation of both gas furnaces and gas turbines.

  10. Partially premixed prevalorized kerosene spray combustion in turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrigui, M.; Ahmadi, W.; Sadiki, A.; Janicka, J. [Institute for Energy and Powerplant Technology, TU Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 30, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Moesl, K. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik, TU Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 15, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    A detailed numerical simulation of kerosene spray combustion was carried out on a partially premixed, prevaporized, three-dimensional configuration. The focus was on the flame temperature profile dependency on the length of the pre-vaporization zone. The results were analyzed and compared to experimental data. A fundamental study was performed to observe the temperature variation and flame flashback. Changes were made to the droplet diameter, kerosene flammability limits, a combustion model parameter and the location of the combustion initialization. Investigations were performed for atmospheric pressure, inlet air temperature of 90 C and a global equivalence ratio of 0.7. The simulations were carried out using the Eulerian Lagrangian procedure under a fully two-way coupling. The Bray-Moss-Libby model was adjusted to account for the partially premixed combustion. (author)

  11. chemical kinetic study of nitrogen oxides formation in methane flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado T, Pedro N; Cadavid S, Francisco; Mondragon, P Fanor; Ruiz, Wilson

    2009-01-01

    The present paper deals with the nitrogen oxides formation in a flameless combustion process characterized for using air highly diluted and preheated at high temperatures. The combustion model used in this study was the one dimensional counterflow methane air diffusion flame. The NOx production rate analysis showed that the thermal and prompt mechanisms are the most important for the formation and consumption of NO under dilution conditions for the oxidant in N 2 and combustion products. These mechanisms are related since the starting reaction for NO formation (N2 molecular dissociation) belongs to the prompt mechanism while the NO formation is reported mainly for the thermal mechanism reactions. On the other hand, the NO - NO 2 equilibrium showed that the reaction rates are comparable to that obtained by the thermal and prompt mechanisms, but its global contribution to NO formation are almost insignificant due to the oxidation reaction with radicals HO 2 .

  12. Application of Pareto-efficient combustion modeling framework to large eddy simulations of turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Ihme, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    The modeling of turbulent combustion requires the consideration of different physico-chemical processes, involving a vast range of time and length scales as well as a large number of scalar quantities. To reduce the computational complexity, various combustion models are developed. Many of them can be abstracted using a lower-dimensional manifold representation. A key issue in using such lower-dimensional combustion models is the assessment as to whether a particular combustion model is adequate in representing a certain flame configuration. The Pareto-efficient combustion (PEC) modeling framework was developed to perform dynamic combustion model adaptation based on various existing manifold models. In this work, the PEC model is applied to a turbulent flame simulation, in which a computationally efficient flamelet-based combustion model is used in together with a high-fidelity finite-rate chemistry model. The combination of these two models achieves high accuracy in predicting pollutant species at a relatively low computational cost. The relevant numerical methods and parallelization techniques are also discussed in this work.

  13. Subgrid scale modeling in large-Eddy simulation of turbulent combustion using premixed fdlamelet chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreman, A.W.; Oijen, van J.A.; Goey, de L.P.H.; Bastiaans, R.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent combustion with premixed flamelets is investigated in this paper. The approach solves the filtered Navier-Stokes equations supplemented with two transport equations, one for the mixture fraction and another for a progress variable. The LES premixed flamelet

  14. Sensitivity of the Numerical Prediction of Turbulent Combustion Dynamics in the LIMOUSINE Combustor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahi, Mina; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Roman Casado, J.C.; Sponfeldner, T.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the sensitivity and accuracy of the reaction flow-field prediction for the LIMOUSINE combustor with regard to choices in computational mesh and turbulent combustion model. The LIMOUSINE combustor is a partially premixed, bluff body-stabilized natural gas

  15. Enhanced activity and stability of La-doped CeO2 monolithic catalysts for lean-oxygen methane combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenjun; Jin, Jianhui; Chen, Xiao; Li, Chuang; Wang, Tonghua; Tsang, Chi-Wing; Liang, Changhai

    2018-02-01

    Effective utilization of coal bed methane is very significant for energy utilization and environment protection. Catalytic combustion of methane is a promising way to eliminate trace amounts of oxygen in the coal bed methane and the key to this technology is the development of high-efficiency catalysts. Herein, we report a series of Ce 1-x La x O 2-δ (x = 0-0.8) monolithic catalysts for the catalytic combustion of methane, which are prepared by citric acid method. The structural characterization shows that the substitution of La enhance the oxygen vacancy concentration and reducibility of the supports and promote the migration of the surface oxygen, as a result improve the catalytic activity of CeO 2 . M-Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ (monolithic catalyst, Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ coated on cordierite honeycomb) exhibits outstanding activity for methane combustion, and the temperature for 10 and 90% methane conversion are 495 and 580 °C, respectively. Additionally, Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ monolithic catalyst presents excellent stability at high temperature. These Ce 1-x La x O 2-δ monolithic materials with a small amount of La incorporation therefore show promises as highly efficient solid solution catalysts for lean-oxygen methane combustion. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  16. On the TFNS Subgrid Models for Liquid-Fueled Turbulent Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Wey, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach capable of capturing unsteady flow structures important for turbulent mixing in the combustion chamber and two different subgrid models used to emulate the major processes occurring in the turbulence-chemistry interaction. These two subgrid models are termed as LEM-like model and EUPDF-like model (Eulerian probability density function), respectively. Two-phase turbulent combustion in a single-element lean-direct-injection (LDI) combustor is calculated by employing the TFNS/LEM-like approach as well as the TFNS/EUPDF-like approach. Results obtained from the TFNS approach employing these two different subgrid models are compared with each other, along with the experimental data, followed by more detailed comparison between the results of an updated calculation using the TFNS/LEM-like model and the experimental data.

  17. Raman Spectra of Methane, Ethylene, Ethane, Dimethyl ether, Formaldehyde and Propane for Combustion Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Magnotti, G.

    2015-05-09

    Spontaneous Raman scattering measurements of temperature and major species concentration in hydrocarbon-air flames require detailed knowledge of the Raman spectra of the hydrocarbons present when fuels more complex than methane are used. Although hydrocarbon spectra have been extensively studied at room temperature, there are no data available at higher temperatures. Quantum mechanical calculations, when available are not sufficiently accurate for combustion applications. This work presents experimental measurements of spontaneous Stokes-Raman scattering spectra of methane, ethylene, ethane, dimethyl ether, formaldehyde and propane in the temperature range 300-860 K. Raman spectra from heated hydrocarbons jets have been collected with a higher resolution than is generally employed for Raman measurements in combustion applications. A set of synthetic spectra have been generated for each hydrocarbon, providing the basis for extrapolation to higher temperatures. The spectra provided here will enable simultaneous measurements of multiple hydrocarbons in flames. This capability will greatly extend the range of applicability of Raman measurements in combustion applications. In addition, the experimental spectra provide a validation dataset for quantum mechanical models.

  18. Raman Spectra of Methane, Ethylene, Ethane, Dimethyl ether, Formaldehyde and Propane for Combustion Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Magnotti, G.; KC, Utsav; Varghese, P.L.; Barlow, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman scattering measurements of temperature and major species concentration in hydrocarbon-air flames require detailed knowledge of the Raman spectra of the hydrocarbons present when fuels more complex than methane are used. Although hydrocarbon spectra have been extensively studied at room temperature, there are no data available at higher temperatures. Quantum mechanical calculations, when available are not sufficiently accurate for combustion applications. This work presents experimental measurements of spontaneous Stokes-Raman scattering spectra of methane, ethylene, ethane, dimethyl ether, formaldehyde and propane in the temperature range 300-860 K. Raman spectra from heated hydrocarbons jets have been collected with a higher resolution than is generally employed for Raman measurements in combustion applications. A set of synthetic spectra have been generated for each hydrocarbon, providing the basis for extrapolation to higher temperatures. The spectra provided here will enable simultaneous measurements of multiple hydrocarbons in flames. This capability will greatly extend the range of applicability of Raman measurements in combustion applications. In addition, the experimental spectra provide a validation dataset for quantum mechanical models.

  19. Structure and combustion characteristics of turbulent, pre-mixed high-pressure flames; Projekt 'Struktur und Brenneigenschaften von turbulenten, vorgemischten Hochdruckflammen'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griebel, P.; Boschek, E.; Erne, D.; Siewert, P.

    2005-12-15

    This illustrated annual report for 2005 for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on the work done in 2005 at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) on the structure and combustion characteristics of turbulent, pre-mixed high-pressure flames. The aims of the project are described in detail, which include, among other things, the completion of previous work, the validation of simulations and the influence of turbulence on the flame front. Work done on the project in 2005 is described and commented on. Experimental installations are described and the results obtained are presented. Also, the influence of adding hydrogen to the methane fuel is commented on. National and international co-operation is reviewed and future work to be carried out is noted.

  20. The production of hydrogen through the uncatalyzed partial oxidation of methane in an internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Ghazi A.; Wierzba, I. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada)

    2008-04-15

    The thermodynamic and kinetic limitations of the uncatalyzed partial oxidation of methane for the production of synthesis gas, which is made up of mostly hydrogen and carbon monoxide in a variety of proportions, are reviewed. It is suggested that such processes can be made to proceed successfully in a conventional internal combustion engine when operated on excessively rich mixtures of methane and oxygenated air. This is achieved while simultaneously producing power and regenerative exhaust gas heating. Experimental results are described that show a dual fuel engine of the compression ignition type with pilot liquid fuel injection can be operated on excessively rich mixtures of methane and air supplemented with oxygen gas to produce hydrogen rich gas with high methane conversion rates. Similarly, a spark ignition engine was reported to be equally capable of such production and performance. It is shown that there are viable prospects for the simultaneous production of synthesis gas in engines with efficient useful mechanical power and exhaust gas regenerative heating. (author)

  1. Turbulent combustion and DDT events as an upper bound for hydrogen mitigation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorofeev, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    A brief review is presented on the limiting conditions for fast combustion regimes (accelerated flames, fast turbulent deflagrations, and DDT events), and on their effect on confining structures. Main attention is given to hydrogen-air-steam mixtures typical for severe accidents in nuclear power plants. Comparison is made of the pressure loads resulting from different combustion regimes. Transient wave processes are shown to be very important for description of the pressure loads. Different limiting conditions are discussed for DDT being the most dangerous combustion event. Possibility of DDT is shown to be limited by the geometrical scale. Detailed description is presented for DDT criterion based on the minimum scale requirement for detonation formation. This criterion gives a conservative estimate that DDT is impossible, if characteristic size of combustible mixture is less than 7 detonation cell widths of the mixture. Conditions limiting possibility of flame acceleration are also discussed. (author)

  2. Chemical effects of a high CO2 concentration in oxy-fuel combustion of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Bentzen, L.L.B.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of methane in an atmospheric-pres sure flow reactor has been studied experimentally under highly diluted conditions in N-2 and CO2, respectively. The stoichiometry was varied from fuel-lean to fuel-rich, and the temperatures covered the range 1200-1800 K. The results were interpreted...... CO2. The high local CO levels may have implications for near-burner corrosion and stagging, but increased problems with CO emission in oxy-fuel combustion are not anticipated....

  3. Study of the catalytic activity of ceramic nano fibers in the methane combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reolon, R.P.; Berutti, F.A.; Alves, A.K.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    In this work titanium oxide fibers, doped with cerium and copper, were synthesized using the electro spinning process. Titanium propoxide was used as a precursor in the electro spinning synthesis. The obtained fibers were heat treated after receive a spray with an alcoholic solution of cerium acetate and copper nitrate. The non-tissue material obtained was characterized by X-ray diffraction to determine the phase and crystallite size, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), BET method to determine the surface and SEM to analyze the microstructure of the fibers. The catalytic activity was evaluated by methane and air combustion under different temperatures. The amount of combustion gases such as NO x , C x H y , CO e CO 2 , were analyzed. (author)

  4. Improved Modeling of Finite-Rate Turbulent Combustion Processes in Research Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanOverbeke, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to further develop and test a stochastic model of turbulent combustion in recirculating flows. There is a requirement to increase the accuracy of multi-dimensional combustion predictions. As turbulence affects reaction rates, this interaction must be more accurately evaluated. In this work a more physically correct way of handling the interaction of turbulence on combustion is further developed and tested. As turbulence involves randomness, stochastic modeling is used. Averaged values such as temperature and species concentration are found by integrating the probability density function (pdf) over the range of the scalar. The model in this work does not assume the pdf type, but solves for the evolution of the pdf using the Monte Carlo solution technique. The model is further developed by including a more robust reaction solver, by using accurate thermodynamics and by more accurate transport elements. The stochastic method is used with Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations. The SIMPLE method is used to solve for velocity, pressure, turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. The pdf solver solves for temperature and species concentration. Thus, the method is partially familiar to combustor engineers. The method is compared to benchmark experimental data and baseline calculations. The baseline method was tested on isothermal flows, evaporating sprays and combusting sprays. Pdf and baseline predictions were performed for three diffusion flames and one premixed flame. The pdf method predicted lower combustion rates than the baseline method in agreement with the data, except for the premixed flame. The baseline and stochastic predictions bounded the experimental data for the premixed flame. The use of a continuous mixing model or relax to mean mixing model had little effect on the prediction of average temperature. Two grids were used in a hydrogen diffusion flame simulation. Grid density did not effect the predictions except

  5. Mechanism of Methane Chemical Looping Combustion with Hematite Promoted with CeO 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Duane D.; Siriwardane, Ranjani

    2013-08-15

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a promising technology for fossil fuel combustion that produces sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream, reducing the energy penalty of CO{sub 2} separation from flue gases. An effective oxygen carrier for CLC will readily react with the fuel gas and will be reoxidized upon contact with oxygen. This study investigated the development of a CeO{sub 2}-promoted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-hematite oxygen carrier suitable for the methane CLC process. Composition of CeO{sub 2} is between 5 and 25 wt % and is lower than what is generally used for supports in Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} carrier preparations. The incorporation of CeO{sub 2} to the natural ore hematite strongly modifies the reduction behavior in comparison to that of CeO{sub 2} and hematite alone. Temperature-programmed reaction studies revealed that the addition of even 5 wt % CeO{sub 2} enhances the reaction capacity of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxygen carrier by promoting the decomposition and partial oxidation of methane. Fixed-bed reactor data showed that the 5 wt % cerium oxides with 95 wt % iron oxide produce 2 times as much carbon dioxide in comparison to the sum of carbon dioxide produced when the oxides were tested separately. This effect is likely due to the reaction of CeO{sub 2} with methane forming intermediates, which are reactive for extracting oxygen from Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} at a considerably faster rate than the rate of the direct reaction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with methane. These studies reveal that 5 wt % CeO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} gives stable conversions over 15 reduction/oxidation cycles. Lab-scale reactor studies (pulsed mode) suggest the methane reacts initially with CeO{sub 2} lattice oxygen to form partial oxidation products (CO + H{sub 2}), which continue to react with oxygen from neighboring Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, leading to its complete oxidation to form CO{sub 2}. The reduced cerium oxide promotes the methane decomposition reaction to form C + H{sub 2}, which continue to

  6. Modeling Turbulent Combustion for Variable Prandtl and Schmidt Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, H. A.

    2004-01-01

    This report consists of two abstracts submitted for possible presentation at the AIAA Aerospace Science Meeting to be held in January 2005. Since the submittal of these abstracts we are continuing refinement of the model coefficients derived for the case of a variable Turbulent Prandtl number. The test cases being investigated are a Mach 9.2 flow over a degree ramp and a Mach 8.2 3-D calculation of crossing shocks. We have developed an axisymmetric code for treating axisymmetric flows. In addition the variable Schmidt number formulation was incorporated in the code and we are in the process of determining the model constants.

  7. On mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of chemical kinetics in turbulent lean premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilleberg, Bjorn

    2011-07-01

    This thesis investigates turbulent reacting lean premixed flows with detailed treatment of the chemistry. First, the fundamental equations which govern laminar and turbulent reacting flows are presented. A perfectly stirred reactor numerical code is developed to investigate the role of unmixedness and chemical kinetics in driving combustion instabilities. This includes both global single-step and detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. The single-step mechanisms predict to some degree a similar behavior as the detailed mechanisms. However, it is shown that simple mechanisms can by themselves introduce instabilities. Magnussens Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) for turbulent combustion is implemented in the open source CFD toolbox OpenFOAM R for treatment of both fast and detailed chemistry. RANS turbulence models account for the turbulent compressible flow. A database of pre-calculated chemical time scales, which contains the influence of chemical kinetics, is coupled to EDC with fast chemistry to account for local extinction in both diffusion and premixed flames. Results are compared to fast and detailed chemistry calculations. The inclusion of the database shows significantly better results than the fast chemistry calculations while having a comparably small computational cost. Numerical simulations of four piloted lean premixed jet flames falling into the 'well stirred reactor/broken reaction zones' regime, with strong finite-rate chemistry effects, are performed. Measured and predicted scalars compare well for the two jets with the lowest velocities. The two jets with the highest velocities experience extinction and reignition, and the simulations are able to capture the decrease and increase of the OH mass fractions, but the peak values are higher than in the experiments. Also numerical simulations of a lean premixed lifted jet flame with high sensitivity to turbulence modeling and chemical kinetics are performed. Limitations of the applied turbulence and

  8. Numerical Analysis of Turbulent Combustion in a Model Swirl Gas Turbine Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Cemal Benim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent reacting flows in a generic swirl gas turbine combustor are investigated numerically. Turbulence is modelled by a URANS formulation in combination with the SST turbulence model, as the basic modelling approach. For comparison, URANS is applied also in combination with the RSM turbulence model to one of the investigated cases. For this case, LES is also used for turbulence modelling. For modelling turbulence-chemistry interaction, a laminar flamelet model is used, which is based on the mixture fraction and the reaction progress variable. This model is implemented in the open source CFD code OpenFOAM, which has been used as the basis for the present investigation. For validation purposes, predictions are compared with the measurements for a natural gas flame with external flue gas recirculation. A good agreement with the experimental data is observed. Subsequently, the numerical study is extended to syngas, for comparing its combustion behavior with that of natural gas. Here, the analysis is carried out for cases without external flue gas recirculation. The computational model is observed to provide a fair prediction of the experimental data and predict the increased flashback propensity of syngas.

  9. Modeling of electron behaviors under microwave electric field in methane and air pre-mixture gas plasma assisted combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Sasaki, K.; Yoshinaga, T.

    2011-10-01

    Recently, plasma-assisted combustion has been focused on for achieving more efficient combustion way of fossil fuels, reducing pollutants and so on. Shinohara et al has reported that the flame length of methane and air premixed burner shortened by irradiating microwave power without increase of gas temperature. This suggests that electrons heated by microwave electric field assist the combustion. They also measured emission from 2nd Positive Band System (2nd PBS) of nitrogen during the irradiation. To clarify this mechanism, electron behavior under microwave power should be examined. To obtain electron transport parameters, electron Monte Carlo simulations in methane and air mixture gas have been done. A simple model has been developed to simulate inside the flame. To make this model simple, some assumptions are made. The electrons diffuse from the combustion plasma region. And the electrons quickly reach their equilibrium state. And it is found that the simulated emission from 2nd PBS agrees with the experimental result. Recently, plasma-assisted combustion has been focused on for achieving more efficient combustion way of fossil fuels, reducing pollutants and so on. Shinohara et al has reported that the flame length of methane and air premixed burner shortened by irradiating microwave power without increase of gas temperature. This suggests that electrons heated by microwave electric field assist the combustion. They also measured emission from 2nd Positive Band System (2nd PBS) of nitrogen during the irradiation. To clarify this mechanism, electron behavior under microwave power should be examined. To obtain electron transport parameters, electron Monte Carlo simulations in methane and air mixture gas have been done. A simple model has been developed to simulate inside the flame. To make this model simple, some assumptions are made. The electrons diffuse from the combustion plasma region. And the electrons quickly reach their equilibrium state. And it is found

  10. Flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion: A direct numerical simulation analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Wacks, Daniel H.

    2016-12-02

    The distributions of flow topologies within the flames representing the corrugated flamelets, thin reaction zones, and broken reaction zone regimes of premixed turbulent combustion are investigated using direct numerical simulation data of statistically planar turbulent H-2-air flames with an equivalence ratio phi = 0.7. It was found that the diminishing influence of dilatation rate with increasing Karlovitz number has significant influences on the statistical behaviors of the first, second, and third invariants (i.e., P, Q, and R) of the velocity gradient tensor. These differences are reflected in the distributions of the flow topologies within the flames considered in this analysis. This has important consequences for those topologies that make dominant contributions to the scalar-turbulence interaction and vortex-stretching terms in the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport equations, respectively. Detailed physical explanations are provided for the observed regime dependences of the flow topologies and their implications on the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport.

  11. Flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion: A direct numerical simulation analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Wacks, Daniel H.; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus; Arias, Paul G.; Im, Hong G.

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of flow topologies within the flames representing the corrugated flamelets, thin reaction zones, and broken reaction zone regimes of premixed turbulent combustion are investigated using direct numerical simulation data of statistically planar turbulent H-2-air flames with an equivalence ratio phi = 0.7. It was found that the diminishing influence of dilatation rate with increasing Karlovitz number has significant influences on the statistical behaviors of the first, second, and third invariants (i.e., P, Q, and R) of the velocity gradient tensor. These differences are reflected in the distributions of the flow topologies within the flames considered in this analysis. This has important consequences for those topologies that make dominant contributions to the scalar-turbulence interaction and vortex-stretching terms in the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport equations, respectively. Detailed physical explanations are provided for the observed regime dependences of the flow topologies and their implications on the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport.

  12. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent combustion: fundamental insights towards predictive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, Evatt R; Sankaran, Ramanan; Sutherland, James C; Chen, Jacqueline H

    2005-01-01

    The advancement of our basic understanding of turbulent combustion processes and the development of physics-based predictive tools for design and optimization of the next generation of combustion devices are strategic areas of research for the development of a secure, environmentally sound energy infrastructure. In direct numerical simulation (DNS) approaches, all scales of the reacting flow problem are resolved. However, because of the magnitude of this task, DNS of practical high Reynolds number turbulent hydrocarbon flames is out of reach of even terascale computing. For the foreseeable future, the approach to this complex multi-scale problem is to employ distinct but synergistic approaches to tackle smaller sub-ranges of the complete problem, which then require models for the small scale interactions. With full access to the spatially and temporally resolved fields, DNS can play a major role in the development of these models and in the development of fundamental understanding of the micro-physics of turbulence-chemistry interactions. Two examples, from simulations performed at terascale Office of Science computing facilities, are presented to illustrate the role of DNS in delivering new insights to advance the predictive capability of models. Results are presented from new three-dimensional DNS with detailed chemistry of turbulent non-premixed jet flames, revealing the differences between mixing of passive and reacting scalars, and determining an optimal lower dimensional representation of the full thermochemical state space

  13. A parallel adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for predicting turbulent non-premixed combusting flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, X.; Groth, C.P.T.

    2005-01-01

    A parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm is proposed for predicting turbulent non-premixed combusting flows characteristic of gas turbine engine combustors. The Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations governing mixture and species transport for a reactive mixture of thermally perfect gases in two dimensions, the two transport equations of the κ-ψ turbulence model, and the time-averaged species transport equations, are all solved using a fully coupled finite-volume formulation. A flexible block-based hierarchical data structure is used to maintain the connectivity of the solution blocks in the multi-block mesh and facilitate automatic solution-directed mesh adaptation according to physics-based refinement criteria. This AMR approach allows for anisotropic mesh refinement and the block-based data structure readily permits efficient and scalable implementations of the algorithm on multi-processor architectures. Numerical results for turbulent non-premixed diffusion flames, including cold- and hot-flow predictions for a bluff body burner, are described and compared to available experimental data. The numerical results demonstrate the validity and potential of the parallel AMR approach for predicting complex non-premixed turbulent combusting flows. (author)

  14. Template-Assisted Wet-Combustion Synthesis of Fibrous Nickel-Based Catalyst for Carbon Dioxide Methanation and Methane Steam Reforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghayan, M; Potemkin, D I; Rubio-Marcos, F; Uskov, S I; Snytnikov, P V; Hussainova, I

    2017-12-20

    Efficient capture and recycling of CO 2 enable not only prevention of global warming but also the supply of useful low-carbon fuels. The catalytic conversion of CO 2 into an organic compound is a promising recycling approach which opens new concepts and opportunities for catalytic and industrial development. Here we report about template-assisted wet-combustion synthesis of a one-dimensional nickel-based catalyst for carbon dioxide methanation and methane steam reforming. Because of a high temperature achieved in a short time during reaction and a large amount of evolved gases, the wet-combustion synthesis yields homogeneously precipitated nanoparticles of NiO with average particle size of 4 nm on alumina nanofibers covered with a NiAl 2 O 4 nanolayer. The as-synthesized core-shell structured fibers exhibit outstanding activity in steam reforming of methane and sufficient activity in carbon dioxide methanation with 100% selectivity toward methane formation. The as-synthesized catalyst shows stable operation under the reaction conditions for at least 50 h.

  15. Optimal combustor dimensions for the catalytic combustion of methane-air mixtures in micro-channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Junjie; Song, Wenya; Xu, Deguang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of combustor dimensions on the combustion stability was elucidated. • Wall thermal properties are important for optimizing combustor dimensions. • The optimal wall thickness increases with flow velocity. • The optimal combustor length depends on the wall thermal conductivity. • Stability diagrams were constructed and design recommendations were made. - Abstract: This paper addresses the question of choosing appropriate combustor dimensions for the self-sustained catalytic combustion in parallel plate micro-channels. The combustion characteristics and stability of methane-air mixtures over platinum in catalytic micro-combustors were studied, using a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with detailed chemistry and transport. The effects of gap size, wall thickness, and combustor length on the combustion stability and combustor performance were explored to provide guidelines for optimal design of combustor dimensions. Combustion stability diagrams were constructed, and design recommendations were made. The effect of wall thermal conductivity on the mechanisms of extinction and blowout, and its implications on optimal combustor geometry were studied. It was shown that combustor dimensions are vital in determining the combustion stability of the system. The choice of appropriate combustor dimensions is crucial in achieving stable combustion, due to a rather narrow operating space determined by stability, material, and conversion constraints. The optimal gap size depends on whether the flow velocity or flow rate is kept constant. For most practical wall materials in the range of metals to highly conductive ceramics, larger combustors are more stable at a fixed flow velocity, whereas smaller combustors are recommended for a fixed flow rate at the expense of hot spots. The optimal wall thickness increases with flow velocity. Higher flow velocities can be sustained in combustors with low-conductivity materials using

  16. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flows in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaeizadeh, Araz

    The two-phase compressible scalar filtered mass density function (FMDF) model is further developed and employed for large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent spray combustion in internal combustion (IC) engines. In this model, the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved in a generalized curvilinear coordinate system with high-order, multi-block, compact differencing schemes for the turbulent velocity and pressure. However, turbulent mixing and combustion are computed with a new two-phase compressible scalar FMDF model. The spray and droplet dispersion/evaporation are modeled with a Lagrangian method. A new Lagrangian-Eulerian-Lagrangian computational method is employed for solving the flow, spray and scalar equation. The pressure effect in the energy equation, as needed in compressible flows, is included in the FMDF formulation. The performance of the new compressible LES/FMDF model is assessed by simulating the flow field and scalar mixing in a rapid compression machine (RCM), in a shock tube and in a supersonic co-axial jet. Consistency of temperatures predicted by the Eulerian finite-difference (FD) and Lagrangian Monte Carlo (MC) parts of the LES/FMDF model are established by including the pressure on the FMDF. It is shown that the LES/FMDF model is able to correctly capture the scalar mixing in both compressible subsonic and supersonic flows. Using the new two-phase LES/FMDF model, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, spray and combustion in the RCM with flat and crevice piston are studied. It is shown that the temperature distribution in the RCM with crevice piston is more uniform than the RCM with flat piston. The fuel spray characteristics and the spray parameters affecting the fuel mixing inside the RCM in reacting and non-reacting flows are also studied. The predicted liquid penetration and flame lift-off lengths for respectively non-reacting and reacting sprays are found to compare well with the available experimental data. Temperatures and

  17. Investigation of Turbulent Hydrogen Premixed Flame Topologies at Different Combustion Regimes Using Computational Singular Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingas, Efstathios-Alexandros; Hernandez Perez, Francisco; Im, Hong

    2017-11-01

    The investigation of turbulent flames at higher Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers has been gaining research interest, due to the advances in the computational power that has facilitated the use of direct numerical simulations (DNS). One of the additional challenges associated with highly turbulent premixed flames is the difficulties in identifying the turbulent flame topologies as the flame structures become severely corrugated or even disrupted by the small scale turbulent eddies. In these conditions, the conventional methods using a scalar iso-surface may lead to uncertainties in describing the flame front dynamics. In this study, the computational singular perturbation (CSP) is utilized as an automated tool to identify the flame front topologies based on the dynamical time scales and eigenvalues. In particular, the tangential stretch rate (TSR) approach, an extended generalized method to depict the dynamics of chemical and transport processes, is used for the flame front identification. The CSP/TSR approach and tools are used to compare the flame fronts of two turbulent H2/air premixed flames and to identify their similarities/differences, from a dynamical point of view. The results for two different combustion regimes are analyzed and compared.

  18. Optimization and analysis of large chemical kinetic mechanisms using the solution mapping method - Combustion of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael; Wang, Hai; Rabinowitz, Martin J.

    1992-01-01

    A method of systematic optimization, solution mapping, as applied to a large-scale dynamic model is presented. The basis of the technique is parameterization of model responses in terms of model parameters by simple algebraic expressions. These expressions are obtained by computer experiments arranged in a factorial design. The developed parameterized responses are then used in a joint multiparameter multidata-set optimization. A brief review of the mathematical background of the technique is given. The concept of active parameters is discussed. The technique is applied to determine an optimum set of parameters for a methane combustion mechanism. Five independent responses - comprising ignition delay times, pre-ignition methyl radical concentration profiles, and laminar premixed flame velocities - were optimized with respect to thirteen reaction rate parameters. The numerical predictions of the optimized model are compared to those computed with several recent literature mechanisms. The utility of the solution mapping technique in situations where the optimum is not unique is also demonstrated.

  19. Influence of morphology of ceramic fibers in catalytic combustion of methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabarelli, A.C.; Alves, A.K.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    Methane, considered as the main constituent of natural gas has been widely used as an energy source. During its combustion are produced pollutants that cause concern and necessity to eliminate or reduce the emission of these agents in the atmosphere. One of the main means of controlling emissions is the use of catalysts. In order to contribute to the development of new catalysts, this study analyzed the morphology of ceramic fibers of cerium oxide (ceria) doped with copper fabricated by electrospinning, in order to verify their effects on catalytic activity. Parameters were varied in distance from the electrodes, the diameter of the capillary and applied voltage between electrodes. The characterizations were performed: scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, BET and Xray diffraction (DXR). The results indicate that after the thermal treatment there was a reduction of approximately 40% fiber diameter and specific surface area ranging between 28.929 and 34.501 m 2 /g. (author)

  20. Scale Effect of Premixed Methane-Air Combustion in Confined Space Using LES Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas explosion is the most hazardous incident occurring in underground airways. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD techniques are sophisticated in simulating explosions in confined spaces; specifically, when testing large-scale gaseous explosions, such as methane explosions in underground mines. The dimensions of a confined space where explosions could occur vary significantly. Thus, the scale effect on explosion parameters is worth investigating. In this paper, the impact of scaling on explosion overpressures is investigated by employing two scaling factors: The Gas-fill Length Scaling Factor (FLSF and the Hydraulic Diameter Scaling Factor (HDSF. The combinations of eight FLSFs and five HDSFs will cover a wide range of space dimensions where flammable gas could accumulate. Experiments were also conducted to evaluate the selected numerical models. The Large Eddy Simulation turbulence model was selected because it shows accuracy compared to the widely used Reynolds’ averaged models for the scenarios investigated in the experiments. Three major conclusions can be drawn: (1 The overpressure increases with both FLSF and HDSF within the deflagration regime; (2 In an explosion duct with a length to diameter ratio greater than 54, detonation is more likely to be triggered for a stoichiometric methane/air mixture; (3 Overpressure increases as an increment hydraulic diameter of a geometry within deflagration regime. A relative error of 7% is found when predicting blast peak overpressure for the base case compared to the experiment; a good agreement for the wave arrival time is also achieved.

  1. Computational fluid dynamic on the temperature simulation of air preheat effect combustion in propane turbulent flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwina; Yunardi; Bindar, Yazid

    2018-04-01

    this paper presents results obtained from the application of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code Fluent 6.3 to modelling of temperature in propane flames with and without air preheat. The study focuses to investigate the effect of air preheat temperature on the temperature of the flame. A standard k-ε model and Eddy Dissipation model are utilized to represent the flow field and combustion of the flame being investigated, respectively. The results of calculations are compared with experimental data of propane flame taken from literature. The results of the study show that a combination of the standard k-ε turbulence model and eddy dissipation model is capable of producing reasonable predictions of temperature, particularly in axial profile of all three flames. Both experimental works and numerical simulation showed that increasing the temperature of the combustion air significantly increases the flame temperature.

  2. Influence of the Steam Addition on Premixed Methane Air Combustion at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Steam-diluted combustion in gas turbine systems is an effective approach to control pollutant emissions and improve the gas turbine efficiency. The primary purpose of the present research is to analyze the influence of steam dilution on the combustion stability, flame structures, and CO emissions of a swirl-stabilized gas turbine model combustor under atmospheric pressure conditions. The premixed methane/air/steam flame was investigated with three preheating temperatures (384 K/434 K/484 K and the equivalence ratio was varied from stoichiometric conditions to the flammability limits where the flame was physically blown out from the combustor. In order to represent the steam dilution intensity, the steam fraction Ω defined as the steam to air mass flow rate ratio was used in this work. Exhaust gases were sampled with a water-cooled emission probe which was mounted at the combustor exit. A 120 mm length quartz liner was used which enabled the flame visualization and optical measurement. Time-averaged CH chemiluminescence imaging was conducted to characterize the flame location and it was further analyzed with the inverse Abel transform method. Chemical kinetics calculation was conducted to support and analyze the experimental results. It was found that the LBO (lean blowout limits were increased with steam fraction. CH chemiluminescence imaging showed that with a high steam fraction, the flame length was elongated, but the flame structure was not altered. CO emissions were mapped as a function of the steam fraction, inlet air temperature, and equivalence ratios. Stable combustion with low CO emission can be achieved with an appropriate steam fraction operation range.

  3. On ternary species mixing and combustion in isotropic turbulence at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Hong; Miller, Richard S.

    2004-05-01

    Effects of Soret and Dufour cross-diffusion, whereby both concentration and thermal diffusion occur in the presence of mass fraction, temperature, and pressure gradients, are investigated in the context of both binary and ternary species mixing and combustion in isotropic turbulence at large pressure. The compressible flow formulation is based on a cubic real-gas state equation, and includes generalized forms for heat and mass diffusion derived from nonequilibrium thermodynamics and fluctuation theory. A previously derived formulation of the generalized binary species heat and mass fluxes is first extended to the case of ternary species, and appropriate treatment of the thermal and mass diffusion factors is described. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are then conducted for both binary and ternary species mixing and combustion in stationary isotropic turbulence. Mean flow temperatures and pressures of =700 K and =45 atm are considered to ensure that all species mixtures remain in the supercritical state such that phase changes do not occur. DNS of ternary species systems undergoing both pure mixing and a simple chemical reaction of the form O2+N2→2NO are then conducted. It is shown that stationary scalar states previously observed for binary mixing persist for the ternary species problem as well; however, the production and magnitude of the scalar variance is found to be altered for the intermediate molecular weight species as compared to the binary species case. The intermediate molecular weight species produces a substantially smaller scalar variance than the remaining species for all flows considered. For combustion of nonstoichiometric mixtures, a binary species mixture, characterized by stationary scalar states, results at long times after the lean reactant is depleted. The form of this final scalar distribution is observed to be similar to that found in the binary flow situation. A series of lower resolution simulations for a variety of species is then

  4. Three Dimensional Transient Turbulent Simulations of Scramjet Fuel Injection and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahbaz, Marwane

    2011-11-01

    Scramjet is a propulsion system that is more effective for hypersonic flights (M >5). The main objective of the simulation is to understand both the mixing and combustion process of air flow using hydrogen fuel in high speed environment s. The understanding of this phenomenon is used to determine the number of fuel injectors required to increase combustion efficiency and energy transfer. Due to the complexity of this simulation, multiple software tools are used to achieve this objective. First, Solid works is used to draw a scramjet combustor with accurate measurements. Second software tool used is Gambit; It is used to make several types of meshes for the scramjet combustor. Finally, Open Foam and CFD++ are software used to process and post process the scramjet combustor. At this stage, the simulation is divided into two categories. The cold flow category is a series of simulations that include subsonic and supersonic turbulent air flow across the combustor channel with fuel interaction from one or more injectors'. The second category is the combustion simulations which involve fluid flow and fuel mixing with ignition. The simulation and modeling of scramjet combustor will assist to investigate and understand the combustion process and energy transfer in hypersonic environment.

  5. Evaluation of turbulent transport and flame surface dissipation using direct numerical simulation of turbulent combustion; Evaluation des termes de transport et de dissipation de surface de flamme par simulation numerique directe de la combustion turbulente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughanem, H.

    1998-03-24

    The assumption of gradient transport for the mean reaction progress variable has a limited domain of validity in premixed turbulent combustion. The existence of two turbulent transport regimes, gradient and counter-gradient, is demonstrated in the present work using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of plane flame configurations. The DNS data base describes the influence of the heat release factor, of the turbulence-to-flame velocity ratio, and of an external pressure gradient. The simulations reveal a strong correlation between the regime of turbulent transport and the turbulent flame speed and turbulent flame thickness. These effects re not well described by current turbulent combustion models. A conditional approach `fresh gases / burnt gases` is proposed to overcome these difficulties. Furthermore, he development of flame instabilities in turbulent configurations is also observed in the simulations. A criterion is derived that determines the domain of occurrence of these instabilities (Darrieus- Landau instabilities, Rayleigh- Taylor instabilities, thermo-diffusive instabilities). This criterion suggests that the domain of occurrence of flame instabilities is not limited to small Reynolds numbers. (author) 98 refs.

  6. Numerical investigations of combustion and emissions of syngas as compared to methane in a 200 MW package boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, Mohamed A.; Mokheimer, Esmail M.A.; Sanusi, Sofihullahi Y.; Nemitallah, Medhat A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Syngas combustion is numerically investigated in a two-burner 200 MW package boiler. • Different syngas compositions were considered for combustion with air. • The 33% CO:67% H 2 syngas composition was found to have the shortest flame. • The boiler exit temperature was found to increase with the increase of hydrogen contents. • The 50% CO:50% H 2 syngas composition had the best combustion characteristics. - Abstract: During the last decades, focus has been made on the use of syngas instead of conventional hydrocarbon fuels targeting NO x emission reduction in the exhaust gases. With advances in solar-steam methane reforming for the production of synthesis gas, the applicability of syngas at industrial scale becomes imperative. In the present work, syngas combustion and emission characteristics are numerically investigated and compared with the case of pure methane combustion in a two-burner 200 MW package boiler. A detailed reaction kinetics mechanism of 21 steps and 11 species was considered for the modeling of syngas–air combustion. Different syngas compositions were considered for combustion with air including 67% CO:33% H 2 , 50% CO:50% H 2 and 33% CO:67% H 2 . The results showed a combustion delay in case of pure methane combustion as compared to syngas combustion. The case of 33% CO:67% H 2 syngas composition was found to have the shortest flame as compared to that of other syngas compositions. The case of 50% CO:50% H 2 syngas resulted in lowest maximum boiler temperature while 67% CO:33% H 2 syngas resulted in highest maximum boiler temperature. The boiler exit temperature was found to increase with the increase of hydrogen content in the syngas. The excess air factor was found to have a significant effect on both CO and NO x emissions. NO x emission decreases by about 30% when the amount of excess air is increased from 5% to 25%, which is very promising. Among the tested syngas compositions, the 50% CO:50% H 2 syngas composition

  7. Interactive computer modeling of combustion chemistry and coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive computer code for simulation of a high-intensity turbulent combustor as a single point inhomogeneous stirred reactor was developed from an existing batch processing computer code CDPSR. The interactive CDPSR code was used as a guide for interpretation and direction of DOE-sponsored companion experiments utilizing Xenon tracer with optical laser diagnostic techniques to experimentally determine the appropriate mixing frequency, and for validation of CDPSR as a mixing-chemistry model for a laboratory jet-stirred reactor. The coalescence-dispersion model for finite rate mixing was incorporated into an existing interactive code AVCO-MARK I, to enable simulation of a combustor as a modular array of stirred flow and plug flow elements, each having a prescribed finite mixing frequency, or axial distribution of mixing frequency, as appropriate. Further increase the speed and reliability of the batch kinetics integrator code CREKID was increased by rewriting in vectorized form for execution on a vector or parallel processor, and by incorporating numerical techniques which enhance execution speed by permitting specification of a very low accuracy tolerance.

  8. Combustion Stability Characteristics of the Project Morpheus Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Main Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The project Morpheus liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) main engine is a Johnson Space Center (JSC) designed 5,000 lbf-thrust, 4:1 throttling, pressure-fed cryogenic engine using an impinging element injector design. The engine met or exceeded all performance requirements without experiencing any in- ight failures, but the engine exhibited acoustic-coupled combustion instabilities during sea-level ground-based testing. First tangential (1T), rst radial (1R), 1T1R, and higher order modes were triggered by conditions during the Morpheus vehicle derived low chamber pressure startup sequence. The instability was never observed to initiate during mainstage, even at low power levels. Ground-interaction acoustics aggravated the instability in vehicle tests. Analysis of more than 200 hot re tests on the Morpheus vehicle and Stennis Space Center (SSC) test stand showed a relationship between ignition stability and injector/chamber pressure. The instability had the distinct characteristic of initiating at high relative injection pressure drop at low chamber pressure during the start sequence. Data analysis suggests that the two-phase density during engine start results in a high injection velocity, possibly triggering the instabilities predicted by the Hewitt stability curves. Engine ignition instability was successfully mitigated via a higher-chamber pressure start sequence (e.g., 50% power level vs 30%) and operational propellant start temperature limits that maintained \\cold LOX" and \\warm methane" at the engine inlet. The main engine successfully demonstrated 4:1 throttling without chugging during mainstage, but chug instabilities were observed during some engine shutdown sequences at low injector pressure drop, especially during vehicle landing.

  9. Combustion characteristics and turbulence modeling of swirling reacting flow in solid fuel ramjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Omer; Xiong, Chen; Changsheng, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    This paper reviews the historical studies have been done on the solid-fuel ramjet engine and difficulties associated with numerical modeling of swirling flow with combustible gases. A literature survey about works related to numerical and experimental investigations on solid-fuel ramjet as well as using swirling flow and different numerical approaches has been provided. An overview of turbulence modeling of swirling flow and the behavior of turbulence at streamline curvature and system rotation are presented. A new and simple curvature/correction factor is proposed in order to reduce the programming complexity of SST-CC turbulence model. Finally, numerical and experimental investigations on the impact of swirling flow on SFRJ have been carried out. For that regard, a multi-physics coupling code is developed to solve the problems of multi-physics coupling of fluid mechanics, solid pyrolysis, heat transfer, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. The connected-pipe test facility is used to carry out the experiments. The results showed a positive impact of swirling flow on SFRJ along with, three correlations are proposed.

  10. Uncertainty quantification of cinematic imaging for development of predictive simulations of turbulent combustion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, Matthew; Debusschere, Bert J.; Najm, Habib N.; Sargsyan, Khachik; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2010-09-01

    Recent advances in high frame rate complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) cameras coupled with high repetition rate lasers have enabled laser-based imaging measurements of the temporal evolution of turbulent reacting flows. This measurement capability provides new opportunities for understanding the dynamics of turbulence-chemistry interactions, which is necessary for developing predictive simulations of turbulent combustion. However, quantitative imaging measurements using high frame rate CMOS cameras require careful characterization of the their noise, non-linear response, and variations in this response from pixel to pixel. We develop a noise model and calibration tools to mitigate these problems and to enable quantitative use of CMOS cameras. We have demonstrated proof of principle for image de-noising using both wavelet methods and Bayesian inference. The results offer new approaches for quantitative interpretation of imaging measurements from noisy data acquired with non-linear detectors. These approaches are potentially useful in many areas of scientific research that rely on quantitative imaging measurements.

  11. Enstrophy transport conditional on local flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Papapostolou, Vassilios

    2017-09-11

    Enstrophy is an intrinsic feature of turbulent flows, and its transport properties are essential for the understanding of premixed flame-turbulence interaction. The interrelation between the enstrophy transport and flow topologies, which can be assigned to eight categories based on the three invariants of the velocity-gradient tensor, has been analysed here. The enstrophy transport conditional on flow topologies in turbulent premixed flames has been analysed using a Direct Numerical Simulation database representing the corrugated flamelets (CF), thin reaction zones (TRZ) and broken reaction zones (BRZ) combustion regimes. The flame in the CF regime exhibits considerable flame-generated enstrophy, and the dilatation rate and baroclinic torque contributions to the enstrophy transport act as leading order sink and source terms, respectively. Consequently, flow topologies associated with positive dilatation rate values, contribute significantly to the enstrophy transport in the CF regime. By contrast, enstrophy decreases from the unburned to the burned gas side for the cases representing the TRZ and BRZ regimes, with diminishing influences of dilatation rate and baroclinic torque. The enstrophy transport in the TRZ and BRZ regimes is governed by the vortex-stretching and viscous dissipation contributions, similar to non-reacting flows, and topologies existing for all values of dilatation rate remain significant contributors.

  12. Engineered Sulfur‐Resistant Catalyst System with an Assisted Regeneration Strategy for Lean‐Burn Methane Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallinen, Kauko; Maunula, Teuvo; Suvanto, Mika

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Catalytic combustion of methane, the main component of natural gas, is a challenge under lean‐burn conditions and at low temperatures owing to sulfur poisoning of the Pd‐rich catalyst. This paper introduces a more sulfur‐resistant catalyst system that can be regenerated during operation. The developed catalyst system lowers the barrier that has restrained the use of liquefied natural gas as a fuel in energy production. PMID:29780434

  13. Effects of pressure fluctuations on the combustion process in turbulent premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsell, Guillaume; Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    The need for a thorough understanding of turbulence-combustion interactions in compressible flows is driven by recent technological developments in propulsion as well as renewed interest in the development of next generation supersonic and hypersonic vehicles. In such flows, pressure fluctuations displaying a wide range of length and timescales are present. These fluctuations are expected to impact the combustion process to varying degrees, depending amongst other things on the amplitude of the pressure variations and the timescales of the chemical reactions taking place in the flame. In this context, numerical simulations of these flows can provide insight into the impact of pressure fluctuations on the combustion process. In the present work, we analyze data from simulations of statistically-flat premixed n-heptane/air flames at high Karlovitz numbers. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved exactly (DNS) and results obtained with both detailed kinetic modeling and one-step chemistry are considered. The effects of pressure fluctuations on the fuel burning rate are investigated. The findings are compared with results obtained from simulations of one-dimensional premixed flames subjected to various pressure waves.

  14. Combustion Characteristics for Turbulent Prevaporized Premixed Flame Using Commercial Light Diesel and Kerosene Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. Shehata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study has been carried out for investigating fuel type, fuel blends, equivalence ratio, Reynolds number, inlet mixture temperature, and holes diameter of perforated plate affecting combustion process for turbulent prevaporized premixed air flames for different operating conditions. CO2, CO, H2, N2, C3H8, C2H6, C2H4, flame temperature, and gas flow velocity are measured along flame axis for different operating conditions. Gas chromatographic (GC and CO/CO2 infrared gas analyzer are used for measuring different species. Temperature is measured using thermocouple technique. Gas flow velocity is measured using pitot tube technique. The effect of kerosene percentage on concentration, flame temperature, and gas flow velocity is not linearly dependent. Correlations for adiabatic flame temperature for diesel and kerosene-air flames are obtained as function of mixture strength, fuel type, and inlet mixture temperature. Effect of equivalence ratio on combustion process for light diesel-air flame is greater than for kerosene-air flame. Flame temperature increases with increased Reynolds number for different operating conditions. Effect of Reynolds number on combustion process for light diesel flame is greater than for kerosene flame and also for rich flame is greater than for lean flame. The present work contributes to design and development of lean prevaporized premixed (LPP gas turbine combustors.

  15. The conditional moment closure method for modeling lean premixed turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Scott Montgomery

    Natural gas fired lean premixed gas turbines have become the method of choice for new power generation systems due to their high efficiency and low pollutant emissions. As emission regulations for these combustion systems become more stringent, the use of numerical modeling has become an important a priori tool in designing clean and efficient combustors. Here a new turbulent combustion model is developed in an attempt to improve the state of the art. The Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) method is a new theory that has been applied to non-premixed combustion with good success. The application of the CMC method to premixed systems has been proposed, but has not yet been done. The premixed CMC method replaces the species mass fractions as independent variables with the species mass fractions that are conditioned on a reaction progress variable (RPV). Conservation equations for these new variables are then derived and solved. The general idea behind the CMC method is that the behavior of the chemical species is closely coupled to the reaction progress variable. Thus, species conservation equations that are conditioned on the RPV will have terms involving the fluctuating quantities that are much more likely to be negligible. The CMC method accounts for the interaction between scalar dissipation (micromixing) and chemistry, while de-coupling the kinetics from the bulk flow (macromixing). Here the CMC method is combined with a commercial computational fluid dynamics program, which calculates the large-scale fluid motions. The CMC model is validated by comparison to 2-D reacting backward facing step data. Predicted species, temperature and velocity fields are compared to experimental data with good success. The CMC model is also validated against the University of Washington's 3-D jet stirred reactor (JSR) data, which is an idealized lean premixed combustor. The JSR results are encouraging, but not as good as the backward facing step. The largest source of error is from

  16. A multi-scalar PDF approach for LES of turbulent spray combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Venkat; Heye, Colin

    2011-11-01

    A comprehensive joint-scalar probability density function (PDF) approach is proposed for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent spray combustion and tests are conducted to analyze the validity and modeling requirements. The PDF method has the advantage that the chemical source term appears closed but requires models for the small scale mixing process. A stable and consistent numerical algorithm for the LES/PDF approach is presented. To understand the modeling issues in the PDF method, direct numerical simulation of a spray flame at three different fuel droplet Stokes numbers and an equivalent gaseous flame are carried out. Assumptions in closing the subfilter conditional diffusion term in the filtered PDF transport equation are evaluated for various model forms. In addition, the validity of evaporation rate models in high Stokes number flows is analyzed.

  17. A robust, efficient and accurate β- pdf integration algorithm in nonpremixed turbulent combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.; Lien, F.S.; Chui, E.

    2005-01-01

    Among many presumed-shape pdf approaches, the presumed β-function pdf is widely used in nonpremixed turbulent combustion models in the literature. However, singularity difficulties at Z = 0 and 1, Z being the mixture fraction, may be encountered in the numerical integration of the b-function pdf and there are few publications addressing this issue to date. The present study proposes an efficient, robust and accurate algorithm to overcome these numerical difficulties. The present treatment of the β-pdf integration is firstly used in the Burke-Schumann solution in conjunction with the k - ε turbulent model in the case of CH 4 /H 2 bluff-body jets and flames. Afterward it is extended to a more complex model, the laminar flamelet model, for the same flow. Numerical results obtained by using the proposed β-pdf integration method are compared to experimental values of the velocity field, temperature and constituent mass fraction to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the present method. (author)

  18. Combustion characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen hybrid fuel turbulent diffusion flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Ghafour, S.A.A.; El-dein, A.H.E.; Aref, A.A.R. [Mechanical Power Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Suez Canal University, Port-Said (Egypt)

    2010-03-15

    Combustion characteristics of natural gas - hydrogen hybrid fuel were investigated experimentally in a free jet turbulent diffusion flame flowing into a slow co-flowing air stream. Experiments were carried out at a constant jet exit Reynolds number of 4000 and with a wide range of NG-H{sub 2} mixture concentrations, varied from 100%NG to 50%NG-50% H{sub 2} by volume. The effect of hydrogen addition on flame stability, flame length, flame structure, exhaust species concentration and pollutant emissions was conducted. Results showed that, hydrogen addition sustains a progressive improvement in flame stability and reduction in flame length, especially for relatively high hydrogen concentrations. Hydrogen-enriched flames found to have a higher combustion temperatures and reactivity than natural gas flame. Also, it was found that hydrogen addition to natural gas is an ineffective strategy for NO and CO reduction in the studied range, while a significant reduction in the %CO{sub 2} molar concentration by about 30% was achieved. (author)

  19. Unsteady Flame Embedding (UFE) Subgrid Model for Turbulent Premixed Combustion Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    El-Asrag, Hossam

    2010-01-04

    We present a formulation for an unsteady subgrid model for premixed combustion in the flamelet regime. Since chemistry occurs at the unresolvable scales, it is necessary to introduce a subgrid model that accounts for the multi-scale nature of the problem using the information available on the resolved scales. Most of the current models are based on the laminar flamelet concept, and often neglect the unsteady effects. The proposed model\\'s primary objective is to encompass many of the flame/turbulence interactions unsteady features and history effects. In addition it provides a dynamic and accurate approach for computing the subgrid flame propagation velocity. The unsteady flame embedding approach (UFE) treats the flame as an ensemble of locally one-dimensional flames. A set of elemental one dimensional flames is used to describe the turbulent flame structure at the subgrid level. The stretched flame calculations are performed on the stagnation line of a strained flame using the unsteady filtered strain rate computed from the resolved- grid. The flame iso-surface is tracked using an accurate high-order level set formulation to propagate the flame interface at the coarse resolution with minimum numerical diffusion. In this paper the solver and the model components are introduced and used to investigate two unsteady flames with different Lewis numbers in the thin reaction zone regime. The results show that the UFE model captures the unsteady flame-turbulence interactions and the flame propagation speed reasonably well. Higher propagation speed is observed for the lower than unity Lewis number flame because of the impact of differential diffusion.

  20. Simultaneous identification of transfer functions and combustion noise of a turbulent flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, M.; Jaensch, S.; Silva, C.; Polifke, W.

    2018-05-01

    The Large Eddy Simulation/System Identification (LES/SI) approach allows to deduce a flame transfer function (FTF) from LES of turbulent reacting flow: Time series of fluctuations of reference velocity and global heat release rate resulting from broad-band excitation of a simulated turbulent flame are post-processed via SI techniques to derive a low order model of the flame dynamics, from which the FTF is readily deduced. The current work investigates an extension of the established LES/SI approach: In addition to estimation of the FTF, a low order model for the combustion noise source is deduced from the same time series data. By incorporating such a noise model into a linear thermoacoustic model, it is possible to predict the overall level as well as the spectral distribution of sound pressure in confined combustion systems that do not exhibit self-excited thermoacoustic instability. A variety of model structures for estimation of a noise model are tested in the present study. The suitability and quality of these model structures are compared against each other, their sensitivity regarding certain time series properties is studied. The influence of time series length, signal-to-noise ratio as well as acoustic reflection coefficient of the boundary conditions on the identification are examined. It is shown that the Box-Jenkins model structure is superior to simpler approaches for the simultaneous identification of models that describe the FTF as well as the combustion noise source. Subsequent to the question of the most adequate model structure, the choice of optimal model order is addressed, as in particular the optimal parametrization of the noise model is not obvious. Akaike's Information Criterion and a model residual analysis are applied to draw qualitative and quantitative conclusions on the most suitable model order. All investigations are based on a surrogate data model, which allows a Monte Carlo study across a large parameter space with modest

  1. A turbulent time scale based k–ε model for probability density function modeling of turbulence/chemistry interactions: Application to HCCI combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroteaux, Fadila; Pommier, Pierre-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Turbulent time evolution is introduced in stochastic modeling approach. ► The particles number is optimized trough a restricted initial distribution. ► The initial distribution amplitude is modeled by magnitude of turbulence field. -- Abstract: Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine technology is known as an alternative to reduce NO x and particulate matter (PM) emissions. As shown by several experimental studies published in the literature, the ideally homogeneous mixture charge becomes stratified in composition and temperature, and turbulent mixing is found to play an important role in controlling the combustion progress. In a previous study, an IEM model (Interaction by Exchange with the Mean) has been used to describe the micromixing in a stochastic reactor model that simulates the HCCI process. The IEM model is a deterministic model, based on the principle that the scalar value approaches the mean value over the entire volume with a characteristic mixing time. In this previous model, the turbulent time scale was treated as a fixed parameter. The present study focuses on the development of a micro-mixing time model, in order to take into account the physical phenomena it stands for. For that purpose, a (k–ε) model is used to express this micro-mixing time model. The turbulence model used here is based on zero dimensional energy cascade applied during the compression and the expansion cycle; mean kinetic energy is converted to turbulent kinetic energy. Turbulent kinetic energy is converted to heat through viscous dissipation. Besides, in this study a relation to calculate the initial heterogeneities amplitude is proposed. The comparison of simulation results against experimental data shows overall satisfactory agreement at variable turbulent time scale

  2. Effect of pressure on high Karlovitz number lean turbulent premixed hydrogen-enriched methane-air flames using LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicoria, David; Chan, C. K.

    2017-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is employed to investigate the effect of pressure on lean CH4-H2-air turbulent premixed flames at high Karlovitz number for mixtures up to 60% of hydrogen in volume. The subfilter combustion term representing the interaction between turbulence and chemistry is modelled using the PaSR model, along with complex chemistry using a skeletal mechanism based on GRI-MECH3.0. The influence of pressure at high turbulence levels is studied by means of the local flame structure, and the assessment of species formation inside the flame. Results show that the ratio of turbulent flame thickness to laminar flame thickness δt/δu increases faster with pressure, and increases with the fraction of hydrogen in the mixture, leading to higher ratio of turbulent to laminar flame speed. The flame displays smaller structures and higher degree of wrinkling at higher pressure. Final species of CO2 and H2O formation is almost independent of pressure. For intermediate species CO and OH, an increase in pressure at constant volume fraction of hydrogen β leads to a decrease of emission of these species.

  3. Turbulent combustion modelization via a tabulation method of detailed kinetic chemistry coupled to Probability Density Function. Application to aeronautical engines; Modelisation de la combustion turbulente via une methode tabulation de la cinetique chimique detaillee couplee a des fonctions densites de probabilite. Application aux foyers aeronautiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rullaud, M

    2004-06-01

    A new modelization of turbulent combustion is proposed with detailed chemistry and probability density functions (PDFs). The objective is to capture temperature and species concentrations, mainly the CO. The PCM-FTC model, Presumed Conditional Moment - Flame Tabulated Chemistry, is based on the tabulation of laminar premixed and diffusion flames to capture partial pre-mixing present in aeronautical engines. The presumed PDFs is introduced to predict averaged values. The tabulation method is based on the analysis of the chemical structure of laminar premixed and diffusion flames. Hypothesis are presented, tested and validated with Sandia experimental data jet flames. Then, the model is introduced in a turbulent flow simulation software. Three configurations are retained to quantify the level of prediction of this formulation: the D and F-Flames of Sandia and lifted jet flames of methane/air of Stanford. A good agreement is observed between experiments and simulations. The validity of this method is then demonstrated. (author)

  4. Experiments on mixing and combustion with low heat release in a turbulent shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mungel, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    A new blowdown facility was built to study mixing and combustion in a turbulent shear layer. The system is capable of 100 m/s for three seconds in a 5 x 20 cm exit area on the high speed side, and 50 m/s in a 10 x 20 cm exit area on the low speed side. Dilute concentrations of hydrogen and fluorine, carried in an inert gas, react when both fluid streams meet at the tip of a splitter plate. The reaction is spontaneous, rapid, and highly exothermic. The resulting temperature field was studied using a rake of eight fast response thermometers placed across the width of the layer. Runs were performed for low heat release over a wide range of equivalence (concentration) ratios, at a Reynolds number of 30,800 based on velocity difference and vorticity thickness. The heat release is sufficiently low so that the overall properties of the mixing layer are not significantly changed from the cold case. The results show the presence of large, hot structures within the flow together with cool, irrotational tongues of freestream fluid that penetrate deep into the layer. Thus, it is possible for the entire width of the layer to be quite hot, owing to the passage of a large structure, or for the layer to be quite cool, owing to the presence of the cool fluid tongues. The mean temperature results from a duty cycle whereby a given point in the flow sees alternating hot and cool fluid which averages into the local mean. The results compare favorably with the recent theoretical model of Broadwell and Breidenthal for mixing and chemical reaction in a turbulent shear layer. With this model it is possible to bring the results for gases and liquids into quantitative agreement

  5. Numerical Methods and Turbulence Modeling for LES of Piston Engines: Impact on Flow Motion and Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misdariis A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, Large Eddy Simulations (LES of Spark Ignition (SI engines are performed to evaluate the impact of the numerical set-upon the predictedflow motion and combustion process. Due to the high complexity and computational cost of such simulations, the classical set-up commonly includes “low” order numerical schemes (typically first or second-order accurate in time and space as well as simple turbulence models (such as the well known constant coefficient Smagorinsky model (Smagorinsky J. (1963 Mon. Weather Rev. 91, 99-164. The scope of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility and the potential benefits of using high precision methods for engine simulations, relying on higher order numerical methods and state-of-the-art Sub-Grid-Scale (SGS models. For this purpose, two high order convection schemes from the Two-step Taylor Galerkin (TTG family (Colin and Rudgyard (2000 J. Comput. Phys. 162, 338-371 and several SGS turbulence models, namely Dynamic Smagorinsky (Germano et al. (1991 Phys. Fluids 3, 1760-1765 and sigma (Baya Toda et al. (2010 Proc. Summer Program 2010, Stanford, Center for Turbulence Research, NASA Ames/Stanford Univ., pp. 193-202 are considered to improve the accuracy of the classically used Lax-Wendroff (LW (Lax and Wendroff (1964 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 17, 381-398 - Smagorinsky set-up. This evaluation is performed considering two different engine configurations from IFP Energies nouvelles. The first one is the naturally aspirated four-valve spark-ignited F7P engine which benefits from an exhaustive experimental and numerical characterization. The second one, called Ecosural, is a highly supercharged spark-ignited engine. Unique realizations of engine cycles have been simulated for each set-up starting from the same initial conditions and the comparison is made with experimental and previous numerical results for the F7P configuration. For the Ecosural engine, experimental results are not available yet and only

  6. PIV measurements of the turbulence integral length scale on cold combustion flow field of tangential firing boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wen-fei; Xie, Jing-xing; Gong, Zhi-jun; Li, Bao-wei [Inner Mongolia Univ. of Science and Technology, Baotou (China). Inner Mongolia Key Lab. for Utilization of Bayan Obo Multi-Metallic Resources: Elected State Key Lab.

    2013-07-01

    The process of the pulverized coal combustion in tangential firing boiler has prominent significance on improving boiler operation efficiency and reducing NO{sub X} emission. This paper aims at researching complex turbulent vortex coherent structure formed by the four corners jets in the burner zone, a cold experimental model of tangential firing boiler has been built. And by employing spatial correlation analysis method and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) technique, the law of Vortex scale distribution on the three typical horizontal layers of the model based on the turbulent Integral Length Scale (ILS) has been researched. According to the correlation analysis of ILS and the temporal average velocity, it can be seen that the turbulent vortex scale distribution in the burner zone of the model is affected by both jet velocity and the position of wind layers, and is not linear with the variation of jet velocity. The vortex scale distribution of the upper primary air is significantly different from the others. Therefore, studying the ILS of turbulent vortex integral scale is instructive to high efficiency cleaning combustion of pulverized coal in theory.

  7. Selective coke combustion by oxygen pulsing during Mo/ZSM‐5‐catalyzed methane dehydroaromatization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinov, N.; Coumans, F.J.A.G.; Uslamin, E.A.; Kapteijn, F.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-oxidative methane dehydroaromatization is a promising reaction to directly convert natural gas into aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrogen. Commercialization of this technology is hampered by rapid catalyst deactivation because of coking. A novel approach is presented involving selective oxidation

  8. Ensemble Diffraction Measurements of Spray Combustion in a Novel Vitiated Coflow Turbulent Jet Flame Burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabra, R.; Hamano, Y.; Chen, J. Y.; Dibble, R. W.; Acosta, F.; Holve, D.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation is presented of a novel vitiated coflow spray flame burner. The vitiated coflow emulates the recirculation region of most combustors, such as gas turbines or furnaces; additionally, since the vitiated gases are coflowing, the burner allows exploration of the chemistry of recirculation without the corresponding fluid mechanics of recirculation. As such, this burner allows for chemical kinetic model development without obscurations caused by fluid mechanics. The burner consists of a central fuel jet (droplet or gaseous) surrounded by the oxygen rich combustion products of a lean premixed flame that is stabilized on a perforated, brass plate. The design presented allows for the reacting coflow to span a large range of temperatures and oxygen concentrations. Several experiments measuring the relationships between mixture stoichiometry and flame temperature are used to map out the operating ranges of the coflow burner. These include temperatures as low 300 C to stoichiometric and oxygen concentrations from 18 percent to zero. This is achieved by stabilizing hydrogen-air premixed flames on a perforated plate. Furthermore, all of the CO2 generated is from the jet combustion. Thus, a probe sample of NO(sub X) and CO2 yields uniquely an emission index, as is commonly done in gas turbine engine exhaust research. The ability to adjust the oxygen content of the coflow allows us to steadily increase the coflow temperature surrounding the jet. At some temperature, the jet ignites far downstream from the injector tube. Further increases in the coflow temperature results in autoignition occurring closer to the nozzle. Examples are given of methane jetting into a coflow that is lean, stoichiometric, and even rich. Furthermore, an air jet with a rich coflow produced a normal looking flame that is actually 'inverted' (air on the inside, surrounded by fuel). In the special case of spray injection, we demonstrate the efficacy of this novel burner with a

  9. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  10. A comparative parametric study of a catalytic plate methane reformer coated with segmented and continuous layers of combustion catalyst for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhwa, Mayur; Parmar, Rajesh D.; Thurgood, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    A parametric comparison study is carried out between segmented and conventional continuous layer configurations of the coated combustion-catalyst to investigate their influence on the performance of methane steam reforming (MSR) for hydrogen production in a catalytic plate reactor (CPR). MSR is simulated on one side of a thin plate over a continuous layer of nickel-alumina catalyst by implementing an experimentally validated surface microkinetic model. Required thermal energy for the MSR reaction is supplied by simulating catalytic methane combustion (CMC) on the opposite side of the plate over segmented and continuous layer of a platinum-alumina catalyst by implementing power law rate model. The simulation results of both coating configurations of the combustion-catalyst are compared using the following parameters: (1) co-flow and counter-flow modes between CMC and MSR, (2) gas hourly space velocity and (3) reforming-catalyst thickness. The study explains why CPR designed with the segmented combustion-catalyst and co-flow mode shows superior performance not only in terms of high hydrogen production but also in terms of minimizing the maximum reactor plate temperature and thermal hot-spots. The study shows that the segmented coating requires 7% to 8% less combustion-side feed flow and 70% less combustion-catalyst to produce the required flow of hydrogen (29.80 mol/h) on the reforming-side to feed a 1 kW fuel-cell compared to the conventional continuous coating of the combustion-catalyst.

  11. Hybrid Approach for Modeling Chemical Kinetics and Turbulence Effects on Combustion-Instability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Combustion instabilities pose a significant technical risk in the development of liquid and solid rocket motors. Much of the effort in modeling combustion...

  12. Effects of Turbulent Reynolds Number on the Displacement Speed Statistics in the Thin Reaction Zones Regime of Turbulent Premixed Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjan Chakraborty

    2011-01-01

    nature of the correlations remains unaffected. The dependence of displacement speed on strain rate and curvature is found to weaken with increasing turbulent Reynolds number when either Damköhler or Karlovitz number is held constant, but the qualitative nature of the correlation remains unaltered. The implications of turbulent Reynolds number effects in the context of Flame Surface Density (FSD modelling have also been addressed, with emphasis on the influence of displacement speed on the curvature and propagation terms in the FSD balance equation.

  13. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    2008-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, a topic generally taught at the upper undergraduate and graduate level in most mechanical engineering programs, and many chemical engineering programs, is the study of rapid energy and mass transfer usually through the common physical phenomena of flame oxidation. It covers the physics and chemistry of this process and the engineering applications-from the generation of power such as the internal combustion automobile engine to the gas turbine engine. Renewed concerns about energy efficiency and fuel costs, along with continued concerns over toxic and particulate emissions have kept the interest in this vital area of engineering high and brought about new developments in both fundamental knowledge of flame and combustion physics as well as new technologies for flame and fuel control. *New chapter on new combustion concepts and technologies, including discussion on nanotechnology as related to combustion, as well as microgravity combustion, microcombustion, and catalytic combustion-all ...

  14. Sourcing methane and carbon dioxide emissions from a small city: Influence of natural gas leakage and combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Samuel D; Ingraffea, Anthony R; Sparks, Jed P

    2016-11-01

    Natural gas leakage and combustion are major sources of methane (CH 4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), respectively; however, our understanding of emissions from cities is limited. We mapped distribution pipeline leakage using a mobile CH 4 detection system, and continuously monitored atmospheric CO 2 and CH 4 concentrations and carbon isotopes (δ 13 C-CO 2 and δ 13 C-CH 4 ) for one-year above Ithaca, New York. Pipeline leakage rates were low (emission source in that wind sector. Our results demonstrate pipeline leakage rates are low in cities with a low extent of leak prone pipe, and natural gas power facilities may be an important source of urban and suburban emissions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Catalytic Combustion of Low Concentration Methane over Catalysts Prepared from Co/Mg-Mn Layered Double Hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfeng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of Co/Mg-Mn mixed oxides were synthesized through thermal decomposition of layered double hydroxides (LDHs precursors. The resulted catalysts were then subjected for catalytic combustion of methane. Experimental results revealed that the Co4.5Mg1.5Mn2LDO catalyst possessed the best performance with the T90=485°C. After being analyzed via XRD, BET-BJH, SEM, H2-TPR, and XPS techniques, it was observed that the addition of cobalt had significantly improved the redox ability of the catalysts whilst certain amount of magnesium was essential to guarantee the catalytic activity. The presence of Mg was helpful to enhance the oxygen mobility and, meanwhile, improved the dispersion of Co and Mn oxides, preventing the surface area loss after calcination.

  16. AuRu/meso-Mn2O3: A Highly Active and Stable Catalyst for Methane Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z.; Fang, J. Y.; Xie, S. H.; Deng, J. G.; Liu, Y. X.; Dai, H. X.

    2018-05-01

    Three-dimensionally ordered mesoporous Mn2O3 (meso-Mn2O3) and its supported Au, Ru, and AuRu alloy (0.49 wt% Au/meso-Mn2O3, 0.48 wt% Ru/meso-Mn2O3, and 0.97 wt% AuRu/meso-Mn2O3 (Au/Ru molar ratio = 0.98)) nanocatalysts were prepared using the KIT-6-templating and polyvinyl alcohol-protected reduction methods, respectively. Physicochemical properties of the samples were characterized by means of numerous techniques, and their catalytic activities were evaluated for the combustion of methane. It is found that among all of the samples, 0.48 wt% Ru/meso-Mn 2O3 and 0.97 wt% AuRu/meso-Mn2O3 performed the best (the reaction temperature (T90% ) at 90% methane conversion was 530-540°C), but the latter showed a better thermal stability than the former. The partial deactivation of 0.97 wt% AuRu/meso-Mn2O3 due to H2O or CO2 introduction was reversible. It is concluded that the good catalytic activity and thermal stability of 0.97 wt% AuRu/meso-Mn2O3 was associated with the high dispersion of AuRu alloy NPs (2-5 nm) on the surface of meso-Mn2O3 and good low-temperature reducibility.

  17. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  18. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1997-01-01

    This Third Edition of Glassman's classic text clearly defines the role of chemistry, physics, and fluid mechanics as applied to the complex topic of combustion. Glassman's insightful introductory text emphasizes underlying physical and chemical principles, and encompasses engine technology, fire safety, materials synthesis, detonation phenomena, hydrocarbon fuel oxidation mechanisms, and environmental considerations. Combustion has been rewritten to integrate the text, figures, and appendixes, detailing available combustion codes, making it not only an excellent introductory text but also an important reference source for professionals in the field. Key Features * Explains complex combustion phenomena with physical insight rather than extensive mathematics * Clarifies postulates in the text using extensive computational results in figures * Lists modern combustion programs indicating usage and availability * Relates combustion concepts to practical applications.

  19. Effect of turbulent natural convection on sodium pool combustion in the steam generator building of a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karthikeyan, S.; Sundararajan, T.; Shet, U.S.P.; Selvaraj, P.

    2009-01-01

    A computational model is proposed to simulate sodium pool combustion considering the effect of turbulent natural convection in a vented enclosure of the steam generator building (SGB) of a fast breeder reactor. The model is validated by comparing the simulated results with the experimental results available in literature for sodium pool combustion in a CSTF vessel. After validation, the effects of vents and the location of the pool on the burning rate of sodium and the associated heat transfer to the walls are studied in an enclosure comparable in size to one floor of the steam generator building. In the presence of ventilation, the burning rate of sodium increases, but the total heat transferred to the walls of the enclosure is reduced. It is also found that the burning rate of sodium pool and the heat transfer to the walls of the enclosures vary significantly with the location of sodium pool.

  20. Ammonia-methane combustion in tangential swirl burners for gas turbine power generation

    OpenAIRE

    Valera Medina, Agustin; Marsh, Richard; Runyon, Jon; Pugh, Daniel; Beasley, Paul; Hughes, Timothy Richard; Bowen, Philip John

    2017-01-01

    Ammonia has been proposed as a potential energy storage medium in the transition towards a low-carbon economy. This paper details experimental results and numerical calculations obtained to progress towards optimisation of fuel injection and fluidic stabilisation in swirl burners with ammonia as the primary fuel. A generic tangential swirl burner has been employed to determine flame stability and emissions produced at different equivalence ratios using ammonia–methane blends. Experiments were...

  1. Combustible gas production (methane) and biodegradation of solid and liquid mixtures of meat industry wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, A.; Al-Kassir, A.; Cuadros, F.; Lopez-Rodriguez, F. [School of Engineering, University of Extremadura, Avda. De Elva, s/n, 06071, Badajoz (Spain); Mohamad, A.A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. N.W., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    This work is devoted to determine the optimal operational conditions on the methane production as well as on the biodegradation obtained from the anaerobic codigestion of solid (fat, intestines, rumen, bowels, whiskers, etc.) and liquid (blood, washing water, manure, etc.) wastes of meat industry, particularly the ones rising from the municipal slaughterhouse of Badajoz (Spain). The experiments were performed using a 2 l capacity discontinuous digester at 38 C. The loading rate were 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4.5 g COD for wastewater (washing water and blood; Mixture 1), and 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 g COD for the co-digestion of a mixture of 97% liquid effluent and 3% solid wastes v/v (Mixture 2) which represents the annual mean composition of the waste generated by the slaughterhouse. The maximal biodegradation rates obtained were: Mixture 1, 56.9% for a COD load of 1 g; and Mixture 2, 19.1% for a COD load of 2 g. For both mixtures, the greatest methane production was for the maximum COD load (4.5 g for Mixture 1, and 4 g for Mixture 2), at which values the amounts of methane obtained during and at the end of the co-digestion were practically indistinguishable between the two mixtures. The results will be used to design, construct, and establish the optimal operating conditions of a continuous complete-mixture biodigester. (author)

  2. Modelling of Non-Premixed Turbulent Combustion of Hydrogen using Conditional Moment Closure Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, M M; Hairuddin, A Aziz; Wandel, Andrew P; Yusaf, T F

    2012-01-01

    Most of the electricity generation and energy for transport is still generated by the conversion of chemical to mechanical energy by burning the fuels in the combustion chamber. Regulation for pollution and the demand for more fuel economy had driven worldwide researcher to focus on combustion efficiency. In order to reduce experimental cost, accurate modelling and simulation is very critical step. Taylor series expansion was utilised to reduce the error term for the discretization. FORTRAN code was used to execute the discretized partial differential equation. Hydrogen combustion was simulated using Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) model. Combustion of hydrogen with oxygen was successfully simulated and reported in this paper.

  3. Investigation of Methane Oxy-Fuel Combustion in a Swirl-Stabilised Gas Turbine Model Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available CO2 has a strong impact on both operability and emission behaviours in gas turbine combustors. In the present study, an atmospheric, preheated, swirl-stabilised optical gas turbine model combustor rig was employed. The primary objectives were to analyse the influence of CO2 on the fundamental characteristics of combustion, lean blowout (LBO limits, CO emission and flame structures. CO2 dilution effects were examined with three preheating temperatures (396.15, 431.15, and 466.15 K. The fundamental combustion characteristics were studied utilising chemical kinetic simulations. To study the influence of CO2 on the operational range of the combustor, equivalence ratio (Ф was varied from stoichiometric conditions to the LBO limits. CO emissions were measured at the exit of the combustor using a water-cooled probe over the entire operational range. The flame structures and locations were characterised by performing CH chemiluminescence imaging. The inverse Abel transformation was used to analyse the CH distribution on the axisymmetric plane of the combustor. Chemical kinetic modelling indicated that the CO2 resulted in a lower reaction rate compared with the CH4/air flame. Fundamental combustion properties such as laminar flame speed, ignition delay time and blowout residence time were found to be affected by CO2. The experimental results revealed that CO2 dilution resulted in a narrower operational range for the equivalence ratio. It was also found that CO2 had a strong inhibiting effect on CO burnout, which led to a higher concentration of CO in the combustion exhaust. CH chemiluminescence showed that the CO2 dilution did not have a significant impact on the flame structure.

  4. Numerical investigation on the combustion characteristics of methane/air in a micro-combustor with a hollow hemispherical bluff body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li; Zhu, Junchen; Yan, Yunfei; Guo, Hongliang; Yang, Zhongqing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A micro-combustor with a hollow hemisphere bluff body is developed. • Blow-off limit of reactor is expanded 2.5 times by the hollow hemisphere bluff body. • Methane conversion rate of combustor sharply increases at the location of bluff body. • Methane conversion rate is mainly affected by equivalence ratio and inlet velocity. • Recirculation zone expands blow-off limit and increases methane conversion rate. - Abstract: The combustion characteristics of methane in a cube micro-combustor with a hollow hemispherical bluff body were numerically investigated. The blow-off limit, recirculation zone length and methane conversion rate were examined. The results illustrate that the blow-off limit of the micro-combustor with a hollow hemispherical bluff body is 2.5 times higher than that without bluff body, which are 24.5 m/s and 9.5 m/s at the same equivalence ratio (ϕ = 1), respectively. With the use of hollow hemispherical bluff body, methane conversion sharply increases from 0.24% to 17.95% at 3 mm along the inlet-flow direction, where is the location of bluff-body, which is not affected by equivalence ratio and inlet velocity. The recirculation zone size has determined influence on residence time of the mixture gas, which increases with the increase of inlet velocity. Methane conversion rate is determined by equivalence ratio and inlet velocity. Methane conversion rate firstly increases and then decreases when the equivalence ratio and inlet velocity increase, reaching the maximum value (97.84%) at ϕ = 1 and 0.02 m/s. Methane conversion rate sharply increases from 45% to 97.84% when the inlet velocity increases from 0.008 m/s to 0.02 m/s

  5. Numerical study of laminar nonpremixed methane flames in coflow jets: Autoignited lifted flames with tribrachial edges and MILD combustion at elevated temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    M. Al-Noman, Saeed

    2016-07-07

    Autoignition characteristics of laminar nonpremixed methane jet flames in high-temperature coflow air are studied numerically. Several flame configurations are investigated by varying the initial temperature and fuel mole fraction. At a relatively low initial temperature, a non-autoignited nozzle-attached flame is simulated at relatively low jet velocity. When the initial temperature is higher than that required for autoignition, two regimes are investigated: an autoignited lifted flame with tribrachial edge structure and an autoignited lifted flame with Mild combustion. The autoignited lifted flame with tribrachial edge exhibited three branches: lean and rich premixed flame wings and a trailing diffusion flame. Characteristics of kinetic structure for autoignited lifted flames are discussed based on the kinetic structures of homogeneous autoignition and flame propagation of stoichiometric mixture. Results showed that a transition from autoignition to flame propagation modes occurs for reasonably stoichiometric mixtures. The autoignited lifted flame with Mild combustion occurs when methane fuel is highly diluted with nitrogen. The kinetic structure analysis shows that the characteristics of Mild combustion can be treated as an autoignited lean premixed lifted flame. Transition behavior from Mild combustion to nozzle-attached flame was investigated by increasing the fuel mole fraction. As the maximum flame temperature increases with decreasing liftoff height, the kinetic structure showed a transition behavior from autoignition to flame propagation of a lean premixed flame. © 2016 The Combustion Institute

  6. Sulphur poisoning of palladium catalysts used for methane combustion: Effect of the support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escandon, Lara S.; Ordonez, Salvador; Vega, Aurelio; Diez, Fernando V.

    2008-01-01

    Four different supported palladium catalysts (using alumina, silica, zirconia and titania as supports), prepared by incipient wetness impregnation, were tested as catalysts for methane oxidation in presence of sulphur dioxide. The catalyst supported on zirconia showed the best performance, whereas the silica-supported one showed the fastest deactivation. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments of the poisoned catalysts suggest that SO 2 adsorption capacity of the support plays a key role in the catalyst poisoning. In order to study the effect of promoters, expected to improve the thermal stability and thioresistance of the catalyst, commercial zirconia modified by yttrium and lantane was tested as supports. It was found that the presence of these promoters does not improve the performance of the zirconia-supported catalyst. A deactivation model - considering two different active sites (fresh and poisoning), pseudo-first order dependence on methane concentration and poisoning rate depending on sulphur concentration and fraction of non-poisoned palladium - was used for modelling the deactivation behaviour

  7. A simple recipe for modeling reaction-rate in flows with turbulent-combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1991-01-01

    A computationally viable scheme to account for chemical reaction in turbulent flows is presented. The multivariate beta-pdf model for multiple scalar mixing forms the basis of this scheme. Using the model scalar joint pdf and a general form of the instantaneous reaction-rate, the unclosed chemical reaction terms are expressed as simple functions of scalar means and the turbulent scalar energy. The calculation procedure requires that the mean scalar equations and only one other transport equation - for the turbulent scalar energy - be solved.

  8. Fuel rich and fuel lean catalytic combustion of the stabilized confined turbulent gaseous diffusion flames over noble metal disc burners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal S. Zakhary

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic combustion of stabilized confined turbulent gaseous diffusion flames using Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3 disc burners situated in the combustion domain under both fuel-rich and fuel-lean conditions was experimentally studied. Commercial LPG fuel having an average composition of: 23% propane, 76% butane, and 1% pentane was used. The thermal structure of these catalytic flames developed over Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3 burners were examined via measuring the mean temperature distribution in the radial direction at different axial locations along the flames. Under-fuel-rich condition the flames operated over Pt catalytic disc attained high temperature values in order to express the progress of combustion and were found to achieve higher activity as compared to the flames developed over Pd catalytic disc. These two types of catalytic flames demonstrated an increase in the reaction rate with the downstream axial distance and hence, an increase in the flame temperatures was associated with partial oxidation towards CO due to the lack of oxygen. However, under fuel-lean conditions the catalytic flame over Pd catalyst recorded comparatively higher temperatures within the flame core in the near region of the main reaction zone than over Pt disc burner. These two catalytic flames over Pt and Pd disc burners showed complete oxidation to CO2 since the catalytic surface is covered by more rich oxygen under the fuel-lean condition.

  9. Turbulent convective heat transfer of methane at supercritical pressure in a helical coiled tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Sun, Baokun; Lin, Wei; He, Fan; You, Yingqiang; Yu, Jiuyang

    2018-02-01

    The heat transfer of methane at supercritical pressure in a helically coiled tube was numerically investigated using the Reynolds Stress Model under constant wall temperature. The effects of mass flux ( G), inlet pressure ( P in) and buoyancy force on the heat transfer behaviors were discussed in detail. Results show that the light fluid with higher temperature appears near the inner wall of the helically coiled tube. When the bulk temperature is less than or approach to the pseudocritical temperature ( T pc ), the combined effects of buoyancy force and centrifugal force make heavy fluid with lower temperature appear near the outer-right of the helically coiled tube. Beyond the T pc , the heavy fluid with lower temperature moves from the outer-right region to the outer region owing to the centrifugal force. The buoyancy force caused by density variation, which can be characterized by Gr/ Re 2 and Gr/ Re 2.7, enhances the heat transfer coefficient ( h) when the bulk temperature is less than or near the T pc , and the h experiences oscillation due to the buoyancy force. The oscillation is reduced progressively with the increase of G. Moreover, h reaches its peak value near the T pc . Higher G could improve the heat transfer performance in the whole temperature range. The peak value of h depends on P in. A new correlation was proposed for methane at supercritical pressure convective heat transfer in the helical tube, which shows a good agreement with the present simulated results.

  10. Turbulent combustion modeling using Flamelet-Generated Manifolds for Gas Turbine applications in OpenFOAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fancello, A.; Panek, L.; Lammel, O.; Krebs, W.; Bastiaans, R.J.M.; de Goey, L.P.H.

    2014-01-01

    The continuous interest in reducing pollutions and developing both an efficient and clean combustion system require large attention in the design requirements, especially when related to industrial gas turbine application. Although in recent years the advancements in modelling have increased

  11. Combustion Dynamics of Biocidal Metal-Based Energetic Components in Turbulent Reactive Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    of the dump tank . The gas passes through a bubbler: a 500ml beaker is filled halfway with distilled water, and the gas is piped to the bottom of...the bubbler. This process collects the particles attached to the inside walls of the dump tank . A rough settling time calculation places the...combustion are limited. This size range is particularly interesting because the combustion mode is expected to transition from the gas-phase diffusion

  12. Stretch rate effects and flame surface densities in premixed turbulent combustion up to 1.25 MPa

    KAUST Repository

    Bagdanavicius, Audrius

    2015-11-01

    Independent research at two centres using a burner and an explosion bomb has revealed important aspects of turbulent premixed flame structure. Measurements at pressures and temperatures up to 1.25MPa and 673K in the two rigs were aimed at quantifying the influences of flame stretch rate and strain rate Markstein number, Masr , on both turbulent burning velocity and flame surface density. That on burning velocity is expressed through the stretch rate factor, Io , or probability of burning, Pb 0.5. These depend on Masr , but they grow in importance as the Karlovitz stretch factor, K, increases, and are evaluated from the associated burning velocity data. Planar laser tomography was employed to identify contours of reaction progress variable in both rigs. These enabled both an appropriate flame front for the measurement of the turbulent burning velocity to be identified, and flame surface densities, with the associated factors, to be evaluated. In the explosion measurements, these parameters were derived also from the flame surface area, the derived Pb 0.5 factor and the measured turbulent burning velocities. In the burner measurement they were calculated directly from the flame surface density, which was derived from the flame contours.A new overall correlation is derived for the Pb 0.5 factor, in terms of Masr at different K and this is discussed in the light of previous theoretical studies. The wrinkled flame surface area normalised by the area associated with the turbulent burning velocity measurement, and the ratio of turbulent to laminar burning velocity, ut /ul , are also evaluated. The higher the value of Pb0.5, the more effective is an increased flame wrinkling in increasing ut /ul A correlation of the product of k and the laminar flame thickness with Karlovitz stretch factor and Markstein number is explored using the present data and those of other workers. Some generality is revealed, enabling the wave length associated with the spatial change in mean

  13. Stretch rate effects and flame surface densities in premixed turbulent combustion up to 1.25 MPa

    KAUST Repository

    Bagdanavicius, Audrius; Bowen, Phil J.; Bradley, Derek; Lawes, Malcolm; Mansour, Morkous S.

    2015-01-01

    Independent research at two centres using a burner and an explosion bomb has revealed important aspects of turbulent premixed flame structure. Measurements at pressures and temperatures up to 1.25MPa and 673K in the two rigs were aimed at quantifying the influences of flame stretch rate and strain rate Markstein number, Masr , on both turbulent burning velocity and flame surface density. That on burning velocity is expressed through the stretch rate factor, Io , or probability of burning, Pb 0.5. These depend on Masr , but they grow in importance as the Karlovitz stretch factor, K, increases, and are evaluated from the associated burning velocity data. Planar laser tomography was employed to identify contours of reaction progress variable in both rigs. These enabled both an appropriate flame front for the measurement of the turbulent burning velocity to be identified, and flame surface densities, with the associated factors, to be evaluated. In the explosion measurements, these parameters were derived also from the flame surface area, the derived Pb 0.5 factor and the measured turbulent burning velocities. In the burner measurement they were calculated directly from the flame surface density, which was derived from the flame contours.A new overall correlation is derived for the Pb 0.5 factor, in terms of Masr at different K and this is discussed in the light of previous theoretical studies. The wrinkled flame surface area normalised by the area associated with the turbulent burning velocity measurement, and the ratio of turbulent to laminar burning velocity, ut /ul , are also evaluated. The higher the value of Pb0.5, the more effective is an increased flame wrinkling in increasing ut /ul A correlation of the product of k and the laminar flame thickness with Karlovitz stretch factor and Markstein number is explored using the present data and those of other workers. Some generality is revealed, enabling the wave length associated with the spatial change in mean

  14. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Modified Hematite by Methane (CH{sub 4}) for Chemical-Looping Combustion: A Global Kinetics Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monazam, Esmail R; Breault, Ronald W; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Miller, Duane D

    2013-10-01

    Iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) or in its natural form (hematite) is a potential material to capture CO{sub 2} through the chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process. It is known that magnesium (Mg) is an effective methyl cleaving catalyst and as such it has been combined with hematite to assess any possible enhancement to the kinetic rate for the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with methane. Therefore, in order to evaluate its effectiveness as a hematite additive, the behaviors of Mg-modified hematite samples (hematite –5% Mg(OH){sub 2}) have been analyzed with regard to assessing any enhancement to the kinetic rate process. The Mg-modified hematite was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis. The reactivity experiments were conducted in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) using continuous stream of CH{sub 4} (5, 10, and 20%) at temperatures ranging from 700 to 825 {degrees}C over ten reduction cycles. The mass spectroscopy analysis of product gas indicated the presence of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2} and CO in the gaseous product. The kinetic data at reduction step obtained by isothermal experiments could be well fitted by two parallel rate equations. The modified hematite samples showed higher reactivity as compared to unmodified hematite samples during reduction at all investigated temperatures.

  15. Construction, evaluation and demonstration of mobile catalytic combustion units for destruction of methane and different odor pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannasch, Anna-Karin [Catator AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-02-15

    This project reports on the construction, the evaluation and the demonstration of novel, mobile small-scale (< 100 Nm{sup 3}/h) combustion units for reduction of methane and/or different odour pollutants (e.g. hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, VOC) existing in small concentrations in process air streams. The evaluated units include a regenerative (MeshRegenOx/MRO) and a recuperative, catalytic unit (Deodoron), respectively, which both are based on Catator's proprietary wire mesh catalyst technology. The evaluation and the demonstration work have involved laboratory tests with synthetic gases and a number of field tests at plants for biogas production, water and waste treatment. The results show that: 1. In comparison to conventional thermal emission abatement systems, the wire mesh catalyst technology opens up for the construction of very compact (V=0.6 Nm, W=500 kg for 1000 Nm{sup 3}/h) and thermo-economical systems (> 95 %), which technology can easily be scaled up and integrated into existing industrial and/or process streams. 2. Catator's MRO-prototype enables for autothermal oxidation of methane, with a conversion degree of 97-98 %, from an inlet concentration of 0.2 vol% at an operation temperature of 660-700 deg, i.e. 200-300 deg less than when conventional homogenous flame combustion is applied. 3. The performance of the MRO-unit was seen to be somewhat unstable, with an oscillating conversion degree during the operation cycle. This should however be able to overcome by further optimizing the integrated catalyst package and the heat exchanger. Significant improvements in efficiency and stability are also to be expected by the scale-up due to a decreasing heat loss with an increasing capacity 4. Close to 100 % removal of different odorants, with a thermal efficiency of around 80 %, can be obtained by the use of Catator's unit Deodoron at an operation temperature of 300-400 deg. The results were verified by odor tests performed up- and downstream the

  16. Effects of turbulence enhancement on combustion process using a double injection strategy in direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) gasoline engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taehoon; Song, Jingeun; Park, Sungwook

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Using double injection strategy, turbulent kinetic energy can be improved with slight decrease in mixture homogeneity. • Retarded first injection timing reduces vapor fuel loss to intake port. • Double injection increases tumble intensity. • High turbulent intensity caused by double injection increases flame propagation speed. - Abstract: Direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) gasoline engines have been spotlighted due to their high thermal efficiency. Increase in the compression ratio that result from the heat absorption effect of fuel vaporization induces higher thermal efficiency than found in port fuel injection (PFI) engines. Since fuel is injected at the cylinder directly, various fuel injection strategies can be used. In this study, turbulent intensity was improved by a double injection strategy while maintaining mixture homogeneity. To analyze the turbulence enhancement effects using the double injection strategy, a side fuel injected, homogeneous-charge-type DISI gasoline engine with a multi-hole-type injector was utilized. The spray model was evaluated using experimental data for various injection pressures and the combustion model was evaluated for varied ignition timing. First and second injection timing was swept by 20 degree interval. The turbulent kinetic energy and mixture inhomogeneity index were mapped. First injection at the middle of the intake stroke and second injection early in the compression stroke showed improved turbulent characteristics that did not significantly decrease with mixture homogeneity. A double injection case that showed improved turbulent intensity while maintaining an adequate level of mixture homogeneity and another double injection case that showed significantly improved turbulent intensity with a remarkable decrease in mixture homogeneity were considered for combustion simulation. We found that the improved turbulent intensity increased the flame propagation speed. Also, the mixture homogeneity

  17. Flame Acceleration and Transition to Detonation in High Speed Turbulent Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-21

    Contract number N000141410177 for the time period December 31, 2013- December 31 , 2016 Principal Investigator: Elaine S. Oran Co-Investigator: Norman ...channel shown. (a) Rough walls generate turbulence. Flame ( green ) accelerates as it propagates down the channel. (b) DDT in the boundary layer near t

  18. Some calculations using the two-dimensional turbulent combustion code flare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.

    1986-09-01

    A brief description of the code FLARE is given. Both the model used in FLARE and the numerical scheme used to implement the model are described. Results for the simulation of an experiment are presented and discussed. An alternative turbulence model to that used in FLARE is discussed but it is concluded that the original model is better. (author)

  19. Validation of unsteady flamelet models for non-premixed turbulent combustion with intermittency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourlioux, A.; Volkov, O.

    2003-01-01

    Flamelets play an important role as subgrid models in large eddy simulations of turbulent flames: they are based on a one-dimensional steady asymptotic solution for the flame. The focus of the present study is to validate their use when unsteadiness and multidimensional effects are present, as to be expected for turbulent flows. To shortcut the prohibitively expansive step of solving the complete Navier-Stokes equations in the turbulent regime, a synthetic turbulent-like flow field is specified, which allows for extensive yet affordable simulations and analysis. The flow field consists of a simple steady horizontal shear with a time-periodic vertical sweep. Despite the simplicity of the flow field, the passive scalar response displays qualitatively many characteristics observed in experiments with fully turbulent flow, in particular, in terms of the strong departure from Gaussianity of its probability distribution function. The same set-up is utilized for the reactive case in order to generate challenging conditions to test the robustness of unsteady versions of the laminar flamelet models. We analyze the asymptotic behavior of the models for a large range of Damkoehler and Peclet numbers in the presence of intermittency and confirm for those demanding test-cases the good performance of the models that had been observed for less-demanding one-dimensional test-cases with smooth time behavior. In particular, the performance of the models is quite satisfactory in the intermediate regimes where neither the very fast nor the very slow chemistry asymptotic approximation would be appropriate. (author)

  20. Quantitative Imaging of Turbulent Mixing Dynamics in High-Pressure Fuel Injection to Enable Predictive Simulations of Engine Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Jonathan H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Reacting Flows Dept.; Pickett, Lyle M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Engine Combustion Dept.; Bisson, Scott E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Remote Sensing and Energetic Materials Dept.; Patterson, Brian D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). combustion Chemistry Dept.; Ruggles, Adam J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Reacting Flows Dept.; Skeen, Scott A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Engine Combustion Dept.; Manin, Julien Luc [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Engine Combustion Dept.; Huang, Erxiong [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Reacting Flows Dept.; Cicone, Dave J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Engine Combustion Dept.; Sphicas, Panos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Engine Combustion Dept.

    2015-09-01

    In this LDRD project, we developed a capability for quantitative high - speed imaging measurements of high - pressure fuel injection dynamics to advance understanding of turbulent mixing in transcritical flows, ignition, and flame stabilization mechanisms, and to provide e ssential validation data for developing predictive tools for engine combustion simulations. Advanced, fuel - efficient engine technologies rely on fuel injection into a high - pressure, high - temperature environment for mixture preparation and com bustion. Howe ver, the dynamics of fuel injection are not well understood and pose significant experimental and modeling challenges. To address the need for quantitative high - speed measurements, we developed a Nd:YAG laser that provides a 5ms burst of pulses at 100 kHz o n a robust mobile platform . Using this laser, we demonstrated s patially and temporally resolved Rayleigh scattering imaging and particle image velocimetry measurements of turbulent mixing in high - pressure gas - phase flows and vaporizing sprays . Quantitativ e interpretation of high - pressure measurements was advanced by reducing and correcting interferences and imaging artifacts.

  1. Flame Acceleration and Transition to Detonation in High-Speed Turbulent Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-21

    ficult to overestimate, as it is the main process in all internal-combustion engines used for propulsion and energy generation. These include piston ...distorted tulip flame develops a double -cusped, concave flame front (6.91 and 7.34 ms) . By t his time, the pressure waves are amplified , and

  2. On hydrogen addition effects in turbulent combustion using the Flamelet Generated Manifold technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fancello, A.; Bastiaans, R.J.M.; de Goey, L.P.H.

    2014-01-01

    The idea of reducing emissions and pollution in turbo-machinery technology is growing significantly in the last decades. In order to reach these standards and to guarantee, at the same time, efficient combustion systems, new configurations for burners are required. Classical approaches such as

  3. Thermal and fluid dynamic analysis of partially premixed turbulent combustion driven by thermo acoustic effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahi, Mina; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Sponfeldner, Thomas; Malcolm, M.J.; Pawelczyk, M.; Paosawatyangyong, B.

    2013-01-01

    Thermo-acoustic instability can be caused by the feedback mechanism between unsteady heat release, acoustic oscillations and flow perturbations. In a gas turbine combustor limit cycles of pressure oscillations at elevated temperatures generated by the unstable combustion process enhance the

  4. Subfilter Scale Modelling for Large Eddy Simulation of Lean Hydrogen-Enriched Turbulent Premixed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez Perez, F.E.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) enrichment of hydrocarbon fuels in lean premixed systems is desirable since it can lead to a progressive reduction in greenhouse-gas emissions, while paving the way towards pure hydrogen combustion. In recent decades, large-eddy simulation (LES) has emerged as a promising tool to

  5. An experimental and numerical study of confined non-reacting and reacting turbulent jets to facilitate homogeneous combustion in industrial furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Insu

    Confined non-reacting turbulent jets are ideal for recirculating the hot flue gas back into the furnace from an external exhaust duct. Such jets are also used inside the furnace to internally entrain and recirculate the hot flue gas to preheat and dilute the reactants. Both internal and external implementation of confined turbulent jets increase the furnace thermal efficiency. For external implementation, depending on the circumstances, the exhaust gas flow may be co- or counter-flow relative to the jet flow. Inside the furnaces, fuel and air jets are injected separately. To create a condition which can facilitate near homogeneous combustion, these jets have to first mix with the burned gas inside the furnace and simultaneously being heated and diluted prior to combustion. Clearly, the combustion pattern and emissions from reacting confined turbulent jets are affected by jet interactions, mixing and entrainment of hot flue gas. In this work, the flow and mixing characteristics of a non-reacting and reacting confined turbulent jet are investigated experimentally and numerically. This work consists of two parts: (i) A study of flow and mixing characteristics of non-reacting confined turbulent jets with co- or counter-flowing exhaust/flue gas. Here the axial and radial distributions of temperature, velocity and NO concentration (used as a tracer gas) were measured. FLUENT was used to numerically simulate the experimental results. This work provides the basic understanding of the flow and mixing characteristics of confined turbulent jets and develops some design considerations for recirculating flue gas back into the furnace as expressed by the recirculation zone and the stagnation locations. (ii) Numerical calculations of near homogeneous combustion are performed for the existing furnace. The exact geometry of the furnace in the lab is used and the real dimensional boundary conditions are considered. The parameters such as air nozzle diameter (dair), fuel nozzle

  6. Determination of thermal characteristics of combustion products of fire-tube heat generator with flow turbulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukjanov Alexander V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Boiler construction is one of the major industries of any state. The aim is to determine the effect of the turbulator on the intensity of heat transfer in the convective part of the fire-tube heat generator of domestic production. The improvement of convective heating surfaces is one of the ways to increase the energy efficiency of the fire-tube heat generator. Since model of the process of heat transfer of gas flow in the convective tubes is multifactorial and does not have clear analytical solution at present, the study of process above is carried out using the experimental method. The results of applying the flow turbulator as a broken tape in the fire-tube heat generator of KV-GM type are presented. On their basis it can be concluded about increasing of heat transfer in convective part of the unit. The use of efficient, reliable, easy to manufacture, relatively inexpensive turbulator in domestic fire-tube heat generators will allow to increase their energy conversion efficiency and reduce fuel consumption, which will have a positive economic effect.

  7. LES of explosions in venting chamber: A test case for premixed turbulent combustion models

    OpenAIRE

    Vermorel , Olivier; Quillatre , Pierre; Poinsot , Thierry

    2017-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a new experimental and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) database to study upscaling effects in vented gas explosions. The propagation of premixed flames in three setups of increasing size is investigated experimentally and numerically. The baseline model is the well-known laboratory-scale combustion chamber from Sydney (Kent et al., 2005; Masri et al., 2012); two exact replicas at scales 6 and 24.4 were set up by GexCon (Bergen, Norway). The volume ratio...

  8. On the formulation and assessment of flamelet-generated manifolds applied to two-phase turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojko, Brian T.

    solving the 1D flame equations at varying drop sizes, where the source terms for energy, mixture fraction, and progress variable are cataloged as a function of normalized diameter. A unique coupling of the DFGM and planar UFGM is developed and is used to account for individual and gas phase combustion processes in turbulent combustion situations, such as spray flames, particle laden blasts, etc. The DFGM for the methanol and aluminum droplets are used in mixed Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian formulations of compressible multiphase flows. System level simulations are conducted and compared experimental data for a methanol spray flame and an aluminized blast studied at the Explosives Components Facility (ECF) at Sandia National Laboratories.

  9. CATALYTIC COMBUSTION OF METHANE OVER Pt/γ-Al2O3 IN MICRO-COMBUSTOR WITH DETAILED CHEMICAL KINETIC MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNJIE CHEN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Micro-scale catalytic combustion characteristics and heat transfer processes of preheated methane-air mixtures (φ = 0.4 in the plane channel were investigated numerically with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. The plane channel of length L = 10.0 mm, height H =1.0 mm and wall thickness δ = 0.1 mm, which inner horizontal surfaces contained Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst washcoat. The computational results indicate that the presence of the gas phase reactions extends mildly the micro-combustion stability limits at low and moderate inlet velocities due to the strong flames establishment, and have a more profound effect on extending the high-velocity blowout limits by allowing for additional heat release originating mainly from the incomplete CH4 gas phase oxidation in the plane channel. When the same mass flow rate (ρin × Vin is considered, the micro-combustion stability limits at p: 0.1 MPa are much narrower than at p: 0.6 MPa due to both gas phase and catalytic reaction activities decline with decreasing pressure. Catalytic micro-combustor can achieve stable combustion at low solid thermal conductivity ks < 0.1 W∙m-1•K-1, while the micro-combustion extinction limits reach their larger extent for the higher thermal conductivity ks = 20.0-100.0 W∙m-1•K-1. The existence of surface radiation heat transfers significantly effects on the micro-combustion stability limits and micro-combustors energy balance. Finally, gas phase combustion in catalytic micro-combustors can be sustained at the sub-millimeter scale (plane channel height of 0.25 mm.

  10. Determination of thermal characteristics of combustion products of fire-tube heat generator with flow turbulator

    OpenAIRE

    Lukjanov Alexander V.; Ostapenko Dmitry V.; Basist Dmitry V.

    2014-01-01

    Boiler construction is one of the major industries of any state. The aim is to determine the effect of the turbulator on the intensity of heat transfer in the convective part of the fire-tube heat generator of domestic production. The improvement of convective heating surfaces is one of the ways to increase the energy efficiency of the fire-tube heat generator. Since model of the process of heat transfer of gas flow in the convective tubes is multifactorial and does not have clear analytical ...

  11. A Phenomenological Model for Prediction Auto-Ignition and Soot Formation of Turbulent Diffusion Combustion in a High Pressure Common Rail Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghui Zhou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new phenomenological model, the TP (Temperature Phase model, is presented to carry out optimization calculations for turbulent diffusion combustion in a high-pressure common rail diesel engine. Temperature is the most important parameter in the TP model, which includes two parts: an auto-ignition and a soot model. In the auto-ignition phase, different reaction mechanisms are built for different zones. For the soot model, different methods are used for different temperatures. The TP model is then implemented in KIVA code instead of original model to carry out optimization. The results of cylinder pressures, the corresponding heat release rates, and soot with variation of injection time, variation of rail pressure and variation of speed among TP model, KIVA standard model and experimental data are analyzed. The results indicate that the TP model can carry out optimization and CFD (computational fluid dynamics and can be a useful tool to study turbulent diffusion combustion.

  12. Methane combustion in various regimes: First and second thermodynamic-law comparison between air-firing and oxyfuel condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yaming; Chen, Sheng; Liu, Shi; Feng, Yongxin; Xu, Kai; Zheng, Chuguang

    2016-01-01

    MILD oxyfuel combustion has been attracting increasing attention as a promising clean combustion technology. How to design a pathway to reach MILD oxyfuel combustion regime and what can provide a theoretical guide to design such a pathway are two critical questions that need to be answered. So far there has been no open literature on these issues. A type of combustion regime classification map proposed in our previous work, based on the so-called ”Hot Diluted Diffusion Ignition” (HDDI) configuration, is adopted here as a simple but useful tool to solve these problems. Firstly, we analyze comprehensively the influences of various dilution atmosphere and fuel type on combustion regimes. The combustion regime classification maps are made out according to the analyses. In succession, we conduct a comparison between the map in air-firing condition and its oxyfuel counterpart. With the aid of the second thermodynamic-law analysis on the maps, it is easy to identify the major contributors to entropy generation in various combustion regimes in advance, which is crucial for combustion system optimization. Moreover, we find that, for the first time, a combustion regime classification map also may be used as a safety indicator. With the aid of these maps, some conclusions in previous publications can be explained more straightforwardly. - Highlights: • Analyze the influences of different fuels and dilution atmosphere on combustion regimes for the first time. • Provide a theoretical guide for practical operation to establish MILD oxyfuel combustion for the first time. • A new finding to expand the purposes of combustion regime maps for practical operation and combustion optimization.

  13. An Investigation on Flame Shape and Size for a High-Pressure Turbulent Non-Premixed Swirl Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongya Xi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Flame shape and size for a high-pressure turbulent non-premixed swirl combustion were experimentally investigated over a wide range of varying parameters including fuel mass flow rate, combustor pressure, primary-air mass flow rate, and nozzle exit velocity. A CFD simulation was conducted to predict the flame profile. Meanwhile, a theoretical calculation was also performed to estimate flame length. It was observed that flame length increased linearly with increasing fuel mass flow rate but decreased with the increment of combustor pressure in the power function. The flame diminished at a larger primary-air mass flow rate but remained unaffected by the increasing nozzle exit velocity. Considering the global effect of all parameters at a particular pressure, the flame length generally decreased as the primary-air to fuel ratio increased. This was attributed to the reduced air entrainment required to dilute the fuel to stoichiometric proportions. The CFD simulation offered a good prediction of the variation trends of flame length, although some deviations from experimental values were observed. The theoretical calculation estimated the trends of flame length variation particularly well. Nevertheless the difference between the theoretical and experimental results was found to be due to the swirl influence. Hence, a swirl factor was proposed to be added to the original equation for swirl flames.

  14. Comparing Spray Characteristics from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) National Combustion Code (NCC) Calculations Against Experimental Data for a Turbulent Reacting Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.; Moder, Jeffery P.

    2010-01-01

    Developing physics-based tools to aid in reducing harmful combustion emissions, like Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Unburnt Hydrocarbons (UHC s), and Sulfur Dioxides (SOx), is an important goal of aeronautics research at NASA. As part of that effort, NASA Glenn Research Center is performing a detailed assessment and validation of an in-house combustion CFD code known as the National Combustion Code (NCC) for turbulent reacting flows. To assess the current capabilities of NCC for simulating turbulent reacting flows with liquid jet fuel injection, a set of Single Swirler Lean Direct Injection (LDI) experiments performed at the University of Cincinnati was chosen as an initial validation data set. This Jet-A/air combustion experiment operates at a lean equivalence ratio of 0.75 at atmospheric pressure and has a 4 percent static pressure drop across the swirler. Detailed comparisons of NCC predictions for gas temperature and gaseous emissions (CO and NOx) against this experiment are considered in a previous work. The current paper is focused on detailed comparisons of the spray characteristics (radial profiles of drop size distribution and at several radial rakes) from NCC simulations against the experimental data. Comparisons against experimental data show that the use of the correlation for primary spray break-up implemented by Raju in the NCC produces most realistic results, but this result needs to be improved. Given the single or ten step chemical kinetics models, use of a spray size correlation gives similar, acceptable results

  15. Development of a computerized analysis for solid propellant combustion instability with turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, T. J.; Park, O. Y.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-dimensional numerical model has been developed for the unsteady state oscillatory combustion of solid propellants subject to acoustic pressure disturbances. Including the gas phase unsteady effects, the assumption of uniform pressure across the flame zone, which has been conventionally used, is relaxed so that a higher frequency response in the long flame of a double-base propellant can be calculated. The formulation is based on a premixed, laminar flame with a one-step overall chemical reaction and the Arrhenius law of decomposition with no condensed phase reaction. In a given geometry, the Galerkin finite element solution shows the strong resonance and damping effect at the lower frequencies, similar to the result of Denison and Baum. Extended studies deal with the higher frequency region where the pressure varies in the flame thickness. The nonlinear system behavior is investigated by carrying out the second order expansion in wave amplitude when the acoustic pressure oscillations are finite in amplitude. Offset in the burning rate shows a negative sign in the whole frequency region considered, and it verifies the experimental results of Price. Finally, the velocity coupling in the two-dimensional model is discussed.

  16. Experimental and numerical study of the accuracy of flame-speed measurements for methane/air combustion in a slot burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selle, L.; Ferret, B. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, Toulouse (France); Poinsot, T. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, Toulouse (France); CERFACS, Toulouse (France)

    2011-01-15

    Measuring the velocities of premixed laminar flames with precision remains a controversial issue in the combustion community. This paper studies the accuracy of such measurements in two-dimensional slot burners and shows that while methane/air flame speeds can be measured with reasonable accuracy, the method may lack precision for other mixtures such as hydrogen/air. Curvature at the flame tip, strain on the flame sides and local quenching at the flame base can modify local flame speeds and require corrections which are studied using two-dimensional DNS. Numerical simulations also provide stretch, displacement and consumption flame speeds along the flame front. For methane/air flames, DNS show that the local stretch remains small so that the local consumption speed is very close to the unstretched premixed flame speed. The only correction needed to correctly predict flame speeds in this case is due to the finite aspect ratio of the slot used to inject the premixed gases which induces a flow acceleration in the measurement region (this correction can be evaluated from velocity measurement in the slot section or from an analytical solution). The method is applied to methane/air flames with and without water addition and results are compared to experimental data found in the literature. The paper then discusses the limitations of the slot-burner method to measure flame speeds for other mixtures and shows that it is not well adapted to mixtures with a Lewis number far from unity, such as hydrogen/air flames. (author)

  17. LITGS: a new technique for single shot temperature and fuel concentration measurements in turbulent combusting environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantoni, Roberta; Giorgi, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; De Risi, A.; Laforgia, D. [Lecce Univ., Lecce (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    In the present study the possibility to apply time resolved Laser Induced Thermal Grating Spectroscopy (LITGS) to detect fuel concentration and temperature in mixtures and flames at atmospheric pressure or higher is investigated. The resonant IR single photon absorption of two short pulse pump beams is used to initially generate a population grating, decaying into a thermal grating due to relaxation processes in the gas mixture. The thermal grating evolution is followed by monitoring the scattered signal of a cw visible probe beam after the end of the pump pulse. The use of the IR optical transition of diesel fuel assured a high species selectivity and a negligible influence of the visible emission background due to the presence of electronically excited species in flames. Fuel concentration and temperature measurements in a pressurized cell, with pressure ranging between 0.1 an 1.5 MPa, and in a diffusion turbulent flame generated by a burner feed with diesel fuel operating at atmospheric pressure are presented. The experimental investigation shows that LITGS signal increase linearly with gas density. This characteristic makes LITGS a very interesting technique for fuel distribution and temperature measurements in hostile (high-pressure and turbulent flow) environments. Detection limit for diesel fuel at atmospheric pressure is found to be about 40 ppm and it decreases with the increase of the pressure. The low detection limit which can be reached makes this technique suitable also for monitoring minor species and radicals. [Italian] Nel presente studio si investiga la possibilita' di applicare la tecnica LITGS (Laser Induced Thermal Grating Spectroscopy) per misurare la concentrazione e la temperatura di carburante in miscele e fiamme a pressiona atmosferica o superiore. L'assorbimento risonante di un singolo fotone IR proveniente da uno dei due laser impulsati di pompa e' utilizzato per generare inizialmente un reticolo di popolazione, che decade

  18. Influence of turbulence-chemistry interaction for n-heptane spray combustion under diesel engine conditions with emphasis on soot formation and oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Michele; Farrace, Daniele; Wright, Yuri M.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2014-03-01

    The influence of the turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) for n-heptane sprays under diesel engine conditions has been investigated by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The conditional moment closure approach, which has been previously validated thoroughly for such flows, and the homogeneous reactor (i.e. no turbulent combustion model) approach have been compared, in view of the recent resurgence of the latter approaches for diesel engine CFD. Experimental data available from a constant-volume combustion chamber have been used for model validation purposes for a broad range of conditions including variations in ambient oxygen (8-21% by vol.), ambient temperature (900 and 1000 K) and ambient density (14.8 and 30 kg/m3). The results from both numerical approaches have been compared to the experimental values of ignition delay (ID), flame lift-off length (LOL), and soot volume fraction distributions. TCI was found to have a weak influence on ignition delay for the conditions simulated, attributed to the low values of the scalar dissipation relative to the critical value above which auto-ignition does not occur. In contrast, the flame LOL was considerably affected, in particular at low oxygen concentrations. Quasi-steady soot formation was similar; however, pronounced differences in soot oxidation behaviour are reported. The differences were further emphasised for a case with short injection duration: in such conditions, TCI was found to play a major role concerning the soot oxidation behaviour because of the importance of soot-oxidiser structure in mixture fraction space. Neglecting TCI leads to a strong over-estimation of soot oxidation after the end of injection. The results suggest that for some engines, and for some phenomena, the neglect of turbulent fluctuations may lead to predictions of acceptable engineering accuracy, but that a proper turbulent combustion model is needed for more reliable results.

  19. Analysis of energy efficiency of methane and hydrogen-methane blends in a PFI/DI SI research engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catapano, F.; Di Iorio, S.; Sementa, P.; Vaglieco, B.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, even more attention was paid to the alternative fuels that allow both reducing the fossil fuel consumption and the pollutant emissions. Gaseous fuels like methane and hydrogen are the most interesting in terms of engine application. This paper reports a comparison between methane and different methane/hydrogen mixtures in a single-cylinder Port Fuel/Direct Injection spark ignition (PFI/DI SI) engine operating under steady state conditions. It is representative of the gasoline engine for automotive application. Engine performance and exhaust emissions were evaluated. Moreover, 2D-digital cycle resolved imaging was performed with high spatial and temporal resolution in the combustion chamber. In particular, it allows characterizing the combustion by means of the flame propagation in terms of mean radius and velocity. Moreover, the interaction of turbulence with the local flame was evaluated. For both the engine configurations, it was observed that the addition of hydrogen results in a more efficient combustion, even though the engine configuration plays an important role. In PFI mode, the lower density of hydrogen causes a lower energy input. In DI mode, instead, the larger hydrogen diffusivity counteracts the charge stratification especially for larger hydrogen content. - Highlights: • The effect of hydrogen on methane combustion was investigated in an optical PFI/DI SI engine. • The effect of hydrogen addition for PFI and DI configurations was evaluated on the same engine. • The flame front propagation was characterized by means of 2-D digital imaging.

  20. Influence of morphology of ceramic fibers in catalytic combustion of methane; Influencia da morfologia de fibras ceramicas na combustao catalitica do metano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabarelli, A.C.; Alves, A.K.; Bergmann, C.P., E-mail: andretabarelli@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Departamento de Materiais

    2012-07-01

    Methane, considered as the main constituent of natural gas has been widely used as an energy source. During its combustion are produced pollutants that cause concern and necessity to eliminate or reduce the emission of these agents in the atmosphere. One of the main means of controlling emissions is the use of catalysts. In order to contribute to the development of new catalysts, this study analyzed the morphology of ceramic fibers of cerium oxide (ceria) doped with copper fabricated by electrospinning, in order to verify their effects on catalytic activity. Parameters were varied in distance from the electrodes, the diameter of the capillary and applied voltage between electrodes. The characterizations were performed: scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, BET and Xray diffraction (DXR). The results indicate that after the thermal treatment there was a reduction of approximately 40% fiber diameter and specific surface area ranging between 28.929 and 34.501 m{sup 2}/g. (author)

  1. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Soo Bak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronic states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.

  2. Methane oxidation with low O2/CH4 ratios in the present of water: Combustion or reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Haojie; Yang, Zhongqing; Zhang, Li; Ran, Jingyu; Yan, Yunfei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Copper catalyst displays an inhibitory effect of water while cobalt catalyst does not. • Both catalysts show their catalytic ability for oxidation and reforming reaction. • Oxidation precedes reforming in methane reaction over both catalysts. • Water participates in reforming reaction and shows increasing effect in high temperature. - Abstract: This paper investigates the reaction of methane over copper and cobalt catalysts under oxygen-deficient conditions with added water. A fixed-bed reactor, TPD analysis, in situ DRIFTS study, and temperature detection were used to test the activity of the methane reaction, water adsorption on the metal surface, OH group behavior, and the endothermic and exothermic processes of the reaction. The results show that the inhibitory effect of water mainly occurs at a low temperature and methane conversion decreases when water is introduced into the feed. Water easily adsorbs on metal clusters and forms OH groups at low temperatures. Copper tends to adsorb more water than cobalt and shows a stronger inhibitory effect. The DRIFTS spectra of the Cu catalyst show strong OH peaks during the reaction, of which the magnitudes increase with the water pressure. When the reaction temperature rises (750 °C), water begins to serve as an oxidant and participates in the reforming reaction. Both catalysts show a transition process between the oxidation and reforming reactions as the temperature increases. Co displays a better catalytic performance in the reforming reaction. Oxidation precedes reforming; water does not participate in the reaction if the oxygen is not fully consumed.

  3. A Contribution to Turbulent Combustion: Premixed Flames and Material Surfaces Une contribution à la combustion turbulente : flammes prémélangées et surfaces des matériaux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolleau F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of premixed flames has been examined by many authors. In fact the problem of combustion which develops in a turbulent medium depends on two scalings. One makes reference to the scales of the flame the other one is related to the turbulent field. Comparisons between these two scalings allow us to identified what sort of regime is expected. In this paper we first study the development of a material surface which may be identify with a flame front under rather severe conditions. An analytical approach is first used. Hereafter a numerical simulation will be introduced. The role of a fine grained turbulence is more active on the extension of the surface than large structures. To a large extent big eddies convey the surface without distorting it. The risks of extinction are generally predicted by making comparisons between the scales of the flame and the scales of the turbulent field starting from a direct simulation. Poinçot et al show that the smallest structures are not responsible for the extinction : intermediate structures are more efficient than the smallest ones. In a previous paper the role of these structures was examined : the distorting mechanism are acting in a cumulative way. The life time of the smallest structures is too short to have them playing a decive role in the extinction process. Intermediate sized structures are less active but they strain the flame during a longer period. This idea requires a detailed description of the turbulent field. That is made possible by using the ß model which accounts for the location of turbulent structures whose ranks in the whole sequence is termed n . The cumulative role of the velocity gradients is given as a function of n . The influence of the intermediate structure on the extinction process is thereby emphasized. Finally the ß model is also used to describe the domain of distributed combustion zones. Flames propagate in limited regions of space. These regions are disconnected

  4. Kinetics of the reduction of hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) by methane (CH{sub 4}) during chemical looping combustion: A global mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monazam, Esmail R; Breault, Ronald W; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Richards, George; Carpenter, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as a promising technology for fossil fuel combustion which produces a sequestration ready concentrated CO{sub 2} stream in power production. A CLC system is composed with two reactors, an air and a fuel reactor. An oxygen carrier such as hematite (94%Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) circulates between the reactors, which transfers the oxygen necessary for the fuel combustion from the air to the fuel. An important issue for the CLC process is the selection of metal oxide as oxygen carrier, since it must retain its reactivity through many cycles. The primary objective of this work is to develop a global mechanism with respective kinetics rate parameters such that CFD simulations can be performed for large systems. In this study, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the reduction of hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in a continuous stream of CH{sub 4} (15, 20, and 35%) was conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 825{degrees}C over ten reduction cycles. The mass spectroscopy analysis of product gas indicated the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O at the early stage of reaction and H{sub 2} and CO at the final stage of reactions. A kinetic model based on two parallel reactions, 1) first-order irreversible rate kinetics and 2) Avrami equation describing nucleation and growth processes, was applied to the reduction data. It was found, that the reaction rates for both reactions increase with, both, temperature and the methane concentration in inlet gas.

  5. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Timescale Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Kuron, Mike; Ren, Zhuyin; Lu, Tianfeng; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-11-01

    Transported probability density function (TPDF) method features the generality for all combustion regimes, which is attractive for turbulent combustion simulations. However, the modeling of micromixing due to molecular diffusion is still considered to be a primary challenge for TPDF method, especially in turbulent premixed flames. Recently, a hybrid mixing rate model for TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed flames has been proposed, which recovers the correct mixing rates in the limits of flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime while at the same time aims to properly account for the transition in between. In this work, this model is employed in TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed methane-air slot burner flames. The model performance is assessed by comparing the results from both direct numerical simulation (DNS) and conventional constant mechanical-to-scalar mixing rate model. This work is Granted by NSFC 51476087 and 91441202.

  6. LES/FMDF of turbulent jet ignition in a rapid compression machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Schock, Harold; Toulson, Elisa; Jaberi, Farhad; CFD; Engine Research Labs, Michigan State University Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent Jet Ignition (TJI) is an efficient method for initiating and controlling combustion in combustion systems, e.g. internal combustion engines. It enables combustion in ultra-lean mixtures by utilizing hot product turbulent jets emerging from a pre-chamber combustor as the ignition source for the main combustion chamber. Here, we study the TJI-assisted ignition and combustion of lean methane-air mixtures in a Rapid Compression Machine (RCM) for various flow/combustion conditions with the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) computational model. In the LES/FMDF model, the filtered form of compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity, while the FMDF transport equation is solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar (species mass fraction and temperature) field. The LES/FMDF data are used to study the physics of TJI and combustion in RCM. The results show the very complex behavior of the reacting flow and the flame structure in the pre-chamber and RCM.

  7. Numerical study of turbulent normal diffusion flame CH4-air stabilized by coaxial burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riahi Zouhair

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The practical combustion systems such as combustion furnaces, gas turbine, engines, etc. employ non-premixed combustion due to its better flame stability, safety, and wide operating range as compared to premixed combustion. The present numerical study characterizes the turbulent flame of methane-air in a coaxial burner in order to determine the effect of airflow on the distribution of temperature, on gas consumption and on the emission of NOx. The results in this study are obtained by simulation on FLUENT code. The results demonstrate the influence of different parameters on the flame structure, temperature distribution and gas emissions, such as turbulence, fuel jet velocity, air jet velocity, equivalence ratio and mixture fraction. The lift-off height for a fixed fuel jet velocity is observed to increase monotonically with air jet velocity. Temperature and NOx emission decrease of important values with the equivalence ratio, it is maximum about the unity.

  8. Challenges in simulation of chemical processes in combustion furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Kilpinen, P. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The presentation gives an introduction to some of the present issues and problems in treating the complex chemical processes in combustion. The focus is in the coupling of the hydrocarbon combustion process with nitrogen oxide formation and destruction chemistry in practical furnaces or flames. Detailed kinetic modelling based on schemes of elementary reactions are shown to be a useful novel tool for identifying and studying the key reaction paths for nitrogen oxide formation and destruction in various systems. The great importance of the interaction between turbulent mixing and combustion chemistry is demonstrated by the sensitivity of both methane oxidation chemistry and fuel nitrogen conversion chemistry to the reactor and mixing pattern chosen for the kinetic calculations. The fluidized bed combustion (FBC) nitrogen chemistry involves several important heterogeneous reactions. Particularly the char in the bed plays an essential role. Recent research has advanced rapidly and the presentation proposes an overall picture of the fuel nitrogen reaction routes in circulating FBC conditions. (author)

  9. Challenges in simulation of chemical processes in combustion furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M; Kilpinen, P [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The presentation gives an introduction to some of the present issues and problems in treating the complex chemical processes in combustion. The focus is in the coupling of the hydrocarbon combustion process with nitrogen oxide formation and destruction chemistry in practical furnaces or flames. Detailed kinetic modelling based on schemes of elementary reactions are shown to be a useful novel tool for identifying and studying the key reaction paths for nitrogen oxide formation and destruction in various systems. The great importance of the interaction between turbulent mixing and combustion chemistry is demonstrated by the sensitivity of both methane oxidation chemistry and fuel nitrogen conversion chemistry to the reactor and mixing pattern chosen for the kinetic calculations. The fluidized bed combustion (FBC) nitrogen chemistry involves several important heterogeneous reactions. Particularly the char in the bed plays an essential role. Recent research has advanced rapidly and the presentation proposes an overall picture of the fuel nitrogen reaction routes in circulating FBC conditions. (author)

  10. A Modified Version of the RNG k–ε Turbulence Model for the Scale-Resolving Simulation of Internal Combustion Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesselin Krassimirov Krastev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady and random character of turbulent flow motion is a key aspect of the multidimensional modeling of internal combustion engines (ICEs. A typical example can be found in the prediction of the cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV in modern, highly downsized gasoline direct injection (GDI engines, which strongly depends on the accurate simulation of turbulent in-cylinder flow structures. The current standard for turbulence modeling in ICEs is still represented by the unsteady form of Reynold-averaged Navier Stokes equations (URANS, which allows the simulation of full engine cycles at relatively low computational costs. URANS-based methods, however, are only able to return a statistical description of turbulence, as the effects of all scales of motion are entirely modeled. Therefore, during the last decade, scale-resolving methods such as large eddy simulation (LES or hybrid URANS/LES approaches are gaining increasing attention among the engine-modeling community. In the present paper, we propose a scale-resolving capable modification of the popular RNG k– ε URANS model. The modification is based on a detached-eddy simulation (DES framework and allows one to explicitly set the behavior (URANS, DES or LES of the model in different zones of the computational domain. The resulting zonal formulation has been tested on two reference test cases, comparing the numerical predictions with the available experimental data sets and with previous computational studies. Overall, the scale-resolved part of the computed flow has been found to be consistent with the expected flow physics, thus confirming the validity of the proposed simulation methodology.

  11. Modeling Turbulent Mixing/Combustion of Bio-Agents Behind Detonations: Effect of Instabilities, Dense Clustering, and Trace Survivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Detonations: Effect of Instabilities, Dense Clustering , and Trace Survivability Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release...number of particles handled is severely restricted based on the memory limitations of a given processor cluster . Although, this limitation can be...S. 2010c. Clustering and combustion of dilute alumi- num particle clouds in a post-detonation flow field. Proc. Combust. Inst., 33, 2255. Boiko, V.M

  12. Capturing energy from ventilation air methane a preliminary design for a new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluff, D.L.; Kennedy, G.A.; Bennett, J.G.; Foster, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG), discharged to the atmosphere by coalmining, the natural gas industry and natural biological processes, second only to carbon dioxide; thus, any reduction in atmospheric methane would be globally beneficial. The capture or use of ventilation air methane (VAM) is challenging because it is a high volume low concentration methane source. This results in the routine discharge of methane into the atmosphere. A review of VAM mitigation technologies is provided and the main disadvantages of the existing technologies are discussed. In the proposed VamTurBurner © system, the heat from the combustion chamber is transferred to the preheating zone either by a heat exchanger or by redirecting the combustion products to mix with the ventilation air stream from a coalmine. Gas turbines (GT) are used to produce electricity with the exhaust gases directed to mix with the incoming ventilation airflow. The turbulence introduced by the GT exhaust assists with mixing of the incoming ventilation airflow and the return flow of combustion products from the combustion chamber. The combustion products are a source of heat, which increases the temperature of the incoming ventilation air to a value high enough for the methane to undergo flameless combustion upon encountering the igniters. The high temperature combustion products enter a multi-generation system. The multi-generation system is based on mature engineering technology such as heat exchangers and steam turbines. The residual heat provides additional heat based products such as industrial scale drying, chilling by an absorption chiller or simply hot water. The VamTurBurner © uses the energy from the GT, igniters and VAM to provide clean efficient energy while mitigating the atmospheric emissions of methane. The opportunity to collect carbon credits may improve the economics. Since the VAM is a free energy source, the output of the system is greater than the purchased energy. - Highlights:

  13. Combustion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ragland, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Combustion Engineering The Nature of Combustion Combustion Emissions Global Climate Change Sustainability World Energy Production Structure of the Book   Section I: Basic Concepts Fuels Gaseous Fuels Liquid Fuels Solid Fuels Problems Thermodynamics of Combustion Review of First Law Concepts Properties of Mixtures Combustion StoichiometryChemical EnergyChemical EquilibriumAdiabatic Flame TemperatureChemical Kinetics of CombustionElementary ReactionsChain ReactionsGlobal ReactionsNitric Oxide KineticsReactions at a Solid SurfaceProblemsReferences  Section II: Combustion of Gaseous and Vaporized FuelsFlamesLaminar Premixed FlamesLaminar Flame TheoryTurbulent Premixed FlamesExplosion LimitsDiffusion FlamesGas-Fired Furnaces and BoilersEnergy Balance and EfficiencyFuel SubstitutionResidential Gas BurnersIndustrial Gas BurnersUtility Gas BurnersLow Swirl Gas BurnersPremixed-Charge Engine CombustionIntroduction to the Spark Ignition EngineEngine EfficiencyOne-Zone Model of Combustion in a Piston-...

  14. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of two-phases turbulent combustion: application to study of propagation and structure of flames; Simulation numerique directe de la combustion turbulente diphasique: application a l'etude de la propagation et de la structure des flammes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canneviere, K.

    2003-12-15

    This work is devoted to the study of the propagation and the structure of two-phases turbulent flames. To this end, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are used. First, numerical systems for two-phases flow simulations is presented along with a specific chemical model. Then, a study of laminar spray flames is carried out. An analytical study related to the dynamics of evaporation of droplets is first proposed where the influence on the equivalence ratio of the ratio between the heating delay of the droplet and the evaporation delay is detailed. The simulation of a propagating flame through a cloud of droplets is carried out and a pulsating behavior is highlighted. A study of these flames according to the topology of liquid fuel enabled us to characterize a double flame structure composed of a premixed flame and a diffusion flame. Our last study is devoted to spray turbulent flames. Two-phase combustion of turbulent jets has been simulated. By varying the spray injection parameters (density, equivalence ratio), a database has been generated. This database allowed us to describe local and global flame regimes appearing in the combustion of sprays. They have been categorized in four main structures: open and closed external regime, group combustion and mixed combustion. Eventually, a combustion diagram has been developed. It involves the spray vaporization time, the mean inter-space between droplets or group of droplets and eventually the injected equivalence ratio. (author)

  16. 柴油在甲烷氛围及在甲醇氛围下的着火燃烧特性%Ignition and Combustion Characteristics of Diesel in Premixed Methane and Methanol Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿培林; 姚春德; 胡江涛; 张德福; 马明

    2017-01-01

    为了解不同着火性质燃料之间的相互作用,在定容燃烧弹上结合高压燃油共轨系统,通过高速摄像光学系统,研究了柴油分别在两种不同的单碳高辛烷值燃料氛围下的着火和燃烧行为.结果表明:降低环境温度和增加预混甲烷的浓度均延长柴油着火滞燃期,增大燃烧放热率峰值,且较低的环境温度和高的甲烷浓度有利于减少碳烟的生成;相比于甲烷,甲醇对柴油着火的抑制作用更强,具有较长的滞燃期,为油气混合赢得更多的时间,预混燃烧部分增加,因此柴油在甲醇氛围下的放热率峰值略高于甲烷氛围,同时产生碳烟的扩散燃烧比例降低,生成的碳烟减少.%In order to understand the interaction between fuels of different ignition properties,the ignition and combustion characteristics of diesel injected in either methanol or methane mixture were researched in a constant volume combustion chamber coupled with high pressure common rail system by using high speed camera optical system.The premixed atmospheres are the mixture of methane and the mixture of methanol and air, respectively.Results show that the ignition delay period and the peak combustion release heat rate increase as the ambient temperature decreases or the premixed methane concentration increases.Under low ambient temperature or premixed methane atmosphere,the soot formation decreases.Compared with methanemethanol has a greater inhibitory effect on diesel ignitionso the ignition delay period of the methanol atmosphere is longer than that of the methane atmosphere.There are much time for diesel fuel to mix with airso the peak release heat rate of the methanol atmosphere is bigger and less soot is generated.

  17. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  18. Autoignited laminar lifted flames of methane/hydrogen mixtures in heated coflow air

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2012-04-01

    Autoignited lifted flame behavior in laminar jets of methane/hydrogen mixture fuels has been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. Three regimes of autoignited lifted flames were identified depending on initial temperature and hydrogen to methane ratio. At relatively high initial temperature, addition of a small amount of hydrogen to methane improved ignition appreciably such that the liftoff height decreased significantly. In this hydrogen-assisted autoignition regime, the liftoff height increased with jet velocity, and the characteristic flow time - defined as the ratio of liftoff height to jet velocity - correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time. At lower temperature, the autoignited lifted flame demonstrated a unique feature in that the liftoff height decreased with increasing jet velocity. Such behavior has never been observed in lifted laminar and turbulent jet flames. A transition regime existed between these two regimes at intermediate temperature. © 2011 The Combustion Institute.

  19. Impact of finite rate chemistry on the hydrodynamic stability of shear flows in turbulent lean premixed combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Yuval; Ghoniem, Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    Recent experimental observations show that the dynamic response of a reactive flow is strongly impacted by the fuel chemistry. In order to gain insight into some of the underlying mechanisms we formulate a new linear stability model that incorporates the impact of finite rate chemistry on the hydrodynamic stability of shear flows. Contrary to previous studies which typically assume that the velocity field is independent of the kinetic rates, the velocity field in our study is coupled with the temperature field. Using this formulation, we reproduce previous results, e.g., most unstable global modes, obtained for non-reacting shear flow. Moreover, we show that these modes are significantly altered in frequency and gain by the presence of a reaction region within the shear layer. This qualitatively agrees with results of our recent experimental and numerical studies, which show that the flame surface location relative to the shear layer influences the stability characteristics in combustion tunnels. This study suggests a physical explanation for the observed impact of finite rate chemistry on shear flow stability.

  20. Thermochemical recuperative combined cycle with methane-steam reforming combustion; Tennengasu kaishitsu nensho ni yoru konbaindo saikuru hatsuden no kokoritsuka oyobi denryoku fuka heijunka taio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, R.; Essaki, K.; Tsutsumi, A. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Chemical System Engineering; Kaganoi, S.; Kurimura, H. [Teikoku Sekiyu Co., Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, T.; Ogawa, T. [Toshiba Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-10

    Thermochemical recuperative combined cycles with methane-steam reforming are proposed for improving their thermal efficiency and for peak-load leveling. For targeting higher thermal efficiency, a cycle with methane-steam reforming reaction heated by gas turbine exhaust was analyzed. The inlet temperature of gas turbine was set at 1,350 degree C. Low-pressure steam extracted from a steam turbine is mixed with methane, and then this mixture is heated by part of the gas turbine exhaust to promote a reforming reaction. The rest of the exhaust heat is used to produce steam, which drives steam turbines to generate electricity. The effect of steam-to-methane ratio (S/C) on thermal efficiency of the cycle, as well as on methane conversion, is investigated by using the ASPEN Plus process simulator. The methane feed rate was fixed at constant and S/C ratio was varied from 2.25 to 4.75. Methane conversion shows an increasing trend toward the ratio and has a maximum value of 17.9 % at S/C=4.0. Thermal efficiency for the system is about 51 % higher than that calculated for a conventional 1,300 degree C class combined cycle under similar conditions. A thermochemical recuperative combined cycle is designed for peak-load leveling. In night-time operation from 20 : 00 to 8 : 00 it stores hydrogen produced by methane steam reforming at S/C=3.9 to save power generation. The gas turbine inlet temperature is 1,330 degree C. In daytime operation from 8 : 00 to 20 : 00 the chemically recuperated combined cycle operated at S/C=2.0 is driven by the mixture of a combined cycle operated at constant load with the same methane feed rate, whereas daytime operation generated power 1.26 times larger than that of the combined cycle. (author)

  1. Correspondence Between “Stable” Flame Macrostructure and Thermo-acoustic Instability in Premixed Swirl-Stabilized Turbulent Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Taamallah, Soufien; LaBry, Zachary A.; Shanbhogue, Santosh J.; Habib, Mohamed A. M.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    Copyright © 2015 by ASME. In this paper, we conduct an experimental investigation to study the link between the flame macroscale structure - or flame brush spatial distribution - and thermo-acoustic instabilities, in a premixed swirl-stabilized dump combustor. We operate the combustor with premixed methane-air in the range of equivalence ratio (Φ) from the lean blowout limit to Φ = 0. 75. First, we observe the different dynamic modes in this lean range as Φ is raised. We also document the effect of Φ on the flame macrostructure. Next, we examine the correspondence between dynamic mode transitions and changes in flame macrostructure. To do so, we modify the combustor length - by downstream truncation - without changing the underlying flow upstream. Thus, the resonant frequencies of the geometry are altered allowing for decoupling the heat release rate fluctuations and the acoustic feedback. Mean flame configurations in the modified combustor and for the same range of equivalence ratio are examined, following the same experimental protocol. It is found that not only the same sequence of flame macrostructures is observed in both combustors but also that the transitions occur at a similar set of equivalence ratio. In particular, the appearance of the flame in the outside recirculation zone (ORZ) in the long combustor - which occurs simultaneously with the onset of instability at the fundamental frequency - happens at similar Φ when compared to the short combustor, but without being in latter case accompanied by a transition to thermo-acoustic instability. Then, we interrogate the flow field by analyzing the streamlines, mean, and rms velocities for the nonreacting flow and the different flame types. Finally, we focus on the transition of the flame to the ORZ in the acoustically decoupled case. Our analysis of this transition shows that it occurs gradually with an intermittent appearance of a flame in the ORZ and an increasing probability with Φ. The spectral

  2. Correspondence Between “Stable” Flame Macrostructure and Thermo-acoustic Instability in Premixed Swirl-Stabilized Turbulent Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Taamallah, Soufien

    2014-12-23

    Copyright © 2015 by ASME. In this paper, we conduct an experimental investigation to study the link between the flame macroscale structure - or flame brush spatial distribution - and thermo-acoustic instabilities, in a premixed swirl-stabilized dump combustor. We operate the combustor with premixed methane-air in the range of equivalence ratio (Φ) from the lean blowout limit to Φ = 0. 75. First, we observe the different dynamic modes in this lean range as Φ is raised. We also document the effect of Φ on the flame macrostructure. Next, we examine the correspondence between dynamic mode transitions and changes in flame macrostructure. To do so, we modify the combustor length - by downstream truncation - without changing the underlying flow upstream. Thus, the resonant frequencies of the geometry are altered allowing for decoupling the heat release rate fluctuations and the acoustic feedback. Mean flame configurations in the modified combustor and for the same range of equivalence ratio are examined, following the same experimental protocol. It is found that not only the same sequence of flame macrostructures is observed in both combustors but also that the transitions occur at a similar set of equivalence ratio. In particular, the appearance of the flame in the outside recirculation zone (ORZ) in the long combustor - which occurs simultaneously with the onset of instability at the fundamental frequency - happens at similar Φ when compared to the short combustor, but without being in latter case accompanied by a transition to thermo-acoustic instability. Then, we interrogate the flow field by analyzing the streamlines, mean, and rms velocities for the nonreacting flow and the different flame types. Finally, we focus on the transition of the flame to the ORZ in the acoustically decoupled case. Our analysis of this transition shows that it occurs gradually with an intermittent appearance of a flame in the ORZ and an increasing probability with Φ. The spectral

  3. Numerical study of laminar nonpremixed methane flames in coflow jets: Autoignited lifted flames with tribrachial edges and MILD combustion at elevated temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    M. Al-Noman, Saeed; Choi, Sang Kyu; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Autoignition characteristics of laminar nonpremixed methane jet flames in high-temperature coflow air are studied numerically. Several flame configurations are investigated by varying the initial temperature and fuel mole fraction. At a relatively

  4. Development of a self-ignition and combustion model for diesel engines; Modelisation de l`auto-inflammation et de la combustion pour les moteurs diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires Da Cruz, A.

    1997-12-09

    The work concerns self-ignition and combustion modelling in Diesel engines. Special attention is given to turbulence induced effects. Only gas fuel injection is taken into account. Turbulent mixing is identified as one of the main parameters controlling self-ignition in Diesel engines. However, turbulence effects are often neglected by models currently used in engine calculation codes. A new model based on results obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) is proposed. It includes turbulence effects by means of the scalar dissipation rate and presumed pdf of the mixture fraction and a chemical reaction progress variable. The model is validated through several steps. First, its results are compared to DNS in simple mixing and self-ignition cases. Then, its averaged version is integrated into the KIVA2-MB calculation code, where its behavior is tested in a one dimensional version and compared to other formulations. Finally, the model is validated with comparisons to experimental results of methane injection into a high pressure combustion chamber filled with hot air. The combustion chamber allows large optical access and therefore, optical diagnostics can be made. (author) 101 refs.

  5. PDF methods for turbulent reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on computation of turbulent combustion, governing equations, closure problem, PDF modeling of turbulent reactive flows, validation cases, current projects, and collaboration with industry and technology transfer.

  6. DNS of turbulent premixed slot flames with mixture inhomogeneity: a study of NOx formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Stefano; Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-11-01

    A set of Direct Numerical Simulations of three-dimensional methane/air lean flames in a spatially developing turbulent slot burner are performed. The flames are in the thin-reaction zone regimes and the jet Reynolds number is 5600. This configuration is of interest since it displays turbulent production by mean shear as in real devices. The gas phase hydrodynamics are modeled with the reactive, unsteady Navier-Stokes equations in the low Mach number limit. Combustion is treated with finite-rate chemistry. The jet is characterized by a non-uniform equivalence ratio at the inlet and varying levels of incomplete premixing for the methane/air mixture are considered. The global equivalence ratio is 0.7 and temperature is 800 K. All simulations are performed at 4 atm. The instantaneous profiles of the mass fractions of methane and air at the inlet are sampled from a set of turbulent channel simulations that provide realistic, fully turbulent fields. The data are analyzed to study the influence of partial premixing on the flame structure. Particular focus is devoted to the assessment of heat release rate fluctuations and NOx formation. In particular, the effects of partial premixing on the production rates for the various pathways to NOx formation are investigated.

  7. Quantitative Thermochemical Measurements in High-Pressure Gaseous Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Jun J.; Fischer, David G.

    2012-01-01

    We present our strategic experiment and thermochemical analyses on combustion flow using a subframe burst gating (SBG) Raman spectroscopy. This unconventional laser diagnostic technique has promising ability to enhance accuracy of the quantitative scalar measurements in a point-wise single-shot fashion. In the presentation, we briefly describe an experimental methodology that generates transferable calibration standard for the routine implementation of the diagnostics in hydrocarbon flames. The diagnostic technology was applied to simultaneous measurements of temperature and chemical species in a swirl-stabilized turbulent flame with gaseous methane fuel at elevated pressure (17 atm). Statistical analyses of the space-/time-resolved thermochemical data provide insights into the nature of the mixing process and it impact on the subsequent combustion process in the model combustor.

  8. Turbulent flame acceleration and detonation quenching and reinitiation - modelling and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.; Kratzel, T.; Pantow, E.

    1997-01-01

    For both, the reactor safety in an accidental release of hydrogen into containment compartments and also for the industrial safety of the production, storage and transport of combustibles like hydrogen, propane, methane and others in the Petroleum, Petrochemical and Pharmaceutical Industries, it is of great interest to know how the pressure forces of fast hydrogen combustion processes can be reduced. The numerical study of highly turbulent or detonation driven flame propagation processes is relatively recent because it depends on the availability of high performance computers and specialized numerical algorithms to solve the governing equations of reactive fluid dynamic processes. Numerical simulation can be used at a number of levels to study turbulent combustion and detonations. What is needed is both, to use modelling and numerical simulation to investigate fundamental interactions, and using modelling and numerical simulation as a tool to predict turbulent flame accelerating processes and decoupling or re-initiation of detonation waves in complex geometries of technical applications. Today, modelling and simulation show good agreement with a variety of fast combustion phenomena observed in experiments. Results of reactive computational fluid dynamics codes deliver inputs to reduce experimental parameters and provide the basis for an innovative design of arresters for deflagration and detonation processes. (author)

  9. Vortex Simulation of Turbulent Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-19

    Japan, (lecture). 14. 1990, Toyota Motor Co., Nagoya, Japan, (lecture). 15. 1990, Nissan Motor Co., Yokosaka, Japan, (lecture). 16. 1990, Mitsubishi...Nagoya University, Japan 12. 1990, Institute of Computational Fluid Dynamics, Tokyo, Japan, one-day professional course. 13. 1990, Honda Motor Co. Wako...established by comparing the results of variable density shear layers with the results of a shear layer with an initially asymmetric vorticity distribution

  10. Investigations into the Impact of the Equivalence Ratio on Turbulent Premixed Combustion Using Particle Image Velocimetry and Large Eddy Simulation Techniques: “V” and “M” Flame Configurations in a Swirl Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Kewlani, Gaurav

    2016-03-24

    Turbulent premixed combustion is studied using experiments and numerical simulations in an acoustically uncoupled cylindrical sudden-expansion swirl combustor, and the impact of the equivalence ratio on the flame–flow characteristics is analyzed. In order to numerically capture the inherent unsteadiness exhibited in the flow, the large eddy simulation (LES) technique based on the artificial flame thickening combustion model is employed. The experimental data are obtained using particle image velocimetry. It is observed that changes in heat loading, in the presence of wall confinement, significantly influence the flow field in the wake region, the stabilization location of the flame, and the flame intensity. Specifically, increasing the equivalence ratio drastically reduces the average inner recirculation zone size and causes transition of the flame macrostructure from the “V” configuration to the “M” configuration. In other words, while the flame stabilizes along the inner shear layer for the V flame, a persistent diffuse reaction zone is also manifested along the outer shear layer for the M flame. The average chemiluminescence intensity increases in the case of the M flame macrostructure, while the axial span of the reaction zone within the combustion chamber decreases. The predictions of the numerical approach resemble the experimental observations, suggesting that the LES framework can be an effective tool for examining the effect of heat loading on flame–flow interactions and the mechanism of transition of the flame macrostructure with a corresponding change in the equivalence ratio.

  11. Preparation of alternate fuels by means of bio-methanization, pyrolysis and gasification; Preparation thermique de combustibles alternatifs par bio-methanisation, thermolyse et gazeification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, A.; Jung, C.G. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2003-06-01

    The paper gives a general description of wastes and their various components each of them depending on their behaviour during the beneficiation treatment: water, organic matters (bio-degradable and non bio-degradable), mineral matters and metals some examples are given. Various processes are available: compost production, bio-methanization and thermal processes. These thermal processes are incineration, gasification and pyrolysis, depending on the quantity (or absence) of air during the process. The paper gives a description of these processes as well as the type of equipment that are utilised. (authors)

  12. Twenty-fifth symposium (international) on combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of the papers presented at this conference are contained in this volume. The other one-third appear in special issues of ''Combustion and Flame'', Vol. 99, 1994 and Vol. 100, 1995. Papers are divided into the following sections: Supersonic combustion; Detonations and explosions; Internal combustion engines; Practical aspects of combustion; Incineration and wastes; Sprays and droplet combustion; Coal and organic solids combustion; Soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Reaction kinetics; NO x ; Turbulent flames; Turbulent combustion; Laminar flames; Flame spread, fire and halogenated fire suppressants; Global environmental effects; Ignition; Two-phase combustion; Solid propellant combustion; Materials synthesis; Microgravity; and Experimental diagnostics. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  13. Catalytic removal of methane and NO{sub x} in lean-burn natural-gas engine exhaust; Elimination par catalyse du methane et des NO{sub x} dans les echappements de moteur au gaz naturel a basse combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H.; Satokawa, S.; Yahagi, M.; Yamaseki, K.; Hoshi, F.; Uchida, H.; Yokota, H. [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    We have developed a new catalytic system to reduce the emissions of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) contained in the exhaust gases from a lean-burn natural-gas engine. Catalytic oxidation of unburned hydrocarbons and CO in the exhaust has been studied for noble metals supported on alumina. (1) A low-loading catalyst comprising platinum supported on alumina (Pt/alumina) was efficient for the oxidation of CO and hydrocarbons without methane. The CO conversions were maintained at more than 98 % for 20,000 hours over the Pt/alumina. (2) A catalyst comprising platinum and palladium supported on alumina (Pt-Pd/alumina) exhibited higher levels of oxidation of hydrocarbons (including methane) than a catalyst comprising only palladium supported on alumina (Pd/alumina). Its oxidation also lasted longer. The combined effects of the platinum and palladium metals achieved high sulfur dioxide resistance. Increasing the palladium content in the Pt-Pd/alumina catalyst increased the level of oxidation and extended the lifetime of the catalyst. (3) A catalyst comprising silver supported on alumina (Ag/alumina) was effective at reducing the amount of NO{sub X} by using the unburned hydrocarbons in the exhaust gas. The NO{sub x} conversions over Ag/alumina were maintained at more than 30 % for 3,500 hours. We describe a total clean-up system consisting of a Ag/alumina catalyst and a Pt-Pd/alumina catalyst in series on the exhaust gas stream. (authors)

  14. Measurements and correlations of turbulent burning velocities over wide ranges of fuels and elevated pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Bradley, Derek; Lawes, Malcolm; Liu, Kexin; Mansour, Morkous S.

    2013-01-01

    The implosion technique has been used to extend measurements of turbulent burning velocities over greater ranges of fuels and pressures. Measurements have been made up to 3.5 MPa and at strain rate Markstein numbers as low as 23. The implosion technique, with spark ignition at two opposite wall positions within a fan-stirred spherical bomb is capable of measuring turbulent burning velocities, at higher pressures than is possible with central ignition. Pressure records and schlieren high speed photography define the rate of burning and the smoothed area of the flame front. The first aim of the study was to extend the previous measurements with ethanol and propane-air, with further measurements over wider ranges of fuels and equivalence ratios with mixtures of hydrogen, methane, 10% hydrogen-90% methane, toluene, and i-octane, with air. The second aim was to study further the low turbulence regime in which turbulent burning co-exists with laminar flame instabilities. Correlations are presented of turbulent burning velocity normalised by the effective rms turbulent velocity acting on the flame front, ut=u0k , with the Karlovitz stretch factor, K, for different strain rate Markstein numbers, a decrease in which increases ut=u0k . Experimental correlations are presented for the present measurements, combined with previous ones. Different burning regimes are also identified, extending from that of mixed turbulence/laminar instability at low values of K to that at high values of K, in which ut=u0k is gradually reduced due to increasing localised flame extinctions. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  15. Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    was in collaboration with Prof. R. Bowersox (Texas A&M University) and Dr. K. Kobayashi ( Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA). 4.2 Ignition... cinema stereoscopic PIV system for the measurement of micro- and meso-scale turbulent premixed flame dynamics,” Paper B13, 5th US Combustion

  16. Study of polyoxide catalysts of methane combustion on Mn, Cu, Ni, rare earth elements, alkaline earth elements base by the X-ray fluorescence analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'eva, V.P.; Popova, N.M.; Zheksenbaeva, Z.T.; Sass, A.S.; Salakhova, R.Kh.; Dosumov, K.D.

    2002-01-01

    The results of X-ray fluorescence analysis of polyoxide catalysts on of Mn, Cu, Ni, rare earth elements, alkaline earth elements base supported on 2 % Ce/θ-Al 2 O 3 are presented. This polyoxide catalysts are using for deep methane oxidation. DRON-4-7 X-ray diffractometers was applied for the analysis. It was found, that oxides in Ni-Cu-Cr catalysts after long time heating up to 1200 deg. C have been interacted with catalyst supports with Ni(Cu)Al 2 O 3 aluminates formation and due to its decomposition transformation degree of CH 4 to CO 2 are reduced. Activity of MnBaSrCeLa catalysts after heating up to 1200 deg. C does not changed

  17. Distributed Low Temperature Combustion: Fundamental Understanding of Combustion Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    behaviour as compared to ethanol. The latter fuel has also been considered along with methane. Work has also been performed on the further assessment of... behaviour as compared to ethanol. The latter fuel has also been considered along with methane. Work has also been performed on the further assess- ment of...identification of various combustion gas states. A range of Damköhler numbers (Da) from the conventional propagating flamelet regime well into the distributed

  18. Mathematical Modeling in Combustion Science

    CERN Document Server

    Takeno, Tadao

    1988-01-01

    An important new area of current research in combustion science is reviewed in the contributions to this volume. The complicated phenomena of combustion, such as chemical reactions, heat and mass transfer, and gaseous flows, have so far been studied predominantly by experiment and by phenomenological approaches. But asymptotic analysis and other recent developments are rapidly changing this situation. The contributions in this volume are devoted to mathematical modeling in three areas: high Mach number combustion, complex chemistry and physics, and flame modeling in small scale turbulent flow combustion.

  19. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cekli, H.E.; Joosten, R.; van de Water, W.

    2015-01-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the

  20. Direct Aromaization of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Marcelin

    1997-01-15

    The thermal decomposition of methane offers significant potential as a means of producing higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of reaction is limited. Work in the literature previous to this project had shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds would significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon or heavier (Clo+) materials. This project studied the effect and optimization of the quenching process as a means of increasing the amount of value added products during the pyrolysis of methane. A reactor was designed to rapidly quench the free-radical combustion reaction so as to maximize the yield of aromatics. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts were studied as a means of lowering the reaction temperature. A lower reaction temperature would have the benefits of more rapid quenching as well as a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. It was the goal of the project to identify promising routes from methane to higher hydrocarbons based on the pyrolysis of methane.

  1. A combustão catalítica do metano: estudo estatístico do efeito das variáveis de preparação e pré-tratamento de catalisadores de paládio suportado sobre a atividade catalítica The catalytic combustion of methane: statistical study of preparation and pretreatment conditions of palladium supported catalysts and their relationship with catalytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Graça Carneiro da Rocha

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic combustion of methane on alumina supported palladium catalysts was studied. It has been reported that the activity of the catalyst increases with its time on line, despite of an increase of the palladium particle size. However, different preparation, pretreatment and testing conditions can be the reason for the observed different results. An experimental design, which allows to verify the influence of several parameters at the same time with a good statistical quality, was used. A Plackett-Burman design was selected for the screening of the variables which have an effect on the increase of the catalyst activity.

  2. Numerical study of flame structure in the mild combustion regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardani Amir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, turbulent non-premixed CH4+H2 jet flame issuing into a hot and diluted co-flow air is studied numerically. This flame is under condition of the moderate or intense low-oxygen dilution (MILD combustion regime and related to published experimental data. The modelling is carried out using the EDC model to describe turbulence-chemistry interaction. The DRM-22 reduced mechanism and the GRI2.11 full mechanism are used to represent the chemical reactions of H2/methane jet flame. The flame structure for various O2 levels and jet Reynolds numbers are investigated. The results show that the flame entrainment increases by a decrease in O2 concentration at air side or jet Reynolds number. Local extinction is seen in the upstream and close to the fuel injection nozzle at the shear layer. It leads to the higher flame entertainment in MILD regime. The turbulence kinetic energy decay at centre line of jet decreases by an increase in O2 concentration at hot Co-flow. Also, increase in jet Reynolds or O2 level increases the mixing rate and rate of reactions.

  3. An experimental and numerical investigation of the combustion characteristics of a dual fuel engine with a swirl chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.; Karim, G.A.; Xiao, F.; Sohrabi, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Schulich School of Engineering, Mechanical and Manufacturing Dept.

    2007-07-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the performance of a small bore engine with a swirl chamber when operating as a dual fuel engine with commercial methane as the gaseous fuel were presented in this paper. The experiment involved using a 3-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model to predict the performance of the engine. A detailed chemical kinetics for the gaseous fuel component, consisting primarily of methane and a reduced detailed chemical kinetics for the diesel fuel while considering the turbulent combustion processes an associated performance of a dual fuel engine with a swirl chamber were incorporated in the simulation. The study experimentally and numerically investigated the effects of changes in the quantities of the liquid fuel pilot and gaseous fuels on the combustion processes, engine performance, cyclic variations, and emissions. The paper discussed the experimental approach and results. It also discussed the simulation of the dual fuel engine combustion process. It was concluded that dual fuel combustion was an effective method to burn a gaseous fuel-air mixture with a low energy density. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Improvement of lean combustion characteristics of heavy-hydrocarbon fuels with hydrogen addition; Suiso tenka ni yoru kokyu tanka suisokei nenryo no kihaku nensho no kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Y. [Saitama Institute of Technology, Saitama (Japan); Ishizuka, S. [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-09-25

    The Lewis numbers of lean heavy-hydrocarbon fuels are larger than unity, and hence, their flames are prone to extinction in a shear flow, which occurs in a turbulent combustion. Here, propane is used as a representative fuel of heavy-hydrocarbon fuels because the Lewis number of lean propane/air mixtures is larger than unity, and an attempt to improve its combustion characteristics by hydrogen addition has been made. A tubular flame burner is used to evaluate its improvement, since a rotating, stretched vortex flow is established in the burner. The results show that with' hydrogen addition, the fuel concentration, the flame diameter and the flame temperature at extinction are reduced and its combustion characteristics are improved. However, it is found that the effective equivalence ration at extinction cannot become so small as that of lean methane/air mixture, which has a Lewis number less than unity. (author)

  5. Studies in combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koszykowski, M.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding and a quantitative predictive capability in combustion modeling. A large part of the understanding of the chemistry of combustion processes comes from {open_quotes}chemical kinetic modeling.{close_quotes} However, successful modeling is not an isolated activity. It necessarily involves the integration of methods and results from several diverse disciplines and activities including theoretical chemistry, elementary reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics and computational science. Recently the authors have developed and utilized new tools for parallel processing to implement the first numerical model of a turbulent diffusion flame including a {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} chemical mechanism.

  6. Direct Numerical Simulations of NOx formation in spatially developing turbulent premixed Bunsen flames with mixture inhomogeneity

    KAUST Repository

    Luca, Stefano

    2017-01-05

    Direct Numerical Simulation of three-dimensional spatially developing turbulent methane/air flames are performed. Four flames are simulated; they differ for the level of premixing of the fuel inlet: one has a fully premixed inlet, the other three have a partially premixed inlet that mimic a common injection strategy in stationary gas turbines. The jet consist of a methane/air mixture with global equivalence ratio ɸ = 0.7 and temperature of 800 K. The simulations are performed at 4 atm. The inlet velocity field and the fuel/air fields were extracted from a fully developed turbulent channel simulation. Chemistry is treated with a new skeletal chemical mechanism consisting of 33 species developed specifically for the DNS. The data are analyzed to study possible influences of partial premixing on the flame structure and the combustion efficiency. The results show that increasing the level of partial premixing, the fluctuations of heat release rate increase, due to the richer and leaner pockets of mixture in the flame, while the conditional mean decreases. Increasing the level of partial premixing, the peak of NO and the range of NO values for a given temperature increase. An analysis of NO production is performed categorizing the different initiation steps in the Ndecomposition through four pathways: thermal, prompt, NNH and NO. Different behaviour with respect to laminar flames is found for the NNH pathway suggesting that turbulence influences this pathway of formation of NO.

  7. Methane emissions and climate compatibility of fossil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, B.

    1992-01-01

    Methane contributes directly and indirectly to the additional greenhouse effect caused by human activities. The vast majority of the anthropogenic methane release occurs worldwide in non-fossil sources such as rice cultivation, livestock operations, sanitary landfills and combustion of bio-mass. Methane emissions also occur during production, distribution and utilisation of fossil fuels. Also when considering the methane release and CO 2 -emissions of processes upstream of combustion, the ranking of environmental compatibility of natural gas, fuel oil and cool remains unchanged. Of all fossil fuels, natural gas contributes the least to the greenhouse effect. (orig.) [de

  8. Radiative Heat Transfer in Combustion Applications: Parallel Efficiencies of Two Gas Models, Turbulent Radiation Interactions in Particulate Laden Flows, and Coarse Mesh Finite Difference Acceleration for Improved Temporal Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Mathew A.

    We investigate several aspects of the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation in the context of coal combustion: the parallel efficiency of two commonly-used opacity models, the sensitivity of turbulent radiation interaction (TRI) effects to the presence of coal particulate, and an improvement of the order of temporal convergence using the coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) method. There are four opacity models commonly employed to evaluate the radiative transfer equation in combustion applications; line-by-line (LBL), multigroup, band, and global. Most of these models have been rigorously evaluated for serial computations of a spectrum of problem types [1]. Studies of these models for parallel computations [2] are limited. We assessed the performance of the Spectral-Line-Based weighted sum of gray gasses (SLW) model, a global method related to K-distribution methods [1], and the LBL model. The LBL model directly interpolates opacity information from large data tables. The LBL model outperforms the SLW model in almost all cases, as suggested by Wang et al. [3]. The SLW model, however, shows superior parallel scaling performance and a decreased sensitivity to load imbalancing, suggesting that for some problems, global methods such as the SLW model, could outperform the LBL model. Turbulent radiation interaction (TRI) effects are associated with the differences in the time scales of the fluid dynamic equations and the radiative transfer equations. Solving on the fluid dynamic time step size produces large changes in the radiation field over the time step. We have modified the statistically homogeneous, non-premixed flame problem of Deshmukh et al. [4] to include coal-type particulate. The addition of low mass loadings of particulate minimally impacts the TRI effects. Observed differences in the TRI effects from variations in the packing fractions and Stokes numbers are difficult to analyze because of the significant effect of variations in problem

  9. Effects of premixed flames on turbulence and turbulent scalar transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatnikov, A.N.; Chomiak, J. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Chalmers University of Technology, 412 75 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    Experimental data and results of direct numerical simulations are reviewed in order to show that premixed combustion can change the basic characteristics of a fluctuating velocity field (the so-called flame-generated turbulence) and the direction of scalar fluxes (the so-called countergradient or pressure-driven transport) in a turbulent flow. Various approaches to modeling these phenomena are discussed and the lack of a well-elaborated and widely validated predictive approach is emphasized. Relevant basic issues (the transition from gradient to countergradient scalar transport, the role played by flame-generated turbulence in the combustion rate, the characterization of turbulence in premixed flames, etc.) are critically considered and certain widely accepted concepts are disputed. Despite the substantial progress made in understanding the discussed effects over the past decades, these basic issues strongly need further research. (author)

  10. Direct Numerical Simulations for Combustion Science: Past, Present, and Future

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. This chapter attempts to provide a brief historical review of the progress in DNS of turbulent combustion during the past decades. Major scientific accomplishments and contributions towards fundamental understanding of turbulent combustion will be summarized and future challenges and research needs will be proposed.

  11. Direct Numerical Simulations for Combustion Science: Past, Present, and Future

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2017-12-12

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. This chapter attempts to provide a brief historical review of the progress in DNS of turbulent combustion during the past decades. Major scientific accomplishments and contributions towards fundamental understanding of turbulent combustion will be summarized and future challenges and research needs will be proposed.

  12. High fidelity chemistry and radiation modeling for oxy -- combustion scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Sater, Hassan A.

    To account for the thermal and chemical effects associated with the high CO2 concentrations in an oxy-combustion atmosphere, several refined gas-phase chemistry and radiative property models have been formulated for laminar to highly turbulent systems. This thesis examines the accuracies of several chemistry and radiative property models employed in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of laminar to transitional oxy-methane diffusion flames by comparing their predictions against experimental data. Literature review about chemistry and radiation modeling in oxy-combustion atmospheres considered turbulent systems where the predictions are impacted by the interplay and accuracies of the turbulence, radiation and chemistry models. Thus, by considering a laminar system we minimize the impact of turbulence and the uncertainties associated with turbulence models. In the first section of this thesis, an assessment and validation of gray and non-gray formulations of a recently proposed weighted-sum-of-gray gas model in oxy-combustion scenarios was undertaken. Predictions of gas, wall temperatures and flame lengths were in good agreement with experimental measurements. The temperature and flame length predictions were not sensitive to the radiative property model employed. However, there were significant variations between the gray and non-gray model radiant fraction predictions with the variations in general increasing with decrease in Reynolds numbers possibly attributed to shorter flames and steeper temperature gradients. The results of this section confirm that non-gray model predictions of radiative heat fluxes are more accurate than gray model predictions especially at steeper temperature gradients. In the second section, the accuracies of three gas-phase chemistry models were assessed by comparing their predictions against experimental measurements of temperature, species concentrations and flame lengths. The chemistry was modeled employing the Eddy

  13. LOX/Methane Regeneratively-Cooled Rocket Engine Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this project is to advance the technologies required to build a subcritical regeneratively cooled liquid oxygen/methane rocket combustion chamber for...

  14. The mathematical model structural-parametric synthesis of working processes in an oxygen-methane steam generator with flow swirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshinova, T. S.; Shmatov, D. P.; Kretinin, A. V.; Drozdov, I. G.

    2017-11-01

    While formulating a mathematical model of the flow and interaction between oxygen-methane fuel combustion products with tangentially swirled ballast water injected in the end of the combustion chamber in CAE product Fluent, which integrated into the ANSYS Workbench platform, the problem of structural-parametric synthesis is solved for structure optimization of the model. Equations are selected from the catalogue of Fluent physical models. Also optimization helps to find “regime” model parameters that determine the specific implementation of the model inside the synthesized structure. As a result, such solutions which were developed during creation of a numerical algorithm, as the choice of a turbulence model and the state equation, the methods for determining the thermodynamic thermophysical characteristics of combustion products, the choice of the radiation model, the choice of the resistance law for drops, the choice of the expression which allows to evaluate swirling flows lateral force, determination of the turbulent dispersion strength, choice of the mass exchange law, etc. Fields of temperature, pressure, velocity and volume fraction of phases were obtained at different ballast water mass flows. Dependence of wall temperature from mass flow of ballast water is constructed, that allows us to compare results of the experiment and mathematical modeling.

  15. Microwave Hydrogen Production from Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    combustion NOx control of reciprocating engine exhaust and fuel cell application of biogas . Our target is to obtain the methane conversion efficiency...demonstration of MW technology removing and destroying hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and siloxanes from biogas produced by Sacramento Regional Wastewater...running on biogas and is currently conducting the field demonstration of the unit at Tollenaar Dairy in Elk Grove, CA. SMUD, California Air Resources

  16. Application of the GRI 1.2 Methane Oxidation Model to Methane and Methanol Oxidation in Supercritical Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rice, Steven

    1997-01-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has been leading an effort over the past few years to consolidate recent developments in the elementary reaction modeling of the oxidation of methane for combustion applications into a single...

  17. Preliminary assessment of combustion modes for internal combustion wave rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalim, M. Razi

    1995-01-01

    Combustion within the channels of a wave rotor is examined as a means of obtaining pressure gain during heat addition in a gas turbine engine. Several modes of combustion are considered and the factors that determine the applicability of three modes are evaluated in detail; premixed autoignition/detonation, premixed deflagration, and non-premixed compression ignition. The last two will require strong turbulence for completion of combustion in a reasonable time in the wave rotor. The compression/autoignition modes will require inlet temperatures in excess of 1500 R for reliable ignition with most hydrocarbon fuels; otherwise, a supplementary ignition method must be provided. Examples of combustion mode selection are presented for two core engine applications that had been previously designed with equivalent 4-port wave rotor topping cycles using external combustion.

  18. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Antoni K.; Maxson, James A.; Hensinger, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  19. Investigating observational constraints on the contemporary methane budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monteil, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, naturally produced by bio-degradation of organic material (mainly in wetlands), by continuous and eruptive releases from mud volcanoes, and by combustion of organic material in forest and peat fires. Large quantities of methane are also emitted by human

  20. Modeling of free and confined turbulent natural gas flames using an extension of CFX-F3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roekaerts, D [Shell Research and Technology Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hsu, A

    1998-12-31

    A general form of the fast chemistry / assumed shape probability density function model for turbulent gaseous diffusion flames has been implemented in a new combination of computer programs consisting of the commercial code CFX-F3D (formerly CFDS-FLOW3D) and the program FLAME, developed at Delft University of Technology. Also a mixedness-reactedness model with two independent variables (mixture fraction and reaction progress variable) has been implemented. The main strength of the new program is that it combines the advantages of a general purpose commercial CFD code (applicable to arbitrarily shaped domains, wide range of solvers) with the advantages of special purpose combustion subroutines (more detail in modeling of chemistry and of turbulence-chemistry interaction, flexibility). The new combination of programs has been validated by the application to the prediction of the properties of a labscale turbulent natural gas diffusion flame for which detailed measurements are available. The mixedness-reactedness model has been applied to the case of a confined natural gas diffusion flame at globally rich conditions. In contrast with fast chemistry models, the mixedness-reactedness model can be used to predict the amount of methane at the end of the reactor vessel (`methane slip`) as a function of operating conditions. (author)

  1. Modeling of free and confined turbulent natural gas flames using an extension of CFX-F3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roekaerts, D. [Shell Research and Technology Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hsu, A.

    1997-12-31

    A general form of the fast chemistry / assumed shape probability density function model for turbulent gaseous diffusion flames has been implemented in a new combination of computer programs consisting of the commercial code CFX-F3D (formerly CFDS-FLOW3D) and the program FLAME, developed at Delft University of Technology. Also a mixedness-reactedness model with two independent variables (mixture fraction and reaction progress variable) has been implemented. The main strength of the new program is that it combines the advantages of a general purpose commercial CFD code (applicable to arbitrarily shaped domains, wide range of solvers) with the advantages of special purpose combustion subroutines (more detail in modeling of chemistry and of turbulence-chemistry interaction, flexibility). The new combination of programs has been validated by the application to the prediction of the properties of a labscale turbulent natural gas diffusion flame for which detailed measurements are available. The mixedness-reactedness model has been applied to the case of a confined natural gas diffusion flame at globally rich conditions. In contrast with fast chemistry models, the mixedness-reactedness model can be used to predict the amount of methane at the end of the reactor vessel (`methane slip`) as a function of operating conditions. (author)

  2. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  3. Combustion, detonation, shock waves. Proceedings of the Zel'dovich memorial - International conference on combustion. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzhanov, A.G.; Frolov, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This book contains lectures by the experts in various fields of modern research in combustion, detonation and shock waves, presented at the Zel'dovich memorial - International conference on combustion dedicated to the 80-th birthday of academician Ya.B. Zel'dovich. There are eight chapters discussing the state-of-the-art in combustion kinetics, ignition and steady-state flame propagation, diffusion and heterogeneous combustion, turbulent combustion, unsteady combustion, detonation, combustion and detonation analogies, intense shock waves and extreme states of matter [ru

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Biskamp, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to, and modern account of, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, an active field both in general turbulence theory and in various areas of astrophysics. The book starts by introducing the MHD equations, certain useful approximations and the transition to turbulence. The second part of the book covers incompressible MHD turbulence, the macroscopic aspects connected with the different self-organization processes, the phenomenology of the turbulence spectra, two-point closure theory, and intermittency. The third considers two-dimensional turbulence and compressi

  5. Agricultural methanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    After having briefly outlined the interest of the development of methanization of agricultural by-products in the context of struggle against climate change, and noticed that France is only now developing this sector as some other countries already did, this publication describes the methanization process also called anaerobic digestion, which produces a digestate and biogas. Advantages for the agriculture sector are outlined, as well as drawbacks and recommendations (required specific technical abilities, an attention to the use of energetic crops, an improved economic balance which still depends on public subsidies, competition in the field of waste processing). Actions undertaken by the ADEME are briefly evoked

  6. Turbulent Jet Flames Into a Vitiated Coflow. PhD Thesis awarded Spring 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdeman, James D. (Technical Monitor); Cabra, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    Examined is the vitiated coflow flame, an experimental condition that decouples the combustion processes of flows found in practical combustors from the associated recirculating fluid mechanics. The configuration consists of a 4.57 mm diameter fuel jet into a coaxial flow of hot combustion products from a lean premixed flame. The 210 mm diameter coflow isolates the jet flame from the cool ambient, providing a hot environment similar to the operating conditions of advanced combustors; this important high temperature element is lacking in the traditional laboratory experiments of jet flames into cool (room) air. A family of flows of increasing complexity is presented: 1) nonreacting flow, 2) all hydrogen flame (fuel jet and premixed coflow), and 3) set of methane flames. This sequence of experiments provides a convenient ordering of validation data for combustion models. Laser Raman-Rayleigh-LIF diagnostics at the Turbulent Diffusion Flame laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories produced instantaneous multiscalar point measurements. These results attest to the attractive features of the vitiated coflow burner and the well-defined boundary conditions provided by the coflow. The coflow is uniform and steady, isolating the jet flame from the laboratory air for a downstream distance ranging from z/d = 50-70. The statistical results show that differential diffusion effects in this highly turbulent flow are negligible. Complementing the comprehensive set of multiscalar measurements is a parametric study of lifted methane flames that was conducted to analyze flame sensitivity to jet and coflow velocity, as well as coflow temperature. The linear relationship found between the lift-off height and the jet velocity is consistent with previous experiments. New linear sensitivities were found correlating the lift-off height to coflow velocity and temperature. A blow-off study revealed that the methane flame blows off at a common coflow temperature (1260 K), regardless of

  7. Modeling of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki

    2012-10-01

    Recently, many experimental study of plasma-assisted combustion has been done. However, numerous complex reactions in combustion of hydrocarbons are preventing from theoritical study for clarifying inside the plasma-assisted combustion, and the effect of plasma-assist is still not understood. Shinohara and Sasaki [1,2] have reported that the shortening of flame length by irradiating microwave without increase of gas temperature. And they also reported that the same phenomena would occur when applying dielectric barrier discharges to the flame using simple hydrocarbon, methane. It is suggested that these phenomena may result by the electron heating. To clarify this phenomena, electron behavior under microwave and DBD was examined. For the first step of DBD plasma-assisted combustion simulation, electron Monte Carlo simulation in methane, oxygen and argon mixture gas(0.05:0.14:0.81) [2] has been done. Electron swarm parameters are sampled and electron energy distribution function (EEDF)s are also determined. In the combustion, gas temperature is higher(>1700K), so reduced electric field E/N becomes relatively high(>10V/cm/Torr). The electrons are accelerated to around 14 eV. This result agree with the optical emission from argon obtained by the experiment of reference [2]. Dissociation frequency of methane and oxygens are obtained in high. This might be one of the effect of plasma-assist. And it is suggested that the electrons should be high enough to dissociate methane, but plasma is not needed.[4pt] [1] K. Shinohara et al, J. Phys. D:Appl. Phys., 42, 182008 (1-7) (2009).[0pt] [2] K. Sasaki, 64th Annual Gaseous Electronic Conference, 56, 15 CT3.00001(2011).

  8. LES and RANS modeling of pulverized coal combustion in swirl burner for air and oxy-combustion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warzecha, Piotr; Boguslawski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Combustion of pulverized coal in oxy-combustion technology is one of the effective ways to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The process of transition from conventional combustion in air to the oxy-combustion technology, however, requires a thorough investigations of the phenomena occurring during the combustion process, that can be greatly supported by numerical modeling. The paper presents the results of numerical simulations of pulverized coal combustion process in swirl burner using RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) methods for turbulent flow. Numerical simulations have been performed for the oxyfuel test facility located at the Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer at RWTH Aachen University. Detailed analysis of the flow field inside the combustion chamber for cold flow and for the flow with combustion using different numerical methods for turbulent flows have been done. Comparison of the air and oxy-coal combustion process for pulverized coal shows significant differences in temperature, especially close to the burner exit. Additionally the influence of the combustion model on the results has been shown for oxy-combustion test case. - Highlights: • Oxy-coal combustion has been modeled for test facility operating at low oxygen ratio. • Coal combustion process has been modeled with simplified combustion models. • Comparison of oxy and air combustion process of pulverized coal has been done. • RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) results for pulverized coal combustion process have been compared

  9. Superfluid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Most flows of fluids, in nature and in technology, are turbulent. Since much of the energy expended by machines and devices that involve fluid flows is spent in overcoming drag caused by turbulence, there is a strong motivation to understand the phenomena. Surprisingly, the peculiar, quantum-mechanical form of turbulence that can form in superfluid helium may turn out to be much simpler to understand that the classical turbulence that forms in normal fluids. It now seems that the study of superfluid turbulence may provide simplified model systems for studying some forms of classical turbulence. There are also practical motivations for studying superfluid turbulence. For example, superfuid helium is often used as a coolant in superconducting machinery. Superfluid turbulence is the primary impediment to the transfer of heat by superfluid helium; an understanding of the phenomena may make it possible to design more efficient methods of refrigeration for superconducting devices. 8 figs

  10. Landfill Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill methane (CH4) accounts for approximately 1.3% (0.6 Gt) of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions relative to total emissions from all sectors of about 49 Gt CO2-eq yr-1. For countries with a history of controlled landfilling, landfills can be one of the larger national sources of ant...

  11. Soot emissions from turbulent diffusion flames burning simple alkane fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canteenwalla, P.M.; Johnson, M.R. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Thomson, K.A.; Smallwood, G.J. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Inst. for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology

    2007-07-01

    A classic problem in combustion involves measurement and prediction of soot emissions from turbulent diffusion flames. Very high-sensitivity measurements of particulate matter (PM) from very low-sooting diffusion flames burning methane and other simple alkane fuels have been enabled from recent advances in laser-induced incandescence (LII). In order to quantify soot emissions from a lab-scale turbulent diffusion flame burner, this paper presented a study that used LII to develop a sampling protocol. The purpose of the study was to develop an experimentally based model to predict PM emissions from flares used in industry using soot emissions from lab-scale flares. Quantitative results of mass of soot emitted per mass of fuel burned were presented across a range of flow conditions and fuels. The experiment used digital imaging to measure flame lengths and estimate flame residence times. Comparisons were also made between current measurements and results of previous researchers for soot in the overfire region. The study also considered the validity applicability of buoyancy based models for predicting and scaling soot emissions. The paper described the experimental setup including sampling system and flame length imaging. Background information on soot yield and a comparison of flame residence time definitions were provided. The results and discussion of results were also presented. It was concluded that the results highlighted the subjective nature of flame length measurements. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  12. METHANE PHYTOREMEDIATION BY VEGETATIVE LANDFILL COVER SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill gas, consisting of methane and other gases, is produced from organic compounds degrading in landfills, contributes to global climate change, is toxic to various types of vegetation, and may pose a combustion hazard at higher concentrations. New landfills are required to ...

  13. Propellant injection strategy for suppressing acoustic combustion instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Qina

    Shear-coaxial injector elements are often used in liquid-propellant-rocket thrust chambers, where combustion instabilities remain a significant problem. A conventional solution to the combustion instability problem relies on passive control techniques that use empirically-developed hardware such as acoustic baffles and tuned cavities. In addition to adding weight and decreasing engine performance, these devices are designed using trial-and-error methods, which do not provide the capability to predict the overall system stability characteristics in advance. In this thesis, two novel control strategies that are based on propellant fluid dynamics were investigated for mitigating acoustic instability involving shear-coaxial injector elements. The new control strategies would use a set of controlled injectors allowing local adjustment of propellant flow patterns for each operating condition, particularly when instability could become a problem. One strategy relies on reducing the oxidizer-fuel density gradient by blending heavier methane with the main fuel, hydrogen. Another strategy utilizes modifying the equivalence ratio to affect the acoustic impedance through mixing and reaction rate changes. The potential effectiveness of these strategies was assessed by conducting unit-physics experiments. Two different model combustors, one simulating a single-element injector test and the other a double-element injector test, were designed and tested for flame-acoustic interaction. For these experiments, the Reynolds number of the central oxygen jet was kept between 4700 and 5500 making the injector flames sufficiently turbulent. A compression driver, mounted on one side of the combustor wall, provided controlled acoustic excitation to the injector flames, simulating the initial phase of flame-acoustic interaction. Acoustic excitation was applied either as band-limited white noise forcing between 100 Hz and 5000 Hz or as single-frequency, fixed-amplitude forcing at 1150 Hz

  14. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz G.

    2014-01-01

    , internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model

  15. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-11-01

    interaction. Furthermore, the steady state distribution of energy again follows a Kolmogorov scaling law; in this case the ripple energy is distributed according to 1/k 7/4. Again, in parallel with vortex turbulence ripple turbulence exhibits intermittency. The problem of ripple turbulence presents an experimental opportunity to generate data in a controlled, benchmarked system. In particular the surface of a sphere is an ideal environment to study ripple turbulence. Waves run around the sphere and interact with each other, and the effect of walls is eliminated. In microgravity this state can be realized for over 2 decades of frequency. Wave turbulence is a physically relevant problem in its own right. It has been studied on the surface of liquid hydrogen and its application to Alfven waves in space is a source of debate. Of course, application of wave turbulence perspectives to ocean waves has been a major success. The experiment which we plan to run in microgravity is conceptually straightforward. Ripples are excited on the surface of a spherical drop of fluid and then their amplitude is recorded with appropriate photography. A key challenge is posed by the need to stably position a 10cm diameter sphere of water in microgravity. Two methods are being developed. Orbitec is using controlled puffs of air from at least 6 independent directions to provided the positioning force. This approach has actually succeeded to position and stabilize a 4cm sphere during a KC 135 segment. Guigne International is using the radiation pressure of high frequency sound. These transducers have been organized into a device in the shape of a dodecahedron. This apparatus 'SPACE DRUMS' has already been approved for use for combustion synthesis experiments on the International Space Station. A key opportunity presented by the ripple turbulence data is its use in driving the development of codes to simulate its properties.

  16. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-01-01

    interaction. Furthermore, the steady state distribution of energy again follows a Kolmogorov scaling law; in this case the ripple energy is distributed according to 1/k (sup 7/4). Again, in parallel with vortex turbulence ripple turbulence exhibits intermittency. The problem of ripple turbulence presents an experimental opportunity to generate data in a controlled, benchmarked system. In particular the surface of a sphere is an ideal environment to study ripple turbulence. Waves run around the sphere and interact with each other, and the effect of walls is eliminated. In microgravity this state can be realized for over 2 decades of frequency. Wave turbulence is a physically relevant problem in its own right. It has been studied on the surface of liquid hydrogen and its application to Alfven waves in space is a source of debate. Of course, application of wave turbulence perspectives to ocean waves has been a major success. The experiment which we plan to run in microgravity is conceptually straightforward. Ripples are excited on the surface of a spherical drop of fluid and then their amplitude is recorded with appropriate photography. A key challenge is posed by the need to stably position a 10cm diameter sphere of water in microgravity. Two methods are being developed. Orbitec is using controlled puffs of air from at least 6 independent directions to provided the positioning force. This approach has actually succeeded to position and stabilize a 4cm sphere during a KC 135 segment. Guigne International is using the radiation pressure of high frequency sound. These transducers have been organized into a device in the shape of a dodecahedron. This apparatus 'SPACE DRUMS' has already been approved for use for combustion synthesis experiments on the International Space Station. A key opportunity presented by the ripple turbulence data is its use in driving the development of codes to simulate its properties.

  17. Oxygen-Methane Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Tim

    2012-01-01

    An oxygen-methane thruster was conceived with integrated igniter/injector capable of nominal operation on either gaseous or liquid propellants. The thruster was designed to develop 100 lbf (approximately 445 N) thrust at vacuum conditions and use oxygen and methane as propellants. This continued development included refining the design of the thruster to minimize part count and manufacturing difficulties/cost, refining the modeling tools and capabilities that support system design and analysis, demonstrating the performance of the igniter and full thruster assembly with both gaseous and liquid propellants, and acquiring data from this testing in order to verify the design and operational parameters of the thruster. Thruster testing was conducted with gaseous propellants used for the igniter and thruster. The thruster was demonstrated to work with all types of propellant conditions, and provided the desired performance. Both the thruster and igniter were tested, as well as gaseous propellants, and found to provide the desired performance using the various propellant conditions. The engine also served as an injector testbed for MSFC-designed refractory combustion chambers made of rhenium.

  18. Space Station Freedom combustion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Extended operations in microgravity, on board spacecraft like Space Station Freedom, provide both unusual opportunities and unusual challenges for combustion science. On the one hand, eliminating the intrusion of buoyancy provides a valuable new perspective for fundamental studies of combustion phenomena. On the other hand, however, the absence of buoyancy creates new hazards of fires and explosions that must be understood to assure safe manned space activities. These considerations - and the relevance of combustion science to problems of pollutants, energy utilization, waste incineration, power and propulsion systems, and fire and explosion hazards, among others - provide strong motivation for microgravity combustion research. The intrusion of buoyancy is a greater impediment to fundamental combustion studies than to most other areas of science. Combustion intrinsically heats gases with the resulting buoyant motion at normal gravity either preventing or vastly complicating measurements. Perversely, this limitation is most evident for fundamental laboratory experiments; few practical combustion phenomena are significantly affected by buoyancy. Thus, we have never observed the most fundamental combustion phenomena - laminar premixed and diffusion flames, heterogeneous flames of particles and surfaces, low-speed turbulent flames, etc. - without substantial buoyant disturbances. This precludes rational merging of theory, where buoyancy is of little interest, and experiments, that always are contaminated by buoyancy, which is the traditional path for developing most areas of science. The current microgravity combustion program seeks to rectify this deficiency using both ground-based and space-based facilities, with experiments involving space-based facilities including: laminar premixed flames, soot processes in laminar jet diffusion flames, structure of laminar and turbulent jet diffusion flames, solid surface combustion, one-dimensional smoldering, ignition and flame

  19. The combustion of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    The burning rates of sodium in the form of vapour jets, droplets, sprays and unconfined and confined pools have been reviewed. Attention has been paid to assessing the value of models in the various combustion modes. Additional models have been constructed for the descriptions of laminar and turbulent vapour jets, stationary droplets, forced convection over ambient pool fires together with correlations for peak pressures in confined pool environments. Where appropriate experiments with sodium have not been conducted, the likely behaviour is predicted by comparison with the burning of other fuels, particularly in the field of large free ambient fires. Some areas where further knowledge is required are highlighted. (author)

  20. Modeling Compressed Turbulence with BHR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    Turbulence undergoing compression or expansion occurs in systems ranging from internal combustion engines to supernovae. One common feature in many of these systems is the presence of multiple reacting species. Direct numerical simulation data is available for the single-fluid, low turbulent Mach number case. Wu, et al. (1985) compared their DNS results to several Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models. They also proposed a three-equation k - ɛ - τ model, in conjunction with a Reynolds-stress model. Subsequent researchers have proposed alternative corrections to the standard k - ɛ formulation. Here we investigate three variants of the BHR model (Besnard, 1992). BHR is a model for multi-species variable-density turbulence. The three variants are the linear eddy-viscosity, algebraic-stress, and full Reynolds-stress formulations. We then examine the predictions of the model for the fluctuating density field for the case of variable-density turbulence.

  1. Premixed autoignition in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Krisman, Alexander; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Prediction of chemical ignition delay in an autoignition process is critical in combustion systems like compression ignition engines and gas turbines. Often, ignition delay times measured in simple homogeneous experiments or homogeneous calculations are not representative of actual autoignition processes in complex turbulent flows. This is due the presence of turbulent mixing which results in fluctuations in thermodynamic properties as well as chemical composition. In the present study the effect of fluctuations of thermodynamic variables on the ignition delay is quantified with direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence. A premixed syngas-air mixture is used to remove the effects of inhomogeneity in the chemical composition. Preliminary results show a significant spatial variation in the ignition delay time. We analyze the topology of autoignition kernels and identify the influence of extreme events resulting from compressibility and intermittency. The dependence of ignition delay time on Reynolds and turbulent Mach numbers is also quantified. Supported by Basic Energy Sciences, Dept of Energy, United States.

  2. IEA combustion agreement : a collaborative task on alternative fuels in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larmi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the alternative fuels in combustion task of the International Energy Agency is on high efficiency engine combustion, furnace combustion, and combustion chemistry. The objectives of the task are to develop optimum combustion for dedicated fuels by fully utilizing the physical and chemical properties of synthetic and renewable fuels; a significant reduction in carbon dioxide, NOx and particulate matter emissions; determine the minimum emission levels for dedicated fuels; and meet future emission standards of engines without or with minimum after-treatment. This presentation discussed the alternative fuels task and addressed issues such as synthetic fuel properties and benefits. The anticipated future roadmap was presented along with a list of the synthetic and renewable engine fuels to be studied, such as neat oxygenates like alcohols and ethers, biogas/methane and gas combustion, fuel blends, dual fuel combustion, high cetane number diesel fuels like synthetic Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel and hydrogenated vegetable oil, and low CN number fuels. Implementation examples were also discussed, such as fuel spray studies in optical spray bombs; combustion research in optical engines and combustion chambers; studies on reaction kinetics of combustion and emission formation; studies on fuel properties and ignition behaviour; combustion studies on research engines; combustion optimization; implementing the optimum combustion in research engines; and emission measurements. Overall milestone examples and the overall schedule of participating countries were also presented. figs.

  3. Combustion Velocity of Benzine-Benzol-Air Mixtures in High-Speed Internal-Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnauffer, Kurt

    1932-01-01

    The present paper describes a device whereby rapid flame movement within an internal-combustion engine cylinder may be recorded and determined. By the aid of a simple cylindrical contact and an oscillograph the rate of combustion within the cylinder of an airplane engine during its normal operation may be measured for gas intake velocities of from 30 to 35 m/s and for velocities within the cylinder of from 20 to 25 m/s. With it the influence of mixture ratios, of turbulence, of compression ratio and kind of fuel on combustion velocity may be determined. Besides the determination of the influence of the above factors on combustion velocity, the degree of turbulence may also be determined. As a unit of reference in estimating the degree of turbulence, the intake velocity of the charge is chosen.

  4. Methane-fueled vehicles: A promising market for coalbed methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deul, M.

    1993-01-01

    The most acceptable alternative fuel for motor vehicles is compressed natural gas (CNG). An important potential source of such gas is coalbed methane, much of which is now being wasted. Although there are no technological impediments to the use of CNG it has not been adequately promoted for a variety of reasons: structural, institutional and for coalbed gas, legal. The benefits of using CNG fuel are manifold: clean burning, low cost, abundant, and usable in any internal combustion engine. Even though more than 30,000 CNG vehicles are now in use in the U.S.A., they are not readily available, fueling stations are not easily accessible, and there is general apathy on the part of the public because of negligence by such agencies as the Department of Energy, the Department of Transportation and the Environmental Protection Agency. The economic benefits of using methane are significant: 100,000 cubic feet of methane is equivalent to 800 gallons of gasoline. Considering the many millions of cubic feet methane wasted from coal mines conservation and use of this resource is a worthy national goal

  5. COMBUSTION SIMULATION IN A SPARK IGNITION ENGINE CYLINDER: EFFECTS OF AIR-FUEL RATIO ON THE COMBUSTION DURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureddin Dinler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion is an important subject of internal combustion engine studies. To reduce the air pollution from internal combustion engines and to increase the engine performance, it is required to increase combustion efficiency. In this study, effects of air/fuel ratio were investigated numerically. An axisymmetrical internal combustion engine was modeled in order to simulate in-cylinder engine flow and combustion. Two dimensional transient continuity, momentum, turbulence, energy, and combustion equations were solved. The k-e turbulence model was employed. The fuel mass fraction transport equation was used for modeling of the combustion. For this purpose a computational fluid dynamics code was developed by using the finite volume method with FORTRAN programming code. The moving mesh was utilized to simulate the piston motion. The developed code simulates four strokes of engine continuously. In the case of laminar flow combustion, Arrhenius type combustion equations were employed. In the case of turbulent flow combustion, eddy break-up model was employed. Results were given for rich, stoichiometric, and lean mixtures in contour graphs. Contour graphs showed that lean mixture (l = 1.1 has longer combustion duration.

  6. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B F [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  7. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B.F. [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  8. The evolution of the flame surface in turbulent premixed jet flames at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Stefano; Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2017-11-01

    A set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed flames in a spatially developing turbulent slot burner at four Reynolds number is presented. This configuration is of interest since it displays turbulent production by mean shear as in real combustion devices. The gas phase hydrodynamics are modeled with the reactive, unsteady Navier-Stokes equations in the low Mach number limit, with finite-rate chemistry consisting of 16 species and 73 reactions. For the highest jet Reynolds number of 22 ×103, 22 Billion grid points are employed. The jet consists of a lean methane/air mixture at 4 atm and preheated to 800 K. The analysis of stretch statistics shows that the mean total stretch is close to zero. Mean stretch decreases moving downstream from positive to negative values, suggesting a formation of surface area in the near field and destruction at the tip of the flame; the mean contribution of the tangential strain term is positive, while the mean contribution of the propagative term is always negative. Positive values of stretch are due to the tangential strain rate term, while large negative values are associated with the propagative term. Increasing Reynolds number is found to decrease the correlation between stretch and the single contributions.

  9. Coalbed Methane Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coalbed Methane Outreach Program, voluntary program seeking to reduce methane emissions from coal mining activities. CMOP promotes profitable recovery/use of coal mine methane (CMM), addressing barriers to using CMM instead of emitting it to atmosphere.

  10. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilik, Gregory K.; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Hedan; Haworth, Daniel C. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Herreros, Jose Martin [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla La-Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine, with a focus on exhaust emissions. Hydrogen was substituted for diesel fuel on an energy basis of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10% and 15% by aspiration of hydrogen into the engine's intake air. Four speed and load conditions were investigated (1800 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output and 3600 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output). A significant retarding of injection timing by the engine's electronic control unit (ECU) was observed during the increased aspiration of hydrogen. The retarding of injection timing resulted in significant NO{sub X} emission reductions, however, the same emission reductions were achieved without aspirated hydrogen by manually retarding the injection timing. Subsequently, hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was examined, with the pilot and main injection timings locked, to study the effects caused directly by hydrogen addition. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion resulted in a modest increase of NO{sub X} emissions and a shift in NO/NO{sub 2} ratio in which NO emissions decreased and NO{sub 2} emissions increased, with NO{sub 2} becoming the dominant NO{sub X} component in some combustion modes. Computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD) of the hydrogen assisted diesel combustion process captured this trend and reproduced the experimentally observed trends of hydrogen's effect on the composition of NO{sub X} for some operating conditions. A model that explicitly accounts for turbulence-chemistry interactions using a transported probability density function (PDF) method was better able to reproduce the experimental trends, compared to a model that ignores the influence of turbulent fluctuations on mean chemical production rates, although the importance of the fluctuations is not as strong as has been reported in some other recent modeling studies. The CFD results confirm

  11. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  12. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  13. Soot Formation In Turbulent Combusting Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santoro, Robert

    1998-01-01

    .... Laser-based techniques were used to measure the soot volume fraction, particle size and number density as well as the temperature and relative concentration of hydroxyl radicals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons...

  14. Turbulence Model Evaluation in Premixed Combustion Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente, W.; Salinas, M.; Rodríguez, A.; Jiménez, R.

    2004-01-01

    Se estudia la influencia del modelo de turbulencia en la formación de CO y NO en una llama de metano turbulenta. En la simulación numérica se usa un modelo estocástico de combustión. Este modelo está basado en técnicas combinadas de volúmenes finitos y Monte Carlo, para la solución de una ecuación de una función de densidad de probabilidad conjunta. Las velocidades de reacción se presentan mediante un modelo químico reducido y derivado de un mecanismo GRI completo. Una llama turbulenta, de pr...

  15. Turbulent Combustion Study of Scramjet Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The filtered Navier-Stokes equation are solved on the left grid. The wall shear stress are estimated from algebraic relation or by solving thin...when we know e and V , we solve the non- linear equation of e = H(T )+ RT M for the temperature of T , then P is calculated by P = RT/(MV ). The...the elementary gas model: µi = 2.6693 · 10−5 √ MiT δ2i Ω (2,2) ij . (2.37) ki = µi ( cp,i + 5 4 R Mi ) . (2.38) Here Mi is the molecular mass of

  16. The role of pair dispersion in turbulent flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourgoin, M.; Ouellette, N.T.; Xu, H.T.

    2006-01-01

    Mixing and transport in turbulent flows - which have strong local concentration fluctuations - essential in many natural and industrial systems including reactions in chemical mixers, combustion in engines and burners, droplet formation in warm clouds, and biological odor detection and chemotaxis...

  17. Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.; Arias, Paul G.; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Uranakara, Harshavardhana A.

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms

  18. Example Problems in LES Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Lesieur, M., Turbulence in Fluids , 2nd Revised Ed., Fluid Mechanics and Its Applications, Vol. 1, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, Massachusetts, 1990...34, Journal of Fluid Mechanics , Vol. 238, 1992, pp. 155-185. 5. Hirsch, C., Numerical Computation of Internal and External Flows, Vol. 2, Computational...reaction mechanisms for the oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels in flames", Combustion Science and Technology, Vol. 27, 1981, pp. 31-43. 14. Spalding, D.B

  19. High Turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    EuHIT, Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.

  20. Plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates

  1. Wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarenko, Sergey [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Mathematics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Wave Turbulence refers to the statistical theory of weakly nonlinear dispersive waves. There is a wide and growing spectrum of physical applications, ranging from sea waves, to plasma waves, to superfluid turbulence, to nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. Beyond the fundamentals the book thus also covers new developments such as the interaction of random waves with coherent structures (vortices, solitons, wave breaks), inverse cascades leading to condensation and the transitions between weak and strong turbulence, turbulence intermittency as well as finite system size effects, such as ''frozen'' turbulence, discrete wave resonances and avalanche-type energy cascades. This book is an outgrow of several lectures courses held by the author and, as a result, written and structured rather as a graduate text than a monograph, with many exercises and solutions offered along the way. The present compact description primarily addresses students and non-specialist researchers wishing to enter and work in this field. (orig.)

  2. CO2 capture by chemical looping combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero, Carmen R; Adanez, Juan; Gayan, Pilar; Garcia L, Francisco; Abad, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    NiO and CuO based oxygen carriers (OCs) supported on Al 2 O 3 prepared by impregnation were selected for its evaluation in a continuous pilot plant of 500 Wth of two interconnected fluidized beds, where both methane and syngas were used as fuel gas. In addition, the effect of possible impurities in the fuel gas such as sulphur compounds and other hydrocarbons in the combustion efficiency of the process and the behaviour of the OCs were studied. Based on these results, it can be concluded that both OCs are suitable for a chemical looping combustion (CLC) process with methane, syngas and methane with impurities such as light hydrocarbons or sulphur.

  3. Development of a Premixed Combustion Capability for Scramjet Combustion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; Rice, Brian E.; Chelliah, Harsha; McDaniel, James C.; Edwards, Jack R.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing engines rely on scramjet combustion processes, which involve high speed, compressible, and highly turbulent flows. The combustion environment and the turbulent flames at the heart of these engines are difficult to simulate and study in the laboratory under well controlled conditions. Typically, wind-tunnel testing is performed that more closely approximates engine testing rather than a careful investigation of the underlying physics that drives the combustion process. The experiments described in this paper, along with companion data sets being developed separately, aim to isolate the chemical kinetic effects from the fuel-air mixing process in a dual-mode scramjet combustion environment. A unique fuel injection approach is taken that produces a nearly uniform fuel-air mixture at the entrance to the combustor. This approach relies on the precombustion shock train upstream of the dual-mode scramjet combustor. A stable ethylene flame anchored on a cavity flameholder with a uniformly mixed combustor inflow has been achieved in these experiments allowing numerous companion studies involving coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), particle image velocimetry (PIV), and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be performed.

  4. Singler-chamber SOFCs based on gadolinia doped ceria operated on methane and propane; Pilas de combustible de una sola camara, basadas en electrolitos de ceria dopada con gadolinia y operadas con metano y propano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, M.; Roa, J. J.; Capdevila, X. G.; Segarra, M.; Pinol, S.

    2010-07-01

    The main advantages of single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) respect to dual-chamber SOFCs, are to simplify the device design and to operate in mixtures of hydrocarbon (methane, propane...) and air, with no separation between fuel and oxidant. However, this design requires the use of selective electrodes for the fuel oxidation and the oxidant reduction. In this work, electrolyte-supported SOFCs were fabricated using gadolinia doped ceria (GDC) as the electrolyte, Ni + GDC as the anode and LSC(La{sub 0}.5Sr{sub 0}.5CoO{sub 3}-{delta})-GDC-Ag{sub 2}O as the cathode. The electrical properties of the cell were determined in mixtures of methane + air and propane + air. The influence of temperature, gas composition and total flow rate on the fuel cell performance was investigated. As a result, the power density was strongly increased with increasing temperature, total flow rate and hydrocarbon composition. Under optimized gas compositions and total flow conditions, power densities of 70 and 320 mW/cm{sup 2} operating on propane at a temperature of 600 degree centigrade and methane (795 degree centigrade) were obtained, respectively. (Author)

  5. Large-eddy simulation of swirling pulverized-coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, L.Y.; Luo, Y.H. [Shanghai Jiaotong Univ. (China). School of Mechanical Engineering; Zhou, L.X.; Xu, C.S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics

    2013-07-01

    A Eulerian-Lagrangian large-eddy simulation (LES) with a Smagorinsky-Lilly sub-grid scale stress model, presumed-PDF fast chemistry and EBU gas combustion models, particle devolatilization and particle combustion models are used to study the turbulence and flame structures of swirling pulverized-coal combustion. The LES statistical results are validated by the measurement results. The instantaneous LES results show that the coherent structures for pulverized coal combustion is stronger than that for swirling gas combustion. The particles are concentrated in the periphery of the coherent structures. The flame is located at the high vorticity and high particle concentration zone.

  6. The interaction of combustion pressure oscillations and liner vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2006-01-01

    Gas turbine combustors have at industrial scale a thermal power released by combustion of 1 to 400 MW. As the flames in these combustors are very turbulent, the combustion generates high levels of thermo acoustic noise. Of crucial importance for the operation of the engine is not the noise emitted,

  7. The modelling of direct chemical kinetic effects in turbulent flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstet, R.P. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2000-06-01

    Combustion chemistry-related effects have traditionally been of secondary importance in the design of gas turbine combustors. However, the need to deal with issues such as flame stability, relight and pollutant emissions has served to bring chemical kinetics and the coupling of finite rate chemistry with turbulent flow fields to the centre of combustor design. Indeed, improved cycle efficiency and more stringent environmental legislation, as defined by the ICAO, are current key motivators in combustor design. Furthermore, lean premixed prevaporized (LPP) combustion systems, increasingly used for power generation, often operate close to the lean blow-off limit and are prone to extinction/reignition type phenomena. Thus, current key design issues require that direct chemical kinetic effects be accounted for accurately in any simulation procedure. The transported probability density function (PDF) approach uniquely offers the potential of facilitating the accurate modelling of such effects. The present paper thus assesses the ability of this technique to model kinetically controlled phenomena, such as carbon monoxide emissions and flame blow-off, through the application of a transported PDF method closed at the joint scalar level. The closure for the velocity field is at the second moment level, and a key feature of the present work is the use of comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanisms. The latter are derived from recent work by Lindstedt and co-workers that has resulted in a compact 141 reactions and 28 species mechanism for LNG combustion. The systematically reduced form used here features 14 independent C/H/O scalars, with the remaining species incorporated via steady state approximations. Computations have been performed for hydrogen/carbon dioxide and methane flames. The former (high Reynolds number) flames permit an assessment of the modelling of flame blow-off, and the methane flame has been selected to obtain an indication of the influence of differential

  8. Combustion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  9. The generation of resonant turbulence for a premixed burner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Antonie Alex; Pos, R.C.; Stoffels, Genie G.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2012-01-01

    Is it possible to optimize the turbulent combustion of a low swirl burner by using resonance in turbulence? To that end an active grid is constructed that consists of two perforated disks of which one is rotating, creating a system of pulsating jets, which in the end can be used as a central

  10. 3rd International Conference on Numerical Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Larrouturou, Bernard; Numerical Combustion

    1989-01-01

    Interest in numerical combustion is growing among applied mathematicians, physicists, chemists, engine manufacturers and many industrialists. This proceedings volume contains nine invited lectures and twenty seven contributions carefully selected by the editors. The major themes are numerical simulation of transsonic and supersonic combustion phenomena, the study of supersonic reacting mixing layers, and turbulent combustion. Emphasis is laid on hyperbolic models and on numerical simulations of hydrocarbon planes with a complete set of chemical reactions carried out in two-dimensional geometries as well as on complex reactive flow simulations.

  11. Novel CO2 Separation and Methanation for Oxygen and Fuel Production, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) proposes a novel efficient, compact, and lightweight MicrolithREG-based CO2 separator and methanation reactor to separate CO2 from...

  12. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  13. Cryogenic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2005-01-01

    Understanding turbulence is vital in astrophysics, geophysics and many engineering applications, with thermal convection playing a central role. I shall describe progress that has recently been made in understanding this ubiquitous phenomenon by making controlled experiments using low-temperature helium, and a brief account of the frontier topic of superfluid turbulence will also be given. CERN might be able to play a unique role in experiments to probe these two problems.

  14. Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

  15. Oxyfuel combustion using a catalytic ceramic membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Xiaoyao; Li, K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, University of London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Thursfield, A.; Metcalfe, I.S. [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-29

    Membrane catalytic combustion (MCC) is an environmentally friendly technique for heat and power generation from methane. This work demonstrates the performances of a MCC perovskite hollow fibre membrane reactor for the catalytic combustion of methane. The ionic-electronic La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{alpha}} (LSCF6428) mixed conductor, in the form of an oxygen-permeable hollow fibre membrane, has been prepared successfully by means of a phase-inversion spinning/sintering technique. For this process polyethersulfone (PESf) was used as a binder, N-methyl-2-pyrrollidone (NMP) as solvent and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, K16-18) as an additive. With the prepared LSCF6428 hollow fibre membranes packed with catalyst, hollow fibre membrane reactors (HFMRs) have been assembled to perform the catalytic combustion of methane. A simple mathematical model that combines the local oxygen permeation rate with approximate catalytic reaction kinetics has been developed and can be used to predict the performance of the HFMRs for methane combustion. The effects of operating temperature and methane and air feed flow rates on the performance of the HFMR have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Both the methane conversion and oxygen permeation rate can be improved by means of coating platinum on the air side of the hollow fibre membranes. (author)

  16. On the influence of steam on combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, M.A.F.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, a numerical simulation study is presented of the influence of steam on premixed and partially premixed combustion. Both laminar (premixed) and turbulent (partially premixed) calculations are presented. The laminar calculations were performed using a detailed chemical mechanism and

  17. A biomimetic methane-oxidising catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, H [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1997-12-31

    The diminishing resources of petroleum oil has meant that there has been considerable efforts in recent years to find a suitable substitute for gasoline as a transportation fuel. Methanol has been identified as a suitable substitute since it is a readily combustible fuel which can be manufactured from a number of different sources. Methane is commonly used as a starting material for the production of synthesis gas (CO + H{sub 2}) and hence methanol. It is well known that the cleavage of the C-H bond of methane is extremely difficult (bond energy is around 104 kcal/mol) and that fairly drastic conditions are required to convert methane into methanol. Temperatures around 1200 deg C and pressures of up to 100 atmospheres over metal catalysts in a series of reactions are required to effect this process. Efforts have been made to reduce the temperature and the number of steps by using lanthanide ruthenium oxide catalyst but such reactions are still thermodynamically endothermic. An energetically more efficient reaction would be the direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen as the oxidant: CH{sub 4} + 1/2O{sub 2} -> CH{sub 3}OH {Delta}H deg = - 30.7 kcal/mol. Such a direct oxidation route is manifest in the bacterially-mediated oxidation of methane by methanotrophic bacteria. These organisms effect the direct oxidation of methane to methanol by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) as part of the reaction sequences to oxidize methane to carbon dioxide. (14 refs.)

  18. A biomimetic methane-oxidising catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, H. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1996-12-31

    The diminishing resources of petroleum oil has meant that there has been considerable efforts in recent years to find a suitable substitute for gasoline as a transportation fuel. Methanol has been identified as a suitable substitute since it is a readily combustible fuel which can be manufactured from a number of different sources. Methane is commonly used as a starting material for the production of synthesis gas (CO + H{sub 2}) and hence methanol. It is well known that the cleavage of the C-H bond of methane is extremely difficult (bond energy is around 104 kcal/mol) and that fairly drastic conditions are required to convert methane into methanol. Temperatures around 1200 deg C and pressures of up to 100 atmospheres over metal catalysts in a series of reactions are required to effect this process. Efforts have been made to reduce the temperature and the number of steps by using lanthanide ruthenium oxide catalyst but such reactions are still thermodynamically endothermic. An energetically more efficient reaction would be the direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen as the oxidant: CH{sub 4} + 1/2O{sub 2} -> CH{sub 3}OH {Delta}H deg = - 30.7 kcal/mol. Such a direct oxidation route is manifest in the bacterially-mediated oxidation of methane by methanotrophic bacteria. These organisms effect the direct oxidation of methane to methanol by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) as part of the reaction sequences to oxidize methane to carbon dioxide. (14 refs.)

  19. Combustion of alternative fuels in vortex trapped combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghenai, Chaouki; Zbeeb, Khaled; Janajreh, Isam

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We model the combustion of alternative fuels in trapped vortex combustor (TVC). ► We test syngas and hydrogen/hydrocarbon mixture fuels. ► We examine the change in combustion performance and emissions of TVC combustor. ► Increasing the hydrogen content of the fuel will increase the temperature and NO x emissions. ► A high combustor efficiency is obtained for fuels with different compositions and LHV. - Abstract: Trapped vortex combustor represents an efficient and compact combustor for flame stability. Combustion stability is achieved through the use of cavities in which recirculation zones of hot products generated by the direct injection of fuel and air are created and acting as a continuous source of ignition for the incoming main fuel–air stream. Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis was performed in this study to test the combustion performance and emissions from the vortex trapped combustor when natural gas fuel (methane) is replaced with renewable and alternative fuels such as hydrogen and synthetic gas (syngas). The flame temperature, the flow field, and species concentrations inside the Vortex Trapped Combustor were obtained. The results show that hydrogen enriched hydrocarbon fuels combustion will result in more energy, higher temperature (14% increase when methane is replaced with hydrogen fuels) and NO x emissions, and lower CO 2 emissions (50% decrease when methane is replaced with methane/hydrogen mixture with 75% hydrogen fraction). The NO x emission increases when the fraction of hydrogen increases for methane/hydrogen fuel mixture. The results also show that the flame for methane combustion fuel is located in the primary vortex region but it is shifted to the secondary vortex region for hydrogen combustion.

  20. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  1. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  2. FY1995 molecular control technology for mining of methane-gas-hydrate; 1995 nendo methane hydrate no bunshi seigyo mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of the investigation are as follows: 1) developing a method to control formation/dissociation of methane-gas-hydrate, 2) developing a technology to displace methane gas by CO{sub 2} in methane-gas-hydrate deposit, 3) developing a technology to produce methane gas from the deposit efficiently. The final purpose of the project is to create new mining industry that solves both the problems of energy and global environment. 1) Clustering of water molecules is found to play the key role in the methane gas hydrate formation. 2) Equilibrium properties and kinetics of gas hydrates formation and dissociation in bulk-scale gas-hydrate are clarified in the practical environmental conditions. 3) Particle size of hydrate deposit influences the formation and dissociation of bulk-scale gas-hydrate crystal. 4) Mass transfer between gas and liquid phase in turbulent bubbly flow is a function of bubble diameter. The mass transfer depends on interfacial dynamics. (NEDO)

  3. Modeling Scramjet Flows with Variable Turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X.; Hassan, H. A.; Baurle, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    A complete turbulence model, where the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers are calculated as part of the solution and where averages involving chemical source terms are modeled, is presented. The ability of avoiding the use of assumed or evolution Probability Distribution Functions (PDF's) results in a highly efficient algorithm for reacting flows. The predictions of the model are compared with two sets of experiments involving supersonic mixing and one involving supersonic combustion. The results demonstrate the need for consideration of turbulence/chemistry interactions in supersonic combustion. In general, good agreement with experiment is indicated.

  4. Flames in fractal grid generated turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, K H H; Hampp, F; Lindstedt, R P [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Geipel, P, E-mail: p.lindstedt@imperial.ac.uk [Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, SE-612 83 Finspong (Sweden)

    2013-12-15

    Twin premixed turbulent opposed jet flames were stabilized for lean mixtures of air with methane and propane in fractal grid generated turbulence. A density segregation method was applied alongside particle image velocimetry to obtain velocity and scalar statistics. It is shown that the current fractal grids increase the turbulence levels by around a factor of 2. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was applied to show that the fractal grids produce slightly larger turbulent structures that decay at a slower rate as compared to conventional perforated plates. Conditional POD (CPOD) was also implemented using the density segregation technique and the results show that CPOD is essential to segregate the relative structures and turbulent kinetic energy distributions in each stream. The Kolmogorov length scales were also estimated providing values {approx}0.1 and {approx}0.5 mm in the reactants and products, respectively. Resolved profiles of flame surface density indicate that a thin flame assumption leading to bimodal statistics is not perfectly valid under the current conditions and it is expected that the data obtained will be of significant value to the development of computational methods that can provide information on the conditional structure of turbulence. It is concluded that the increase in the turbulent Reynolds number is without any negative impact on other parameters and that fractal grids provide a route towards removing the classical problem of a relatively low ratio of turbulent to bulk strain associated with the opposed jet configuration. (paper)

  5. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  6. Soliton turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  7. Investigation of Scalar Filtered Density Function in Turbulent Partially Premixed Flames

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tong, Chenning

    2006-01-01

    ... using measurement data obtained in turbulent partially premixed methane/air (Sandia) flames. For SGS scalar variance small compared to its mean, the FMDF is not far from Gaussian and the SGS scalar is well mixed...

  8. Global Methane Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Global Methane Initiative promotes cost-effective, near-term methane recovery through partnerships between developed and developing countries, with participation from the private sector, development banks, and nongovernmental organizations.

  9. An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, Robers [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Dryer, Frederick [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Ju, Yiguang [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2013-09-30

    An integrated and collaborative effort involving experiments and complementary chemical kinetic modeling investigated the effects of significant concentrations of water and CO2 and minor contaminant species (methane [CH4], ethane [C2H6], NOX, etc.) on the ignition and combustion of HHC fuels. The research effort specifically addressed broadening the experimental data base for ignition delay, burning rate, and oxidation kinetics at high pressures, and further refinement of chemical kinetic models so as to develop compositional specifications related to the above major and minor species. The foundation for the chemical kinetic modeling was the well validated mechanism for hydrogen and carbon monoxide developed over the last 25 years by Professor Frederick Dryer and his co-workers at Princeton University. This research furthered advance the understanding needed to develop practical guidelines for realistic composition limits and operating characteristics for HHC fuels. A suite of experiments was utilized that that involved a high-pressure laminar flow reactor, a pressure-release type high-pressure combustion chamber and a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor.

  10. Numerical investigation of biogas flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ehsan; Bagheri, Ghobad; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel consumption decreases from 3.24 g/s in biogas conventional combustion to 1.07 g/s in flameless mode. • The differences between reactants and products temperature intensifies irreversibility in traditional combustion. • The temperature inside the chamber is uniform in biogas flameless mode and exergy loss decreases in this technique. • Low O 2 concentration in the flameless mode confirms a complete and quick combustion process in flameless regime. - Abstract: The purpose of this investigation is to analyze combustion characteristics of biogas flameless mode based on clean technology development strategies. A three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study has been performed to illustrate various priorities of biogas flameless combustion compared to the conventional mode. The effects of preheated temperature and wall temperature, reaction zone and pollutant formation are observed and the impacts of combustion and turbulence models on numerical results are discussed. Although preheated conventional combustion could be effective in terms of fuel consumption reduction, NO x formation increases. It has been found that biogas is not eligible to be applied in furnace heat up due to its low calorific value (LCV) and it is necessary to utilize a high calorific value fuel to preheat the furnace. The required enthalpy for biogas auto-ignition temperature is supplied by enthalpy of preheated oxidizer. In biogas flameless combustion, the mean temperature of the furnace is lower than traditional combustion throughout the chamber. Compared to the biogas flameless combustion with uniform temperature, very high and fluctuated temperatures are recorded in conventional combustion. Since high entropy generation intensifies irreversibility, exergy loss is higher in biogas conventional combustion compared to the biogas flameless regime. Entropy generation minimization in flameless mode is attributed to the uniform temperature inside the chamber

  11. Comprehensive Validation of Skeletal Mechanism for Turbulent Premixed Methane–Air Flame Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Luca, Stefano

    2017-08-01

    A new skeletal mechanism, consisting of 16 species and 72 reactions, has been developed for lean methane–air premixed combustion from the GRI-Mech 3.0. The skeletal mechanism is validated for elevated unburnt temperatures (800 K) and pressures up to 4 atm, thereby addressing realistic gas turbine conditions. The skeletal mechanism is obtained by applying the directed relation graph method and performing sensitivity analysis on the detailed mechanism. The mechanism has been validated for flame speed and flame structure in a wide range of conditions and configurations. A good agreement between the skeletal mechanism and GRI-3.0 was obtained. The configurations considered include one-dimension laminar premixed flames, laminar non-premixed counterflow burners, and two- and three-dimensional unsteady configurations with variations of temperature, pressure, and composition. The skeletal mechanism allows for the inclusion of accurate finite rate chemistry in large-scale direct numerical simulations of lean turbulent premixed flames. In a large-scale direct numerical simulation, the use of the skeletal mechanism reduces the memory requirements by more than a factor of 3 and accelerates the simulation by a factor of 7 compared with the detailed mechanism. The skeletal mechanism is suitable for unsteady three-dimensional simulations of methane turbulent premixed, non-premixed, and globally lean partially premixed flames and is available as supplementary material.

  12. Cosmic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, L.O.; Stewart, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A generalization of a transformation due to Kurskov and Ozernoi is used to rewrite the usual equations governing subsonic turbulence in Robertson-Walker cosmological models as Navier-Stokes equations with a time-dependent viscosity. This paper first rederives some well-known results in a very simple way by means of this transformation. The main result however is that the establishment of a Kolmogorov spectrum at recombination appears to be incompatible with subsonic turbulence. The conditions after recombination are also discussed briefly. (author)

  13. 4th iTi Conference in Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Peinke, Joachim; Talamelli, Alessandro; Castillo, Luciano; Hölling, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This fourth issue on "progress in turbulence" is based on the fourth ITI conference (ITI interdisciplinary turbulence initiative), which took place in Bertinoro, North Italy. Leading researchers from the engineering and physical sciences presented latest results in turbulence research. Basic as well as applied research is driven by the rather notorious difficult and essentially unsolved problem of turbulence. In this collection of contributions clear progress can be seen in different aspects, ranging from new quality of numerical simulations to new concepts of experimental investigations and new theoretical developments. The importance of turbulence is shown for a wide range of applications including: combustion, energy, flow control, urban flows, are few examples found in this volume. A motivation was to bring fundamentals of turbulence in connection with renewable energy. This lead us to add a special topic relevant to the impact of turbulence on the wind energy conversion. The structure of the present book...

  14. Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.

    2004-09-14

    Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and lifetime cycles of materials in contact with combustion products and to reduce pollutants while maintaining relatively high combustion and thermal cycle efficiencies. The first stage of combustion operates fuel rich where most of the heat of combustion is released by burning it with nitrogen-enriched air. Part of the energy in the combustion gases is used to perform work or to provide heat. The cooled combustion gases are reheated by additional stages of combustion until the last stage is at or near stoichiometric conditions. Additional energy is extracted from each stage to result in relatively high thermal cycle efficiency. The air is enriched with nitrogen using air separation technologies such as diffusion, permeable membrane, absorption, and cryogenics. The combustion method is applicable to many types of combustion equipment, including: boilers, burners, turbines, internal combustion engines, and many types of fuel including hydrogen and carbon-based fuels including methane and coal.

  15. Investigating the effects of critical phenomena in premixed methane-oxygen flames at cryogenic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Abishek; Yellapantula, Shashank; Larsson, Johan

    2017-11-01

    Methane is increasingly becoming viable as a rocket fuel in the latest generation of launch vehicles. In liquid rocket engines, fuel and oxidizer are injected under cryogenic conditions into the combustion chamber. At high pressures, typical of rocket combustion chambers, the propellants exist in supercritical states where the ideal gas thermodynamics are no longer valid. We investigate the effects of real-gas thermodynamics on transcritical laminar premixed methane-oxygen flames. The effect of the real-gas cubic equations of state and high-pressure transport properties on flame dynamics is presented. We also study real-gas effects on the extinction limits of the methane-oxygen flame.

  16. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence...

  17. Computation and Analysis of EGR Mixing in Internal Combustion Engine Manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Sakowitz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with turbulent mixing processes occurring in internal combustion engines, when applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). EGR is a very efficient way to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in internal combustion engines. Exhaust gases are recirculated and mixed with the fresh intake air, reducing the oxygen con- centration of the combustion gas and thus the peak combustion temperatures. This temperature decrease results in a reduction of NOx emissions. When applying EGR...

  18. Characteristics of transitional and turbulent jet diffusion flames in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Yousef M.; Small, James F., Jr.; Hegde, Uday G.; Zhou, Liming; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the ground-based results obtained to date in preparation of a proposed space experiment to study the role of large-scale structures in microgravity transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames by investigating the dynamics of vortex/flame interactions and their influence on flame characteristics. The overall objective is to gain an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames. Understanding of the role of large-scale structures on the characteristics of microgravity transitional and turbulent flames will ultimately lead to improved understanding of normal-gravity turbulent combustion.

  19. Global Methane Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeburgh, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    Methane (CH4) has been studied as an atmospheric constituent for over 200 years. A 1776 letter from Alessandro Volta to Father Campi described the first experiments on flammable "air" released by shallow sediments in Lake Maggiore (Wolfe, 1996; King, 1992). The first quantitative measurements of CH4, both involving combustion and gravimetric determination of trapped oxidation products, were reported in French by Boussingault and Boussingault, 1864 and Gautier (1901), who reported CH4 concentrations of 10 ppmv and 0.28 ppmv (seashore) and 95 ppmv (Paris), respectively. The first modern measurements of atmospheric CH4 were the infrared absorption measurements of Migeotte (1948), who estimated an atmospheric concentration of 2.0 ppmv. Development of gas chromatography and the flame ionization detector in the 1950s led to observations of vertical CH4 distributions in the troposphere and stratosphere, and to establishment of time-series sampling programs in the late 1970s. Results from these sampling programs led to suggestions that the concentration of CH4, as that of CO2, was increasing in the atmosphere. The possible role of CH4 as a greenhouse gas stimulated further research on CH4 sources and sinks. Methane has also been of interest to microbiologists, but findings from microbiology have entered the larger context of the global CH4 budget only recently.Methane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the atmosphere. It plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry and the radiative balance of the Earth. Stratospheric oxidation of CH4 provides a means of introducing water vapor above the tropopause. Methane reacts with atomic chlorine in the stratosphere, forming HCl, a reservoir species for chlorine. Some 90% of the CH4 entering the atmosphere is oxidized through reactions initiated by the OH radical. These reactions are discussed in more detail by Wofsy (1976) and Cicerone and Oremland (1988), and are important in controlling the oxidation state of the atmosphere

  20. Low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newson, E; Roth, F von; Hottinger, P; Truong, T B [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - air mixtures would allow the development of no-NO{sub x} burners for heating and power applications. Using commercially available catalysts, the room temperature ignition of methane-propane-air mixtures has been shown in laboratory reactors with combustion efficiencies over 95% and maximum temperatures less than 700{sup o}C. After a 500 hour stability test, severe deactivation of both methane and propane oxidation functions was observed. In cooperation with industrial partners, scaleup to 3 kW is being investigated together with startup dynamics and catalyst stability. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  1. Tubular combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Tubular combustors are cylindrical tubes where flame ignition and propagation occur in a spatially confined, highly controlled environment, in a nearly flat, elongated geometry. This allows for some unique advantages where extremely even heat dispersion is required over a large surface while still maintaining fuel efficiency. Tubular combustors also allow for easy flexibility in type of fuel source, allowing for quick changeover to meet various needs and changing fuel pricing. This new addition to the MP sustainable energy series will provide the most up-to-date research on tubular combustion--some of it only now coming out of private proprietary protection. Plentiful examples of current applications along with a good explanation of background theory will offer readers an invaluable guide on this promising energy technology. Highlights include: * An introduction to the theory of tubular flames * The "how to" of maintaining stability of tubular flames through continuous combustion * Examples of both small-scal...

  2. On the Computation of Turbulent Mixing Processes with Application to EGR in IC-engines

    OpenAIRE

    Sakowitz, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with turbulent mixing processes occuring in internal combustion engines, when applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). EGR is a very efficient way to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in internal combustion engines. Exhaust gases are recirculated and mixed with the intake air of the engine, thus reducing the oxygen concentration of the combustion gas and the maximum combustion tempera- ture. This temperature decrease results in a reduction of NOx emissions, since NO...

  3. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  4. Fundamental combustion characteristics of lean hydrogen mixtures; Suiso kihaku kongoki no kisoteki nensho tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, D; Kido, H; Nakahara, M; Hashimoto, J [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    One of the excellent combustion characteristics of hydrogen-air mixture is that its emission is free of CO2, but the problem of NOx remains, mainly caused by the high combustion temperature. Using leaner mixture and carrying out EGR are supposed to be effective methods to reduce NOx. In this study, to examine the effectiveness of the two methods, fundamental combustion characteristics of nitrogen added lean hydrogen mixtures were investigated by chemical equilibrium calculations and measurements of turbulent combustion characteristics. It is suggested that nitrogen added mixtures can achieve lower NOx combustion than lean mixtures, taking the combustion efficiency into consideration. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Application of Detailed Chemical Kinetics to Combustion Instability Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Clearance Number 15692 Clearance Date 12/3/2015 14. ABSTRACT A comparison of a single step global reaction and the detailed GRI -Mech 1.2 for combustion...comparison of a single step global reaction and the detailed GRI -Mech 1.2 for com- bustion instability modeling in a methane-fueled longitudinal-mode...methane as the fuel. We use the GRI -Mech 1.2 kinetics mechanism for methane oxidation.11 The GRI -Mech 1.2 was chosen over 2.11 because the only

  6. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  7. On the Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Lean Partially Premixed Combustion, Burning Speed, Flame Instability and Plasma Formation of Alternative Fuels at High Temperatures and Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Omid

    This dissertation investigates the combustion and injection fundamental characteristics of different alternative fuels both experimentally and theoretically. The subjects such as lean partially premixed combustion of methane/hydrogen/air/diluent, methane high pressure direct-injection, thermal plasma formation, thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air mixtures at high temperatures, laminar flames and flame morphology of synthetic gas (syngas) and Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) fuels were extensively studied in this work. These subjects will be summarized in three following paragraphs. The fundamentals of spray and partially premixed combustion characteristics of directly injected methane in a constant volume combustion chamber have been experimentally studied. The injected fuel jet generates turbulence in the vessel and forms a turbulent heterogeneous fuel-air mixture in the vessel, similar to that in a Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Direct-Injection (DI) engines. The effect of different characteristics parameters such as spark delay time, stratification ratio, turbulence intensity, fuel injection pressure, chamber pressure, chamber temperature, Exhaust Gas recirculation (EGR) addition, hydrogen addition and equivalence ratio on flame propagation and emission concentrations were analyzed. As a part of this work and for the purpose of control and calibration of high pressure injector, spray development and characteristics including spray tip penetration, spray cone angle and overall equivalence ratio were evaluated under a wide range of fuel injection pressures of 30 to 90 atm and different chamber pressures of 1 to 5 atm. Thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air plasma mixtures at ultra-high temperatures must be precisely calculated due to important influence on the flame kernel formation and propagation in combusting flows and spark discharge applications. A new algorithm based on the statistical thermodynamics was developed to calculate the ultra-high temperature plasma

  8. Environmental optimisation of waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Robert [AaF Energikonsult, Stockholm (Sweden); Berge, Niclas; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    substances as methane produces however a good opportunity to supervise and detect good combustion. One conclusion concerning stand-by burners is that a well-designed burner installation in a waste combustion unit gives excellent possibilities to achieve good combustion. Stand by burners in general will however give no guarantee for this. Another conclusion is that the leakage of cooling air from the inactive burners represents a potential hydrocarbon emission risk. If and to what extent is dependent on the local conditions. A third conclusion is that it is possible to achieve low emission combustion without stand by burners, if the plant is operated correctly. The recommendation is that: - O{sub 2}, residence time and temperature demands of the furnace is removed and replaced by other low emission criteria. - All units should have either a low emission of CO or a continuos measurement of methane or total hydrocarbon (THC). - The measurement of CO and/or THC should be correlated individually and periodically against a heavy hydrocarbon measurement method (i.e., PAH etc.). - The measurement device must have a short response time in order to detect rapid peaks of unburnt species. The most important task to achieve good combustion is to create a well controlled mixing in the whole furnace.

  9. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  10. Enhancement of exergy efficiency in combustion systems using flameless mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ehsan; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Exergy efficiency in flameless combustion mode is 13% more than conventional combustion. • The maximum exergy efficiency in flameless combustion mode is achieved when oxidizer contains 10% oxygen. • Exergy destruction of flameless combustion is maximized when CO 2 is used for dilution of oxidizer. - Abstract: An exergitic-based analysis of methane (CH 4 ) conventional and flameless combustion in a lab-scale furnace is performed to determine the rate of pollutant formation and the effective potential of a given amount of fuel in the various combustion modes. The effects of inlet air temperature on exergy efficiency and pollutant formation of conventional combustion in various equivalence ratios are analyzed. The rate of exergy destruction in different conditions of flameless combustion (various equivalence ratios, oxygen concentration in the oxidizer and the effects of diluent) are computed using three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD). Fuel consumption reduction and exergy efficiency augmentation are the main positive consequences of using preheated air temperature in conventional combustion, however pollutants especially NO x formation increases dramatically. Low and moderate temperature inside the chamber conducts the flameless combustion system to low level pollutant formation. Fuel consumption and exergy destruction reduce drastically in flameless mode in comparison with conventional combustion. Exergy efficiency of conventional and flameless mode is 75% and 88% respectively in stoichiometric combustion. When CO 2 is used for dilution of oxidizer, chemical exergy increases due to high CO 2 concentration in the combustion products and exergy efficiency reduces around 2% compared to dilution with nitrogen (N 2 ). Since the rate of irreversibilities in combustion systems is very high in combined heat and power (CHP) generation and other industries, application of flameless combustion could be effective in terms of pollutant

  11. Graphic Turbulence Guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  12. Graphical Turbulence Guidance - Composite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  13. Flow and Combustion in Advanced Gas Turbine Combustors

    CERN Document Server

    Janicka, Johannes; Schäfer, Michael; Heeger, Christof

    2013-01-01

    With regard to both the environmental sustainability and operating efficiency demands, modern combustion research has to face two main objectives, the optimization of combustion efficiency and the reduction of pollutants. This book reports on the combustion research activities carried out within the Collaborative Research Center (SFB) 568 “Flow and Combustion in Future Gas Turbine Combustion Chambers” funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). This aimed at designing a completely integrated modeling and numerical simulation of the occurring very complex, coupled and interacting physico-chemical processes, such as turbulent heat and mass transport, single or multi-phase flows phenomena, chemical reactions/combustion and radiation, able to support the development of advanced gas turbine chamber concepts.

  14. Approximate Deconvolution and Explicit Filtering For LES of a Premixed Turbulent Jet Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-19

    from laminar flamelets computed with the GRI -mechanism for methane-air combustion (Smith et al. 1999) and the progress variable Yc is defined as in... gri - mech/. Subramanian, V., P. Domingo, and L. Vervisch (2010). Large-Eddy Simulation of forced igni- tion of an annular bluff-body burner. Combust

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  16. Flame kernel generation and propagation in turbulent partially premixed hydrocarbon jet

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Mohy S.; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Zayed, M. F.

    2014-01-01

    Flame development, propagation, stability, combustion efficiency, pollution formation, and overall system efficiency are affected by the early stage of flame generation defined as flame kernel. Studying the effects of turbulence and chemistry

  17. Methane, Black Carbon, and Ethane Emissions from Natural Gas Flares in the Bakken Shale, North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvakharia, Alexander; Kort, Eric A; Brandt, Adam; Peischl, Jeff; Ryerson, Thomas B; Schwarz, Joshua P; Smith, Mackenzie L; Sweeney, Colm

    2017-05-02

    Incomplete combustion during flaring can lead to production of black carbon (BC) and loss of methane and other pollutants to the atmosphere, impacting climate and air quality. However, few studies have measured flare efficiency in a real-world setting. We use airborne data of plume samples from 37 unique flares in the Bakken region of North Dakota in May 2014 to calculate emission factors for BC, methane, ethane, and combustion efficiency for methane and ethane. We find no clear relationship between emission factors and aircraft-level wind speed or between methane and BC emission factors. Observed median combustion efficiencies for methane and ethane are close to expected values for typical flares according to the US EPA (98%). However, we find that the efficiency distribution is skewed, exhibiting log-normal behavior. This suggests incomplete combustion from flares contributes almost 1/5 of the total field emissions of methane and ethane measured in the Bakken shale, more than double the expected value if 98% efficiency was representative. BC emission factors also have a skewed distribution, but we find lower emission values than previous studies. The direct observation for the first time of a heavy-tail emissions distribution from flares suggests the need to consider skewed distributions when assessing flare impacts globally.

  18. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  19. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  20. Comparison between premixed and partially premixed combustion in swirling jet from PIV, OH PLIF and HCHO PLIF measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobasov, A. S.; Chikishev, L. M.; Dulin, V. M.

    2017-09-01

    The present paper reports on the investigation of fuel-rich and fuel-lean turbulent combustion in a high-swirl jet. The jet flow was featured by a breakdown of the vortex core, presence of the central recirculation zone and intensive precession of the flow. The measurements were performed by the stereo PIV, OH PLIF and HCHO PLIF techniques, simultaneously. Fluorescence of OH* in the flame and combustion products was excited via transition in the (1,0) vibrational band of the A2Σ+ - X2Π electronic system. The fluorescence was detected in the spectral range of 305-320 nm. In the case of HCHO PLIF measurements the A-X {4}01 transition was excited. The jet Reynolds number was fixed as 5 000 (the bulk velocity was U 0 = 5 m/s). Three cases of the equivalence ratio ϕ of methane/air mixture issued from the nozzle were considered 0.7, 1.4 and 2.5. In all cases the flame front was subjected to deformations due to large-scale vortices, which rolled-up in the inner (around the central recirculation zone) and outer (between the annular jet core and surrounding air) mixing layers.

  1. Prediction of the combustion process and emission formation of a bi-fuel s.i. engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Errico, Gianluca

    2008-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is developed and validated for the prediction of the combustion process and pollutant formation in s.i. engines, fuelled by gasoline and compressed natural gas. Attention is focused on the main physical and chemical phenomena to allow a reliable evaluation of the burning rate and of the specie concentrations, including intermediates such as CO, O, H, and OH. A new correlation for laminar flame speed of methane-air mixtures is derived by interpolating more than 1000 different conditions at high pressure and temperature, computed by a detailed chemical approach. Successively an extended dissertation about the fundamental mechanisms which govern the pollutant formation in the turbulent premixed combustion which characterizes the s.i. engines is given. The conclusion of such analysis is the definition of a new reduced chemical scheme, based on the application of partial-equilibrium and steady-state assumptions for the radicals and the solution of a transport equation for each specie which is kinetically controlled. Finally the proposed schemes and formulations were embedded into the developed quasi-D model and into a CFD code, to simulate a s.i. engine fuelled by gasoline and CNG, allowing a deeper understanding of the reliability of the simplifications made in the quasi-dimensional model and a comprehensive investigation of several physical and chemical properties, whose experimental measurement is not usually available. Computed results were compared with the available experimental data of in-cylinder pressure histories and engine emissions for two different engine configurations

  2. Large eddy simulation of premixed and non-premixed combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Malalasekera, W; Ibrahim, SS; Masri, AR; Sadasivuni, SK; Gubba, SR

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarises the authors experience in using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique for the modelling of premixed and non-premixed combustion. The paper describes the application of LES based combustion modelling technique to two well defined experimental configurations where high quality data is available for validation. The large eddy simulation technique for the modelling flow and turbulence is based on the solution of governing equations for continuity and momentum in a struct...

  3. US-Japan Seminar on Modeling in Combustion Science

    CERN Document Server

    Takeno, Tadao

    1995-01-01

    The articles in this volume treat various problems in combustion science that are of importance in applications to technology and to environmental sciences. The authors treat turbulence in premixed and non-premixed flames as well as pressure interactions and wave phenomena. Also supersonic flows and detonations are discussed. The main emphasis, however, is on the modelling and numerical treatment of combustion phenomena. The book addresses researchers in physics and engineering, and mathematicians from scientific computing.

  4. Utilization of coalbed methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, J.B. [Gustavson Associates Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in capturing coalbed methane (CBM gas), which constitutes a valuable source of clean burning energy. It is of importance to study the various potential uses of coalbed methane and to understand the various technologies required, as well as their economics and any institutional constraints. In industrialised countries, the uses of coalbed methane are almost solely dependent on microeconomics; coalbed methane must compete for a market against natural gas and other energy sources - and frequently, coalbed methane is not competitive against other energy sources. In developing countries, on the other hand, particularly where other sources of energy are in short supply, coalbed methane economics yield positive results. Here, constraints to development of CBM utilization are mainly lack of technology and investment capital. Sociological aspects such as attitude and cultural habits, may also have a strong negative influence. This paper outlines the economics of coalbed methane utilization, particularly its competition with natural gas, and touches upon the many different uses to which coalbed methane may be applied. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Direct Activation Of Methane

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie; Sun, Miao; Caps, Valerie; Pelletier, Jeremie; Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2013-01-01

    Heteropolyacids (HPAs) can activate methane at ambient temperature (e.g., 20.degree. C.) and atmospheric pressure, and transform methane to acetic acid, in the absence of any noble metal such as Pd). The HPAs can be, for example, those with Keggin

  6. Methane and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reay, D.; Smith, P.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-fifth of man-made global warming. Per kilogram, it is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time horizon -- and global warming is likely to enhance methane release from a number of

  7. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  8. Ion measurements in premixed methane-oxygen flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad

    2014-07-25

    Ions are formed as a result of chemi-ionization processes in combustion systems. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in understanding flame ion chemistry due to the possible application of external electric fields to reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of combustion process. In order to predict the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasma, it is critical to gain a good understanding of the flame ion chemistry. In this work, a Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometer (MBMS) is utilized to measure ion concentration profiles in premixed methane-oxygen-argon burner-stabilized flames. Lean, stoichiometric and rich flames at atmospheric pressure are used to study the dependence of ion chemistry on equivalence ratio of premixed flames. The relative ion concentration profiles are compared qualitatively with previous methane-oxygen studies and show good agreement. The relative ion concentration data obtained in the present study can be used to validate and improve ion chemistry models for methane-oxygen flames.

  9. Towards predictive simulations of soot formation: from surrogate to turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanquart, Guillaume [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-03-28

    The combustion of transportation fuels leads to the formation of several kinds of pollutants, among which are soot particles. These particles, also formed during coal combustion and in fires, are the source of several health problems and environmental issues. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena leading to the formation of soot particles remains incomplete, and as a result, the predictive capability of our numerical tools is lacking. The objective of the work was to reduce the gap in the present understanding and modeling of soot formation both in laminar and turbulent flames. The effort spanned several length scales from the molecular level to large scale turbulent transport.

  10. Mitigating the effect of siloxanes on internal combustion engines using landfill gasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2014-01-21

    A waste gas combustion method that includes providing a combustible fuel source, in which the combustible fuel source is composed of at least methane and siloxane gas. A sodium source or magnesium source is mixed with the combustible fuel source. Combustion of the siloxane gas of the combustible fuel source produces a silicon containing product. The sodium source or magnesium source reacts with the silicon containing product to provide a sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or a magnesium containing silicate. By producing the sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or the magnesium containing silicate, or magnesium source for precipitating particulate silica instead of hard coating, the method may reduce or eliminate the formation of silica deposits within the combustion chamber and the exhaust components of the internal combustion engine.

  11. Symposium on turbulence, 7th, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO, September 21-23, 1981, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, G.K.; Zakin, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Investigations related to the study of boundary layers are discussed, taking into account the simulation of turbulent shear flows, turbulent shear flows behind two-dimensional obstacles placed on a plane boundary, the development of turbulent boundary layers in open channel flows, the turbulent kinetic energy balance in a conical diffuser, strong adverse pressure gradient effects on supersonic turbulent boundary layers, the effects of upstream boundary layer thickness upon flow past a backward-facing step, and a turbulent wall jet issued from a Coanda nozzle. Other topics considered are concerned with scalar transport and combustion, particulate flows, experimental techniques and signal processing, thermal anemometry, complient surface and polymer effects, the coherent structure of turbulence, laser Doppler anemometry, and the transition to turbulence. Attention is given to a pattern recognition study of coherent motion in a transpired turbulent boundary layer, investigations of flow visualization techniques for detecting turbulent bursts, and the frequency response of cold wires

  12. Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2016-07-15

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties of hydrocarbon fuels, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. The article attempts to provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art DNS of turbulent premixed flames at high Re/Ka conditions, with an emphasis on homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow configurations. Some important qualitative findings from numerical studies are summarized, new analytical approaches to investigate intensely turbulent premixed flame dynamics are discussed, and topics for future research are suggested. © 2016 Taylor & Francis.

  13. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  14. Thermally accurate LES of the stability-emission performance of staged gas-turbine combustion; Simulation aux grandes echelles de la combustion etagee dans les turbines a gaz et son interaction stabilite-polluants-thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, P.

    2005-06-15

    Modern gas turbines use turbulent lean partially premixed combustion in order to minimise nitrous oxide (NO{sub X}) emissions while ensuring flashback safety. The Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of such a device is the goal of this work. Focus is laid on correctly predicting the NO{sub X} emissions, which are influenced by four factors: heat transfer, mixing quality, combustion modelling and thermo-acoustic stability. As NO{sub X} reaction rates are strongly influenced by temperature, heat transfer by radiation and convection is included. Radiation is predicted by a model, which assumes that the gases are optically thin. Convective heat transfer is included via a newly developed and validated wall-function approach based on the logarithmic law of the wall for temperature. An optimised 2-step reduced chemical reaction scheme for lean methane combustion is presented. This scheme is used for the LES in conjunction with an additional third reaction, fitted to produce the same NO{sub X} reaction rates as in the complete reaction mechanism. Turbulence is accounted for with the thickened flame model in a form, which is optimised for changing equivalence ratios and mesh-resolutions. Mixing is essential not only for predicting flame stabilisation, but also for pollutant emissions as NO{sub X} reaction rates depend exponentially on equivalence ratio. Therefore the full burner geometry, including 16 fuel injections is resolved in LES. Additionally, effusion cooling and film cooling is accounted for in a simplified manner. The non-reacting flow is extensively validated with experimental results. As mixture-fraction fluctuations do not only arise from turbulence, but also from thermo-acoustic instabilities, care was taken to provide acoustic boundary conditions that come close to reality. The resulting LES shows a strong thermo-acoustic instability, comparing well with experimental observations. By making the boundaries completely anechoic it is shown that when the instability

  15. Rotary combustion device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Rotary combustion device (1) with rotary combustion chamber (4). Specific measures are taken to provide ignition of a combustible mixture. It is proposed that a hollow tube be provided coaxially with the axis of rotation (6), so that a small part of the mixture is guided into the combustion chamber.

  16. Investigation of combustion and thermodynamic performance of a lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Juan; Weng Yiwu

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this research were to investigate the combustion and thermodynamic performance of a lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine. The characteristics of lean burn catalytic combustion were investigated by utilising 1D heterogeneous plug flow model which was validated by experiments. The effects of operating parameters on catalytic combustion were numerically analysed. The system models were built in ASPEN Plus and three independent design variables, i.e. compressor pressure ratio (PR), regenerator effectiveness (RE) and turbine inlet temperature (TIT) were selected to analyse the thermodynamic performance of the thermal cycle. The main results show that: simulations from 1D heterogeneous plug flow model can capture the trend of catalytic combustion and describe the behavior of the catalytic monolith in detail. Inlet temperature is the most significant parameter that impacts operation of the catalytic combustor. When TIT and RE are constant, the increase of PR results in lowering the inlet temperature of the catalytic combustor, which results in decreasing methane conversion. The peak thermal efficiency and the optimal PR at a constant TIT increase with the increase of TIT; and at the constant PR, the thermal efficiency increases with the increase of TIT. However, with lower TIT conditions, the optimal PR and the peak efficiency at a constant TIT of the LBCCGT cycle are relative low to that of the conventional cycle. When TIT and PR are constant, the decrease of RE may result in lower methane conversion. The influences of RE on the methane conversion and the thermal efficiency are more significant at higher PRs. The higher thermal efficiency for the lower RE is achieved at lower PR.

  17. Mechanics of coalbed methane production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creel, J C; Rollins, J B [Crawley, Gillespie and Associates, Inc. (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Understanding the behaviour of coalbed methane reservoirs and the mechanics of production is crucial to successful management of coalbed methane resources and projects. This paper discusses the effects of coal properties and coalbed methane reservoir characteristics on gas production rates and recoveries with a review of completion techniques for coalbed methane wells. 4 refs., 17 figs.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of premixed turbulent flames with flamelet-generated manifolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oijen, van J.A.; Bastiaans, R.J.M.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is a very powerful tool to evaluate the validity of new models and theories for turbulent combustion. In this paper, direct numerical simulations of spherically expanding premixed turbulent flames in the thin reaction zone regime and in the broken reaction zone regime are

  19. Stratified turbulent Bunsen flames : flame surface analysis and flame surface density modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, W.J.S.; Oijen, van J.A.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper it is investigated whether the Flame Surface Density (FSD) model, developed for turbulent premixed combustion, is also applicable to stratified flames. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent stratified Bunsen flames have been carried out, using the Flamelet Generated Manifold

  20. Coherent structures in turbulence : Their generation, identification, and contribution to tracer particle dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudar Vishwanathappa, M.

    2017-01-01

    Turbulence is implicitly present or explicitly desired in many natural and industrial processes, such as, flow over solid surfaces, cloud formation, pollination, combustion, and chemical mixing. Hence, a better understanding of turbulence can aid in fuel saving by reducing drag in the case of flow

  1. On Challenges for Hypersonic Turbulent Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, H.C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2009-01-01

    This short note discusses some of the challenges for design of suitable spatial numerical schemes for hypersonic turbulent flows, including combustion, and thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows. Often, hypersonic turbulent flows in re-entry space vehicles and space physics involve mixed steady strong shocks and turbulence with unsteady shocklets. Material mixing in combustion poses additional computational challenges. Proper control of numerical dissipation in numerical methods beyond the standard shock-capturing dissipation at discontinuities is an essential element for accurate and stable simulations of the subject physics. On one hand, the physics of strong steady shocks and unsteady turbulence/shocklet interactions under the nonequilibrium environment is not well understood. On the other hand, standard and newly developed high order accurate (fourth-order or higher) schemes were developed for homogeneous hyperbolic conservation laws and mixed hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs) (without source terms). The majority of finite rate chemistry and thermal nonequilibrium simulations employ methods for homogeneous time-dependent PDEs with a pointwise evaluation of the source terms. The pointwise evaluation of the source term might not be the best choice for stability, accuracy and minimization of spurious numerics for the overall scheme

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Multi-Stage Autoignition Relevant to Engine Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jacqueline

    2017-11-01

    Due to the unrivaled energy density of liquid hydrocarbon fuels combustion will continue to provide over 80% of the world's energy for at least the next fifty years. Hence, combustion needs to be understood and controlled to optimize combustion systems for efficiency to prevent further climate change, to reduce emissions and to ensure U.S. energy security. In this talk I will discuss recent progress in direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion focused on providing fundamental insights into key `turbulence-chemistry' interactions that underpin the development of next generation fuel efficient, fuel flexible engines for transportation and power generation. Petascale direct numerical simulation (DNS) of multi-stage mixed-mode turbulent combustion in canonical configurations have elucidated key physics that govern autoignition and flame stabilization in engines and provide benchmark data for combustion model development under the conditions of advanced engines which operate near combustion limits to maximize efficiency and minimize emissions. Mixed-mode combustion refers to premixed or partially-premixed flames propagating into stratified autoignitive mixtures. Multi-stage ignition refers to hydrocarbon fuels with negative temperature coefficient behavior that undergo sequential low- and high-temperature autoignition. Key issues that will be discussed include: 1) the role of mixing in shear driven turbulence on the dynamics of multi-stage autoignition and cool flame propagation in diesel environments, 2) the role of thermal and composition stratification on the evolution of the balance of mixed combustion modes - flame propagation versus spontaneous ignition - which determines the overall combustion rate in autoignition processes, and 3) the role of cool flames on lifted flame stabilization. Finally prospects for DNS of turbulent combustion at the exascale will be discussed in the context of anticipated heterogeneous machine architectures. sponsored by DOE

  3. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  4. Time-Filtered Navier-Stokes Approach and Emulation of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Wey, Thomas; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the time-filtered Navier-Stokes approach capable of capturing unsteady flow structures important for turbulent mixing and an accompanying subgrid model directly accounting for the major processes in turbulence-chemistry interaction. They have been applied to the computation of two-phase turbulent combustion occurring in a single-element lean-direct-injection combustor. Some of the preliminary results from this computational effort are presented in this paper.

  5. Methane monitoring from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, C.; Alpers, M.; Millet, B.; Ehret, G.; Flamant, P.

    2017-11-01

    Methane is one of the strongest anthropogenic greenhouse gases. It contributes by its radiative forcing significantly to the global warming. For a better understanding of climate changes, it is necessary to apply precise space-based measurement techniques in order to obtain a global view on the complex processes that control the methane concentration in the atmosphere. The MERLIN mission is a joint French-German cooperation, on a micro satellite mission for space-based measurement of spatial and temporal gradients of atmospheric methane columns on a global scale. MERLIN will be the first Integrated Path Differential Absorption LIDAR for greenhouse gas monitoring from space. In contrast to passive methane missions, the LIDAR instrument allows measurements at alllatitudes, all-seasons and during night.

  6. Methane prediction in collieries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Creedy, DP

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the project was to assess the current status of research on methane emission prediction for collieries in South Africa in comparison with methods used and advances achieved elsewhere in the world....

  7. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  8. Pulverized straw combustion in a low-NOx multifuel burner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias; Rosendahl, Lasse; Yin, Chungen

    2010-01-01

    A CFD simulation of pulverized coal and straw combustion using a commercial multifuel burner have been undertaken to examine the difference in combustion characteristics. Focus has also been directed to development of the modeling technique to deal with larger non-spherical straw particles...... and to determine the relative importance of different modeling choices for straw combustion. Investigated modeling choices encompass the particle size and shape distribution, the modification of particle motion and heating due to the departure from the spherical ideal, the devolatilization rate of straw......, the influence of inlet boundary conditions and the effect of particles on the carrier phase turbulence. It is concluded that straw combustion is associated with a significantly longer flame and smaller recirculation zones compared to coal combustion for the present air flow specifications. The particle size...

  9. Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    REPORT Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We have transformed a plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, with the...298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 31-Mar-2012 Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane Report Title ABSTRACT We have transformed a...DD882) Scientific Progress See attachment Technology Transfer 1    Final Report for DARPA project W911NF1010027  Phytoremediation  of Atmospheric

  10. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature...... the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  11. Methanation of Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Daniel Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere has been linked to global warming. Carbon dioxide's (CO2) one of the most abundant greenhouse gases. Natural gas, mainly methane, is the cleanest fossil fuel for electricity production helping meet the United States ever growing energy needs. The methanation of CO2 has the potential to address both of these problems if a catalyst can be developed that meets the activity, economic and environmental requirements to industrialize the process. ...

  12. Combustion and operating characteristics of spark-ignition engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, J. B.; Keck, J. C.; Beretta, G. P.; Watts, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    The spark-ignition engine turbulent flame propagation process was investigated. Then, using a spark-ignition engine cycle simulation and combustion model, the impact of turbocharging and heat transfer variations or engine power, efficiency, and NO sub x emissions was examined.

  13. A description of the two-dimensional combustion code FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.

    1986-07-01

    This report gives details of the computer code FLARE. The model used for the turbulent combustion of premixed gases is described. Details of the numerical scheme used to solve the resulting equations are discussed. The input and output for the code are also described. Details of the coding are given in the Appendices together with sample input and output. (author)

  14. Reduced NOX combustion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delano, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for combusting fuel and oxidant to achieve reduced formation of nitrogen oxides. It comprises: It comprises: heating a combustion zone to a temperature at least equal to 1500 degrees F.; injecting into the heated combustion zone a stream of oxidant at a velocity within the range of from 200 to 1070 feet per second; injecting into the combustion zone, spaced from the oxidant stream, a fuel stream at a velocity such that the ratio of oxidant stream velocity to fuel stream velocity does not exceed 20; aspirating combustion gases into the oxidant stream and thereafter intermixing the aspirated oxidant stream and fuel stream to form a combustible mixture; combusting the combustible mixture to produce combustion gases for the aspiration; and maintaining the fuel stream substantially free from contact with oxidant prior to the intermixture with aspirated oxidant

  15. Compressible turbulent flows: aspects of prediction and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, R. [TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Fachgebiet Stroemungsmechanik

    2007-03-15

    Compressible turbulent flows are an important element of high-speed flight. Boundary layers developing along fuselage and wings of an aircraft and along engine compressor and turbine blades are compressible and mostly turbulent. The high-speed flow around rockets and through rocket nozzles involves compressible turbulence and flow separation. Turbulent mixing and combustion in scramjet engines is another example where compressibility dominates the flow physics. Although compressible turbulent flows have attracted researchers since the fifties of the last century, they are not completely understood. Especially interactions between compressible turbulence and combustion lead to challenging, yet unsolved problems. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large-eddy simulation (LES) represent modern powerful research tools which allow to mimic such flows in great detail and to analyze underlying physical mechanisms, even those which cannot be accessed by the experiment. The present lecture provides a short description of these tools and some of their numerical characteristics. It then describes DNS and LES results of fully-developed channel and pipe flow and highlights effects of compressibility on the turbulence structure. The analysis of pressure fluctuations in such flows with isothermal cooled walls leads to the conclusion that the pressure-strain correlation tensor decreases in the wall layer and that the turbulence anisotropy increases, since the mean density falls off relative to the incompressible flow case. Similar increases in turbulence anisotropy due to compressibility are observed in inert and reacting temporal mixing layers. The nature of the pressure fluctuations is however two-facetted. While inert compressible mixing layers reveal wave-propagation effects in the pressure and density fluctuations, compressible reacting mixing layers seem to generate pressure fluctuations that are controlled by the time-rate of change of heat release and mean density

  16. Turbulent spark-jet ignition in SI gas fuelled engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pielecha Ireneusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains a thermodynamic analysis of a new combustion system that allows the combustion of stratified gas mixtures with mean air excess coefficient in the range 1.4-1.8. Spark ignition was used in the pre-chamber that has been mounted in the engine cylinder head and contained a rich mixture out of which a turbulent flow of ignited mixture is ejected. It allows spark-jet ignition and the turbulent combustion of the lean mixture in the main combustion chamber. This resulted in a two-stage combustion system for lean mixtures. The experimental study has been conducted using a single-cylinder test engine with a geometric compression ratio ε = 15.5 adapted for natural gas supply. The tests were performed at engine speed n = 2000 rpm under stationary engine load when the engine operating parameters and toxic compounds emissions have been recorded. Analysis of the results allowed to conclude that the evaluated combustion system offers large flexibility in the initiation of charge ignition through an appropriate control of the fuel quantities supplied into the pre-chamber and into the main combustion chamber. The research concluded with determining the charge ignition criterion for a suitably divided total fuel dose fed to the cylinder.

  17. Numerical simulation of fuel sprays and combustion in a premixed lean diesel engine; Kihaku yokongo diesel kikan ni okeru nenryo funmu to nensho no suchi simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, T; Harada, A; Sasaki, S; Shimazaki, N; Hashizume, T; Akagawa, H; Tsujimura, K

    1997-10-01

    Fuel sprays and combustion in a direct injection Premixed lean Diesel Combustion (PREDIC) engine, which can make smokeless combustion with little NOx emission, is studied numerically. Numerical simulation was carried out by means of KIVA II based computer code with a combustion submodel. The combustion submodel describes the formation of combustible fuel vapor by turbulent mixing and four-step chemical reaction which includes low temperature oxidation. Comparison between computation and experiment shows qualitatively good agreement in terms of heat release rate and NO emission. Computational results indicate that the combustion is significantly influenced by fuel spray characteristics and injection timing to vary NO emission. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Effect of the mixing fields on the stability and structure of turbulent partially premixed flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Mohy S.

    2016-10-22

    The mixing field is known to be one of the key parameters that affect the stability and structure of partially premixed flames. Data in these flames are now available covering the effects of turbulence, combustion system geometry, level of partially premixing and fuel type. However, quantitative analyses of the flame structure based on the mixing field are not yet available. The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive study of the effects of the mixing fields on the structure and stability of partially premixed methane flames. The mixing field in a concentric flow conical nozzle (CFCN) burner with well-controlled mechanism of the mixing is investigated using Rayleigh scattering technique. The flame stability, structure and flow field of some selected cases are presented using LIF of OH and PIV. The experimental data of the mixing field cover wide ranges of Reynolds number, equivalence ratio and mixing length. The data show that the mixing field is significantly affected by the mixing length and the ratio of the air-to-fuel velocities. The Reynolds number has a minimum effect on the mixing field in high turbulent flow regime and the stability is significantly affected by the turbulence level. The temporal fluctuations of the range of mixture fraction within the mixing field correlate with the flame stability. The highest point of stability occurs at recess distances where fluid mixtures near the jet exit plane are mostly within the flammability limits. This paper provides some correlations between the stability range in mixture fraction space and the turbulence level for different equivalence ratios.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Flames in Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    the flow direction and (b) typical flame length scales seen in the OH-PLIF image with Mach 4.5 freestream (high turbulence) at P0 = 0.65 bar, T0...flame structures (3 mm) are observed at the upstream location of area 1 where the combustion localization first appears. The typical flame length scale

  20. The generation of resonant turbulence for a premixed burner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Antonie Alex; Pos, R.C.; Stoffels, Genie G.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; van der Meer, Th.H.

    Is it possible to optimize the turbulent combustion of a low swirl burner by using resonance in turbu- lence? To that end an active grid is constructed that consists of two perforated disks of which one is rotat- ing, creating a system of pulsating jets, which in the end can be used as a central

  1. Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Hanjing; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

    2013-08-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology that utilizes oxygen from oxygen carriers (OC), such as metal oxides, instead of air to combust fuels. The use of natural minerals as oxygen carriers has advantages, such as lower cost and availability. Eight materials, based on copper or iron oxides, were selected for screening tests of CLC processes using coal and methane as fuels. Thermogravimetric experiments and bench-scale fixed-bed reactor tests were conducted to investigate the oxygen transfer capacity, reaction kinetics, and stability during cyclic reduction/oxidation reaction. Most natural minerals showed lower combustion capacity than pure CuO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to low-concentrations of active oxide species in minerals. In coal CLC, chryscolla (Cu-based), magnetite, and limonite (Fe-based) demonstrated better reaction performances than other materials. The addition of steam improved the coal CLC performance when using natural ores because of the steam gasification of coal and the subsequent reaction of gaseous fuels with active oxide species in the natural ores. In methane CLC, chryscolla, hematite, and limonite demonstrated excellent reactivity and stability in 50-cycle thermogravimetric analysis tests. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based ores possess greater oxygen utilization but require an activation period before achieving full performance in methane CLC. Particle agglomeration issues associated with the application of natural ores in CLC processes were also studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  2. Coalbed methane: new frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, S.

    2003-02-01

    There are large numbers of stacked coal seams permeated with methane or natural gas in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, and approximately 20 coalbed methane pilot projects are operating in the area, and brief descriptions of some of them were provided. Coalbed methane reserves have a long life cycle. A definition of coalbed methane can be a permeability challenged reservoir. It is not uncommon for coalbed methane wells to flow water for periods varying from 2 to 6 months after completion before the production of natural gas. A made-in-Canada technological solution is being developed by CDX Canada Inc., along with its American parent company. The techniques used by CDX are a marriage between coal mining techniques and oil and gas techniques. A brief description of coalification was provided. Nexen is participating in the production of gas from an Upper Mannville coal at 1 000-metres depth in a nine-well pilot project. The Alberta Foothills are considered prime exploration area since older coal is carried close to the surface by thrusting. CDX Canada uses cavitation completion in vertical wells. Cavitation consists in setting the casing above the coal seam and drilling ahead under balanced. The design of wells for coalbed methane gas is based on rock and fluid mechanics. Hydraulic fracturing completions is also used, as are tiltmeters. An enhanced coalbed methane recovery pilot project is being conducted by the Alberta Research Council at Fenn-Big Valley, located in central Alberta. It injects carbon dioxide, which shows great potential for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. 1 figs.

  3. Methane Formation by Flame-Generated Hydrogen Atoms in the Flame Ionization Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1996-01-01

    , and conceivably all hydrocarbons are quantitatively converted into methane at temperatures below 600 C, that is, before the proper combustion has started. The splitting of the C-C bonds is preceded by hydrogenation of double and triple bonds and aromatic rings. The reactions, no doubt, are caused by hydrogen...... atoms, which are formed in the burning hydrogen and which diffuse into the inner core of the flame. The quantitative formation of methane appears to explain the "equal per carbon" rule for the detector response of hydrocarbons, since all carbons are "exchanged" for methane molecules....

  4. Emissions of NO and CO from counterflow combustion of CH4 under MILD and oxyfuel conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Kin-Pang; Li, Pengfei; Wang, Feifei; Mi, Jianchun

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the NO and CO emission characteristics of counterflow combustion of methane simulated under MILD or/and oxyfuel conditions. Simulations using CHEMKIN are conducted for various injection conditions of fuel and oxidizer. Note that the terms “oxyfuel”, “MILD-N 2 ” and “MILD-CO 2 ” combustion adopted hereafter represent the conventional oxy-combustion and those MILD combustions diluted by N 2 and CO 2 , respectively. It is observed that the NO emission of MILD-CO 2 combustion is ultra-low for all cases of investigation, even when increasing the combustion temperature up to 2000 K or adding more N 2 (up to 20%) to either the fuel stream (to simulate nitrogen-containing fuels like biomass) or the oxidizer stream (to simulate the air-ingress). A higher temperature allowed under MILD-CO 2 combustion suggests the improvement of energy efficiency for the MILD combustion technology. Moreover, the presence of steam in the oxidant reduces both NO and CO emissions of combustion for all cases. The relative importance analysis reveals that the N 2 O-intermediate mechanism for producing NO prevails in MILD-CO 2 combustion while the prompt and thermal mechanisms predominate MILD-N 2 and oxyfuel combustion, respectively. In addition, the sensitivity analysis identifies those main reactions that play important roles for the NO emission under these combustion conditions. - Highlights: • Assessing the NO and CO emissions from MILD combustion diluted by CO 2 . • Examining the possibility of higher combustion intensity in MILD-CO 2 combustion than in MILD-N 2 combustion. • Differentiating the contributions from each NO mechanism to the total NO emission. • Revealing major NO mechanisms under different combustion conditions. • Better understanding the NO formation mechanisms under MILD combustion.

  5. Turbulent Flame Speed Scaling for Positive Markstein Number Expanding Flames in Near Isotropic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Law, Chung

    2012-11-01

    In this work we clarify the role of Markstein diffusivity on turbulent flame speed and it's scaling, from analysis and experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding flames propagating in near isotropic turbulence. For all C0-C4 hydrocarbon-air mixtures presented in this work and recently published C8 data from Leeds, the normalized turbulent flame speed data of individual mixtures approximately follows the recent theoretical and experimental ReT, f 0 . 5 scaling, where the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property. We observe that for a constant ReT, f 0 . 5 , the normalized turbulent flame speed decreases with increasing Mk. This could be explained by considering Markstein diffusivity as the large wavenumber, flame surface fluctuation dissipation mechanism. As originally suggested by the theory, replacing thermal diffusivity with Markstein diffusivity in the turbulence Reynolds number definition above, the present and Leeds dataset could be scaled by the new ReT, f 0 . 5 irrespective of the fuel considered, equivalence ratio, pressure and turbulence intensity for positive Mk flames. This work was supported by the Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001198 and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  6. Methane distributions and transports in the nocturnal boundary layer at a rural station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Zeeman, Matthias; Brosy, Caroline; Münkel, Christoph; Fersch, Benjamin; Mauder, Matthias; Emeis, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the methane distributions and transports, the role of related atmospheric processes by determination of vertical profiles of wind, turbulence, temperature and humidity as well as nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) height and the quantification of methane emissions at local and plot scale the so-called ScaleX-campaign was performed in a pre-alpine observatory in Southern Germany from 01 June until 31 July 2015. The following measurements from the ground up to the free troposphere were performed: layering of the atmosphere by a ceilometer (Vaisala CL51); temperature, wind, turbulence profiles from 50 m up to 500 m by a Radio-Acoustic Sounding System (RASS, Metek GmbH); temperature, humidity profiles in situ by a hexacopter; methane farm emissions by two open-path laser spectrometers (Boreal GasFinder2); methane concentrations in situ (Los Gatos DLT-100) with tubes in 0.3 m agl and 5 sampling heads; and methane soil emissions by a big chamber (10 m length, 2.60 m width, up to 0.61 m height) with a plastic cover. The methane concentrations near the surface show a daily variation with a maximum and a frequent double-peak structure during night-time. Analysis of the variation of the nocturnal methane concentration together with the hexacopter and RASS data indicates that the first peak in the nocturnal methane concentration is probably due to local cooling and stabilization which keeps the methane emissions from the soil near the ground. The second peak seems to be due to advection of methane-enriched air which had formed in the environment of the nearby farm yards. These dairy farm emissions were determined by up-wind and down-wind open-path concentration measurements, turbulence data from an EC station nearby and Backward Lagrangian Simulation (WindTrax software). The methane fluxes at plot scale (big chamber) are characterized by emissions at water saturated grassland patches, by an exponential decrease of these emissions during grassland drying, and by an

  7. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  8. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani; Oß wald, Patrick; Hansen, Nils; Kohse-Hö inghaus, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    . While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides

  9. Spectral modeling of radiation in combustion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Gopalendu

    Radiation calculations are important in combustion due to the high temperatures encountered but has not been studied in sufficient detail in the case of turbulent flames. Radiation calculations for such problems require accurate, robust, and computationally efficient models for the solution of radiative transfer equation (RTE), and spectral properties of radiation. One more layer of complexity is added in predicting the overall heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems due to nonlinear interactions between turbulent fluctuations and radiation. The present work is aimed at the development of finite volume-based high-accuracy thermal radiation modeling, including spectral radiation properties in order to accurately capture turbulence-radiation interactions (TRI) and predict heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems correctly and efficiently. The turbulent fluctuations of temperature and chemical species concentrations have strong effects on spectral radiative intensities, and TRI create a closure problem when the governing partial differential equations are averaged. Recently, several approaches have been proposed to take TRI into account. Among these attempts the most promising approaches are the probability density function (PDF) methods, which can treat nonlinear coupling between turbulence and radiative emission exactly, i.e., "emission TRI". The basic idea of the PDF method is to treat physical variables as random variables and to solve the PDF transport equation stochastically. The actual reacting flow field is represented by a large number of discrete stochastic particles each carrying their own random variable values and evolving with time. The mean value of any function of those random variables, such as the chemical source term, can be evaluated exactly by taking the ensemble average of particles. The local emission term belongs to this class and thus, can be evaluated directly and exactly from particle ensembles. However, the local absorption term

  10. High Reynolds Number Turbulence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smits, Alexander J

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of the grant were to provide a systematic study to fill the gap between existing research on low Reynolds number turbulent flows to the kinds of turbulent flows encountered on full-scale vehicles...

  11. Comparative study of non-premixed and partially-premixed combustion simulations in a realistic Tay model combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, K.; Ghobadian, A.; Nouri, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study of two combustion models based on non-premixed assumption and partially premixed assumptions using the overall models of Zimont Turbulent Flame Speed Closure Method (ZTFSC) and Extended Coherent Flamelet Method (ECFM) are conducted through Reynolds stress turbulence modelling of Tay model gas turbine combustor for the first time. The Tay model combustor retains all essential features of a realistic gas turbine combustor. It is seen that the non-premixed combustion model fa...

  12. Dynamic Behavior of Reverse Flow Reactor for Lean Methane Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Yogi W. Budhi; M. Effendy; Yazid Bindar; Subagjo

    2014-01-01

    The stability of reactor operation for catalytic oxidation of lean CH4 has been investigated through modeling and simulation, particularly the influence of switching time and heat extraction on reverse flow reactor (RFR) performance. A mathematical model of the RFR was developed, based on one-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model for mass and heat balances, incorporating heat loss through the reactor wall. The configuration of the RFR consisted of inert-catalyst-inert, with or without heat ext...

  13. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golodova, E; Shchepakina, E

    2006-01-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models

  14. Investigation of the effects of quarl and initial conditions on swirling non-premixed methane flames: Flow field, temperature, and species distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-12-19

    Detailed measurements are presented of the turbulent flow field, gas species concentrations and temperature field in a non-premixed methane swirl flame. Attention is given to the effect of the quarl geometry on the flame structure and emission characteristics due to its importance in gas turbine and industrial burner applications. Two different quarls were fitted to the burner exit, one a straight quarl and the other a diverging quarl of 15° half cone angle. Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) was applied to obtain the three components of the instantaneous velocity on a vertical plane immediately downstream of the quarl exit. Temperature and gaseous species measurements were made both inside and downstream of the quarls, using a fine wire thermocouple and sampling probe, respectively. This work provides experimental verification by complementary techniques. The results showed that although the main flame structures were governed by the swirl motion imparted to the air stream, the quarl geometry, fuel loading and air loading also had a significant effect on the flow pattern, turbulence intensity, mixture formation, temperature distribution, emissions and flame stabilization. Particularly, in the case of the straight quarl flame, the flow pattern leads to strong, rapid mixing and reduces the residence time for NO formation within the internal recirculation zone (IRZ). However, for the diverging quarl flames, the recirculation zone is shifted radially outward, and the turbulent interaction between the central fuel jet and the internal recirculation zone IRZ induces another small vortex between these two flow features. Less mixing near the diverging quarl exit is observed, with a higher concentration of NO and CO in the post-combustion zone. The instantaneous flow field for both flames showed the existence of small scale vortical structure near the shear layers which were not apparent in the time averaged flow field. These structures, along with high levels

  15. Turbulence and wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Arno J.; Peinke, Joachim; Mann, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed.......The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed....

  16. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  17. Strong Langmuir turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    After a brief discussion of beam-excited Langmuir turbulence in the solar wind, we explain the criteria for wave-particle, three-wave and strong turbulence interactions. We then present the results of a numerical integration of the Zakharov equations, which describe the strong turbulence saturation of a weak (low-density) high energy, bump-on-tail beam instability. (author)

  18. New insights into methane-oxygen ion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad B.S.; Chen, Bingjie; Han, Jie; Selim, Hatem; Belhi, Memdouh; Karakaya, Yasin; Kasper, Tina; Sarathy, Mani; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    External electric fields may reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of combustion processes. In-depth, quantitative understanding of ion chemistry in flames enables predictive models to describe the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasma. This study presents detailed cation profile measurements in low-pressure, burner-stabilized, methane/oxygen/argon flames. A quadrupole molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) coupled to a low-pressure (P =30Torr) combustion chamber was utilized to measure ion signals as a function of height above the burner. Lean, stoichiometric and rich flames were examined to evaluate the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Additionally, for the first time, cataloging of flame cations is performed using a high mass resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) to distinguish ions with the same nominal mass. In the lean and stoichiometric flames, the dominant ions were HO, CHO , CHO, CHO and CHO, whereas large signals were measured for HO, CH and CHO in the rich flame. The spatial distribution of cations was compared with results from numerical simulations constrained by thermocouple-measured flame temperatures. Across all flames, the predicted HO decay rate was noticeably faster than observed experimentally. Sensitivity analysis showed that the mole fraction of HO is most sensitive to the rate of chemi-ionization CH+O↔CHO +E. To our knowledge, this work represents the first detailed measurements of positive ions in canonical low-pressure methane flames.

  19. New insights into methane-oxygen ion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad B.S.

    2016-06-15

    External electric fields may reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of combustion processes. In-depth, quantitative understanding of ion chemistry in flames enables predictive models to describe the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasma. This study presents detailed cation profile measurements in low-pressure, burner-stabilized, methane/oxygen/argon flames. A quadrupole molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) coupled to a low-pressure (P =30Torr) combustion chamber was utilized to measure ion signals as a function of height above the burner. Lean, stoichiometric and rich flames were examined to evaluate the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Additionally, for the first time, cataloging of flame cations is performed using a high mass resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) to distinguish ions with the same nominal mass. In the lean and stoichiometric flames, the dominant ions were HO, CHO , CHO, CHO and CHO, whereas large signals were measured for HO, CH and CHO in the rich flame. The spatial distribution of cations was compared with results from numerical simulations constrained by thermocouple-measured flame temperatures. Across all flames, the predicted HO decay rate was noticeably faster than observed experimentally. Sensitivity analysis showed that the mole fraction of HO is most sensitive to the rate of chemi-ionization CH+O↔CHO +E. To our knowledge, this work represents the first detailed measurements of positive ions in canonical low-pressure methane flames.

  20. Analysis of the microturbine combustion chamber by using the CHEMKIN III computer code; Analise da camara de combustao de microturbinas empregando-se o codigo computacional CHEMKIN III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madela, Vinicius Zacarias; Pauliny, Luis F. de A.; Veras, Carlos A. Gurgel [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: gurgel@enm.unb.br; Costa, Fernando de S. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Combustao e Propulsao]. E-mail: fernando@cptec.inpe.br

    2000-07-01

    This work presents the results obtained with the simulation of multi fuel micro turbines combustion chambers. In particular, the predictions for the methane and Diesel burning are presented. The appropriate routines of the CHEMKIN III computer code were used.

  1. The turbulence structure in an unconfined swirling diffusion flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finzenhagen, F.; Doherty, T.O.; Bates, C.; Wirtz, S.; Kremer, H.

    1999-01-01

    Turbulent swirling flows are used in many practical combustion systems. The swirl improves the flame stability as a result of the formation of a central recirculation zone combined with fast mixing at the boundaries of this zone. Knowledge about swirl flames has increased over the last few decades as a result of practical experience and fundamental research. Some important questions concerning the influence of the turbulence structure on the flame stability and chemical kinetics of the combustion process remain unresolved. The structure of turbulence, especially turbulent scales and time dependent effects, at the outlet zone controls the mixing process and therefore the flame properties. Understanding of these complex phenomena is far from complete. The present work describes the results of an experimental study of the turbulence structure of a swirled diffusion flame using laser-optical measurement techniques, e.g. Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PW). All the processed information available from the burst-mode Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) measurements has been combined and compared with high spatial resolution PIV measurements of the flow. The extensive statistical post processing of the data has enabled the turbulent microstructure to be characterised. (author)

  2. Methane of the coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, H.

    1997-01-01

    In the transformation process of the vegetable material to the coal (Carbonization), the products that are generated include CH 4, CO2, N2 and H2. The methane is generated by two mechanisms: below 50 centigrade degree, as product of microbial decomposition, the methanogenic is generated; and above 50 centigrade degree, due to the effects of the buried and increase of the range of the coal, the thermogenic methane is detachment, as a result of the catagenic. The generated methane is stored in the internal surfaces of the coal, macro and micro pores and in the natural fractures. The presence of accumulations of gas of the coal has been known in the entire world by many years, but only as something undesirable for its danger in the mining exploitation of the coal

  3. Combustion of a high-velocity hydrogen microjet effluxing in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, V. V.; Grek, G. R.; Korobeinichev, O. P.; Litvinenko, Yu. A.; Shmakov, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    This study is devoted to experimental investigation of hydrogen-combustion modes and the structure of a diffusion flame formed at a high-velocity efflux of hydrogen in air through round apertures of various diameters. The efflux-velocity range of the hydrogen jet and the diameters of nozzle apertures at which the flame is divided in two zones with laminar and turbulent flow are found. The zone with the laminar flow is a stabilizer of combustion of the flame as a whole, and in the zone with the turbulent flow the intense mixing of fuel with an oxidizer takes place. Combustion in these two zones can occur independently from each other, but the steadiest mode is observed only at the existence of the flame in the laminar-flow zone. The knowledge obtained makes it possible to understand more deeply the features of modes of microjet combustion of hydrogen promising for various combustion devices.

  4. Catalytic aromatization of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, James J; Hutchings, Graham

    2014-02-07

    Recent developments in natural gas production technology have led to lower prices for methane and renewed interest in converting methane to higher value products. Processes such as those based on syngas from methane reforming are being investigated. Another option is methane aromatization, which produces benzene and hydrogen: 6CH4(g) → C6H6(g) + 9H2(g) ΔG°(r) = +433 kJ mol(-1) ΔH°(r) = +531 kJ mol(-1). Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction show that benzene formation is insignificant below ∼600 °C, and that the formation of solid carbon [C(s)] is thermodynamically favored at temperatures above ∼300 °C. Benzene formation is insignificant at all temperatures up to 1000 °C when C(s) is included in the calculation of equilibrium composition. Interestingly, the thermodynamic limitation on benzene formation can be minimized by the addition of alkanes/alkenes to the methane feed. By far the most widely studied catalysts for this reaction are Mo/HZSM-5 and Mo/MCM-22. Benzene selectivities are generally between 60 and 80% at methane conversions of ∼10%, corresponding to net benzene yields of less than 10%. Major byproducts include lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and higher molecular weight substituted aromatics. However, carbon formation is inevitable, but the experimental findings show this can be kinetically limited by the use of H2 or oxidants in the feed, including CO2 or steam. A number of reactor configurations involving regeneration of the carbon-containing catalyst have been developed with the goal of minimizing the cost of regeneration of the catalyst once deactivated by carbon deposition. In this tutorial review we discuss the thermodynamics of this process, the catalysts used and the potential reactor configurations that can be applied.

  5. Status of Turbulence Modeling for Hypersonic Propulsion Flowpaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Vyas, Manan A.; Engblom, William A.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of current turbulent flow calculation methods for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths, particularly the scramjet engine. Emphasis is placed on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, but some discussion of newer meth- ods such as Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is also provided. The report is organized by considering technical issues throughout the scramjet-powered vehicle flowpath including laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition, shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions, scalar transport modeling (specifically the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers) and compressible mixing. Unit problems are primarily used to conduct the assessment. In the combustor, results from calculations of a direct connect supersonic combustion experiment are also used to address the effects of turbulence model selection and in particular settings for the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. It is concluded that RANS turbulence modeling shortfalls are still a major limitation to the accuracy of hypersonic propulsion simulations, whether considering individual components or an overall system. Newer methods such as LES-based techniques may be promising, but are not yet at a maturity to be used routinely by the hypersonic propulsion community. The need for fundamental experiments to provide data for turbulence model development and validation is discussed.

  6. Steam-moderated oxy-fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seepana, Sivaji; Jayanti, Sreenivas

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to propose a new variant of the oxy-fuel combustion for carbondioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration in which steam is used to moderate the flame temperature. In this process, pure oxygen is mixed with steam and the resulting oxidant mixture is sent to the boiler for combustion with a fossil fuel. The advantage of this method is that flue gas recirculation is avoided and the volumetric flow rates through the boiler and auxiliary components is reduced by about 39% when compared to the conventional air-fired coal combustion power plant leading to a reduction in the size of the boiler. The flue gas, after condensation of steam, consists primarily of CO 2 and can be sent directly for compression and sequestration. Flame structure analysis has been carried out using a 325-step reaction mechanism of methane-oxidant combustion to determine the concentration of oxygen required to ensure a stable flame. Thermodynamic exergy analysis has also been carried out on SMOC-operated CO 2 sequestration power plant and air-fired power plant, which shows that though the gross efficiency increases the absolute power penalty of ∼8% for CO 2 sequestration when compared to air-fired power plant.

  7. Steam-moderated oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seepana, Sivaji; Jayanti, Sreenivas [Department of Chemical Engineering, IIT Madras, Adyar, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2010-10-15

    The objective of the present paper is to propose a new variant of the oxy-fuel combustion for carbondioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in which steam is used to moderate the flame temperature. In this process, pure oxygen is mixed with steam and the resulting oxidant mixture is sent to the boiler for combustion with a fossil fuel. The advantage of this method is that flue gas recirculation is avoided and the volumetric flow rates through the boiler and auxiliary components is reduced by about 39% when compared to the conventional air-fired coal combustion power plant leading to a reduction in the size of the boiler. The flue gas, after condensation of steam, consists primarily of CO{sub 2} and can be sent directly for compression and sequestration. Flame structure analysis has been carried out using a 325-step reaction mechanism of methane-oxidant combustion to determine the concentration of oxygen required to ensure a stable flame. Thermodynamic exergy analysis has also been carried out on SMOC-operated CO{sub 2} sequestration power plant and air-fired power plant, which shows that though the gross efficiency increases the absolute power penalty of {proportional_to}8% for CO{sub 2} sequestration when compared to air-fired power plant. (author)

  8. Direct Activation Of Methane

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2013-07-15

    Heteropolyacids (HPAs) can activate methane at ambient temperature (e.g., 20.degree. C.) and atmospheric pressure, and transform methane to acetic acid, in the absence of any noble metal such as Pd). The HPAs can be, for example, those with Keggin structure: H.sub.4SiW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.3PW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.4SiMo.sub.12O.sub.40, or H.sub.3PMo.sub.12O.sub.40, can be when supported on silica.

  9. Methanization - Technical sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastide, Guillaume

    2015-02-01

    This document explains fundamentals of methanization such as biological reactions and conditions suitable for biogas production (temperature, pH, anaerobic medium, and so on). It also proposes an overview of available techniques, of the present regulation, of environmental impacts, and of costs and profitability of methanization installations. Examples of installations are provided, as well as a set of questions and answers. Perspectives of development are finally discussed in terms of sector development potential, of regulatory evolution, of new perspectives for gas valorisation, of need of acquisition of reference data due to the relatively low number of existing installations, and of research and development

  10. Australian methane fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates are provided for the amount of methane emitted annually into the atmosphere in Australia for a variety of sources. The sources considered are coal mining, landfill, motor vehicles, natural gas suply system, rice paddies, bushfires, termites, wetland and animals. This assessment indicates that the major sources of methane are natural or agricultural in nature and therefore offer little scope for reduction. Nevertheless the remainder are not trival and reduction of these fluxes could play a significant part in any Australian action on the greenhouse problem. 19 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig

  11. Development of an empirical correlation for combustion durations in spark ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayraktar, Hakan; Durgun, Orhan

    2004-01-01

    Development of an empirical correlation for combustion duration is presented. For this purpose, the effects of variations in compression ratio engine speed, fuel/air equivalence ratio and spark advance on combustion duration have been determined by means of a quasi-dimensional SI engine cycle model previously developed by the authors. Burn durations at several engine operating conditions were calculated from the turbulent combustion model. Variations of combustion duration with each operating parameter obtained from the theoretical results were expressed by second degree polynomial functions. By using these functions, a general empirical correlation for the burn duration has been developed. In this correlation, the effects of engine operating parameters on combustion duration were taken into account. Combustion durations predicted by means of this correlation are in good agreement with those obtained from experimental studies and a detailed combustion model

  12. Uncertainties in hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamps, D.W.; Wong, C.C.; Nelson, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three important areas of hydrogen combustion with uncertainties are identified: high-temperature combustion, flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition, and aerosol resuspension during hydrogen combustion. The uncertainties associated with high-temperature combustion may affect at least three different accident scenarios: the in-cavity oxidation of combustible gases produced by core-concrete interactions, the direct containment heating hydrogen problem, and the possibility of local detonations. How these uncertainties may affect the sequence of various accident scenarios is discussed and recommendations are made to reduce these uncertainties. 40 references

  13. Premixed combustion under electric field in a constant volume chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2012-12-01

    The effects of electric fields on outwardly propagating premixed flames in a constant volume chamber were experimentally investigated. An electric plug, subjected to high electrical voltages, was used to generate electric fields inside the chamber. To minimize directional ionic wind effects, alternating current with frequency of 1 kHz was employed. Lean and rich fuel/air mixtures for both methane and propane were tested to investigate various preferential diffusion conditions. As a result, electrically induced instability showing cracked structure on the flame surface could be observed. This cracked structure enhanced flame propagation speed for the initial period of combustion and led to reduction in flame initiation and overall combustion duration times. However, by analyzing pressure data, it was found that overall burning rates are not much affected from the electric field for the pressurized combustion period. The reduction of overall combustion time is less sensitive to equivalence ratio for methane/air mixtures, whereas the results demonstrate pronounced effects on a lean mixture for propane. The improvement of combustion characteristics in lean mixtures will be beneficial to the design of lean burn engines. Two hypothetical mechanisms to explain the electrically induced instability were proposed: 1) ionic wind initiated hydrodynamic instability and 2) thermodiffusive instability through the modification of transport property such as mass diffusivity. © 2012 IEEE.

  14. Premixed combustion under electric field in a constant volume chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min; Lee, Yonggyu

    2012-01-01

    The effects of electric fields on outwardly propagating premixed flames in a constant volume chamber were experimentally investigated. An electric plug, subjected to high electrical voltages, was used to generate electric fields inside the chamber. To minimize directional ionic wind effects, alternating current with frequency of 1 kHz was employed. Lean and rich fuel/air mixtures for both methane and propane were tested to investigate various preferential diffusion conditions. As a result, electrically induced instability showing cracked structure on the flame surface could be observed. This cracked structure enhanced flame propagation speed for the initial period of combustion and led to reduction in flame initiation and overall combustion duration times. However, by analyzing pressure data, it was found that overall burning rates are not much affected from the electric field for the pressurized combustion period. The reduction of overall combustion time is less sensitive to equivalence ratio for methane/air mixtures, whereas the results demonstrate pronounced effects on a lean mixture for propane. The improvement of combustion characteristics in lean mixtures will be beneficial to the design of lean burn engines. Two hypothetical mechanisms to explain the electrically induced instability were proposed: 1) ionic wind initiated hydrodynamic instability and 2) thermodiffusive instability through the modification of transport property such as mass diffusivity. © 2012 IEEE.

  15. Effect of hydrogen addition on autoignited methane lifted flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choin, Byung Chul

    2012-01-01

    Autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets with hydrogen-enriched methane fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. The results showed that the autoignited lifted flame of the methane/hydrogen mixture, which had an initial temperature over 920 K, the threshold temperature for autoignition in methane jets, exhibited features typical of either a tribrachial edge or mild combustion depending on fuel mole fraction and the liftoff height increased with jet velocity. The liftoff height in the hydrogen-assisted autoignition regime was dependent on the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time for the addition of small amounts of hydrogen, as was the case for pure methane jets. When the initial temperature was below 920 K, where the methane fuel did not show autoignition behavior, the flame was autoignited by the addition of hydrogen, which is an ignition improver. The liftoff height demonstrated a unique feature in that it decreased nonlinearly as the jet velocity increased. The differential diffusion of hydrogen is expected to play a crucial role in the decrease in the liftoff height with increasing jet velocity.

  16. Progress in turbulence research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in experiments and eddy simulations, as an introduction to a discussion of turbulence modeling for engineers is reviewed. The most important advances in the last decade rely on computers: microcomputers to control laboratory experiments, especially for multidimensional imaging, and supercomputers to simulate turbulence. These basic studies in turbulence research are leading to genuine breakthroughs in prediction methods for engineers and earth scientists. The three main branches of turbulence research: experiments, simulations (numerically-accurate three-dimensional, time-dependent solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, with any empiricism confined to the smallest eddies), and modeling (empirical closure of time-averaged equations for turbulent flow) are discussed. 33 refs

  17. AFRL’s ALREST Physics-Based Combustion Stability Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    enduring challenge because of the inherent complexities in the physics of multiphase turbulent flames. The present paper provides the Air Force...Combustor F i d e l i t y URANS LES Steady RANS HLES Current SOA Capability with 2000 cores Capability at Program End in 2015 (2,000 cores+GPUs) Capability...Unlimited ALREST Validation Cases “Final Exam ” Hydrogen Stable Single Element (PSU) Stable Single Element Methane (Singla) Supercritical Non

  18. Homogeneous turbulence dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sagaut, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This book provides state-of-the-art results and theories in homogeneous turbulence, including anisotropy and compressibility effects with extension to quantum turbulence, magneto-hydodynamic turbulence  and turbulence in non-newtonian fluids. Each chapter is devoted to a given type of interaction (strain, rotation, shear, etc.), and presents and compares experimental data, numerical results, analysis of the Reynolds stress budget equations and advanced multipoint spectral theories. The role of both linear and non-linear mechanisms is emphasized. The link between the statistical properties and the dynamics of coherent structures is also addressed. Despite its restriction to homogeneous turbulence, the book is of interest to all people working in turbulence, since the basic physical mechanisms which are present in all turbulent flows are explained. The reader will find a unified presentation of the results and a clear presentation of existing controversies. Special attention is given to bridge the results obta...

  19. Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse

    of resolved inflow turbulence on airfoil simulations in CFD. The detached-eddy simulation technique is used because it can resolve the inflow turbulence without becoming too computationally expensive due to its limited requirements for mesh resolution in the boundary layer. It cannot resolve the turbulence......Wind turbines operate in inflow turbulence whether it originates from the shear in the atmospheric boundary layer or from the wake of other wind turbines. Consequently, the airfoils of the wings experience turbulence in the inflow. The main topic of this thesis is to investigate the effect...... that is formed in attached boundary layers, but the freestream turbulence can penetrate the boundary layer. The idea is that the resolved turbulence from the freestream should mix high momentum flow into the boundary layer and thereby increase the resistance against separation and increase the maximum lift...

  20. New class of combustion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzhanov, A.G.; Borovinskaya, I.P.

    1975-01-01

    A short review is given of the results of work carried out since 1967 on studying the combustion processes caused by the interaction of chemical elements in the condensed phase and leading to the formation of refractory compounds. New phenomena and processes are described which are revealed when investigating the combustion of the systems of this class, viz solid-phase combustion, fast combustion in the condensed phase, filtering combustion, combustion in liquid nitrogen, spinning combustion, self-oscillating combustion, and repeated combustion. A new direction in employment of combustion processes is discussed, viz. a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of refractory nitrides, carbides, borides, silicides and other compounds

  1. Utilization and mitigation of VAM/CMM emissions by a catalytic combustion gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, K.; Yoshino, Y.; Kashihara, H. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Hyougo (Japan); Kajita, S.

    2013-07-01

    A system configured with a catalytic combustion gas turbine generator unit is introduced. The system has been developed using technologies produced by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., such as small gas turbines, recuperators and catalytic combustors, and catalytic oxidation units which use exhaust heat from gas turbines. The system combusts (oxidizes) ventilation air methane (less than 1% concentration) and low concentration coal mine methane (30% concentration or less) discharged as waste from coal mines. Thus, it cannot only reduce the consumption of high- quality fuel for power generation, but also mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

  2. Permafrost slowly exhales methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.

    2018-04-01

    Permafrost soils store vast quantities of organic matter that are vulnerable to decomposition under a warming climate. Recent research finds that methane release from thawing permafrost may outpace carbon dioxide as a major contributor to global warming over the next century.

  3. Methane pellet moderator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.; Carpenter, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A methane pellet moderator assembly consisting of a pelletizer, a helium cooled sub-cooling tunnel, a liquid helium cooled cryogenic pellet storage hopper and a 1.5L moderator cell has been constructed for the purpose demonstrating a system for use in high-power spallation sources. (orig.)

  4. Methane emissions from grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol - van Dasselaar, van den A.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction

    Methane (CH 4 ) is an important greenhouse gas. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has been increasing since pre-industrial times, mainly due to human activities. This increase gives concern,

  5. The turbulent viscosity models and their experimental validation; Les modeles de viscosite turbulente et leur validation experimentale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This workshop on turbulent viscosity models and on their experimental validation was organized by the `convection` section of the French society of thermal engineers. From the 9 papers presented during this workshop, 8 deal with the modeling of turbulent flows inside combustion chambers, turbo-machineries or in other energy-related applications, and have been selected for ETDE. (J.S.)

  6. LES of a laboratory-scale turbulent premixed bunsen flame using FSD, PCM-FPI and thickened flame models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez Perez, F.E.; Yuen, F.T.C.; Groth, C.P.T.; Gülder, O.L.

    2011-01-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) of a turbulent premixed Bunsen flame were carried out with three subfilter-scale (SFS) modelling approaches for turbulent premixed combustion. One approach is based on the artificially thickened flame and power-law flame wrinkling models, the second approach is based on

  7. Impact on the greenhouse effect of peat mining and combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodhe, H.; Svensson, Bo

    1995-01-01

    Combustion of peat leads to emission of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the atmosphere. In addition, mining of the peat alters the environment such that the natural fluxes of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases are modified. Of particular interest is a reduction in the emission of methane (CH 4 ) in the drained parts of the mires. We estimate the total impact on the greenhouse effect of these processes. The results indicate that the decreased emission of methane from the drained mires compensates for about 15% of the CO 2 emission during the combustion of the peat. It follows that, in a time perspective of less than several hundred years, peat is comparable to a fossil fuel, as far as the contribution to the greenhouse effect is concerned. 39 refs, 1 fig, 4 tabs

  8. Methane emissions from natural wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.L. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States); Burke, R.A. Jr. [Environmental Protection Agency, Athens, GA (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1993-09-01

    Analyses of air trapped in polar ice cores in conjunction with recent atmospheric measurements, indicate that the atmospheric methane concentration increased by about 250% during the past two or three hundred years (Rasmussen and Khalil, 1984). Because methane is a potent ``greenhouse`` gas, the increasing concentrations are expected to contribute to global warning (Dickinson and Cicerone, 1986). The timing of the methane increase suggests that it is related to the rapid growth of the human population and associated industrialization and agricultural development. The specific causes of the atmospheric methane concentration increase are not well known, but may relate to either increases in methane sources, decreases in the strengths of the sinks, or both.

  9. Radiation energy devaluation in diffusion combusting flows of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhanlall, Deodat; Munda, Josiah L.; Jiang, Peixue

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: CFD (Computational fluid dynamics) is used to evaluate the thermodynamic second-law effects of thermal radiation in turbulent diffusion natural gas flames. Radiative heat transfer processes in gas and at solid walls are identified as important causes of energy devaluation in the combusting flows. The thermodynamic role of thermal radiation cannot be neglected when compared to that of heat conduction and convection, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and viscous dissipation. An energy devaluation number is also defined, with which the optimum fuel–air equivalence for combusting flows can be determined. The optimum fuel–air equivalence ratio for a natural gas flame is determined to be 0.7. The CFD model is validated against experimental measurements. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic effects of thermal radiation in combusting flows analyzed. • General equation for second-law analyses of combusting flows extended. • Optimum fuel–air equivalence ratio determined for natural gas flame

  10. Turbulence Modulation by Non-Spherical Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias

    This study deals with the interaction between turbulence and non-spherical particles and represents an extension of the modeling framework for particleladen flows. The effect of turbulence on particles is commonly referred to as turbulent dispersion while the effect of particles on the carrier....... This study encompass an outlook on existing work, an experimental study, development of a numerical model and a case study advancing the modeling techniques for pulverized coal combustion to deal with larger non-spherical biomass particles. Firstly, existing knowledge concerning the motion of non......-spherical particles and turbulence modulation are outlined. A complete description of the motion of non-spherical particles is still lacking. However, evidence suggests that the equation of motion for a sphere only represent an asymptotical value for a more general, but yet unformulated, description of the motion...

  11. Investigations on H2 combustion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitung, W.; Hesselschwerdt, E.; Massier, H.; Moeschke, M.; Redlinger, R.; Wilkening, H.; Werle, H.; Wolff, J.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994 results were obtained for turbulent deflagrations, detonation ignition criteria, and detonations. In the field of turbulent deflagrations, two different 2-d codes have been developed, which are capable of describing the large spectrum of combustion regimes important for severe accident analysis. Two series of large scale experiments on turbulent H 2 -air combustion have been completed, one with premixed atmospheres, one with dynamic H 2 -injection into the test volume. They provided new clean data for code evaluation on reactor relevant scale (up to 480 m 3 volume). In the field of detonation ignition criteria different mechanisms were investigated which can trigger a transition from deflagration to detonation (DDT). Large scale experiments were performed on turbulent jet ignition of unconfined H 2 -air mixtures. As in earlier small scale tests, detonation ignition was only observed above 25% hydrogen in air. Such reactive mixtures will be rare in severe accidents. Pressure wave focussing was also investigated experimentally. The Mach numbers necessary to trigger a local detonation in different geometries and in different H 2 -air mixtures were measured on small scale. The conditions necessary for a shockless detonation ignition by induction time gradients were calculated. Only close to the reactor pressure vessel the corresponding temperatures and temperature gradients can possibly exist, not in the remainder of the containment. In the field of detonation modeling the code development was completed. Detonation experiments were performed in a 12 m tube equipped with complex obstacles. Some of the data were used to validate the codes. The remaining analysis will be performed in early 1995. The codes can describe well all important physical phenomena which influence detonation loads in complex 3-d geometries. The validated codes were used to calculate local detonation loads in a preliminary EPR containment. (orig./HP)

  12. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  13. Boiler using combustible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  14. Investigation of bluff-body micro-flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ehsan; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The temperature uniformity of the micro-flameless combustion increases when a triangular bluff-body is applied. • The velocity and temperature of exhaust gases are higher in micro-flameless combustion compared to the conventional mode. • The rate of fuel–oxidizer consumption in micro-flameless mode is lower than conventional micro-combustion. - Abstract: Characteristics of lean premixed conventional micro-combustion and lean non-premixed flameless regime of methane/air are investigated in this paper by solving three-dimensional governing equations. At moderate equivalence ratio (∅ = 0.5), standard k–ε and the eddy-dissipation concept are employed to simulate temperature distribution and combustion stability of these models. The effect of bluff-body on the temperature distribution of both conventional and flameless mode is developed. The results show that in the premixed conventional micro-combustion the stability of the flame is increased when a triangular bluff-body is applied. Moreover, micro-flameless combustion is more stable when bluff-body is used. Micro-flameless mode with bluff-body and 7% O 2 concentration (when N 2 is used as diluent) illustrated better performance than other cases. The maximum temperature in premixed conventional micro-combustion and micro-flameless combustion was recorded 2200 K and 1520 K respectively. Indeed, the flue gas temperature of conventional mode and flameless combustion was 1300 K and 1500 K respectively. The fluctuation of temperature in the conventional micro-combustor wall has negative effects on the combustor and reduces the lifetime of micro-combustor. However, in the micro-flameless mode, the wall temperature is moderate and uniform. The rate of fuel–oxidizer consumption in micro-flameless mode takes longer time and the period of cylinders recharging is prolonged

  15. Prediction of Combustion Instability with Detailed Chemical Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    of combustion instability. The mechanisms used for methane oxidation are the GRI 1.2 set that comprises of 32 chemical species and 177 reactions. All...with a single step global reaction and the GRI -1.2 kinetics mechanism which contains 177 reactions. The paper is organized as follows, Section II...flame speeds10. GRI -1.2 is a more complete set of hydrocarbon reactions consisting of 177 reactions involving 32 species and was optimized for natural

  16. Symposium on Turbulent Shear Flows, 7th, Stanford University, CA, Aug. 21-23, 1989, Proceedings. Volumes 1 ampersand 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Papers on turbulent shear flows are presented, covering topics such as the structure of pressure fluctuations, fossil two-dimensional turbulence in the ocean, turbulence production and eddy structure in wall turbulence, bypass transition in a heated boundary layer, a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow, the evolution of an axisymmetric jet, plane mixing layer development, vortex models of a pseudoturbulent shear flow, numerical techniques for turbulence studies, Reynolds stress in the wall region of turbulent pipe flow, the turbulent structure of a momentumless wake, the near field of the transverse jet. Additional topics include a turbulent boundary layer disturbed by a cylinder, evolving mixing layers, flow analysis in a vortex flowmeter, ejections and bursts in pulsatile turbulent wall flow measurements, a flat plate oscillating in pitch, turbulent buoyant flows, isothermal lobed mixer flows, flow distortion on a turbulent scalar field, two phase flows. In addition, papers on the applications of turbulent shear flow studies are given, including air pollutant deposition, closures, oceanography, instrumentation, heat transfer, rotating flows, combustion, coherent structures, turbulence control, and scalar transport modeling

  17. Experience with the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Technique for the Modelling of Premixed and Non-premixed Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Malalasekera, W; Ibrahim, SS; Masri, AR; Gubba, SR; Sadasivuni, SK

    2013-01-01

    Compared to RANS based combustion modelling, the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique has recently emerged as a more accurate and very adaptable technique in terms of handling complex turbulent interactions in combustion modelling problems. In this paper application of LES based combustion modelling technique and the validation of models in non-premixed and premixed situations are considered. Two well defined experimental configurations where high quality data are available for validation is...

  18. Direct numerical simulations of evaporating droplets in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    This work demonstrates direct numerical simulations of evaporating two phase flows, with applications to studying combustion in aircraft engines. Inside the engine, liquid fuel is injected into the combustion chamber where it atomizes into droplets and evaporates. Combustion occurs as the fuel vapor mixes with the surrounding flow of turbulent gas. Understanding combustion, therefore, requires studying evaporation in a turbulent flow and the resulting vapor distribution. We study the problem using a finite volume framework to solve the Navier-Stokes and scalar transport equations under a low-Mach assumption [Desjardins et al., J. Comp. Phys., 2008]. The liquid-gas interface is tracked using a conservative level-set method [Desjardins et al., J. Comp. Phys., 2008] which allows for a sharp reconstruction of the discontinuity across the interface. Special care is taken in the discretization of cells near the liquid-gas interface to ensure the stability and accuracy of the solution. Results are discussed for non-reacting simulations of liquid droplets evaporating into a turbulent field of inert gas.

  19. Design and evaluation of a porous burner for the mitigation of anthropogenic methane emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susie; Fletcher, David F; Joseph, Stephen D; Dawson, Adrian; Harris, Andrew T

    2009-12-15

    Methane constitutes 15% of total global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The mitigation of these emissions could have a significant near-term effect on slowing global warming, and recovering and burning the methane would allow a wasted energy resource to be exploited. The typically low and fluctuating energy content of the emission streams makes combustion difficult; however porous burners-an advanced combustion technology capable of burning low-calorific value fuels below the conventional flammability limit-are one possible mitigation solution. Here we discuss a pilot-scale porous burner designed for this purpose. The burner comprises a cylindrical combustion chamber filled with a porous bed of alumina saddles, combined with an arrangement of heat exchanger tubes for preheating the incoming emission stream. A computational fluid dynamics model was developed to aid in the design process. Results illustrating the burner's stable operating range and behavior are presented: stable ultralean combustion is demonstrated at natural gas concentrations as low as 2.3 vol%, with transient combustion at concentrations down to 1.1 vol%; the system is comparatively stable to perturbations in the operating conditions, and emissions of both carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons are negligible. Based on this pilot-scale demonstration, porous burners show potential as a methane mitigation technology.

  20. Future combustion methods for biomethane powered tractor engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prehn, Sascha; Harndorf, Horst; Wichmann, Volker; Beberdick, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Biomethane represents an alternative to fossil fuels (petrol, diesel), not only in the on-road sector. Methane-based fuels come in focus of farmers in the agriculture sector, due to cost constraints, increasing regulation of pollutant emissions and reduction of carbondioxid. To represent a monovalent gas operation, a functional model is derived from a series diesel engine for agricultural use. On the test engine, systematic studies on the combustion process are carried out by cylinder pressure indication and exhaust-emission measurement. Combustion under stoichiometric conditions (with or without exhaust gas recirculation) as well as the conversion of fuel from excess air is observed. The study shows that with a natural-gas engine, a complex post-treatment system of exhaust gas (DOC + DPF + SCR) that is typically for diesel engines can be dispensed with. The exhaust gas limits in force since 2014 and a limitation of methane on 0,5 g/kWh can be met with a stoichiometric combustion concept and a three way catalytic converter optimized for the methane oxidation.

  1. Lump wood combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  2. Methane and Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Fluxes in Amazon Floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melack, J. M.; MacIntyre, S.; Forsberg, B.; Barbosa, P.; Amaral, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Field studies on the central Amazon floodplain in representative aquatic habitats (open water, flooded forests, floating macrophytes) combine measurements of methane and carbon dioxide concentrations and fluxes to the atmosphere over diel and seasonal times with deployment of meteorological sensors and high-resolution thermistors and dissolved oxygen sondes. A cavity ringdown spectrometer is used to determine gas concentrations, and floating chambers and bubble collectors are used to measure fluxes. To further understand fluxes, we measured turbulence as rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy based on microstructure profiling. These results allow calculations of vertical mixing within the water column and of air-water exchanges using surface renewal models. Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes varied as a function of season, habitat and water depth. High CO2 fluxes at high water are related to high pCO2; low pCO2 levels at low water result from increased phytoplankton uptake. CO2 fluxes are highest at turbulent open water sites, and pCO2 is highest in macrophyte beds. Fluxes and pCH4 are high in macrophyte beds.

  3. Visualizing turbulent mixing of gases and particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu; Smith, Philip J.; Jain, Sandeep

    1995-01-01

    A physical model and interactive computer graphics techniques have been developed for the visualization of the basic physical process of stochastic dispersion and mixing from steady-state CFD calculations. The mixing of massless particles and inertial particles is visualized by transforming the vector field from a traditionally Eulerian reference frame into a Lagrangian reference frame. Groups of particles are traced through the vector field for the mean path as well as their statistical dispersion about the mean position by using added scalar information about the root mean square value of the vector field and its Lagrangian time scale. In this way, clouds of particles in a turbulent environment are traced, not just mean paths. In combustion simulations of many industrial processes, good mixing is required to achieve a sufficient degree of combustion efficiency. The ability to visualize this multiphase mixing can not only help identify poor mixing but also explain the mechanism for poor mixing. The information gained from the visualization can be used to improve the overall combustion efficiency in utility boilers or propulsion devices. We have used this technique to visualize steady-state simulations of the combustion performance in several furnace designs.

  4. Turbulence generation by waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  5. Methane oxidation in presence of sulfur dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantashyan, A.A.; Avetisyan, A.M.; Makaryan, E.M.; Wang, H.

    2006-01-01

    The emission of sulfurous gases including SO 2 from stationary power generation remains to be a serious environmental and ecological problem. Sulfurous gases are almost entirely produced from the combustion of sulfur-containing fuels. While fuel desulfurization and flue gas scrubbing is a viable solution, in the developing countries it remains to be an economical challenge to implement these SO x reduction technologies. The oxidation of methane in presence of sulfurous gas (SO 2 ) addition was studied experimentally. Te experiments were conducted in a static reactor at temperature of 728-786 K, and for mixture of C 4 /O 2 ≡ 1/2 at a pressure of 117 Torr with varying amount of SO 2 addition. It was observed that SO 2 addition accelerated the oxidation process, reduced the induction period and increased the extent of methane consumption. At the relatively short resident time (less than 50 sec) SO 3 was detected, but at longer residence time SO 3 was reduced spontaneously to SO 2

  6. Cycle-to-cycle fluctuation of combustion in a spark-ignition engine; Hibana tenka engine no nensho hendo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamamoto, Y; Yoshiyama, S; Tomita, E; Hamagami, T [Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Otsubo, H [Yammer Diesel Engine Co. Ltd. Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    In a homogeneous charge spark-ignition engine, the duration of early stage of combustion is a dominant factor for determining the fluctuation of mean effective pressure. And the early stage of combustion varies with the equivalence ratio and turbulence characteristics of the mixture. In this study, the fluctuations of 1% combustion duration and indicated mean effective pressure Pmi were computed as the function of fluctuations both in the equivalence ratio {phi} of the mixture and in the turbulence characteristics of the cylinder charge. And effects of the spark timing {theta}ig and {phi} on the cycle-to-cycle fluctuation in Pmi were investigated. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Flameless Combustion Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutmark, Ephraim

    2005-01-01

    .... "Flameless Combustion" is characterized by high stability levels with virtually no thermoacoustic instabilities, very low lean stability limits and therefore extremely low NOx production, efficient...

  8. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  9. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  10. Experimental Study of Hydrogen Addition Effects on a Swirl-Stabilized Methane-Air Flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of H2 addition on a premixed methane-air flame was studied experimentally with a swirl-stabilized gas turbine model combustor. Experiments with 0%, 25%, and 50% H2 molar fraction in the fuel mixture were conducted under atmospheric pressure. The primary objectives are to study the impacts of H2 addition on flame lean blowout (LBO limits, flame shapes and anchored locations, flow field characteristics, precessing vortex core (PVC instability, as well as the CO emission performance. The flame LBO limits were identified by gradually reducing the equivalence ratio until the condition where the flame physically disappeared. The time-averaged CH chemiluminescence was used to reveal the characteristics of flame stabilization, e.g., flame structure and stabilized locations. In addition, the inverse Abel transform was applied to the time-averaged CH results so that the distribution of CH signal on the symmetric plane of the flame was obtained. The particle image velocimetry (PIV was used to detect the characteristics of the flow field with a frequency of 2 kHz. The snapshot method of POD (proper orthogonal decomposition and fast Fourier transform (FFT were adopted to capture the most prominent coherent structures in the turbulent flow field. CO emission was monitored with an exhaust probe that was installed close to the combustor exit. The experimental results indicated that the H2 addition extended the flame LBO limits and the operation range of low CO emission. The influence of H2 addition on the flame shape, location, and flow field was observed. With the assistance of POD and FFT, the combustion suppression impacts on PVC was found.

  11. Methane cycling. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T; Gruen, Danielle S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C; Holden, James F; Hristov, Alexander N; Pohlman, John W; Morrill, Penny L; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B; Reeves, Eoghan P; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N; Ritter, Daniel J; Seewald, Jeffrey S; McIntosh, Jennifer C; Hemond, Harold F; Kubo, Michael D; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-04-24

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle, with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply substituted "clumped" isotopologues (for example, (13)CH3D) has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures. However, the effect of biological processes on methane's clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on (13)CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation-temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. International evaluation of the programme on engine-related combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcoumanis, D [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Greenhalgh, D [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom); Magnusson, B F [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Peters, N [Institut fuer Technische Mechanik, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    The 12 projects in the engine related combustion programme cover the entire range from fundamental and theoretical aspects of combustion to more applied subjects such as engine control. The common denominator in the programme clearly is the internal combustion engine, both the reciprocating as well as the gas turbine engine. Such a large coverage by a relatively small number of projects necessarily leads to an isolation of some of the projects in terms of their subject as well as the methodology that is used. On the other hand, all the research areas of interest in combustion technology are represented by at least one of the projects. These are: mathematical and numerical methods in combustion; modelling of turbulent combustion; laser diagnostics of flows with combustion; studies of engine performance and their control; semi-empirical model development for practical applications. As a conclusion, the evaluation committee believes that the programme is well balanced between fundamental and applied projects. It covers the entire range of modern methodologies that are used on the international level and thereby contributes to the application and further development of these research tools in Sweden

  13. Experimental study on oxidation and combustion characteristics of sodium droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhigang; Sun Shubin; Liu Chongchong; Tang Yexin

    2015-01-01

    In the operation of the sodium-cooled fast reactor, the accident caused by the leakage and combustion of liquid sodium is common and frequent. In this paper, the oxidation and combustion characteristics of sodium droplets were studied by carrying out the experiments of the oxidation and combustion under different conditions of initial temperatures (140-370℃) of the sodium droplets and oxygen concentrations (4%-21%). The oxidation and combustion behaviors were visualized by a set of combustion apparatus of sodium droplet and a high speed camera. The experiment results show that the columnar oxides grow longer as the initial temperature of sodium droplet and oxygen concentration become lower. Under the same oxygen concentration condition, the sodium droplet with the higher initial temperature is easier to ignite and burn. When the initial temperature of sodium droplet is below 200℃, it is very difficult to ignite. If there is a turbulence damaging the oxide layer on the surface, the sodium droplet will also burn gradually. When the initial temperature ranges from 140℃ to 370℃ and the oxygen fraction is equal to or higher than 12%, the sodium droplet could burn completely and the maximum combustion temperature could roughly reach 600-800℃. When the oxygen concentration is below 12%, the sodium droplet could not burn completely and the highest combustion temperature is below 600℃. The results are helpful to the research on the columnar flow and spray sodium fire. (authors)

  14. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Yanzhao; Dawood, Alaaeldin; Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Somers, Bart; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON

  15. Methane from dairy waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-10-22

    This short article describes a facility which will incorporate features to allow for the recovery of the methane gas that is produced in the manufacture of cheese and spray-dried whey powder at the site. The dairy plant is expected to produce about 1,385 m/sup 3//day of methane which will supplement the operation of oil burners and replace the annual consumption of 4,000 bbl of heavy fuel oil. In addition, development of the treatment system would eliminate the consumption of 7,200 kWh/day of electrical energy that would otherwise be required to operate an aerobic disposal system. Total annual energy savings, when the project is fully operational in the spring of 1984, are expected to reach $321,000.

  16. Methanation: reality or fiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses whether it is possible to partly replace oil and natural gas by electricity-based gas, i.e. to produce methane from water by electrolysis, or by using molecule cracking in dedicated nuclear reactors, and carbon dioxide. He outlines the benefits of this perspective in terms of reduction of imports, and of national electricity production optimisation. He also discusses the drawbacks: it will be difficult to produce the huge required quantity of CO 2 ; it will be even more difficult to produce the required quantity of electricity; the e-methane production cost is much higher than that of the currently imported natural gas. In appendix, the author discusses some key figures related to energy in France (consumption, shares, imports, crucial role of nuclear energy for the future)

  17. Plasma Turbulence General Topics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadomtsev, B. B. [Nuclear Energy Institute, Academy of Sciences of the USSR, Moscow, USSR (Russian Federation)

    1965-06-15

    It is known that under experimental conditions plasma often shows chaotic motion. Such motion, when many degrees of freedom are excited to levels considerably above the thermal level, will be called turbulent. The properties of turbulent plasma in many respects differ from the properties of laminar plasma. It can be said that the appearance of various anomalies in plasma behaviour indicates the presence of turbulence in plasma. In order to verify directly the presence of turbulent motion in plasma we must, however, measure the fluctuation of some microscopic parameters in plasma.

  18. Project identification for methane reduction options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses efforts directed at reduction in emission of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which on a 20 year timeframe may present a similar problem to carbon dioxide. In addition, methane causes additional problems in the form of smog and its longer atmospheric lifetime. The author discusses strategies for reducing methane emission from several major sources. This includes landfill methane recovery, coalbed methane recovery, livestock methane reduction - in the form of ruminant methane reduction and manure methane recovery. The author presents examples of projects which have implemented these ideas, the economics of the projects, and additional gains which come from the projects.

  19. Volumetric Combustion Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-03

    Ma, L., Lei, Q., Capil, T., Hammack, S.D., Cater , C.D., Direct comparison of 2D and 3D LIF measurements on highly turbulent flames, Optics Letters...reporting period: [14]. Ma, L., Lei, Q., Capil, T., Hammack, S.D., Cater , C.D., Direct comparison of 2D and 3D LIF measurements on highly turbulent flames

  20. Molecular hydrogen (H2) combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H) signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S.W.; Röckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its stable isotope signature ( D), and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally