WorldWideScience

Sample records for turbulent fluid motion

  1. Universal equations and constants of turbulent motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumert, H Z

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a parameter-free theory of shear-generated turbulence at asymptotically high Reynolds numbers in incompressible fluids. It is based on a two-fluids concept. Both components are materially identical and inviscid. The first component is an ensemble of quasi-rigid dipole-vortex tubes (vortex filaments, excitations) as quasi-particles in chaotic motion. The second is a superfluid performing evasive motions between the tubes. The local dipole motions follow Helmholtz' law. The vortex radii scale with the energy-containing length scale. Collisions between quasi-particles lead either to annihilation (likewise rotation, turbulent dissipation) or to scattering (counterrotation, turbulent diffusion). There are analogies with birth and death processes of population dynamics and their master equations and with Landau's two-fluid theory of liquid helium. For free homogeneous decay the theory predicts the turbulent kinetic energy to follow t −1 . With an adiabatic wall condition it predicts the logarithmic law with von Kármán's constant as 1/√(2 π)= 0.399. Likewise rotating couples form localized dissipative patches almost at rest (→ intermittency) wherein under local quasi-steady conditions the spectrum evolves into an ‘Apollonian gear’ as discussed first by Herrmann (1990 Correlation and Connectivity (Dordrecht: Kluwer) pp 108–20). Dissipation happens exclusively at scale zero and at finite scales this system is frictionless and reminds of Prigogine's (1947 Etude Thermodynamique des Phenomenes Irreversibles (Liege: Desoer) p 143) law of minimum (here: zero) entropy production. The theory predicts further the prefactor of the 3D-wavenumber spectrum (a Kolmogorov constant) as 1/3 (4 π) 2/3 =1.802, well within the scatter range of observational, experimental and direct numerical simulation results. (paper)

  2. Universal equations and constants of turbulent motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumert, H. Z.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a parameter-free theory of shear-generated turbulence at asymptotically high Reynolds numbers in incompressible fluids. It is based on a two-fluids concept. Both components are materially identical and inviscid. The first component is an ensemble of quasi-rigid dipole-vortex tubes (vortex filaments, excitations) as quasi-particles in chaotic motion. The second is a superfluid performing evasive motions between the tubes. The local dipole motions follow Helmholtz' law. The vortex radii scale with the energy-containing length scale. Collisions between quasi-particles lead either to annihilation (likewise rotation, turbulent dissipation) or to scattering (counterrotation, turbulent diffusion). There are analogies with birth and death processes of population dynamics and their master equations and with Landau's two-fluid theory of liquid helium. For free homogeneous decay the theory predicts the turbulent kinetic energy to follow t-1. With an adiabatic wall condition it predicts the logarithmic law with von Kármán's constant as 1/\\sqrt {2\\,\\pi }= 0.399 . Likewise rotating couples form localized dissipative patches almost at rest (→ intermittency) wherein under local quasi-steady conditions the spectrum evolves into an ‘Apollonian gear’ as discussed first by Herrmann (1990 Correlation and Connectivity (Dordrecht: Kluwer) pp 108-20). Dissipation happens exclusively at scale zero and at finite scales this system is frictionless and reminds of Prigogine's (1947 Etude Thermodynamique des Phenomenes Irreversibles (Liege: Desoer) p 143) law of minimum (here: zero) entropy production. The theory predicts further the prefactor of the 3D-wavenumber spectrum (a Kolmogorov constant) as \\frac {1}{3}(4\\,\\pi )^{2/3}=1.802 , well within the scatter range of observational, experimental and direct numerical simulation results.

  3. Reynolds number scaling of straining motions in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsinga, Gerrit; Ishihara, T.; Goudar, M. V.; da Silva, C. B.; Hunt, J. C. R.

    2017-11-01

    Strain is an important fluid motion in turbulence as it is associated with the kinetic energy dissipation rate, vorticity stretching, and the dispersion of passive scalars. The present study investigates the scaling of the turbulent straining motions by evaluating the flow in the eigenframe of the local strain-rate tensor. The analysis is based on DNS of homogeneous isotropic turbulence covering a Reynolds number range Reλ = 34.6 - 1131. The resulting flow pattern reveals a shear layer containing tube-like vortices and a dissipation sheet, which both scale on the Kolmogorov length scale, η. The vorticity stretching motions scale on the Taylor length scale, while the flow outside the shear layer scales on the integral length scale. These scaling results are consistent with those in wall-bounded flow, which suggests a quantitative universality between the different flows. The overall coherence length of the vorticity is 120 η in all directions, which is considerably larger than the typical size of individual vortices, and reflects the importance of spatial organization at the small scales. Transitions in flow structure are identified at Reλ 45 and 250. Below these respective Reynolds numbers, the small-scale motions and the vorticity stretching motions appear underdeveloped.

  4. On the relative rotational motion between rigid fibers and fluid in turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchioli, C. [Department of Electrical, Management and Mechanical Engineering, University of Udine, 33100 Udine (Italy); Zhao, L., E-mail: lihao.zhao@ntnu.no [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Andersson, H. I. [Department of Electrical, Management and Mechanical Engineering, University of Udine, 33100 Udine (Italy); Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the rotation of small rigid fibers relative to the surrounding fluid in wall-bounded turbulence is examined by means of direct numerical simulations coupled with Lagrangian tracking. Statistics of the relative (fiber-to-fluid) angular velocity, referred to as slip spin in the present study, are evaluated by modelling fibers as prolate spheroidal particles with Stokes number, St, ranging from 1 to 100 and aspect ratio, λ, ranging from 3 to 50. Results are compared one-to-one with those obtained for spherical particles (λ = 1) to highlight effects due to fiber length. The statistical moments of the slip spin show that differences in the rotation rate of fibers and fluid are influenced by inertia, but depend strongly also on fiber length: Departures from the spherical shape, even when small, are associated with an increase of rotational inertia and prevent fibers from passively following the surrounding fluid. An increase of fiber length, in addition, decouples the rotational dynamics of a fiber from its translational dynamics suggesting that the two motions can be modelled independently only for long enough fibers (e.g., for aspect ratios of order ten or higher in the present simulations)

  5. DNS of droplet motion in a turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Michele; Elghobashi, S.

    2013-11-01

    The objective of our research is to study the multi-way interactions between turbulence and vaporizing liquid droplets by performing direct numerical simulations (DNS). The freely-moving droplets are fully resolved in 3D space and time and all the relevant scales of the turbulent motion are simultaneously resolved down to the smallest length- and time-scales. Our DNS solve the unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and continuity equations throughout the whole computational domain, including the interior of the liquid droplets. The droplet surface motion and deformation are captured accurately by using the Level Set method. The pressure jump condition, density and viscosity discontinuities across the interface as well as surface tension are accounted for. Here, we present only the results of the first stage of our research which considers the effects of turbulence on the shape change of an initially spherical liquid droplet, at density ratio (of liquid to carrier fluid) of 1000, moving in isotropic turbulent flow. We validate our results via comparison with available expe. This research has been supported by NSF-CBET Award 0933085 and NSF PRAC (Petascale Computing Resource Allocation) Award.

  6. Langevin equation of a fluid particle in wall-induced turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, J.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    We derive the Langevin equation describing the stochastic process of fluid particle motion in wall-inducedturbulence (turbulent flow in pipes, channels, and boundary layers including the atmospheric surface layer).The analysis is based on the asymptotic behavior at a large Reynolds number. We use

  7. Power laws and inverse motion modelling: application to turbulence measurements from satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo D. Mininni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of tackling the ill-posed inverse problem of motion estimation from image sequences, we propose to introduce prior knowledge on flow regularity given by turbulence statistical models. Prior regularity is formalised using turbulence power laws describing statistically self-similar structure of motion increments across scales. The motion estimation method minimises the error of an image observation model while constraining second-order structure function to behave as a power law within a prescribed range. Thanks to a Bayesian modelling framework, the motion estimation method is able to jointly infer the most likely power law directly from image data. The method is assessed on velocity fields of 2-D or quasi-2-D flows. Estimation accuracy is first evaluated on a synthetic image sequence of homogeneous and isotropic 2-D turbulence. Results obtained with the approach based on physics of fluids outperform state-of-the-art. Then, the method analyses atmospheric turbulence using a real meteorological image sequence. Selecting the most likely power law model enables the recovery of physical quantities, which are of major interest for turbulence atmospheric characterisation. In particular, from meteorological images we are able to estimate energy and enstrophy fluxes of turbulent cascades, which are in agreement with previous in situ measurements.

  8. Periodic Boundary Motion in Thermal Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jun; Libchaber, Albert

    2000-01-01

    A free-floating plate is introduced in a Benard convection cell with an open surface. It partially covers the cell and distorts the local heat flux, inducing a coherent flow that in turn moves the plate. Remarkably, the plate can be driven to a periodic motion even under the action of a turbulent fluid. The period of the oscillation depends on the coverage ratio, and on the Rayleigh number of the convective system. The plate oscillatory behavior observed in this experiment may be related to a geological model, in which continents drift in a quasiperiodic fashion. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  9. Advances in fluid modeling and turbulence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Akira; Ninokata, Hisashi; Tanaka, Nobukazu

    2002-01-01

    The context of this book consists of four fields: Environmental Fluid Mechanics; Industrial Fluid Mechanics; Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics; and Turbulence Measurements. Environmental Fluid Mechanics includes free surface flows in channels, rivers, seas, and estuaries. It also discusses wind engineering issues, ocean circulation model and dispersion problems in atmospheric, water and ground water environments. In Industrial Fluid Mechanics, fluid phenomena in energy exchanges, modeling of turbulent two- or multi-phase flows, swirling flows, flows in combustors, variable density flows and reacting flows, flows in turbo-machines, pumps and piping systems, and fluid-structure interaction are discussed. In Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, progress in modeling turbulent flows and heat/mass transfers, computational fluid dynamics/numerical techniques, parallel computing algorithms, applications of chaos/fractal theory in turbulence are reported. In Turbulence Measurements, experimental studies of turbulent flows, experimental and post-processing techniques, quantitative and qualitative flow visualization techniques are discussed. Separate abstracts were presented for 15 of the papers in this issue. The remaining 89 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  10. Turbulent Fluid Motion 6: Turbulence, Nonlinear Dynamics, and Deterministic Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Several turbulent and nonturbulent solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are obtained. The unaveraged equations are used numerically in conjunction with tools and concepts from nonlinear dynamics, including time series, phase portraits, Poincare sections, Liapunov exponents, power spectra, and strange attractors. Initially neighboring solutions for a low-Reynolds-number fully developed turbulence are compared. The turbulence is sustained by a nonrandom time-independent external force. The solutions, on the average, separate exponentially with time, having a positive Liapunov exponent. Thus, the turbulence is characterized as chaotic. In a search for solutions which contrast with the turbulent ones, the Reynolds number (or strength of the forcing) is reduced. Several qualitatively different flows are noted. These are, respectively, fully chaotic, complex periodic, weakly chaotic, simple periodic, and fixed-point. Of these, we classify only the fully chaotic flows as turbulent. Those flows have both a positive Liapunov exponent and Poincare sections without pattern. By contrast, the weakly chaotic flows, although having positive Liapunov exponents, have some pattern in their Poincare sections. The fixed-point and periodic flows are nonturbulent, since turbulence, as generally understood, is both time-dependent and aperiodic.

  11. Low frequency fluid drift turbulence in magnetised plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.

    2001-03-01

    We start with the first principles of fluid dynamics and classical electrodynamics and then find the regime in which we can reduce to quasineutral dynamics, which also implicitly underlies MHD. Then, we find the limits under which we can specialise to the MHD model as a subset, first of two fluid dynamics, then of the fluid drift dynamics that results when the motions are not vigorous enough to compress the magnetic field. In Chapters 4 and 5 we find the basic character of small disturbances in this system. Chapters 6 through 9 treat various aspects of fluid drift turbulence, also called drift wave turbulence, moving from a simple consideration of the underlying nonlinear dynamics, to some methods by which one can diagnose computations to find out what is going on, and then to the nonlinear instability which is the hallmark of this physics, and then to the interactions with large scale sheared flows. Chapter 10 introduces interchange turbulence, which is the plasma analog of the buoyant convection well known from fluid dynamics. Chapters 11 through 13 treat electromagnetic drift wave turbulence in closed magnetic field geometry, starting with a simplified model treating only the electron pressure and then introducing the electron and ion temperatures. Chapter 14 treats the basic characteristics of the transport that results from fluid drift turbulence, as this is quite different from the kinetic diffusion, such as heat conduction, that is more familiar. Appendices A and B treat the details of the numerical methods and models of magnetic field geometry necessary to treat all but the simplest cases. For this subject is dominated by nonlinear physics and therefore numerical computation. Computations therefore form an integral part of its study right from the beginning. Citations to the literature are not intended to be comprehensive but to serve as starting points for further reading, a section for which is included in every chapter. Much of this work is very new, and

  12. Computational fluid dynamics incompressible turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kajishima, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents numerical solution techniques for incompressible turbulent flows that occur in a variety of scientific and engineering settings including aerodynamics of ground-based vehicles and low-speed aircraft, fluid flows in energy systems, atmospheric flows, and biological flows. This book encompasses fluid mechanics, partial differential equations, numerical methods, and turbulence models, and emphasizes the foundation on how the governing partial differential equations for incompressible fluid flow can be solved numerically in an accurate and efficient manner. Extensive discussions on incompressible flow solvers and turbulence modeling are also offered. This text is an ideal instructional resource and reference for students, research scientists, and professional engineers interested in analyzing fluid flows using numerical simulations for fundamental research and industrial applications. • Introduces CFD techniques for incompressible flow and turbulence with a comprehensive approach; • Enr...

  13. Development of bubble-induced turbulence model for advanced two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Hideaki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A two-fluid model can simulate two-phase flow by computational cost less than detailed two-phase flow simulation method such as interface tracking method. The two-fluid model is therefore useful for thermal hydraulic analysis in the large-scale domain such as rod bundles. However, since the two-fluid model includes a lot of constitutive equations verified by use of experimental results, it has problems that the result of analyses depends on accuracy of the constitutive equations. To solve these problems, an advanced two-fluid model has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency. In this model, interface tracking method is combined with two-fluid model to accurately predict large interface structure behavior. Liquid clusters and bubbles larger than a computational cell are calculated using the interface tracking method, and those smaller than the cell are simulated by the two-fluid model. The constitutive equations to evaluate the effects of small bubbles or droplets on two-phase flow are also required in the advanced two-fluid model, just as with the conventional two-fluid model. However, the dependency of small bubbles and droplets on two-phase flow characteristics is relatively small, and fewer experimental results are required to verify the characteristics of large interface structures. Turbulent dispersion force model is one of the most important constitutive equations for the advanced two-fluid model. The turbulent dispersion force model has been developed by many researchers for the conventional two-fluid model. However, existing models implicitly include the effects of large bubbles and the deformation of bubbles, and are unfortunately not applicable to the advanced two-fluid model. In the previous study, the authors suggested the turbulent dispersion force model based on the analogy of Brownian motion. And the authors improved the turbulent dispersion force model in consideration of bubble-induced turbulence to improve the analysis results for small

  14. ADIABATIC HEATING OF CONTRACTING TURBULENT FLUIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Brant; Goldreich, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence influences the behavior of many astrophysical systems, frequently by providing non-thermal pressure support through random bulk motions. Although turbulence is commonly studied in systems with constant volume and mean density, turbulent astrophysical gases often expand or contract under the influence of pressure or gravity. Here, we examine the behavior of turbulence in contracting volumes using idealized models of compressed gases. Employing numerical simulations and an analytical model, we identify a simple mechanism by which the turbulent motions of contracting gases 'adiabatically heat', experiencing an increase in their random bulk velocities until the largest eddies in the gas circulate over a Hubble time of the contraction. Adiabatic heating provides a mechanism for sustaining turbulence in gases where no large-scale driving exists. We describe this mechanism in detail and discuss some potential applications to turbulence in astrophysical settings.

  15. Turbulent mixing and fluid transport within Florida Bay seagrass meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jennifer C. R.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2017-10-01

    Seagrasses serve an important function in the ecology of Florida Bay, providing critical nursery habitat and a food source for a variety of organisms. They also create significant benthic structure that induces drag, altering local hydrodynamics that can influence mixing and nutrient dynamics. Thalassia testudinum seagrass meadows were investigated to determine how shoot density and morphometrics alter local wave conditions, the generation of turbulence, and fluid exchange above and within the canopy. Sparsely vegetated and densely vegetated meadows were monitored, with shoot densities of 259 ± 26 and 484 ± 78 shoots m-2, respectively. The temporal and spatial structure of velocity and turbulence were measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeters and an in situ particle image velocimetry (PIV) system positioned both above and within the seagrass canopy. The retention of fluid within the canopy was determined by examining e-folding times calculated from the concentration curves of dye plumes released within the seagrass canopy. Results show that a shear layer with an inflection point develops at the top of the seagrass canopy, which generates instabilities that impart turbulence into the seagrass meadow. Compared to the overlying water column, turbulence was enhanced within the sparse canopy due to flow interaction with the seagrass blades, but reduced within the dense canopy. Wave generated oscillatory motion penetrated deeper into the canopy than unidirectional currents, enhancing fluid exchange. Both shoot density and the relative magnitude of wave- versus current-driven flow conditions were found to be important controls on turbulent exchange of water masses across the canopy-water interface.

  16. Turbulence theories and modelling of fluids and plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Yokoi, Nobumitsu [Institute of Industrial Science, Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    Theoretical and heuristic modelling methods are reviewed for studying turbulence phenomena of fluids and plasmas. Emphasis is put on understanding of effects on turbulent characteristics due to inhomogeneities of field and plasma parameters. The similarity and dissimilarity between the methods for fluids and plasmas are sought in order to shed light on the properties that are shared or not by fluid and plasma turbulence. (author)

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Plasma and Fluid Turbulence: Theory and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, A.; Itoh, S. I.; Itoh, K.

    2003-03-01

    The area of turbulence has been covered by many books over the years. This has, of course, mainly been fluid turbulence, while the area of plasma turbulence has been treated much less. This book by Yoshizawa et al covers both plasma and fluid turbulence, in a way that does justice to both areas at the same time as cross-disciplinary aspects are illuminated. The book should be useful to physicists working in both areas partly because it examines fundamental aspects in a pedagogical way, partly because it is up to date and partly because of the cross-disciplinary aspects which enrich both areas. It is written as an advanced textbook. The reader should have previous knowledge of at least one of the areas and also some background in statistical physics. The book starts with the very important and highly up to date area of structure formation which is relevant both to fluids and plasmas. Here, pipe flow of fluids is treated as an introduction to the area, then follows discussion of the generation of magnetic fields by turbulent motion in stellar objects and stucture formation in plasmas confined by a magnetic field. Also the concept of bifurcation is introduced. This part builds up knowledge from the simple fluid case to the problems of magnetic confinement of plasmas in a very pedagogical way. It continues by introducing the fundamentals of fluid turbulence. This is done very systematically and concepts useful for industrial applications like the K-e method and several ways of heuristic modelling are introduced. Also the two dimensional vortex equation, which is also relevant to magnetized plasmas is introduced. In chapter 5 the statistical theory of turbulence is treated. It starts with a very nice and easy to understand example of renormalization of a simple nonlinear equation where the exact solution is known. It introduces the method of partial renormalization, Greens functions and the direct interaction approximation (DIA). The book then continues with an

  18. Threshold Criteria for Incipient Grain Motion with Turbulent Fluctuations on a Horizontal Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, M.W.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of turbulent fluctuations on the threshold criteria for incipient grain motion over a wide range of sediment size is investigated. In this work, attention is paid to the comparison of the critical Shields parameter θ_c profile obtained when the near-bed fluid forces induced sediment motion are oscillating-grid turbulence and a single idealised eddy of vortex ring. For experimental work, near-spherical monodisperse sediments were used throughout with relative densities of 1.2 and 2.5 and mean diameters d ranging between 80 and 1087 μm. The measured values of θ_c on a horizontal bed α = 0 (hence denoted as θ_c_0), were compared to the θ_c_0 profiles obtained by grid turbulence and vortex ring experiments. Although different in magnitude, the θ_c_0 profiles were comparable, that is the θ_c_0 were seen to increase monotonically for hydraulically smooth bed forms and to be approximately constant for hydraulically rough bed forms. However the limit of hydraulically smooth region was found to vary between the oscillating-grid turbulence experiments, where wider smooth region was found when the turbulent fluctuations used to calculate θ_c_0 is not the near-bed velocity. (author)

  19. Turbulent Motion of Liquids in Hydraulic Resistances with a Linear Cylindrical Slide-Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Velescu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the motion of viscous and incompressible liquids in the annular space of controllable hydraulic resistances with a cylindrical linear slide-valve. This theoretical study focuses on the turbulent and steady-state motion regimes. The hydraulic resistances mentioned above are the most frequent type of hydraulic resistances used in hydraulic actuators and automation systems. To study the liquids’ motion in the controllable hydraulic resistances with a linear cylindrical slide-valve, the report proposes an original analytic method. This study can similarly be applied to any other type of hydraulic resistance. Another purpose of this study is to determine certain mathematical relationships useful to approach the theoretical functionality of hydraulic resistances with magnetic controllable fluids as incompressible fluids in the presence of a controllable magnetic field. In this report, we established general analytic equations to calculate (i velocity and pressure distributions, (ii average velocity, (iii volume flow rate of the liquid, (iv pressures difference, and (v radial clearance.

  20. Equations of motion and conservation laws in a theory of stably stratified turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L' vov, Victor S; Rudenko, Oleksii [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)], E-mail: oleksii.rudenko@weizmann.ac.il

    2008-12-15

    This paper is part of an invited talk given at the international conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond'. We consider non-isothermal fluid flows and revise simplifications of basic hydrodynamic equations for such flows, arriving eventually at a generalization of the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation valid for arbitrary equation of state including both non-ideal gases as well as liquids. The proposed approach is based on a suggested general definition of potential temperature. Special attention is paid to the energy conservation principle: the proposed approximation exactly preserves the total mechanical energy by approximate equations of motion. It is emphasized explicitly the importance for any turbulent boundary layer model to respect the conservation laws.

  1. Performances of motion tracking enhanced Tomo-PIV on turbulent shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Matteo; Scarano, Fulvio

    The motion tracking enhancement technique (MTE) is a recently introduced method to improve the accuracy of tomographic PIV measurements at seeding density higher than currently practiced. The working principle is based on the fact that the particle field and its projections are correlated between the two exposures. Therefore, information from subsequent exposures can be shared within the tomographic reconstruction process of a single object, which largely reduces the energy lost into ghost particles . The study follows a previous work based on synthetic particle images, showing that the MTE technique has an effect similar to that of increasing the number of cameras. In the present analysis, MTE is applied to Tomographic PIV data from two time-resolved experiments on turbulent shear flows: a round jet at Re  = 5,000 ( f acq  = 1,000 Hz) and a turbulent boundary layer at the trailing edge of an airfoil ( Re c  = 370,000) measured at 12,000 Hz. The application of MTE is extended to the case of more than two recordings. The performance is assessed comparing the results from a lowered number of cameras with respect to the full tomographic imaging system. The analysis of the jet flow agrees with the findings of numerical simulations provided the results are scaled taking into account the concept of MTE efficiency based on the volume fraction where ghost - pairs (Elsinga et al. 2010a) are produced. When a large fraction of fluid has uniform motion (stagnant fluid surrounding the jet), only a moderate reduction in ghost intensity is expected by MTE. Nevertheless, a visible recovery of reconstruction quality is observed for the 3-cameras system when MTE is applied making use of 3 recordings. In the turbulent boundary layer, the objective is set to increase the seeding density beyond current practice, and the experiments are performed at approximately 200,000 particles/megapixel. The measurement robustness is monitored with the signal-to-noise ratio S/N for the cross

  2. Random forcing of geostrophic motion in rotating stratified turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Michael L.

    2017-12-01

    Random forcing of geostrophic motion is a common approach in idealized simulations of rotating stratified turbulence. Such forcing represents the injection of energy into large-scale balanced motion, and the resulting breakdown of quasi-geostrophic turbulence into inertia-gravity waves and stratified turbulence can shed light on the turbulent cascade processes of the atmospheric mesoscale. White noise forcing is commonly employed, which excites all frequencies equally, including frequencies much higher than the natural frequencies of large-scale vortices. In this paper, the effects of these high frequencies in the forcing are investigated. Geostrophic motion is randomly forced with red noise over a range of decorrelation time scales τ, from a few time steps to twice the large-scale vortex time scale. It is found that short τ (i.e., nearly white noise) results in about 46% more gravity wave energy than longer τ, despite the fact that waves are not directly forced. We argue that this effect is due to wave-vortex interactions, through which the high frequencies in the forcing are able to excite waves at their natural frequencies. It is concluded that white noise forcing should be avoided, even if it is only applied to the geostrophic motion, when a careful investigation of spontaneous wave generation is needed.

  3. Iterative and multigrid methods in the finite element solution of incompressible and turbulent fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, N.; Taylor, C.

    1999-07-01

    Multigrid and iterative methods are used to reduce the solution time of the matrix equations which arise from the finite element (FE) discretisation of the time-independent equations of motion of the incompressible fluid in turbulent motion. Incompressible flow is solved by using the method of reduce interpolation for the pressure to satisfy the Brezzi-Babuska condition. The k-l model is used to complete the turbulence closure problem. The non-symmetric iterative matrix methods examined are the methods of least squares conjugate gradient (LSCG), biconjugate gradient (BCG), conjugate gradient squared (CGS), and the biconjugate gradient squared stabilised (BCGSTAB). The multigrid algorithm applied is based on the FAS algorithm of Brandt, and uses two and three levels of grids with a V-cycling schedule. These methods are all compared to the non-symmetric frontal solver. Copyright

  4. Nonlinear dynamics of a flexible rotor supported by turbulent journal bearings with couple stress fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.-Y.; Chang-Jian, C.-W.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a dynamic analysis of a rotor supported by two turbulent flow model journal bearings and lubricated with couple stress fluid under nonlinear suspension. The dynamics of the rotor center and bearing center is studied. The dynamic equations are solved using the Runge-Kutta method. The analysis methods employed in this study is inclusive of the dynamic trajectories of the rotor center and bearing center, power spectra, Poincare maps and bifurcation diagrams. The maximum Lyapunov exponent analysis is also used to identify the onset of chaotic motion. The results show that the values of dimensionless parameters l* strongly influence dynamic motions of bearing and rotor centre. It is found that couple stress fluid improve the stability of the system when l* > 0.4 even if the flow of this system is turbulent. We also demonstrated that the dimensionless rotational speed ratios s and the dimensionless unbalance parameter β are also significant system parameters. The modeling results thus obtained by using the method proposed in this paper can be employed to predict the stability of the rotor-bearing system and the undesirable behavior of the rotor and bearing center can be avoided

  5. The turbulent mixing of non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demianov, A. Yu; Doludenko, A. N.; Inogamov, N. A.; Son, E. E.

    2013-07-01

    The turbulence caused by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability represents a complicated phenomenon. It is usually related to the major hydrodynamic activities, the tangling of the media contact boundary, merging, separation and intermixing of originally smoothed initial structures. An important role in the theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is played by the discontinuity of density on a contact interface between two homogeneous (in terms of density) fluids. A numerical modeling of the intermixing of two fluids with different rheology whose densities differ twice as a result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability has been carried out. The coefficients of turbulent intermixing in a multimode statement of the problem for the Bingham, dilatant and pseudo-plastic fluids have been obtained.

  6. Introduction to the theory of fluid and magnetofluid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1984-03-01

    This set of notes was transcribed from the tape recording of three lectures given at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, in June, 1983. The lectures were intended to provide an introduction to the theory of magnetofluid turbulence which is a relatively new branch of plasma physics. It is related more closely to classic fluid dynamics than to the nonlinear theory of plasma oscillation. For this reason, fluid turbulence theory was reviewed as the background of the subject. The first lecture is on the origins of fluid and magnetofluid turbulence. The universal transition to turbulence takes place at sufficiently high Reynolds number, well above the critical threshold. The second lecture is on closures, attempt on dynamical theories. The Navier-Stokes case is discussed, and the attempt to reduce the number of the degrees of freedom, the importance of helicity in MHD, the direct interaction approximation (DIA) and others are explained. The third lecture is on the cascade and inverse cascade in fluid and magnetofluid. The idea of cascade was introduced into the theory of Navier-Stokes turbulence around 1941. The calculation of a form for inertial range energy spectra, the relation with dissipation rate, the tendency of migrating to long wavelength, the simulation of decaying turbulence, the numbers characterizing MHD and others are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  7. Description and detection of burst events in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, P. J.; García-Gutierrez, A.; Jiménez, J.

    2018-04-01

    A mathematical and computational framework is developed for the detection and identification of coherent structures in turbulent wall-bounded shear flows. In a first step, this data-based technique will use an embedding methodology to formulate the fluid motion as a phase-space trajectory, from which state-transition probabilities can be computed. Within this formalism, a second step then applies repeated clustering and graph-community techniques to determine a hierarchy of coherent structures ranked by their persistencies. This latter information will be used to detect highly transitory states that act as precursors to violent and intermittent events in turbulent fluid motion (e.g., bursts). Used as an analysis tool, this technique allows the objective identification of intermittent (but important) events in turbulent fluid motion; however, it also lays the foundation for advanced control strategies for their manipulation. The techniques are applied to low-dimensional model equations for turbulent transport, such as the self-sustaining process (SSP), for varying levels of complexity.

  8. Application of foam-extend on turbulent fluid-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rege, K.; Hjertager, B. H.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulent flow around flexible structures is likely to induce structural vibrations which may eventually lead to fatigue failure. In order to assess the fatigue life of these structures, it is necessary to take the action of the flow on the structure into account, but also the influence of the vibrating structure on the fluid flow. This is achieved by performing fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations. In this work, we have investigated the capability of a FSI toolkit for the finite volume computational fluid dynamics software foam-extend to simulate turbulence-induced vibrations of a flexible structure. A large-eddy simulation (LES) turbulence model has been implemented to a basic FSI problem of a flexible wall which is placed in a confined, turbulent flow. This problem was simulated for 2.32 seconds. This short simulation required over 200 computation hours, using 20 processor cores. Thereby, it has been shown that the simulation of FSI with LES is possible, but also computationally demanding. In order to make turbulent FSI simulations with foam-extend more applicable, more sophisticated turbulence models and/or faster FSI iteration schemes should be applied.

  9. Soliton turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  10. Strong Turbulence in Low-beta Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchen, C. M.; Pécseli, Hans; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of the spectral structure of turbulence in a plasma confined by a strong homogeneous magnetic field was made by means of a fluid description. The turbulent spectrum is divided into subranges. Mean gradients of velocity and density excite turbulent motions, and govern the production......-cathode reflex arc, Stellarator, Zeta discharge, ionospheric plasmas, and auroral plasma turbulence....

  11. Temperature oscillation and the sloshing motion of the large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Chen, Xin; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2017-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the temperature oscillation and the sloshing motion of the large-scale circulation (LSC) in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water. Temperature measurements were made in aspect ratio one cylindrical cell by probes put in fluid and embedded in the sidewall simultaneously, and located at the 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 heights of the convection cell. The results show that the temperature measured in fluid contains information of both the LSC and the signature of the hot and cold plumes, while the temperature measured in sidewall only contains information of the LSC. It is found that the sloshing motion of the LSC can be measured by both the temperatures in fluid and in sidewall. We also studies the effect of cell tilting on the temperature oscillation and sloshing motion of the LSC. It is found that both the amplitude and the frequency of the temperature oscillation (and the sloshing motion) increase when the tilt angle increases, while the off-center distance of the sloshing motion of the LSC remains unchanged. This work is supported by the NSFC of China (Grant Nos. 11472094 and U1613227), the RGC of Hong Kong SAR (Grant No. 403712) and the 111 project of China (Grant No. B17037).

  12. ION KINETIC ENERGY CONSERVATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH CONSTANCY IN MULTI-FLUID SOLAR WIND ALFVÉNIC TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, L.; Horbury, T. S.; Schwartz, S. J. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Pantellini, F. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universit Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Velli, M. [Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, UCLA, California (United States)

    2015-03-20

    We investigate the properties of plasma fluid motion in the large-amplitude, low-frequency fluctuations of highly Alfvénic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles which, due to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low-frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform the proton velocity into the frame of Alfvénic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfvénic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfvénic turbulence, is the origin of the observed constancy of the magnetic field; while the constant velocity corresponding to constant energy can only be observed in the frame of the fluctuations, the corresponding constant total magnetic field, invariant for Galilean transformations, remains the observational signature in the spacecraft frame of the constant total energy in the Alfvén turbulence frame.

  13. Turbulent diffusion of small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolin, L.G.

    1977-11-01

    The diffusion of small, spherical, rigid particles suspended in an incompressible turbulent fluid, but not interacting with each other, was studied. As a stochastic process, the turbulent fluid velocity field is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic and stationary. Assuming the Stokes regime, a particle of equation of motion is used which includes only the effects of Stokes drag and a virtual mass force and an exact solution is found for the particle velocity correlation function, for all times and initial conditions, in terms of a fluid velocity correlation function measured along the motion of the particle. This shows that for times larger than a certain time scale, the particle velocity correlation becomes stationary. The effect of small shears in the fluid velocity was considered, under the additional restrictions of a certain high frequency regime for the turbulence. The shears convected past the particle much faster than the growth of the boundary layer. New force terms due to the presence of such shears are calculated and incorporated into the equation of motion. A perturbation solution to this equation is constructed, and the resultant particle velocity correlation function and diffusion coefficient are calculated. To lowest order, the particle diffusivity is found to be unaltered by the presence of small mean flow shears. The last model treated is one in which particles traverse a turbulent fluid with a large mean velocity. Among other restrictions, linearized form drag is assumed. The diffusion coefficient for such particles was calculated, and found to be much smaller than the passive scalar diffusion coefficient. This agrees within 5 percent with the experimental results of Snyder and Lumley

  14. Advances in the simulation of toroidal gyro Landau fluid model turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, R.E.; Kerbel, G.D.; Milovich, J.; Hammett, G.W.

    1994-12-01

    The gyro-Landau fluid (GLF) model equations for toroidal geometry have been recently applied to the study ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence using the 3D nonlinear ballooning mode representation (BMR). The present paper extends this work by treating some unresolved issues conceming ITG turbulence with adiabatic electrons. Although eddies are highly elongated in the radial direction long time radial correlation lengths are short and comparable to poloidal lengths. Although transport at vanishing shear is not particularly large, transport at reverse global shear, is significantly less. Electrostatic transport at moderate shear is not much effected by inclusion of local shear and average favorable curvature. Transport is suppressed when critical ExB rotational shear is comparable to the maximum linear growth rate with only a weak dependence on magnetic shear. Self consistent turbulent transport of toroidal momentum can result in a transport bifurcation at suffciently large r/(Rq). However the main thrust of the new formulation in the paper deals with advances in the development of finite beta GLF models with trapped electron and BMR numerical methods for treating the fast parallel field motion of the untrapped electrons

  15. Flowing and heat transfer characteristics of turbulent flow in typical rod bundles at rolling motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Binghuo; Yu Lei; Gu Hanyang

    2011-01-01

    The influence mechanism of rolling motion on the flowing and heat transfer characteristics of turbulent flow in typical four rod bundles was investigated with Fluent code. The flowing and heat transfer characteristics of turbulent flow in rod bundles can be affected by rolling motion. But the flowing similarity of turbulent flow in adiabatic and non-adiabatic can not be affected. If the rolling period is small, the radial additional force can make the parameter profiles, the turbulent flowing and heat transfer change greatly. At rolling motion, as the pitch to diameter ratio decreases, especially if it is less than 1.1, the flowing and heat transfer of turbulent flow at rolling motion change significantly. The variation of pitch to diameter ratio can change the profiles of secondary flow and turbulent kinetic energy in cross-section greatly. (authors)

  16. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-11-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k5/3 which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  17. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-01-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k(sup 5/3) which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M$ millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  18. Planktivorous feeding in calm and turbulent environments, with emphasis on copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Saiz, E.

    1995-01-01

    Turbulence may enhance contact rates between planktonic predators and their prey. We formulate simple and general models of prey encounter rates, taking into account the behaviours and motility patterns of both prey and predator as well as turbulent fluid motion. Using these models we determine...... the levels of turbulence (as dissipation rate) at which ambient fluid motion is important in enhancing prey encounter rates for various types of predators (e.g, ambush and cruise predators, suspension feeders). Generally, turbulence has the largest effect on prey encounters for predators with low motility...... and long reaction distances. Also, turbulence is most important for meso-sized (mm to cm) predators and insignificant for smaller and larger predators. The effect of turbulence on copepods is specifically examined. For copepods that establish feeding currents, turbulence is of minor importance; for ambush...

  19. Annual review of fluid mechanics. Volume 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumley, J.L.; Van Dyke, M.; Reed, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in theoretical, experimental, and computational fluid mechanics are discussed in a collection of annual review essays. Topics addressed include Lagrangian ocean studies, drag reduction in nature, the hydraulics of rotating strait and sill flow, analytical methods for the development of Reynolds-stress closures in turbulence, and exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Consideration is given to the theory of hurricanes, flow phenomena in CVD of thin films, particle-imaging techniques for experimental fluid mechanics, symmetry and symmetry-breaking bifurcations in fluid dynamics, turbulent mixing in stratified fluids, numerical simulation of transition in wall-bounded shear flows, fractals and multifractals in fluid turbulence, and coherent motions in the turbulent boundary layer

  20. Turbulence and fossil turbulence lead to life in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, Carl H

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than all the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Fossil turbulence is a perturbation produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid ceases to be turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Because vorticity is produced at small scales, turbulence must cascade from small scales to large, providing a consistent physical basis for Kolmogorovian universal similarity laws. Oceanic and astrophysical mixing and diffusion are dominated by fossil turbulence and fossil turbulent waves. Observations from space telescopes show turbulence and vorticity existed in the beginning of the universe and that their fossils persist. Fossils of big bang turbulence include spin and the dark matter of galaxies: clumps of ∼10 12 frozen hydrogen planets that make globular star clusters as seen by infrared and microwave space telescopes. When the planets were hot gas, they hosted the formation of life in a cosmic soup of hot-water oceans as they merged to form the first stars and chemicals. Because spontaneous life formation according to the standard cosmological model is virtually impossible, the existence of life falsifies the standard cosmological model. (paper)

  1. Turbulent characteristics of shear-thinning fluids in recirculating flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, A.S. [Inst. Superior de Engenharia do Porto (Portugal). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Pinho, F.T. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)

    2000-03-01

    A miniaturised fibre optic laser-Doppler anemometer was used to carry out a detailed hydrodynamic investigation of the flow downstream of a sudden expansion with 0.1-0.2% by weight shear-thinning aqueous solutions of xanthan gum. Upstream of the sudden expansion the pipe flow was fully-developed and the xanthan gum solutions exhibited drag reduction with corresponding lower radial and tangential normal Reynolds stresses, but higher axial Reynolds stress near the wall and a flatter axial mean velocity profile in comparison with Newtonian flow. The recirculation bubble length was reduced by more than 20% relative to the high Reynolds number Newtonian flow, and this was attributed to the occurrence further upstream of high turbulence for the non-Newtonian solutions, because of advection of turbulence and earlier high turbulence production in the shear layer. Comparisons with the measurements of Escudier and Smith (1999) with similar fluids emphasized the dominating role of inlet turbulence. The present was less anisotropic, and had lower maximum axial Reynolds stresses (by 16%) but higher radial turbulence (20%) than theirs. They reported considerably longer recirculating bubble lengths than we do for similar non-Newtonian fluids and Reynolds numbers. (orig.)

  2. Spectral analysis of the turbulent mixing of two fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    The authors describe a spectral approach to the investigation of fluid instability, generalized turbulence, and the interpenetration of fluids across an interface. The technique also applies to a single fluid with large variations in density. Departures of fluctuating velocity components from the local mean are far subsonic, but the mean Mach number can be large. Validity of the description is demonstrated by comparisons with experiments on turbulent mixing due to the late stages of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, when the dynamics become approximately self-similar in response to a constant body force. Generic forms for anisotropic spectral structure are described and used as a basis for deriving spectrally integrated moment equations that can be incorporated into computer codes for scientific and engineering analyses.

  3. Interstellar turbulence model : A self-consistent coupling of plasma and neutral fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Zank, Gary P.; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a preliminary investigation of interstellar turbulence based on a self-consistent two-dimensional fluid simulation model. Our model describes a partially ionized magnetofluid interstellar medium (ISM) that couples a neutral hydrogen fluid to a plasma through charge exchange interactions and assumes that the ISM turbulent correlation scales are much bigger than the shock characteristic length-scales, but smaller than the charge exchange mean free path length-scales. The shocks have no influence on the ISM turbulent fluctuations. We find that nonlinear interactions in coupled plasma-neutral ISM turbulence are influenced substantially by charge exchange processes

  4. Editorial Special Issue on Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a shark is more efficient than a propeller; the notoriously complicated and nonlinear Navier–. Stokes equations governing fluid motion provide fertile ground for research to both applied and pure mathematicians. There is the phenomenon of turbulence in fluid flows. A statement in 1932, attributed to Horace Lamb, author of ...

  5. A computer model for dispersed fluid-solid turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.H.; Tulig, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    A computer model is being developed to simulate two-phase turbulent flow phenomena in fluids containing finely dispersed solids. The model is based on a dual-continuum picture of the individual phases and an extension of a two-equation turbulence closure theory. The resulting set of nonlinear partial differential equations are solved using a finite difference procedure with special treatment to promote convergence. The model has been checked against a number of idealized flow problems with known solutions. The authors are currently comparing model predictions with measurements to determine a proper set of turbulence parameters needed for simulating two-phase turbulent flows

  6. Principles of fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreider, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction on fluid mechanics incorporating computer applications. Topics covered are as follows: brief history; what is a fluid; two classes of fluids: liquids and gases; the continuum model of a fluid; methods of analyzing fluid flows; important characteristics of fluids; fundamentals and equations of motion; fluid statics; dimensional analysis and the similarity principle; laminar internal flows; ideal flow; external laminar and channel flows; turbulent flow; compressible flow; fluid flow measurements

  7. Parallel plasma fluid turbulence calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Carreras, B.A.; Charlton, L.A.; Drake, J.B.; Lynch, V.E.; Newman, D.E.; Sidikman, K.L.; Spong, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The study of plasma turbulence and transport is a complex problem of critical importance for fusion-relevant plasmas. To this day, the fluid treatment of plasma dynamics is the best approach to realistic physics at the high resolution required for certain experimentally relevant calculations. Core and edge turbulence in a magnetic fusion device have been modeled using state-of-the-art, nonlinear, three-dimensional, initial-value fluid and gyrofluid codes. Parallel implementation of these models on diverse platforms--vector parallel (National Energy Research Supercomputer Center's CRAY Y-MP C90), massively parallel (Intel Paragon XP/S 35), and serial parallel (clusters of high-performance workstations using the Parallel Virtual Machine protocol)--offers a variety of paths to high resolution and significant improvements in real-time efficiency, each with its own advantages. The largest and most efficient calculations have been performed at the 200 Mword memory limit on the C90 in dedicated mode, where an overlap of 12 to 13 out of a maximum of 16 processors has been achieved with a gyrofluid model of core fluctuations. The richness of the physics captured by these calculations is commensurate with the increased resolution and efficiency and is limited only by the ingenuity brought to the analysis of the massive amounts of data generated

  8. Vortex Thermometry for Turbulent Two-Dimensional Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groszek, Andrew J; Davis, Matthew J; Paganin, David M; Helmerson, Kristian; Simula, Tapio P

    2018-01-19

    We introduce a new method of statistical analysis to characterize the dynamics of turbulent fluids in two dimensions. We establish that, in equilibrium, the vortex distributions can be uniquely connected to the temperature of the vortex gas, and we apply this vortex thermometry to characterize simulations of decaying superfluid turbulence. We confirm the hypothesis of vortex evaporative heating leading to Onsager vortices proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 165302 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.113.165302, and we find previously unidentified vortex power-law distributions that emerge from the dynamics.

  9. Calibration of NASA Turbulent Air Motion Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, John D. W.; Ritter, John A.; Watson, Catherine E.; Wynkoop, Mark W.; Quinn, John K.; Norfolk, Daniel R.

    1996-01-01

    A turbulent air motion measurement system (TAMMS) was integrated onboard the Lockheed 188 Electra airplane (designated NASA 429) based at the Wallops Flight Facility in support of the NASA role in global tropospheric research. The system provides air motion and turbulence measurements from an airborne platform which is capable of sampling tropospheric and planetary boundary-layer conditions. TAMMS consists of a gust probe with free-rotating vanes mounted on a 3.7-m epoxy-graphite composite nose boom, a high-resolution inertial navigation system (INS), and data acquisition system. A variation of the tower flyby method augmented with radar tracking was implemented for the calibration of static pressure position error and air temperature probe. Additional flight calibration maneuvers were performed remote from the tower in homogeneous atmospheric conditions. System hardware and instrumentation are described and the calibration procedures discussed. Calibration and flight results are presented to illustrate the overall ability of the system to determine the three-component ambient wind fields during straight and level flight conditions.

  10. The Importance of Splat Events to the Spatiotemporal Structure of Near-Bed Fluid Velocity and Bed Load Motion Over Bed Forms: Laboratory Experiments Downstream of a Backward Facing Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, K. C. P.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2017-12-01

    Flow separation/reattachment on the lee side of alluvial bed forms is known to produce a complex turbulence field, but the spatiotemporal details of the associated patterns of bed load sediment transported remain largely unknown. Here we report turbulence-resolving, simultaneous measurements of bed load motion and near-bed fluid velocity downstream of a backward facing step in a laboratory flume. Two synchronized high-speed video cameras simultaneously observed bed load motion and the motion of neutrally buoyant particles in a laser light sheet 6 mm above the bed at 250 frames/s downstream of a 3.8 cm backward facing step. Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) and Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) were used to characterize fluid turbulent patterns, while manual particle tracking techniques were used to characterize bed load transport. Octant analysis, conducted using ADV data, coupled with Markovian sequence probability analysis highlights differences in the flow near reattachment versus farther downstream. Near reattachment, three distinct flow patterns are apparent. Farther downstream we see the development of a dominant flow sequence. Localized, intermittent, high-magnitude transport events are more apparent near flow reattachment. These events are composed of streamwise and cross-stream fluxes of comparable magnitudes. Transport pattern and fluid velocity data are consistent with the existence of permeable "splat events," wherein a volume of fluid moves toward and impinges on the bed (sweep) causing a radial movement of fluid in all directions around the point of impingement (outward interaction). This is congruent with flow patterns, identified with octant analysis, proximal to flow reattachment.

  11. Subchannel analysis with turbulent mixing rate of supercritical pressure fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhui; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Subchannel analysis with turbulent mixing rate law of supercritical pressure fluid (SPF) is carried out. • Turbulent mixing rate is enhanced, compared with that calculated by the law of pressurized water reactor (PWR). • Increase in maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) is smaller comparing with PWR model. • The sensitivities of MCST on non-uniformity of subchannel area and power peaking are reduced by using SPF model. - Abstract: The subchannel analysis with turbulent mixing rate law of supercritical pressure fluid (SPF) is carried out for supercritical-pressurized light water cooled and moderated reactor (Super LWR). It is different from the turbulent mixing rate law of pressurized water reactor (PWR), which is widely adopted in Super LWR subchannel analysis study, the density difference between adjacent subchannels is taken into account for turbulent mixing rate law of SPF. MCSTs are evaluated on three kinds of fuel assemblies with different pin power distribution patterns, gap spacings and mass flow rates. Compared with that calculated by employing turbulent mixing rate law of PWR, the increase in MCST is smaller even when peaking factor is large and gap spacing is uneven. The sensitivities of MCST on non-uniformity of the subchannel area and power peaking are reduced

  12. Fluid model of the magnetic presheath in a turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanojevic, M; Duhovnik, J; Jelic, N; Kendl, A; Kuhn, S

    2005-01-01

    A fluid model of the magnetic presheath in a turbulent boundary plasma is presented. Turbulent transport corrections of the classical three-dimensional fluid transport equations, which can be used to study magnetic presheaths in various geometries, are derived by means of the ensemble averaging procedure from the statistical theory of plasma turbulence. Then, the magnetic presheath in front of an infinite plane surface is analysed in detail. The linearized planar magnetic presheath equations are applied to the plasma-presheath-magnetic-presheath boundary (i.e. the magnetic presheath edge), whereas the original non-linear planar magnetic presheath equations are used for the entire magnetic presheath, allowing for various sets of experimentally relevant free model parameters to be applied. Important new results of this study are, among others, new expressions for the fluid Bohm criterion at the Debye sheath edge and for the ion flux density perpendicular to the wall. These new results, which exhibit corrections due to the turbulent charged particle transport, can qualitatively explain the fact that whenever the angle between the magnetic field and the wall is very small (i.e. several degrees) or zero, electric currents, measured by Langmuir probes in the boundary regions of nuclear fusion devices and in various low-temperature plasmas, are anomalously enhanced in comparison with those expected or predicted by other theoretical models

  13. Turbulence characterization by studying laser beam wandering in a differential tracking motion setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Darío G.; Zunino, Luciano; Gulich, Damián; Funes, Gustavo; Garavaglia, Mario

    2009-09-01

    The Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) is a standard and widely used instrument for astronomical seeing measurements. The seeing values are estimated from the variance of the differential image motion over two equal small pupils some distance apart. The twin pupils are usually cut in a mask on the entrance pupil of the telescope. As a differential method, it has the advantage of being immune to tracking errors, eliminating erratic motion of the telescope. The Differential Laser Tracking Motion (DLTM) is introduced here inspired by the same idea. Two identical laser beams are propagated through a path of air in turbulent motion, at the end of it their wander is registered by two position sensitive detectors-at a count of 800 samples per second. Time series generated from the difference of the pair of centroid laser beam coordinates is then analyzed using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. Measurements were performed at the laboratory with synthetic turbulence: changing the relative separation of the beams for different turbulent regimes. The dependence, with respect to these parameters, and the robustness of our estimators is compared with the non-differential method. This method is an improvement with respect to previous approaches that study the beam wandering.

  14. A glimpse of fluid turbulence from the molecular scale

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S.

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of freely decaying turbulence in three-dimensional space are reported. Fluid components are defined from the microscopic states by eliminating thermal components from the coarse-grained fields. The energy spectrum of the fluid components is observed to scale reasonably well according to Kolmogorov scaling determined from the energy dissipation rate and the viscosity of the fluid, even though the Kolmogorov length is of the order of the molecular scale. © 2014 The Authors.

  15. The Motion Of A Deformable Body In - Bounded Fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galpert, A.R.; Miloh, T.

    1998-01-01

    The Hamiltonian formalism for the motion of a deformable body in an inviscid irrotational fluid is generalized for the case of the motion in a bounded fluid. We found that the presence of the boundaries in a liquid leads to the chaotization of the body's motion. The ('memory' effect connected with a free surface boundary condition is also accounted for

  16. Turbulent magnetohydrodynamics in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berhanu, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In electrically conducting fluids, the electromagnetic field is coupled with the fluid motion by induction effects. We studied different magnetohydrodynamic phenomena, using two experiments involving turbulent flows of liquid metal. The first mid-sized uses gallium. The second, using sodium, is conducted within the VKS (Von Karman Sodium) collaboration. It has led to the observation of the dynamo effect, namely converting a part of the kinetic energy of the fluid into magnetic energy. We have shown that, depending on forcing conditions, a statistically stationary dynamo, or dynamical regimes of magnetic field can be generated. In particular, polarity reversals similar to those of Earth's magnetic field were observed. Meanwhile, experiment with Gallium has been developed to study the effects of electromagnetic induction by turbulent flows in a more homogeneous and isotropic configuration than in the VKS experiment. Using data from these two experiments, we studied the advection of magnetic field by a turbulent flow and the induced fluctuations. The development of probes measuring electrical potential difference allowed us to further highlight the magnetic braking of a turbulent flow of Gallium by Lorentz force. This mechanism is involved in the saturation of the dynamo instability. (author) [fr

  17. Turbulent solutal convection and surface patterning in solid dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.S.; Liu, Y.; Ecke, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    We describe experiments in which crystals of NaCl, KBr, and KCl are dissolved from below by aqueous solutions containing concentrations of the respective salts from zero concentration to near saturation. The solution near the solid-liquid interface is gravitationally unstable, producing turbulent hydrodynamic motion similar to thermal convection from a single surface cooled from above. The coupling of the fluid flow with the solid dissolution produces irregular patterns at the solid-liquid interface with a distribution of horizontal length scales. The dissolution mass flux and the pattern length scales are compared with a turbulent boundary layer model. Remarkable agreement is found, showing that the fluid motion controls both the dissolution rate and the interface patterning. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Essentials of fluid dynamics with applications to hydraulics, aeronautics, meteorology and other subjets

    CERN Document Server

    Prandtl, Ludwig

    1953-01-01

    Equilibrium of liquids and gases ; kinematics : dynamics of frictionless fluids ; motion of viscous fluids : turbulence : fluid resistance : practical applications ; flow with appreciable volume changes (dynamics of gases) ; miscellaneous topics.

  19. Scaling, Intermittency and Decay of MHD Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarian, A.; Cho, Jungyeon

    2005-01-01

    We discuss a few recent developments that are important for understanding of MHD turbulence. First, MHD turbulence is not so messy as it is usually believed. In fact, the notion of strong non-linear coupling of compressible and incompressible motions along MHD cascade is not tenable. Alfven, slow and fast modes of MHD turbulence follow their own cascades and exhibit degrees of anisotropy consistent with theoretical expectations. Second, the fast decay of turbulence is not related to the compressibility of fluid. Rates of decay of compressible and incompressible motions are very similar. Third, viscosity by neutrals does not suppress MHD turbulence in a partially ionized gas. Instead, MHD turbulence develops magnetic cascade at scales below the scale at which neutrals damp ordinary hydrodynamic motions. Forth, density statistics does not exhibit the universality that the velocity and magnetic field do. For instance, at small Mach numbers the density is anisotropic, but it gets isotropic at high Mach numbers. Fifth, the intermittency of magnetic field and velocity are different. Both depend on whether the measurements are done in a local system of reference oriented along the local magnetic field or in the global system of reference related to the mean magnetic field

  20. Mean-Lagrangian formalism and covariance of fluid turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariki, Taketo

    2017-05-01

    Mean-field-based Lagrangian framework is developed for the fluid turbulence theory, which enables physically objective discussions, especially, of the history effect. Mean flow serves as a purely geometrical object of Lie group theory, providing useful operations to measure the objective rate and history integration of the general tensor field. The proposed framework is applied, on the one hand, to one-point closure model, yielding an objective expression of the turbulence viscoelastic effect. Application to two-point closure, on the other hand, is also discussed, where natural extension of known Lagrangian correlation is discovered on the basis of an extended covariance group.

  1. Flapping motion and force generation in a viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, Thibaud; Lauga, Eric

    2008-12-01

    In a variety of biological situations, swimming cells have to move through complex fluids. Similarly, mucociliary clearance involves the transport of polymeric fluids by beating cilia. Here, we consider the extent to which complex fluids could be exploited for force generation on small scales. We consider a prototypical reciprocal motion (i.e., identical under time-reversal symmetry): the periodic flapping of a tethered semi-infinite plane. In the Newtonian limit, such motion cannot be used for force generation according to Purcell’s scallop theorem. In a polymeric fluid (Oldroyd-B, and its generalization), we show that this is not the case and calculate explicitly the forces on the flapper for small-amplitude sinusoidal motion. Three setups are considered: a flapper near a wall, a flapper in a wedge, and a two-dimensional scalloplike flapper. In all cases, we show that at quadratic order in the oscillation amplitude, the tethered flapping motion induces net forces, but no average flow. Our results demonstrate therefore that the scallop theorem is not valid in polymeric fluids. The reciprocal component of the movement of biological appendages such as cilia can thus generate nontrivial forces in polymeric fluid such as mucus, and normal-stress differences can be exploited as a pure viscoelastic force generation and propulsion method.

  2. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Turbulent Couette Minimal Flow Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward

    2016-11-01

    What happens to turbulent motions below the Kolmogorov length scale? In order to explore this question, a 300 million molecule Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation is presented for the minimal Couette channel in which turbulence can be sustained. The regeneration cycle and turbulent statistics show excellent agreement to continuum based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) at Re=400. As MD requires only Newton's laws and a form of inter-molecular potential, it captures a much greater range of phenomena without requiring the assumptions of Newton's law of viscosity, thermodynamic equilibrium, fluid isotropy or the limitation of grid resolution. The fundamental nature of MD means it is uniquely placed to explore the nature of turbulent transport. A number of unique insights from MD are presented, including energy budgets, sub-grid turbulent energy spectra, probability density functions, Lagrangian statistics and fluid wall interactions. EPSRC Post Doctoral Prize Fellowship.

  3. New class of turbulence in active fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratanov, Vasil; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is a fundamental and ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, occurring from astrophysical to biophysical scales. At the same time, it is widely recognized as one of the key unsolved problems in modern physics, representing a paradigmatic example of nonlinear dynamics far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Whereas in the past, most theoretical work in this area has been devoted to Navier–Stokes flows, there is now a growing awareness of the need to extend the research focus to systems with more general patterns of energy injection and dissipation. These include various types of complex fluids and plasmas, as well as active systems consisting of self-propelled particles, like dense bacterial suspensions. Recently, a continuum model has been proposed for such “living fluids” that is based on the Navier–Stokes equations, but extends them to include some of the most general terms admitted by the symmetry of the problem [Wensink HH, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109:14308–14313]. This introduces a cubic nonlinearity, related to the Toner–Tu theory of flocking, which can interact with the quadratic Navier–Stokes nonlinearity. We show that as a result of the subtle interaction between these two terms, the energy spectra at large spatial scales exhibit power laws that are not universal, but depend on both finite-size effects and physical parameters. Our combined numerical and analytical analysis reveals the origin of this effect and even provides a way to understand it quantitatively. Turbulence in active fluids, characterized by this kind of nonlinear self-organization, defines a new class of turbulent flows. PMID:26598708

  4. Fluid dynamics transactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fiszdon, W

    1965-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Transactions, Volume 2 compiles 46 papers on fluid dynamics, a subdiscipline of fluid mechanics that deals with fluid flow. The topics discussed in this book include developments in interference theory for aeronautical applications; diffusion from sources in a turbulent boundary layer; unsteady motion of a finite wing span in a compressible medium; and wall pressure covariance and comparison with experiment. The certain classes of non-stationary axially symmetric flows in magneto-gas-dynamics; description of the phenomenon of secondary flows in curved channels by means of co

  5. Study on turbulent characteristics and transition behavior of combined-convection boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Yasuo

    2001-01-01

    The stabilizing mechanism of the turbulent combined-convection boundary layer along an isothermally-heated flat plate in air aided by a weak freestream are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The turbulent statistics of the combined-convection boundary layer measured with hot- and cold wires at different Grashof numbers indicates that with an increase in the freestream velocity, a similar change in the turbulent quantities appears independently of local Grashof number. Then based on the such experimental results, it is verified that the laminarization of the boundary layer due to an increase in freestream velocity arises at Grx / Rex 6 . Then, through the experiments with a particle image velocimetry (PIV), the spatio-temporal structure of the turbulent combined-convection boundary layer is investigated. For instantaneous velocity vectors obtained with PIV, large-scale fluid motions, which play a predominant role in the generation of turbulence, are frequently observed in the outer layer, while quasi-coherent structures do not exist in the near-wall region. Thus, it is revealed that increasing freestream restricts large-scale fluid motions in the outer layer, and consequently the generation of turbulence is suppressed and the boundary layer becomes laminar. (author)

  6. Coupled large eddy simulation and discrete element model of bedload motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, D.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    We combine a three-dimensional large eddy simulation of turbulence to a three-dimensional discrete element model of turbulence. The large eddy simulation of the turbulent fluid is extended into the bed composed of non-moving particles by adding resistance terms to the Navier-Stokes equations in accordance with the Darcy-Forchheimer law. This allows the turbulent velocity and pressure fluctuations to penetrate the bed of discrete particles, and this addition of a porous zone results in turbulence structures above the bed that are similar to previous experimental and numerical results for hydraulically-rough beds. For example, we reproduce low-speed streaks that are less coherent than those over smooth-beds due to the episodic outflow of fluid from the bed. Local resistance terms are also added to the Navier-Stokes equations to account for the drag of individual moving particles. The interaction of the spherical particles utilizes a standard DEM soft-sphere Hertz model. We use only a simple drag model to calculate the fluid forces on the particles. The model reproduces an exponential distribution of bedload particle velocities that we have found experimentally using high-speed video of a flat bed of moving sand in a recirculating water flume. The exponential distribution of velocity results from the motion of many particles that are nearly constantly in contact with other bed particles and come to rest after short distances, in combination with a relatively few particles that are entrained further above the bed and have velocities approaching that of the fluid. Entrainment and motion "hot spots" are evident that are not perfectly correlated with the local, instantaneous fluid velocity. Zones of the bed that have recently experienced motion are more susceptible to motion because of the local configuration of particle contacts. The paradigm of a characteristic saltation hop length in riverine bedload transport has infused many aspects of geomorphic thought, including

  7. Energy partitioning constraints at kinetic scales in low-β turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; F.-Viñas, Adolfo; Dorelli, John C.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Shuster, Jason; Avanov, Levon A.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Stawarz, Julia E.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Schiff, Conrad; Lavraud, Benoit; Saito, Yoshifumi; Paterson, William R.; Giles, Barbara L.; Pollock, Craig J.; Strangeway, Robert J.; Russell, Christopher T.; Torbert, Roy B.; Moore, Thomas E.; Burch, James L.

    2018-02-01

    Turbulence is a fundamental physical process through which energy injected into a system at large scales cascades to smaller scales. In collisionless plasmas, turbulence provides a critical mechanism for dissipating electromagnetic energy. Here, we present observations of plasma fluctuations in low-β turbulence using data from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission in Earth's magnetosheath. We provide constraints on the partitioning of turbulent energy density in the fluid, ion-kinetic, and electron-kinetic ranges. Magnetic field fluctuations dominated the energy density spectrum throughout the fluid and ion-kinetic ranges, consistent with previous observations of turbulence in similar plasma regimes. However, at scales shorter than the electron inertial length, fluctuation power in electron kinetic energy significantly exceeded that of the magnetic field, resulting in an electron-motion-regulated cascade at small scales. This dominance is highly relevant for the study of turbulence in highly magnetized laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  8. Vorticity and turbulence effects in fluid structure interaction an application to hydraulic structure design

    CERN Document Server

    Brocchini, M

    2006-01-01

    This book contains a collection of 11 research and review papers devoted to the topic of fluid-structure interaction.The subject matter is divided into chapters covering a wide spectrum of recognized areas of research, such as: wall bounded turbulence; quasi 2-D turbulence; canopy turbulence; large eddy simulation; lake hydrodynamics; hydraulic hysteresis; liquid impacts; flow induced vibrations; sloshing flows; transient pipe flow and air entrainment in dropshaft.The purpose of each chapter is to summarize the main results obtained by the individual research unit through a year-long activity on a specific issue of the above list. The main feature of the book is to bring state of the art research on fluid structure interaction to the attention of the broad international community.This book is primarily aimed at fluid mechanics scientists, but it will also be of value to postgraduate students and practitioners in the field of fluid structure interaction.

  9. Indeterminism in Classical Dynamics of Particle Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory; Vishniac, Ethan; Lalescu, Cristian; Aluie, Hussein; Kanov, Kalin; Burns, Randal; Meneveau, Charles; Szalay, Alex

    2013-03-01

    We show that ``God plays dice'' not only in quantum mechanics but also in the classical dynamics of particles advected by turbulent fluids. With a fixed deterministic flow velocity and an exactly known initial position, the particle motion is nevertheless completely unpredictable! In analogy with spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets which persists as external field is taken to zero, the particle trajectories in turbulent flow remain random as external noise vanishes. The necessary ingredient is a rough advecting field with a power-law energy spectrum extending to smaller scales as noise is taken to zero. The physical mechanism of ``spontaneous stochasticity'' is the explosive dispersion of particle pairs proposed by L. F. Richardson in 1926, so the phenomenon should be observable in laboratory and natural turbulent flows. We present here the first empirical corroboration of these effects in high Reynolds-number numerical simulations of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic fluid turbulence. Since power-law spectra are seen in many other systems in condensed matter, geophysics and astrophysics, the phenomenon should occur rather widely. Fast reconnection in solar flares and other astrophysical systems can be explained by spontaneous stochasticity of magnetic field-line motion

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic motion of a two-fluid plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, J. W.

    2017-08-01

    The two-fluid Maxwell system couples frictionless electrons and ion fluids via Maxwell's equations. When the frequencies of light waves, Langmuir waves, and single-particle cyclotron motion are scaled to be asymptotically large, the two-fluid Maxwell system becomes a fast-slow dynamical system. This fast-slow system admits a formally exact single-fluid closure that may be computed systematically with any desired order of accuracy through the use of a functional partial differential equation. In the leading order approximation, the closure reproduces magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Higher order truncations of the closure give an infinite hierarchy of extended MHD models that allow for arbitrary mass ratio, as well as perturbative deviations from charge neutrality. The closure is interpreted geometrically as an invariant slow manifold in the infinite-dimensional two-fluid phase space, on which two-fluid motions are free of high-frequency oscillations. This perspective shows that the full closure inherits a Hamiltonian structure from the two-fluid theory. By employing infinite-dimensional Lie transforms, the Poisson bracket for the all-order closure may be obtained in the closed form. Thus, conservative truncations of the single-fluid closure may be obtained by simply truncating the single-fluid Hamiltonian. Moreover, the closed-form expression for the all-order bracket gives explicit expressions for a number of the full closure's conservation laws. Notably, the full closure, as well as any of its Hamiltonian truncations, admits a pair of independent circulation invariants.

  11. Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA of probability distributions in fluid turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Wu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA was introduced by Chang and Wu (2008 to describe the multifractal characteristic of intermittent events. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has successfully been applied to MHD turbulence simulations and turbulence data observed in various space plasmas. In this paper, the technique is applied to the probability distributions in the inertial range of the turbulent fluid flow, as given in the vast Johns Hopkins University (JHU turbulence database. In addition, a new way of finding the continuous ROMA spectrum and the scaled probability distribution function (PDF simultaneously is introduced.

  12. Two-equation and multi-fluid turbulence models for Rayleigh–Taylor mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokkinakis, I.W.; Drikakis, D.; Youngs, D.L.; Williams, R.J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a new improved version of the K–L model. • The improved K–L is found in good agreement with the multi-fluid model and ILES. • The study concerns Rayleigh–Taylor flows at initial density ratios 3:1 and 20:1. - Abstract: This paper presents a new, improved version of the K–L model, as well as a detailed investigation of K–L and multi-fluid models with reference to high-resolution implicit large eddy simulations of compressible Rayleigh–Taylor mixing. The accuracy of the models is examined for different interface pressures and specific heat ratios for Rayleigh–Taylor flows at initial density ratios 3:1 and 20:1. It is shown that the original version of the K–L model requires modifications in order to provide comparable results to the multi-fluid model. The modifications concern the addition of an enthalpy diffusion term to the energy equation; the formulation of the turbulent kinetic energy (source) term in the K equation; and the calculation of the local Atwood number. The proposed modifications significantly improve the results of the K–L model, which are found in good agreement with the multi-fluid model and implicit large eddy simulations with respect to the self-similar mixing width; peak turbulent kinetic energy growth rate, as well as volume fraction and turbulent kinetic energy profiles. However, a key advantage of the two-fluid model is that it can represent the degree of molecular mixing in a direct way, by transferring mass between the two phases. The limitations of the single-fluid K–L model as well as the merits of more advanced Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes models are also discussed throughout the paper.

  13. Impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Grandgirard, V [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Dif-Pradalier, G [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Fleurence, E [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Garbet, X [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Ghendrih, Ph [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bertrand, P [LPMIA-Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Boulevard des Aiguillettes BP239, 54506 Vandoe uvre-les-Nancy (France); Besse, N [LPMIA-Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Boulevard des Aiguillettes BP239, 54506 Vandoe uvre-les-Nancy (France); Crouseilles, N [IRMA, UMR 7501 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, 7 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Sonnendruecker, E [IRMA, UMR 7501 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, 7 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Latu, G [LSIIT, UMR 7005 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, Bd Sebastien Brant BP10413, 67412 Illkirch (France); Violard, E [LSIIT, UMR 7005 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, Bd Sebastien Brant BP10413, 67412 Illkirch (France)

    2006-12-15

    The impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas is explored by means of various kinetic models. Zonal flows are found to lead to a non-linear upshift of turbulent transport in a 3D kinetic model for interchange turbulence. Such a transition is absent from fluid simulations, performed with the same numerical tool, which also predict a much larger transport. The discrepancy cannot be explained by zonal flows only, despite they being overdamped in fluids. Indeed, some difference remains, although reduced, when they are artificially suppressed. Zonal flows are also reported to trigger transport barriers in a 4D drift-kinetic model for slab ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence. The density gradient acts as a source drive for zonal flows, while their curvature back stabilizes the turbulence. Finally, 5D simulations of toroidal ITG modes with the global and full-f GYSELA code require the equilibrium density function to depend on the motion invariants only. If not, the generated strong mean flows can completely quench turbulent transport.

  14. Impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarazin, Y; Grandgirard, V; Dif-Pradalier, G; Fleurence, E; Garbet, X; Ghendrih, Ph; Bertrand, P; Besse, N; Crouseilles, N; Sonnendruecker, E; Latu, G; Violard, E

    2006-01-01

    The impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas is explored by means of various kinetic models. Zonal flows are found to lead to a non-linear upshift of turbulent transport in a 3D kinetic model for interchange turbulence. Such a transition is absent from fluid simulations, performed with the same numerical tool, which also predict a much larger transport. The discrepancy cannot be explained by zonal flows only, despite they being overdamped in fluids. Indeed, some difference remains, although reduced, when they are artificially suppressed. Zonal flows are also reported to trigger transport barriers in a 4D drift-kinetic model for slab ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence. The density gradient acts as a source drive for zonal flows, while their curvature back stabilizes the turbulence. Finally, 5D simulations of toroidal ITG modes with the global and full-f GYSELA code require the equilibrium density function to depend on the motion invariants only. If not, the generated strong mean flows can completely quench turbulent transport

  15. Occurrence of turbulent flow conditions in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pauw, Ruben; Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2014-09-26

    Having similar densities as liquids but with viscosities up to 20 times lower (higher diffusion coefficients), supercritical CO2 is the ideal (co-)solvent for fast and/or highly efficient separations without mass-transfer limitations or excessive column pressure drops. Whereas in liquid chromatography the flow remains laminar in both the packed bed and tubing, except in extreme cases (e.g. in a 75 μm tubing, pure acetonitrile at 5 ml/min), a supercritical fluid can experience a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in more typical operation modes. Due to the significant lower viscosity, this transition for example already occurs at 1.3 ml/min for neat CO2 when using connection tubing with an ID of 127 μm. By calculating the Darcy friction factor, which can be plotted versus the Reynolds number in a so-called Moody chart, typically used in fluid dynamics, higher values are found for stainless steel than PEEK tubing, in agreement with their expected higher surface roughness. As a result turbulent effects are more pronounced when using stainless steel tubing. The higher than expected extra-column pressure drop limits the kinetic performance of supercritical fluid chromatography and complicates the optimization of tubing ID, which is based on a trade-off between extra-column band broadening and pressure drop. One of the most important practical consequences is the non-linear increase in extra-column pressure drop over the tubing downstream of the column which leads to an unexpected increase in average column pressure and mobile phase density, and thus decrease in retention. For close eluting components with a significantly different dependence of retention on density, the selectivity can significantly be affected by this increase in average pressure. In addition, the occurrence of turbulent flow is also observed in the detector cell and connection tubing. This results in a noise-increase by a factor of four when going from laminar to turbulent flow (e.g. going

  16. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  17. Influence of fluid-property variation on turbulent convective heat transfer in vertical annular CHANNEL FLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joong Hun Bae; Jung Yul Yoo; Haecheon Choi

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The influence of variable fluid property on turbulent convective heat transfer is investigated using direct numerical simulations. We consider thermally-developing flows of air and supercritical-pressure CO 2 in a vertical annular channel where the inner wall is heated with a constant heat flux and the outer wall is insulated. Turbulence statistics show that the heat and momentum transport characteristics of variable-property flows are significantly different from those of constant-property flows. The difference is mainly caused by the spatial and temporal variations of fluid density. The non-uniform density distribution causes fluid particles to be accelerated either by expansion or buoyancy force, while the temporal density fluctuations change the heat and momentum transfer via transport of turbulent mass flux, ρ'u' i . Both effects of the spatial and temporal variations of density are shown to be important in the analysis of turbulent convective heat transfer for supercritical-pressure fluids. For variable-property heated air flows, however, the effect of temporal density fluctuations can be neglected at low Mach number, which is in good accordance with the Morkovin's hypothesis. (authors)

  18. Modification of large-scale motions in a turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senshu, Kohei; Shinozaki, Hiroaki; Sakakibara, Jun

    2017-11-01

    We performed experiments to modify the flow structures in a fully developed turbulent flow in a straight round pipe. The modification of the flow was achieved by installing a short coaxial inner pipe. The inner pipe has ability to add continuous suction or blowing disturbance through its outer surface. The experiments were conducted at a Reynolds number of 44,000 with seven different disturbance patterns. The wall static pressure was measured and pipe friction coefficient was evaluated. The velocity distribution was measured with PIV and very large scale motions (VLSMs) were visualized. Pipe friction coefficient was increased by installing the inner pipe, while turbulence intensities over the cross section were reduced. Slight change of the friction was observed if the disturbance was added. We decomposed fluctuating velocity field in the azimuthal direction by a Fourier series expansion. As a result, we obtained that contribution of lower azimuthal mode numbers (m = 2, 3, 4) reduced while the higher modes increased. This was consistent with the observation of visualized very large scale motions.

  19. Symmetry breaking in fluid dynamics: Lie group reducible motions for real fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, D.D.

    1976-07-01

    The physics of fluids is based on certain kinematical invariance principles, which refer to coordinate systems, dimensions, and Galilean reference frames. Other, thermodynamic, symmetry principles are introduced by the material description. In the present work, the interplay between these two kinds of invariance principles is used to solve for classes of one-dimensional non-steady isentropic motions of a fluid whose equation of state is of Mie-Gruneisen type. Also, the change in profile and attenuation of weak shock waves in a dissipative medium is studied at the level of Burgers' approximation from the viewpoint of its underlying symmetry structure. The mathematical method of approach is based on the theory of infinitesimal Lie groups. Fluid motions are characterized according to inequivalent subgroups of the full invariance group of the flow description and exact group reducible solutions are presented

  20. Symmetry breaking in fluid dynamics: Lie group reducible motions for real fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, D.D.

    1976-07-01

    The physics of fluids is based on certain kinematical invariance principles, which refer to coordinate systems, dimensions, and Galilean reference frames. Other, thermodynamic, symmetry principles are introduced by the material description. In the present work, the interplay between these two kinds of invariance principles is used to solve for classes of one-dimensional non-steady isentropic motions of a fluid whose equation of state is of Mie-Gruneisen type. Also, the change in profile and attenuation of weak shock waves in a dissipative medium is studied at the level of Burgers' approximation from the viewpoint of its underlying symmetry structure. The mathematical method of approach is based on the theory of infinitesimal Lie groups. Fluid motions are characterized according to inequivalent subgroups of the full invariance group of the flow description and exact group reducible solutions are presented.

  1. Anomalous Chained Turbulence in Actively Driven Flows on Spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelin, Oscar; Słomka, Jonasz; Burns, Keaton J.; Lecoanet, Daniel; Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Faria, Luiz M.; Dunkel, Jörn

    2018-04-01

    Recent experiments demonstrate the importance of substrate curvature for actively forced fluid dynamics. Yet, the covariant formulation and analysis of continuum models for nonequilibrium flows on curved surfaces still poses theoretical challenges. Here, we introduce and study a generalized covariant Navier-Stokes model for fluid flows driven by active stresses in nonplanar geometries. The analytical tractability of the theory is demonstrated through exact stationary solutions for the case of a spherical bubble geometry. Direct numerical simulations reveal a curvature-induced transition from a burst phase to an anomalous turbulent phase that differs distinctly from externally forced classical 2D Kolmogorov turbulence. This new type of active turbulence is characterized by the self-assembly of finite-size vortices into linked chains of antiferromagnetic order, which percolate through the entire fluid domain, forming an active dynamic network. The coherent motion of the vortex chain network provides an efficient mechanism for upward energy transfer from smaller to larger scales, presenting an alternative to the conventional energy cascade in classical 2D turbulence.

  2. The structure of vortex tube segments in fluid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lipo

    2011-01-01

    Geometrical description of the flow fields is an important direction to understand the physics of turbulence. Recently several new analysis approaches addressing the entire field properties have been developed, such as dissipation element analysis for the scalar fields and streamtube segment analysis (J. Fluid Mech. 2010, 648: 183-203) for the velocity vector field. By decomposing into a fundamental structure, i.e. stream-tube segments, the velocity field can be understood from the statistics of these relative simple units. Similar idea can be adopted to analyze the vorticity field. The classic concept of vortex tube has been remaining as a topic of essential importance in many aspects. However, the vortex tube structure is not complete to represent the entire turbulent fields, because of its ambiguous definition and small volume portion. This work presents tentatively the vorticitytube segment structure to overcome the existing deficiency. Vorticitytube segments reveal an inherent topology of turbulence vorticity fields. Based on statistics conditioned on different vorticitytube segments, some problems can be newly understood, such as the enstrophy production. Results hereof may also serve for turbulence modeling.

  3. Speculation about near-wall turbulence scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurchenko, N F

    2008-01-01

    A strategy to control near-wall turbulence modifying scales of fluid motion is developed. The boundary-layer flow is shown to respond selectively to the scale of streamwise vortices initiated, e.g. with the spanwise regular temperature distribution over a model surface. It is used to generate sustainable streamwise vortices and thus to optimize integral flow characteristics.

  4. A combined volume-of-fluid method and low-Mach-number approach for DNS of evaporating droplets in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael; Ferrante, Antonino

    2017-11-01

    Our objective is to perform DNS of finite-size droplets that are evaporating in isotropic turbulence. This requires fully resolving the process of momentum, heat, and mass transfer between the droplets and surrounding gas. We developed a combined volume-of-fluid (VOF) method and low-Mach-number approach to simulate this flow. The two main novelties of the method are: (i) the VOF algorithm captures the motion of the liquid gas interface in the presence of mass transfer due to evaporation and condensation without requiring a projection step for the liquid velocity, and (ii) the low-Mach-number approach allows for local volume changes caused by phase change while the total volume of the liquid-gas system is constant. The method is verified against an analytical solution for a Stefan flow problem, and the D2 law is verified for a single droplet in quiescent gas. We also demonstrate the schemes robustness when performing DNS of an evaporating droplet in forced isotropic turbulence.

  5. First general solutions for unidirectional motions of rate type fluids over an infinite plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Fetecau

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on a simple but important remark regarding the governing equation for the non-trivial shear stress corresponding to the motion of a fluid over an infinite plate, exact solutions are established for the motion of Oldroyd-B fluids due to the plate that applies an arbitrary time-dependent shear stress to the fluid. These solutions, that allow us to provide the first exact solutions for motions of rate type fluids produced by an infinite plate that applies constant, constantly accelerating or oscillating shears stresses to the fluid, can easily be reduced to the similar solutions for Maxwell, second grade or Newtonian fluids performing the same motion. Furthermore, the obtained solutions are used to develop general solutions for the motion induced by a moving plate and to correct or recover as special cases different known results from the existing literature. Consequently, the motion problem of such fluids over an infinite plate that is moving in its plane or applies a shear stress to the fluid is completely solved.

  6. Four-fluid description of turbulent plasma focus dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayd, A.; Maurer, M.; Meinke, P.; Kaeppeler, H.J.

    1984-06-01

    The dynamic phenomena in the compression, pinch and late phases of the plasma focus experiment POSEIDON in its operational mode at 60 kV, 280 kJ, were previously calculated from a two-fluid theory using the new hybrid code REDUCE/FORTRAN. Two important results were found: the neutron production already in the pinch phase for currents larger than 500 kA and filamentary structures on and around the pinch axis. In a continuation of this work, a four-fluid system of dynamical equations was formulated and programmed with the REDUCE/FORTRAN code. Besides macro-turbulence, the new four-fluid theory includes micro-instabilities and anomalous transport properties, as well as the runaway effect for electrons and ions. First results from calculations with this new theory are presented and are compared with previous calculations and with recent experimental observations. (orig.)

  7. Spinning fluids in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J. R.; Smalley, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    General relativity field equations are employed to examine a continuous medium with internal spin. A variational principle formerly applied in the special relativity case is extended to the general relativity case, using a tetrad to express the spin density and the four-velocity of the fluid. An energy-momentum tensor is subsequently defined for a spinning fluid. The equations of motion of the fluid are suggested to be useful in analytical studies of galaxies, for anisotropic Bianchi universes, and for turbulent eddies.

  8. Visualization of grid-generated turbulence in He II using PTV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, B.; Guo, W.

    2017-12-01

    Due to its low viscosity, cryogenic He II has potential use for simulating large-scale, high Reynolds number turbulent flow in a compact and efficient apparatus. To realize this potential, the behavior of the fluid in the simplest cases, such as turbulence generated by flow past a mesh grid, must be well understood. We have designed, constructed, and commissioned an apparatus to visualize the evolution of turbulence in the wake of a mesh grid towed through He II. Visualization is accomplished using the particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique, where μm-sized tracer particles are introduced to the flow, illuminated with a planar laser sheet, and recorded by a scientific imaging camera; the particles move with the fluid, and tracking their motion with a computer algorithm results in a complete map of the turbulent velocity field in the imaging region. In our experiment, this region is inside a carefully designed He II filled cast acrylic channel measuring approximately 16 × 16 × 330 mm. One of three different grids, which have mesh numbers M = 3, 3.75, or 5 mm, can be attached to the pulling system which moves it through the channel with constant velocity up to 600 mm/s. The consequent motion of the solidified deuterium tracer particles is used to investigate the energy statistics, effective kinematic viscosity, and quantized vortex dynamics in turbulent He II.

  9. Modification of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence by solid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wontae

    2005-12-01

    Particle-laden flows are prevalent in natural and industrial environments. Dilute loadings of small, heavy particles have been observed to attenuate the turbulence levels of the carrier-phase flow, up to 80% in some cases. We attempt to increase the physical understanding of this complex phenomenon by studying the interaction of solid particles with the most fundamental type of turbulence, which is homogeneous and isotropic with no mean flow. A flow facility was developed that could create air turbulence in a nearly-spherical chamber by means of synthetic jet actuators mounted on the corners. Loudspeakers were used as the actuators. Stationary turbulence and natural decaying turbulence were investigated using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry for the base flow qualification. Results indicated that the turbulence was fairly homogeneous throughout the measurement domain and very isotropic, with small mean flow. The particle-laden flow experiments were conducted in two different environments, the lab and in micro-gravity, to examine the effects of particle wakes and flow structure distortion caused by settling particles. The laboratory experiments showed that glass particles with diameters on the order of the turbulence Kolmogorov length scale attenuated the fluid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and dissipation rate with increasing particle mass loadings. The main source of fluid TKE production in the chamber was the speakers, but the loss of potential energy of the settling particles also resulted in a significant amount of production of extra TKE. The sink of TKE in the chamber was due to the ordinary fluid viscous dissipation and extra dissipation caused by particles. This extra dissipation could be divided into "unresolved" dissipation caused by local velocity disturbances in the vicinity of the small particles and dissipation caused by large-scale flow distortions from particle wakes and particle clusters. The micro-gravity experiments in NASA's KC-135

  10. Annual review of fluid mechanics. Volume 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyke, M.; Wehausen, J.V.; Lumley, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of experimental results and analytical techniques for modelling various flows and the behavior of flows around flown-driven machinery is presented. Attention is given to analytical models for wind flows and power extraction by horizontal axis wind turbines. The phenomena occurring in the impact of compressible fluids with a solid body are described, as are the instabilities, pattern formation, and turbulence in flames. Homogeneous turbulence is explored, theories for autorotation by falling bodies are discussed, and attention is devoted to theoretical models for magneto-atmospheric waves and their presence in solar activity. The design characteristics of low Reynolds number airfoils are explored, and numerical and fluid mechanics formulations for integrable, chaotic, and turbulent vortex motion in two-dimensional flows are reviewed. Finally, measurements and models of turbulent wall jets for engineering purposes are examined

  11. Emergence of multi-scaling in fluid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzis, Diego; Yakhot, Victor

    2017-11-01

    We present new theoretical and numerical results on the transition to strong turbulence in an infinite fluid stirred by a Gaussian random force. The transition is defined as a first appearance of anomalous scaling of normalized moments of velocity derivatives (or dissipation rates) emerging from the low-Reynolds-number Gaussian background. It is shown that due to multi-scaling, strongly intermittent rare events can be quantitatively described in terms of an infinite number of different ``Reynolds numbers'' reflecting a multitude of anomalous scaling exponents. We found that anomalous scaling for high order moments emerges at very low Reynolds numbers implying that intense dissipative-range fluctuations are established at even lower Reynolds number than that required for an inertial range. Thus, our results suggest that information about inertial range dynamics can be obtained from dissipative scales even when the former does not exit. We discuss our further prediction that transition to fully anomalous turbulence disappears at Rλ < 3 . Support from NSF is acknowledged.

  12. Turbulence modulation induced by interaction between a bubble swarm and decaying turbulence in oscillating-grid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, Ryota; Morikawa, Koichi; Higuchi, Masamori; Saito, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the interaction between a bubble swarm and homogeneous isotropic turbulence was experimentally investigated. The objective is to clarify the turbulence modulation induced by interaction between the bubble swarm and the homogeneous isotropic turbulence without mean flow. In order to generate simultaneously ideally homogeneous isotropic turbulence and a sufficiently controlled bubble swarm, we employed both oscillating grid and bubble generators equipped with audio speakers. First, the homogeneous isotropic turbulence was formed by operating the oscillating grid cylindrical acrylic pipe (height: 600 mm, inner diameter: 149 mm) filled with ion-exchanged and degassed water. Second, we stopped the oscillating-grid in arbitrary time after the homogeneous isotropic turbulence was achieved. A few moments later, the controlled bubble swarm (number of bubbles: 3, average equivalent diameter of bubble: 3 mm, bubble Reynolds number: 859, Weber number: 3.48) was launched into the decaying turbulence described above, using the bubble generators. The bubble formation, bubble size and bubble-launch timing are controlled arbitrarily and precisely by this device. In this study, we conducted the following experiments: 1) measurement of the motion of bubbles in rest water and oscillating grid turbulence via high-speed visualization, 2) measurement of the liquid phase motion around the bubbles in rest water via PIV system with LIF method, 3) measurement of the liquid phase motion around the bubbles in oscillating-grid turbulence via PIV system with LIF method. In the vitalization of the liquid-phase motion of both experiments, two high speed video cameras were employed in order to simultaneously film large- and small-scale interrogation areas. The liquid-phase ambient turbulence hastened the change of the bubble motion from zigzag mode to spiral mode. The interaction between the bubble swarm and liquid-phase turbulence increased decay-rate of the turbulence. (author)

  13. Comparison between kinetic and fluid simulations of slab ion temperature gradient driven turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Horton, W. [University of Texas at Austin, Institute for Fusion Studies, Austin, Texas (United States)

    2002-10-01

    A detailed comparison between kinetic and fluid simulations of collisionless slab ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence is made. The nondissipative closure model (NCM) for linearly unstable modes, which is presented by Sugama, Watanabe, and Horton [Phys. Plasmas 8, 2617 (2001)], and the dissipative closure model by Hammett and Perkins (HP) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 3019 (1990)] are used in separate fluid simulations. The validity of these closure models for quantitative prediction of the turbulent thermal transport is examined by comparing nonlinear results of the fluid simulations with those of the collisionless kinetic simulation of high accuracy. Simulation results show that, in the saturated turbulent state, the turbulent thermal diffusivity {chi} obtained from the HP model is significantly larger than the {chi} given by the NCM which is closer to {chi} measured in the kinetic simulation. Contrary to the dissipative form of the parallel heat flux closure relation assumed in the HP model, the NCM describes well the exact kinetic simulation, in which for some unstable wave numbers k, the imaginary part of the ratio of the parallel heat flux q{sub k} to the temperature fluctuation T{sub k} is a oscillatory function of time and sometimes takes positive values. The positive values of Im(q{sub k}/T{sub k}), imply the negative parallel heat diffusivity, correlate with the occasional inward heat flux occurring for the wave numbers k, and reduce the total {chi}. (author)

  14. Comparison between kinetic and fluid simulations of slab ion temperature gradient driven turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Horton, W.

    2002-10-01

    A detailed comparison between kinetic and fluid simulations of collisionless slab ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence is made. The nondissipative closure model (NCM) for linearly unstable modes, which is presented by Sugama, Watanabe, and Horton [Phys. Plasmas 8, 2617 (2001)], and the dissipative closure model by Hammett and Perkins (HP) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 3019 (1990)] are used in separate fluid simulations. The validity of these closure models for quantitative prediction of the turbulent thermal transport is examined by comparing nonlinear results of the fluid simulations with those of the collisionless kinetic simulation of high accuracy. Simulation results show that, in the saturated turbulent state, the turbulent thermal diffusivity χ obtained from the HP model is significantly larger than the χ given by the NCM which is closer to χ measured in the kinetic simulation. Contrary to the dissipative form of the parallel heat flux closure relation assumed in the HP model, the NCM describes well the exact kinetic simulation, in which for some unstable wave numbers k, the imaginary part of the ratio of the parallel heat flux q k to the temperature fluctuation T k is a oscillatory function of time and sometimes takes positive values. The positive values of Im(q k /T k ), imply the negative parallel heat diffusivity, correlate with the occasional inward heat flux occurring for the wave numbers k, and reduce the total χ. (author)

  15. Flow and heat transfer in laminar–turbulent transitional flow regime under rolling motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Hongsheng; Tan, Sichao; Zhuang, Nailiang; Lan, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Flow and heat transfer experiment in transitional flow regime under rolling motion. • Increases of average friction factor and Nu were found. • Periodic breakdown of laminar flow contributes to the increase. • Nonlinear variation of pressure drop or Nu with Re also contributes to the increase. • Effect of critical Reynolds number shift was discussed. - Abstract: Flow and heat transfer characteristics under rolling motion are extremely important to thermohydraulic analysis of offshore nuclear reactors. An experimental study was conducted in a heated rectangular channel to investigate flow and heat transfer in laminar–turbulent transitional flow regime under rolling motion. The results showed that the average friction factor and Nusselt number are higher than that of the corresponding steady flow as the flow rate fluctuates in transitional flow regime. Larger relative flow rate fluctuation was observed under larger rolling amplitude or higher rolling frequency. In the same manner, larger increases of average friction factor and Nusselt number were achieved under larger rolling amplitude or higher rolling frequency. The increases were mainly caused by the flow rate fluctuation through periodic breakdown of laminar flow and development of turbulence in laminar–turbulent transitional flow regime. First, turbulence, which enhances the rate of momentum and energy exchange, occurs near the crest of flow rate wave even the flow is still in laminar flow regime according to the average Reynolds number. Second, as a result of rapid increases of the friction and heat transfer with Reynolds number in transitional flow regime, the increases of the friction and the heat transfer near the crest of flow rate wave are larger than the decreases of them near the trough of flow rate wave, which also contributes to increases of average friction and heat transfer. Additionally, the effect of critical Reynolds number shift under unsteady flow and heating

  16. Numerical investigation of turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer in complex ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokni, M.

    1998-01-01

    The need for a reliable and reasonable accurate turbulence model without specific convergence problem for calculating duct flows in industrial applications has become more evident. In this study a general computational method has been developed for calculating turbulent quantities in any arbitrary three dimensional duct. Four different turbulence models for predicting the turbulent Reynolds stresses namely; standard k-{epsilon} model, the non-linear-k-{epsilon} model of Speziale, an Explicit Algebraic Stress Model (EASM) and a full Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) are compared with each other. The advantages, disadvantages and accuracy of these models are discussed. The turbulent heat fluxes are modeled by the SED concept, the GGDH and the WET methods. The advantages of GGDH and WET compared to SED are discussed and the limitations of these models are clarified. The two-equation model of temperature invariance and its dissipation rate for calculating turbulent heat fluxes are also discussed. The low Reynolds number version of all the models are considered except for the RSM. At high Reynolds numbers the wall functions for both the temperature field and the flow field are applied. It has been shown that the standard k-{epsilon} model with the curvilinear transformation provides false secondary motions in general non-orthogonal ducts and can not be used for predicting the turbulent secondary motions in ducts. The numerical method is based on the finite volume technique with non-staggered grid arrangement. The SIMPLEC algorithm is used for pressure-velocity coupling. A modified SIP and TDMA solving methods are implemented for solving the equations. The van Leer, QUICK and hybrid schemes are applied for treating the convective terms. However, in order to achieve stability in the k and {epsilon} equations, the hybrid scheme is used for the convective terms in these equations. Periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the main flow direction for decreasing the number of

  17. Brownian motion in a flowing fluid revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown how the phenomenon of osmosis may be treated using the phenomenological theory of Brownian motion in a flowing fluid. The theory is also generalized to include viscous stresses in the particle and mixture momentum equations

  18. Turbulent structure of stably stratified inhomogeneous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Oaki

    2018-04-01

    Effects of buoyancy force stabilizing disturbances are investigated on the inhomogeneous flow where disturbances are dispersed from the turbulent to non-turbulent field in the direction perpendicular to the gravity force. Attaching the fringe region, where disturbances are excited by the artificial body force, a Fourier spectral method is used for the inhomogeneous flow stirred at one side of the cuboid computational box. As a result, it is found that the turbulent kinetic energy is dispersed as layered structures elongated in the streamwise direction through the vibrating motion. A close look at the layered structures shows that they are flanked by colder fluids at the top and hotter fluids at the bottom, and hence vertically compressed and horizontally expanded by the buoyancy related to the countergradient heat flux, though they are punctuated by the vertical expansion of fluids at the forefront of the layered structures, which is related to the downgradient heat flux, indicating that the layered structures are gravity currents. However, the phase between temperature fluctuations and vertical velocity is shifted by π/2 rad, indicating that temperature fluctuations are generated by the propagation of internal gravity waves.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Mechanically- and Convectively-Driven Turbulence in Planetary Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grannan, Alexander Michael

    2017-08-01

    The energy for driving turbulent flows in planetary fluid layers comes from a combination of thermocompositional sources and the motion of the boundary in contact with the fluid through mechanisms like precessional, tidal, and librational forcing. Characterizing the resulting turbulent fluid motions are necessary for understanding many aspects of the planet's dynamics and evolution including the generation of magnetic fields in the electrically conducting fluid layers and dissipation in the oceans. Although such flows are strongly inertial they are also strongly influenced by the Coriolis force whose source is in the rotation of the body and tends to constrain the inertial effects and provide support for fluid instabilities that might in-turn generate turbulence. Furthermore, the magnetic fields generated by the electrically conducting fluids act back on the fluid through the Lorentz force that also tends to constrain the flow. The goal of this dissertation is to investigate the characteristics of turbulent flows under the influence of mechanical, convective, rotational and magnetic forcing. In order to investigate the response of the fluid to mechanical forcing, I have modified a unique set of laboratory experiments that allows me to quantify the generation of turbulence driven by the periodic oscillations of the fluid containing boundary through tides and libration. These laboratory experiments replicate the fundamental ingredients found in planetary environments and are necessary for the excitation of instabilities that drive the turbulent fluid motions. For librational forcing, a rigid ellipsoidal container and ellipsoidal shell of isothermal unstratified fluid is made to rotate with a superimposed oscillation while, for tidal forcing, an elastic ellipsoidal container of isothermal unstratified fluid is made to rotate while an independently rotating perturbance also flexes the elastic container. By varying the strength and frequencies of these oscillations the

  20. Superfluid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Most flows of fluids, in nature and in technology, are turbulent. Since much of the energy expended by machines and devices that involve fluid flows is spent in overcoming drag caused by turbulence, there is a strong motivation to understand the phenomena. Surprisingly, the peculiar, quantum-mechanical form of turbulence that can form in superfluid helium may turn out to be much simpler to understand that the classical turbulence that forms in normal fluids. It now seems that the study of superfluid turbulence may provide simplified model systems for studying some forms of classical turbulence. There are also practical motivations for studying superfluid turbulence. For example, superfuid helium is often used as a coolant in superconducting machinery. Superfluid turbulence is the primary impediment to the transfer of heat by superfluid helium; an understanding of the phenomena may make it possible to design more efficient methods of refrigeration for superconducting devices. 8 figs

  1. Small-scale turbulence, marine snow formation, and planktivorous feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    predators encounter prey in turbulent environments, and the equations are modified to take predator and prey behaviour into account. Simple equations that describe prey encounter rates for cruising predators, suspension feeders, ambush feeders, and pause-travel predators in calm and turbulent water...... are derived. The influence of fluid motion on post-encounter prey capture (pursuit success) is examined. Experimental results on various copepod and larval fish predators will be used to illustrate the theory. Finally, the significance of size and behaviour is discussed. It is shown that turbulence...... is potentially very important for prey encounter in mm-cm sized planktonic predators, while it is unimportant for most larger and smaller ones....

  2. Unsteady motion and transition to turbulence in developing curved duct flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnal, M.; Firmino, F.; Humphrey, J.A.C.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment was performed to further the understanding of developing flows in curved ducts of square cross-section. Unlike most earlier works, attention was paid to investigating the time-dependent character of the motion. Mean and unsteady flow characteristics were determined using flow visualization and a laser-Doppler velocimeter. Only one velocity component, that aligned in the longitudinal (streamwise) coordinate direction, was measured. Notwithstanding, the time histories, autocorrelations and spectra derived reveal a time-periodic motion that becomes turbulent with increasing Reynolds number. The results are of intrinsic fundamental value and also illustrate the danger of imposing symmetry of the conservation equations on numerical solutions of this flow. 24 references

  3. Three-dimensional simulations of turbulent spectra in the local interstellar medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Shaikh

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluids describing super-Alfvénic, supersonic and strongly magnetized space and laboratory plasmas show a nonlinear relaxation towards a state of near incompressibility. The latter is characterized essentially by a subsonic turbulent Mach number. This transition is mediated dynamically by disparate spectral energy dissipation rates in compressible magnetosonic and shear Alfvénic modes. Nonlinear cascades lead to super-Alfvénic turbulent motions decaying to a sub-Alfvénic regime that couples weakly with (magnetoacoustic cascades. Consequently, the supersonic plasma motion is transformed into highly subsonic motion and density fluctuations experience a passive convection. This model provides a self-consistent explaination of the ubiquitous nature of incompressible magnetoplasma fluctuations in the solar wind and the interstellar medium.

  4. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulence Modification and Particle Dispersion in a Fully-Developed Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Sarma; Pratap Vanka, Surya

    1999-11-01

    A LES study of the modification of turbulence in a fully-developed turbulent pipe flow by dispersed heavy particles at Re_τ = 360 is presented. A 64 (radial) x 64 (azimuthal) x 128 (axial) grid has been used. An Eulerian-Lagrangian approach has been used for treating the continuous and the dispersed phases respectively. The particle equation of motion included only the drag force. Three different LES models are used in the continuous fluid simulation: (i) A “No-Model” LES (coarse-grid DNS) (ii) Smagorinsky’s model and (iii) Schumann’s model . The motivation behind employing the Schumann’s model is to study the impact of sub-grid-scale fluctuations on the particle motion and their (SGS fluctuations) modulation, in turn, by the particles. The effect of particles on fluid turbulence is investigated by tracking 100000 particles of different diameters. Our studies confirm the preferential concentration of particles in the near wall region. It is observed that the inclusion of two-way coupling reduces the preferential concentration of particles. In addition, it was found that two-way coupling attenuates the fluid turbulence. However, we expect the above trends to differ depending upon the particle diameter, volumetric and mass fractions. The effect of SGS fluctuations on the particle dispersion and turbulence modulation is also being investigated. Other relevant statistics for the continuous and the dispersed phases are collected for the cases of one-way and two-way coupling. These statistics are compared to study the modulation of turbulence by the particles.

  5. Shape matters: Near-field fluid mechanics dominate the collective motions of ellipsoidal squirmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoya, K; Matsunaga, D; Imai, Y; Omori, T; Ishikawa, T

    2015-12-01

    Microswimmers show a variety of collective motions. Despite extensive study, questions remain regarding the role of near-field fluid mechanics in collective motion. In this paper, we describe precisely the Stokes flow around hydrodynamically interacting ellipsoidal squirmers in a monolayer suspension. The results showed that various collective motions, such as ordering, aggregation, and whirls, are dominated by the swimming mode and the aspect ratio. The collective motions are mainly induced by near-field fluid mechanics, despite Stokes flow propagation over a long range. These results emphasize the importance of particle shape in collective motion.

  6. The effect of sediments on turbulent plume dynamics in a stratified fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Erik; Ezhova, Ekaterina; Brandt, Luca

    2017-11-01

    We report large eddy simulation results of sediment-loaded turbulent plumes in a stratified fluid. The configuration, where the plume is discharged from a round source, provides an idealized model of subglacial discharge from a submarine tidewater glacier and is a starting point for understanding the effect of sediments on the dynamics of the rising plume. The transport of sediments is modeled by means of an advection-diffusion equation where sediment settling velocity is taken into account. We initially follow the experimental setup of Sutherland (Phys. Rev. Fluids, 2016), considering uniformly stratified ambients and further extend the work to pycnocline-type stratifications typical of Greenland fjords. Apart from examining the rise height, radial spread and intrusion of the rising plume, we gain further insights of the plume dynamics by extracting turbulent characteristics and the distribution of the sediments inside the plume.

  7. On the late phase of relaxation of two-dimensional fluids: turbulence of unitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spineanu, F; Vlad, M

    2017-01-01

    The two-dimensional ideal fluid and the plasma confined by a strong magnetic field exhibit an intrinsic tendency to organization due to the inverse spectral cascade. In the asymptotic states reached at relaxation the turbulence has vanished and there are only coherent vortical structures. We are interested in the regime that precedes these ordered flow patterns, in which there still is turbulence and imperfect but robust structures have emerged. To develop an analytical description we propose to start from the stationary coherent states and (in the direction opposite to relaxation) explore the space of configurations before the extremum of the functional that defines the structures has been reached. We find necessary to assemble different but related models: point-like vortices, its field theoretical formulation as interacting matter and gauge fields, chiral model and surfaces with constant mean curvature. These models are connected by the similar ability to described randomly interacting coherent structures. They derive exactly the same equation for the asymptotic state (sinh-Poisson equation, confirmed by numerical calculation of fluid flows). The chiral model, to which one can arrive from self-duality equation of the field theoretical model for fluid and from constant mean curvature surface equations, appears to be the suitable analytical framework. Its solutions, the unitons, aquire dynamics when the system is not at the extremum of the action. In the present work we provide arguments that the underlying common nature of these models can be used to develop an approach to fluid and plasma states of turbulence interacting with structures. (paper)

  8. CISM Course on Rotating Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    The volume presents a comprehensive overview of rotation effects on fluid behavior, emphasizing non-linear processes. The subject is introduced by giving a range of examples of rotating fluids encountered in geophysics and engineering. This is then followed by a discussion of the relevant scales and parameters of rotating flow, and an introduction to geostrophic balance and vorticity concepts. There are few books on rotating fluids and this volume is, therefore, a welcome addition. It is the first volume which contains a unified view of turbulence in rotating fluids, instability and vortex dynamics. Some aspects of wave motions covered here are not found elsewhere.

  9. Direct measurement of the ballistic motion of a freely floating colloid in Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Andrew P; Corwin, Eric I

    2017-10-01

    A thermal colloid suspended in a liquid will transition from a short-time ballistic motion to a long-time diffusive motion. However, the transition between ballistic and diffusive motion is highly dependent on the properties and structure of the particular liquid. We directly observe a free floating tracer particle's ballistic motion and its transition to the long-time regime in both a Newtonian fluid and a viscoelastic Maxwell fluid. We examine the motion of the free particle in a Newtonian fluid and demonstrate a high degree of agreement with the accepted Clercx-Schram model for motion in a dense fluid. Measurements of the functional form of the ballistic-to-diffusive transition provide direct measurements of the temperature, viscosity, and tracer radius. We likewise measure the motion in a viscoelastic Maxwell fluid and find a significant disagreement between the theoretical asymptotic behavior and our measured values of the microscopic properties of the fluid. We observe a greatly increased effective mass for a freely moving particle and a decreased plateau modulus.

  10. MFGA-IDT2 workshop: Astrophysical and geophysical fluid mechanics: the impact of data on turbulence theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, D.; Falgarone, E.

    simulations of stably stratified turbulent shear flows. Seuront et al. consider scaling and multiscaling properties of scalar fields (temperature and phytoplankton concentration) advected by oceanic turbulence in both Eulerian and Lagrangian frameworks. Despite the apparent complexity linked to a multifractal background, temperature and fluorescence (i.e. phytoplankton biomass surrogate) fields are expressed over a wide range of scale by only three universal multifractal parameters, H, α and C_l. On scales smaller than the characteristic scale of the ship, sampling is rather Eulerian. On larger scales, the drifting platform being advected by turbulent motions, sampling may be rather considered as Lagrangian. Observed Eulerian and Lagrangian universal multifractal properties of the physical and biological fields are discussed. Whereas theoretical models provide different scaling laws for fluid and MHD turbulent flows, no attempt has been done up to now to experimentally support evidence for these differences. Carbone et al. use measurements from the solar wind turbulence and from turbulence in ordinary fluid flows, in order to assess these differences. They show that the so-called Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) is evident in the solar wind turbulence up to a certain scale. Furthermore, up to a given order of the velocity structure functions, the scaling laws of MHD and fluids flows axe experimentally indistinguishable. However, differences can be observed for higher orders and the authors speculate on their origin. Dudok de Wit and Krasnosel'skikh present analysis of strong plasma turbulence in the vicinity of the Earth's bow shock with the help of magnetometer data from the AMPTE UKS satellite. They demonstrate that there is a departure from Gaussianity which could be a signature of multifractality. However, they point out that the complexity of plasma turbulence precludes a more quantitative understanding. Finally, the authors emphasise the fact that the duration of records

  11. MFGA-IDT2 workshop: Astrophysical and geophysical fluid mechanics: the impact of data on turbulence theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schertzer

    1996-01-01

    simulations of stably stratified turbulent shear flows. Seuront et al. consider scaling and multiscaling properties of scalar fields (temperature and phytoplankton concentration advected by oceanic turbulence in both Eulerian and Lagrangian frameworks. Despite the apparent complexity linked to a multifractal background, temperature and fluorescence (i.e. phytoplankton biomass surrogate fields are expressed over a wide range of scale by only three universal multifractal parameters, H, alpha and C_l. On scales smaller than the characteristic scale of the ship, sampling is rather Eulerian. On larger scales, the drifting platform being advected by turbulent motions, sampling may be rather considered as Lagrangian. Observed Eulerian and Lagrangian universal multifractal properties of the physical and biological fields are discussed. Whereas theoretical models provide different scaling laws for fluid and MHD turbulent flows, no attempt has been done up to now to experimentally support evidence for these differences. Carbone et al. use measurements from the solar wind turbulence and from turbulence in ordinary fluid flows, in order to assess these differences. They show that the so-called Extended Self-Similarity (ESS is evident in the solar wind turbulence up to a certain scale. Furthermore, up to a given order of the velocity structure functions, the scaling laws of MHD and fluids flows axe experimentally indistinguishable. However, differences can be observed for higher orders and the authors speculate on their origin. Dudok de Wit and Krasnosel'skikh present analysis of strong plasma turbulence in the vicinity of the Earth's bow shock with the help of magnetometer data from the AMPTE UKS satellite. They demonstrate that there is a departure from Gaussianity which could be a signature of multifractality. However, they point out that the complexity of plasma turbulence precludes a more quantitative understanding. Finally, the authors emphasise the fact that the duration of records

  12. Plasma Turbulence General Topics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadomtsev, B. B. [Nuclear Energy Institute, Academy of Sciences of the USSR, Moscow, USSR (Russian Federation)

    1965-06-15

    It is known that under experimental conditions plasma often shows chaotic motion. Such motion, when many degrees of freedom are excited to levels considerably above the thermal level, will be called turbulent. The properties of turbulent plasma in many respects differ from the properties of laminar plasma. It can be said that the appearance of various anomalies in plasma behaviour indicates the presence of turbulence in plasma. In order to verify directly the presence of turbulent motion in plasma we must, however, measure the fluctuation of some microscopic parameters in plasma.

  13. Numerical study of fluid motion in bioreactor with two mixers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheleva, I., E-mail: izheleva@uni-ruse.bg [Department of Heat Technology, Hydraulics and Ecology, Angel Kanchev University of Rousse, 8 Studentska str., 7017 Rousse (Bulgaria); Lecheva, A., E-mail: alecheva@uni-ruse.bg [Department of Mathematics, Angel Kanchev University of Rousse, 8 Studentska str., 7017 Rousse (Bulgaria)

    2015-10-28

    Numerical study of hydrodynamic laminar behavior of a viscous fluid in bioreactor with multiple mixers is provided in the present paper. The reactor is equipped with two disk impellers. The fluid motion is studied in stream function-vorticity formulation. The calculations are made by a computer program, written in MATLAB. The fluid structure is described and numerical results are graphically presented and commented.

  14. Equations of motion and conservation laws in a theory of stable stratified turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L'vov, V.S.; Rudenko, O.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is part of an invited talk given at the international conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond'. We consider non-isothermal fluid flows and revise simplifications of basic hydrodynamic equations for such flows, arriving eventually at a generalization of the Oberbeck–Boussinesq

  15. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of κ-ε modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy κ, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation ε, for each material. Hence a set of κ and ε equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both κ and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe

  16. Laminar motion of the incompressible fluids in self-acting thrust bearings with spiral grooves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velescu, Cornel; Popa, Nicolae Calin

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the laminar motion of incompressible fluids in self-acting thrust bearings with spiral grooves with inner or external pumping. The purpose of the study is to find some mathematical relations useful to approach the theoretical functionality of these bearings having magnetic controllable fluids as incompressible fluids, in the presence of a controllable magnetic field. This theoretical study approaches the permanent motion regime. To validate the theoretical results, we compare them to some experimental results presented in previous papers. The laminar motion of incompressible fluids in bearings is described by the fundamental equations of fluid dynamics. We developed and particularized these equations by taking into consideration the geometrical and functional characteristics of these hydrodynamic bearings. Through the integration of the differential equation, we determined the pressure and speed distributions in bearings with length in the "pumping" direction. These pressure and speed distributions offer important information, both quantitative (concerning the bearing performances) and qualitative (evidence of the viscous-inertial effects, the fluid compressibility, etc.), for the laminar and permanent motion regime.

  17. Laminar Motion of the Incompressible Fluids in Self-Acting Thrust Bearings with Spiral Grooves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Velescu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the laminar motion of incompressible fluids in self-acting thrust bearings with spiral grooves with inner or external pumping. The purpose of the study is to find some mathematical relations useful to approach the theoretical functionality of these bearings having magnetic controllable fluids as incompressible fluids, in the presence of a controllable magnetic field. This theoretical study approaches the permanent motion regime. To validate the theoretical results, we compare them to some experimental results presented in previous papers. The laminar motion of incompressible fluids in bearings is described by the fundamental equations of fluid dynamics. We developed and particularized these equations by taking into consideration the geometrical and functional characteristics of these hydrodynamic bearings. Through the integration of the differential equation, we determined the pressure and speed distributions in bearings with length in the “pumping” direction. These pressure and speed distributions offer important information, both quantitative (concerning the bearing performances and qualitative (evidence of the viscous-inertial effects, the fluid compressibility, etc., for the laminar and permanent motion regime.

  18. Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2014-04-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

  19. Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong Buneman turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Che, H. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate turbulence-induced momentum transport and energy dissipation while a plasma is unstable to the Buneman instability in force-free current sheets. Using 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the macroscopic effects generated by wave-particle interactions in Buneman instability can be approximately described by a set of electron fluid equations. We show that both energy dissipation and momentum transport along electric current in the current layer are locally quasi-static, but globally dynamic and irreversible. Turbulent drag dissipates both the streaming energy of the current sheet and the associated magnetic energy. The net loss of streaming energy is converted into the electron component heat conduction parallel to the magnetic field and increases the electron Boltzmann entropy. The growth of self-sustained Buneman waves satisfies a Bernoulli-like equation that relates the turbulence-induced convective momentum transport and thermal momentum transport. Electron trapping and de-trapping drive local momentum transports, while phase mixing converts convective momentum into thermal momentum. The drag acts like a micro-macro link in the anomalous heating processes. The decrease of magnetic field maintains an inductive electric field that re-accelerates electrons, but most of the magnetic energy is dissipated and converted into the component heat of electrons perpendicular to the magnetic field. This heating process is decoupled from the heating of Buneman instability in the current sheets. Ion heating is weak but ions play an important role in assisting energy exchanges between waves and electrons. Cold ion fluid equations together with our electron fluid equations form a complete set of equations that describes the occurrence, growth, saturation and decay of the Buneman instability.

  20. Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong Buneman turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H.

    2014-06-01

    To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate turbulence-induced momentum transport and energy dissipation while a plasma is unstable to the Buneman instability in force-free current sheets. Using 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the macroscopic effects generated by wave-particle interactions in Buneman instability can be approximately described by a set of electron fluid equations. We show that both energy dissipation and momentum transport along electric current in the current layer are locally quasi-static, but globally dynamic and irreversible. Turbulent drag dissipates both the streaming energy of the current sheet and the associated magnetic energy. The net loss of streaming energy is converted into the electron component heat conduction parallel to the magnetic field and increases the electron Boltzmann entropy. The growth of self-sustained Buneman waves satisfies a Bernoulli-like equation that relates the turbulence-induced convective momentum transport and thermal momentum transport. Electron trapping and de-trapping drive local momentum transports, while phase mixing converts convective momentum into thermal momentum. The drag acts like a micro-macro link in the anomalous heating processes. The decrease of magnetic field maintains an inductive electric field that re-accelerates electrons, but most of the magnetic energy is dissipated and converted into the component heat of electrons perpendicular to the magnetic field. This heating process is decoupled from the heating of Buneman instability in the current sheets. Ion heating is weak but ions play an important role in assisting energy exchanges between waves and electrons. Cold ion fluid equations together with our electron fluid equations form a complete set of equations that describes the occurrence, growth, saturation and decay of the Buneman instability.

  1. Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong Buneman turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che, H.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate turbulence-induced momentum transport and energy dissipation while a plasma is unstable to the Buneman instability in force-free current sheets. Using 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the macroscopic effects generated by wave-particle interactions in Buneman instability can be approximately described by a set of electron fluid equations. We show that both energy dissipation and momentum transport along electric current in the current layer are locally quasi-static, but globally dynamic and irreversible. Turbulent drag dissipates both the streaming energy of the current sheet and the associated magnetic energy. The net loss of streaming energy is converted into the electron component heat conduction parallel to the magnetic field and increases the electron Boltzmann entropy. The growth of self-sustained Buneman waves satisfies a Bernoulli-like equation that relates the turbulence-induced convective momentum transport and thermal momentum transport. Electron trapping and de-trapping drive local momentum transports, while phase mixing converts convective momentum into thermal momentum. The drag acts like a micro-macro link in the anomalous heating processes. The decrease of magnetic field maintains an inductive electric field that re-accelerates electrons, but most of the magnetic energy is dissipated and converted into the component heat of electrons perpendicular to the magnetic field. This heating process is decoupled from the heating of Buneman instability in the current sheets. Ion heating is weak but ions play an important role in assisting energy exchanges between waves and electrons. Cold ion fluid equations together with our electron fluid equations form a complete set of equations that describes the occurrence, growth, saturation and decay of the Buneman instability

  2. The pdf approach to turbulent polydispersed two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Peirano, Eric

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a probabilistic approach to turbulent polydispersed two-phase flows. The two-phase flows considered are composed of a continuous phase, which is a turbulent fluid, and a dispersed phase, which represents an ensemble of discrete particles (solid particles, droplets or bubbles). Gathering the difficulties of turbulent flows and of particle motion, the challenge is to work out a general modelling approach that meets three requirements: to treat accurately the physically relevant phenomena, to provide enough information to address issues of complex physics (combustion, polydispersed particle flows, …) and to remain tractable for general non-homogeneous flows. The present probabilistic approach models the statistical dynamics of the system and consists in simulating the joint probability density function (pdf) of a number of fluid and discrete particle properties. A new point is that both the fluid and the particles are included in the pdf description. The derivation of the joint pdf model for the fluid and for the discrete particles is worked out in several steps. The mathematical properties of stochastic processes are first recalled. The various hierarchies of pdf descriptions are detailed and the physical principles that are used in the construction of the models are explained. The Lagrangian one-particle probabilistic description is developed first for the fluid alone, then for the discrete particles and finally for the joint fluid and particle turbulent systems. In the case of the probabilistic description for the fluid alone or for the discrete particles alone, numerical computations are presented and discussed to illustrate how the method works in practice and the kind of information that can be extracted from it. Comments on the current modelling state and propositions for future investigations which try to link the present work with other ideas in physics are made at the end of the paper.

  3. Scaling for turbulent viscosity of buoyant plumes in stratified fluids: PIV measurement with implications for submarine hydrothermal plume turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; He, Zhiguo; Jiang, Houshuo

    2017-11-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been used to measure instantaneous two-dimensional velocity vector fields of laboratory-generated turbulent buoyant plumes in linearly stratified saltwater over extended periods of time. From PIV-measured time-series flow data, characteristics of plume mean flow and turbulence have been quantified. To be specific, maximum plume penetration scaling and entrainment coefficient determined from the mean flow agree well with the theory based on the entrainment hypothesis for buoyant plumes in stratified fluids. Besides the well-known persistent entrainment along the plume stem (i.e., the 'plume-stem' entrainment), the mean plume velocity field shows persistent entrainment along the outer edge of the plume cap (i.e., the 'plume-cap' entrainment), thereby confirming predictions from previous numerical simulation studies. To our knowledge, the present PIV investigation provides the first measured flow field data in the plume cap region. As to measured plume turbulence, both the turbulent kinetic energy field and the turbulence dissipation rate field attain their maximum close to the source, while the turbulent viscosity field reaches its maximum within the plume cap region; the results also show that maximum turbulent viscosity scales as νt,max = 0.030(B/N)1/2, where B is source buoyancy flux and N is ambient buoyancy frequency. These PIV data combined with previously published numerical simulation results have implications for understanding the roles of hydrothermal plume turbulence, i.e. plume turbulence within the cap region causes the 'plume-cap' entrainment that plays an equally important role as the 'plume-stem' entrainment in supplying the final volume flux at the plume spreading level.

  4. Radiated sound and turbulent motions in a blunt trailing edge flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, Daniel W.; Morris, Scott C.; Mueller, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The dipole sound produced by edge scattering of pressure fluctuations at a trailing edge is most often an undesirable effect in turbomachinery and control surface flows. The ability to model the flow mechanisms associated with the production of trailing edge acoustics is important for the quiet design of such devices. The objective of the present research was to experimentally measure flow field and acoustic variables in order to develop an understanding of the mechanisms that generate trailing edge noise. The results of these experiments have provided insight into the causal relationships between the turbulent flow field, unsteady surface pressure, and radiated far field acoustics. Experimental methods used in this paper include particle image velocimetry (PIV), unsteady surface pressures, and far field acoustic pressures. The model investigated had an asymmetric 45 o beveled trailing edge. Reynolds numbers based on chord ranged from 1.2 x 10 6 to 1.9 x 10 6 . It was found that the small-scale turbulent motions in the vicinity of the trailing edge were modulated by a large scale von Karman wake instability. The broadband sound produced by these motions was also found to be dependant on the 'phase' of the wake instability

  5. Plasma turbulence calculations on supercomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.A.; Charlton, L.A.; Dominguez, N.; Drake, J.B.; Garcia, L.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Lee, D.K.; Lynch, V.E.; Sidikman, K.

    1991-01-01

    Although the single-particle picture of magnetic confinement is helpful in understanding some basic physics of plasma confinement, it does not give a full description. Collective effects dominate plasma behavior. Any analysis of plasma confinement requires a self-consistent treatment of the particles and fields. The general picture is further complicated because the plasma, in general, is turbulent. The study of fluid turbulence is a rather complex field by itself. In addition to the difficulties of classical fluid turbulence, plasma turbulence studies face the problems caused by the induced magnetic turbulence, which couples field by itself. In addition to the difficulties of classical fluid turbulence, plasma turbulence studies face the problems caused by the induced magnetic turbulence, which couples back to the fluid. Since the fluid is not a perfect conductor, this turbulence can lead to changes in the topology of the magnetic field structure, causing the magnetic field lines to wander radially. Because the plasma fluid flows along field lines, they carry the particles with them, and this enhances the losses caused by collisions. The changes in topology are critical for the plasma confinement. The study of plasma turbulence and the concomitant transport is a challenging problem. Because of the importance of solving the plasma turbulence problem for controlled thermonuclear research, the high complexity of the problem, and the necessity of attacking the problem with supercomputers, the study of plasma turbulence in magnetic confinement devices is a Grand Challenge problem

  6. Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magnetized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schekochihin, A.A.; Cowley, S.C.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G.W.; Howes, G.G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulent motions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the 'inertial range' above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-field strength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations

  7. Turbulent/non-turbulent interfaces detected in DNS of incompressible turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Zhang, X.; Nagata, K.

    2018-03-01

    The turbulent/non-turbulent interface (TNTI) detected in direct numerical simulations is studied for incompressible, temporally developing turbulent boundary layers at momentum thickness Reynolds number Reθ ≈ 2000. The outer edge of the TNTI layer is detected as an isosurface of the vorticity magnitude with the threshold determined with the dependence of the turbulent volume on a threshold level. The spanwise vorticity magnitude and passive scalar are shown to be good markers of turbulent fluids, where the conditional statistics on a distance from the outer edge of the TNTI layer are almost identical to the ones obtained with the vorticity magnitude. Significant differences are observed for the conditional statistics between the TNTI detected by the kinetic energy and vorticity magnitude. A widely used grid setting determined solely from the wall unit results in an insufficient resolution in a streamwise direction in the outer region, whose influence is found for the geometry of the TNTI and vorticity jump across the TNTI layer. The present results suggest that the grid spacing should be similar for the streamwise and spanwise directions. Comparison of the TNTI layer among different flows requires appropriate normalization of the conditional statistics. Reference quantities of the turbulence near the TNTI layer are obtained with the average of turbulent fluids in the intermittent region. The conditional statistics normalized by the reference turbulence characteristics show good quantitative agreement for the turbulent boundary layer and planar jet when they are plotted against the distance from the outer edge of the TNTI layer divided by the Kolmogorov scale defined for turbulent fluids in the intermittent region.

  8. Dynamics of fibres in a turbulent flow field - A particle-level simulation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasic, Srdjan; Almstedt, Alf-Erik

    2010-01-01

    A particle-level simulation technique has been developed for modelling the flow of fibres in a turbulent flow field. A single fibre is conceived here as a chain of segments, thus enabling the model fibre to have all the degrees of freedom (translation, rotation, bending and twisting) needed to realistically reproduce the dynamics of real fibres. Equations of motion are solved for each segment, accounting for the interaction forces with the fluid, the contact forces with other fibres and the forces that maintain integrity of the fibre. The motion of the fluid is resolved as a combination of 3D mean flow velocities obtained from a CFD code and fluctuating turbulent velocities derived from the Langevin equation. A case of homogeneous turbulence is treated in this paper. The results obtained show that fibre flocs in air-fibre flows can be created even when attractive forces are not present. In such a case, contacts between fibres, properties of an individual fibre (such as flexibility and equilibrium shapes) and properties of the flow of the carrying fluid are shown to govern the physics behind formation and breaking up of fibre flocs. Highly irregular fibre shapes and stiff fibres lead to strong flocculation. The modelling framework applied in this work aims at making possible a numerical model applicable for designing processes involving transport of fibres by air at industrial scale.

  9. Fast Propagation in Fluid Transport Models with Evolution of Turbulence Saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2012-01-01

    This report compiles and extends two works on models that reproduce the experimental facts of non local transport and pulse propagation in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The works are based on fluid transport models, originally designed to explain the formation of edge or internal transport barriers, that include fast evolution equations for the particle and heat fluxes. The heating of the plasma core in response to a sudden edge cooling or the propagation of turbulent fronts around transport barriers are a consequence of the competing roles of linear drive and non-linear reduction of the turbulent fluxes. Possibilities to use the models to interpret TJ-II plasmas are discussed. (Author) 62 refs.

  10. Fast Propagation in Fluid Transport Models with Evolution of Turbulence Saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report compiles and extends two works on models that reproduce the experimental facts of non local transport and pulse propagation in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The works are based on fluid transport models, originally designed to explain the formation of edge or internal transport barriers, that include fast evolution equations for the particle and heat fluxes. The heating of the plasma core in response to a sudden edge cooling or the propagation of turbulent fronts around transport barriers are a consequence of the competing roles of linear drive and non-linear reduction of the turbulent fluxes. Possibilities to use the models to interpret TJ-II plasmas are discussed. (Author) 62 refs.

  11. Turbulent Liquid Metal Dynamo Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, Cary

    2007-01-01

    The self-generation of magnetic fields in planets and stars--the dynamo effect--is a long-standing problem of magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics. Until recently, research on the self-excitation process has been primarily theoretical. In this talk, I will begin with a tutorial on how magnetic fields are generated in planets and stars, describing the 'Standard Model' of self-excitation known as the alpha-omega dynamo. In this model, axisymmetric differential rotation can produce the majority of the magnetic field, but some non-axisymmetric, turbulence driven currents are also necessary. Understanding the conversion of turbulent kinetic energy in the fluid motion into electrical currents and thus magnetic fields, is a major challenge for both experiments and theory at this time. I will then report on recent results from a 1 meter diameter, spherical, liquid sodium dynamo experiment at the University of Wisconsin, in which the first clear evidence for these turbulence driven currents has been observed.

  12. Effect of fluid motion on colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis aeruginosa, generally occurring in large colonies under natural conditions, mainly exists as single cells in laboratory cultures. The mechanisms involved in colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa and their roles in algal blooms remain unknown. In this study, based on previous research findings that fluid motion may stimulate the colony formation in green algae, culture experiments were conducted under axenic conditions in a circular water chamber where the flow rate, temperature, light, and nutrients were controlled. The number of cells of Microcystis aeruginosa, the number of cells per colony, and the colonial characteristics in various growth phases were observed and measured. The results indicated that the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa, which was not observed under stagnant conditions, was evident when there was fluid motion, with the number of cells per largest colony reaching 120 and the proportion of the number of cells in colonial form to the total number of cells and the mean number of cells per colony reaching their peak values at a flow rate of 35 cm/s. Based on the analysis of colony formation process, fluid motion stimulates the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa in the lag growth phase, while flushes and disaggregates the colonies in the exponential growth phase. The stimulation effect in the lag growth phase may be attributable to the involvement of fluid motion in a series of physiological processes, including the uptake of trace elements and the synthesis and secretion of polysaccharides. In addition, the experimental groups exhibiting typical colonial characteristics in the lag growth phase were found to have higher cell biomass in the later phase.

  13. The dynamics of variable-density turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The dynamics of variable-density turbulent fluids are studied by direct numerical simulation. The flow is incompressible so that acoustic waves are decoupled from the problem, and implying that density is not a thermodynamic variable. Changes in density occur due to molecular mixing. The velocity field, is in general, divergent. A pseudo-spectral numerical technique is used to solve the equations of motion. Three-dimensional simulations are performed using a grid size of 128 3 grid points. Two types of problems are studied: (1) the decay of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, and (2) buoyancy-generated turbulence in a fluid with large density fluctuations. In the case of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, the overall statistical decay behavior, for the cases studied, is relatively unaffected by the presence of density variations when the initial density and velocity fields are statistically independent. The results for this case are in quantitative agreement with previous numerical and laboratory results. In this case, the initial density field has a bimodal probability density function (pdf) which evolves in time towards a Gaussian distribution. The pdf of the density field is symmetric about its mean value throughout its evolution. If the initial velocity and density fields are statistically dependent, however, the decay process is significantly affected by the density fluctuations. For the case of buoyancy-generated turbulence, variable-density departures from the Boussinesq approximation are studied. The results of the buoyancy-generated turbulence are compared with variable-density model predictions. Both a one-point (engineering) model and a two-point (spectral) model are tested against the numerical data. Some deficiencies in these variable-density models are discussed and modifications are suggested

  14. Study of the motion of a vertically falling sphere in a viscous fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, A A; Caramelo, L; Andrade, M A P M

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to a better understanding of the motion of spherical particles in viscous fluids. The classical problem of spheres falling through viscous fluids for small Reynolds numbers was solved taking into account the effects of added mass. The analytical solution for the motion of a falling sphere, from the beginning to the end of the fall, was combined with an iterative numerical method to determine the fluid viscosity coefficient, diameter of the sphere and terminal velocity. The proposed solution was validated with experimental literature data. The study presented may also help understanding the fluid-particle interactions from both theoretical and educational standpoints. (paper)

  15. Motions of deformable inclusions in a horizontally oscillating vessel with a compressible fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demidov, I.V.; Sorokin, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the analysis of rigid particle and compressible gas bubble motion in a horizontally oscillating vessel with a compressible fluid. A nonlinear differential equation describing motion of inclusions with respect to the vessel is derived and solved by the method of direct...... of the bubbles which are affected by the negligible vibrational force is found. Also an approximate expression has been obtained for the average velocity of bubble׳s motion in the fluid; relationship between this velocity and bubble radius and vibration parameters has been revealed. A simple physical explanation...

  16. On turbulent motion caused by temperature fluctuations - a critical review on the Boussinesq approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruediger, R.

    1977-01-01

    Fluctuating motions which are caused by a given stochastical temperature field acting in a gas with gravitation and T = constant are dealt with. It results that the often used Boussinesq approximation much underestimates the horizontal motions in case wide-spread temperature fluctuations occur. For sufficiently large scales the horizontal motion exceeds the vertical ones even in the case of the temperature field fluctuating completely isotropically. Scales of 1,000 km and 1 day in the Earth atmosphere lead to the observed value u'(horizontal)/u'(vertical) approximately 10. Finally besides the relation between density correlation and pressure correlation the expression for the turbulent mass transport vanishing with the molecular viscosity is determined. (author)

  17. New developments in isotropic turbulent models for FENE-P fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, P. R.; Cavadas, A. S.

    2018-04-01

    The evolution of viscoelastic turbulent models, in the last years, has been significant due to the direct numeric simulation (DNS) advances, which allowed us to capture in detail the evolution of the viscoelastic effects and the development of viscoelastic closures. New viscoelastic closures are proposed for viscoelastic fluids described by the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Peterlin constitutive model. One of the viscoelastic closure developed in the context of isotropic turbulent models, consists in a modification of the turbulent viscosity to include an elastic effect, capable of predicting, with good accuracy, the behaviour for different drag reductions. Another viscoelastic closure essential to predict drag reduction relates the viscoelastic term involving velocity and the tensor conformation fluctuations. The DNS data show the high impact of this term to predict correctly the drag reduction, and for this reason is proposed a simpler closure capable of predicting the viscoelastic behaviour with good performance. In addition, a new relation is developed to predict the drag reduction, quantity based on the trace of the tensor conformation at the wall, eliminating the need of the typically parameters of Weissenberg and Reynolds numbers, which depend on the friction velocity. This allows future developments for complex geometries.

  18. Turbulent entrainment across turbulent-nonturbulent interfaces in stably stratified mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Riley, J. J.; Nagata, K.

    2017-10-01

    The entrainment process in stably stratified mixing layers is studied in relation to the turbulent-nonturbulent interface (TNTI) using direct numerical simulations. The statistics are calculated with the interface coordinate in an Eulerian frame as well as with the Lagrangian fluid particles entrained from the nonturbulent to the turbulent regions. The characteristics of entrainment change as the buoyancy Reynolds number Reb decreases and the flow begins to layer. The baroclinic torque delays the enstrophy growth of the entrained fluids at small Reb, while this effect is less efficient for large Reb. The entrained particle movement within the TNTI layer is dominated by the small dissipative scales, and the rapid decay of the kinetic energy dissipation rate due to buoyancy causes the entrained particle movement relative to the interface location to become slower. Although the Eulerian statistics confirm that there exists turbulent fluid with strong vorticity or with large buoyancy frequency near the TNTI, the entrained fluid particles circumvent these regions by passing through the TNTI in strain-dominant regions or in regions with small buoyancy frequency. The multiparticle statistics show that once the nonturbulent fluid volumes are entrained, they are deformed into flattened shapes in the vertical direction and diffuse in the horizontal direction. When Reb is large enough for small-scale turbulence to exist, the entrained fluid is able to penetrate into the turbulent core region. Once the flow begins to layer with decreasing Reb, however, the entrained fluid volume remains near the outer edge of the turbulent region and forms a stably stratified layer without vertical overturning.

  19. A method for the computation of turbulent polymeric liquids including hydrodynamic interactions and chain entanglements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivotides, Demosthenes, E-mail: demosthenes.kivotides@strath.ac.uk

    2017-02-12

    An asymptotically exact method for the direct computation of turbulent polymeric liquids that includes (a) fully resolved, creeping microflow fields due to hydrodynamic interactions between chains, (b) exact account of (subfilter) residual stresses, (c) polymer Brownian motion, and (d) direct calculation of chain entanglements, is formulated. Although developed in the context of polymeric fluids, the method is equally applicable to turbulent colloidal dispersions and aerosols. - Highlights: • An asymptotically exact method for the computation of polymer and colloidal fluids is developed. • The method is valid for all flow inertia and all polymer volume fractions. • The method models entanglements and hydrodynamic interactions between polymer chains.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of droplet-laden isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael S.

    us to explain the pathways for TKE exchange between the carrier turbulent flow and the flow inside the droplet. We also explain the role of the interfacial surface energy in the two-fluid TKE equation through work performed by surface tension. Furthermore, we derive the relationship between the power of surface tension and the rate of change of total droplet surface area. This link allows us to explain how droplet deformation, breakup and coalescence play roles in the temporal evolution of TKE. We then extend the code for non-evaporating droplets and develop a combined VoF method and low-Mach-number approach to simulate evaporating and condensing droplets. The two main novelties of the method are: (i) the VOF algorithm captures the motion of the liquid gas interface in the presence of mass transfer due to evaporation and condensation without requiring a projection step for the liquid velocity, and (ii) the low-Mach-number approach allows for local volume changes caused by phase change while the total volume of the liquid-gas system is constant. The method is verified against an analytical solution for a Stefan flow problem, and the D2 law is verified for a single droplet in quiescent gas. Finally, we perform DNS of an evaporating liquid droplet in forced isotropic turbulence. We show that the method accurately captures the temperature and vapor fields in the turbulent regime, and that the local evaporation rate can vary along the droplet surface depending on the structure of the surrounding vapor cloud. We also report the time evolution of the mean Sherwood number, which indicates that turbulence enhances the vaporization rate of liquid droplets.

  1. Energy transfer in compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence for isothermal self-gravitating fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Supratik; Kritsuk, Alexei G.

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional, compressible, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence of an isothermal, self-gravitating fluid is analyzed using two-point statistics in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers (both kinetic and magnetic). Following an alternative formulation proposed by Banerjee and Galtier [Phys. Rev. E 93, 033120 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.033120; J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 50, 015501 (2017), 10.1088/1751-8113/50/1/015501], an exact relation has been derived for the total energy transfer. This approach results in a simpler relation expressed entirely in terms of mixed second-order structure functions. The kinetic, thermodynamic, magnetic, and gravitational contributions to the energy transfer rate can be easily separated in the present form. By construction, the new formalism includes such additional effects as global rotation, the Hall term in the induction equation, etc. The analysis shows that solid-body rotation cannot alter the energy flux rate of compressible turbulence. However, the contribution of a uniform background magnetic field to the flux is shown to be nontrivial unlike in the incompressible case. Finally, the compressible, turbulent energy flux rate does not vanish completely due to simple alignments, which leads to a zero turbulent energy flux rate in the incompressible case.

  2. Fluid-structure coupling for an oscillating hydrofoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, C.; Ausoni, P.; Braun, O.; Farhat, M.; Avellan, F.

    2010-08-01

    Fluid-structure investigations in hydraulic machines using coupled simulations are particularly time-consuming. In this study, an alternative method is presented that linearizes the hydrodynamic load of a rigid, oscillating hydrofoil. The hydrofoil, which is surrounded by incompressible, turbulent flow, is modeled with forced and free pitching motions, where the mean incidence angle is 0° with a maximum angle amplitude of 2°. Unsteady simulations of the flow, performed with ANSYS CFX, are presented and validated with experiments which were carried out in the EPFL High-Speed Cavitation Tunnel. First, forced motion is investigated for reduced frequencies ranging from 0.02 to 100. The hydrodynamic load is modeled as a simple combination of inertia, damping and stiffness effects. As expected, the potential flow analysis showed the added moment of inertia is constant, while the fluid damping and the fluid stiffness coefficients depend on the reduced frequency of the oscillation motion. Behavioral patterns were observed and two cases were identified depending on if vortices did or did not develop in the hydrofoil wake. Using the coefficients identified in the forced motion case, the time history of the profile incidence is then predicted analytically for the free motion case and excellent agreement is found for the results from coupled fluid-structure simulations. The model is validated and may be extended to more complex cases, such as blade grids in hydraulic machinery.

  3. Enhancement of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernitsas, Michael M [Saline, MI; Raghavan, Kamaldev [Houston, TX

    2011-11-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to increase Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Enhancement is needed in such applications as harnessing of clean and renewable energy from ocean/river currents using the ocean energy converter VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibration for Aquatic Clean Energy).

  4. Three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model with eddy viscosity and turbulent resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Goldstein, Melvyn L., E-mail: arcadi.usmanov@nasa.gov [Code 672, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    We have developed a three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating. The solar wind plasma is described as a system of co-moving solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons, with separate energy equations for each species. Numerical steady-state solutions of Reynolds-averaged solar wind equations coupled with turbulence transport equations for turbulence energy, cross helicity, and correlation length are obtained by the time relaxation method in the corotating with the Sun frame of reference in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU (but still inside the termination shock). The model equations include the effects of electron heat conduction, Coulomb collisions, photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with the solar wind protons, turbulence energy generation by pickup protons, and turbulent heating of solar wind protons and electrons. The turbulence transport model is based on the Reynolds decomposition and turbulence phenomenologies that describe the conversion of fluctuation energy into heat due to a turbulent cascade. In addition to using separate energy equations for the solar wind protons and electrons, a significant improvement over our previous work is that the turbulence model now uses an eddy viscosity approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor and the mean turbulent electric field. The approximation allows the turbulence model to account for driving of turbulence by large-scale velocity gradients. Using either a dipole approximation for the solar magnetic field or synoptic solar magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory for assigning boundary conditions at the coronal base, we apply the model to study the global structure of the solar wind and its three-dimensional properties, including embedded turbulence, heating, and acceleration throughout the heliosphere. The model results are

  5. On turbulence structure in vertical pipe flow of fiber suspensions [refractivity, flow measurement, turbulent flow, glass fibers, fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, M.

    1989-01-01

    A suspension of glass fibers in alcohol has been used to investigate a upward vertical developing pipe flow. The refractive index of the alcohol was matched to that of the glass fibers, making the whole suspension transparent. Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) was applied, and fluid velocities could then be measured for consistencies up to c = 12 g/l. Radial profiles of axial U-velocity and turbulence spectra have been recorded at various positions (z/D = 2, 5, 36) downstream of an orifice (step) with 64% open area. Measurements were taken for different consistencies (c = 1.2, 12 g/l), fiber lengths (l = 1, 3 mm) and Reynolds numbers (R e = 8.5 ⋅ 10 3 , 6.5 ⋅ 10 4 ). The fiber crowding factor (n f ) has been used to discuss the observed effects of the present fibers on momentum transfer and turbulence structure. The results show both an increase (l= 1 mm, c= 1.2 g/l) and decrease (l=3 mm, c = 12 g/l) in turbulence levels in the presence of fibers. Suspensions with long fibers at the highest consistency show plug flow in parts of the core. This causes damping of the turbulence mainly at smaller length scales. For short fibers at low consistency, the increased turbulent energy was mainly observed at small length scales in the spectrum. (author)

  6. Strongly coupled fluid-particle flows in vertical channels. I. Reynolds-averaged two-phase turbulence statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of strongly coupled (i.e., high-mass-loading) fluid-particle flows in vertical channels are performed with the purpose of understanding the fundamental physics of wall-bounded multiphase turbulence. The exact Reynolds-averaged (RA) equations for high-mass-loading suspensions are presented, and the unclosed terms that are retained in the context of fully developed channel flow are evaluated in an Eulerian–Lagrangian (EL) framework for the first time. A key distinction between the RA formulation presented in the current work and previous derivations of multiphase turbulence models is the partitioning of the particle velocity fluctuations into spatially correlated and uncorrelated components, used to define the components of the particle-phase turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and granular temperature, respectively. The adaptive spatial filtering technique developed in our previous work for homogeneous flows [J. Capecelatro, O. Desjardins, and R. O. Fox, “Numerical study of collisional particle dynamics in cluster-induced turbulence,” J. Fluid Mech. 747, R2 (2014)] is shown to accurately partition the particle velocity fluctuations at all distances from the wall. Strong segregation in the components of granular energy is observed, with the largest values of particle-phase TKE associated with clusters falling near the channel wall, while maximum granular temperature is observed at the center of the channel. The anisotropy of the Reynolds stresses both near the wall and far away is found to be a crucial component for understanding the distribution of the particle-phase volume fraction. In Part II of this paper, results from the EL simulations are used to validate a multiphase Reynolds-stress turbulence model that correctly predicts the wall-normal distribution of the two-phase turbulence statistics.

  7. Strongly coupled fluid-particle flows in vertical channels. I. Reynolds-averaged two-phase turbulence statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-03-01

    Simulations of strongly coupled (i.e., high-mass-loading) fluid-particle flows in vertical channels are performed with the purpose of understanding the fundamental physics of wall-bounded multiphase turbulence. The exact Reynolds-averaged (RA) equations for high-mass-loading suspensions are presented, and the unclosed terms that are retained in the context of fully developed channel flow are evaluated in an Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) framework for the first time. A key distinction between the RA formulation presented in the current work and previous derivations of multiphase turbulence models is the partitioning of the particle velocity fluctuations into spatially correlated and uncorrelated components, used to define the components of the particle-phase turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and granular temperature, respectively. The adaptive spatial filtering technique developed in our previous work for homogeneous flows [J. Capecelatro, O. Desjardins, and R. O. Fox, "Numerical study of collisional particle dynamics in cluster-induced turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 747, R2 (2014)] is shown to accurately partition the particle velocity fluctuations at all distances from the wall. Strong segregation in the components of granular energy is observed, with the largest values of particle-phase TKE associated with clusters falling near the channel wall, while maximum granular temperature is observed at the center of the channel. The anisotropy of the Reynolds stresses both near the wall and far away is found to be a crucial component for understanding the distribution of the particle-phase volume fraction. In Part II of this paper, results from the EL simulations are used to validate a multiphase Reynolds-stress turbulence model that correctly predicts the wall-normal distribution of the two-phase turbulence statistics.

  8. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is a universal, nonlinear phenomenon found in all energetic fluid and plasma motion. In particular. understanding magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and incorporating its effects in the computation and prediction of the flow of ionized gases in space, for example, are great challenges that must be met if such computations and predictions are to be meaningful. Although a general solution to the "problem of turbulence" does not exist in closed form, numerical integrations allow us to explore the phase space of solutions for both ideal and dissipative flows. For homogeneous, incompressible turbulence, Fourier methods are appropriate, and phase space is defined by the Fourier coefficients of the physical fields. In the case of ideal MHD flows, a fairly robust statistical mechanics has been developed, in which the symmetry and ergodic properties of phase space is understood. A discussion of these properties will illuminate our principal discovery: Coherent structure and randomness co-exist in ideal MHD turbulence. For dissipative flows, as opposed to ideal flows, progress beyond the dimensional analysis of Kolmogorov has been difficult. Here, some possible future directions that draw on the ideal results will also be discussed. Our conclusion will be that while ideal turbulence is now well understood, real turbulence still presents great challenges.

  9. Fluid particles only separate exponentially in the dissipation range of turbulence after extremely long times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhariwal, Rohit; Bragg, Andrew D.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we consider how the statistical moments of the separation between two fluid particles grow with time when their separation lies in the dissipation range of turbulence. In this range, the fluid velocity field varies smoothly and the relative velocity of two fluid particles depends linearly upon their separation. While this may suggest that the rate at which fluid particles separate is exponential in time, this is not guaranteed because the strain rate governing their separation is a strongly fluctuating quantity in turbulence. Indeed, Afik and Steinberg [Nat. Commun. 8, 468 (2017), 10.1038/s41467-017-00389-8] argue that there is no convincing evidence that the moments of the separation between fluid particles grow exponentially with time in the dissipation range of turbulence. Motivated by this, we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) to compute the moments of particle separation over very long periods of time in a statistically stationary, isotropic turbulent flow to see if we ever observe evidence for exponential separation. Our results show that if the initial separation between the particles is infinitesimal, the moments of the particle separation first grow as power laws in time, but we then observe convincing evidence that at sufficiently long times the moments do grow exponentially. However, this exponential growth is only observed after extremely long times ≳200 τη , where τη is the Kolmogorov time scale. This is due to fluctuations in the strain rate about its mean value measured along the particle trajectories, the effect of which on the moments of the particle separation persists for very long times. We also consider the backward-in-time (BIT) moments of the article separation, and observe that they too grow exponentially in the long-time regime. However, a dramatic consequence of the exponential separation is that at long times the difference between the rate of the particle separation forward in time (FIT) and BIT grows

  10. IUTAM Symposium on Hamiltonian Dynamics, Vortex Structures, Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Borisov, Alexey V; Mamaev, Ivan S; Sokolovskiy, Mikhail A; IUTAM BOOKSERIES : Volume 6

    2008-01-01

    This work brings together previously unpublished notes contributed by participants of the IUTAM Symposium on Hamiltonian Dynamics, Vortex Structures, Turbulence (Moscow, 25-30 August 2006). The study of vortex motion is of great interest to fluid and gas dynamics: since all real flows are vortical in nature, applications of the vortex theory are extremely diverse, many of them (e.g. aircraft dynamics, atmospheric and ocean phenomena) being especially important. The last few decades have shown that serious possibilities for progress in the research of real turbulent vortex motions are essentially related to the combined use of mathematical methods, computer simulation and laboratory experiments. These approaches have led to a series of interesting results which allow us to study these processes from new perspectives. Based on this principle, the papers collected in this proceedings volume present new results on theoretical and applied aspects of the processes of formation and evolution of various flows, wave a...

  11. Characterization of turbulence stability through the identification of multifractional Brownian motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. C.

    2013-02-01

    Multifractional Brownian motions have become popular as flexible models in describing real-life signals of high-frequency features in geoscience, microeconomics, and turbulence, to name a few. The time-changing Hurst exponent, which describes regularity levels depending on time measurements, and variance, which relates to an energy level, are two parameters that characterize multifractional Brownian motions. This research suggests a combined method of estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent and variance using the local variation of sampled paths of signals. The method consists of two phases: initially estimating global variance and then accurately estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent. A simulation study shows its performance in estimation of the parameters. The proposed method is applied to characterization of atmospheric stability in which descriptive statistics from the estimated time-changing Hurst exponent and variance classify stable atmosphere flows from unstable ones.

  12. Characterization of turbulence stability through the identification of multifractional Brownian motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Lee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Multifractional Brownian motions have become popular as flexible models in describing real-life signals of high-frequency features in geoscience, microeconomics, and turbulence, to name a few. The time-changing Hurst exponent, which describes regularity levels depending on time measurements, and variance, which relates to an energy level, are two parameters that characterize multifractional Brownian motions. This research suggests a combined method of estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent and variance using the local variation of sampled paths of signals. The method consists of two phases: initially estimating global variance and then accurately estimating the time-changing Hurst exponent. A simulation study shows its performance in estimation of the parameters. The proposed method is applied to characterization of atmospheric stability in which descriptive statistics from the estimated time-changing Hurst exponent and variance classify stable atmosphere flows from unstable ones.

  13. Turbulence and secondary motions in square duct flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirozzoli, Sergio; Modesti, Davide; Orlandi, Paolo; Grasso, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    We study turbulent flows in pressure-driven ducts with square cross-section through DNS up to Reτ 1050 . Numerical simulations are carried out over extremely long integration times to get adequate convergence of the flow statistics, and specifically high-fidelity representation of the secondary motions which arise. The intensity of the latter is found to be in the order of 1-2% of the bulk velocity, and unaffected by Reynolds number variations. The smallness of the mean convection terms in the streamwise vorticity equation points to a simple characterization of the secondary flows, which in the asymptotic high-Re regime are found to be approximated with good accuracy by eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator. Despite their effect of redistributing the wall shear stress along the duct perimeter, we find that secondary motions do not have large influence on the mean velocity field, which can be characterized with good accuracy as that resulting from the concurrent effect of four independent flat walls, each controlling a quarter of the flow domain. As a consequence, we find that parametrizations based on the hydraulic diameter concept, and modifications thereof, are successful in predicting the duct friction coefficient. This research was carried out using resources from PRACE EU Grants.

  14. Effects of elevated line sources on turbulent mixing in channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2016-11-01

    Fluids mixing in turbulent flows has been studied extensively, due to the importance of this phenomena in nature and engineering. Convection effects along with motion of three-dimensional coherent structures in turbulent flow disperse a substance more efficiently than molecular diffusion does on its own. We present here, however, a study that explores the conditions under which turbulent mixing does not happen, when different substances are released into the flow field from different vertical locations. The study uses a method which combines Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) with Lagrangian Scalar Tracking (LST) to simulate a turbulent channel flow and track the motion of passive scalars with different Schmidt numbers (Sc). The particles are released from several instantaneous line sources, ranging from the wall to the center region of the channel. The combined effects of mean velocity difference, molecular diffusion and near-wall coherent structures lead to the observation of different concentrations of particles downstream from the source. We then explore in details the conditions under which particles mixing would not happen. Results from numerical simulation at friction Reynolds number of 300 and 600 will be discussed and for Sc ranging from 0.1 to 2,400.

  15. Coherent structures in wave boundary layers. Part 2. Solitary motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Jensen, Palle Martin; Sørensen, Lone B.

    2010-01-01

    This study continues the investigation of wave boundary layers reported by Carstensen, Sumer & Fredsøe (J. Fluid Mech., 2010, part 1 of this paper). The present paper summarizes the results of an experimental investigation of turbulent solitary wave boundary layers, simulated by solitary motion...... the boundary-layer flow experiences a regular array of vortex tubes near the bed over a short period of time during the deceleration stage; and (iii) transitional regime characterized with turbulent spots, revealed by single/multiple, or, sometimes, quite dense spikes in the bed shear stress traces...

  16. Structure-Preserving Variational Multiscale Modeling of Turbulent Incompressible Flow with Subgrid Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John; Coley, Christopher; Aronson, Ryan; Nelson, Corey

    2017-11-01

    In this talk, a large eddy simulation methodology for turbulent incompressible flow will be presented which combines the best features of divergence-conforming discretizations and the residual-based variational multiscale approach to large eddy simulation. In this method, the resolved motion is represented using a divergence-conforming discretization, that is, a discretization that preserves the incompressibility constraint in a pointwise manner, and the unresolved fluid motion is explicitly modeled by subgrid vortices that lie within individual grid cells. The evolution of the subgrid vortices is governed by dynamical model equations driven by the residual of the resolved motion. Consequently, the subgrid vortices appropriately vanish for laminar flow and fully resolved turbulent flow. As the resolved velocity field and subgrid vortices are both divergence-free, the methodology conserves mass in a pointwise sense and admits discrete balance laws for energy, enstrophy, and helicity. Numerical results demonstrate the methodology yields improved results versus state-of-the-art eddy viscosity models in the context of transitional, wall-bounded, and rotational flow when a divergence-conforming B-spline discretization is utilized to represent the resolved motion.

  17. Two-Fluid Description of Wave-Particle Interactions in Strong Buneman Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Che, H.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate turbulence-induced momentum transport and energy dissipation while a plasma is unstable to the Buneman instability in force-free current sheets. Using 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the macroscopic effects generated by wave-particle interactions in Buneman instability can be approximately described by a set of electron fluid equations. We show that both energy dissipation and momentum tra...

  18. Characterisation of minimal-span plane Couette turbulence with pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Atsushi; Atkinson, Callum; Soria, Julio

    2018-04-01

    The turbulence statistics and dynamics in the spanwise-minimal plane Couette flow with pressure gradients, so-called, Couette-Poiseuille (C-P) flow, are investigated using direct numerical simulation. The large-scale motion is limited in the spanwise box dimension as in the minimal-span channel turbulence of Flores & Jiménez (Phys. Fluids, vol. 22, 2010, 071704). The effect of the top wall, where normal pressure-driven Poiseuille flow is realised, is distinguished from the events on the bottom wall, where the pressure gradient results in mild or almost-zero wall-shear stress. A proper scaling of turbulence statistics in minimal-span C-P flows is presented. Also the ‘shear-less’ wall-bounded turbulence, where the Corrsin shear parameter is very weak compared to normal wall-bounded turbulence, represents local separation, which is also observed as spanwise streaks of reversed flow in full-size plane C-P turbulence. The local separation is a multi-scale event, which grows up to the order of the channel height even in the minimal-span geometry.

  19. Turbulence intensity measurement in the wind tunnel used for airfoil flutter investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šidlof Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on hot wire turbulence intensity measurements performed in the entry of a suction-type wind tunnel, used for investigation of flow-induced vibration of airfoils and slender structures. The airfoil is elastically supported with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge in the test section of the wind tunnel with lateral optical access for interferometric measurements, and free to oscillate. The turbulence intensity was measured for velocities up to M = 0.3 i with the airfoil blocked, ii with the airfoil self-oscillating. Measurements were performed for a free inlet and further with two different turbulence grids generating increased turbulence intensity levels. For the free inlet and static airfoil, the turbulence intensity lies below 0.4%. The turbulence grids G1 and G2 increase the turbulence level up to 1.8% and 2.6%, respectively. When the airfoil is free to oscillate due to fluid-structure interaction, its motion disturbs the surrounding flow field and increases the measured turbulence intensity levels up to 5%.

  20. Turbulence and intermittent transport at the boundary of magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical fluid simulations of interchange turbulence for geometry and parameters relevant to the boundary region of magnetically confined plasmas are shown to result in intermittent transport qualitatively similar to recent experimental measurements. The two-dimensional simulation domain features...... a forcing region with spatially localized sources of particles and heat outside which losses due to the motion along open magnetic-field lines dominate, corresponding to the edge region and the scrape-off layer, respectively. Turbulent states reveal intermittent eruptions of hot plasma from the edge region...... fluctuation wave forms and transport statistics are also in a good agreement with those derived from the experiments. Associated with the turbulence bursts are relaxation oscillations in the particle and heat confinements as well as in the kinetic energy of the sheared poloidal flows. The formation of blob...

  1. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  2. Droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with wettability gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2012-05-11

    Droplet motion on solid substrates has been widely studied not only because of its importance in fundamental research but also because of its promising potentials in droplet-based devices developed for various applications in chemistry, biology, and industry. In this paper, we investigate the motion of an evaporating droplet in one-component fluids on a solid substrate with a wettability gradient. As is well known, there are two major difficulties in the continuum description of fluid flows and heat fluxes near the contact line of droplets on solid substrates, namely, the hydrodynamic (stress) singularity and thermal singularity. To model the droplet motion, we use the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)] for the hydrodynamic equations in the bulk region, supplemented with the boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface. In this continuum hydrodynamic model, various physical processes involved in the droplet motion can be taken into account simultaneously, e.g., phase transitions (evaporation or condensation), capillary flows, fluid velocity slip, and substrate cooling or heating. Due to the use of the phase field method (diffuse interface method), the hydrodynamic and thermal singularities are resolved automatically. Furthermore, in the dynamic van der Waals theory, the evaporation or condensation rate at the liquid-gas interface is an outcome of the calculation rather than a prerequisite as in most of the other models proposed for evaporating droplets. Numerical results show that the droplet migrates in the direction of increasing wettability on the solid substrates. The migration velocity of the droplet is found to be proportional to the wettability gradients as predicted by Brochard [Langmuir 5, 432 (1989)]. The proportionality coefficient is found to be linearly dependent on the ratio of slip length to initial droplet radius. These results indicate that the steady migration of the droplets results from the balance between the

  3. Droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with wettability gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2012-01-01

    Droplet motion on solid substrates has been widely studied not only because of its importance in fundamental research but also because of its promising potentials in droplet-based devices developed for various applications in chemistry, biology, and industry. In this paper, we investigate the motion of an evaporating droplet in one-component fluids on a solid substrate with a wettability gradient. As is well known, there are two major difficulties in the continuum description of fluid flows and heat fluxes near the contact line of droplets on solid substrates, namely, the hydrodynamic (stress) singularity and thermal singularity. To model the droplet motion, we use the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)] for the hydrodynamic equations in the bulk region, supplemented with the boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface. In this continuum hydrodynamic model, various physical processes involved in the droplet motion can be taken into account simultaneously, e.g., phase transitions (evaporation or condensation), capillary flows, fluid velocity slip, and substrate cooling or heating. Due to the use of the phase field method (diffuse interface method), the hydrodynamic and thermal singularities are resolved automatically. Furthermore, in the dynamic van der Waals theory, the evaporation or condensation rate at the liquid-gas interface is an outcome of the calculation rather than a prerequisite as in most of the other models proposed for evaporating droplets. Numerical results show that the droplet migrates in the direction of increasing wettability on the solid substrates. The migration velocity of the droplet is found to be proportional to the wettability gradients as predicted by Brochard [Langmuir 5, 432 (1989)]. The proportionality coefficient is found to be linearly dependent on the ratio of slip length to initial droplet radius. These results indicate that the steady migration of the droplets results from the balance between the

  4. Fluid-structure interaction simulation of floating structures interacting with complex, large-scale ocean waves and atmospheric turbulence with application to floating offshore wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderer, Antoni; Guo, Xin; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2018-02-01

    We develop a numerical method for simulating coupled interactions of complex floating structures with large-scale ocean waves and atmospheric turbulence. We employ an efficient large-scale model to develop offshore wind and wave environmental conditions, which are then incorporated into a high resolution two-phase flow solver with fluid-structure interaction (FSI). The large-scale wind-wave interaction model is based on a two-fluid dynamically-coupled approach that employs a high-order spectral method for simulating the water motion and a viscous solver with undulatory boundaries for the air motion. The two-phase flow FSI solver is based on the level set method and is capable of simulating the coupled dynamic interaction of arbitrarily complex bodies with airflow and waves. The large-scale wave field solver is coupled with the near-field FSI solver with a one-way coupling approach by feeding into the latter waves via a pressure-forcing method combined with the level set method. We validate the model for both simple wave trains and three-dimensional directional waves and compare the results with experimental and theoretical solutions. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of the new computational framework by carrying out large-eddy simulation of a floating offshore wind turbine interacting with realistic ocean wind and waves.

  5. Modeling of turbulent flows in porous media and at the interface with a free fluid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandesris, M.

    2006-12-01

    This work deals with the numerical simulation of turbulent flows in the whole nuclear reactor core, using multi-scale approaches. First, a macroscopic turbulence model is built, based on a porous media approach, to describe the flow in the fuel assemblies part of the nuclear core. Then, we study the jump conditions that have to be applied at a free fluid/porous interface. A thorough analytical study is carried out for laminar flows. This study allows to answer some fundamental questions about the physical meaning of the jump conditions, the values of the jump parameters and the location of the interface. Using these results, jump conditions for turbulent flows are proposed. The model is then applied to the simulation of a turbulent flow in a simplified model of a reactor core. (author)

  6. Experimental study of MHD effects on turbulent flow of flibe simulant fluid in a circular pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Junichi; Morley, N.B.; Abdou, M.A.; Satake, Shin-ichi; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2007-01-01

    Experimental studies of MHD turbulent pipe flow of Flibe simulant fluid have been conducted as a part of US-Japan JUPITER-II collaboration. Flibe is considered as a promising candidate for coolant and tritium breeder in some fusion reactor design concepts because of its low electrical conductivity compared to liquid metals. This reduces the MHD pressure drop to a negligible level; however, turbulence can be significantly suppressed by MHD effects in fusion reactor magnetic field conditions. Heat transfer in the Flibe coolant is characterized by its high Prandtl number. In order to achieve sufficient heat transfer and to prevent localized heat concentration in a high Prandtl number coolant, high turbulence is essential. Even though accurate prediction of the MHD effects on heat transfer for high Prandtl number fluids in the fusion environment is very important, reliable data is not available. In these experiments, an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide is used as a simulant fluid for Flibe. This paper presents the experimental results obtained by flow field measurement using particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The PIV measurements provide 2-dimensional 2-velocity component information on the MHD flow field. The test section is a circular pipe with 89 mm inner diameter and 7.0 m in length, which is 79 times pipe diameter. This relatively large diameter pipe is selected in order to maximize the MHD effects measured by Hartmann number (Ha=BL(sigma/mu)1/2), and to allow better resolution of the flow in the near-wall region. The test section is placed under maximum 2 Tesla magnetic fields for 1.4m of the axial length. The hydrodynamic developing length under the magnetic field is expected to be 1.2 m. In order to apply PIV technique in the magnetic field condition, special optical devices and visualization sections were created. PIV measurements are performed for Re = 11600 with variable Hartmann numbers. The turbulence statistics of the MHD turbulent flow

  7. Cascade of circulations in fluid turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2006-12-01

    Kelvin's theorem on conservation of circulations is an essential ingredient of Taylor's theory of turbulent energy dissipation by the process of vortex-line stretching. In previous work, we have proposed a nonlinear mechanism for the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem in ideal turbulence at infinite Reynolds number. We develop here a detailed physical theory of this cascade of circulations. Our analysis is based upon an effective equation for large-scale coarse-grained velocity, which contains a turbulent-induced vortex force that can violate Kelvin's theorem. We show that singularities of sufficient strength, which are observed to exist in turbulent flow, can lead to nonvanishing dissipation of circulation for an arbitrarily small coarse-graining length in the effective equations. This result is an analog for circulation of Onsager's theorem on energy dissipation for singular Euler solutions. The physical mechanism of the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem is diffusion of lines of large-scale vorticity out of the advected loop. This phenomenon can be viewed as a classical analog of the Josephson-Anderson phase-slip phenomenon in superfluids due to quantized vortex lines. We show that the circulation cascade is local in scale and use this locality to develop concrete expressions for the turbulent vortex force by a multiscale gradient expansion. We discuss implications for Taylor's theory of turbulent dissipation and we point out some related cascade phenomena, in particular for magnetic flux in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  8. Motion of a suspended charged particle in a NON-Newtonian fluid. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Khalek, M M [Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The path lines of a solid spherical charged particle suspended in a non-newton electrical conducting viscous fluid through two infinite parallel plates in the presence of a constant magnetic field normal to the plane of particle motion were determined. The effect of some parameters such as particle volume, fluid density, fluid viscosity, and the use magnetic field strength on these path lines were determined. The present solution requires some empirical parameters concerning the collision of the particles with the wall. The differential equations of motion were numerically solved by Runge-Kutta method. Some conclusions about width, maximum height and number of collisions with upper and lower plates were deduced. 4 figs.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Experiencing Platform Pitching Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanhtoan Tran

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to illustrate the unsteady aerodynamic effects of a floating offshore wind turbine experiencing the prescribed pitching motion of a supporting floating platform as a sine function. The three-dimensional, unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the shear-stress transport (SST k-ω turbulence model were applied. Moreover, an overset grid approach was used to model the rigid body motion of a wind turbine blade. The current simulation results are compared to various approaches from previous studies. The unsteady aerodynamic loads of the blade were demonstrated to change drastically with respect to the frequency and amplitude of platform motion.

  10. Turbulent black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  11. Study of ultrasonic propagation through vortices for acoustic monitoring of high-temperature and turbulent fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massacret, Nicolas; Moysan, Joseph; Ploix, Marie-Aude; Chaouch, Naim; Jeannot, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic monitoring in high temperature fluids with turbulences requires the knowledge of wave propagation in such media and the development of simulation tools. Applications could be the monitoring of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The objectives are mainly acoustic telemetry and thermometry, which involve the propagation of ultrasounds in turbulent and heated sodium flows. We developed a ray-tracing model to simulate the wave propagation and to determine wave deviations and delays due to an inhomogeneous medium. In previous work we demonstrated the sensitivity of ultrasounds to temperature gradients in liquid sodium. To complete that study, we need to investigate the sensitivity of ultrasounds to vortices created in a moving fluid. We designed a specific experimental setup called IKHAR (Instabilities of Kelvin-Helmholtz for Acoustic Research) in order to assess the validity of the ray-tracing model and the potential of ultrasounds for monitoring such fluid. In this experiment, Von Karman instabilities were created in a flow of water. Fluid temperature was homogeneous in our experimental setup. Through a careful choice of the parameters, periodic vortices were generated. The experiment was also simulated using Comsol registered to allow discussion about repeatability. The throughtransmission method was used to measure wave delays due to the vortices. Arrays of transducers were used to measure time of flight variations of several nanoseconds with a high spatial resolution. Results were similar to simulation results. They demonstrate that beam delays due to vortices can be measured and confirm the potential of ultrasounds in monitoring very inhomogeneous fluid media such as liquid sodium used as coolant fluid in nuclear fast reactors.

  12. Measurements of turbulence in a microscale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yanxiang; Cheng, Janine Chungyin; Fox, Rodney O; Olsen, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    The microscale multi-inlet vortex reactor (MIVR) is designed for use in Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP), a promising technique for producing nanoparticles within small particle size distribution. Fluid mixing is crucial in the FNP process, and due to mixing’s strong dependence upon fluid kinematics, investigating velocity and turbulence within the reactor is crucial to optimizing reactor design. To this end, microscopic particle image velocimetry has been used to investigate flow within the MIVR. Three Reynolds numbers are studied, namely, Re j = 53, 93 and 240. At Re j = 53, the flow is laminar and steady. Due to the strong viscous effects at this Reynolds number, distinct flow patterns are observed at different distances from the reactor top and bottom walls. The viscous effects also retard the tangential motions within the reactor, resulting in a weaker vortex than appears at the higher Reynolds numbers. As the Reynolds number is increased to 93, the flow becomes more homogeneous over the depth of the reactor due to weaker viscous effects, yet the flow is still steady. The diminishing effects of viscosity also result in a stronger vortex. At the highest Reynolds number investigated, the flow is turbulent. Turbulent statistics including tangential and radial velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stresses are analyzed for this case in addition to the mean velocity field. The tangential motions of the flow are strongest at Re j = 240. Both the tangential and radial velocity fluctuations increase as the flow spirals toward the center of the reactor. The magnitudes of the tangential and radial velocity fluctuations are similar, suggesting that the turbulence is locally isotropic. (paper)

  13. CISM course on stochastic methods in fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chibbaro, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Since their first introduction in natural sciences through the work of Einstein on Brownian motion in 1905 and further works, in particular by Langevin, Smoluchowski and others, stochastic processes have been used in several areas of science and technology. For example, they have been applied in chemical studies, or in fluid turbulence and for combustion and reactive flows. The articles in this book provide a general and unified framework in which stochastic processes are presented as modeling tools for various issues in engineering, physics and chemistry, with particular focus on fluid mechan

  14. The influence of heat transfer and the variations of the properties of the fluids in turbulent flow in tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, G.J.; Sielwa, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    The study is presented of the effects of heat transfer and the variations of the properties of the fluids in turbulent flow in tube. One model for the turbulent Eddy viscosity and termal Eddy diffusivity developed by CEBECI; NA and HABIB was utilized. The theoretical results agree well with experimental results [pt

  15. Vortex filament method as a tool for computational visualization of quantum turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänninen, Risto; Baggaley, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    The vortex filament model has become a standard and powerful tool to visualize the motion of quantized vortices in helium superfluids. In this article, we present an overview of the method and highlight its impact in aiding our understanding of quantum turbulence, particularly superfluid helium. We present an analysis of the structure and arrangement of quantized vortices. Our results are in agreement with previous studies showing that under certain conditions, vortices form coherent bundles, which allows for classical vortex stretching, giving quantum turbulence a classical nature. We also offer an explanation for the differences between the observed properties of counterflow and pure superflow turbulence in a pipe. Finally, we suggest a mechanism for the generation of coherent structures in the presence of normal fluid shear. PMID:24704873

  16. Modeling of turbulent bubbly flows; Modelisation des ecoulements turbulents a bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellakhal, Ghazi

    2005-03-15

    The two-phase flows involve interfacial interactions which modify significantly the structure of the mean and fluctuating flow fields. The design of the two-fluid models adapted to industrial flows requires the taking into account of the effect of these interactions in the closure relations adopted. The work developed in this thesis concerns the development of first order two-fluid models deduced by reduction of second order closures. The adopted reasoning, based on the principle of decomposition of the Reynolds stress tensor into two statistically independent contributions turbulent and pseudo-turbulent parts, allows to preserve the physical contents of the second order relations closure. Analysis of the turbulence structure in two basic flows: homogeneous bubbly flows uniform and with a constant shear allows to deduce a formulation of the two-phase turbulent viscosity involving the characteristic scales of bubbly turbulence, as well as an analytical description of modification of the homogeneous turbulence structure induced by the bubbles presence. The Eulerian two-fluid model was then generalized with the case of the inhomogeneous flows with low void fractions. The numerical results obtained by the application of this model integrated in the computer code MELODIF in the case of free sheared turbulent bubbly flow of wake showed a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and made it possible to analyze the modification of the characteristic scales of such flow by the interfacial interactions. The two-fluid first order model is generalized finally with the case of high void fractions bubbly flows where the hydrodynamic interactions between the bubbles are not negligible any more. (author)

  17. Homogeneous wave turbulence driven by tidal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, B.; Le Reun, T.; Barker, A.; Le Bars, M.

    2017-12-01

    When a moon orbits around a planet, the rotation of the induced tidal bulge drives a homogeneous, periodic, large-scale flow. The combination of such an excitation with the rotating motion of the planet has been shown to drive parametric resonance of a pair of inertial waves in a mechanism called the elliptical instability. Geophysical fluid layers can also be stratified: this is the case for instance of the Earth's oceans and, as suggested by several studies, of the upper part of the Earth's liquid Outer Core. We thus investigate the stability of a rotating and stratified layer undergoing tidal distortion in the limit where either rotation or stratification is dominant. We show that the periodic tidal flow drives a parametric subharmonic resonance of inertial (resp. internal) waves in the rotating (resp. stratified) case. The instability saturates into a wave turbulence pervading the whole fluid layer. In such a state, the instability mechanism conveys the tidal energy from the large scale tidal flow to the resonant modes, which then feed a succession of triadic resonances also generating small spatial scales. In the rotating case, we observe a kinetic energy spectrum with a k-2 slope for which the Coriolis force is dominant at all spatial scales. In the stratified case, where the timescale separation is increased between the tidal excitation and the Brunt-Väisälä frequencies, the temporal spectrum decays with a ω-2 power law up to the cut-off frequency beyond which waves do not exist. This result is reminiscent of the Garrett and Munk spectrum measured in the oceans and theoretically described as a manifestation of internal wave turbulence. In addition to revealing an instability driving homogeneous turbulence in geophysical fluid layers, our approach is also an efficient numerical tool to investigate the possibly universal properties of wave turbulence in a geophysical context.

  18. Study on effects of turbulence promoter on fluid mixing in T-junction piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Akihiro; Hibara, Hideki; Ochi, Junji; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2004-07-01

    Flows in T-junction piping system with turbulence promoter have been investigated experimentally using flow visualization techniques (the dye injection method) and velocity measurement by LDV. Effects of turbulent promoter on characteristics of fluid mixing and thermal-striping phenomena are examined. From the experiment, following results are obtained. (1) Arch vortex is formed further than the case without promoter in the upstream station and is rapidly transported to the downstream direction. (2) Secondary flow induced in the cross section become stronger and the diffusion of axial momentum is promoted, as the height of turbulence promoter is higher. (3) Main flow deflects towards to the opposite side of branch pipe at the T-junction, as the height of turbulence promoter is higher, and as velocity ratio becomes smaller, and the flow continues to deflect to a considerably downstream station. (4) Velocity fluctuation is observed in the position where the vortex is formed, and it becomes a maximum at z/Dm=2. In the further downstream, velocity fluctuation decreases with the vortex breakdown, and it considerably remains to the downstream. (author)

  19. Effects of temperature gradient induced nanoparticle motion on conduction and convection of fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Leping; Peterson, George P.; Yoda, Minani; Wang Buxuan

    2012-01-01

    The role of temperature gradient induced nanoparticle motion on conduction and convection was investigated. Possible mechanisms for variations resulting from variations in the thermophysical properties are theoretically and experimentally discussed. The effect of the nanoparticle motion on conduction is demonstrated through thermal conductivity measurement of deionized water with suspended CuO nanoparticles (50 nm in diameter) and correlated with the contributions of Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, etc. The tendencies observed is that the magnitude of and the variation in the thermal conductivity increases with increasing volume fraction for a given temperature, which is due primarily to the Brownian diffusion of the nanoparticles. Using dimensional analysis, the thermal conductivity is correlated and both the interfacial thermal resistance and near-field radiation are found to be essentially negligible. A modification term that incorporates the contributions of Brownian motion and thermophoresis is proposed. The effect of nanoscale convection is illustrated through an experimental investigation that utilized fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticle tracers (200 nm in diameter) and multilayer nanoparticle image velocimetry. The results indicate that both the magnitude and the deviation of the fluid motion increased with increasing heat flux in the near-wall region. Meanwhile, the fluid motion tended to decrease with the off-wall distance for a given heating power. A corresponding numerical study of convection of pure deionized water shows that the velocity along the off-wall direction is several orders of magnitude lower than that of deionized water, which indicates that Brownian motion in the near-wall region is crucial for fluid with suspended nanoparticles in convection.

  20. Organized turbulent motions in a hedgerow vineyard: effect of evolving canopy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Nadia; Tezza, Luca; Tha Paw U, Kyaw; Pitacco, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Vegetation-atmosphere exchanges are determined by functional and structural properties of the plants together with environmental forcing. However, a fundamental aspect is the interaction of the canopy with the lower atmosphere. The vegetation deeply alters the composition and physical properties of the air flow, exchanging energy, matter and momentum with it. These processes take place in the bottom part of the atmospheric boundary layer where turbulence is the main mechanism transporting within-canopy air towards the mid- and upper atmospheric boundary layer and vice versa. Canopy turbulence is highly influenced by vegetation drag elements, determining the vertical profile of turbulent moments within the canopy. Canopies organized in rows, like vineyards, show peculiar turbulent transport dynamics. In addition, the morphological structure (phenology) of the vineyard is greatly variable seasonally, shifting from an empty canopy during vine dormancy to dense foliage in summer. The understanding of the canopy ventilation regime is related to several practical applications in vineyard management. For example, within-canopy turbulent motion is very important to predict small particles dispersion, like fungal spores, and minimize infection studying the effect on leaf wetness duration. Our study aims to follow the continuous evolution of turbulence characteristics and canopy structure during the growing season of a hedgerow vineyard, from bud break to fully developed canopy. The field experiment was conducted in a flat extensive vineyard in North-Eastern Italy, using a vertical array of five synchronous sonic anemometers within and above the canopy. Turbulent flow organization was greatly influenced by canopy structure. Turbulent coherent structures involved in momentum transport have been investigated using the classical quadrant analysis and a novel approach to identify dominant temporal scales. Momentum transport in the canopy was dominated by downward gusts showing

  1. Plasma Turbulence in Earth's Magnetotail Observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackler, D. A.; Avanov, L. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Pollock, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection, a process in which the magnetic topology undergoes multi-scale changes, is a significant mechanism for particle energization as well as energy dissipation. Reconnection is observed to occur in thin current sheets generated between two regions of magnetized plasma merging with a non-zero shear angle. Within a thinning current sheet, the dominant scale size approaches first the ion and then electron kinetic scale. The plasma becomes demagnetized, field lines transform, then once again the plasma becomes frozen-in. The reconnection process accelerates particles, leading to heated jets of plasma. Turbulence is another fundamental process in collision less plasmas. Despite decades of turbulence studies, an essential science question remains as to how turbulent energy dissipates at small scales by heating and accelerating particles. Turbulence in both plasmas and fluids has a fundamental property in that it follows an energy cascade into smaller scales. Energy introduced into a fluid or plasma can cause large scale motion, introducing vorticity, which merge and interact to make increasingly smaller eddies. It has been hypothesized that turbulent energy in magnetized plasmas may be dissipated by magnetic reconnection, just as viscosity dissipates energy in neutral fluid turbulence. The focus of this study is to use the new high temporal resolution suite of instruments on board the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission to explore this hypothesis. An observable feature of the energy cascade in a turbulent magnetized plasma is its similarity to classical hydrodynamics in that the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of turbulent fluctuations follows a Kolmogorov-like power law (Image-5/3). We use highly accurate (0.1 nT) Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM) data to derive the PSD as a function of frequency in the magnetic fluctuations. Given that we are able to confirm the turbulent nature of the flow field; we apply the method of Partial Variance of Increments (PVI

  2. Cascades and Dissipative Anomalies in Compressible Fluid Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory L. Eyink

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate dissipative anomalies in a turbulent fluid governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equation. We follow an exact approach pioneered by Onsager, which we explain as a nonperturbative application of the principle of renormalization-group invariance. In the limit of high Reynolds and Péclet numbers, the flow realizations are found to be described as distributional or “coarse-grained” solutions of the compressible Euler equations, with standard conservation laws broken by turbulent anomalies. The anomalous dissipation of kinetic energy is shown to be due not only to local cascade but also to a distinct mechanism called pressure-work defect. Irreversible heating in stationary, planar shocks with an ideal-gas equation of state exemplifies the second mechanism. Entropy conservation anomalies are also found to occur via two mechanisms: an anomalous input of negative entropy (negentropy by pressure work and a cascade of negentropy to small scales. We derive “4/5th-law”-type expressions for the anomalies, which allow us to characterize the singularities (structure-function scaling exponents required to sustain the cascades. We compare our approach with alternative theories and empirical evidence. It is argued that the “Big Power Law in the Sky” observed in electron density scintillations in the interstellar medium is a manifestation of a forward negentropy cascade or an inverse cascade of usual thermodynamic entropy.

  3. Cascades and Dissipative Anomalies in Compressible Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L.; Drivas, Theodore D.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate dissipative anomalies in a turbulent fluid governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equation. We follow an exact approach pioneered by Onsager, which we explain as a nonperturbative application of the principle of renormalization-group invariance. In the limit of high Reynolds and Péclet numbers, the flow realizations are found to be described as distributional or "coarse-grained" solutions of the compressible Euler equations, with standard conservation laws broken by turbulent anomalies. The anomalous dissipation of kinetic energy is shown to be due not only to local cascade but also to a distinct mechanism called pressure-work defect. Irreversible heating in stationary, planar shocks with an ideal-gas equation of state exemplifies the second mechanism. Entropy conservation anomalies are also found to occur via two mechanisms: an anomalous input of negative entropy (negentropy) by pressure work and a cascade of negentropy to small scales. We derive "4 /5 th-law"-type expressions for the anomalies, which allow us to characterize the singularities (structure-function scaling exponents) required to sustain the cascades. We compare our approach with alternative theories and empirical evidence. It is argued that the "Big Power Law in the Sky" observed in electron density scintillations in the interstellar medium is a manifestation of a forward negentropy cascade or an inverse cascade of usual thermodynamic entropy.

  4. The effect of wall geometry in particle-laden turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdehkakha, Hoora; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2016-11-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flow plays a significant role in various industrial applications, as turbulence alters the exchange of momentum and energy between particles and fluid flow. In wall-bounded flows, inhomogeneity in turbulent properties is the primary cause of turbophoresis that leads the particles toward the walls. Conversely, shear-induced lift force on the particles can become important if large scale vortical structures are present. The objective of this study is to understand the effects of geometry on fluid flows and consequently on particles transport and concentration. Direct numerical simulations combined with point particle Lagrangian tracking are performed for several geometries such as a pipe, channel, square duct, and squircle (rounded-corners duct). In non-circular ducts, anisotropic and inhomogeneous Reynolds stresses are the most influential phenomena that produce the secondary flows. It has been shown that these motions can have a significant impact on transporting momentum, vorticity, and energy from the core of the duct to the corners. The main focus of the present study is to explore the effects of near the wall structures and secondary flows on turbophoresis, lift, and particle concentration.

  5. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  6. Electron Fluid Description of Wave-Particle Interactions in Strong Buneman Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Haihong

    2013-10-01

    To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate turbulence-induced momentum transport and energy dissipation associated with electron heating in Buneman instability. Using 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the macroscopic effects generated by wave-particle interactions can be described by a set of electron fluid equations. These equations show that the energy dissipation and momentum transports in Buneman instability are locally quasi-static but globally non-static and irreversible. Turbulence drag dissipates both the bulk energy of electron streams and the associated magnetic energy. The decrease of magnetic field maintains an inductive electric field that re-accelerates electrons. The net loss of streaming energy is converted into electron heat and increases the electron Boltzmann entropy. The growth of self-sustained Buneman waves satisfies a Bernoulli-like equation which relates the turbulence-induced convective momentum transport and thermal momentum transport. Electron trapping and de-trapping drives local momentum transports, while phase mixing converts convective momentum into thermal momentum.These two local momentum transports sustain the Buneman waves and act as the micro-macro link in the anomalous heating process. This research is supported by the NASA Postdoctoral Program at NASA/GSFC administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA.

  7. Motion of charged suspended particle in a non-Newtonian fluid between two long parallel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd Elkhalek, M M [Nuclear Research Center-Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The motion of charged suspended particle in a non-Newtonian fluid between two long parallel plates is discussed. The equation of motion of a suspended particle was suggested by Closkin. The equations of motion are reduced to ordinary differential equations by similarity transformation and solved numerically by using Runge-Kutta method. The trajectories of particles are calculated by integrating the equation of motion of a single particle. The present simulation requires some empirical parameters concerning the collision of the particles with the wall. The effect of solid particles on flow properties are discussed. Some typical results for both fluid and particle phases and density distributions of the particles are presented graphically. 4 figs.

  8. Motion of Charged Suspended Particle in a Non-Newtonian Fluid between Two Long Parallel Plated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-El Khalek, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    The motion of charged suspended particle in a non-Newtonian fluid between two long parallel plates is discussed. The equation of motion of a suspended particle was suggested by Closkin. The equations of motion are reduced to ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations and solved numerically by using the Runge-Kutta method. The trajectories of particles are calculated by integrating the equation of motion of a single particle. The present simulation requires some empirical parameters concerning the collision of the particles with the wall. The effects of solid particles on flow properties are discussed. Some typical results for both fluid and particle phases and density distributions of the particles are presented graphically

  9. MILKY WAY STAR-FORMING COMPLEXES AND THE TURBULENT MOTION OF THE GALAXY'S MOLECULAR GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eve J.; Rahman, Mubdi; Murray, Norman

    2012-01-01

    We analyze Spitzer GLIMPSE, Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX), and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) images of the Milky Way to identify 8 μm and free-free sources in the Galaxy. Seventy-two of the 88 WMAP sources have coverage in the GLIMPSE and MSX surveys suitable for identifying massive star-forming complexes (SFCs). We measure the ionizing luminosity functions of the SFCs and study their role in the turbulent motion of the Galaxy's molecular gas. We find a total Galactic free-free flux f ν = 46,177.6 Jy; the 72 WMAP sources with full 8 μm coverage account for 34,263.5 Jy (∼75%), with both measurements made at ν = 94 GHz (W band). We find a total of 280 SFCs, of which 168 have unique kinematic distances and free-free luminosities. We use a simple model for the radial distribution of star formation to estimate the free-free and ionizing luminosity for the sources lacking distance determinations. The total dust-corrected ionizing luminosity is Q = (2.9 ± 0.5) × 10 53 photons s –1 , which implies a Galactic star formation rate of M-dot * = 1.2±0.2 M ☉ yr -1 . We present the (ionizing) luminosity function of the SFCs and show that 24 sources emit half the ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy. The SFCs appear as bubbles in GLIMPSE or MSX images; the radial velocities associated with the bubble walls allow us to infer the expansion velocity of the bubbles. We calculate the kinetic luminosity of the bubble expansion and compare it to the turbulent luminosity of the inner molecular disk. SFCs emitting 80% of the total Galactic free-free luminosity produce a kinetic luminosity equal to 65% of the turbulent luminosity in the inner molecular disk. This suggests that the expansion of the bubbles is a major driver of the turbulent motion of the inner Milky Way molecular gas.

  10. Self-propelled motion in a viscous compressible fluid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mácha, Václav; Nečasová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 2 (2016), s. 415-433 ISSN 0308-2105 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/11/1304; GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : self-propelled motion * compressible fluid * deformable structure Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.158, year: 2016 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=10065194&fileId=S0308210515000487

  11. Inertial-particle dynamics in turbulent flows: caustics, concentration fluctuations and random uncorrelated motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, K; Mehlig, B; Meneguz, E; Reeks, M

    2012-01-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of inertial particles in random model flows in the white-noise limit (at zero Kubo number, Ku = 0) and at finite Kubo numbers. Our results for the moments of relative inertial-particle velocities are in good agreement with recent theoretical results (Gustavsson and Mehlig 2011a) based on the formation of phase-space singularities in the inertial-particle dynamics (caustics). We discuss the relation between three recent approaches describing the dynamics and spatial distribution of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows: caustic formation, real-space singularities of the deformation tensor and random uncorrelated motion. We discuss how the phase- and real-space singularities are related. Their formation is well understood in terms of a local theory. We summarise the implications for random uncorrelated motion. (paper)

  12. Basal melting driven by turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbanipour Esfahani, Babak; Hirata, Silvia C.; Berti, Stefano; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2018-05-01

    Melting and, conversely, solidification processes in the presence of convection are key to many geophysical problems. An essential question related to these phenomena concerns the estimation of the (time-evolving) melting rate, which is tightly connected to the turbulent convective dynamics in the bulk of the melt fluid and the heat transfer at the liquid-solid interface. In this work, we consider a convective-melting model, constructed as a generalization of the Rayleigh-Bénard system, accounting for the basal melting of a solid. As the change of phase proceeds, a fluid layer grows at the heated bottom of the system and eventually reaches a turbulent convection state. By means of extensive lattice-Boltzmann numerical simulations employing an enthalpy formulation of the governing equations, we explore the model dynamics in two- and three-dimensional configurations. The focus of the analysis is on the scaling of global quantities like the heat flux and the kinetic energy with the Rayleigh number, as well as on the interface morphology and the effects of space dimensionality. Independently of dimensionality, we find that the convective-melting system behavior shares strong resemblances with that of the Rayleigh-Bénard one, and that the heat flux is only weakly enhanced with respect to that case. Such similarities are understood, at least to some extent, considering the resulting slow motion of the melting front (with respect to the turbulent fluid velocity fluctuations) and its generally little roughness (compared to the height of the fluid layer). Varying the Stefan number, accounting for the thermodynamical properties of the material, also seems to have only a mild effect, which implies the possibility of extrapolating results in numerically delicate low-Stefan setups from more convenient high-Stefan ones. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the geophysically relevant problem of modeling Arctic ice melt ponds.

  13. Turbulence Modulation by Non-Spherical Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias

    This study deals with the interaction between turbulence and non-spherical particles and represents an extension of the modeling framework for particleladen flows. The effect of turbulence on particles is commonly referred to as turbulent dispersion while the effect of particles on the carrier....... This study encompass an outlook on existing work, an experimental study, development of a numerical model and a case study advancing the modeling techniques for pulverized coal combustion to deal with larger non-spherical biomass particles. Firstly, existing knowledge concerning the motion of non......-spherical particles and turbulence modulation are outlined. A complete description of the motion of non-spherical particles is still lacking. However, evidence suggests that the equation of motion for a sphere only represent an asymptotical value for a more general, but yet unformulated, description of the motion...

  14. The influence of viscosity stratification on boundary-layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Jung, Seo Yoon; Sung, Hyung Jin; Zaki, Tamer A.

    2012-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over isothermally-heated walls were performed to investigate the influence of viscosity stratification on boundary-layer turbulence and drag. The adopted model for temperature-dependent viscosity was typical of water. The free-stream temperature was set to 30°C, and two wall temperatures, 70°C and 99°C, were simulated. In the heated flows, the mean shear-rate is enhanced near the wall and reduced in the buffer region, which induces a reduction in turbulence production. On the other hand, the turbulence dissipation is enhanced near the wall, despite the the reduction in fluid viscosity. The higher dissipation is attributed to a decrease in the smallest length scales and near-wall fine-scale motions. The combined effect of the reduced production and enhanced dissipation leads to lower Reynolds shear stresses and, as a result, reduction of the skin-friction coefficient. Supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (Grant EP/F034997/1) and partially supported by the Erasmus Mundus Build on Euro-Asian Mobility (EM-BEAM) programme.

  15. Two-fluid turbulence including electron inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrés, Nahuel, E-mail: nandres@iafe.uba.ar; Gómez, Daniel [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio, CC. 67, suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellón I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, Carlos; Martin, Luis; Dmitruk, Pablo [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-12-15

    We present a full two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description for a completely ionized hydrogen plasma, retaining the effects of the Hall current, electron pressure, and electron inertia. According to this description, each plasma species introduces a new spatial scale: the ion inertial length λ{sub i} and the electron inertial length λ{sub e}, which are not present in the traditional MHD description. In the present paper, we seek for possible changes in the energy power spectrum in fully developed turbulent regimes, using numerical simulations of the two-fluid equations in two-and-a-half dimensions. We have been able to reproduce different scaling laws in different spectral ranges, as it has been observed in the solar wind for the magnetic energy spectrum. At the smallest wavenumbers where plain MHD is valid, we obtain an inertial range following a Kolmogorov k{sup −5∕3} law. For intermediate wavenumbers such that λ{sub i}{sup −1}≪k≪λ{sub e}{sup −1}, the spectrum is modified to a k{sup −7∕3} power-law, as has also been obtained for Hall-MHD neglecting electron inertia terms. When electron inertia is retained, a new spectral region given by k>λ{sub e}{sup −1} arises. The power spectrum for magnetic energy in this region is given by a k{sup −11∕3} power law. Finally, when the terms of electron inertia are retained, we study the self-consistent electric field. Our results are discussed and compared with those obtained in the solar wind observations and previous simulations.

  16. Langevin equation of a fluid particle in wall-induced turbulence = Уравнение ланжевена для частицы жидкости в потоке с вызванной наличием стенок турбулентностью

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, J.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    We derive the Langevin equation describing the stochastic process of fluid particle motion in wall-induced turbulence (turbulent flow in pipes, channels, and boundary layers including the atmospheric surface layer). The analysis is based on the asymptotic behavior at a large Reynolds number. We use

  17. Biomimetic structures for fluid drag reduction in laminar and turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetics allows one to mimic nature to develop materials and devices of commercial interest for engineers. Drag reduction in fluid flow is one of the examples found in nature. In this study, nano, micro, and hierarchical structures found in lotus plant surfaces, as well as shark skin replica and a rib patterned surface to simulate shark skin structure were fabricated. Drag reduction efficiency studies on the surfaces were systematically carried out using water flow. An experimental flow channel was used to measure the pressure drop in laminar and turbulent flows, and the trends were explained in terms of the measured and predicted values by using fluid dynamics models. The slip length for various surfaces in laminar flow was also investigated based on the measured pressure drop. For comparison, the pressure drop for various surfaces was also measured using air flow.

  18. Investigation of the influence of turbulence models on the prediction of heat transfer to low Prandtl number fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, R.; Ma, W.; Anglart, H.

    2011-01-01

    Despite many advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), heat transfer modeling and validation of code for liquid metal flows needs to be improved. This contribution aims to provide validation of several turbulence models implemented in OpenFOAM. 6 different low Reynolds number and 3 high Reynolds number turbulence models have been validated against experimental data for 3 different Reynolds numbers. The results show that most models are able to predict the temperature profile tendencies and that especially the k-ω-SST by Menter has good predictive capabilities. However, all turbulence models show deteriorating capabilities with decreasing Reynolds numbers. (author)

  19. Study of Variable Turbulent Prandtl Number Model for Heat Transfer to Supercritical Fluids in Vertical Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ran; Dai, Xiaoye; Wang, Dabiao; Shi, Lin

    2018-06-01

    In order to improve the prediction performance of the numerical simulations for heat transfer of supercritical pressure fluids, a variable turbulent Prandtl number (Prt) model for vertical upward flow at supercritical pressures was developed in this study. The effects of Prt on the numerical simulation were analyzed, especially for the heat transfer deterioration conditions. Based on the analyses, the turbulent Prandtl number was modeled as a function of the turbulent viscosity ratio and molecular Prandtl number. The model was evaluated using experimental heat transfer data of CO2, water and Freon. The wall temperatures, including the heat transfer deterioration cases, were more accurately predicted by this model than by traditional numerical calculations with a constant Prt. By analyzing the predicted results with and without the variable Prt model, it was found that the predicted velocity distribution and turbulent mixing characteristics with the variable Prt model are quite different from that predicted by a constant Prt. When heat transfer deterioration occurs, the radial velocity profile deviates from the log-law profile and the restrained turbulent mixing then leads to the deteriorated heat transfer.

  20. Three-dimensional simulation of the motion of a single particle under a simulated turbulent velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Casas, P. A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    A 3D Lagrangian particle tracking model is coupled to a 3D channel velocity field to simulate the saltation motion of a single sediment particle moving in saltation mode. The turbulent field is a high-resolution three dimensional velocity field that reproduces a by-pass transition to turbulence on a flat plate due to free-stream turbulence passing above de plate. In order to reduce computational costs, a decoupled approached is used, i.e., the turbulent flow is simulated independently from the tracking model, and then used to feed the 3D Lagrangian particle model. The simulations are carried using the point-particle approach. The particle tracking model contains three sub-models, namely, particle free-flight, a post-collision velocity and bed representation sub-models. The free-flight sub-model considers the action of the following forces: submerged weight, non-linear drag, lift, virtual mass, Magnus and Basset forces. The model also includes the effect of particle angular velocity. The post-collision velocities are obtained by applying conservation of angular and linear momentum. The complete model was validated with experimental results from literature within the sand range. Results for particle velocity time series and distribution of particle turbulent intensities are presented.

  1. Fluid simulations of ∇Te-driven turbulence and transport in boundary plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.; Cohen, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is a report on simulations of a new drift wave type instability driven by the electron temperature gradient in tokamak scrapeoff-layers (SOL). A 2D(x,y) fluid code has been developed in order to explore the anomalous transport in the boundary plasmas. The simulation consists of a set of fluid equations (in the electrostatic limit) for the vorticity ∇ perpendicular 2 φ, the electron density n e and the temperature T e in a shearless plasma slab confined by a uniform, straight magnetic field B z with two diverter (or limiter) plates intercepting the magnetic field. The model has two regions separated by a magnetic separatrix: in the edge region inside the separatrix, the model is periodic along the magnetic field while in the SOL region outside the separatrix, the magnetic field is taken to be of finite length with model (logical sheath) boundary conditions at diverter (or limiter) plates. The simulation results show that the observed linear instability agrees well with theory, and that a saturated state of turbulence is reached. In saturated turbulence, clear evidence of the expected long-wavelength mode penetration into the edge is seen, an inverse cascade of wave energy (toward both long wavelengths and low frequencies) is observed. The simulation results also show that amplitudes of potential and the electron temperature fluctuations are somewhat above and the heat flux are somewhat below those of the simplest mixing-length estimates. The results from the self-consistent simulations to determine the microturbulent SOL electron temperature profile agree reasonably with the experimental measurements. The effects on the mode of neutral gas collisions at the divertor sheath and comparisons with the ionization driven turbulence are discussed

  2. Near field fluid coupling between internal motion of the organ of Corti and the basilar membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Stephen J.; Ni, Guangjian [Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-31

    The pressure distribution in each of the fluid chambers of the cochlea can be decomposed into a 1D, or plane wave, component and a near field component, which decays rapidly away from the excitation point. The transverse motion of the basilar membrane, BM, for example, generates both a 1D pressure field, which couples into the slow wave, and a local near field pressure, proportional to the BM acceleration, that generates an added mass on the BM due to the fluid motion. When the organ of Corti, OC, undergoes internal motion, due for example to outer hair cell activity, this motion will not itself generate any 1D pressure if the OC is incompressible and the BM is constrained not to move volumetrically, and so will not directly couple into the slow wave. This motion will, however, generate a near field pressure, proportional to the OC acceleration, which will act on the OC and thus increases its effective mass. The near field pressure due to this OC motion will also act on the BM, generating a force on the BM proportional to the acceleration of the OC, and thus create a “coupling mass” effect. By reciprocity, this coupling mass is the same as that acting on the OC due to the motion of the BM. This near field fluid coupling is initially observed in a finite element model of a slice of the cochlea. These simulations suggest a simple analytical formulation for the fluid coupling, using higher order beam modes across the width of the cochlear partition. It is well known that the added mass due to the near field pressure dominates the overall mass of the BM, and thus significantly affects the micromechanical dynamics. This work not only quantifies the added mass of the OC due its own motion in the fluid, and shows that this is important, but also demonstrates that the coupling mass effect between the BM and OC significantly affects the dynamics of simple micromechanical models.

  3. Fundamentals of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, James C.

    2006-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere and oceans exhibit complex patterns of fluid motion over a vast range of space and time scales. These patterns combine to establish the climate in response to solar radiation that is inhomogeneously absorbed by the materials comprising air, water, and land. Spontaneous, energetic variability arises from instabilities in the planetary-scale circulations, appearing in many different forms such as waves, jets, vortices, boundary layers, and turbulence. Geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) is the science of all these types of fluid motion. This textbook is a concise and accessible introduction to GFD for intermediate to advanced students of the physics, chemistry, and/or biology of Earth's fluid environment. The book was developed from the author's many years of teaching a first-year graduate course at the University of California, Los Angeles. Readers are expected to be familiar with physics and mathematics at the level of general dynamics (mechanics) and partial differential equations. Covers the essential GFD required for atmospheric science and oceanography courses Mathematically rigorous, concise coverage of basic theory and applications to both oceans and atmospheres Author is a world expert; this book is based on the course he has taught for many years Exercises are included, with solutions available to instructors from solutions@cambridge.org

  4. Turbulent Cloud Structure and Power Spectrum from 23 years of HST Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard; Simon, Amy; Morales-Juberias, Raul

    2018-01-01

    Images of Jupiter’s clouds show that turbulence is a ubiquitous phenomenon over many orders of scale size. According to Kolmogorov’s theory for turbulence, the frequency/distribution of clouds at various scales can be used to produce an energy power spectrum of a passive tracer. Kolmogorov theory predicts the spectral slopes for “shallow” and “deep” fluids in motion by following how energy is injected and dissipated in the fluid. We are quantifying the turbulent nature of Jupiter’s clouds over 23 years of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations using an algorithm first presented in Choi and Showman (2011, Icarus 216). We applied the power spectrum fitting algorithm to a variety of filters from available HST data and tested its sensitivity to free parameters and compare our results to Choi and Showman (2011). We will comment on the evidence for a 2D turbulent regime In Jupiter’s clouds and will report on empirical values found in the spectra and their physical interpretations, such as the Rhines scale. We also will report on the behavior of the passive tracer power spectrum and trends that exist over time for different latitudinal regions, primarily the belts and zones and the north and south equatorial belts.

  5. Numerical Study of Correlation of Fluid Particle Acceleration and Turbulence Intensity in Swirling Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Gui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical investigation of correlation between the fluid particle acceleration and the intensity of turbulence in swirling flows at a large Reynolds number is carried out via direct numerical simulation. A weak power-law form correlation ur.m.sE~C(aLφ between the Lagrangian acceleration and the Eulerian turbulence intensity is derived. It is found that the increase of the swirl level leads to the increase of the exponent φ and the trajectory-conditioned correlation coefficient ρ(aL,uE and results in a weak power-law augmentation of the acceleration intermittency. The trajectory-conditioned convection of turbulence fluctuation in the Eulerian viewpoint is generally linearly proportional to the fluctuation of Lagrangian accelerations, indicating a weak but clear relation between the Lagrangian intermittency and Eulerian intermittency effects. Moreover, except the case with vortex breakdown, the weak linear dependency is maintained when the swirl levels change, only with the coefficient of slope varied.

  6. Helicity and other conservation laws in perfect fluid motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serre, Denis

    2018-03-01

    In this review paper, we discuss helicity from a geometrical point of view and see how it applies to the motion of a perfect fluid. We discuss its relation with the Hamiltonian structure, and then its extension to arbitrary space dimensions. We also comment about the existence of additional conservation laws for the Euler equation, and its unlikely integrability in Liouville's sense.

  7. Natural convection in nano-fluids: Are the thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects significant in nano-fluid heat transfer enhancement?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Zoubida; Abu-Nada, Eiyad; Oztop, Hakan F.; Mataoui, Amina

    2012-01-01

    Natural convection heat transfer and fluid flow of CuO-Water nano-fluids is studied using the Rayleigh-Benard problem. A two component non-homogenous equilibrium model is used for the nano-fluid that incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Variable thermal conductivity and variable viscosity are taken into account in this work. Finite volume method is used to solve governing equations. Results are presented by streamlines, isotherms, nano-particle distribution, local and mean Nusselt numbers and nano-particle profiles at top and bottom side. Comparison of two cases as absence of Brownian and thermophoresis effects and presence of Brownian and thermophoresis effects showed that higher heat transfer is formed with the presence of Brownian and thermophoresis effect. In general, by considering the role of thermophoresis and Brownian motion, an enhancement in heat transfer is observed at any volume fraction of nano-particles. However, the enhancement is more pronounced at low volume fraction of nano-particles and the heat transfer decreases by increasing nano-particle volume fraction. On the other hand, by neglecting the role of thermophoresis and Brownian motion, deterioration in heat transfer is observed and this deterioration elevates by increasing the volume fraction of nano-particles. (authors)

  8. Mitigation of sliding motion of a cask-canister by fluid-structure interaction in an annular region - 59208

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tomohiro; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Shintani, Atsuhiko; Nakagaw, Chihiro; Furuta, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    The cask-canister system is a coaxial circular cylindrical structure in which several spent fuels are installed. This system is a free-standing structure thus, it is very important to reduce sliding motion for very large seismic excitations. In this study, we propose a mitigation method for sliding motion. Water is installed in an annular region between a cask and a canister. The equations of motion are derived taking fluid-structure interaction into consideration for nonlinear sliding motion analyses. Based on these equations, mitigation effects of sliding motions are studied analytically. Furthermore, a fundamental test model of a cask-canister system is fabricated and shaking table tests are conducted. From the analytical and test results, sliding motion mitigation effects are investigated. In this paper, the sliding motion of the cask-canister system subjected to a horizontal base excitation is studied and the effectiveness of water filled in the annular region between the cask and the canister is evaluated. This water brings inertia force coupling effect which is proportional to acceleration of the cask and the canister. Therefore, due to this fluid coupling, the cask and canister system couples through 3 types of forces, i.e., spring force, damping force and inertia force of the liquid. Equations of motion for the sliding motion are derived based on the fluid-structure coupling effects formulated by Fritz. Based on these equations of motion, nonlinear sliding motion of the cask-canister system is analyzed and the sliding suppression effects are investigated numerically. Furthermore, a fundamental test model of a cask-canister system is fabricated and the shaking table tests are conducted. From these analytical and test results, the sliding motion suppression effects due to fluid-structure coupling effects are investigated. As a result, it is confirmed that the inertia coupling effects due to water filled in the annular region are relatively large, and the

  9. Turbulence, Magnetic Reconnection in Turbulent Fluids and Energetic Particle Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarian, A.; Vlahos, L.; Kowal, G.; Yan, H.; Beresnyak, A.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.

    2012-11-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in astrophysics. It radically changes many astrophysical phenomena, in particular, the propagation and acceleration of cosmic rays. We present the modern understanding of compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, in particular its decomposition into Alfvén, slow and fast modes, discuss the density structure of turbulent subsonic and supersonic media, as well as other relevant regimes of astrophysical turbulence. All this information is essential for understanding the energetic particle acceleration that we discuss further in the review. For instance, we show how fast and slow modes accelerate energetic particles through the second order Fermi acceleration, while density fluctuations generate magnetic fields in pre-shock regions enabling the first order Fermi acceleration of high energy cosmic rays. Very importantly, however, the first order Fermi cosmic ray acceleration is also possible in sites of magnetic reconnection. In the presence of turbulence this reconnection gets fast and we present numerical evidence supporting the predictions of the Lazarian and Vishniac (Astrophys. J. 517:700-718, 1999) model of fast reconnection. The efficiency of this process suggests that magnetic reconnection can release substantial amounts of energy in short periods of time. As the particle tracing numerical simulations show that the particles can be efficiently accelerated during the reconnection, we argue that the process of magnetic reconnection may be much more important for particle acceleration than it is currently accepted. In particular, we discuss the acceleration arising from reconnection as a possible origin of the anomalous cosmic rays measured by Voyagers as well as the origin cosmic ray excess in the direction of Heliotail.

  10. Hydromagnetic turbulence in the direct interaction approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagarajan, S.

    1975-01-01

    The dissertation is concerned with the nature of turbulence in a medium with large electrical conductivity. Three distinct though inter-related questions are asked. Firstly, the evolution of a weak, random initial magnetic field in a highly conducting, isotropically turbulent fluid is discussed. This was first discussed in the paper 'Growth of Turbulent Magnetic Fields' by Kraichnan and Nagargian. The Physics of Fluids, volume 10, number 4, 1967. Secondly, the direct interaction approximation for hydromagnetic turbulence maintained by stationary, isotropic, random stirring forces is formulated in the wave-number-frequency domain. Thirdly, the dynamical evolution of a weak, random, magnetic excitation in a turbulent electrically conducting fluid is examined under varying kinematic conditions. (G.T.H.)

  11. Incipient motion in gravel bed rivers due to energetic turbulent flow events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos

    2013-04-01

    This contribution reviews recent developments and contributions in the field of incipient motion and entrainment of coarse sediment grains due to the action of near bed turbulent flows. Specifically, traditional shear based spatio-temporally averaged concepts and instantaneous stress tensor criteria are contrasted to the newly proposed flow event based impulse and energy criteria. The energy criterion, suggests that only sufficiently energetic turbulent events can remove a particle from its resting position on the bed surface and result on its entrainment downstream. While the impulse and energy criteria are interconnected through the energy-impulse equation, the later appears to be more versatile and appropriate for generalising to sediment transport. These flow event based criteria have a sound physical basis for describing the intermittent character of particle entrainment as inherited by near boundary turbulence at near threshold conditions. These criteria can be derived from fundamental laws of physics such as Newtonian classical mechanics and the Lagrange equations respectively. The energetic events that are capable of performing geomorphic work at the scale of individual particles are shown to follow a power law, meaning that more energetic events (capable of removing larger stones) are expected to occur less frequently. In addition, this paper discusses the role of the coefficient of energy transfer efficiency introduced in the energy equation for particle entrainment. A preliminary investigation from analysis of a series of mobile grain flume experiments illustrates that different signatures of turbulence or sequence of flow structures may have different effectiveness towards particle transport. Characteristic cases of specific energetic flow events and the associated particle response are shown and classified with regard to the time required for complete entrainment. Finally these findings are commented with respect to the implications for sediment

  12. Density Effects on Post-shock Turbulence Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yifeng; Jaberi, Farhad; Livescu, Daniel; Li, Zhaorui; Michigan State University Collaboration; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration; Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The effects of density variations due to mixture composition on post-shock turbulence structure are studied using turbulence-resolving shock-capturing simulations. This work extends the canonical Shock-Turbulence Interaction (STI) problem to involve significant variable density effects. The numerical method has been verified using a series of grid and LIA convergence tests, and is used to generate accurate post-shock turbulence data for a detailed flow study. Density effects on post-shock turbulent statistics are shown to be significant, leading to an increased amplification of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Eulerian and Lagrangian analyses show that the increase in the post-shock correlation between rotation and strain is weakened in the case with significant density variations (referred to as the ``multi-fluid'' case). Similar to previous single-fluid results and LIA predictions, the shock wave significantly changes the topology of the turbulent structures, exhibiting a symmetrization of the joint PDF of second and third invariant of the deviatoric part of velocity gradient tensor. In the multi-fluid case, this trend is more significant and mainly manifested in the heavy fluid regions. Lagrangian data are also used to study the evolution of turbulence structure away from the shock wave and assess the accuracy of Lagrangian dynamical models.

  13. On the interaction between fluid turbulence and particle loading: numerical simulation of turbidity currents and prediction of deep-sea arenites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronzo, D. M.; Dufek, J.

    2012-04-01

    Turbidity currents are water-particle flows able to move large distance over the seafloor, and the deep-sea arenitic facies of their deposits often represents an important class of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Coupling flow behavior and the resulting deposits may thus help finding new reservoirs, as well as reconstructing the sediment transport mechanisms from the continental shelf to the abyssal plain. There is a broad literature of turbidity currents, which includes field, theoretical, experimental, and numerical studies on flow dynamics and associated deposits. Generally, the field and theoretical approaches focus on the scale of actual deposits and currents, respectively, whereas experimental and numerical approaches are often restricted to the laboratory scale and relatively low-Reynolds number, respectively. Fully resolved simulations that incorporate complex bathymetry, large-scale flow, multiphase and 3D effects, are computationally expensive and require closure schemes. Here, a 2D numerical model of turbidity current is proposed, which is based on the Euler-Lagrange formulation of multiphase physics, and on the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes closure of turbulence. This strategy has been recently used in volcanology to simulate the gas-particle flow of pyroclastic density currents, in order to predict their deposits. The incompressible conservation equations of mass and momentum are solved for the water, and the equation of particle motion is solved for the sediment, which for this example, has an initial concentration of 1 % of 0.5 mm sand particles. The equations are solved numerically with the finite-volume method of Ansys Fluent software, and particle and fluid motion are two-way coupled during calculation, which means that the particles are tracked on the basis of water solution, then are allowed to affect the liquid turbulence through a momentum exchange. The Reynolds (turbulent) stresses, which dominate over the viscous ones in the turbidity current, are

  14. Using FlowLab, an educational computational fluid dynamics tool, to perform a comparative study of turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parihar, A.; Kulkarni, A.; Stern, F.; Xing, T.; Moeykens, S.

    2005-01-01

    Flow over an Ahmed body is a key benchmark case for validating the complex turbulent flow field around vehicles. In spite of the simple geometry, the flow field around an Ahmed body retains critical features of real, external vehicular flow. The present study is an attempt to implement such a real life example into the course curriculum for undergraduate engineers. FlowLab, which is a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool developed by Fluent Inc. for use in engineering education, allows students to conduct interactive application studies. This paper presents a synopsis of FlowLab, a description of one FlowLab exercise, and an overview of the educational experience gained by students through using FlowLab, which is understood through student surveys and examinations. FlowLab-based CFD exercises were implemented into 57:020 Mechanics of Fluids and Transport Processes and 58:160 Intermediate Mechanics of Fluids courses at the University of Iowa in the fall of 2004, although this report focuses only on experiences with the Ahmed body exercise, which was used only in the intermediate-level fluids class, 58:160. This exercise was developed under National Science Foundation funding by the authors of this paper. The focus of this study does not include validating the various turbulence models used for the Ahmed body simulation, because a two-dimensional simplification was applied. With the two-dimensional simplification, students may setup, run, and post process this model in a 50 minute class period using a single-CPU PC, as required for the 58:160 class at the University of Iowa. It is educational for students to understand the implication of a two- dimensional approximation for essentially a three-dimensional flow field, along with the consequent variation in both qualitative and quantitative results. Additionally, through this exercise, students may realize that the choice of the respective turbulence model will affect simulation prediction. (author)

  15. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Dorland, W.

    2011-01-01

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  16. The Renormalization-Group Method in the Problem on Calculation of the Spectral Energy Density of Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorovich, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    In order to find the shape of energy spectrum within the framework of the model of stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence, the renormalization-group equations, which reflect the Markovian nature of the mechanism of energy transfer along the wavenumber spectrum, are used in addition to the dimensional considerations and the energy balance equation. For the spectrum, the formula depends on three parameters, namely, the wavenumber, which determines the upper boundary of the range of the turbulent energy production, the spectral flux through this boundary, and the fluid kinematic viscosity.

  17. Numerical study and modeling of turbulence modulation in a sheet flow burdened with particulates; Etude numerique et modelisation de la modulation de la turbulence dans un ecoulement de nappe chargee en particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermorel, O

    2003-11-15

    This work is devoted to the numerical and theoretical study of turbulence modulation by particles using direct numerical simulation for the continuous phase coupled with a Lagrangian prediction of trajectories of discrete particles. The configuration corresponds to a slab of particles injected at high velocity into an isotropic decaying turbulence. The motion of a particle is supposed to be governed only by the drag force. The particle mass loading is large so that momentum exchange between particles and fluid results in a significant modulation of the turbulence. Collisions are neglected. The momentum transfer between particles and gas causes a strong acceleration of the gas in the slab. In the periphery of the slab, the turbulence is enhanced due to the production by the mean gas velocity gradients. The analysis of the interphase transfer terms in the gas turbulent kinetic energy equation shows that the direct effect of the particles is to damp the turbulence in the core of the slab but to enhance it in the periphery. This last effect is due to a strong correlation between the particle distribution and the instantaneous gas velocity. Another issue concerns the k-{epsilon} model and the validity of its closure assumptions in two phase flows. A new eddy viscosity expression, function of particle parameters, is used to model the Reynolds stress tensor. The modelling of the gas turbulent dissipation rate is questioned. A two-phase Langevin equation is also tested to model drift velocity and fluid-particles velocity covariance equations. (author)

  18. Multi-time, multi-scale correlation functions in turbulence and in turbulent models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biferale, L.; Boffetta, G.; Celani, A.; Toschi, F.

    1999-01-01

    A multifractal-like representation for multi-time, multi-scale velocity correlation in turbulence and dynamical turbulent models is proposed. The importance of subleading contributions to time correlations is highlighted. The fulfillment of the dynamical constraints due to the equations of motion is

  19. Structure and motion of edge turbulence in the National Spherical Torus Experiment and Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweben, S. J.; Maqueda, R. J.; Terry, J. L.; Munsat, T.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D.; Russell, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; LeBlanc, B.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Stotler, D. P.; Williams, K. M.; Bush, C. E.; Maingi, R.; Grulke, O.; Sabbagh, S. A.; White, A. E.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper we compare the structure and motion of edge turbulence observed in L-mode vs. H-mode plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, M. G. Bell, R. E. Bell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 45, A335 (2003)]. The radial and poloidal correlation lengths are not significantly different between the L-mode and the H-mode in the cases examined. The poloidal velocity fluctuations are lower and the radial profiles of the poloidal turbulence velocity are somewhat flatter in the H-mode compared with the L-mode plasmas. These results are compared with similar measurements Alcator C-Mod [E. Marmar, B. Bai, R. L. Boivin et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 1610 (2003)], and with theoretical models.

  20. Numerical investigation of the effects of large particles on wall-turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.; Banerjee, S.

    1997-01-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flows, at average volume fraction less than 4x10 -4 , in open channels are numerically simulated by using a pseudospectral method. The motion of particles, that are large compared with the dissipative length scale, is coupled to the fluid motion by a method that generates a open-quotes virtualclose quotes no-slip boundary on the particle surface by imposition of an external force field on the grid-points enclosed by the particle. Cases for both moving and stationary particles, lying on the wall, are simulated. The investigations focus on particle-turbulence interaction. It is found that particles increase turbulence intensities and Reynolds stress. By examining higher order turbulence statistics and doing a quadrant analysis of the Reynolds stress, it is found that the ejection-sweep cycle is affected emdash primarily through suppression of sweeps by the smaller particles and enhancement of sweep activity by the larger particles. An assessment of the impact of these findings on scalar transfer is made, as enhancement of wall heat/mass transfer rates is a motivation of the overall work on this subject. In the cases considered, comparison of the calculations with an existing experiment was possible, and shows good agreement. At present, due to limitations in available computational resources, this method cannot be used when the particle diameter is smaller than the smallest turbulence scale (e.g. the Kolmogorov length scale) and the volume fraction is of the same order as studied in this paper, i.e. between 10 -3 and 10 -4 . copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  1. Numerical investigation of fluid mud motion using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and two-dimensional fluid mud coupling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Zhang, Qinghe; Hao, Linnan

    2015-03-01

    A water-fluid mud coupling model is developed based on the unstructured grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) to investigate the fluid mud motion. The hydrodynamics and sediment transport of the overlying water column are solved using the original three-dimensional ocean model. A horizontal two-dimensional fluid mud model is integrated into the FVCOM model to simulate the underlying fluid mud flow. The fluid mud interacts with the water column through the sediment flux, current, and shear stress. The friction factor between the fluid mud and the bed, which is traditionally determined empirically, is derived with the assumption that the vertical distribution of shear stress below the yield surface of fluid mud is identical to that of uniform laminar flow of Newtonian fluid in the open channel. The model is validated by experimental data and reasonable agreement is found. Compared with numerical cases with fixed friction factors, the results simulated with the derived friction factor exhibit the best agreement with the experiment, which demonstrates the necessity of the derivation of the friction factor.

  2. ``Large''- vs Small-scale friction control in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Jacopo; Örlü, Ramis; Chin, Cheng; Schlatter, Philipp

    2017-11-01

    We reconsider the ``large-scale'' control scheme proposed by Hussain and co-workers (Phys. Fluids 10, 1049-1051 1998 and Phys. Rev. Fluids, 2, 62601 2017), using new direct numerical simulations (DNS). The DNS are performed in a turbulent channel at friction Reynolds number Reτ of up to 550 in order to eliminate low-Reynolds-number effects. The purpose of the present contribution is to re-assess this control method in the light of more modern developments in the field, in particular also related to the discovery of (very) large-scale motions. The goals of the paper are as follows: First, we want to better characterise the physics of the control, and assess what external contribution (vortices, forcing, wall motion) are actually needed. Then, we investigate the optimal parameters and, finally, determine which aspects of this control technique actually scale in outer units and can therefore be of use in practical applications. In addition to discussing the mentioned drag-reduction effects, the present contribution will also address the potential effect of the naturally occurring large-scale motions on frictional drag, and give indications on the physical processes for potential drag reduction possible at all Reynolds numbers.

  3. Review of some experimental studies of turbulent mixed convection covering a wide range Prandtl number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    The early experimental studies of buoyancy-influenced turbulent convective heat transfer to fluids flowing upwards and downwards in long uniformly heated vertical tubes were mainly performed using water at atmospheric pressure as the working fluid. In addition, some experiments using air were reported and even some using mercury. At that time there was also quite a lot of interest in heat transfer to water at supercritical pressure and also carbon dioxide. More recently, experimental results have been obtained using liquid sodium. The Prandtl numbers in the studies referred to above cover a wide range of values, being well in excess of unity under some conditions in the case of the supercritical pressure fluids and atmospheric pressure water, just under unity in the case of air, much less than unity in the case of mercury and even lower in the case of liquid sodium. Over the years a good general understanding has gradually been achieved of the complex manner in which buoyancy affects heat transfer in conventional fluids such as water and air. Up to a point, the behaviour in the case of a liquid metal such as mercury can be reconciled with such arguments. However, this is certainly not so in the case of liquid sodium. In the present paper results from a number of experimental studies of buoyancy-influenced heat transfer in vertical tubes are reviewed. This is done with the aim of providing a picture of observed behaviour consistent with our understanding of the basic mechanisms of convective heat transfer, taking account of the complicated manner in which the mean motion, turbulence and the heat transfer are affected by buoyancy. The starting point is to view convective heat transfer in wall shear flows in terms of the local balance between diffusion of heat (turbulent and molecular) and advection of heat by the flowing fluid. Prandtl number affects the radial temperature profile and therefore the variation of density across the shear flow and, in turn, the extent

  4. A stochastic model of particle dispersion in turbulent reacting gaseous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David; Hewson, John

    2012-11-01

    We are performing fundamental studies of dispersive transport and time-temperature histories of Lagrangian particles in turbulent reacting flows. The particle-flow statistics including the full particle temperature PDF are of interest. A challenge in modeling particle motions is the accurate prediction of fine-scale aerosol-fluid interactions. A computationally affordable stochastic modeling approach, one-dimensional turbulence (ODT), is a proven method that captures the full range of length and time scales, and provides detailed statistics of fine-scale turbulent-particle mixing and transport. Limited results of particle transport in ODT have been reported in non-reacting flow. Here, we extend ODT to particle transport in reacting flow. The results of particle transport in three flow configurations are presented: channel flow, homogeneous isotropic turbulence, and jet flames. We investigate the functional dependence of the statistics of particle-flow interactions including (1) parametric study with varying temperatures, Reynolds numbers, and particle Stokes numbers; (2) particle temperature histories and PDFs; (3) time scale and the sensitivity of initial and boundary conditions. Flow statistics are compared to both experimental measurements and DNS data.

  5. An apparatus for generation and quantitative measurement of homogeneous isotropic turbulence in He ii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, Brian; Guo, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The superfluid phase of helium-4, known as He ii, exhibits extremely small kinematic viscosity and may be a useful tool for economically producing and studying high Reynolds number turbulent flow. Such applications are not currently possible because a comprehensive understanding of the complex two-fluid behavior of He ii is lacking. This situation could be remedied by a systematic investigation of simple, well controlled turbulence that can be directly compared with theoretical models. To this end, we have developed a new apparatus that combines flow visualization with second sound attenuation to study turbulence in the wake of a mesh grid towed through a He ii filled channel. One of three mesh grids (mesh number M = 3, 3.75, or 5 mm) can be pulled at speeds between 0.1 and 60 cm/s through a cast acrylic flow channel which has a 16 mm × 16 mm cross section and measures 330 mm long. The motion of solidified deuterium tracer particles, with diameter of the order 1 μm, in the resulting flow is captured by a high speed camera, and a particle tracking velocimetry algorithm resolves the Lagrangian particle trajectories through the turbulent flow field. A pair of oscillating superleak second sound transducers installed in the channel allows complementary measurement of vortex line density in the superfluid throughout the turbulent decay process. Success in early experiments demonstrates the effectiveness of both probes, and preliminary analysis of the data shows that both measurements strongly correlate with each other. Further investigations will provide comprehensive information that can be used to address open questions about turbulence in He ii and move toward the application of this fluid to high Reynolds number fluid research.

  6. Interpretation of Fermion system equilibration by energy fluid motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S.

    1990-01-01

    We study the equilibration of fermion system with the help of both linear and non-linear master equations which are originated from the extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation of motion. We show how the non-linear master equation for nucleon occupation number transforms into the Navier-Stokes type of one dimensional equation for non-stationary flow of a compressible and viscous fluid. Physical consequences of these equations are investigated by providing illustrative examples

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myeong, Hyeon Guk

    1999-06-01

    This book deals with computational fluid dynamics with basic and history of numerical fluid dynamics, introduction of finite volume method using one-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of two-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of Navier-Stokes equation, fluid with heat transport, turbulent flow and turbulent model, Navier-Stokes solution by generalized coordinate system such as coordinate conversion, conversion of basic equation, program and example of calculation, application of abnormal problem and high speed solution of numerical fluid dynamics.

  8. A Generalized turbulent dispersion model for bubbly flow numerical simulation in NEPTUNE-CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviéville, Jérôme, E-mail: Jerome-marcel.lavieville@edf.fr; Mérigoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr; Guingo, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.guingo@edf.fr; Baudry, Cyril, E-mail: Cyril.baudry@edf.fr; Mimouni, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.mimouni@edf.fr

    2017-02-15

    The NEPTUNE-CFD code, based upon an Eulerian multi-fluid model, is developed within the framework of the NEPTUNE project, financially supported by EDF (Electricité de France), CEA (Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives), IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire) and AREVA-NP. NEPTUNE-CFD is mainly focused on Nuclear Safety applications involving two-phase water-steam flows, like two-phase Pressurized Shock (PTS) and Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB). Many of these applications involve bubbly flows, particularly, for application to flows in PWR fuel assemblies, including studies related to DNB. Considering a very usual model for interfacial forces acting on bubbles, including drag, virtual mass and lift forces, the turbulent dispersion force is often added to moderate the lift effect in orthogonal directions to the main flow and get the right dispersion shape. This paper presents a formal derivation of this force, considering on the one hand, the fluctuating part of drag and virtual mass, and on the other hand, Turbulent Pressure derivation obtained by comparison between Lagrangian and Eulerian description of bubbles motion. An extension of the Tchen’s theory is used to express the turbulent kinetic energy of bubbles and the two-fluid turbulent covariance tensor in terms of liquid turbulent velocities and time scale. The model obtained by this way, called Generalized Turbulent Dispersion Model (GTD), does not require any user parameter. The model is validated against Liu & Bankoff air-water experiment, Arizona State University (ASU) experiment, DEBORA experiment and Texas A&M University (TAMU) boiling flow experiments.

  9. Turbulent energy generated by accelerations and shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikaelian, K.O.

    1986-01-01

    The turbulent energy generated at the interface between two fluids undergoing a constant acceleration or a shock is calculated. Assuming linear density profiles in the mixed region we find E/sub turbulent//E/sub directed/ = 2.3A 2 % (constant acceleration) and 9.3A 2 % (shock), where A is the Atwood number. Diffusion models predict somewhat less turbulent energy and a density profile with a tail extending into the lower density fluid. Eddy sizes are approximately 27% (constant acceleration) and 17% (shock) of the mixing depth into the heavier fluid. 6 refs., 3 figs

  10. Computational domain length and Reynolds number effects on large-scale coherent motions in turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Daniel; Bauer, Christian; Wagner, Claus

    2018-03-01

    We present results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent pipe flow at shear Reynolds numbers up to Reτ = 1500 using different computational domains with lengths up to ?. The objectives are to analyse the effect of the finite size of the periodic pipe domain on large flow structures in dependency of Reτ and to assess a minimum ? required for relevant turbulent scales to be captured and a minimum Reτ for very large-scale motions (VLSM) to be analysed. Analysing one-point statistics revealed that the mean velocity profile is invariant for ?. The wall-normal location at which deviations occur in shorter domains changes strongly with increasing Reτ from the near-wall region to the outer layer, where VLSM are believed to live. The root mean square velocity profiles exhibit domain length dependencies for pipes shorter than 14R and 7R depending on Reτ. For all Reτ, the higher-order statistical moments show only weak dependencies and only for the shortest domain considered here. However, the analysis of one- and two-dimensional pre-multiplied energy spectra revealed that even for larger ?, not all physically relevant scales are fully captured, even though the aforementioned statistics are in good agreement with the literature. We found ? to be sufficiently large to capture VLSM-relevant turbulent scales in the considered range of Reτ based on our definition of an integral energy threshold of 10%. The requirement to capture at least 1/10 of the global maximum energy level is justified by a 14% increase of the streamwise turbulence intensity in the outer region between Reτ = 720 and 1500, which can be related to VLSM-relevant length scales. Based on this scaling anomaly, we found Reτ⪆1500 to be a necessary minimum requirement to investigate VLSM-related effects in pipe flow, even though the streamwise energy spectra does not yet indicate sufficient scale separation between the most energetic and the very long motions.

  11. MILKY WAY STAR-FORMING COMPLEXES AND THE TURBULENT MOTION OF THE GALAXY'S MOLECULAR GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eve J.; Rahman, Mubdi [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Murray, Norman, E-mail: elee@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: rahman@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: elee@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: murray@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2012-06-20

    We analyze Spitzer GLIMPSE, Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX), and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) images of the Milky Way to identify 8 {mu}m and free-free sources in the Galaxy. Seventy-two of the 88 WMAP sources have coverage in the GLIMPSE and MSX surveys suitable for identifying massive star-forming complexes (SFCs). We measure the ionizing luminosity functions of the SFCs and study their role in the turbulent motion of the Galaxy's molecular gas. We find a total Galactic free-free flux f{sub {nu}} = 46,177.6 Jy; the 72 WMAP sources with full 8 {mu}m coverage account for 34,263.5 Jy ({approx}75%), with both measurements made at {nu} = 94 GHz (W band). We find a total of 280 SFCs, of which 168 have unique kinematic distances and free-free luminosities. We use a simple model for the radial distribution of star formation to estimate the free-free and ionizing luminosity for the sources lacking distance determinations. The total dust-corrected ionizing luminosity is Q = (2.9 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 53} photons s{sup -1}, which implies a Galactic star formation rate of M-dot{sub *}= 1.2{+-}0.2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We present the (ionizing) luminosity function of the SFCs and show that 24 sources emit half the ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy. The SFCs appear as bubbles in GLIMPSE or MSX images; the radial velocities associated with the bubble walls allow us to infer the expansion velocity of the bubbles. We calculate the kinetic luminosity of the bubble expansion and compare it to the turbulent luminosity of the inner molecular disk. SFCs emitting 80% of the total Galactic free-free luminosity produce a kinetic luminosity equal to 65% of the turbulent luminosity in the inner molecular disk. This suggests that the expansion of the bubbles is a major driver of the turbulent motion of the inner Milky Way molecular gas.

  12. Turbulent Helicity in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhetiani, Otto G.; Kurgansky, Michael V.; Vazaeva, Natalia V.

    2018-05-01

    We consider the assumption postulated by Deusebio and Lindborg (J Fluid Mech 755:654-671, 2014) that the helicity injected into the Ekman boundary layer undergoes a cascade, with preservation of its sign (right- or alternatively left-handedness), which is a signature of the system rotation, from large to small scales, down to the Kolmogorov microscale of turbulence. At the same time, recent direct field measurements of turbulent helicity in the steppe region of southern Russia near Tsimlyansk Reservoir show the opposite sign of helicity from that expected. A possible explanation for this phenomenon may be the joint action of different scales of atmospheric flows within the boundary layer, including the sea-breeze circulation over the test site. In this regard, we consider a superposition of the classic Ekman spiral solution and Prandtl's jet-like slope-wind profile to describe the planetary boundary-layer wind structure. The latter solution mimics a hydrostatic shallow breeze circulation over a non-uniformly heated surface. A 180°-wide sector on the hodograph plane exists, within which the relative orientation of the Ekman and Prandtl velocity profiles favours the left rotation with height of the resulting wind velocity vector in the lowermost part of the boundary layer. This explains the negative (left-handed) helicity cascade toward small-scale turbulent motions, which agrees with the direct field measurements of turbulent helicity in Tsimlyansk. A simple turbulent relaxation model is proposed that explains the measured positive values of the relatively minor contribution to turbulent helicity from the vertical components of velocity and vorticity.

  13. Toward topology-based characterization of small-scale mixing in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Sawan; Girimaji, Sharath

    2011-11-01

    Turbulent mixing rate at small scales of motion (molecular mixing) is governed by the steepness of the scalar-gradient field which in turn is dependent upon the prevailing velocity gradients. Thus motivated, we propose a velocity-gradient topology-based approach for characterizing small-scale mixing in compressible turbulence. We define a mixing efficiency metric that is dependent upon the topology of the solenoidal and dilatational deformation rates of a fluid element. The mixing characteristics of solenoidal and dilatational velocity fluctuations are clearly delineated. We validate this new approach by employing mixing data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of compressible decaying turbulence with passive scalar. For each velocity-gradient topology, we compare the mixing efficiency predicted by the topology-based model with the corresponding conditional scalar variance obtained from DNS. The new mixing metric accurately distinguishes good and poor mixing topologies and indeed reasonably captures the numerical values. The results clearly demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach for characterizing and predicting mixing in compressible flows.

  14. Quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in shallow fluid layers: the role of bottom friction and fluid layer depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clercx, H J H; van Heijst, G J F; Zoeteweij, M L

    2003-06-01

    The role of bottom friction and the fluid layer depth in numerical simulations and experiments of freely decaying quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in shallow fluid layers has been investigated. In particular, the power-law behavior of the compensated kinetic energy E0(t)=E(t)e(2lambda t), with E(t) the total kinetic energy of the flow and lambda the bottom-drag coefficient, and the compensated enstrophy Omega(0)(t)=Omega(t)e(2lambda t), with Omega(t) the total enstrophy of the flow, have been studied. We also report on the scaling exponents of the ratio Omega(t)/E(t), which is considered as a measure of the characteristic length scale in the flow, for different values of lambda. The numerical simulations on square bounded domains with no-slip boundaries revealed bottom-friction independent power-law exponents for E0(t), Omega(0)(t), and Omega(t)/E(t). By applying a discrete wavelet packet transform technique to the numerical data, we have been able to compute the power-law exponents of the average number density of vortices rho(t), the average vortex radius a(t), the mean vortex separation r(t), and the averaged normalized vorticity extremum omega(ext)(t)/square root E(t). These decay exponents proved to be independent of the bottom friction as well. In the experiments we have varied the fluid layer depth, and it was found that the decay exponents of E0(t), Omega(0)(t), Omega(t)/E(t), and omega(ext)(t)/square root E(t) are virtually independent of the fluid layer depth. The experimental data for rho(t) and a(t) are less conclusive; power-law exponents obtained for small fluid layer depths agree with those from previously reported experiments, but significantly larger power-law exponents are found for experiments with larger fluid layer depths.

  15. The effect of magnetisation transfer contrast on cerebrospinal fluid on motion artefacts on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aprile, I.; Principi, M.; Ottaviano, P.; Scapeccia, M.

    2003-01-01

    We assessed possible advantages of the use of fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) sequences with magnetisation-transfer contrast (MTC) over conventional FLAIR images. We carried out cranial MRI at 1 tesla on 50 patients with both sequences. In nine patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) we performed a quantitative comparison of the two sequences, looking at the contrast-to-noise ratio between lesions and normal white matter and counting the number of lesions shown using each method. A qualitative comparison on all patients consisted of the analysis of the appearance of the normal parenchyma, of any lesions, and of artefacts, with particular reference to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) motion artefacts. The quantitative analysis showed no meaningful difference between the two sequences. The cerebral parenchyma and lesions appeared substantially the same with both techniques. With FLAIR MTC there was a clear, and consistent reduction in CSF motion artefacts. FLAIR MTC sequences can usefully be used in place of the conventional sequence at 1 tesla. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of turbulent particle dispersion models in turbulent shear flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laín

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the performance of two Lagrangian turbulent particle dispersion models: the standard model (e.g., that presented in Sommerfeld et al. (1993, in which the fluctuating fluid velocity experienced by the particle is composed of two components, one correlated with the previous time step and a second one randomly sampled from a Wiener process, and the model proposed by Minier and Peirano (2001, which is based on the PDF approach and performs closure at the level of acceleration of the fluid experienced by the particle. Formulation of a Langevin equation model for the increments of fluid velocity seen by the particle allows capturing some underlying physics of particle dispersion in general turbulent flows while keeping the mathematical manipulation of the stochastic model simple, thereby avoiding some pitfalls and simplifying the derivation of macroscopic relations. The performance of both dispersion models is tested in the configurations of grid-generated turbulence (Wells and Stock (1983 experiments, simple shear flow (Hyland et al., 1999 and confined axisymmetric jet flow laden with solids (Hishida and Maeda (1987 experiments.

  17. Comments on ''theory of dissipative density-gradient-driven turbulence in the tokamak edge'' [Phys. Fluids 28, 1419 (1985)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    The author critiques the model of tokamak edge turbulence by P.W. Terry and P.H. Diamond (Phys. Fluids 28, 1419, 1985). The critique includes a discussion of the physical basis, consistency and quantitative accuracy of the Terry-Diamond model. 19 refs

  18. Self-consistent computation of transport barrier formation by fluid drift turbulence in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.; Jenko, F.; Peeters, A.G.; Teo, A.C.Y.

    1999-01-01

    (1) Computations of turbulence from the electromagnetic gyro fluid model are performed in a flux surface geometry representing the actual MHD equilibrium of the ASDEX Upgrade edge flux surfaces. The transition to ideal ballooning seen in simple geometries as the plasma beta rises is suppressed, leaving the transport at quantitatively realistic levels. Computations for core parameters at half-radius geometry show significant contribution due to the finite beta electron dynamics, possibly removing the standard ITG threshold. (2) Strong inward vorticity transport in edge turbulence, resulting from ion diamagnetic flows, may lead to a build up of mean ExB vorticity fast enough to cause an H-mode transition. (3) Friction of mean ion flows against neutrals involves both toroidal and poloidal flow components, leading to a finite radial current due to a given ExB profile even with zero poloidal rotation. (author)

  19. Self-propelled motion in a viscous compressible fluid –unbounded domains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mácha, Václav; Nečasová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2016), s. 627-643 ISSN 0218-2025 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : self-propelled motion * compressible fluid * deformable structure Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.860, year: 2016 http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/10.1142/S0218202516500123

  20. Eulerian-Lagrangian simulation of non-isothermal gas-solid flows: particle-turbulence interactions in pipe flows; Simulation eulerienne-lagrangienne d'ecoulements gaz-solide non isothermes: interactions particules-turbulence, application aux ecoulements en conduite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagras, V.

    2004-03-15

    The aim of this work is to contribute to the numerical modeling of turbulent gas-solid flows in vertical or horizontal non isothermal pipes, which can be found in many industrial processes (pneumatic transport, drying, etc). The model is based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach allowing a fine description of the interactions between the two phases (action of the fluid upon the particles (dispersion), action of the particles upon the fluid (two way coupling) and between particles (collisions)), more or less influential according to the characteristics of the flow. The influence of the gas phase turbulence on the particle motion is taken into account using a non-isotropic dispersion model, which allows the generation of velocity and temperature fluctuations of the fluid seen by the particles. The numerical developments brought to the model for vertical and horizontal pipe flow have been validated by comparison with available experimental results from the literature. The sensitivity tests highlight the influence of the dispersion model, collisions and turbulence modulation (direct and non direct modifications ) on the dynamic and thermal behavior of the suspension. The model is able to predict the heat exchanges in the presence of particles for a wide range of flows in vertical and horizontal pipes. However numerical problems still exist in two-way coupling for very small particles and loading ratios above one. This is related to the problems encountered when modeling the coupling terms between the two phases (parameters C{sub {epsilon}}{sub 2} and C{sub {epsilon}}{sub 3} ) involved in the turbulence dissipation balance. (author)

  1. Wave-induced coherent turbulence structures and sediment resuspension in the nearshore of a prototype-scale sandy barrier beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Hachem; Thompson, Charlotte E. L.; Amos, Carl L.; Townend, Ian H.

    2015-10-01

    The suspension of sediments by oscillatory flows is a complex case of fluid-particle interaction. The aim of this study is to provide insight into the spatial (time) and scale (frequency) relationships between wave-generated boundary layer turbulence and event-driven sediment transport beneath irregular shoaling and breaking waves in the nearshore of a prototype sandy barrier beach, using data collected through the Barrier Dynamics Experiment II (BARDEX II). Statistical, quadrant and spectral analyses reveal the anisotropic and intermittent nature of Reynolds' stresses (momentum exchange) in the wave boundary layer, in all three orthogonal planes of motion. The fractional contribution of coherent turbulence structures appears to be dictated by the structural form of eddies beneath plunging and spilling breakers, which in turn define the net sediment mobilisation towards or away from the barrier, and hence ensuing erosion and accretion trends. A standing transverse wave is also observed in the flume, contributing to the substantial skewness of spanwise turbulence. Observed low frequency suspensions are closely linked to the mean flow (wave) properties. Wavelet analysis reveals that the entrainment and maintenance of sediment in suspension through a cluster of bursting sequence is associated with the passage of intermittent slowly-evolving large structures, which can modulate the frequency of smaller motions. Outside the boundary layer, small scale, higher frequency turbulence drives the suspension. The extent to which these spatially varied perturbation clusters persist is associated with suspension events in the high frequency scales, decaying as the turbulent motion ceases to supply momentum, with an observed hysteresis effect.

  2. On exact solutions for some oscillating motions of a generalized Oldroyd-B fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M.; Anjum, Asia; Qi, Haitao; Fetecau, C.

    2010-02-01

    This paper deals with exact solutions for some oscillating motions of a generalized Oldroyd-B fluid. The fractional calculus approach is used in the constitutive relationship of fluid model. Analytical expressions for the velocity field and the corresponding shear stress for flows due to oscillations of an infinite flat plate as well as those induced by an oscillating pressure gradient are determined using Fourier sine and Laplace transforms. The obtained solutions are presented under integral and series forms in terms of the Mittag-Leffler functions. For α = β = 1, our solutions tend to the similar solutions for ordinary Oldroyd-B fluid. A comparison between generalized and ordinary Oldroyd-B fluids is shown by means of graphical illustrations.

  3. Aviation turbulence processes, detection, prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Anyone who has experienced turbulence in flight knows that it is usually not pleasant, and may wonder why this is so difficult to avoid. The book includes papers by various aviation turbulence researchers and provides background into the nature and causes of atmospheric turbulence that affect aircraft motion, and contains surveys of the latest techniques for remote and in situ sensing and forecasting of the turbulence phenomenon. It provides updates on the state-of-the-art research since earlier studies in the 1960s on clear-air turbulence, explains recent new understanding into turbulence generation by thunderstorms, and summarizes future challenges in turbulence prediction and avoidance.

  4. Statistical properties of turbulence: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the turbulent advection of passive scalars, turbulence in the one-dimensional Burgers equation, and fluid turbulence in the presence of polymer ... However, it is not easy to state what would consti- tute a solution of the turbulence ...... flow with Lagrangian tracers and use a cubic spline interpolation method to calculate their ...

  5. Multi-CPU plasma fluid turbulence calculations on a CRAY Y-MP C90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, V.E.; Carreras, B.A.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Curtis, B.C.; Troutman, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Significant improvements in real-time efficiency have been obtained for plasma fluid turbulence calculations by microtasking the nonlinear fluid code KITE in which they are implemented on the CRAY Y-MP C90 at the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC). The number of processors accessed concurrently scales linearly with problem size. Close to six concurrent processors have so far been obtained with a three-dimensional nonlinear production calculation at the currently allowed memory size of 80 Mword. With a calculation size corresponding to the maximum allowed memory of 200 Mword in the next system configuration, we expect to be able to access close to nine processors of the C90 concurrently with a commensurate improvement in real-time efficiency. These improvements in performance are comparable to those expected from a massively parallel implementation of the same calculations on the Intel Paragon

  6. Multi-CPU plasma fluid turbulence calculations on a CRAY Y-MP C90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, V.E.; Carreras, B.A.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Curtis, B.C.; Troutman, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Significant improvements in real-time efficiency have been obtained for plasma fluid turbulence calculations by microtasking the nonlinear fluid code KITE in which they are implemented on the CRAY Y-MP C90 at the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC). The number of processors accessed concurrently scales linearly with problem size. Close to six concurrent processors have so far been obtained with a three-dimensional nonlinear production calculation at the currently allowed memory size of 80 Mword. With a calculation size corresponding to the maximum allowed memory of 200 Mword in the next system configuration, they expect to be able to access close to ten processors of the C90 concurrently with a commensurate improvement in real-time efficiency. These improvements in performance are comparable to those expected from a massively parallel implementation of the same calculations on the Intel Paragon

  7. Theoretical and experimental investigation into structural and fluid motions at low frequencies in water distribution pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Liu, Yuyou

    2017-06-01

    Vibrational energy is transmitted in buried fluid-filled pipes in a variety of wave types. Axisymmetric (n = 0) waves are of practical interest in the application of acoustic techniques for the detection of leaks in underground pipelines. At low frequencies n = 0 waves propagate longitudinally as fluid-dominated (s = 1) and shell-dominated (s = 2) waves. Whilst sensors such as hydrophones and accelerometers are commonly used to detect leaks in water distribution pipes, the mechanism governing the structural and fluid motions is not well documented. In this paper, the low-frequency behaviour of the pipe wall and the contained fluid is investigated. For most practical pipework systems, these two waves are strongly coupled; in this circumstance the ratios of the radial pipe wall displacements along with the internal pressures associated with these two wave types are obtained. Numerical examples show the relative insensitivity of the structural and fluid motions to the s = 2 wave for both metallic and plastic pipes buried in two typical soils. It is also demonstrated that although both acoustic and vibration sensors at the same location provide the identical phase information of the transmitted signals, pressure responses have significantly higher levels than acceleration responses, and thus hydrophones are better suited in a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environment. This is supported by experimental work carried out at a leak detection facility. Additional pressure measurements involved excitation of the fluid and the pipe fitting (hydrant) on a dedicated water pipe. This work demonstrates that the s = 1 wave is mainly responsible for the structural and fluid motions at low frequencies in water distribution pipes as a result of water leakage and direct pipe excitation.

  8. New phenomena in variable-density Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livescu, D; Ristorcelli, J R; Petersen, M R; Gore, R A, E-mail: livescu@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents several issues related to mixing and turbulence structure in buoyancy-driven turbulence at low to moderate Atwood numbers, A, found from direct numerical simulations in two configurations: classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability and an idealized triply periodic Rayleigh-Taylor flow. Simulations at A up to 0.5 are used to examine the turbulence characteristics and contrast them with those obtained close to the Boussinesq approximation. The data sets used represent the largest simulations to date in each configuration. One of the more remarkable issues explored, first reported in (Livescu and Ristorcelli 2008 J. Fluid Mech. 605 145-80), is the marked difference in mixing between different density fluids as opposed to the mixing that occurs between fluids of commensurate densities, corresponding to the Boussinesq approximation. Thus, in the triply periodic configuration and the non-Boussinesq case, an initially symmetric density probability density function becomes skewed, showing that the mixing is asymmetric, with pure heavy fluid mixing more slowly than pure light fluid. A mechanism producing the mixing asymmetry is proposed and the consequences for the classical Rayleigh-Taylor configuration are discussed. In addition, it is shown that anomalous small-scale anisotropy found in the homogeneous configuration (Livescu and Ristorcelli 2008 J. Fluid Mech. 605 145-80) and Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence at A=0.5 (Livescu et al 2008 J. Turbul. 10 1-32) also occurs near the Boussinesq limit. Results pertaining to the moment closure modelling of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence are also presented. Although the Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer width reaches self-similar growth relatively fast, the lower-order terms in the self-similar expressions for turbulence moments have long-lasting effects and derived quantities, such as the turbulent Reynolds number, are slow to follow the self-similar predictions. Since eddy diffusivity in the popular gradient transport hypothesis

  9. Stability of fluid motions I

    CERN Document Server

    Joseph, Daniel D

    1976-01-01

    The study of stability aims at understanding the abrupt changes which are observed in fluid motions as the external parameters are varied. It is a demanding study, far from full grown"whose most interesting conclusions are recent. I have written a detailed account of those parts of the recent theory which I regard as established. Acknowledgements I started writing this book in 1967 at the invitation of Clifford Truesdell. It was to be a short work on the energy theory of stability and if I had stuck to that I would have finished the writing many years ago. The theory of stability has developed so rapidly since 1967 that the book I might then have written would now have a much too limited scope. I am grateful to Truesdell, not so much for the invitation to spend endless hours of writing and erasing, but for the generous way he has supported my efforts and encouraged me to higher standards of good work. I have tried to follow Truesdell's advice to write this work in a clear and uncomplicated style. This is not ...

  10. Fluid simulation of tokamak ion temperature gradient turbulence with zonal flow closure model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagishi, Osamu, E-mail: yamagisi@nifs.ac.jp; Sugama, Hideo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Nonlinear fluid simulation of turbulence driven by ion temperature gradient modes in the tokamak fluxtube configuration is performed by combining two different closure models. One model is a gyrofluid model by Beer and Hammett [Phys. Plasmas 3, 4046 (1996)], and the other is a closure model to reproduce the kinetic zonal flow response [Sugama et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 022502 (2007)]. By including the zonal flow closure, generation of zonal flows, significant reduction in energy transport, reproduction of the gyrokinetic transport level, and nonlinear upshift on the critical value of gradient scale length are observed.

  11. Fluid simulation of tokamak ion temperature gradient turbulence with zonal flow closure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Osamu; Sugama, Hideo

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear fluid simulation of turbulence driven by ion temperature gradient modes in the tokamak fluxtube configuration is performed by combining two different closure models. One model is a gyrofluid model by Beer and Hammett [Phys. Plasmas 3, 4046 (1996)], and the other is a closure model to reproduce the kinetic zonal flow response [Sugama et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 022502 (2007)]. By including the zonal flow closure, generation of zonal flows, significant reduction in energy transport, reproduction of the gyrokinetic transport level, and nonlinear upshift on the critical value of gradient scale length are observed.

  12. On specification of initial conditions in turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollin, Bertrand [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andrews, Malcolm J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has shown that initial conditions have a significant influence on the evolution of a flow towards turbulence. This important finding offers a unique opportunity for turbulence control, but also raises the question of how to properly specify initial conditions in turbulence models. We study this problem in the context of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is an interfacial fluid instability that leads to turbulence and turbulent mixing. It occurs when a light fluid is accelerated in to a heavy fluid because of misalignment between density and pressure gradients. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability plays a key role in a wide variety of natural and man-made flows ranging from supernovae to the implosion phase of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Our approach consists of providing the turbulence models with a predicted profile of its key variables at the appropriate time in accordance to the initial conditions of the problem.

  13. Efficacy of betamethasone on the fetal motion and biophysical profile and amniotic fluid index in preterm fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasalizadeh, Shamsi; Pharabar, Zahra Neghadan; Abbasalizadeh, Fatmeh; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Goldust, Mohamad

    2013-11-15

    The term ofpreterm birth is used to define the premature neonates considering pregnancy age. In less than 34 week pregnancies, corticosteroids are prescribed to promote embryos' lung maturity. The presents study aimed at evaluating effects of betamethasone injection on feeling embryo motion by mother and index and biophysical profile in preterm pregnancies. In a descriptive-analytical study, 40 pregnant women with the pregnancy age of 30-34 weeks were evaluated. Embryo motion and index and biophysical profile of the amniotic fluid were checked before prescription of double dosage of muscular betamethasone (12 mg) at a 24 h time interval. The injection was repeated for 24 and 48 h after the first injection. The resulted outcomes were compared with those results related to before betamethasone injection. In this study, there was statistically meaningful relationship between embryo motions before injection of betamethasone and 12 h after its injection (p = 0.03). Also, there was a significant relationship between embryo motions 24 and 48 h after injection of betamethasone (p = 0.001). In other words, the embryo motions decreased 12 h after injection of betamethasone. They were improved 48 h after betamethasone injection. But, index and biophysical profile results of amniotic fluid were left unchanged. Application of betamethasone leads to evident but transient decrease in embryo motions. Although motion element of index and biophysical profile of amniotic fluid which is one of the tests used in evaluating the embryo health is fixed and normal, it can be concluded that injection of betamethasone may not affect embryo health.

  14. Tracking of macroscopic particle motions generated by a turbulent wind via digital image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, A. D.; Kawall, J. G.; Keffer, J. F.

    A novel technique utilizing the basic principles of two-dimensional signal analysis and artificial intelligence/computer vision to reconstruct the Lagrangian particle trajectories from flow visualization images of macroparticle motions in a turbulent boundary layer is presented. Since, in most cases, the entire trajectory of a particle could not be viewed in one photographic frame (the particles were moving at a high velocity over a small field of view), a stochastic model was developed to complete the trajectories and obtain statistical data on particle velocities. The associated programs were implemented on a Cray supercomputer to optimize computational costs and time.

  15. Selective decay by Casimir dissipation in inviscid fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Holm, Darryl D

    2013-01-01

    The problem of parameterizing the interactions of larger scales and smaller scales in fluid flows is addressed by considering a property of two-dimensional (2D) incompressible turbulence. The property we consider is selective decay, in which a Casimir of the ideal formulation (enstrophy in 2D flows, helicity in three-dimensional flows) decays in time, while the energy stays essentially constant. This paper introduces a mechanism that produces selective decay by enforcing Casimir dissipation in fluid dynamics. This mechanism turns out to be related in certain cases to the numerical method of anticipated vorticity discussed in Sadourny and Basdevant (1981 C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris 292 1061–4, 1985 J. Atm. Sci. 42 1353–63). Several examples are given and a general theory of selective decay is developed that uses the Lie–Poisson structure of the ideal theory. A scale-selection operator allows the resulting modifications of the fluid motion equations to be interpreted in several examples as parametrizing the nonlinear, dynamical interactions between disparate scales. The type of modified fluid equation systems derived here may be useful in modelling turbulent geophysical flows where it is computationally prohibitive to rely on the slower, indirect effects of a realistic viscosity, such as in large-scale, coherent, oceanic flows interacting with much smaller eddies. (paper)

  16. Recent results on analytical plasma turbulence theory: Realizability, intermittency, submarginal turbulence, and self-organized criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent results and future challenges in the systematic analytical description of plasma turbulence are described. First, the importance of statistical realizability is stressed, and the development and successes of the Realizable Markovian Closure are briefly reviewed. Next, submarginal turbulence (linearly stable but nonlinearly self-sustained fluctuations) is considered and the relevance of nonlinear instability in neutral-fluid shear flows to submarginal turbulence in magnetized plasmas is discussed. For the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations, a self-consistency loop that leads to steady-state vortex regeneration in the presence of dissipation is demonstrated and a partial unification of recent work of Drake (for plasmas) and of Waleffe (for neutral fluids) is given. Brief remarks are made on the difficulties facing a quantitatively accurate statistical description of submarginal turbulence. Finally, possible connections between intermittency, submarginal turbulence, and self-organized criticality (SOC) are considered and outstanding questions are identified

  17. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, P.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  18. Turbulent Dynamo Amplification of Magnetic Fields in Laser-Produced Plasmas: Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Rigby, A.; Bott, A.; Bell, A.; Bingham, R.; Casner, A.; Cattaneo, F.; Churazov, E.; Forest, C.; Katz, J.; Koenig, M.; Li, C.-K.; Meinecke, J.; Petrasso, R.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ross, J.; Ryutov, D.; Ryu, D.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.; Schekochihin, A.; Froula, D.; Lamb, D.; Gregori, G.

    2017-10-01

    The universe is permeated by magnetic fields, with strengths ranging from a femtogauss in the voids between the filaments of galaxy clusters to several teragauss in black holes and neutron stars. The standard model for cosmological magnetic fields is the nonlinear amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo. We have conceived experiments to demonstrate and study the turbulent dynamo mechanism in the laboratory. Here, we describe the design of these experiments through large-scale 3D FLASH simulations on the Mira supercomputer at ANL, and the laser-driven experiments we conducted with the OMEGA laser at LLE. Our results indicate that turbulence is capable of rapidly amplifying seed fields to near equipartition with the turbulent fluid motions. This work was supported in part from the ERC (FP7/2007-2013, No. 256973 and 247039), and the U.S. DOE, Contract No. B591485 to LLNL, FWP 57789 to ANL, Grant No. DE-NA0002724 and DE-SC0016566 to the University of Chicago, and DE-AC02-06CH11357 to ANL.

  19. Scaling of Ln(Permeability) in Sediments and Velocity Distributions in Turbulence: The Possibility of an Analogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molz, F. J.; Kozubowski, T. J.; Miller, R. S.; Podgorski, K.

    2005-12-01

    The theory of non-stationary stochastic processes with stationary increments gives rise to stochastic fractals. When such fractals are used to represent measurements of (assumed stationary) physical properties, such as ln(k) increments in sediments or velocity increments "delta(v)" in turbulent flows, the resulting measurements exhibit scaling, either spatial, temporal or both. (In the present context, such scaling refers to systematic changes in the statistical properties of the increment distributions, such as variance, with the lag size over which the increments are determined.) Depending on the class of probability density functions (PDFs) that describe the increment distributions, the resulting stochastic fractals will display different properties. Until recently, the stationary increment process was represented using mainly Gaussian, Gamma or Levy PDFs. However, measurements in both sediments and fluid turbulence indicate that these PDFs are not commonly observed. Based on recent data and previous studies referenced and discussed in Meerschaert et al. (2004) and Molz et al. (2005), the measured increment PDFs display an approximate double exponential (Laplace) shape at smaller lags, and this shape evolves towards Gaussian at larger lags. A model for this behavior based on the Generalized Laplace PDF family called fractional Laplace motion, in analogy with its Gaussian counterpart - fractional Brownian motion, has been suggested (Meerschaert et al., 2004) and the necessary mathematics elaborated (Kozubowski et al., 2005). The resulting stochastic fractal is not a typical self-affine monofractal, but it does exhibit monofractal-like scaling in certain lag size ranges. To date, it has been shown that the Generalized Laplace family fits ln(k) increment distributions and reproduces the original 1941 theory of Kolmogorov when applied to Eulerian turbulent velocity increments. However, to make a physically self-consistent application to turbulence, one must adopt a

  20. Nonlinear simulation of electromagnetic current diffusive interchange mode turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.I.; Fukuyama, A.

    1998-01-01

    The anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas has been investigated extensively. It is pointed out that the nonlinear instability is important in driving the microturbulence[1], i.e., the self-sustained plasma turbulence. This concept is explained as follows; when the electron motion along the magnetic field line is resisted by the background turbulence, it gives rise to the effective resistivity and enhances the level of the turbulence. The nonlinear simulation of the electrostatic current diffusive interchange mode (CDIM) in the two dimensional sheared slab geometry has been performed as an example. The occurrence of the nonlinear instability and the self-sustainment of the plasma turbulence were confirmed by this simulation[2]. On the other hand, the electromagnetic turbulence is sustained in the high pressure limit. The possibility of the self-organization with more variety has been pointed out[3]. It is important to study the electromagnetic turbulence based on the nonlinear simulation. In this paper, the model equation for the electrostatic CDIM turbulence[2] is extended for both electrostatic and electromagnetic turbulence. (1) Not only E x B convective nonlinearity but also the electromagnetic nonlinearity which is related to the parallel flow are incorporated into the model equation. (2) The electron and ion pressure evolution equations are solved separately, making it possible to distinguish the electron and ion thermal diffusivities. The two dimensional nonlinear simulation of the electromagnetic CDIM is performed based on the extended fluid model. This paper is organized as follows. The model equation is explained in section II. The result of simulation is shown in section III. The conclusion and discussion are given in section IV. (author)

  1. Turbulent Dynamics of Partially-Ionized Fluids in 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, S.; Flierl, G.

    2017-12-01

    Ionization occurs in the upper atmospheres of Hot Jupiters, as well asthe interiors of Gas Giants, leading to Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effectswhich can significantly alter the flow. The interactions of these MHDregions with the non-ionized atmosphere will occur in transitionregions where only a fraction of the fluid is ionized. We areexploring the dynamics of Partially-Ionized MHD (PIMHD) using a twofluid model - one neutral and one ionized and subject to MHD -coupled by a collision, or Joule heating, term proportional to thedifference in velocities. By varying both the ionization fraction aswell as the collision frequency (coupling), we examine the parameterspace of 2D PIMHD turbulence in hopes of better understanding itscharacteristics in certain, possibly realistic, regimes. We payparticular attention to the Joule heating term and its role indissipation and energy exchange between the two species. Thisknowledge will serve as the basis to further studies in which we lookat, in a more realistic setting, the PIMHD dynamics in Gas Giant orHot Jupiter atmospheres.

  2. Turbulence modulation induced by bubble swarm in oscillating-grid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Koichi; Urano, Shigeyuki; Saito, Takayuki

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, liquid-phase turbulence modulation induced by a bubble swarm ascending in arbitrary turbulence was experimentally investigated. Liquid-phase homogeneous isotropic turbulence was formed using an oscillating grid in a cylindrical acrylic vessel of 149 mm in inner diameter. A bubble swarm consisting of 19 bubbles of 2.8 mm in equivalent diameter was examined; the bubble size and launching time were completely controlled using a bubble launching device through audio speakers. This bubble launching device was able to repeatedly control the bubble swarm arbitrarily and precisely. The bubble swarm was launched at a frequency of 4 Hz. The liquid phase motion was measured via two LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometer) probes. The turbulence intensity, spatial correlation and integral scale were calculated from LDA data obtained by the two spatially-separate-point measurement. When the bubble swarm was added, the turbulence intensity dramatically changed. The original isotropic turbulence was modulated to the anisotropic turbulence by the mutual interference between the bubble swarm and ambient isotropic turbulence. The integral scales were calculated from the spatial correlation function. The effects of the bubble swarm on the integral scales showed the tendencies similar to those on turbulence intensity. (author)

  3. Vortex flow and motion of notices in nature and technical science. Wirbelstroemung in Natur und Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugt, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    First the publication gives a historical overview on classical mechanics and the theories of vortices. Then the paper offers an intelligible introduction in the motion of vortices comprising the following topics: Properties of vortices, vorticity, detachment, instability and turbulence, fluid flow in a rotating system, changes of density in ocean and atmosphere, cyclones. The paper contains no mathematical applications but computer graphics and experiments are described.

  4. Modeling of turbulent flows in porous media and at the interface with a free fluid medium; Modelisation des ecoulements turbulents dans les milieux poreux et a l'interface avec un milieu libre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandesris, M

    2006-12-15

    This work deals with the numerical simulation of turbulent flows in the whole nuclear reactor core, using multi-scale approaches. First, a macroscopic turbulence model is built, based on a porous media approach, to describe the flow in the fuel assemblies part of the nuclear core. Then, we study the jump conditions that have to be applied at a free fluid/porous interface. A thorough analytical study is carried out for laminar flows. This study allows to answer some fundamental questions about the physical meaning of the jump conditions, the values of the jump parameters and the location of the interface. Using these results, jump conditions for turbulent flows are proposed. The model is then applied to the simulation of a turbulent flow in a simplified model of a reactor core. (author)

  5. Exact Theory of Compressible Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivas, Theodore; Eyink, Gregory

    2017-11-01

    We obtain exact results for compressible turbulence with any equation of state, using coarse-graining/filtering. We find two mechanisms of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation: scale-local energy cascade and ``pressure-work defect'', or pressure-work at viscous scales exceeding that in the inertial-range. Planar shocks in an ideal gas dissipate all kinetic energy by pressure-work defect, but the effect is omitted by standard LES modeling of pressure-dilatation. We also obtain a novel inverse cascade of thermodynamic entropy, injected by microscopic entropy production, cascaded upscale, and removed by large-scale cooling. This nonlinear process is missed by the Kovasznay linear mode decomposition, treating entropy as a passive scalar. For small Mach number we recover the incompressible ``negentropy cascade'' predicted by Obukhov. We derive exact Kolmogorov 4/5th-type laws for energy and entropy cascades, constraining scaling exponents of velocity, density, and internal energy to sub-Kolmogorov values. Although precise exponents and detailed physics are Mach-dependent, our exact results hold at all Mach numbers. Flow realizations at infinite Reynolds are ``dissipative weak solutions'' of compressible Euler equations, similarly as Onsager proposed for incompressible turbulence.

  6. The response of a turbulent boundary layer to a small-amplitude traveling wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    We study the response of a turbulent boundary layer to an outer-flow disturbance in the form of a small-amplitude wave travelling along the bottom of a smooth channel. In a previous paper we proposed a model for the viscous attenuation of a wave propagating along the interface between two superposed fluids inside a laminar boundary layer attached to the bottom wall. We obtained precise estimates on the amount of attenuation suffered by the oscillatory component of the motion as a result of viscous dissipation. This was accomplished by means of a representation of the solution as the asymptotic sum of a Blasius boundary layer profile and a modified Stokes layer profile. The present paper contains a similar asymptotic decomposition of the solution of the appropriate turbulent Prandtl equations when the outer flow is a small-amplitude travelling wave, and so it may be considered an extension of our previous work to the more realistic case of turbulent flow. 4 refs

  7. CDIO-Concept for Enginering Education in Fluid Power, Motion Control and Mechatronic Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn; Andersen, Torben O.; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2006-01-01

    of mechatronics solutions with fluid power actuators for motion control of machines and robots. The idea of CDIO-Concept is to take care of that the students are learning by doing and learning while doing when the students are active to generate new products and solutions by going through the phases from......The paper presents significant Danish experiment results of a developed CDIO-Concept and approach for active and integrated learning in today’s engineering education of MSc Degree students, and research results from using IT-Tools for CAE/CAD and dynamic modelling, simulation, analysis, and design...... to Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate related to en product design by them self in competition with others. The idea is based on the Danish implementation of a CDIO-Concept. A curriculum at Aalborg University, and Technical University of Denmark, offers courses for Motion Control, Fluid Power within...

  8. Kolmogorov's refined similarity hypotheses for turbulence and general stochastic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolovitzky, G.; Sreenivasan, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    Kolmogorov's refined similarity hypotheses are shown to hold true for a variety of stochastic processes besides high-Reynolds-number turbulent flows, for which they were originally proposed. In particular, just as hypothesized for turbulence, there exists a variable V whose probability density function attains a universal form. Analytical expressions for the probability density function of V are obtained for Brownian motion as well as for the general case of fractional Brownian motion---the latter under some mild assumptions justified a posteriori. The properties of V for the case of antipersistent fractional Brownian motion with the Hurst exponent of 1/3 are similar in many details to those of high-Reynolds-number turbulence in atmospheric boundary layers a few meters above the ground. The one conspicuous difference between turbulence and the antipersistent fractional Brownian motion is that the latter does not possess the required skewness. Broad implications of these results are discussed

  9. Homogeneous turbulence dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sagaut, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This book provides state-of-the-art results and theories in homogeneous turbulence, including anisotropy and compressibility effects with extension to quantum turbulence, magneto-hydodynamic turbulence  and turbulence in non-newtonian fluids. Each chapter is devoted to a given type of interaction (strain, rotation, shear, etc.), and presents and compares experimental data, numerical results, analysis of the Reynolds stress budget equations and advanced multipoint spectral theories. The role of both linear and non-linear mechanisms is emphasized. The link between the statistical properties and the dynamics of coherent structures is also addressed. Despite its restriction to homogeneous turbulence, the book is of interest to all people working in turbulence, since the basic physical mechanisms which are present in all turbulent flows are explained. The reader will find a unified presentation of the results and a clear presentation of existing controversies. Special attention is given to bridge the results obta...

  10. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of fluid motion through an unsaturated fracture and fracture junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Moubin; Meakin, Paul; Huang Hai

    2007-01-01

    Multiphase fluid motion in unsaturated fractures and fracture networks involves complicated fluid dynamics, which is difficult to model using grid-based continuum methods. In this paper, the application of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), a relatively new mesoscale method to simulate fluid motion in unsaturated fractures is described. Unlike the conventional DPD method that employs a purely repulsive conservative (non-dissipative) particle-particle interaction to simulate the behavior of gases, we used conservative particle-particle interactions that combine short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions. This new conservative particle-particle interaction allows the behavior of multiphase systems consisting of gases, liquids and solids to be simulated. Our simulation results demonstrate that, for a fracture with flat parallel walls, the DPD method with the new interaction potential function is able to reproduce the hydrodynamic behavior of fully saturated flow, and various unsaturated flow modes including thin film flow, wetting and non-wetting flow. During simulations of flow through a fracture junction, the fracture junction can be fully or partially saturated depending on the wetting property of the fluid, the injection rate and the geometry of the fracture junction. Flow mode switching from a fully saturated flow to a thin film flow can also be observed in the fracture junction

  11. Transient behavior of superfluid turbulence in a large channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, K.W.; Rozen, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The transient behavior of superfluid turbulence is studied theoretically and experimentally with the aim of understanding the disagreement between vortex-tangle theory and past measurements of free vortex-tangle decay in superfluid 4 He. Scaling theory is extended and large-scale simulations based on the reconnecting-vortex model are carried out. These imply that the Vinen equation should be a reasonable approximation even for rather large transients, and predict definite values for the Vinen parameters. Direct measurements of the vortex-tangle response to a sudden change in the driving velocity are seen to be in reasonable agreement with these predictions. It is found, however, that when the vortex tangle is allowed to decay farther toward zero, it eventually crosses over into a state of anomalously slow decay, which appears to be that observed in previous experiments. We argue that this regime should be interpreted in terms of a coupled-turbulence state in which random superfluid and normal-fluid motion interacts with the vortex tangle, the whole system decaying self-consistently at a rate controlled by the normal-fluid viscosity. Several additional qualitative observations which may be relevant to the question of how the vortex tangle is initiated are also reported

  12. Electromotive force and large-scale magnetic dynamo in a turbulent flow with a mean shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogachevskii, Igor; Kleeorin, Nathan

    2003-09-01

    An effect of sheared large-scale motions on a mean electromotive force in a nonrotating turbulent flow of a conducting fluid is studied. It is demonstrated that in a homogeneous divergence-free turbulent flow the alpha effect does not exist, however a mean magnetic field can be generated even in a nonrotating turbulence with an imposed mean velocity shear due to a "shear-current" effect. A mean velocity shear results in an anisotropy of turbulent magnetic diffusion. A contribution to the electromotive force related to the symmetric parts of the gradient tensor of the mean magnetic field (the kappa effect) is found in nonrotating turbulent flows with a mean shear. The kappa effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion reduce the growth rate of the mean magnetic field. It is shown that a mean magnetic field can be generated when the exponent of the energy spectrum of the background turbulence (without the mean velocity shear) is less than 2. The shear-current effect was studied using two different methods: the tau approximation (the Orszag third-order closure procedure) and the stochastic calculus (the path integral representation of the solution of the induction equation, Feynman-Kac formula, and Cameron-Martin-Girsanov theorem). Astrophysical applications of the obtained results are discussed.

  13. Acoustically Driven Fluid and Particle Motion in Confined and Leaky Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnkob, Rune; Nama, Nitesh; Ren, Liqiang; Huang, Tony Jun; Costanzo, Francesco; Kähler, Christian J.

    2018-01-01

    The acoustic motion of fluids and particles in confined and acoustically leaky systems is receiving increasing attention for its use in medicine and biotechnology. A number of contradicting physical and numerical models currently exist, but their validity is uncertain due to the unavailability of hard-to-access experimental data for validation. We provide experimental benchmarking data by measuring 3D particle trajectories and demonstrate that the particle trajectories can be described numerically without any fitting parameter by a reduced-fluid model with leaky impedance-wall conditions. The results reveal the hitherto unknown existence of a pseudo-standing wave that drives the acoustic streaming as well as the acoustic radiation force on suspended particles.

  14. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Turbulence, Radiation, and Combustion Models for Natural Gas Combustion Burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yik Siang Pang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD study of a natural gas combustion burner focusing on the effect of combustion, thermal radiation and turbulence models on the temperature and chemical species concentration fields. The combustion was modelled using the finite rate/eddy dissipation (FR/EDM and partially premixed flame models. Detailed chemistry kinetics CHEMKIN GRI-MECH 3.0 consisting of 325 reactions was employed to model the methane combustion. Discrete ordinates (DO and spherical harmonics (P1 model were employed to predict the thermal radiation. The gas absorption coefficient dependence on the wavelength is resolved by the weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model (WSGGM. Turbulence flow was simulated using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS based models. The findings showed that a combination of partially premixed flame, P1 and standard k-ε (SKE gave the most accurate prediction with an average deviation of around 7.8% of combustion temperature and 15.5% for reactant composition (methane and oxygen. The results show the multi-step chemistry in the partially premixed model is more accurate than the two-step FR/EDM. Meanwhile, inclusion of thermal radiation has a minor effect on the heat transfer and species concentration. SKE turbulence model yielded better prediction compared to the realizable k-ε (RKE and renormalized k-ε (RNG. The CFD simulation presented in this work may serve as a useful tool to evaluate a performance of a natural gas combustor. Copyright © 2018 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 26th July 2017; Revised: 9th October 2017; Accepted: 30th October 2017; Available online: 22nd January 2018; Published regularly: 2nd April 2018 How to Cite: Pang, Y.S., Law, W.P., Pung, K.Q., Gimbun, J. (2018. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Turbulence, Radiation, and Combustion Models for Natural Gas Combustion Burner. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 13 (1: 155-169 (doi:10.9767/bcrec

  15. 3D fluid simulations of tokamak edge turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeiler, A.; Biskamp, D.; Drake, J.F.; Guzdar, P.N.

    1995-09-01

    3D simulations of drift resistive ballooning turbulence are presented. The turbulence is basically controlled by a parameter α, the ratio of the drift wave frequency to the ideal ballooning growth rate. If this parameters is small (α≤1, corresponding to Ohmic or L-mode plasmas), the system is dominated by ballooning turbulence, which is strongly peaked at the outside of the torus. If it is large (α≥1, corresponding to H-mode plasmas) field line curvature plays a minor role. The turbulence is nonlinearly sustained even if curvature is removed and all modes are linearly stable due to magnetic shear. In the nonlinear regime without curvature the system obeys a different scaling law compared to the low α regime. The transport scaling is discussed in both regimes and the implications for OH-, L-mode and H-mode transport are discussed. (orig.)

  16. The use of cryogenic helium for classical turbulence: Promises and hurdles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemela, J.J.; Sreenivasan, K.R.

    2006-12-01

    Fluid turbulence is a paradigm for non-linear systems with many degrees of freedom and important in numerous applications. Because the analytical understanding of the equations of motion is poor, experiments and, lately, direct numerical simulations of the equations of motion, have been fundamental to making progress. In this vein, a concerted experimental effort has been made to take advantage of the unique properties of liquid and gaseous helium at low temperatures near or below the critical point. We discuss the promise and impact of results from recent helium experiments and identify the current technical barriers which can perhaps be removed by low temperature researchers. We focus mainly on classical flows that utilize helium above the lambda line, but touch on those aspects below that exhibit quasi-classical behavior. (author)

  17. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part I of II, 2001-2002 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkiss, Rollin H. (Washington State University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineers, Albrook Hydraulics Laboratory)

    2002-12-01

    Turbulence in gravel bed rivers plays a critical role in most stream processes including contaminant and nutrient transport, aquatic habitat selection, and natural channel design. While most hydraulic designs and fluid models are based on bulk velocity, migrating juvenile salmon experience and react to the temporally varied turbulent fluctuations. Without properly understanding and accounting for the continuous turbulent motions proper fishway design and guidance are impossible. Matching temporally varied flow to fish reactions is the key to guiding juvenile salmonids to safe passageways. While the ideal solution to fish guidance design would be to use specific fluid action-fish reaction mechanisms, such concrete cause and effect relations have not been established. One way to approach the problem of guidance is to hypothesize that in an environment lacking obvious bulk flow cues (like the reservoir environment), turbulent flow conditions similar to those experienced by juvenile salmonids in natural migration corridors will be attractive to juvenile salmonids. Proof of this hypothesis requires three steps: (1) gathering data on turbulence characteristics in natural migration corridors, (2) reproduction of the turbulence parameters in a controlled environment, and (3) testing the reproduced turbulence on actively migrating juvenile salmonids for increased passage efficiencies. The results from the third step have not been finalized, therefore this report will focus on understanding turbulent processes in gravel bed rivers and reproduction of turbulence in controlled environments for use in fish passage technologies. The purposes of this report are to (1) present data collected in natural gravel bed rivers, (2) present a simple method for reproduction of appropriate turbulence levels in a controlled environment, (3) compare these results to those from one prototype surface collector (PSC), and (4) discuss the implications on fish passage design.

  18. Brownian motion in complex fluids: venerable field and frontier of modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcarra-Rendon, A.; Medina-Noyola, M.; Ruiz-Estrada, H.; Arauz-Lara, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of our understanding of tracer-diffusion phenomena in colloidal suspensions. This is the most direct observation of the Brownian motion executed by labelled Brownian particles interacting with the rest of colloidal particles in a suspension. The fundamental description of this phenomenon constitutes today one of the most relevant problems in the process of understanding the dynamic properties of this important class of complex fluids, from the experimental and theoretical perspective of physical research. This paper describes the recent developments in the extension of the classical theory of Brownian motion and its application to the description of the effects of direct and hydrodynamic interactions among colloidal particles. As a result, a coherent pictured has emerged in which the agreement between theory and experiment from nature fields of physics. The moral of the paper is that the use of well established concepts as statistical physics, assisted by modern experimental techniques, are contributing to transform complex fluids into a more amialbe class of materials from the point of view of the physicist. (Author)

  19. Two-fluid equations for a nuclear system with arbitrary motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Jae [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Doo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Ocean nuclear systems include a seabed-type plant, a floating-type plant, and a nuclear-propulsion ship. We asked ourselves, 'What governing equations should be used for ocean nuclear systems?' Since ocean nuclear systems are apt to move arbitrarily, the two-fluid model must be formulated in the non-inertial frame of reference that is undergoing acceleration with respect to an inertial frame. Two-phase flow systems with arbitrary motions are barely reported. Kim et al. (1996) added the centripetal and Euler acceleration forces to the homogeneous equilibrium momentum equation embedded in the RETRAN code. However, they did not look into the mass and energy equations. The purpose of this study is to derive general two-fluid equations in the non-inertial frame of reference, which can be used for safety analysis of ocean nuclear systems. The two-fluid equation forms for scalar properties such as mass, internal energy, and enthalpy equation in the moving frame are the same as those in the absolute frame. On the other hand, the fictitious effect must be included in the momentum equation.

  20. Lagrangian statistics across the turbulent-nonturbulent interface in a turbulent plane jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira, Rodrigo R; Diogo, José S; Lopes, Diogo C; da Silva, Carlos B

    2013-10-01

    Lagrangian statistics from millions of particles are used to study the turbulent entrainment mechanism in a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent plane jet at Re(λ) ≈ 110. The particles (tracers) are initially seeded at the irrotational region of the jet near the turbulent shear layer and are followed as they are drawn into the turbulent region across the turbulent-nonturbulent interface (TNTI), allowing the study of the enstrophy buildup and thereby characterizing the turbulent entrainment mechanism in the jet. The use of Lagrangian statistics following fluid particles gives a more correct description of the entrainment mechanism than in previous works since the statistics in relation to the TNTI position involve data from the trajectories of the entraining fluid particles. The Lagrangian statistics for the particles show the existence of a velocity jump and a characteristic vorticity jump (with a thickness which is one order of magnitude greater than the Kolmogorov microscale), in agreement with previous results using Eulerian statistics. The particles initially acquire enstrophy by viscous diffusion and later by enstrophy production, which becomes "active" only deep inside the turbulent region. Both enstrophy diffusion and production near the TNTI differ substantially from inside the turbulent region. Only about 1% of all particles find their way into pockets of irrotational flow engulfed into the turbulent shear layer region, indicating that "engulfment" is not significant for the present flow, indirectly suggesting that the entrainment is largely due to "nibbling" small-scale mechanisms acting along the entire TNTI surface. Probability density functions of particle positions suggests that the particles spend more time crossing the region near the TNTI than traveling inside the turbulent region, consistent with the particles moving tangent to the interface around the time they cross it.

  1. Light particles in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagendra Prakash, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the broad topic of particles in turbulence, which has applications in a diverse number of fields. A vast majority of fluid flows found in nature and in the industry are turbulent and contain dispersed elements. In this thesis, I have focused on light particles (air bubbles in

  2. Two-dimensional turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzino, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    We present an overview of the most relevant, and sometimes contrasting, theoretical approaches to Rayleigh-Taylor and mean-gradient-forced Rayleigh-Bénard two-dimensional turbulence together with numerical and experimental evidences for their support. The main aim of this overview is to emphasize that, despite the different character of these two systems, especially in relation to their steadiness/unsteadiness, turbulent fluctuations are well described by the same scaling relationships originated from the Bolgiano balance. The latter states that inertial terms and buoyancy terms balance at small scales giving rise to an inverse kinetic energy cascade. The main difference with respect to the inverse energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence [R. H. Kraichnan, "Inertial ranges in two-dimensional turbulence," Phys. Fluids 10, 1417 (1967)] is that the rate of cascade of kinetic energy here is not constant along the inertial range of scales. Thanks to the absence of physical boundaries, the two systems here investigated turned out to be a natural physical realization of the Kraichnan scaling regime hitherto associated with the elusive "ultimate state of thermal convection" [R. H. Kraichnan, "Turbulent thermal convection at arbitrary Prandtl number," Phys. Fluids 5, 1374-1389 (1962)].

  3. Fluid simulations of ∇Te-driven turbulence and transport in boundary plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.

    1992-01-01

    It is clear that the edge plasma plays a crucial role in global tokamak confinement. This paper is a report on simulations of a new drift wave type instability driven by the electron temperature gradient in tokamak scrapeoff-layers (SOL). A 2d fluid code has been developed in order to explore the anomalous transport in the boundary plasmas. The simulation consists of a set of fluid equations for the vorticity ∇ perpendicular 2 φ, the electron density n c and the temperature T c in a shearless plasma slab confined by a uniform, straight magnetic field B z with two divertor (or limiter) plates intercepting the magnetic field. The model has two regions separated by a magnetic separatrix: in the edge region inside the separatrix, the model is periodic along the magnetic field while in the SOL region outside the separatrix, the magnetic field is taken to be of finite length with model boundary conditions at diverter plates. The simulation results show that the observed linear instability agrees well with theory, and that a saturated state of turbulence is reached. In saturated turbulence, clear evidence of the expected long-wavelength mode penetration into the edge is seen, an inverse cascade of wave energy is observed. The simulation results also show that amplitudes of potential and the electron temperature fluctuations are somewhat above and the heat flux are somewhat below those of the simplest mixing-length estimates, and furthermore the large-scale radial structures of fluctuation quantities indicate that the cross-field transport is not diffusive. After saturation, the electron density and temperature profiles are flattened. A self-consistent simulation to determine the microturbulent SOL electron temperature profile has been done, the results of which reasonably agree with the experimental measurements

  4. Sudden viscous dissipation in compressing plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    Compression of a turbulent plasma or fluid can cause amplification of the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the turnover and viscous dissipation times of the turbulent eddies. The consideration of compressing turbulent flows in inviscid fluids has been motivated by the suggestion that amplification of turbulent kinetic energy occurred on experiments at the Weizmann Institute of Science Z-Pinch. We demonstrate a sudden viscous dissipation mechanism whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, which further increases the temperature, feeding back to further enhance the dissipation. Application of this mechanism in compression experiments may be advantageous, if the plasma can be kept comparatively cold during much of the compression, reducing radiation and conduction losses, until the plasma suddenly becomes hot. This work was supported by DOE through contract 67350-9960 (Prime # DOE DE-NA0001836) and by the DTRA.

  5. Advances in engineering turbulence modeling. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T.-H.

    1992-01-01

    Some new developments in two equation models and second order closure models are presented. In this paper, modified two equation models are proposed to remove shortcomings such as computing flows over complex geometries and the ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. The calculations using various two equation models are compared with direct numerical solutions of channel flows and flat plate boundary layers. Development of second order closure models will also be discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the three dimensional effect of mean flow on the turbulence. The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model to be described in this paper is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of three dimension mean flow on the turbulence.

  6. Large-scale structure of the Taurus molecular complex. II. Analysis of velocity fluctuations and turbulence. III. Methods for turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiner, S.C.; Dickman, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The velocity autocorrelation function (ACF) of observed spectral line centroid fluctuations is noted to effectively reproduce the actual ACF of turbulent gas motions within an interstellar cloud, thereby furnishing a framework for the study of the large scale velocity structure of the Taurus dark cloud complex traced by the present C-13O J = 1-0 observations of this region. The results obtained are discussed in the context of recent suggestions that widely observed correlations between molecular cloud widths and cloud sizes indicate the presence of a continuum of turbulent motions within the dense interstellar medium. Attention is then given to a method for the quantitative study of these turbulent motions, involving the mapping of a source in an optically thin spectral line and studying the spatial correlation properties of the resulting velocity centroid map. 61 references

  7. Numerical investigation on thermal striping conditions for a tee junction of LMFBRE coolant pipes. 7. Effect of the 'Turbulence promoter' on the fluid mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masa-aki; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2004-06-01

    It is important to evaluate thermal-striping phenomena, which is the thermal fatigue issue in the structure generated by the temperature fluctuation due to the fluid mixing. Especially, the high amplitude and the high number of repetitions of the temperature fluctuation are needed to take into consideration. Moreover, it is necessary to consider the comparatively low frequency components of fluid temperature fluctuation, since the influence to structure material is large. Therefore, it is required to know the generating mechanism and conditions of the high amplitude and the low frequency component of fluid temperature fluctuation. In Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, basic research on the promote system for fluid mixing is conducted, which system ('Turbulence promoter') is expected to reduce the large amplitude and low frequency components of fluid temperature fluctuation in T junction pipe. In this investigation, it is aimed to validate the effect and to generalize the mixing characteristics of 'Turbulence promoter' on the fluid mixing in T-junction pipe, and to contribute the knowledge to the rational design of LMFBR. In this report, numerical simulation for the existing experiment was conducted using a quasi-direct simulation code (DINUS-3). From the numerical simulation, the following results are obtained. (1) Numerical calculations could simulate well the flow patterns observed in the visualization experiment, in impinging jet case (Pattern-C) and deflecting jet cases (Pattern-B1 and Pattern-B). (2) By installing Turbulence promoter', cross-section area of main pipe after the mixing point is narrowed, and the fluid of main pipe is accelerated and flows along the slope of the promoter on the opposite side of branch pipe. this accelerated flow acts to prevent the collision of the branch pipe flow to the promoter. Therefore, the branch pipe flow conditions in deflecting jet category are extended. (3) At the throat of the main pipe, the flow was separated

  8. Turbulence generation by waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  9. Cascades, ``Blobby'' Turbulence, and Target Pattern Formation in Elastic Systems: A New Take on Classic Themes in Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiang

    2017-10-01

    Concerns central to understanding turbulence and transport include: 1) Dynamics of dual cascades in EM turbulence; 2) Understanding `negative viscosity phenomena' in drift-ZF systems; 3) The physics of blobby turbulence (re: SOL). Here, we present a study of a simple model - that of Cahn-Hilliard Navier-Stokes (CHNS) Turbulence - which sheds important new light on these issues. The CHNS equations describe the motion of binary fluid undergoing a second order phase transition and separation called spinodal decomposition. The CHNS system and 2D MHD are analogous, as they both contain a vorticity equation and a ``diffusion'' equation. The CHNS system differs from 2D MHD by the appearance of negative diffusivity, and a nonlinear dissipative flux. An analogue of the Alfven wave exists in the 2D CHNS system. DNS shows that mean square concentration spectrum Hkψ scales as k - 7 / 3 in the elastic range. This suggests an inverse cascade of Hψ . However, the kinetic energy spectrum EkK scales as k-3 , as in the direct enstrophy cascade range for a 2D fluid (not MHD!). The resolution is that the feedback of capillarity acts only at blob interfaces. Thus, as blob merger progresses, the packing fraction of interfaces decreases, thus explaining the weakened surface tension feedback and the outcome for EkK. We also examine the evolution of scalar concentration in a single eddy in the Cahn-Hilliard system. This extends the classic problem of flux expulsion in 2D MHD. The simulation results show that a target pattern is formed. Target pattern is a meta stable state, since the band merger process continues on a time scale exponentially long relative to the eddy turnover time. Band merger resembles step merger in drift-ZF staircases. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  10. TURBO: a computer program for two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis using a two-equations turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.; Moreira, M.L.

    1991-06-01

    The Reynolds turbulent transport equations for an incompressible fluid are integrated on a bi-dimensional staggered grid, for velocity and pressure, using the SIMPLER method. With the resulting algebraic relations it was developed the TURBO program, which final objectives are the thermal stratification and natural convection analysis of nuclear reactor pools. This program was tested in problems applications with analytic or experimental solutions previously known. (author)

  11. The magnetic-distortion probe: velocimetry in conducting fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Sophie; Verhille, Gautier; Plihon, Nicolas; Pinton, Jean-François

    2011-09-01

    A new type of velocimeter, capable of local velocity measurements in conducting fluids, is introduced. The principle of the "magnetic-distortion probe" is based on the measurement of the induced magnetic field by the flow of a conducting fluid in the vicinity of a localized magnetic field. The new velocimeter has no moving parts, and can be enclosed in a sealed cap, easing the implementation in harsh environments, such as liquid metals. The proposed method allows one to probe both the continuous part and fluctuations of the velocity, the temporal and spatial resolution being linked to the actual geometric configuration of the probe. A prototype probe has been tested in a gallinstan pipe flow and in a fully turbulent flow of liquid gallium generated by the counter rotation of two coaxial impellers in a cylinder. The signals have been compared to a reference potential probe and show very good agreement both for time-averaged velocities and turbulent fluctuations. The prototype is shown to detect motion from a few cm s(-1) to a few m s(-1). Moreover, the use of the magnetic-distortion probe with large-scale applied magnetic field is discussed. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. Thermal singularity and droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with thermal gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2012-06-26

    Using a continuum model capable of describing the one-component liquid-gas hydrodynamics down to the contact line scale, we carry out numerical simulation and physical analysis for the droplet motion driven by thermal singularity. For liquid droplets in one-component fluids on heated or cooled substrates, the liquid-gas interface is nearly isothermal. Consequently, a thermal singularity occurs at the contact line and the Marangoni effect due to temperature gradient is suppressed. Through evaporation or condensation in the vicinity of the contact line, the thermal singularity makes the contact angle increase with the increasing substrate temperature. This effect on the contact angle can be used to move the droplets on substrates with thermal gradients. Our numerical results for this kind of droplet motion are explained by a simple fluid dynamical model at the droplet length scale. Since the mechanism for droplet motion is based on the change of contact angle, a separation of length scales is exhibited through a comparison between the droplet motion induced by a wettability gradient and that by a thermal gradient. It is shown that the flow field at the droplet length scale is independent of the statics or dynamics at the contact line scale.

  13. Thermal singularity and droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with thermal gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2012-01-01

    Using a continuum model capable of describing the one-component liquid-gas hydrodynamics down to the contact line scale, we carry out numerical simulation and physical analysis for the droplet motion driven by thermal singularity. For liquid droplets in one-component fluids on heated or cooled substrates, the liquid-gas interface is nearly isothermal. Consequently, a thermal singularity occurs at the contact line and the Marangoni effect due to temperature gradient is suppressed. Through evaporation or condensation in the vicinity of the contact line, the thermal singularity makes the contact angle increase with the increasing substrate temperature. This effect on the contact angle can be used to move the droplets on substrates with thermal gradients. Our numerical results for this kind of droplet motion are explained by a simple fluid dynamical model at the droplet length scale. Since the mechanism for droplet motion is based on the change of contact angle, a separation of length scales is exhibited through a comparison between the droplet motion induced by a wettability gradient and that by a thermal gradient. It is shown that the flow field at the droplet length scale is independent of the statics or dynamics at the contact line scale.

  14. Electromotive force in strongly compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, N.

    2017-12-01

    Variable density fluid turbulence is ubiquitous in geo-fluids, not to mention in astrophysics. Depending on the source of density variation, variable density fluid turbulence may be divided into two categories: the weak compressible (entropy mode) turbulence for slow flow and the strong compressible (acoustic mode) turbulence for fast flow. In the strong compressible turbulence, the pressure fluctuation induces a strong density fluctuation ρ ', which is represented by the density variance ( denotes the ensemble average). The turbulent effect on the large-scale magnetic-field B induction is represented by the turbulent electromotive force (EMF) (u': velocity fluctuation, b': magnetic-field fluctuation). In the usual treatment in the dynamo theory, the expression for the EMF has been obtained in the framework of incompressible or weak compressible turbulence, where only the variation of the mean density , if any, is taken into account. We see from the equation of the density fluctuation ρ', the density variance is generated by the large mean density variation ∂ coupled with the turbulent mass flux . This means that in the region where the mean density steeply changes, the density variance effect becomes relevant for the magnetic field evolution. This situation is typically the case for phenomena associated with shocks and compositional discontinuities. With the aid of the analytical theory of inhomogeneous compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, the expression for the turbulent electromotive force is investigated. It is shown that, among others, an obliqueness (misalignment) between the mean density gradient ∂ and the mean magnetic field B may contribute to the EMF as ≈χ B×∂ with the turbulent transport coefficient χ proportional to the density variance (χ ). This density variance effect is expected to strongly affect the EMF near the interface, and changes the transport properties of turbulence. In the case of an interface under the MHD slow

  15. An introduction to turbulence and its measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Bradshaw, P

    1971-01-01

    An Introduction to Turbulence and Its Measurement is an introductory text on turbulence and its measurement. It combines the physics of turbulence with measurement techniques and covers topics ranging from measurable quantities and their physical significance to the analysis of fluctuating signals, temperature and concentration measurements, and the hot-wire anemometer. Examples of turbulent flows are presented. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the physics of turbulence, paying particular attention to Newton's second law of motion, the Newtonian viscous f

  16. Diagnosis at a glance of biological non-Newtonian fluids with Film Interference Flow Imaging (FIFI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidema, R.; Yamada, N.; Furukawa, H.

    2012-04-01

    In the human body, full of biological non-Newtonian fluids exist. For example, synovial fluids exist in our joints, which contain full of biopolymers, such as hyaluronan and mucin. It is thought that these polymers play critical roles on the smooth motion of the joint. Indeed, luck of biopolymers in synovial fluid cause joint pain. Here we study the effects of polymer in thin liquid layer by using an original experimental method called Film Interference Flow Imaging (FIFI). A vertically flowing soap film containing polymers is made as two-dimensional flow to observe turbulence. The thickness of water layer is about 4 μm sandwiched between surfactant mono-layers. The interference pattern of the soap film is linearly related to the flow velocity in the water layer through the change in the thickness of the film. Thus the flow velocity is possibly analyzed by the single image analysis of the interference pattern, that is, FIFI. The grid turbulence was made in the flowing soap films containing the long flexible polymer polyethyleneoxide (PEO, Mw=3.5x106), and rigid polymer hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC, Mw > 1.0 x106). The decaying process of the turbulence is affected by PEO and HPC at several concentrations. The effects of PEO are sharply seen even at low concentrations, while the effects of HPC are gradually occurred at much higher concentration compared to the PEO. It is assumed that such a difference between PEO and HPC is due to the polymer stretching or polymer orientation under turbulence, which is observed and analyzed by FIFI. We believe the FIFI will be applied in the future to examine biological fluids such as synovial fluids quickly and quantitatively.

  17. Turbulence modelling; Modelisation de la turbulence isotherme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-{epsilon} two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the `standard` (R{sub ij}-{epsilon}) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called `feasible`. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author). 37 refs.

  18. Drift-free kinetic equations for turbulent dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, A.; Swailes, D. C.; Skartlien, R.

    2012-11-01

    The dispersion of passive scalars and inertial particles in a turbulent flow can be described in terms of probability density functions (PDFs) defining the statistical distribution of relevant scalar or particle variables. The construction of transport equations governing the evolution of such PDFs has been the subject of numerous studies, and various authors have presented formulations for this type of equation, usually referred to as a kinetic equation. In the literature it is often stated, and widely assumed, that these PDF kinetic equation formulations are equivalent. In this paper it is shown that this is not the case, and the significance of differences among the various forms is considered. In particular, consideration is given to which form of equation is most appropriate for modeling dispersion in inhomogeneous turbulence and most consistent with the underlying particle equation of motion. In this regard the PDF equations for inertial particles are considered in the limit of zero particle Stokes number and assessed against the fully mixed (zero-drift) condition for fluid points. A long-standing question regarding the validity of kinetic equations in the fluid-point limit is answered; it is demonstrated formally that one version of the kinetic equation (derived using the Furutsu-Novikov method) provides a model that satisfies this zero-drift condition exactly in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems. In contrast, other forms of the kinetic equation do not satisfy this limit or apply only in a limited regime.

  19. Optimization of a Two-Fluid Hydrodynamic Model of Churn-Turbulent Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2009-07-01

    A hydrodynamic model of two-phase, churn-turbulent flows is being developed using the computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) code, NPHASE-CMFD. The numerical solutions obtained by this model are compared with experimental data obtained at the TOPFLOW facility of the Institute of Safety Research at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The TOPFLOW data is a high quality experimental database of upward, co-current air-water flows in a vertical pipe suitable for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. A five-field CMFD model was developed for the continuous liquid phase and four bubble size groups using mechanistic closure models for the ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Mechanistic models for the drag and non-drag interfacial forces are implemented to include the governing physics to describe the hydrodynamic forces controlling the gas distribution. The closure models provide the functional form of the interfacial forces, with user defined coefficients to adjust the force magnitude. An optimization strategy was devised for these coefficients using commercial design optimization software. This paper demonstrates an approach to optimizing CMFD model parameters using a design optimization approach. Computed radial void fraction profiles predicted by the NPHASE-CMFD code are compared to experimental data for four bubble size groups.

  20. Experimental investigation of turbulent mixing by Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngs, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A key feature of compressible turbulent mixing is the generation of vorticity via the ∇px ∇(1/ρ) term. This source of vorticity is also present in incompressible flows involving the mixing of fluids of different density, for example Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flows. This paper gives a summary of an experimental investigation of turbulent mixing at a plane boundary between two fluids, of densities ρ 1 , and ρ 2 . (ρ 1 > ρ 2 ) due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The two fluids are near incompressible and mixing occurs when an approximately constant acceleration, g, is applied normal to the interface with direction from fluid 2 to fluid 1. Full details of the experimental programme are given in a set of three reports. Some of the earlier experiments are also described by Read. Previous experimental work and much of the theoretical research has concentrated on studying the growth of the instability from a single wavelength perturbation rather than turbulent mixing. Notable exceptions are published in the Russian literature. A related process, turbulent mixing induced by the passage of shock waves though an interface between fluids of different density is described by Andronov et al. The major purpose of the experiments described here was to study the evolution of the instability from small random perturbations where it is found that large and larger structures appear as time proceeds. A novel technique was used to provide the desired acceleration. The two fluids were enclosed in a rectangular tank, the lighter fluid 2 initially resting on top of the denser fluid 1. One or more rocket motors were then used to drive the tank vertically downwards. The aim of the experimental programme is to provide data for the calibration of a turbulence model used to predict mixing in real situations

  1. Comparative study of turbulent mixing in jet in cross-flow configurations using LES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, B.; Huai, Y.; Sadiki, A.

    2004-01-01

    Mixing processes in turbulent fluid motion are of fundamental interest in many situations in engineering practice. Due to its practical importance in a vast number of applications, the generic configuration of the jet in cross-flow has been studied extensively in the past. Recently, the question has received a lot of attention, whether the unsteady behavior of the jet in cross-flow can be influenced by either active or passive means in order to control and enhance the mixing process. In the present paper, we use the large eddy simulation (LES) methodology to investigate how turbulent mixing can be enhanced by varying the angle between the jet and the oncoming cross-flow. After validating the computations against measurements by Andreopoulos and Rodi, we analyze qualitatively and quantitatively the mixing process for three configurations with different angles. It is shown that the inclination influences the characteristics of vortical structures and secondary motion which in turn have an effect on the mixing process. Besides a PDF of the passive scalar and a scalar energy spectrum, a mixedness parameter is used to provide information with respect to the quality and rate of mixing

  2. TURBULENCE DECAY AND CLOUD CORE RELAXATION IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K.; Xu, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    The turbulent motion within molecular clouds is a key factor controlling star formation. Turbulence supports molecular cloud cores from evolving to gravitational collapse and hence sets a lower bound on the size of molecular cloud cores in which star formation can occur. On the other hand, without a continuous external energy source maintaining the turbulence, such as in molecular clouds, the turbulence decays with an energy dissipation time comparable to the dynamic timescale of clouds, which could change the size limits obtained from Jean's criterion by assuming constant turbulence intensities. Here we adopt scaling relations of physical variables in decaying turbulence to analyze its specific effects on the formation of stars. We find that the decay of turbulence provides an additional approach for Jeans' criterion to be achieved, after which gravitational infall governs the motion of the cloud core. This epoch of turbulence decay is defined as cloud core relaxation. The existence of cloud core relaxation provides a more complete understanding of the effect of the competition between turbulence and gravity on the dynamics of molecular cloud cores and star formation

  3. Resonant quasiparticles in plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, J.T.; Bingham, R.; Shukla, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    A general view is proposed on wave propagation in fluids and plasmas where the resonant interaction of monochromatic waves with quasiparticles is considered. A kinetic equation for quasiparticles is used to describe the broadband turbulence interacting with monochromatic waves. Resonant interactions occur when the phase velocity of the long wavelength monochromatic wave is nearly equal to the group velocity of short wavelength wave packets, or quasiparticles, associated with the turbulent spectrum. It is shown that quasiparticle Landau damping can take place, as well as quasiparticle beam instabilities, thus establishing a direct link between short and large wavelength perturbations of the medium. This link is distinct from the usual picture of direct and inverse energy cascades, and it can be used as a different paradigm for the fluid and plasma turbulence theories

  4. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  5. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  6. Direct numerical simulation of homogeneous stratified rotating turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, O.; Tsujimura, S.; Nagano, Y. [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Department of Mech. Eng., Nagoya (Japan)

    2005-12-01

    The effects of the Prandtl number on stratified rotating turbulence have been studied in homogeneous turbulence by using direct numerical simulations and a rapid distortion theory. Fluctuations under strong stable-density stratification can be theoretically divided into the WAVE and the potential vorticity (PV) modes. In low-Prandtl-number fluids, the WAVE mode deteriorates, while the PV mode remains. Imposing rotation on a low-Prandtl-number fluid makes turbulence two-dimensional as well as geostrophic; it is found from the instantaneous turbulent structure that the vortices merge to form a few vertically-elongated vortex columns. During the period toward two-dimensionalization, the vertical vortices become asymmetric in the sense of rotation. (orig.)

  7. Turbulence prediction in two-dimensional bundle flows using large eddy simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, W.A.; Hassan, Y.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Turbulent flow is characterized by random fluctuations in the fluid velocity and by intense mixing of the fluid. Due to velocity fluctuations, a wide range of eddies exists in the flow field. Because these eddies carry mass, momentum, and energy, this enhanced mixing can sometimes lead to serious problems, such as tube vibrations in many engineering systems that include fluid-tube bundle combinations. Nuclear fuel bundles and PWR steam generators are existing examples in nuclear power plants. Fluid-induced vibration problems are often discovered during the operation of such systems because some of the fluid-tube interaction characteristics are not fully understood. Large Eddy Simulation, incorporated in a three dimensional computer code, became one of the promising techniques to estimate flow turbulence, predict and prevent of long-term tube fretting affecting PWR steam generators. the present turbulence investigations is a step towards more understanding of fluid-tube interaction characteristics by comparing the tube bundles with various pitch-to-diameter ratios were performed. Power spectral densities were used for comparison with experimental data. Correlations, calculations of different length scales in the flow domain and other important turbulent-related parameters were calculated. Finally, important characteristics of turbulent flow field were presented with the aid of flow visualization with tracers impeded in the flow field.

  8. Zonal flows and turbulence in fluids and plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey Bok-Cheung

    In geophysical and plasma contexts, zonal flows are well known to arise out of turbulence. We elucidate the transition from statistically homogeneous turbulence without zonal flows to statistically inhomogeneous turbulence with steady zonal flows. Starting from the Hasegawa--Mima equation, we employ both the quasilinear approximation and a statistical average, which retains a great deal of the qualitative behavior of the full system. Within the resulting framework known as CE2, we extend recent understanding of the symmetry-breaking 'zonostrophic instability'. Zonostrophic instability can be understood in a very general way as the instability of some turbulent background spectrum to a zonally symmetric coherent mode. As a special case, the background spectrum can consist of only a single mode. We find that in this case the dispersion relation of zonostrophic instability from the CE2 formalism reduces exactly to that of the 4-mode truncation of generalized modulational instability. We then show that zonal flows constitute pattern formation amid a turbulent bath. Zonostrophic instability is an example of a Type I s instability of pattern-forming systems. The broken symmetry is statistical homogeneity. Near the bifurcation point, the slow dynamics of CE2 are governed by a well-known amplitude equation, the real Ginzburg-Landau equation. The important features of this amplitude equation, and therefore of the CE2 system, are multiple. First, the zonal flow wavelength is not unique. In an idealized, infinite system, there is a continuous band of zonal flow wavelengths that allow a nonlinear equilibrium. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets. These behaviors are shown numerically to hold in the CE2 system, and we calculate a stability diagram. The stability diagram is in agreement with direct numerical simulations of the quasilinear

  9. Imposing resolved turbulence in CFD simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, L.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    In large‐eddy simulations, the inflow velocity field should contain resolved turbulence. This paper describes and analyzes two methods for imposing resolved turbulence in the interior of the domain in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations. The intended application of the methods is to impose...

  10. The Dynamics of Turbulent Scalar Mixing near the Edge of a Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira, R. M. R.; da Silva, C. B.; Pereira, J. C. F.

    2011-12-01

    In free shear flows a sharp and convoluted turbulent/nonturbulent (T/NT) interface separates the outer fluid region, where the flow is essentially irrotational, from the shear layer turbulent region. It was found recently that the entrainment mechanism is mainly caused by small scale ("nibbling") motions (Westerweel et al. (2005)). The dynamics of this interface is crucial to understand important exchanges of enstrophy and scalars that can be conceived as a three-stage process of entrainment, dispersion and diffusion (Dimotakis (2005)). A thorough understanding of scalar mixing and transport is of indisputable relevance to control turbulent combustion, propulsion and contaminant dispersion (Stanley et al. (2002)). The present work uses several DNS of turbulent jets at Reynolds number ranging from Reλ = 120 to Reλ = 160 (da Silva & Taveira (2010)) and a Schmidt number Sc = 0.7 to analyze the "scalar interface" and turbulent mixing of a passive scalar. Specifically, we employ conditional statistics, denoted by langlerangleI, in order to eliminate the intermittency that affects statistics close to the jet edge. The physical mechanisms behind scalar mixing near the T/NT interfaces, their scales and topology are investigated detail. Analysis of the instantaneous fields showed intense scalar gradient sheet-like structures along regions of persistent strain, in particular at the T/NT interface. The scalar gradient transport equation, at the jet edge, showed that almost all mixing mechanisms are taking place in a confined region, beyond which they become reduced to an almost in perfect balance between production and dissipation of scalar variance. At the T/NT interface transport mechanisms are the ones responsible for the growth in the scalar fluctuations to the entrained fluid, where convection plays a dominant role, smoothing scalar gradients inside the interface and boosting them as far as

  11. The Dynamics of Turbulent Scalar Mixing near the Edge of a Shear Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taveira, R M R; Silva, C B da; Pereira, J C F

    2011-01-01

    In free shear flows a sharp and convoluted turbulent/nonturbulent (T/NT) interface separates the outer fluid region, where the flow is essentially irrotational, from the shear layer turbulent region. It was found recently that the entrainment mechanism is mainly caused by small scale ('nibbling') motions (Westerweel et al. (2005)). The dynamics of this interface is crucial to understand important exchanges of enstrophy and scalars that can be conceived as a three-stage process of entrainment, dispersion and diffusion (Dimotakis (2005)). A thorough understanding of scalar mixing and transport is of indisputable relevance to control turbulent combustion, propulsion and contaminant dispersion (Stanley et al. (2002)). The present work uses several DNS of turbulent jets at Reynolds number ranging from Re λ = 120 to Re λ = 160 (da Silva and Taveira (2010)) and a Schmidt number Sc = 0.7 to analyze the 'scalar interface' and turbulent mixing of a passive scalar. Specifically, we employ conditional statistics, denoted by I , in order to eliminate the intermittency that affects statistics close to the jet edge. The physical mechanisms behind scalar mixing near the T/NT interfaces, their scales and topology are investigated detail. Analysis of the instantaneous fields showed intense scalar gradient sheet-like structures along regions of persistent strain, in particular at the T/NT interface. The scalar gradient transport equation, at the jet edge, showed that almost all mixing mechanisms are taking place in a confined region, beyond which they become reduced to an almost in perfect balance between production and dissipation of scalar variance. At the T/NT interface transport mechanisms are the ones responsible for the growth in the scalar fluctuations to the entrained fluid, where convection plays a dominant role, smoothing scalar gradients inside the interface 0.1y I /λ to 1y I /λand boosting them as far as -2.5y I /η θ C .

  12. Effect of nozzle geometry for swirl type twin-fluid water mist nozzle on the spray characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Soon Hyun; Kim, Do Yeon; Kim, Dong Keon [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bong Hwan [Jinju National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    Experimental investigations on the atomization characteristics of twin-fluid water mist nozzle were conducted using particle image velocimetry (PIV) system and particle motion analysis system (PMAS). The twin-fluid water mist nozzles with swirlers designed two types of swirl angles such as 0 .deg. , 90 .deg. and three different size nozzle hole diameters such as 0.5mm, 1mm, 1.5mm were employed. The experiments were carried out by the injection pressure of water and air divided into 1bar, 2bar respectively. The droplet size of the spray was measured using PMAS. The velocity and turbulence intensity were measured using PIV. The velocity, turbulence intensity and SMD distributions of the sprays were measured along the centerline and radial direction. As the experimental results, swirl angle controlled to droplet sizes. It was found that SMD distribution decreases with the increase of swirl angle. The developed twin-fluid water mist nozzle was satisfied to the criteria of NFPA 750, Class 1. It was proven that the developed nozzle under low pressures could be applied to fire protection system.

  13. Effect of nozzle geometry for swirl type twin-fluid water mist nozzle on the spray characteristic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Soon Hyun; Kim, Do Yeon; Kim, Dong Keon; Kim, Bong Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Experimental investigations on the atomization characteristics of twin-fluid water mist nozzle were conducted using particle image velocimetry (PIV) system and particle motion analysis system (PMAS). The twin-fluid water mist nozzles with swirlers designed two types of swirl angles such as 0 .deg. , 90 .deg. and three different size nozzle hole diameters such as 0.5mm, 1mm, 1.5mm were employed. The experiments were carried out by the injection pressure of water and air divided into 1bar, 2bar respectively. The droplet size of the spray was measured using PMAS. The velocity and turbulence intensity were measured using PIV. The velocity, turbulence intensity and SMD distributions of the sprays were measured along the centerline and radial direction. As the experimental results, swirl angle controlled to droplet sizes. It was found that SMD distribution decreases with the increase of swirl angle. The developed twin-fluid water mist nozzle was satisfied to the criteria of NFPA 750, Class 1. It was proven that the developed nozzle under low pressures could be applied to fire protection system

  14. Motion of liquid plugs between vapor bubbles in capillary tubes: a comparison between fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertossi, Rémi; Ayel, Vincent; Mehta, Balkrishna; Romestant, Cyril; Bertin, Yves; Khandekar, Sameer

    2017-11-01

    Pulsating heat pipes (PHP) are now well-known devices in which liquid/vapor slug flow oscillates in a capillary tube wound between hot and cold sources. In this context, this paper focuses on the motion of the liquid plug, trapped between vapor bubbles, moving in capillary tubes, to try to better understand the thermo-physical phenomena involved in such devices. This study is divided into three parts. In the first part, an experimental study presents the evolution of the vapor pressure during the evaporation process of a liquid thin film deposited from a liquid plug flowing in a heated capillary tube: it is found that the behavior of the generated and removed vapor can be very different, according to the thermophysical properties of the fluids. In the second part, a transient model allows to compare, in terms of pressure and duration, the motion of a constant-length liquid plug trapped between two bubbles subjected to a constant difference of vapor pressure: the results highlight that the performances of the four fluids are also very different. Finally, a third model that can be considered as an improvement of the second one, is also presented: here, the liquid slug is surrounded by two vapor bubbles, one subjected to evaporation, the pressure in both bubbles is now a result of the calculation. This model still allows comparing the behaviors of the fluid. Even if our models are quite far from a complete model of a real PHP, results do indicate towards the applicability of different fluids as suitable working fluids for PHPs, particularly in terms of the flow instabilities which they generate.

  15. Two-phase flow modeling for low concentration spherical particle motion through a Newtonian fluid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit GJF

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available the necessity to model the discrete nature of sep- cite this article in press as: G.J.F. Smit et al., Two-phase flow modeling for low concentration spherical particle motion through a ian fluid, Appl. Math. Comput. (2010), doi:10.1016/j.amc.2010.07.055 2... and Ribberin large-scale and long term morphologica Please cite this article in press as: G.J.F. Smit Newtonian fluid, Appl. Math. Comput. (2010), � 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. modeling of multiphase flow has increasingly become the subject...

  16. Particle-turbulence interaction; Partikkelitihentymien ja turbulenssin vuorovaikutus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karvinen, R.; Savolainen, K. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Technology

    1997-10-01

    In this work the interaction between solid particles and turbulence of the carrier fluid in two-phase flow is studied. The aim of the study is to find out prediction methods for the interaction of particles and fluid turbulence. Accurate measured results are needed in order to develop numerical simulations. There are very few good experimental data sets concerning the particulate matter and its effect on the gas turbulence. Turbulence of the gas phase in a vertical, dilute gas-particle pipe flow has been measured with the laser-Doppler anemometer in Tampere University of Technology. Special attention was paid to different components of the fluctuating velocity. Numerical simulations were done with the Phoenics-code in which the models of two-phase flows suggested in the literature were implemented. It has been observed that the particulate phase increases the rate of anisotropy of the fluid turbulence. It seems to be so that small rigid particles increase the intensity of the axial and decrease the intensity of the radial component in a vertical pipe flow. The change of the total kinetic energy of turbulence obviously depends on the particle size. In the case of 150 ,{mu} spherical glass particles flowing upwards with air, it seems to be slightly positive near the centerline of the pipe. This observation, i.e. the particles decrease turbulence in the radial direction, is very important; because mass and heat transfer in flows is strongly dependent on the component of fluctuating velocity perpendicular to the main flow direction

  17. Experimental studies of occupation times in turbulent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, J.; Ott, Søren; Pécseli, H.L.

    2003-01-01

    The motion of passively convected particles in turbulent flows is studied experimentally in approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows, generated in water by two moving grids. The simultaneous trajectories of many small passively convected, neutrally buoyant, polystyrene particles...

  18. Turbulent mixing of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid at low-Mach number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battista, F.; Casciola, C. M.; Picano, F.

    2014-01-01

    Supercritical fluids near the critical point are characterized by liquid-like densities and gas-like transport properties. These features are purposely exploited in different contexts ranging from natural products extraction/fractionation to aerospace propulsion. Large part of studies concerns this last context, focusing on the dynamics of supercritical fluids at high Mach number where compressibility and thermodynamics strictly interact. Despite the widespread use also at low Mach number, the turbulent mixing properties of slightly supercritical fluids have still not investigated in detail in this regime. This topic is addressed here by dealing with Direct Numerical Simulations of a coaxial jet of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid. Since acoustic effects are irrelevant in the low Mach number conditions found in many industrial applications, the numerical model is based on a suitable low-Mach number expansion of the governing equation. According to experimental observations, the weakly supercritical regime is characterized by the formation of finger-like structures – the so-called ligaments – in the shear layers separating the two streams. The mechanism of ligament formation at vanishing Mach number is extracted from the simulations and a detailed statistical characterization is provided. Ligaments always form whenever a high density contrast occurs, independently of real or perfect gas behaviors. The difference between real and perfect gas conditions is found in the ligament small-scale structure. More intense density gradients and thinner interfaces characterize the near critical fluid in comparison with the smoother behavior of the perfect gas. A phenomenological interpretation is here provided on the basis of the real gas thermodynamics properties

  19. Turbulent mixing of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid at low-Mach number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battista, F.; Casciola, C. M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sapienza University, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Picano, F. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Padova, via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Supercritical fluids near the critical point are characterized by liquid-like densities and gas-like transport properties. These features are purposely exploited in different contexts ranging from natural products extraction/fractionation to aerospace propulsion. Large part of studies concerns this last context, focusing on the dynamics of supercritical fluids at high Mach number where compressibility and thermodynamics strictly interact. Despite the widespread use also at low Mach number, the turbulent mixing properties of slightly supercritical fluids have still not investigated in detail in this regime. This topic is addressed here by dealing with Direct Numerical Simulations of a coaxial jet of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid. Since acoustic effects are irrelevant in the low Mach number conditions found in many industrial applications, the numerical model is based on a suitable low-Mach number expansion of the governing equation. According to experimental observations, the weakly supercritical regime is characterized by the formation of finger-like structures – the so-called ligaments – in the shear layers separating the two streams. The mechanism of ligament formation at vanishing Mach number is extracted from the simulations and a detailed statistical characterization is provided. Ligaments always form whenever a high density contrast occurs, independently of real or perfect gas behaviors. The difference between real and perfect gas conditions is found in the ligament small-scale structure. More intense density gradients and thinner interfaces characterize the near critical fluid in comparison with the smoother behavior of the perfect gas. A phenomenological interpretation is here provided on the basis of the real gas thermodynamics properties.

  20. Group-kinetic theory and modeling of atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    A group kinetic method is developed for analyzing eddy transport properties and relaxation to equilibrium. The purpose is to derive the spectral structure of turbulence in incompressible and compressible media. Of particular interest are: direct and inverse cascade, boundary layer turbulence, Rossby wave turbulence, two phase turbulence; compressible turbulence, and soliton turbulence. Soliton turbulence can be found in large scale turbulence, turbulence connected with surface gravity waves and nonlinear propagation of acoustical and optical waves. By letting the pressure gradient represent the elementary interaction among fluid elements and by raising the Navier-Stokes equation to higher dimensionality, the master equation was obtained for the description of the microdynamical state of turbulence.

  1. L-H transition dynamics in fluid turbulence simulations with neoclassical force balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chôné, L. [Aix–Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Beyer, P.; Fuhr, G.; Benkadda, S. [Aix–Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Sarazin, Y.; Bourdelle, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-07-15

    Spontaneous transport barrier generation at the edge of a magnetically confined plasma is reproduced in flux-driven three-dimensional fluid simulations of electrostatic turbulence. Here, the role on the radial electric field of collisional friction between trapped and passing particles is shown to be the key ingredient. Especially, accounting for the self-consistent and precise dependence of the friction term on the actual plasma temperature allows for the triggering of a transport barrier, provided that the input power exceeds some threshold. In addition, the barrier is found to experience quasi-periodic relaxation events, reminiscent of edge localised modes. These results put forward a possible key player, namely, neoclassical physics via radial force balance, for the low- to high-confinement regime transition observed in most of controlled fusion devices.

  2. Procedure for the direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows in plane channels and annuli and its application in the development of turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, U

    1973-10-01

    Thesis. Submitted to Technische Hochschule, Karlsruhe (West Germany). A numerical difference scheme is described to simulate threedimensional, time- dependent, turbulent flows of incompressible fluids at high Reynolds numbers in a plane channel and in concertric annuli. Starting from the results of Deardorff, the NavierStokes equations, averaged over grid volumes, are integrated. For description of the subgrid scale motion a novel model has been developed which takes into account strongly inhomogeneous turbulence and grid volumes of unequal side lengths. The premises used in the model are described and discussed. Stability criteria are established for this method and for similar difference schemes. For computation of the pressure field the appropriate Poisson's equation is solved accurately, except for rounding errors, by Fast Fourier Transform. The procedure implemented in the TURBIT-1 program is used to simulate turbulent flows in a plane channel and an annulus of 5: 1 ratio of radii. For both types of flow, different cases are realized with a maximum number of grid volumes of 65536. For rather small grid volume numbers the numerical results are in good agreement with experimental values. Especially the velocity profile and the mean velocity fluctuations are computed with significantly better accuracy than in earlier, direct simulations. The energy --length-scale model and the pressurestrain correlation are used as examples to show that the method may be used successfully to evaluate the parameters of turbulence models. Earlier results are reviewed and proposals for future research are made. (auth)

  3. [Turbulence and spatio-temporal chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses Saffman-Taylor instability; cylinder wake; Levy walk and turbulent channel flow; bubble motion and bubble streams; spinal turbulent and wetting; collective behavior of a coupled map system with a conserved quantity; stability of temporally periodic states; generic nonergodic behavior in continuous systems; characterization of unstable periodic orbits; in low-dimensional chaotic attractors and repellers; and Ginzburg-Landau theory for oil-water-surfactant mixture

  4. Similarity Decay of Enstrophy in an Electron Fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, D. J.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Mitchell, T. B.; Montgomery, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    A similarity decay law is proposed for enstrophy of a one-signed-vorticity fluid in a circular free-slip domain. It excludes the metastable equilibrium enstrophy which cannot drive turbulence, and approaches Batchelor's t -2 law for strong turbulence. Measurements of the decay of a turbulent electron fluid agree well with the predictions of the decay law for a variety of initial conditions.

  5. Destabilizing turbulence in pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Song, Baofang; Scarselli, Davide; Budanur, Nazmi Burak; Riedl, Michael; Willis, Ashley P.; Avila, Marc; Hof, Björn

    2018-04-01

    Turbulence is the major cause of friction losses in transport processes and it is responsible for a drastic drag increase in flows over bounding surfaces. While much effort is invested into developing ways to control and reduce turbulence intensities1-3, so far no methods exist to altogether eliminate turbulence if velocities are sufficiently large. We demonstrate for pipe flow that appropriate distortions to the velocity profile lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and subsequently friction losses are reduced by as much as 90%. Counterintuitively, the return to laminar motion is accomplished by initially increasing turbulence intensities or by transiently amplifying wall shear. Since neither the Reynolds number nor the shear stresses decrease (the latter often increase), these measures are not indicative of turbulence collapse. Instead, an amplification mechanism4,5 measuring the interaction between eddies and the mean shear is found to set a threshold below which turbulence is suppressed beyond recovery.

  6. Effects of solid inertial particles on the velocity and temperature statistics of wall bounded turbulent flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadhadi; Lessani, B.

    2016-01-01

    and particles, and the scatter plotsof fluid-particle temperature differences are presented. In addition, the variations of different budgetterms for the turbulent kinetic energy equation and fluctuating temperature variance equation in thepresence of particles are reported. The fluid turbulent heat flux...... is reduced by the presence of particles,and in spite of the additional heat exchange between the carrier fluid and the particles, the total heattransfer rate stays always lower for particle-laden flows. To further clarify this issue, the total Nusseltnumber is split into a turbulence contribution...... and a particle contribution, and the effects of particles inertiaon fluid turbulent heat flux and fluid-particle heat transfer are examined in detail...

  7. Stress assessment in piping under synthetic thermal loads emulating turbulent fluid mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa Garrido, Oriol, E-mail: oriol.costa@ijs.si; El Shawish, Samir, E-mail: samir.elshawish@ijs.si; Cizelj, Leon, E-mail: leon.cizelj@ijs.si

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Generation of complex space-continuous and time-dependent temperature fields. • 1D and 3D thermo-mechanical analyses of pipes under complex surface thermal loads. • Surface temperatures and stress fluctuations are highly linearly correlated. • 1D and 3D results agree for a wide range of Fourier and Biot numbers. • Global thermo-mechanical loading promotes non-equibiaxial stress state. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue assessment of pipes due to turbulent fluid mixing in T-junctions is a rather difficult task because of the existing uncertainties and variability of induced thermal stresses. In these cases, thermal stresses arise on three-dimensional pipe structures due to complex thermal loads, known as thermal striping, acting at the fluid-wall interface. A recently developed approach for the generation of space-continuous and time-dependent temperature fields has been employed in this paper to reproduce fluid temperature fields of a case study from the literature. The paper aims to deliver a detailed study of the three-dimensional structural response of piping under the complex thermal loads arising in fluid mixing in T-junctions. Results of three-dimensional thermo-mechanical analyses show that fluctuations of surface temperatures and stresses are highly linearly correlated. Also, surface stress fluctuations, in axial and hoop directions, are almost equi-biaxial. These findings, representative on cross sections away from system boundaries, are moreover supported by the sensitivity analysis of Fourier and Biot numbers and by the comparison with standard one-dimensional analyses. Agreement between one- and three-dimensional results is found for a wide range of studied parameters. The study also comprises the effects of global thermo-mechanical loading on the surface stress state. Implemented mechanical boundary conditions develop more realistic overall system deformation and promote non-equibiaxial stresses.

  8. Comparative study of the two-fluid momentum equations for multi-dimensional bubbly flows: Modification of Reynolds stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Park, Ik Kyu; Yoon, Han Young [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jae, Byoung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Two-fluid equations are widely used to obtain averaged behaviors of two-phase flows. This study addresses a problem that may arise when the two-fluid equations are used for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. If steady drag is the only accounted force for the interfacial momentum transfer, the disperse-phase velocity would be the same as the continuous-phase velocity when the flow is fully developed without gravity. However, existing momentum equations may show unphysical results in estimating the relative velocity of the disperse phase against the continuous-phase. First, we examine two types of existing momentum equations. One is the standard two-fluid momentum equation in which the disperse-phase is treated as a continuum. The other is the averaged momentum equation derived from a solid/ fluid particle motion. We show that the existing equations are not proper for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. To resolve the problem mentioned above, we modify the form of the Reynolds stress terms in the averaged momentum equation based on the solid/fluid particle motion. The proposed equation shows physically correct results for both multi-dimensional laminar and turbulent flows.

  9. Vortex locking in direct numerical simulations of quantum turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Karla; Koplik, Joel; Rouson, Damian W I

    2008-07-04

    Direct numerical simulations are used to examine the locking of quantized superfluid vortices and normal fluid vorticity in evolving turbulent flows. The superfluid is driven by the normal fluid, which undergoes either a decaying Taylor-Green flow or a linearly forced homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, although the back reaction of the superfluid on the normal fluid flow is omitted. Using correlation functions and wavelet transforms, we present numerical and visual evidence for vortex locking on length scales above the intervortex spacing.

  10. Shell Models of Superfluid Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacks, Daniel H; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2011-01-01

    Superfluid helium consists of two inter-penetrating fluids, a viscous normal fluid and an inviscid superfluid, coupled by a mutual friction. We develop a two-fluid shell model to study superfluid turbulence and investigate the energy spectra and the balance of fluxes between the two fluids in a steady state. At sufficiently low temperatures a 'bottle-neck' develops at high wavenumbers suggesting the need for a further dissipative effect, such as the Kelvin wave cascade.

  11. The rising motion of spheres in structured fluids with yield stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaagha, S.; Pasquino, R.; Iuliano, E.; D'Avino, G.; Zonfrilli, F.; Guida, V.; Grizzuti, N.

    2017-09-01

    The rising of spherical bodies in structured fluids with yield stress is studied. The system is a suspension of hydrogenated castor oil colloidal fibers in a surfactant micellar solution. The fiber network confers to the fluid a viscoelastic behavior, with a well-defined yield stress, which increases with increasing fiber concentration. Various fluids with different fiber contents are prepared and rheologically characterized. A home-made time-lapse photography setup is used to monitor the time evolution position of the spherical particles, and the rising motion of both hollow spheres and air bubbles, in the diameter range 65-550 μm, is measured. The experiments last as long as several weeks, corresponding to significantly low measured velocities. Finite element simulations are performed to support the experimental data, assuming both interfacial slip and no slip conditions. The fluid dynamic phenomenon is studied and discussed in terms of dimensionless numbers, such as yield ratio, Bingham number, and Stokes drag coefficient. The results are novel for the system (suspending medium and hollow spheres) and for the covered Bingham number range, which is extended over three orders of magnitude in comparison with already available literature results. Our values provide quantitative data of the mechanical properties (i.e., yield stress value) at very low shear rates, in a prohibitive range for a traditional rheometer, and agree with the macroscopic rheological response. Moreover, the important role of the power law index n of the Herschel-Bulkley model, used to fit the data, has been highlighted. Our results, based on a Bingham-like fluid, are compared with the experimental data already available with Carbopol, treated as a Herschel Bulkley fluid with n = 0.5. The results could have important implications in the fabric and personal care detergency, a technological area where many fluids have composition and show rheological properties similar to those considered in the

  12. Numerical modelling of near-bottom sediment transport: turbulence modulation, new process models and application to the Scheldt and the Belgian coast

    OpenAIRE

    Bi, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment transport due to fluid motion is a crucial process in many environmental and engineered systems. Therefore, understanding sediment transport is critical for predicting sediment movements and evaluating the short and/or long-term influence to the surface water systems. Despite the importance of sediment transport, the fundamental aspects involved are far from being completely understood. At the core of the problem is the complex interaction between a turbulent flow field and sediment ...

  13. Competition between drag and Coulomb interactions in turbulent particle-laden flows using a coupled-fluid-Ewald-summation based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2018-03-01

    We present a numerical study on inertial electrically charged particles suspended in a turbulent carrier phase. Fluid-particle interactions are accounted for in an Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) framework and coupled to a Fourier-based Ewald summation method, referred to as the particle-particle-particle-mesh (P3M ) method, to accurately capture short- and long-range electrostatic forces in a tractable manner. The EL P3M method is used to assess the competition between drag and Coulomb forces for a range of Stokes numbers and charge densities. Simulations of like- and oppositely charged particles suspended in a two-dimensional Taylor-Green vortex and three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence are reported. It is found that even in dilute suspensions, the short-range electric potential plays an important role in flows that admit preferential concentration. Suspensions of oppositely charged particles are observed to agglomerate in the form of chains and rings. Comparisons between the particle-mesh method typically employed in fluid-particle calculations and P3M are reported, in addition to one-point and two-point statistics to quantify the level of clustering as a function of Reynolds number, Stokes number, and nondimensional electric settling velocity.

  14. Turbulent thermal convection at high Rayleigh numbers for a Boussinesq fluid of constant Prandtl number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amati, G.; Koal, K.; Massaioli, F.; Sreenivasan, K.R.; Verzicco, R.

    2006-12-01

    The results from direct numerical simulations of turbulent Boussinesq convection are briefly presented. The flow is computed for a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio 1/2 in order to compare with the results from recent experiments. The results span eight decades of Ra from 2x10 6 to 2x10 14 and form the baseline data for a strictly Boussinesq fluid of constant Prandtl number (Pr=0.7). A conclusion is that the Nusselt number varies nearly as the 1/3 power of Ra for about four decades towards the upper end of the Ra range covered. (author)

  15. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing in grid-generated turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Kouji; Suzuki, Hiroki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Kubo, Takashi; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Turbulent mixing of passive scalar (heat) in grid-generated turbulence (GGT) is simulated by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS). A turbulence-generating grid, on which the velocity components are set to zero, is located downstream of the channel entrance, and it is numerically constructed on the staggered mesh arrangement using the immersed boundary method. The grid types constructed are: (a) square-mesh biplane grid, (b) square-mesh single-plane grid, (c) composite grid consisting of parallel square-bars and (d) fractal grid. Two fluids with different temperatures are provided separately in the upper and lower streams upstream of the turbulence-generating grids, generating the thermal mixing layer behind the grids. For the grid (a), simulations for two different Prandtl numbers of 0.71 and 7.1, corresponding to air and water flows, are conducted to investigate the effect of the Prandtl number. The results show that the typical grid turbulence and shearless mixing layer are generated downstream of the grids. The results of the scalar field show that a typical thermal mixing layer is generated as well, and the effects of the Prandtl numbers on turbulent heat transfer are observed.

  16. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing in grid-generated turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Kouji; Suzuki, Hiroki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Kubo, Takashi [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Hayase, Toshiyuki [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: nagata@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: hsuzuki@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: ysakai@mech.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: t-kubo@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: hayase@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp

    2008-12-15

    Turbulent mixing of passive scalar (heat) in grid-generated turbulence (GGT) is simulated by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS). A turbulence-generating grid, on which the velocity components are set to zero, is located downstream of the channel entrance, and it is numerically constructed on the staggered mesh arrangement using the immersed boundary method. The grid types constructed are: (a) square-mesh biplane grid, (b) square-mesh single-plane grid, (c) composite grid consisting of parallel square-bars and (d) fractal grid. Two fluids with different temperatures are provided separately in the upper and lower streams upstream of the turbulence-generating grids, generating the thermal mixing layer behind the grids. For the grid (a), simulations for two different Prandtl numbers of 0.71 and 7.1, corresponding to air and water flows, are conducted to investigate the effect of the Prandtl number. The results show that the typical grid turbulence and shearless mixing layer are generated downstream of the grids. The results of the scalar field show that a typical thermal mixing layer is generated as well, and the effects of the Prandtl numbers on turbulent heat transfer are observed.

  17. Large eddy simulation of bundle turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Y.A.; Barsamian, H.R.

    1995-01-01

    Large eddy simulation may be defined as simulation of a turbulent flow in which the large scale motions are explicitly resolved while the small scale motions are modeled. This results into a system of equations that require closure models. The closure models relate the effects of the small scale motions onto the large scale motions. There have been several models developed, the most popular is the Smagorinsky eddy viscosity model. A new model has recently been introduced by Lee that modified the Smagorinsky model. Using both of the above mentioned closure models, two different geometric arrangements were used in the simulation of turbulent cross flow within rigid tube bundles. An inlined array simulations was performed for a deep bundle (10,816 nodes) as well as an inlet/outlet simulation (57,600 nodes). Comparisons were made to available experimental data. Flow visualization enabled the distinction of different characteristics within the flow such as jet switching effects in the wake of the bundle flow for the inlet/outlet simulation case, as well as within tube bundles. The results indicate that the large eddy simulation technique is capable of turbulence prediction and may be used as a viable engineering tool with the careful consideration of the subgrid scale model. (author)

  18. Numerical calculation of two-phase turbulent jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saif, A.A.

    1995-05-01

    Two-phase turbulent round jets were numerically simulated using a multidimensional two-phase CFD code based on the two-fluid model. The turbulence phenomena were treated with the standard k-{epsilon} model. It was modified to take into account the additional dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy by the dispersed phase. Within the context of the two-fluid model it is more appropriate and physically justified to treat the diffusion by an interfacial force in the momentum equation. In this work, the diffusion force and the additional dissipation effect by the dispersed phase were modeled starting from the classical turbulent energy spectrum analysis. A cut-off frequency was proposed to decrease the dissipation effect by the dispersed phase when large size particles are introduced in the flow. The cut-off frequency combined with the bubble-induced turbulence effect allows for an increase in turbulence for large particles. Additional care was taken in choosing the right kind of experimental data from the literature so that a good separate effect test was possible for their models. The models predicted the experimental data very closely and they were general enough to predict extreme limit cases: water-bubble and air-droplet jets.

  19. Turbulent effective absorptivity and refractivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rax, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    The problem of wave propagation in a turbulent magnetized plasma is investigated. Considering small scale, low frequency density fluctuations we solve the Maxwell equations and show that the eikonal approximation remains valid with an effective refractivity and an effective absorptivity taking into account the energy diffusion due to the turbulent motion. Then the result is applied to the problem of lower hybrid waves scattering by drift waves density fluctuations in tokamaks

  20. Interaction of Strong Turbulence With Free Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Robert A.

    Spray from a nozzle, spilling breakers, and “rooster tails” from speeding boats are all examples of a turbulent flow with a free surface. In many cases like these, the free surface is difficult to discern as the volume of air in the fluid can exceed that of the water.In traditional studies, the free surface is simply defined as a continuous surface separating the fluid from air. The pressure at the surface is assumed to be atmospheric pressure and the fluid comprising the surface moves with the surface. While these conditions are sufficient for non-turbulent flows, such as nonbreaking water waves, and lead to the (albeit non-linear) dynamic and kinematic free surface boundary conditions that serve to provide sufficient conditions to determine the surface, they are not valid descriptions for a bubbly free surface in a highly turbulent regime, such as the roller in front of a spilling breaker or the propeller wash behind a ship.

  1. Measurement of the translation and rotation of a sphere in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Diogo; Hiltbrand, Ben; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2018-06-01

    The problem of determining the translation and rotation of a spherical particle moving in fluid flow is considered. Lagrangian tracking of markers printed over the surface of a sphere is employed to compute the center motion and the angular velocity of the solid body. The method initially calculates the sphere center from the 3D coordinates of the reconstructed markers, then finds the optimal rotation matrix that aligns a set of markers tracked at sequential time steps. The parameters involved in the experimental implementation of this procedure are discussed, and the associated uncertainty is estimated from numerical analysis. Finally, the proposed methodology is applied to characterize the motion of a large spherical particle released in a turbulent boundary layer developing in a water channel.

  2. Two-dimensional convection and interchange motions in fluids and magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Naulin, V.

    2006-01-01

    fluids, emphasizing its relation to interchange motions of non- uniformly magnetized plasmas. This is followed by a review of the theories for the onset of convection and quasi-linear saturation in driven-dissipative systems. Non-linear numerical simulations which result in stationary convective states...... behaviour of the fluctuation level which is associated with relaxation oscillations in the kinetic energy of the azimuthally mean flows. This leads to a state of large-scale intermittency manifested by exponential tails in the single-point probability distribution function of the dependent variables...

  3. Coherent Structures and Intermittency in Plasma Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Sen, Abhijit

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses some fundamental issues related to the phenomenon of intermittency in plasma turbulence with particular reference to experimental observations in fusion devices. Intermittency is typically associated with the presence of coherent structures in turbulence. Since coherent structures can play an important role in governing the transport properties of a system they have received a great deal of attention in fusion research. We review some of the experimental measurements and numerical simulation studies on the presence and formation of coherent structures in plasmas and discuss their relevance to intermittency. Intermittency, as widely discussed in the context of neutral fluid turbulence, implies multiscaling behaviour in contrast to self-similar scaling patterns observed in self organized criticality (SOC) phenomenon. The experimental evidence from plasma turbulence measurements reveal a mixed picture--while some observations support the SOC model description others indicate the presence of multiscaling behaviour. We discuss these results in the light of our present understanding of plasma turbulence and in terms of certain unique aspects of intermittency as revealed by fluid models of plasmas.

  4. X-ray doppler velocimetry for diagnosis of fluid motion in ICF implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J. A.; King, J. A.; Huffman, E.; Freeman, R. R.; Dutra, E. C.; Field, J. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Hall, G. N.; Harding, E.; Rochau, G. A.; Porter, J. L.; Covington, A. M.; Beg, F. N.

    2017-08-01

    We are developing a novel diagnostic for measurement of bulk fluid motion in materials, that is particularly applicable to very hot, x-ray emitting plasmas in the High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) regime. The X-ray Doppler Velocimetry (XDV) technique relies on monochromatic imaging in multiple x-ray energy bands near the center of an x-ray emission line in a plasma, and utilizes bent imaging crystals. Higher energy bands are preferentially sensitive to plasma moving towards the viewer, while lower energy bands are preferentially sensitive to plasma moving away from the viewer. Combining multiple images in different energy bands allows for a reconstruction of the fluid velocity field integrated along the line of sight. We review the technique, and we discuss progress towards benchmarking the technique with proof-of-principle HEDP experiments.

  5. Wave-particle interaction in the Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2015-10-01

    Wave motion in disordered Faraday waves is analysed in terms of oscillons or quasi-particles. The motion of these oscillons is measured using particle tracking tools and it is compared with the motion of fluid particles on the water surface. Both the real floating particles and the oscillons, representing the collective fluid motion, show Brownian-type dispersion exhibiting ballistic and diffusive mean squared displacement at short and long times, respectively. While the floating particles motion has been previously explained in the context of two-dimensional turbulence driven by Faraday waves, no theoretical description exists for the random walk type motion of oscillons. It is found that the r.m.s velocity ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) of oscillons is directly related to the turbulent r.m.s. velocity ⟨μ̃⟩(rms) of the fluid particles in a broad range of vertical accelerations. The measured ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) accurately explains the broadening of the frequency spectra of the surface elevation observed in disordered Faraday waves. These results suggest that 2D turbulence is the driving force behind both the randomization of the oscillons motion and the resulting broadening of the wave frequency spectra. The coupling between wave motion and hydrodynamic turbulence demonstrated here offers new perspectives for predicting complex fluid transport from the knowledge of wave field spectra and vice versa.

  6. Biogenic mixing induced by intermediate Reynolds number swimming in stratified fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyan; Ardekani, Arezoo M.

    2015-01-01

    We study fully resolved motion of interacting swimmers in density stratified fluids using an archetypal swimming model called “squirmer”. The intermediate Reynolds number regime is particularly important, because the vast majority of organisms in the aphotic ocean (i.e. regions that are 200 m beneath the sea surface) are small (mm-cm) and their motion is governed by the balance of inertial and viscous forces. Our study shows that the mixing efficiency and the diapycnal eddy diffusivity, a measure of vertical mass flux, within a suspension of squirmers increases with Reynolds number. The mixing efficiency is in the range of O(0.0001–0.04) when the swimming Reynolds number is in the range of O(0.1–100). The values of diapycnal eddy diffusivity and Cox number are two orders of magnitude larger for vertically swimming cells compared to horizontally swimming cells. For a suspension of squirmers in a decaying isotropic turbulence, we find that the diapycnal eddy diffusivity enhances due to the strong viscous dissipation generated by squirmers as well as the interaction of squirmers with the background turbulence. PMID:26628288

  7. Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Bhattacharya

    of renewable energy (e.g., via wind, hydrokinetic generators), creating low-cost healthcare ... multiphase flow, turbulence, bio-fluid dynamics, atmospheric flows, microfluidic flows, and ... study the challenging problem of entry of solids in water.

  8. Analysis of cantilever pipes in transverse fluid flow with motion limiting stopper at the free end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiyavan, R.

    1983-01-01

    Flow-induced vibration in heat exchanger tubes can result in impact with the baffle plates and subsequent tube failure through fatigue, fracture and fretting wear. As a step towards the correlation between the random flow excitations and the rate of wear, this paper presents a general theory for predicting the tube motion and the tube baffle impact forces through a case of cantilever pipe with motion limiting stopper at the free end and simultaneously subjected to transverse fluid flow. The mathematical model has been developed using the theory of fluid-structure interactions with model superposition technique. The pipe displacement induced by lift forces is evaluated by numerical integration. When displacement increases to greater than the pipe-stopper clearance, the pipe impacts on stopper. Assuming semielastic impact, the equation of pipe motion during impact is developed using extended Hertz's theory to include the vibration of one of the colliding bodies. The stopper is assumed to be at rest before and after the impact. The constraint imposed on pipe motion, at the free end due to impact of the pipe on stopper, is considered as one of the boundary conditions and is used to evaluate the pipe natural frequencies. The nonlinear equations are solved numerically. The response of the pipe due to wake induced lift forces superposed by the impact response is evaluated. (orig./GL)

  9. Pipe Flow and Wall Turbulence Using a Modified Navier-Stokes Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirkovsky, L.; Muriel, A.

    2012-01-01

    We use a derived incompressible modified Navier-Stokes equation to model pipe flow and wall turbulence. We reproduce the observed flattened paraboloid velocity profiles of turbulence that cannot be obtained directly using standard incompressible Navier-Stokes equation. The solutions found are in harmony with multi-valued velocity fields as a definition of turbulence. Repeating the procedure for the flow of turbulent fluid between two parallel flat plates we find similar flattened velocity profiles. We extend the analysis to the turbulent flow along a single wall and compare the results with experimental data and the established controversial von Karman logarithmic law of the wall. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  10. On the origin of turbulence in ionizing waves and in hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasa, J.; Rothhardt, L.

    1984-01-01

    Research of irregular (turbulent) ionizing waves is reviewed. Measuring techniques and analogies to fluid turbulence are accentuated. The irregular (turbulent) ionizing waves are recommended as a one-dimensional substrate for further basic studies on turbulence generation because of good accessability and ease of contactless measurement. (author)

  11. Turbulence assessment at potential turbine sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-12-31

    As opposed to a fixed anemometer, the Tala kite is free to move in the air. The motion of the kite is not random, it moves with or against the speed gradient towards the center of passing turbulence events of higher or lower speeds thus allowing the kite to measure event maximum or minimum speed rather than the speed at some unknown distance from the event center like a fixed anemometer. This behavior is confirmed both by a theoretical aerodynamics analysis of the kite motion and by data from a field study where kite and hot film anemometer (HFA) events, defined by the rain flow count method, were compared with flap events on a rotating turbine blade. The HFAs simulated too few events lasting too long while the kites reproduced both the number of events and event periods remarkably close. It is concluded that the kite is the optimal tool for measuring turbulence at potential turbine sites. Kite turbulence can form the bases for economic return estimates and an example is given where less windy sites could be more economical than other more turbulent higher speed sites. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Turbulence of high-beta plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvesyuk, V.I.; Chirkov, A.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Principals of numerical modelling of turbulence in high-beta plasma (β > 0.1) are discussed. Creation of transport model for axial symmetric nonuniform confining magnetic field is considered. Numerical model of plasma turbulence in FRC is presented. The physical and mathematical models are formulated from nonuniform axial symmetric high-beta plasma. It is shown that influence of waves arise under this plasma conditions lead to chaotic motion of charged particles across magnetic field. (author)

  13. Inner-outer predictive wall model for wall-bounded turbulence in hypersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. Pino; Helm, Clara M.

    2017-11-01

    The inner-outer predictive wall model of Mathis et al. is modified for hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. The model is based on a modulation of the energized motions in the inner layer by large scale momentum fluctuations in the logarithmic layer. Using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of turbulent boundary layers with free stream Mach number 3 to 10, it is shown that the variation of the fluid properties in the compressible flows leads to large Reynolds number (Re) effects in the outer layer and facilitate the modulation observed in high Re incompressible flows. The modulation effect by the large scale increases with increasing free-stream Mach number. The model is extended to include spanwise and wall-normal velocity fluctuations and is generalized through Morkovin scaling. Temperature fluctuations are modeled using an appropriate Reynolds Analogy. Density fluctuations are calculated using an equation of state and a scaling with Mach number. DNS data are used to obtain the universal signal and parameters. The model is tested by using the universal signal to reproduce the flow conditions of Mach 3 and Mach 7 turbulent boundary layer DNS data and comparing turbulence statistics between the modeled flow and the DNS data. This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant FA9550-17-1-0104.

  14. Self-organization of turbulence. A brief review of self-organization with particular reference to hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, A [Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (USA)

    1982-02-01

    Theoretical treatments of turbulence in fluids and plasmas often assume that the turbulence is isotropic and homogeneous. It is also often considered that turbulence produces uniformly distributed chaos, even when starting with a coherent initial condition. Recently, however, phenomena which do not obey these classic concepts have emerged. For example, in two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence, an organized flow or structure is found to appear even from a chaotic initial condition. The author attempts to review some of the recent developments of a phenomenon called self-organization in the field of hydrodynamics and plasma physics.

  15. Modelling the optical turbulence boiling and its effect on finite-exposure differential image motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdja, A.; Borgnino, J.

    2007-07-01

    It is usually accepted that whenever dealing with astronomical observation through the atmosphere, the optical turbulence temporal evolution can be sufficiently described with the so-called frozen turbulence hypothesis. In this model, turbulence is supposed to be equivalent to a series of solid phase screens that slide horizontally in front of the observation field of view. Experimental evidence shows, however, that an additional physical process must be taken into account when describing the temporal behaviour of the optical turbulence. In fact, while translating above the observer, turbulence undergoes a proper temporal evolution and affects differently the astronomical and, more specifically, the astrometric observations. The proper temporal evolution of the turbulence-induced optical turbulence observable quantities is here called the optical turbulence boiling. We are proposing through this paper a theoretical approach to the modelling of the optical turbulence temporal evolution when the turbulent layer horizontal translation and the optical turbulence boiling are both involved. The model we propose, as a working hypothesis though, has a direct relevance to differential astrometry because of its explicit dependence upon the optical turbulence temporal evolution. It can also be generalized to other techniques of high angular resolution astronomical observation through the atmospheric turbulence.

  16. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence...

  17. On the motion of rigid bodies in an incompressible or compressible viscous fluid under the action of gravitational forces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ducomet, B.; Nečasová, Šárka

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2013), s. 1193-1213 ISSN 1937-1632 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/11/1304 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : motion of rigid bodies * incompressible fluid * compressible fluid Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics https://www.aimsciences.org/journals/displayArticlesnew.jsp?paperID=8331

  18. A correlation for single phase turbulent mixing in square rod arrays under highly turbulent conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Yong; Ha, Kwi Seok; Kwon, Young Min; Chang, Won Pyo; Lee, Yong Bum

    2006-01-01

    The existing experimental data related to the turbulent mixing factor in rod arrays is examined and a new definition of the turbulent mixing factor is introduced to take into account the turbulent mixing of fluids with various Prandtl numbers. The new definition of the mixing factor is based on the eddy diffusivity of energy. With this definition of the mixing factor, it was found that the geometrical parameter, δ ij /D h , correlates the turbulent mixing data better than S/d, which has been used frequently in existing correlations. Based on the experimental data for a highly turbulent condition in square rod arrays, a correlation describing turbulent mixing dependent on the parameter δ ij /D h has been developed. The correlation is insensitive to the Re number and it takes into account the effect of the turbulent Prandtl number. The proposed correlation predicts a reasonable mixing even at a lower S/d ratio

  19. MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

    2007-01-10

    The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions

  20. Mathematical and numerical foundations of turbulence models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chacón Rebollo, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    With applications to climate, technology, and industry, the modeling and numerical simulation of turbulent flows are rich with history and modern relevance. The complexity of the problems that arise in the study of turbulence requires tools from various scientific disciplines, including mathematics, physics, engineering, and computer science. Authored by two experts in the area with a long history of collaboration, this monograph provides a current, detailed look at several turbulence models from both the theoretical and numerical perspectives. The k-epsilon, large-eddy simulation, and other models are rigorously derived and their performance is analyzed using benchmark simulations for real-world turbulent flows. Mathematical and Numerical Foundations of Turbulence Models and Applications is an ideal reference for students in applied mathematics and engineering, as well as researchers in mathematical and numerical fluid dynamics. It is also a valuable resource for advanced graduate students in fluid dynamics,...

  1. A non-traditional fluid problem: transition between theoretical models from Stokes’ to turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Horacio D.; Olivieri, Néstor A.; Véliz, Maximiliano E.; Raviola, Lisandro A.

    2018-05-01

    In the context of fluid mechanics courses, it is customary to consider the problem of a sphere falling under the action of gravity inside a viscous fluid. Under suitable assumptions, this phenomenon can be modelled using Stokes’ law and is routinely reproduced in teaching laboratories to determine terminal velocities and fluid viscosities. In many cases, however, the measured physical quantities show important deviations with respect to the predictions deduced from the simple Stokes’ model, and the causes of these apparent ‘anomalies’ (for example, whether the flow is laminar or turbulent) are seldom discussed in the classroom. On the other hand, there are various variable-mass problems that students tackle during elementary mechanics courses and which are discussed in many textbooks. In this work, we combine both kinds of problems and analyse—both theoretically and experimentally—the evolution of a system composed of a sphere pulled by a chain of variable length inside a tube filled with water. We investigate the effects of different forces acting on the system such as weight, buoyancy, viscous friction and drag force. By means of a sequence of mathematical models of increasing complexity, we obtain a progressive fit that accounts for the experimental data. The contrast between the various models exposes the strengths and weaknessess of each one. The proposed experience can be useful for integrating concepts of elementary mechanics and fluids, and is suitable as laboratory practice, stressing the importance of the experimental validation of theoretical models and showing the model-building processes in a didactic framework.

  2. Information Theory Analysis of Cascading Process in a Synthetic Model of Fluid Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Materassi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of transfer entropy has proven to be helpful in detecting which is the verse of dynamical driving in the interaction of two processes, X and Y . In this paper, we present a different normalization for the transfer entropy, which is capable of better detecting the information transfer direction. This new normalized transfer entropy is applied to the detection of the verse of energy flux transfer in a synthetic model of fluid turbulence, namely the Gledzer–Ohkitana–Yamada shell model. Indeed, this is a fully well-known model able to model the fully developed turbulence in the Fourier space, which is characterized by an energy cascade towards the small scales (large wavenumbers k, so that the application of the information-theory analysis to its outcome tests the reliability of the analysis tool rather than exploring the model physics. As a result, the presence of a direct cascade along the scales in the shell model and the locality of the interactions in the space of wavenumbers come out as expected, indicating the validity of this data analysis tool. In this context, the use of a normalized version of transfer entropy, able to account for the difference of the intrinsic randomness of the interacting processes, appears to perform better, being able to discriminate the wrong conclusions to which the “traditional” transfer entropy would drive.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulent separated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Turbulent mixing is largely suppressed by the proximity of a wall boundary and ... the uncertainty between the experimental and CFD values falls within ± 3.8% of f .... Numerical, Experimental, and Theoretical Aspects, Vieweg, Berlin, 1989, pp.

  4. Experimental characterization of extreme events of inertial dissipation in a turbulent swirling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, E. -W.; Kuzzay, D.; Faranda, D.; Guittonneau, A.; Daviaud, F.; Wiertel-Gasquet, C.; Padilla, V.; Dubrulle, B.

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional incompressible Navier–Stokes equations, which describe the motion of many fluids, are the cornerstones of many physical and engineering sciences. However, it is still unclear whether they are mathematically well posed, that is, whether their solutions remain regular over time or develop singularities. Even though it was shown that singularities, if exist, could only be rare events, they may induce additional energy dissipation by inertial means. Here, using measurements at the dissipative scale of an axisymmetric turbulent flow, we report estimates of such inertial energy dissipation and identify local events of extreme values. We characterize the topology of these extreme events and identify several main types. Most of them appear as fronts separating regions of distinct velocities, whereas events corresponding to focusing spirals, jets and cusps are also found. Our results highlight the non-triviality of turbulent flows at sub-Kolmogorov scales as possible footprints of singularities of the Navier–Stokes equation. PMID:27578459

  5. Homogeneous internal wave turbulence driven by tidal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Reun, Thomas; Favier, Benjamin; Le Bars, Michael; Erc Fludyco Team

    2017-11-01

    We propose a novel investigation of the stability of strongly stratified planetary fluid layers undergoing periodic tidal distortion in the limit where rotational effects are negligible compared to buoyancy. With the help of a local model focusing on a small fluid area compared to the global layer, we find that periodic tidal distortion drives a parametric subharmonic resonance of internal. This instability saturates into an homogeneous internal wave turbulence pervading the whole fluid interior: the energy is injected in the unstable waves which then feed a succession of triadic resonances also generating small spatial scales. As the timescale separation between the forcing and Brunt-Väisälä is increased, the temporal spectrum of this turbulence displays a -2 power law reminiscent of the Garrett and Munk spectrum measured in the oceans (Garett & Munk 1979). Moreover, in this state consisting of a superposition of waves in weak non-linear interaction, the mixing efficiency is increased compared to classical, Kolmogorov-like stratified turbulence. This study is of wide interest in geophysical fluid dynamics ranging from oceanic turbulence and tidal heating in icy satellites to dynamo action in partially stratified planetary cores as it could be the case in the Earth. We acknowledge support from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (Grant Agreement No. 681835-FLUDYCO-ERC-2015-CoG).

  6. Onset of meso-scale turbulence in active nematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doostmohammadi, A.; Shendruk, T.N.; Thijssen, K.; Yeomans, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Meso-scale turbulence is an innate phenomenon, distinct from inertial turbulence, that spontaneously occurs at low Reynolds number in fluidized biological systems. This spatiotemporal disordered flow radically changes nutrient and molecular transport in living fluids and can strongly affect the

  7. Fractal tracer distributions in turbulent field theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. Lundbek; Bohr, Tomas

    1998-01-01

    We study the motion of passive tracers in a two-dimensional turbulent velocity field generated by the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. By varying the direction of the velocity-vector with respect to the field-gradient we can continuously vary the two Lyapunov exponents for the particle motion and t...

  8. Entropy generation in turbulent mixed convection heat transfer to highly variable property pipe flow of supercritical fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohseni, Mahdi; Bazargan, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The entropy generation in supercritical fluid flows has been numerically investigated. • The mechanisms of entropy generation are different near and away from the walls. • In the near wall region, the energy dissipation is the deciding parameter. • Away from the wall, the heat transfer is the effective factor in entropy generation. • The bulk Be number is greater in the liquid-like region than in vapor-like region. - Abstract: In this study, a two dimensional CFD code has been developed to investigate entropy generation in turbulent mixed convection heat transfer flow of supercritical fluids. Since the fluid properties vary significantly under supercritical conditions, the changes of entropy generation are large. The contribution of each of the mechanisms of entropy production (heat transfer and energy dissipation) is compared in different regions of the flow. The results show that the mechanisms of entropy generation act differently in the near wall region within the viscous sub-layer and in the region away from the wall. The effects of the wall heat flux on the entropy generation are also investigated

  9. Compressibility, turbulence and high speed flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Compressibility, Turbulence and High Speed Flow introduces the reader to the field of compressible turbulence and compressible turbulent flows across a broad speed range, through a unique complimentary treatment of both the theoretical foundations and the measurement and analysis tools currently used. The book provides the reader with the necessary background and current trends in the theoretical and experimental aspects of compressible turbulent flows and compressible turbulence. Detailed derivations of the pertinent equations describing the motion of such turbulent flows is provided and an extensive discussion of the various approaches used in predicting both free shear and wall bounded flows is presented. Experimental measurement techniques common to the compressible flow regime are introduced with particular emphasis on the unique challenges presented by high speed flows. Both experimental and numerical simulation work is supplied throughout to provide the reader with an overall perspective of current tre...

  10. Tearing instabilities in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Effects of micro-turbulence on tearing instabilities are investigated by numerically solving a reduced set of two-fluid equations. Micro-turbulence excites both large-scale and small-scale Fourier modes through energy transfer due to nonlinear mode coupling. The energy transfer to large scale mode does not directly excite tearing instability but it gives an initiation of tearing instability. When tearing instability starts to grow, the excited small scale mode plays an important role. The mixing of magnetic flux by micro-turbulence is the dominant factor of non-ideal MHD effect at the resonant surface and it gives rise to magnetic reconnection which causes tearing instability. Tearing instabilities were investigated against static equilibrium or flowing equilibrium so far. On the other hand, the recent progress of computer power allows us to investigate interactions between turbulence and coherent modes such as tearing instabilities in magnetically confined plasmas by means of direct numerical simulations. In order to investigate effects of turbulence on tearing instabilities we consider a situation that tearing mode is destabilized in a quasi-equilibrium including micro-turbulence. We choose an initial equilibrium that is unstable against kinetic ballooning modes and tearing instabilities. Tearing instabilities are current driven modes and thus they are unstable for large scale Fourier modes. On the other hand kinetic ballooning modes are unstable for poloidal Fourier modes that are characterized by ion Larmor radius. The energy of kinetic ballooning modes spreads over wave number space through nonlinear Fourier mode coupling. We present that micro-turbulence affects tearing instabilities in two different ways by three-dimensional numerical simulation of a reduced set of two-fluid equations. One is caused by energy transfer to large scale modes, the other is caused by energy transfer to small scale modes. The former is the excitation of initial

  11. A comprehensive study of electrostatic turbulence and transport in the laboratory basic plasma device TORPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furno, I.; Fasoli, A.; Avino, F.; Bovet, A.; Gustafson, K.; Iraji, D.; Labit, B.; Loizu, J.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2012-04-01

    TORPEX is a toroidal device located at the CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. In TORPEX, a vertical magnetic field superposed on a toroidal field creates helicoidal field lines with both ends terminating on the torus vessel. The turbulence driven by magnetic curvature and plasma gradients causes plasma transport in the radial direction while at the same time plasma is progressively lost along the field lines. The relatively simple magnetic geometry and diagnostic access of the TORPEX configuration facilitate the experimental study of low frequency instabilities and related turbulent transport, and make an accurate comparison between simulations and experiments possible. We first present a detailed investigation of electrostatic interchange turbulence, associated structures and their effect on plasma using high-resolution diagnostics of plasma parameters and wave fields throughout the whole device cross-section, fluid models and numerical simulations. Interchange modes nonlinearly develop blobs, radially propagating filaments of enhanced plasma pressure. Blob velocities and sizes are obtained from probe measurements using pattern recognition and are described by an analytical expression that includes ion polarization currents, parallel sheath currents and ion-neutral collisions. Then, we describe recent advances of a non-perturbative Li 6+ miniaturized ion source and a detector for the investigation of the interaction between supra thermal ions and interchange-driven turbulence. We present first measurements of the spatial and energy space distribution of the fast ion beam in different plasma scenarios, in which the plasma turbulence is fully characterized. The experiments are interpreted using two-dimensional fluid simulations describing the low-frequency interchange turbulence, taking into account the plasma source and plasma losses at the torus vessel. By treating fast ions as test particles, we integrate their equations of motion in the simulated electromagnetic fields, and

  12. Structure and modeling of turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    The open-quotes vortex stringsclose quotes scale l s ∼ LRe -3/10 (L-external scale, Re - Reynolds number) is suggested as a grid scale for the large-eddy simulation. Various aspects of the structure of turbulence and subgrid modeling are described in terms of conditional averaging, Markov processes with dependent increments and infinitely divisible distributions. The major request from the energy, naval, aerospace and environmental engineering communities to the theory of turbulence is to reduce the enormous number of degrees of freedom in turbulent flows to a level manageable by computer simulations. The vast majority of these degrees of freedom is in the small-scale motion. The study of the structure of turbulence provides a basis for subgrid-scale (SGS) models, which are necessary for the large-eddy simulations (LES)

  13. Kinetic energy budgets near the turbulent/nonturbulent interface in jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira, Rodrigo R.; da Silva, Carlos B.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of the kinetic energy near the turbulent/nonturbulent (T/NT) interface separating the turbulent from the irrotational flow regions is analysed using three direct numerical simulations of turbulent planar jets, with Reynolds numbers based on the Taylor micro-scale across the jet shear layer in the range Reλ ≈ 120-160. Important levels of kinetic energy are already present in the irrotational region near the T/NT interface. The mean pressure and kinetic energy are well described by the Bernoulli equation in this region and agree with recent results obtained from rapid distortion theory in the turbulent region [M. A. C. Teixeira and C. B. da Silva, "Turbulence dynamics near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface," J. Fluid Mech. 695, 257-287 (2012)], 10.1017/jfm.2012.17 while the normal Reynolds stresses agree with the theoretical predictions from Phillips ["The irrotational motion outside a free turbulent boundary," Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 51, 220 (1955)], 10.1017/S0305004100030073. The use of conditional statistics in relation to the distance from the T/NT interface allow a detailed study of the build up of kinetic energy across the T/NT interface, pointing to a very different picture than using classical statistics. Conditional kinetic energy budgets show that apart from the viscous dissipation of kinetic energy, the maximum of all the mechanisms governing the kinetic energy are concentrated in a very narrow region distancing about one to two Taylor micro-scales from the T/NT interface. The (total and fluctuating) kinetic energy starts increasing in the irrotational region by pressure-velocity interactions - a mechanism that can act at distance, and continue to grow by advection (for the total kinetic energy) and turbulent diffusion (for the turbulent kinetic energy) inside the turbulent region. These mechanisms tend to occur preferentially around the core of the large-scale vortices existing near T/NT interface. The production of turbulent

  14. Energy spectrum scaling in an agent-based model for bacterial turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikel-Stites, Maxwell; Staples, Anne

    2017-11-01

    Numerous models have been developed to examine the behavior of dense bacterial swarms and to explore the visually striking phenomena of bacterial turbulence. Most models directly impose fluid dynamics physics, either by modeling the active matter as a fluid or by including interactions between the bacteria and a fluid. In this work, however, the `turbulence' is solely an emergent property of the collective behavior of the bacterial population, rather than a consequence of imposed fluid dynamics physical modeling. The system is simulated using a two dimensional Vicsek-style model, with the addition of individual repulsion to simulate bacterial collisions and physical interactions, and without the common flocking or sensing behaviors. Initial results indicate the presence of k-1 scaling in a portion of the kinetic energy spectrum that can be considered analogous to the inertial subrange in turbulent energy spectra. This result suggests that the interaction of large numbers of individual active bacteria may also be a contributing factor in the emergence of fluid dynamics phenomena, in addition to the physical interactions between bacteria and their fluid environment.

  15. Measurement of beam driven hydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Black, E.; Bandura, L.; Errede, D.; Cummings, M. A. C.

    2003-01-01

    Cooling intense muon beams in liquid hydrogen absorbers introduces kW of heating to the cold fluid, which will drive turbulent flow. The amount of turbulence may be sufficient to help cool the liquid, but calculations are difficult. We have used a 20 MeV electron beam in a water tank to look at the scale of the beam driven convection and turbulence. The density and flow measurements are made with schlieren and Ronchi systems. We describe the optical systems and the turbulence measured. These data are being used to calibrate hydrodynamic calculations of convection driven and forced flow cooling in muon cooling absorbers

  16. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    . For the numerical solution of the discretized equations a new algorithm that is based on the SIMPLE algorithm is developed. The new algorithm treats the particle phase as fully compressible. The algorithm is therefore referred to as compressible dispersed phase method (CDP). The CDP method solves the particle volume fraction from the equation-of-state of the particle phase, and both the equation-of-state and the particle continuity equation are always fulfilled simultaneously. Several types of industrial multiphase flows are studied and it is demonstrated that the two-fluid model solved with the CDP method produces stable and physically reliable solutions. First, the flow of sand and the heap building in an hourglass is computed. By means of an comprehensive parameter study it is shown that whereas the instantaneous equations without frictional stress modeling predict mass flow rates in the hourglass orifice that are in good agreement with the empirical Beverloo correlation, only with the frictional stress model realistic shapes of the heap of sand are obtained. A similar effect on the shape of the bulk particles is shown for the sediment bed in a sedimentation column. Second, the flow in two cold gas-fluidized beds is computed. It is shown that the predicted motion and characteristics of large scale bubbles in a bed with a central jet are in good agreement with classical analytical results and available experimental results. It is also shown that the model predicts spontaneous bubble formation in an uniformly fluidized bed. Third, a liquid-particle system is studied, that is, the settling convection in an inclined parallel plate settler. The computations are in excellent agreement with measurements carried out in our laboratory and analytical theories. However, the results suggest that the kinetic theory of granular material needs modification if applied to liquid-particle suspensions. Finally, the turbulence model is applied to three test cases. The particle

  17. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    finite volume method. For the numerical solution of the discretized equations a new algorithm that is based on the SIMPLE algorithm is developed. The new algorithm treats the particle phase as fully compressible. The algorithm is therefore referred to as compressible dispersed phase method (CDP). The CDP method solves the particle volume fraction from the equation-of-state of the particle phase, and both the equation-of-state and the particle continuity equation are always fulfilled simultaneously. Several types of industrial multiphase flows are studied and it is demonstrated that the two-fluid model solved with the CDP method produces stable and physically reliable solutions. First, the flow of sand and the heap building in an hourglass is computed. By means of an comprehensive parameter study it is shown that whereas the instantaneous equations without frictional stress modeling predict mass flow rates in the hourglass orifice that are in good agreement with the empirical Beverloo correlation, only with the frictional stress model realistic shapes of the heap of sand are obtained. A similar effect on the shape of the bulk particles is shown for the sediment bed in a sedimentation column. Second, the flow in two cold gas-fluidized beds is computed. It is shown that the predicted motion and characteristics of large scale bubbles in a bed with a central jet are in good agreement with classical analytical results and available experimental results. It is also shown that the model predicts spontaneous bubble formation in an uniformly fluidized bed. Third, a liquid-particle system is studied, that is, the settling convection in an inclined parallel plate settler. The computations are in excellent agreement with measurements carried out in our laboratory and analytical theories. However, the results suggest that the kinetic theory of granular material needs modification if applied to liquid-particle suspensions. Finally, the turbulence model is applied to three test cases

  18. Turbulent mixing between subchannels in a gas-liquid two-phase flow. For the equilibrium flow without net fluid transfer between subchannels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Akimaro; Sadatomi, Michio; Sato, Yoshifusa; Saito, Hidetoshi.

    1995-01-01

    To provide data necessary for modeling turbulent mixing between subchannels in a nuclear fuel rod bundle, three experiments were made in series for equilibrium two-phase flows, in which net mass exchange does not occur between subchannels for each phase. The first one was the measurement of turbulent mixing rates of both gas and liquid phases by a tracer technique, using air and water as the working fluids. Three kinds of vertical test channels consisting of two subchannels were used. The data have shown that the turbulent mixing rate of each phase in a two-phase flow is strongly dependent on flow regime. So, to see the relation between turbulent mixing and two-phase flow configuration in the subchannels, the second experiment, flow visualization, was made. It was observed in slug and churn flows that a lateral inter-subchannel liquid flow of a large scale is caused by the successive axial transit of large gas bubbles in each subchannel, and the turbulent mixing for the liquid phase is dominated by this lateral flow. To investigate a driving force of such large scale lateral flow, the third experiment, the measurement of an instantaneous pressure differential between the subchannels, was made. The result showed that there is a close relationship between the liquid phase mixing rate and the magnitude of the pressure differential fluctuation. (author)

  19. The role of the intense vorticity structures in the turbulent structure of the jet edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Ricardo J. N.; da Silva, Carlos B.; Pereira, José C. F.

    In free shear flows (jets, mixing layers and wakes) there is an highly contorted interface dividing the turbulent from the non-turbulent flow: the turbulent/non-turbulent (T/NT) interface. Across this interface important exchanges of mass, momentum and heat take place, in a process known as turbulent entrainment. Recently, the classical idea of the turbulent entrainment caused by engulfing [1] have been questioned, and it has been shown that the entrainment is mainly caused by small scale eddy motions (nibbling) [2, 3]). However, it is still argued that the entrainment rate is still largely governed by the large scale motions induced by the intense vorticity structures (IVS). The goal of the present work is to assess characterize the geometry and analyze the influence of these large scales structures in shaping the turbulent/nonturbulent interface.

  20. Flux surface shaping effects on tokamak edge turbulence and flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendl, A. [Innsbruck Univ., Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Association EURATOM (Austria); Scott, B.D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The influence of shaping of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks on gyro-fluid edge turbulence is studied numerically. Magnetic field shaping in tokamaks is mainly due to elongation, triangularity, shift and the presence of a divertor X-point. A series of tokamak configurations with varying elongation 1 {<=} {kappa} {>=} 2 and triangularity 0 {<=} {delta} {<=} 0.4, and an actual ASDEX Upgrade divertor configuration are obtained with the equilibrium code HELENA and implemented into the gyro-fluid turbulence code GEM. The study finds minimal impact on the zonal flow physics itself, but strong impact on the turbulence and transport. (authors)

  1. Flux surface shaping effects on tokamak edge turbulence and flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendl, A.; Scott, B.D.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of shaping of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks on gyro-fluid edge turbulence is studied numerically. Magnetic field shaping in tokamaks is mainly due to elongation, triangularity, shift and the presence of a divertor X-point. A series of tokamak configurations with varying elongation 1 ≤ κ ≥ 2 and triangularity 0 ≤ δ ≤ 0.4, and an actual ASDEX Upgrade divertor configuration are obtained with the equilibrium code HELENA and implemented into the gyro-fluid turbulence code GEM. The study finds minimal impact on the zonal flow physics itself, but strong impact on the turbulence and transport. (authors)

  2. Beyond scale separation in gyrokinetic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Darmet, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Angelino, P.; Bertrand, P.; Besse, N.; Gravier, E.; Morel, P.; Sonnendruecker, E.; Crouseilles, N.; Dischler, J.-M.; Latu, G.; Violard, E.; Brunetti, M.; Brunner, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Tran, T.-M.; Villard, L.; Boulet, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained with a set of gyrokinetic codes based on a semi-Lagrangian scheme. Several physics issues are addressed, namely, the comparison between fluid and kinetic descriptions, the intermittent behaviour of flux driven turbulence and the role of large scale flows in toroidal ITG turbulence. The question of the initialization of full-F simulations is also discussed

  3. Numerical investigation of kinetic turbulence in relativistic pair plasmas - I. Turbulence statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Werner, Gregory R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2018-02-01

    We describe results from particle-in-cell simulations of driven turbulence in collisionless, magnetized, relativistic pair plasma. This physical regime provides a simple setting for investigating the basic properties of kinetic turbulence and is relevant for high-energy astrophysical systems such as pulsar wind nebulae and astrophysical jets. In this paper, we investigate the statistics of turbulent fluctuations in simulations on lattices of up to 10243 cells and containing up to 2 × 1011 particles. Due to the absence of a cooling mechanism in our simulations, turbulent energy dissipation reduces the magnetization parameter to order unity within a few dynamical times, causing turbulent motions to become sub-relativistic. In the developed stage, our results agree with predictions from magnetohydrodynamic turbulence phenomenology at inertial-range scales, including a power-law magnetic energy spectrum with index near -5/3, scale-dependent anisotropy of fluctuations described by critical balance, lognormal distributions for particle density and internal energy density (related by a 4/3 adiabatic index, as predicted for an ultra-relativistic ideal gas), and the presence of intermittency. We also present possible signatures of a kinetic cascade by measuring power-law spectra for the magnetic, electric and density fluctuations at sub-Larmor scales.

  4. Turbulent resuspension of small nondeformable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaridis, M.; Drossinos, Y.

    1998-01-01

    An energy-balance resuspension model is modified and applied to the resuspension of a monolayer of nondeformable spherical particles. The particle-surface adhesive force is calculated from a microscopic model based on the Lennard-Jones intermolecular potential. Pairwise additivity of intermolecular interactions is assumed and elastic flattening of the particles is neglected. From the resulting particle-surface interaction potential the natural frequency of vibration of a particle on a surface and the depth of the potential well are calculated. The particle resuspension rate is calculated using the results of a previously developed energy-balance model, where the influence of fluid flow on the bound particle motion is recognized. The effect of surface roughness is included by introducing an effective particle radius that results in log-normally distributed adhesive forces. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental results for the resuspension of Al 2 O 3 particles from stainless steel surfaces. Particle resuspension due to turbulent fluid flow is important in the interaction of the atmosphere with various surfaces and in numerous industrial processes. For example, in the nuclear industry, fission-product aerosols released during a postulated severe accident in a Light Water Reactor may deposit and resuspend repeatedly in the vessel circuit and containment

  5. Incompressible Turbulent Flow Simulation Using the κ-ɛ Model and Upwind Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the computation of turbulent flows via turbulence modeling, the treatment of the convective terms is a key issue. In the present work, we present a numerical technique for simulating two-dimensional incompressible turbulent flows. In particular, the performance of the high Reynolds κ-ɛ model and a new high-order upwind scheme (adaptative QUICKEST by Kaibara et al. (2005 is assessed for 2D confined and free-surface incompressible turbulent flows. The model equations are solved with the fractional-step projection method in primitive variables. Solutions are obtained by using an adaptation of the front tracking GENSMAC (Tomé and McKee (1994 methodology for calculating fluid flows at high Reynolds numbers. The calculations are performed by using the 2D version of the Freeflow simulation system (Castello et al. (2000. A specific way of implementing wall functions is also tested and assessed. The numerical procedure is tested by solving three fluid flow problems, namely, turbulent flow over a backward-facing step, turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate under zero-pressure gradients, and a turbulent free jet impinging onto a flat surface. The numerical method is then applied to solve the flow of a horizontal jet penetrating a quiescent fluid from an entry port beneath the free surface.

  6. Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.

    2009-04-23

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulentmotions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-fieldstrength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations

  7. Automated finder for the critical condition on the linear stability of fluid motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Kaoru

    1990-03-01

    An automated finder routine for the critical condition on the linear stability of fluid motions is proposed. The Newton-Raphson method was utilized for an iteration to solve nonlinear eigenvalue problems appeared in the analysis. The routine was applied to linear stability problem of a free convection between vertical parallel plates with different non-uniform temperatures as well as a plane Poiseuille flow. An efficiency of the finder routine is demonstrated for several parameter sets, numerically. (author)

  8. Numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poujade, O.; Lardjane, N.; Peybernes, M.; Boulet, M.

    2009-01-01

    Accelerations in actual Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are often variable. This article focuses on a particular class of variable accelerations where g(t) ∝ t n . A reference database is built from high resolution hydrodynamic numerical simulations. The successful comparison with a simple OD analytical model and the statistical 2SFK (2-Structure, 2-Fluid, 2-Turbulence) turbulence model is provided. Moreover, we show the difference between the mechanism at play in the Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing zone and Kolmogorov's in the self similar developed turbulent regime. (authors)

  9. On a criterion of incipient motion and entrainment into suspension of a particle from cuttings bed in shear flow of non-Newtonian fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatenko, Yaroslav; Bocharov, Oleg; May, Roland

    2017-10-01

    Solids transport is a major issue in high angle wells. Bed-load forms by sediment while transport and accompanied by intermittent contact with stream-bed by rolling, sliding and bouncing. The study presents the results of a numerical simulation of a laminar steady-state flow around a particle at rest and in free motion in a shear flow of Herschel-Bulkley fluid. The simulation was performed using the OpenFOAM open-source CFD package. A criterion for particle incipient motion and entrainment into suspension from cuttings bed (Shields criteria) based on forces and torques balance is discussed. Deflection of the fluid parameters from the ones of Newtonian fluid leads to decreasing of the drag and lift forces and the hydrodynamic moment. Thus, the critical shear stress (Shields parameter) for the considered non-Newtonian fluid must be greater than the one for a Newtonian fluid.

  10. Pressure atomizer having multiple orifices and turbulent generation feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBrocklin, Paul G.; Geiger, Gail E.; Moran, Donald James; Fournier, Stephane

    2002-01-01

    A pressure atomizer includes a silicon plate having a top surface and a bottom surface. A portion of the top surface defines a turbulent chamber. The turbulent chamber is peripherally bounded by the top surface of the plate. The turbulent chamber is recessed a predetermined depth relative to the top surface. The silicon plate further defines at least one flow orifice. Each flow orifice extends from the bottom surface of the silicon plate to intersect with and open into the turbulent chamber. Each flow orifice is in fluid communication with the turbulent chamber.

  11. Reynolds stress analysis of EMHD-controlled wall turbulence. Part I. Streamwise forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C.H.; Karniadakis, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    In this work we investigate numerically turbulent flow of low electrical conductivity fluid subject to electro-magnetic (EMHD) forcing. The configuration is similar to the one considered in the experimental work of Henoch and Stace [Phys. Fluids 7, 1371 (1995)] but in a channel geometry. The lower wall of the channel is covered with alternating streamwise electrodes and magnets to create a Lorentz force in the positive streamwise direction. Two cases are considered in detail corresponding to interaction parameter values of 0.4 (case 1) and 0.1 (case 2). The effect of switching off and on the electrodes is also studied for the two cases. At the Reynolds number considered (Re τ ∼200), a drag increase was obtained for all cases, in agreement with the experiments of Henoch and Stace. A Reynolds stress analysis was performed based on a new decomposition of the gradients normal to the wall of the Reynolds stress -u'v'. It was found that the vortex stretching term w'w 2 ' and the spanwise variation of the stress component u'w' are responsible for the drag increase. More specifically, the term ∂(u'w')/∂x 3 is associated with secondary vortical motions in the near-wall and becomes large and positive for large shear stress in regions where fluid is moving toward the wall. In contrast, negative values are associated with regions of lower shear where fluid is being lifted away from the wall. Unlike the unperturbed flow, in the controlled flow high speed near-wall streamwise jets are present (case 1) even in the time-averaged fields. Other changes in turbulence structure are quantified using streak spacing, vortex lines, vorticity quadrant analysis, and plots of the rms value of the vorticity angle. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. Computational analysis of turbulent flow in hydroelectric plant intakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhadji, L.; Lemon, D.D.; Billenness, D.; Fissel, D. [ASL Environmental Sciences Inc., Sidney, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: lbouhadji@aslenv.com; Djilali, N. [Univ. of Victoria, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: ndjilali@uvic.ca

    2003-07-01

    Turbulent flows in the Lower Monumental powerhouse intake are investigated using computational fluid dynamics. Simulations are carried out to gain an understanding into the impact of a grid-like trash rack on the downstream turbulent flow characteristics within the intake. (author)

  13. Redistribution of Kinetic Energy in Turbulent Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Pumir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In statistically homogeneous turbulent flows, pressure forces provide the main mechanism to redistribute kinetic energy among fluid elements, without net contribution to the overall energy budget. This holds true in both two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D flows, which show fundamentally different physics. As we demonstrate here, pressure forces act on fluid elements very differently in these two cases. We find in numerical simulations that in 3D pressure forces strongly accelerate the fastest fluid elements, and that in 2D this effect is absent. In 3D turbulence, our findings put forward a mechanism for a possibly singular buildup of energy, and thus may shed new light on the smoothness problem of the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation in 3D.

  14. Heat transfer enhancement in a turbulent natural convection boundary layer along a vertical flat plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Toshihiro; Kajitani, Tsuyoshi; Nishino, Tatsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study on heat transfer enhancement for a turbulent natural convection boundary layer in air along a vertical flat plate has been performed by inserting a long flat plate in the spanwise direction (simple heat transfer promoter) and short flat plates aligned in the spanwise direction (split heat transfer promoter) with clearances into the near-wall region of the boundary layer. For a simple heat transfer promoter, the heat transfer coefficients increase by a peak value of approximately 37% in the downstream region of the promoter compared with those in the usual turbulent natural convection boundary layer. It is found from flow visualization and simultaneous measurements of the flow and thermal fields with hot- and cold-wires that such increase of heat transfer coefficients is mainly caused by the deflection of flows toward the outer region of the boundary layer and the invasion of low-temperature fluids from the outer region to the near-wall region with large-scale vortex motions riding out the promoter. However, heat transfer coefficients for a split heat transfer promoter exhibit an increase in peak value of approximately 60% in the downstream region of the promoter. Flow visualization and PIV measurements show that such remarkable heat transfer enhancement is attributed to longitudinal vortices generated by flows passing through the clearances of the promoter in addition to large-scale vortex motions riding out the promoter. Consequently, it is concluded that heat transfer enhancement of the turbulent natural convection boundary layer can be substantially achieved in a wide area of the turbulent natural convection boundary layer by employing multiple column split heat transfer promoters. It may be expected that the heat transfer enhancement in excess of approximately 40% can be accomplished by inserting such promoters

  15. Abstracts of the Mini-Symposium on Stability and Bifurcation in Fluid Motions September 9-10, 1994, Tokai, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Kaoru

    1995-01-01

    This is the abstracts of the Mini-Symposium on Stability and Bifurcation in Fluid Motions held on September 9-10, 1994 at the Tokai Establishment of JAERI and the Tokai Kaikan. Sixteen talks were given on various important subjects related with stability and bifurcation phenomena in fluids. All of them are theoretical and numerical analyses involving linear stability analysis, weakly nonlinear analysis, bifurcation analysis, and direct computation of nonlinearly equilibrium solutions. (author)

  16. Abstracts of the Mini-Symposium on Stability and Bifurcation in Fluid Motions September 9-10, 1994, Tokai, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimura, Kaoru [ed.; Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-01-01

    This is the abstracts of the Mini-Symposium on Stability and Bifurcation in Fluid Motions held on September 9-10, 1994 at the Tokai Establishment of JAERI and the Tokai Kaikan. Sixteen talks were given on various important subjects related with stability and bifurcation phenomena in fluids. All of them are theoretical and numerical analyses involving linear stability analysis, weakly nonlinear analysis, bifurcation analysis, and direct computation of nonlinearly equilibrium solutions. (author).

  17. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  18. Speed-resolution advantage of turbulent supercritical fluid chromatography in open tubular columns: II - Theoretical and experimental evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; Fogwill, Michael

    2017-06-09

    The potential advantage of turbulent supercritical fluid chromatography (TSFC) in open tubular columns (OTC) was evaluated on both theoretical and practical viewpoints. First, the dispersion model derived by Golay in 1958 and recently extended from laminar to turbulent flow regime is used for the predictions of the speed-resolution performance in TSFC. The average dispersion coefficient of matter in the turbulent flow regime was taken from the available experimental data over a range of Reynolds number from 2000 to 6000. Kinetic plots are built at constant pressure drop (ΔP=4500psi) and Schmidt number (Sc=15) for four inner diameters (10, 30, 100, and 300μm) of the OTC and for three retention factors (0, 1, and 10). Accordingly, in turbulent flow regime, for a Reynolds number of 4000 and a retention factor of 1 (the stationary film thickness is assumed to be negligible with respect to the OTC diameter), the theory projects that a 300μm i.d. OTC has the same speed-resolution power (200,000 theoretical plates; 2.4min hold-up time) as that of a 10μm i.d. OTC operated in laminar flow regime. Secondly, the experimental plate heights of n-butylbenzene are measured in laminar and turbulent flow regimes for a 180μm×4.8m fused silica capillary column using pure carbon dioxide as the mobile phase. The back pressure regulator was set at 1500psi, the temperature was uniform at 297K, and the flow rate was increased step-wise from 0.50 to 3.60mL/min so that the experimental Reynolds number increases from 700 to 5400. The experiments are in good agreement with the plate heights projected in TSFC at high flow rates and with those expected at low flow rates in a laminar flow regime. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Workshop on Engineering Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A. (Editor); Liou, W. W. (Editor); Shabbir, A. (Editor); Shih, T.-H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is the future direction of various levels of engineering turbulence modeling related to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations for propulsion. For each level of computation, there are a few turbulence models which represent the state-of-the-art for that level. However, it is important to know their capabilities as well as their deficiencies in order to help engineers select and implement the appropriate models in their real world engineering calculations. This will also help turbulence modelers perceive the future directions for improving turbulence models. The focus is on one-point closure models (i.e., from algebraic models to higher order moment closure schemes and partial differential equation methods) which can be applied to CFD computations. However, other schemes helpful in developing one-point closure models, are also discussed.

  20. Density-ratio effects on buoyancy-driven variable-density turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslangil, Denis; Livescu, Daniel; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-11-01

    Density-ratio effects on the turbulent mixing of two incompressible, miscible fluids with different densities subject to constant acceleration are studied by means of high-resolution Direct Numerical Simulations. In a triply periodic domain, turbulence is generated by stirring in response to the differential buoyancy forces within the flow. Later, as the fluids become molecularly mixed, dissipation starts to overcome turbulence generation by bouyancy. Thus, the flow evolution includes both turbulence growth and decay, and it displays features present in the core region of the mixing layer of the Rayleigh-Taylor as well as Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. We extend the previous studies by investigating a broad range of density-ratio, from 1-14.4:1, corresponding to Atwood numbers of 0.05-0.87. Here, we focus on the Atwood number dependence of mixing-efficiency, that is defined based on the energy-conversion ratios from potential energy to total and turbulent kinetic energies, the decay characteristics of buoyancy-assisted variable-density homogeneous turbulence, and the effects of high density-ratios on the turbulence structure and mixing process. Authors acknowledge financial support from DOE-SSAA (DE-NA0003195) and NSF CAREER (#1453056) awards.

  1. Study of the plasma edge turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Laurent, L.; Mourgues, F.; Roubin, J.P.; Samain, A.

    1990-01-01

    The plasma edge in tokamaks is known to be very turbulent. We investigate here the non linear stability of a test mode in presence of an helical potential perturbation, i.e. a pump mode, which simulates the plasma turbulence. The particle trajectories in this perturbed equilibrium are derived using an hamiltonian formalism. The electrons appear to have trapped trajectories in the potential well of the pump mode, while the ions experience a large convective motion. These two effects have a large influence on the test mode stability. First, non linearly trapped electrons supply an energy source for the test mode. Second, the ion convective motion introduces a radial scale of the test mode larger than the ion Larmor radius, in agreement with experimental data. These two phenomena allow a bifurcation in the turbulence level and provide therefore an explanation for the L-H transition

  2. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in a Ribbed Rotating Two-Pass Square Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liou Tong-Miin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The local turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer in a rotating two-pass square duct with 19 pairs of in-line 90 ∘ ribs have been investigated computationally. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation (RANS with a two-layer k − ϵ turbulence model was solved. The in-line 90 ∘ ribs were arranged on the leading and trailing walls with rib height-to-hydraulic diameter ratio and pitch-to-height ratio of 0.136 and 10, respectively. The Reynolds number, based on duct hydraulic diameter and bulk mean velocity, was fixed at 1.0 × 10 4 whereas the rotational number varied from 0 to 0.2 . Results are validated with previous measured velocity field and heat transfer coefficient distributions. The validation shows that the effect of rotation on the passage-averaged Nusselt number ratio can be predicted reasonably well; nevertheless, the transverse mean velocity and, in turn, the distribution of regional-averaged Nusselt number ratio are markedly underpredicted in the regions toward which the Coriolis force is directed. Further CFD studies are needed.

  3. Synchronization of two coupled turbulent fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kazushi; Gotoda, Hiroshi; Miyano, Takaya; Murayama, Shogo; Tokuda, Isao T.

    2018-04-01

    We numerically study the scale-free nature of a buoyancy-induced turbulent fire and synchronization of two coupled turbulent fires. A scale-free structure is detected in weighted networks between vortices, while its lifetime obeys a clear power law, indicating intermittent appearances, disappearances, and reappearances of the scale-free property. A significant decrease in the distance between the two fire sources gives rise to a synchronized state in the near field dominated by the unstable motion of large-scale of transverse vortex rings. The synchronized state vanishes in the far field forming well-developed turbulent plumes, regardless of the distance between the two fire sources.

  4. Modeling molecular mixing in a spatially inhomogeneous turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Daniel W.; Deb, Rajdeep

    2012-02-01

    Simulations of spatially inhomogeneous turbulent mixing in decaying grid turbulence with a joint velocity-concentration probability density function (PDF) method were conducted. The inert mixing scenario involves three streams with different compositions. The mixing model of Meyer ["A new particle interaction mixing model for turbulent dispersion and turbulent reactive flows," Phys. Fluids 22(3), 035103 (2010)], the interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) model and its velocity-conditional variant, i.e., the IECM model, were applied. For reference, the direct numerical simulation data provided by Sawford and de Bruyn Kops ["Direct numerical simulation and lagrangian modeling of joint scalar statistics in ternary mixing," Phys. Fluids 20(9), 095106 (2008)] was used. It was found that velocity conditioning is essential to obtain accurate concentration PDF predictions. Moreover, the model of Meyer provides significantly better results compared to the IECM model at comparable computational expense.

  5. Relativistic thermodynamics of fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.-M.

    1977-05-01

    The relativistic covariant definition of a statistical equilibrium, applied to a perfect gas, involves a 'temperature four-vector', whose direction is the mean velocity of the fluid, and whose length is the reciprocal temperature. The hypothesis of this 'temperature four-vector' being a relevant variable for the description of the dissipative motions of a simple fluid is discussed. The kinematics is defined by using a vector field and measuring the number of molecules. Such a dissipative fluid is subject to motions involving null entropy generation; the 'temperature four-vector' is then a Killing vector; the equations of motion can be completely integrated. Perfect fluids can be studied by this way and the classical results of Lichnerowicz are obtained. In weakly dissipative motions two viscosity coefficient appear together with the heat conductibility coefficient. Two other coefficients perharps measurable on real fluids. Phase transitions and shock waves are described with using the model [fr

  6. Simulation of turbulent flows with and without combustion with emphasis on the impact of coherent structures on the turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha Galeazzo, Flavio Cesar

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of turbulent mixing in complex turbulent flows is a challenging task. The effective mixing of entrained fluids to a molecular level is a vital part of the dynamics of turbulent flows, especially when combustion is involved. The work has shown the limitations of the steady-state simulations and acknowledged the need of applying high-fidelity unsteady methods for the calculation of flows with pronounced unsteadiness promoted by large-scale coherent structures or other sources.

  7. Software for principles of fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreider, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is intended as a software supplement and provides a means for solving problems rapidly to determine the relative importance of flow and environmental parameters. Topics covered include the following: momentum equation: rocket trajectory; Bernoulli's equation: pipe plug-flow or Bernoulli's equation: tank drawing; fluid statics: submerged gate, or fluid statics: manometry; laminar flow: pipe fittings plus straight pipe, or laminar external flow: between parallel planes; ideal flow: plot of pressure distribution on a cylinder with circulation; laminar external flow: drag force and friction coefficient; turbulent external flow: drag force and friction coefficient on flat plate; turbulent external flow: drag force and friction coefficient on sphere; turbulent pipe flow: fittings plus straight sections (moody diagram); turbulent channel flow; isentropic compressible flow; normal shocks: property changes errors; choked nozzle flow; pump curve and system curve simultaneous solution; and fan affinity laws

  8. On relative spatial diffusion in plasma and fluid turbulences: clumps, Richardson's law and intrinsic stochasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.; Balescu, R.

    1981-02-01

    Three different time regimes are presented for relative spatial diffusion of charged particles in fluctuating electric fields, which behave like tau 3 , exp (tau) and tau 3 , respectively. The first regime, corresponding to a quasi-linear description of the trajectories, is analogous to the one observed in fluid turbulence and is valid in the limit of a small amplitude turbulent spectrum, or for not too small initial separation of the particles. The third regime, appearing for long times, describes the diffusion of independent particles at very large separations. Its existence is ensured by the nonlinear renormalization of the propagators. The second, intermediate, regime appears in a stochastic treatment of the renormalization effect for particles with a very small spatial and velocity difference, and describes Dupree's clumps diffusion. The appearance of the corresponding regime is similar to that of the Suzuki scaling regime of non-linear Langevin equations. It is also shown that the clumps have a behaviour similar to an intrinsic stochasticity, but which is of extrinsic nature. Similar failure of the quasi-linear approximation for spacific velocity domains has been previously studied and solved for classical Landau collisions, as well as for pitch angle diffusion where renormalization effects have been proved also to be important

  9. Radiative heat transfer in a heat generating and turbulently convecting fluid layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; Chan, S.H.; Chawla, T.C.; Cho, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    The coupled problem of radiative transport and turbulent natural convection in a volumetrically heated, horizontal gray fluid medium, bounded from above by a rigid, isothermal wall and below by a rigid, adiabatic wall, is investigated analytically. An approximate method based upon the boundary layer approach is employed to obtain the dependence of heat transfer at the upper wall on the principal parameters of the problem, which, for moderate Prandtl number, are the Rayleigh number, Ra, the optical thickness, KL, and the conduction-radiation coupling parameter, N. Also obtained in this study is the behaviour of the thermal boundary layer at the upper wall. At large kL, the contribution of thermal radiation to heat transfer in the layer is found to be negligible for N > 10, moderate for N approximately 1, and overwhelming for N < 0.1. However, at small kL, thermal radiation is found to be important only for N < 0.01. While a higher level of turbulence results in a thinner boundary layer, a larger effect of radiation is found to result in a thicker one. Thus, in the presence of strong thermal radiation, a much larger value of Ra is required for the boundary layer approach to remain valid. Under severe radiation conditions, no boundary layer flow regime is found to exist even at very high Rayleigh numbers. Accordingly, the ranges of applicability of the present results are determined and the approximate method justified. In particular, the validity of the present analysis is tested in three limiting cases, ie those of kL → infinity, N → infinity, and Ra → infinity, and is further confirmed by comparison with the numerical solution (author)

  10. Statistical descriptions of polydisperse turbulent two-phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jean-pierre.minier@edf.fr

    2016-12-15

    Disperse two-phase flows are flows containing two non-miscible phases where one phase is present as a set of discrete elements dispersed in the second one. These discrete elements, or ‘particles’, can be droplets, bubbles or solid particles having different sizes. This situation encompasses a wide range of phenomena, from nano-particles and colloids sensitive to the molecular fluctuations of the carrier fluid to inertia particles transported by the large-scale motions of turbulent flows and, depending on the phenomenon studied, a broad spectrum of approaches have been developed. The aim of the present article is to analyze statistical models of particles in turbulent flows by addressing this issue as the extension of the classical formulations operating at a molecular or meso-molecular level of description. It has a three-fold purpose: (1) to bring out the thread of continuity between models for discrete particles in turbulent flows (above the hydrodynamical level of description) and classical mesoscopic formulations of statistical physics (below the hydrodynamical level); (2) to reveal the specific challenges met by statistical models in turbulence; (3) to establish a methodology for modeling particle dynamics in random media with non-zero space and time correlations. The presentation is therefore centered on organizing the different approaches, establishing links and clarifying physical foundations. The analysis of disperse two-phase flow models is developed by discussing: first, approaches of classical statistical physics; then, by considering models for single-phase turbulent flows; and, finally, by addressing current formulations for discrete particles in turbulent flows. This brings out that particle-based models do not cease to exist above the hydrodynamical level and offer great interest when combined with proper stochastic formulations to account for the lack of equilibrium distributions and scale separation. In the course of this study, general

  11. Direct numerical simulation and statistical analysis of turbulent convection in lead-bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otic, I.; Grotzbach, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institut fuer Kern-und Energietechnik (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Improved turbulent heat flux models are required to develop and analyze the reactor concept of an lead-bismuth cooled Accelerator-Driven-System. Because of specific properties of many liquid metals we have still no sensors for accurate measurements of the high frequency velocity fluctuations. So, the development of the turbulent heat transfer models which are required in our CFD (computational fluid dynamics) tools needs also data from direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows. We use new simulation results for the model problem of Rayleigh-Benard convection to show some peculiarities of the turbulent natural convection in lead-bismuth (Pr = 0.025). Simulations for this flow at sufficiently large turbulence levels became only recently feasible because this flow requires the resolution of very small velocity scales with the need for recording long-wave structures for the slow changes in the convective temperature field. The results are analyzed regarding the principle convection and heat transfer features. They are also used to perform statistical analysis to show that the currently available modeling is indeed not adequate for these fluids. Basing on the knowledge of the details of the statistical features of turbulence in this convection type and using the two-point correlation technique, a proposal for an improved statistical turbulence model is developed which is expected to account better for the peculiarities of the heat transfer in the turbulent convection in low Prandtl number fluids. (authors)

  12. Definition of the local fields of velocity, temperature and turbulent characteristics for axial stabilized fluid in arbitrary formed rod bundle assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedov, A.A.; Gagin, V.L.

    1995-01-01

    For the temperature fields in rod clads of experimental assemblies a good agreement have been got with use of prior calculations by subchannel code COBRA-IV-I, from results of which an additional information about δt/δX 3 distribution was taken. The method of definition the local fields of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, temperature and eddy diffusivities for one-phase axial stabilized fluids in arbitrary formed rod bundle assemblies with invariable upward geometry was developed. According to this model the AGURA code was worked out to calculate local thermal hydraulic problems in combination with temperature fields in fuel rods and constructive elements of fuel assemblies. The method does not use any prior geometric scales and is based only on invariant local flow parameters: turbulent kinetic energy, velocity field deformation tensor and specific work of inner friction. Verification of this method by available experimental data showed a good agreement of calculation data and findings of velocity and t.k.e. fields, when the secondary flows have not a substantial influence to a balance of axial momentum and turbulent kinetic energy. (author)

  13. Analysis of the K-epsilon turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, B.; Pironneau, O.

    1993-12-01

    This book is aimed at applied mathematicians interested in numerical simulation of turbulent flows. The book is centered around the k - ε model but it also deals with other models such as subgrid scale models, one equation models and Reynolds Stress models. The reader is expected to have some knowledge of numerical methods for fluids and, if possible, some understanding of fluid mechanics, the partial differential equations used and their variational formulations. This book presents the k - ε method for turbulence in a language familiar to applied mathematicians, stripped bare of all the technicalities of turbulence theory. The model is justified from a mathematical standpoint rather than from a physical one. The numerical algorithms are investigated and some theoretical and numerical results presented. This book should prove an invaluable tool for those studying a subject that is still controversial but very useful for industrial applications. (authors). 71 figs., 200 refs

  14. Synthetic three-dimensional turbulent passive scalar fields via the minimal Lagrangian map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Carlos

    2011-07-01

    A method for simple but realistic generation of three-dimensional synthetic turbulent passive scalar fields is presented. The method is an extension of the minimal turnover Lagrangian map approach (MTLM) [C. Rosales and C. Meneveau, Phys. Rev. E 78, 016313 (2008)] formulated for the generation of synthetic turbulent velocity fields. In this development, the minimal Lagrangian map is applied to deform simultaneously a vector field and an advected scalar field. This deformation takes place over a hierarchy of spatial scales encompassing a range from integral to dissipative scales. For each scale, fluid particles are mapped transporting the scalar property, without interaction or diffusional effects, from their initial configuration to new positions determined only by their velocity at the beginning of the motion and a parameter chosen to accumulate deformation for the equivalent of the phenomenological "turn-over" time scale. The procedure is studied for the case of inertial-convective regime. It is found that many features of passive scalar turbulence are well reproduced by this simple kinematical construction. Fundamental statistics of the resulting synthetic scalar fields, evaluated through the flatness and probability density functions of the scalar gradient and scalar increments, reproduce quite well the known statistical characteristics of passive scalars in turbulent fields. High-order statistics are also consistent with those observed in real hydrodynamic turbulence. The anomalous scaling of real turbulence is well reproduced for different kind of structure functions, with good quantitative agreement in general, for the scaling exponents. The spatial structure of the scalar field is also quite realistic, as well as several characteristics of the dissipation fields for the scalar variance and kinetic energy. Similarly, the statistical geometry at dissipative scales that ensues from the coupling of velocity and scalar gradients behaves in agreement with what is

  15. Understanding SOL plasma turbulence by interchange motions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Jan; Pitts, R. A.; Nielsen, A.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 16 (2007), s. 192-193 ISSN 0003-0503. [Annual meeting of the division of plasma physics/49th./. Orlando , 12.11.2007-16.11.2007] Grant - others:-(XE) European Training fellowships and Grants (Euratom), EDGETURB Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : tokamak * plasma * scrape-off layer * turbulence * interchange instability Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/DPP07/Event/70125

  16. Influence of various aspects of low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models on predicting in-tube buoyancy affected heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Chen-Ru; Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Pei-Xue; Bo, Han-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Understanding of the mechanism of buoyancy effect on supercritical heat transfer. • Turbulence related parameters in upward and downward flows were compared. • Turbulent Prandtl number affected the prediction insignificantly. • Buoyancy production was insignificant compared with shear production. • Damping function had the greatest effect and is a priority for further modification. - Abstract: Heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids was modeled for normal and buoyancy affected conditions using several low Reynolds number k-ε models, including the Launder and Sharma, Myong and Kasagi, and Abe, Kondoh and Nagano, with the predictions compared with experimental data. All three turbulence models accurately predicted the cases without heat transfer deterioration, but failed to accurately predict the cases with heat transfer deterioration although the general trends were captured, indicating that further improvements and modifications are needed for the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to better predict buoyancy deteriorated heat transfer. Further investigations studied the influence of various aspects of the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models, including the turbulent Prandtl number, the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy, and the damping function to provide guidelines for model development to more precisely predict buoyancy affected heat transfer. The results show that the turbulent Prandtl number and the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy have little influence on the predictions for cases in this study, while new damping functions with carefully selected control parameters are needed in the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to correctly predict the buoyancy effect for heat transfer simulations in various applications such as supercritical pressure steam generators (SPSGs) in the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR) and the supercritical pressure water reactor (SCWR).

  17. Influence of various aspects of low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models on predicting in-tube buoyancy affected heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chen-Ru; Zhang, Zhen [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, Pei-Xue, E-mail: jiangpx@tsinghua.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of CO_2 Utilization and Reduction Technology/Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Bo, Han-Liang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Understanding of the mechanism of buoyancy effect on supercritical heat transfer. • Turbulence related parameters in upward and downward flows were compared. • Turbulent Prandtl number affected the prediction insignificantly. • Buoyancy production was insignificant compared with shear production. • Damping function had the greatest effect and is a priority for further modification. - Abstract: Heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids was modeled for normal and buoyancy affected conditions using several low Reynolds number k-ε models, including the Launder and Sharma, Myong and Kasagi, and Abe, Kondoh and Nagano, with the predictions compared with experimental data. All three turbulence models accurately predicted the cases without heat transfer deterioration, but failed to accurately predict the cases with heat transfer deterioration although the general trends were captured, indicating that further improvements and modifications are needed for the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to better predict buoyancy deteriorated heat transfer. Further investigations studied the influence of various aspects of the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models, including the turbulent Prandtl number, the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy, and the damping function to provide guidelines for model development to more precisely predict buoyancy affected heat transfer. The results show that the turbulent Prandtl number and the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy have little influence on the predictions for cases in this study, while new damping functions with carefully selected control parameters are needed in the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to correctly predict the buoyancy effect for heat transfer simulations in various applications such as supercritical pressure steam generators (SPSGs) in the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR) and the supercritical pressure water reactor (SCWR).

  18. Existence of the passage to the limit of an inviscid fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldobin, Denis S

    2017-11-24

    In the dynamics of a viscous fluid, the case of vanishing kinematic viscosity is actually equivalent to the Reynolds number tending to infinity. Hence, in the limit of vanishing viscosity the fluid flow is essentially turbulent. On the other hand, the Euler equation, which is conventionally adopted for the description of the flow of an inviscid fluid, does not possess proper turbulent behaviour. This raises the question of the existence of the passage to the limit of an inviscid fluid for real low-viscosity fluids. To address this question, one should employ the theory of turbulent boundary layer near an inflexible boundary (e.g., rigid wall). On the basis of this theory, one can see how the solutions to the Euler equation become relevant for the description of the flow of low-viscosity fluids, and obtain the small parameter quantifying accuracy of this description for real fluids.

  19. Density effects on turbulent boundary layer structure: From the atmosphere to hypersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen J. H.

    This dissertation examines the effects of density gradients on turbulent boundary layer statistics and structure using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Two distinct cases were examined: the thermally stable atmospheric surface layer characteristic of nocturnal or polar conditions, and the hypersonic bounder layer characteristic of high speed aircraft and reentering spacecraft. Previous experimental studies examining the effects of stability on turbulent boundary layers identified two regimes, weak and strong stability, separated by a critical bulk stratification with a collapse of near-wall turbulence thought to be intrinsic to the strongly stable regime. To examine the characteristics of these two regimes, PIV measurements were obtained in conjunction with the mean temperature profile in a low Reynolds number facility over smooth and rough surfaces. The turbulent stresses were found to scale with the wall shear stress in the weakly stable regime prior relaminarization at a critical stratification. Changes in profile shape were shown to correlate with the local stratification profile, and as a result, the collapse of near-wall turbulence is not intrinsic to the strongly stable regime. The critical bulk stratification was found to be sensitive to surface roughness and potentially Reynolds number, and not constant as previously thought. Further investigations examined turbulent boundary layer structure and changes to the motions that contribute to turbulent production. To study the characteristics of a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer at Mach 8, significant improvements were required to the implementation and error characterization of PIV. Limited resolution or dynamic range effects were minimized and the effects of high shear on cross-correlation routines were examined. Significantly, an examination of particle dynamics, subject to fluid inertia, compressibility and non-continuum effects, revealed that particle frequency responses to turbulence can be up to an

  20. Some fluid dynamical problems in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, L.O.

    1979-06-01

    Certain aspects of the cosmic turbulence theory of galaxy formation are considered. Using a generalized form of a transformation due to Kurskov and Ozernoi I exhibit a formal equivalence between the problem of turbulence in an expanding universe containing a coupled matter-radiation fluid and in a non-expanding fluid with a time-dependent viscosity. This enables me to extend the Olson-Sachs formula for vorticity generation in cosmic turbulence to a matter-radiation fluid and to show that, the turbulence can not have an inertial subrange at the epoch of recombination. The linear inviscid stability of axisymmetric flows is considered. Using the projective form of the perturbation equations I obtain a simple proof of a generalised Richardson criterion which holds for all boundary conditions which do not actively feed energy to the perturbation. Further analysis shows the uniform density and pressure discs with self-similar rotation laws, are stable to perturbations which are incompressible in character, but that instability is a generic feature of differentially rotating compressible systems. The problem of numerically solving boundary value problems of the Orr-Sommerfeld type by shooting methods is considered, and a unifying geometrical interpretation of the principal methods is described. (author)

  1. Fluid dynamics theoretical and computational approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Warsi, ZUA

    2005-01-01

    Important Nomenclature Kinematics of Fluid Motion Introduction to Continuum Motion Fluid Particles Inertial Coordinate Frames Motion of a Continuum The Time Derivatives Velocity and Acceleration Steady and Nonsteady Flow Trajectories of Fluid Particles and Streamlines Material Volume and Surface Relation between Elemental Volumes Kinematic Formulas of Euler and Reynolds Control Volume and Surface Kinematics of Deformation Kinematics of Vorticity and Circulation References Problems The Conservation Laws and the Kinetics of Flow Fluid Density and the Conservation of Mass Prin

  2. On the Lamb vector divergence as a momentum field diagnostic employed in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamman, Curtis W.; Kirby, Robert M.; Klewicki, Joseph C.

    2006-11-01

    Vorticity, enstrophy, helicity, and other derived field variables provide invaluable information about the kinematics and dynamics of fluids. However, whether or not derived field variables exist that intrinsically identify spatially localized motions having a distinct capacity to affect a time rate of change of linear momentum is seldom addressed in the literature. The purpose of the present study is to illustrate the unique attributes of the divergence of the Lamb vector in order to qualify its potential for characterizing such spatially localized motions. Toward this aim, we describe the mathematical properties, near-wall behavior, and scaling characteristics of the divergence of the Lamb vector for turbulent channel flow. When scaled by inner variables, the mean divergence of the Lamb vector merges to a single curve in the inner layer, and the fluctuating quantities exhibit a strong correlation with the Bernoulli function throughout much of the inner layer.

  3. BROWNIAN HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT IN THE TURBULENT REGIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Chandrasekhar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents convection heat transfer of a turbulent flow Al2O3/water nanofluid in a circular duct. The duct is a under constant and uniform heat flux. The paper computationally investigates the system’s thermal behavior in a wide range of Reynolds number and also volume concentration up to 6%. To obtain the nanofluid thermophysical properties, the Hamilton-Crosser model along with the Brownian motion effect are utilized. Then the thermal performance of the system with the nanofluid is compared to the conventional systems which use water as the working fluid. The results indicate that the use of nanofluid of 6% improves the heat transfer rate up to 36.8% with respect to pure water. Therefore, using the Al2O3/water nanofluid instead of water can be a great choice when better heat transfer is needed.

  4. Density based topology optimization of turbulent flow heat transfer systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilgen, Sümer Bartug; Dilgen, Cetin Batur; Fuhrman, David R.

    2018-01-01

    The focus of this article is on topology optimization of heat sinks with turbulent forced convection. The goal is to demonstrate the extendibility, and the scalability of a previously developed fluid solver to coupled multi-physics and large 3D problems. The gradients of the objective and the con...... in the optimization process, while also demonstrating extension of the methodology to include coupling of heat transfer with turbulent flows.......The focus of this article is on topology optimization of heat sinks with turbulent forced convection. The goal is to demonstrate the extendibility, and the scalability of a previously developed fluid solver to coupled multi-physics and large 3D problems. The gradients of the objective...

  5. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with deformed bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshinobu; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the direct numerical simulation of a fully-developed turbulent channel flow with deformed bubbles were conducted by means of the refined MARS method, turbulent Reynolds number 150, and Bubble Reynolds number 120. As the results, large-scale wake motions were observed round the bubbles. At the bubble located region, mean velocity was degreased and turbulent intensities and Reynolds shear stress were increased by the effects of the large-scale wake motions round bubbles. On the other hands, near wall region, bubbles might effect on the flow laminarlize and drag reduction. Two types of drag coefficient of bubble were estimated from the accelerated velocity of bubble and correlation equation as a function of Particle Reynolds number. Empirical correlation equation might be overestimated the drag effects in this Particle Reynolds number range. (author)

  6. Has the ultimate state of turbulent thermal convection been observed?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skrbek, L.; Urban, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 785, DEC (2015), s. 270-282 ISSN 0022-1120 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-02005S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : turbulent convection * turbulent flows Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.514, year: 2015

  7. Lattice Boltzmann model for three-dimensional decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hui; Tao Wenquan; Zhang Yan

    2009-01-01

    We implement a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence based on an analogous Galerkin filter and focus on the fundamental statistical isotropic property. This regularized method is constructed based on orthogonal Hermite polynomial space. For decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence, this regularized method can simulate the isotropic property very well. Numerical studies demonstrate that the novel regularized LBM is a promising approximation of turbulent fluid flows, which paves the way for coupling various turbulent models with LBM

  8. CFD modeling of heat transfer performance of MgO-water nanofluid under turbulent flow

    OpenAIRE

    Davarnejad, Reza; Jamshidzadeh, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of turbulent heat transfer behavior of Magnesium Oxide-water nanofluid in a circular tube was studied. The modeling was two dimensional under k–ε turbulence model. The base fluid was pure water and the volume fraction of nanoparticles in the base fluid was 0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%. The applied Reynolds number range was 3000–19000. Three individual models including single phase, Volume of Fluid (VOF) and mixture were used. T...

  9. Turbulent mixing of a critical fluid: The non-perturbative renormalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hnatič

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-perturbative Renormalization Group (NPRG technique is applied to a stochastical model of a non-conserved scalar order parameter near its critical point, subject to turbulent advection. The compressible advecting flow is modeled by a random Gaussian velocity field with zero mean and correlation function 〈υjυi〉∼(Pji⊥+αPji∥/kd+ζ. Depending on the relations between the parameters ζ, α and the space dimensionality d, the model reveals several types of scaling regimes. Some of them are well known (model A of equilibrium critical dynamics and linear passive scalar field advected by a random turbulent flow, but there is a new nonequilibrium regime (universality class associated with new nontrivial fixed points of the renormalization group equations. We have obtained the phase diagram (d, ζ of possible scaling regimes in the system. The physical point d=3, ζ=4/3 corresponding to three-dimensional fully developed Kolmogorov's turbulence, where critical fluctuations are irrelevant, is stable for α≲2.26. Otherwise, in the case of “strong compressibility” α≳2.26, the critical fluctuations of the order parameter become relevant for three-dimensional turbulence. Estimations of critical exponents for each scaling regime are presented.

  10. On turbulence models for rod bundle flow computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, Gabor

    2005-01-01

    In commercial computational fluid dynamics codes there is more than one turbulence model built in. It is the user responsibility to choose one of those models, suitable for the problem studied. In the last decade, several computations were presented using computational fluid dynamics for the simulation of various problems of the nuclear industry. A common feature in a number of those simulations is that they were performed using the standard k-ε turbulence model without justifying the choice of the model. The simulation results were rarely satisfactory. In this paper, we shall consider the flow in a fuel rod bundle as a case study and discuss why the application of the standard k-ε model fails to give reasonable results in this situation. We also show that a turbulence model based on the Reynolds stress transport equations can provide qualitatively correct results. Generally, our aim is pedagogical, we would like to call the readers attention to the fact that turbulence models have to be selected based on theoretical considerations and/or adequate information obtained from measurements

  11. A priori study of subgrid-scale features in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, F.; Trias, F. X.; Gorobets, A.; Oliva, A.

    2017-10-01

    At the crossroad between flow topology analysis and turbulence modeling, a priori studies are a reliable tool to understand the underlying physics of the subgrid-scale (SGS) motions in turbulent flows. In this paper, properties of the SGS features in the framework of a large-eddy simulation are studied for a turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC). To do so, data from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent air-filled RBC in a rectangular cavity of aspect ratio unity and π spanwise open-ended distance are used at two Rayleigh numbers R a ∈{1 08,1 010 } [Dabbagh et al., "On the evolution of flow topology in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection," Phys. Fluids 28, 115105 (2016)]. First, DNS at Ra = 108 is used to assess the performance of eddy-viscosity models such as QR, Wall-Adapting Local Eddy-viscosity (WALE), and the recent S3PQR-models proposed by Trias et al. ["Building proper invariants for eddy-viscosity subgrid-scale models," Phys. Fluids 27, 065103 (2015)]. The outcomes imply that the eddy-viscosity modeling smoothes the coarse-grained viscous straining and retrieves fairly well the effect of the kinetic unfiltered scales in order to reproduce the coherent large scales. However, these models fail to approach the exact evolution of the SGS heat flux and are incapable to reproduce well the further dominant rotational enstrophy pertaining to the buoyant production. Afterwards, the key ingredients of eddy-viscosity, νt, and eddy-diffusivity, κt, are calculated a priori and revealed positive prevalent values to maintain a turbulent wind essentially driven by the mean buoyant force at the sidewalls. The topological analysis suggests that the effective turbulent diffusion paradigm and the hypothesis of a constant turbulent Prandtl number are only applicable in the large-scale strain-dominated areas in the bulk. It is shown that the bulk-dominated rotational structures of vortex-stretching (and its synchronous viscous dissipative structures) hold

  12. Turbulence and star formation in molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Data for many molecular clouds and condensations show that the internal velocity dispersion of each region is well correlated with its size and mass, and these correlations are approximately of power-law form. The dependence of velocity dispersion on region size is similar to the Kolmogoroff law for subsonic turbulence, suggesting that the observed motions are all part of a common hierarchy of interstellar turbulent motions. The regions studied are mostly gravitationally bound and in approximate virial equilibrium. However, they cannot have formed by simple gravitational collapse, and it appears likely that molecular clouds and their substructures have been created at least partly by processes of supersonic hydrodynamics. The hierarchy of subcondensations may terminate with objects so small that their internal motions are no longer supersonic; this predicts a minimum protostellar mass of the order of a few tenths of a solar mass. Massive 'protostellar' clumps always have supersonic internal motions and will therefore develop complex internal structures, probably leading to the formation of many pre-stellar condensation nuclei that grow by accretion to produce the final stellar mass spectrum. Molecular clouds must be transient structures, and are probably dispersed after not much more than 10 7 yr. (author)

  13. Eulerian-Lagranigan simulation of aerosol evolution in turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2016-09-23

    The formation and evolution of aerosol in turbulent flows are ubiquitous in both industrial processes and nature. The intricate interaction of turbulent mixing and aerosol evolution in a canonical turbulent mixing layer was investigated by a direct numerical simulation (DNS) in a recent study (Zhou, K., Attili, A., Alshaarawi, A., and Bisetti, F. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer. Physics of Fluids, 26, 065106 (2014)). In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of aerosol evolution is carried out along Lagrangian trajectories obtained in the previous simulation, in order to quantify the error of the moment method used in the previous simulation. Moreover, the particle size distribution (PSD), not available in the previous works, is also investigated. Along a fluid parcel moving through the turbulent flow, temperature and vapor concentration exhibit complex fluctuations, triggering complicate aerosol processes and rendering complex PSD. However, the mean PSD is found to be bi-modal in most of the mixing layer except that a tri-modal distribution is found in the turbulent transition region. The simulated PSDs agree with the experiment observations available in the literature. A different explanation on the formation of such PSDs is provided.

  14. The PDF of fluid particle acceleration in turbulent flow with underlying normal distribution of velocity fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aringazin, A.K.; Mazhitov, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a formal procedure to obtain and specify the general form of a marginal distribution for the Lagrangian acceleration of fluid particle in developed turbulent flow using Langevin type equation and the assumption that velocity fluctuation u follows a normal distribution with zero mean, in accord to the Heisenberg-Yaglom picture. For a particular representation, β=exp[u], of the fluctuating parameter β, we reproduce the underlying log-normal distribution and the associated marginal distribution, which was found to be in a very good agreement with the new experimental data by Crawford, Mordant, and Bodenschatz on the acceleration statistics. We discuss on arising possibilities to make refinements of the log-normal model

  15. Turbulent equipartitions in two dimensional drift convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isichenko, M.B.; Yankov, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Unlike the thermodynamic equipartition of energy in conservative systems, turbulent equipartitions (TEP) describe strongly non-equilibrium systems such as turbulent plasmas. In turbulent systems, energy is no longer a good invariant, but one can utilize the conservation of other quantities, such as adiabatic invariants, frozen-in magnetic flux, entropy, or combination thereof, in order to derive new, turbulent quasi-equilibria. These TEP equilibria assume various forms, but in general they sustain spatially inhomogeneous distributions of the usual thermodynamic quantities such as density or temperature. This mechanism explains the effects of particle and energy pinch in tokamaks. The analysis of the relaxed states caused by turbulent mixing is based on the existence of Lagrangian invariants (quantities constant along fluid-particle or other orbits). A turbulent equipartition corresponds to the spatially uniform distribution of relevant Lagrangian invariants. The existence of such turbulent equilibria is demonstrated in the simple model of two dimensional electrostatically turbulent plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The turbulence is prescribed, and the turbulent transport is assumed to be much stronger than the classical collisional transport. The simplicity of the model makes it possible to derive the equations describing the relaxation to the TEP state in several limits

  16. A numerical method to calculate flow-induced vibrations in a turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaoka, Noriyuki; Umegaki, Kikuo

    1993-01-01

    An unsteady fluid force on structures in a turbulent flow can cause their vibration. The phenomenon is the most important among various flow-induced vibrations and it is an important subject in design nuclear plant components such as heat exchangers. A new approach to simulate flow-induced vibrations is introduced. A fully coupled analysis of fluid-structure interaction has been realized in a turbulent flow field by integrating the following calculational steps: (a) solving turbulent flow by a direct simulation method where the ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian) type approximation is adopted to take account of structure displacements; (b) estimating fluid force on structures by integrating fluid pressure and shear stress; (c) calculating dynamic response of structures and determining the amount of displacement; (d) regenerate curvilinear grids for new geometry using the boundary-fitted coordinate transformation method. Forced vibration of a circular cylinder in a cross flow were successfully simulated and the synchronization phenomena between Karman-vortices and cylinder vibrations were clearly seen

  17. Damping of the radial impulsive motion of LMFBR core components separated by fluid squeeze films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebe, R.; Zehlein, H.

    1977-01-01

    The core deformation of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) due to local pressure propagation from rapid energy releases is a complex three-dimensional fluid-structure-interaction problem. High pressure transients of short duration cause structural deformation of the closely spaced fuel elements, which are surrounded by the flowing coolant. Corresponding relative displacements give rise to squeezing fluid motion in the thin layers between the subassemblies. Therefore significant backpressures are produced and the resulting time and space dependent fluid forces are acting on the structure as additional non-conservative external loads. Realistic LMFBR safety analysis of several clustered fuel elements have to account for such flow induced forces. Several idealized models have been proposed to study some aspects of the complex problem. As part of the core mechanics activities at GfK Karlsruhe this paper describes two fluid flow models (model A, model B), which are shown to be suitable for physically coupled fluid-structure analyses. Important assumptions are discussed in both cases and basic equations are derived for one- and two-dimensional incompressible flow fields. The interface of corresponing computer codes FLUF (model A) and FLOWAX (model B) with structural dynamics programs is outlined. Finally fluid-structure interaction problems relevant to LMFBR design are analyzed; parametric studies indicate a significant cushioning effect, energy dissipation and a strongly nonlinear as well as timedependent damping of the structural response. (Auth.)

  18. Computational fluid mechanics qualification calculations for the code TEACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrazia, M.C.; Fitzsimmons, L.B.; Reynolds, J.T.

    1979-11-01

    KAPL is developing a predictive method for three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent fluid flow configurations typically encountered in the thermal-hydraulic design of a nuclear reactor. A series of experiments has been selected for analysis to investigate the adequacy of the two-equation turbulence model developed at Imperial College, London, England for predicting the flow patterns in simple geometries. The analysis of these experiments is described with the two-dimensional (2-D) turbulent fluid flow code TEACH. This work qualifies TEACH for a variety of geometries and flow conditions

  19. Investigation on the applicability of turbulent-Prandtl-number models for liquid lead-bismuth eutectic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fei, E-mail: chenfei@iet.cn [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, Henan 450011 (China); Huai, Xiulan, E-mail: hxl@iet.cn [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cai, Jun, E-mail: caijun@iet.cn [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Xunfeng, E-mail: lixunfeng@iet.cn [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Meng, Ruixue, E-mail: mengruixue@iet.cn [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► We examine the applicability of various Pr{sub t} models into the simulation of LBE flow. ► Reynolds analogy suitable for conventional fluids cannot accurately simulate the heat transfer characteristics of LBE flow. ► The different Pr{sub t} model should be selected for the different thermal boundary condition of LBE flow. -- Abstract: With the proposal of Accelerator Driven Sub-critical System (ADS) together with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) as coolant for both reactor and spallation target, the use of accurate heat transfer correlation and reliable turbulent-Prandtl-number model of LBE in turbulent flows is essential when designing ADS components of primary loop and heat exchanger of secondary loop. Unlike conventional fluids, there is not an acknowledged turbulent-Prandtl-number model for LBE flows. This paper reviews and assesses the existing turbulent-Pandtl-number models and various heat transfer correlations in circular tubes. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is employed to evaluate the applicability of various turbulent-Prandtl-number models for LBE in the circular tube under boundary conditions of constant heat flux and constant wall temperature. Based on the assessment of turbulent-Prandtl-number models, the reliable turbulent-Prandtl-number models are recommended for CFD applications to LBE flows under boundary conditions of constant heat flux and constant wall temperature. The present study indicates that turbulent Prandtl number has a significant difference in turbulent LBE flow between constant-heat-flux and constant-wall-temperature boundary conditions.

  20. Warm-ion drift Alfven turbulence and the L-H transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.

    1998-01-01

    Computations of fluid drift turbulence treating ions and electrons on equal footing, including both temperatures, are conducted in a model toroidal geometry. The resulting 'ion mixing mode' turbulence bears features of both electron drift-Alfven and ion temperature gradient turbulence, and nonlinear sensitivity to the relative strengths of the density and temperature gradients provides a possible route to the bifurcation needed for the L-H transition. (author)

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation of heat transfer in a turbulent flume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergant, R.; Tiselj, I.

    2001-01-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) can be used for the description of turbulent heat transfer in the fluid at low Reynolds numbers. DNS means precise solving of Navier-Stoke's equations without any extra turbulent models. DNS should be able to describe all relevant length scales and time scales in observed turbulent flow. The largest length scale is actually dimension of system and the smallest length and time scale is equal to Kolmogorov scale. In the present work simulations of fully developed turbulent velocity and temperature fields were performed in a turbulent flume (open channel) with pseudo-spectral approach at Reynolds number 2670 (friction Reynolds number 171) and constant Prandtl number 5.4, considering the fluid temperature as a passive scalar. Two ideal thermal boundary conditions were taken into account on the heated wall. The first one was an ideal isothermal boundary condition and the second one an ideal isoflux boundary condition. We observed different parameters like mean temperature and velocity, fluctuations of temperature and velocity, and auto-correlation functions.(author)

  2. Turbulence associated with the sawtooth internal disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoletti, J.; Laviron, C.; Olivain, J.; Pecquet, A.L.

    1989-05-01

    Specific turbulence associated with the sawtooth internal disruption has been observed on TFR tokamak plasmas by analyzing density fluctuations with CO 2 laser light scattering. The time localization is clearly connected with the successive phases of the relaxation process. Some specific turbulence appears in relation to the kink motion, but the main burst corresponds to the collapse phase. We concentrate our study on this strong burst and show first its frequency and wave number spectral properties and the corresponding pseudo dispersion relation. The specific turbulence is spatially localized. It is within the interior of the q = 1 surface and extends approximately 120 0 azimuthally. Taking into account the twisting of the central plasma during the turbulent kink phase, this location agrees with the azimuthal position of the ''sooner and faster'' outgoing heat flux. The power level of this turbulence is two orders of magnitude larger than the local quasi-stationary turbulence. These observations are in fair agreement with the predictions of the sawtooth disruption model previously proposed by Andreoletti. The observed specific turbulence shows several similarities with the so called ''magnetodrift turbulence'' described in the model

  3. Self-similarity in the inertial region of wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klewicki, J; Philip, J; Marusic, I; Chauhan, K; Morrill-Winter, C

    2014-12-01

    The inverse of the von Kármán constant κ is the leading coefficient in the equation describing the logarithmic mean velocity profile in wall bounded turbulent flows. Klewicki [J. Fluid Mech. 718, 596 (2013)] connects the asymptotic value of κ with an emerging condition of dynamic self-similarity on an interior inertial domain that contains a geometrically self-similar hierarchy of scaling layers. A number of properties associated with the asymptotic value of κ are revealed. This is accomplished using a framework that retains connection to invariance properties admitted by the mean statement of dynamics. The development leads toward, but terminates short of, analytically determining a value for κ. It is shown that if adjacent layers on the hierarchy (or their adjacent positions) adhere to the same self-similarity that is analytically shown to exist between any given layer and its position, then κ≡Φ(-2)=0.381966..., where Φ=(1+√5)/2 is the golden ratio. A number of measures, derived specifically from an analysis of the mean momentum equation, are subsequently used to empirically explore the veracity and implications of κ=Φ(-2). Consistent with the differential transformations underlying an invariant form admitted by the governing mean equation, it is demonstrated that the value of κ arises from two geometric features associated with the inertial turbulent motions responsible for momentum transport. One nominally pertains to the shape of the relevant motions as quantified by their area coverage in any given wall-parallel plane, and the other pertains to the changing size of these motions in the wall-normal direction. In accord with self-similar mean dynamics, these two features remain invariant across the inertial domain. Data from direct numerical simulations and higher Reynolds number experiments are presented and discussed relative to the self-similar geometric structure indicated by the analysis, and in particular the special form of self

  4. Vortex currents in turbulent superfluid and classical fluid channel flow, the magnus effect, and Goldstone boson fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, E.R.

    1994-01-01

    Expressing hydrodynamics in terms of the flow of vorticity, using the vortex current tensor, helps unify the picture of turbulent channel flow for viscous fluids and for superfluids. In both, eddy viscosity plays a major role in energy dissipation, and in both there is a similar cross stream flow of vorticity, which in the case of superfluids leads to the Josephson frequency. The vortex current tensor, which was introduced in an earlier paper to derive an exact three dimensional Magnus effect formula, turns out to be the classical hydrodynamic limit of the vortex current that is the source for a classical Goldstone-boson field

  5. Parametric study of fluid flow manipulation with piezoelectric macrofiber composite flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, O.; Tarazaga, P.; Stremler, M.; Shahab, S.

    2017-04-01

    Active Fluid Flow Control (AFFC) has received great research attention due to its significant potential in engineering applications. It is known that drag reduction, turbulence management, flow separation delay and noise suppression through active control can result in significantly increased efficiency of future commercial transport vehicles and gas turbine engines. In microfluidics systems, AFFC has mainly been used to manipulate fluid passing through the microfluidic device. We put forward a conceptual approach for fluid flow manipulation by coupling multiple vibrating structures through flow interactions in an otherwise quiescent fluid. Previous investigations of piezoelectric flaps interacting with a fluid have focused on a single flap. In this work, arrays of closely-spaced, free-standing piezoelectric flaps are attached perpendicular to the bottom surface of a tank. The coupling of vibrating flaps due to their interacting with the surrounding fluid is investigated in air (for calibration) and under water. Actuated flaps are driven with a harmonic input voltage, which results in bending vibration of the flaps that can work with or against the flow-induced bending. The size and spatial distribution of the attached flaps, and the phase and frequency of the input actuation voltage are the key parameters to be investigated in this work. Our analysis will characterize the electrohydroelastic dynamics of active, interacting flaps and the fluid motion induced by the system.

  6. Modeling Compressed Turbulence with BHR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    Turbulence undergoing compression or expansion occurs in systems ranging from internal combustion engines to supernovae. One common feature in many of these systems is the presence of multiple reacting species. Direct numerical simulation data is available for the single-fluid, low turbulent Mach number case. Wu, et al. (1985) compared their DNS results to several Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models. They also proposed a three-equation k - ɛ - τ model, in conjunction with a Reynolds-stress model. Subsequent researchers have proposed alternative corrections to the standard k - ɛ formulation. Here we investigate three variants of the BHR model (Besnard, 1992). BHR is a model for multi-species variable-density turbulence. The three variants are the linear eddy-viscosity, algebraic-stress, and full Reynolds-stress formulations. We then examine the predictions of the model for the fluctuating density field for the case of variable-density turbulence.

  7. Computational procedure of a turbulent boundary layer with thermo-capillary effects in laser melted pool with free surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benisahnoune, Omar

    1996-01-01

    A numerical procedure of a turbulent boundary layer with free surface in melted zone of metals is developed to describe interaction between Marangoni convection and turbulence. This study takes into account the phenomena below: Near the surface, vertical motions are damped while stream wise and span wise motions are promoted. Considering a plane surface, the validity of this turbulent model is verified in comparison with experimental results and laminar models. (author) [fr

  8. Analysis of macroscopic and microscopic rotating motions in rotating jets: A direct numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A direct numerical simulation study of the characteristics of macroscopic and microscopic rotating motions in swirling jets confined in a rectangular flow domain is carried out. The different structures of vortex cores for different swirl levels are illustrated. It is found that the vortex cores of low swirl flows are of regular cylindrical-helix patterns, whereas those of the high swirl flows are characterized by the formation of the bubble-type vortex breakdown followed by the radiant processing vortex cores. The results of mean velocity fields show the general procedures of vortex origination. Moreover, the effects of macroscopic and microscopic rotating motions with respect to the mean and fluctuation fields of the swirling flows are evaluated. The microscopic rotating effects, especially the effects with respect to the turbulent fluctuation motion, are increasingly intermittent with the increase in the swirl levels. In contrast, the maximum value of the probability density functions with respect to the macroscopic rotating effects of the fluctuation motion occurs at moderate swirl levels since the macroscopic rotating effects are attenuated by the formation of the bubble vortex breakdown with a region of stagnant fluids at supercritical swirl levels.

  9. Collisional drift fluids and drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Correa-Restrepo, D.

    1995-05-01

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effect of which is extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter is important as concerns charge separation and resulting electric fields which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial for the stability behaviour; it will be discussed via an example. New collisional multispecies drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields in a transparent way conservation of energy and total angular momentum, and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. Their relation to the ideal equations imply, however, also a relation to the ideal Lagrangian of which one can take advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. T ν (x)=const. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theories; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. Linear instability is investigated via energy considerations and the implications of taking ohmic resistivity into account are discussed. (orig./WL)

  10. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence.

  11. Achieving fast reconnection in resistive MHD models via turbulent means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lapenta

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Astrophysical fluids are generally turbulent and this preexisting turbulence must be taken into account for models of magnetic reconnection in astrophysical, solar or heliospheric environments. In addition, reconnection itself induces turbulence which provides an important feedback on the reconnection process. In this paper we discuss both the theoretical model and numerical evidence that magnetic reconnection becomes fast in the approximation of resistive MHD. We consider the relation between the Lazarian and Vishniac turbulent reconnection theory and Lapenta's numerical experiments testifying of the spontaneous onset of turbulent reconnection in systems which are initially laminar.

  12. Particle motion in atmospheric boundary layers of Mars and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, B. R.; Iversen, J. D.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    To study the eolian mechanics of saltating particles, both an experimental investigation of the flow field around a model crater in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel and numerical solutions of the two- and three-dimensional equations of motion of a single particle under the influence of a turbulent boundary layer were conducted. Two-dimensional particle motion was calculated for flow near the surfaces of both Earth and Mars. For the case of Earth both a turbulent boundary layer with a viscous sublayer and one without were calculated. For the case of Mars it was only necessary to calculate turbulent boundary layer flow with a laminar sublayer because of the low values of friction Reynolds number; however, it was necessary to include the effects of slip flow on a particle caused by the rarefied Martian atmosphere. In the equations of motion the lift force functions were developed to act on a single particle only in the laminar sublayer or a corresponding small region of high shear near the surface for a fully turbulent boundary layer. The lift force functions were developed from the analytical work by Saffman concerning the lift force acting on a particle in simple shear flow.

  13. Numerical Methods and Turbulence Modeling for LES of Piston Engines: Impact on Flow Motion and Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misdariis A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, Large Eddy Simulations (LES of Spark Ignition (SI engines are performed to evaluate the impact of the numerical set-upon the predictedflow motion and combustion process. Due to the high complexity and computational cost of such simulations, the classical set-up commonly includes “low” order numerical schemes (typically first or second-order accurate in time and space as well as simple turbulence models (such as the well known constant coefficient Smagorinsky model (Smagorinsky J. (1963 Mon. Weather Rev. 91, 99-164. The scope of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility and the potential benefits of using high precision methods for engine simulations, relying on higher order numerical methods and state-of-the-art Sub-Grid-Scale (SGS models. For this purpose, two high order convection schemes from the Two-step Taylor Galerkin (TTG family (Colin and Rudgyard (2000 J. Comput. Phys. 162, 338-371 and several SGS turbulence models, namely Dynamic Smagorinsky (Germano et al. (1991 Phys. Fluids 3, 1760-1765 and sigma (Baya Toda et al. (2010 Proc. Summer Program 2010, Stanford, Center for Turbulence Research, NASA Ames/Stanford Univ., pp. 193-202 are considered to improve the accuracy of the classically used Lax-Wendroff (LW (Lax and Wendroff (1964 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 17, 381-398 - Smagorinsky set-up. This evaluation is performed considering two different engine configurations from IFP Energies nouvelles. The first one is the naturally aspirated four-valve spark-ignited F7P engine which benefits from an exhaustive experimental and numerical characterization. The second one, called Ecosural, is a highly supercharged spark-ignited engine. Unique realizations of engine cycles have been simulated for each set-up starting from the same initial conditions and the comparison is made with experimental and previous numerical results for the F7P configuration. For the Ecosural engine, experimental results are not available yet and only

  14. About the stability of the rotational motion of a top with a cavity filled up with a viscous fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parada, R.F.; Collar, A.F.

    1995-09-01

    The linear stability problem of the rotational motion of a top around a fixed point containing an inner cavity filled up with a viscous fluid is considered. The effect of the viscosity in the stability problem is studied. (author). 15 refs

  15. Coarse-grained forms for equations describing the microscopic motion of particles in a fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shankar P; Yoshimori, Akira

    2013-10-01

    Exact equations of motion for the microscopically defined collective density ρ(x,t) and the momentum density ĝ(x,t) of a fluid have been obtained in the past starting from the corresponding Langevin equations representing the dynamics of the fluid particles. In the present work we average these exact equations of microscopic dynamics over the local equilibrium distribution to obtain stochastic partial differential equations for the coarse-grained densities with smooth spatial and temporal dependence. In particular, we consider Dean's exact balance equation for the microscopic density of a system of interacting Brownian particles to obtain the basic equation of the dynamic density functional theory with noise. Our analysis demonstrates that on thermal averaging the dependence of the exact equations on the bare interaction potential is converted to dependence on the corresponding thermodynamic direct correlation functions in the coarse-grained equations.

  16. Randomness Representation of Turbulence in Canopy Flows Using Kolmogorov Complexity Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragutin Mihailović

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence is often expressed in terms of either irregular or random fluid flows, without quantification. In this paper, a methodology to evaluate the randomness of the turbulence using measures based on the Kolmogorov complexity (KC is proposed. This methodology is applied to experimental data from a turbulent flow developing in a laboratory channel with canopy of three different densities. The methodology is even compared with the traditional approach based on classical turbulence statistics.

  17. On the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrbek, L.; Stalp, Steven R.

    2000-08-01

    Decaying homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is investigated using a phenomenological model based on the three-dimensional turbulent energy spectra. We generalize the approach first used by Comte-Bellot and Corrsin [J. Fluid Mech. 25, 657 (1966)] and revised by Saffman [J. Fluid Mech. 27, 581 (1967); Phys. Fluids 10, 1349 (1967)]. At small wave numbers we assume the spectral energy is proportional to the wave number to an arbitrary power. The specific case of power 2, which follows from the Saffman invariant, is discussed in detail and is later shown to best describe experimental data. For the spectral energy density in the inertial range we apply both the Kolmogorov -5/3 law, E(k)=Cɛ2/3k-5/3, and the refined Kolmogorov law by taking into account intermittency. We show that intermittency affects the energy decay mainly by shifting the position of the virtual origin rather than altering the power law of the energy decay. Additionally, the spectrum is naturally truncated due to the size of the wind tunnel test section, as eddies larger than the physical size of the system cannot exist. We discuss effects associated with the energy-containing length scale saturating at the size of the test section and predict a change in the power law decay of both energy and vorticity. To incorporate viscous corrections to the model, we truncate the spectrum at an effective Kolmogorov wave number kη=γ(ɛ/v3)1/4, where γ is a dimensionless parameter of order unity. We show that as the turbulence decays, viscous corrections gradually become more important and a simple power law can no longer describe the decay. We discuss the final period of decay within the framework of our model, and show that care must be taken to distinguish between the final period of decay and the change of the character of decay due to the saturation of the energy containing length scale. The model is applied to a number of experiments on decaying turbulence. These include the downstream decay of turbulence in

  18. Large-scale fluid motion in the earth's outer core estimated from non-dipole magnetic field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Masaki; Honkura, Yoshimori

    1989-01-01

    Fluid motions in the Earth's outer core can be estimated from magnetic field data at the Earth's surface based on some assumptions. The basic standpoint here is that the non-dipole magnetic field is generated by the interaction between a strong toroidal magnetic field, created by differential rotation, and the convective motion in the outer core. Large-scale convective motions are studied to express them in terms of the poloidal velocity field expanded into a series of spherical harmonics. The radial distribution of differential rotation is estimated from the balance between the effective couple due to angular momentum transfer and the electromagnetic couple. Then the radial dependence of the toroidal magnetic field is derived from the interaction between the differential rotation thus estimated and the dipole magnetic field within the outer core. Magnetic field data are applied to a secular variation model which takes into account the fluctuations of the standing and drifting parts of the non-zonal magnetic field. The velocity field in the outer core is estimated for two cases. It is revealed that the pattern of convective motions is generally characterized by large-scale motions in the quasi-steady case. In the non-steady case, the magnitude of the velocity field is much larger, indicating a more dynamic feature. (N.K.)

  19. Wavelet based comparison of high frequency oscillations in the geodetic and fluid excitation functions of polar motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, W.; Popinski, W.; Niedzielski, T.

    2011-10-01

    It has been already shown that short period oscillations in polar motion, with periods less than 100 days, are very chaotic and are responsible for increase in short-term prediction errors of pole coordinates data. The wavelet technique enables to compare the geodetic and fluid excitation functions in the high frequency band in many different ways, e.g. by looking at the semblance function. The waveletbased semblance filtering enables determination the common signal in both geodetic and fluid excitation time series. In this paper the considered fluid excitation functions consist of the atmospheric, oceanic and land hydrology excitation functions from ECMWF atmospheric data produced by IERS Associated Product Centre Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum, Potsdam. The geodetic excitation functions have been computed from the combined IERS pole coordinates data.

  20. Flow Visualization in Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael Wayne

    This thesis is a collection of novel flow visualizations of two different flat-plate, zero pressure gradient, supersonic, turbulent boundary layers (M = 2.8, Re _theta ~ 82,000, and M = 2.5, Re_ theta ~ 25,000, respectively). The physics of supersonic shear flows has recently drawn increasing attention with the renewed interest in flight at super and hypersonic speeds. This work was driven by the belief that the study of organized, Reynolds -stress producing turbulence structures will lead to improved techniques for the modelling and control of high-speed boundary layers. Although flow-visualization is often thought of as a tool for providing qualitative information about complex flow fields, in this thesis an emphasis is placed on deriving quantitative results from image data whenever possible. Three visualization techniques were applied--'selective cut-off' schlieren, droplet seeding, and Rayleigh scattering. Two experiments employed 'selective cut-off' schlieren. In the first, high-speed movies (40,000 fps) were made of strong density gradient fronts leaning downstream at between 30^circ and 60^ circ and travelling at about 0.9U _infty. In the second experiment, the same fronts were detected with hot-wires and imaged in real time, thus allowing the examination of the density gradient fronts and their associated single-point mass -flux signals. Two experiments employed droplet seeding. In both experiments, the boundary layer was seeded by injecting a stream of acetone through a single point in the wall. The acetone is atomized by the high shear at the wall into a 'fog' of tiny (~3.5mu m) droplets. In the first droplet experiment, the fog was illuminated with copper-vapor laser sheets of various orientations. The copper vapor laser pulses 'froze' the fog motion, revealing a variety of organized turbulence structures, some with characteristic downstream inclinations, others with large-scale roll-up on the scale of delta. In the second droplet experiment, high

  1. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2014-06-25

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  2. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun; Attili, Antonio; Alshaarawi, Amjad; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  3. Energetic particle parallel diffusion in a cascading wave turbulence in the foreshock region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Otsuka

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We study parallel (field-aligned diffusion of energetic particles in the upstream of the bow shock with test particle simulations. We assume parallel shock geometry of the bow shock, and that MHD wave turbulence convected by the solar wind toward the shock is purely transverse in one-dimensional system with a constant background magnetic field. We use three turbulence models: a homogeneous turbulence, a regular cascade from a large scale to smaller scales, and an inverse cascade from a small scale to larger scales. For the homogeneous model the particle motions along the average field are Brownian motions due to random and isotropic scattering across 90 degree pitch angle. On the other hand, for the two cascade models particle motion is non-Brownian due to coherent and anisotropic pitch angle scattering for finite time scale. The mean free path λ|| calculated by the ensemble average of these particle motions exhibits dependence on the distance from the shock. It also depends on the parameters such as the thermal velocity of the particles, solar wind flow velocity, and a wave turbulence model. For the inverse cascade model, the dependence of λ|| at the shock on the thermal energy is consistent with the hybrid simulation done by Giacalone (2004, but the spatial dependence of λ|| is inconsistent with it.

  4. Suppression of Phase Mixing in Drift-Kinetic Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. T.; Dellar, P. J.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Highcock, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    The solar wind and interstellar medium are examples of strongly magnetised, weakly collisional, astrophysical plasmas. Their turbulent fluctuations are strongly anisotropic, with small amplitudes, and frequencies much lower than the Larmor frequency. This regime is described by gyrokinetic theory, a reduced five-dimensional kinetic system describing averages over Larmor orbits. A turbulent plasma may transfer free energy, a measure of fluctuation amplitudes, from injection at large scales, typically by an instability, to dissipation at small physical scales like a turbulent fluid. Alternatively, a turbulent plasma may form fine scale structures in velocity space via phase-mixing, the mechanism that leads to Landau damping in linear plasma theory. Macroscopic plasma properties like heat and momentum transport are affected by both mechanisms. While each is understood in isolation, their interaction is not. We study this interaction using a Hankel-Hermite velocity space representation of gyrokinetic theory. The Hankel transform interacts neatly with the Bessel functions that arise from averaging over Larmor orbits, so the perpendicular velocity space is decoupled for linearized problems. The Hermite transform expresses phase mixing as nearest-neighbor coupling between parallel velocity space scales represented by Hermite mode numbers. We use this representation to study transfer mechanisms in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence, the long wavelength limit of gyrokinetic theory. We show that phase space is divided into two regions, with one transfer mechanism dominating in each. Most energy is contained in the region where the fluid-like nonlinear cascade dominates. Moreover, in that region the nonlinear cascade interferes with phase mixing by exciting an "anti phase mixing" transfer of free energy from small to large velocity space scales. This cancels out the usual phase mixing, and renders the overall behavior fluid-like. These results profoundly change our understanding

  5. Sensitivity study of CFD turbulent models for natural convection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu sun, Park

    2007-01-01

    The buoyancy driven convective flow fields are steady circulatory flows which were made between surfaces maintained at two fixed temperatures. They are ubiquitous in nature and play an important role in many engineering applications. Application of a natural convection can reduce the costs and efforts remarkably. This paper focuses on the sensitivity study of turbulence analysis using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) for a natural convection in a closed rectangular cavity. Using commercial CFD code, FLUENT and various turbulent models were applied to the turbulent flow. Results from each CFD model will be compared each other in the viewpoints of grid resolution and flow characteristics. It has been showed that: -) obtaining general flow characteristics is possible with relatively coarse grid; -) there is no significant difference between results from finer grid resolutions than grid with y + + is defined as y + = ρ*u*y/μ, u being the wall friction velocity, y being the normal distance from the center of the cell to the wall, ρ and μ being respectively the fluid density and the fluid viscosity; -) the K-ε models show a different flow characteristic from K-ω models or from the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM); and -) the y + parameter is crucial for the selection of the appropriate turbulence model to apply within the simulation

  6. Vortices and turbulence at very low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Wilhelm; Sergeev, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    Recent investigations have highlighted the similarities between turbulence in cryogenic fluids at temperatures close to absolute zero. This book contains lectures on various theoretical and experimental aspects of the problem.

  7. Turbulent breakage of ductile aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioli, Cristian; Soldati, Alfredo

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we study breakage rate statistics of small colloidal aggregates in nonhomogeneous anisotropic turbulence. We use pseudospectral direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow and Lagrangian tracking to follow the motion of the aggregates, modeled as sub-Kolmogorov massless particles. We focus specifically on the effects produced by ductile rupture: This rupture is initially activated when fluctuating hydrodynamic stresses exceed a critical value, σ>σ(cr), and is brought to completion when the energy absorbed by the aggregate meets the critical breakage value. We show that ductile rupture breakage rates are significantly reduced with respect to the case of instantaneous brittle rupture (i.e., breakage occurs as soon as σ>σ(cr)). These discrepancies are due to the different energy values at play as well as to the statistical features of energy distribution in the anisotropic turbulence case examined.

  8. Ludwig Prandtl and Boundary Layers in Fluid Flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    His research is ... research in fluid mechan- ... For common fluids the viscous force is proportional to .... that the analogy is only a very crude, qualitative one. ..... separation is turbulent and the fluid in the wake is nearly stagnant. Method of.

  9. Quantifying near-wall coherent structures in turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasegarane, G. S.; A Puthenveettil, Baburaj; K Agrawal, Yogesh; Schmeling, Daniel; Bosbach, Johannes; Arakeri, Jaywant; IIT Madras-DLR-IISc Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    We present planforms of line plumes formed on horizontal surfaces in turbulent convection, along with the length of near- wall line plumes measured from these planforms, in a six decade range of Rayleigh numbers (105 < Ra <1011) and at three Prandtl numbers (Pr = 0 . 7 , 6 , 602). Using geometric constraints on the relations for the mean plume spacings, we obtain expressions for the total length of these near-wall plumes in turbulent convection. The plume length per unit area (Lp / A), made dimensionless by the near-wall length scale in turbulent convection (Zw) remains a constant for a given fluid. The Nusselt number is shown to be directly proportional to Lp H / A for a given fluid layer of height H. Increase in Pr has a weak influence in decreasing Lp / A . These expressions match the measurements, thereby showing that the assumption of laminar natural convection boundary layers in turbulent convection is consistent with the observed total length of line plumes. We then show that similar relationships are obtained based on the assumption that the line plumes are the outcome of the instability of laminar natural convection boundary layers on the horizontal surfaces.

  10. Self-similar solutions for poloidal magnetic field in turbulent jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarov, S.S.; Ovchinnikov, I.L.

    1990-01-01

    Evolution of a large-scale magnetic field in a turbulent extragalactic source radio jets is considered. Self-similar solutions for a weak poloidal magnetic field transported by turbulent jet of incompressible fluid are found. It is shown that the radial profiles of the solutions are the eigenfunctions of a linear differential operator. In all the solutions, the strength of a large-scale field decreases more rapidly than that of a small-scale turbulent field. This can be understood as a decay of a large-scale field in the turbulent jet

  11. Topology optimization of turbulent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilgen, Cetin B.; Dilgen, Sumer B.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present a fast and viable approach for taking into account turbulence in topology optimization of complex fluid flow systems, without resorting to any simplifying assumptions in the derivation of discrete adjoints. Topology optimization is an iterative gradient...

  12. Fractal dimension of turbulent black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westernacher-Schneider, John Ryan

    2017-11-01

    We present measurements of the fractal dimension of a turbulent asymptotically anti-de Sitter black brane reconstructed from simulated boundary fluid data at the perfect fluid order using the fluid-gravity duality. We argue that the boundary fluid energy spectrum scaling as E (k )˜k-2 is a more natural setting for the fluid-gravity duality than the Kraichnan-Kolmogorov scaling of E (k )˜k-5 /3, but we obtain fractal dimensions D for spatial sections of the horizon H ∩Σ in both cases: D =2.584 (1 ) and D =2.645 (4 ), respectively. These results are consistent with the upper bound of D =3 , thereby resolving the tension with the recent claim in Adams et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 151602 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.151602] that D =3 +1 /3 . We offer a critical examination of the calculation which led to their result, and show that their proposed definition of the fractal dimension performs poorly as a fractal dimension estimator on one-dimensional curves with known fractal dimension. Finally, we describe how to define and in principle calculate the fractal dimension of spatial sections of the horizon H ∩Σ in a covariant manner, and we speculate on assigning a "bootstrapped" value of fractal dimension to the entire horizon H when it is in a statistically quasisteady turbulent state.

  13. Experimental analysis of turbulence effect in settling velocity of suspended sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Salinas–Tapia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Settling velocities of sediment particles for different size ranges were measured in this work using PIV with the help of discriminatory filters. An experimental channel 10x15 cm cross section was used in order to obtain two set of turbulent characteristics corresponding with two different flow rates. The purpose was to analyze the effect of turbulence on the solids settling velocity. The technique allowed us to measure the individual settling velocity of the particles and the flow velocity field of the fluid. Capture and image analysis was performed with digital cameras (CCD using the software Sharp–provision PIV and the statistical cross correlation technique. Results showed that settling velocity of particles is affected by turbulence which enhances the fluid drag coefficient. Physical explanation of this phenomenon is related with the magnitude of the vertical fluctuating velocity of the fluid. However, more research is needed in order to define settling velocity formulas that takes into account this effect

  14. Inertial-range structure of Gross–Pitaevskii turbulence within a spectral closure approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kyo; Arimitsu, Toshihico

    2013-01-01

    The inertial-range structure of turbulence obeying the Gross–Pitaevskii equation, the equation of motion for quantum fluids, is analyzed by means of a spectral closure approximation. It is revealed that, for the energy-transfer range, the spectrum of the order parameter field ψ obeys k −2 law for k ≪ k * and k −1 law for k ≫ k * , where k * is the wavenumber where the characteristic timescales associated with linear and nonlinear terms are of the same order. It is also shown that, for the particle-number-transfer range, the spectrum obeys k −1 law for k ≪ k *, n and k −1/3 law for k ≫ k *,n , where k *,n is the wavenumber corresponding to k * in the particle-number-transfer range. (paper)

  15. Characterization of intermittency in zooplankton behaviour in turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalec, François-Gaël; Schmitt, François G; Souissi, Sami; Holzner, Markus

    2015-10-01

    We consider Lagrangian velocity differences of zooplankters swimming in still water and in turbulence. Using cumulants, we quantify the intermittency properties of their motion recorded using three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry. Copepods swimming in still water display an intermittent behaviour characterized by a high probability of small velocity increments, and by stretched exponential tails. Low values arise from their steady cruising behaviour while heavy tails result from frequent relocation jumps. In turbulence, we show that at short time scales, the intermittency signature of active copepods clearly differs from that of the underlying flow, and reflects the frequent relocation jumps displayed by these small animals. Despite these differences, we show that copepods swimming in still and turbulent flow belong to the same intermittency class that can be modelled by a log-stable model with non-analytical cumulant generating function. Intermittency in swimming behaviour and relocation jumps may enable copepods to display oriented, collective motion under strong hydrodynamic conditions and thus, may contribute to the formation of zooplankton patches in energetic environments.

  16. Realization of a Tunable Dissipation Scale in a Turbulent Cascade using a Quantum Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navon, Nir; Eigen, Christoph; Zhang, Jinyi; Lopes, Raphael; Smith, Robert; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2017-04-01

    Many turbulent flows form so-called cascades, where excitations injected at large length scales, are transported to gradually smaller scales until they reach a dissipation scale. We initiate a turbulent cascade in a dilute Bose fluid by pumping energy at the container scale of an optical box trap using an oscillating magnetic force. In contrast to classical fluids where the dissipation scale is set by the viscosity of the fluid, the turbulent cascade of our quantum gas finishes when the particles kinetic energy exceeds the laser-trap depth. This mechanism thus allows us to effectively tune the dissipation scale where particles (and energy) are lost, and measure the particle flux in the cascade at the dissipation scale. We observe a unit power-law decay of the particle-dissipation rate with trap depth, which confirms the surprising prediction that in a wave-turbulent direct energy cascade, the particle flux vanishes in the ideal limit where the dissipation length scale tends to zero.

  17. A new kinetic description for turbulent collisions including mode-coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.; Tchen, C.M.

    1982-07-01

    The usual introduction of higher-order mode-coupling terms in the description of turbulent collisions beyond usual Renormalized Quasi-Linear approximation (RQL) is briefly analyzed. Here new results are derived in the framework of the general kinetic theory, and the equivalence is proved with the long time limit of simple results deduced from the Vlasov equation. The correction to the RQL turbulent collision term is analyzed and a new approximation is proposed. Turbulent collisions are also described by perturbation around the Lagrangian autocorrelation of fluctuating fields. For an homogeneous turbulence, however, the asymptotic integral of this Lagrangian autocorrelation vanishes identically, similarly to what occurs in Brownian motion. For inhomogeneous turbulence this method can nevertheless be used, and higher-order mode-coupling terms can be interpreted as a shielding of elementary Lagrangian turbulent collisions

  18. Vertical migration of motile phytoplankton chains through turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climent, Eric; Lovecchio, Salvatore; Durham, William; Stocker, Roman

    2017-11-01

    Daily, phytoplankton needs to migrate vertically from and towards the ocean surface to find nutrients such as dissolved oxygen. To travel through the water column they need to fight against gravity (by swimming) and fluid turbulence which can make their journey longer. It is often observed that cells migrate across the water column as chains. The first benefit to form chains is that micro-organisms sum up their thrust while reducing their drag. Therefore, upwards swimming is faster for chains in a quiescent fluid with steady vertical orientation. However, as chain length increases their tendency to periodically tumble in turbulent structures increases which reduces orientation stability and limits their capacity to swim upwards. The purpose of our study is to elaborate on this apparent contradiction. We carried out direct numerical simulations and physical analysis of the coupled system of homogeneous isotropic turbulence and chain trajectories through Lagrangian tracking. Formation of chains is indeed favorable for vertical migration through the upper layer of the ocean.

  19. The roles of turbulence on plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Takaichi; Kawabe, Takaya.

    1976-06-01

    In this paper, the characteristic features of the turbulent heating are reviewed, which is considered to be one of the strong candidates of the further heating method in fusion reactor systems, referring to the works in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University. The roles of turbulence in plasma heating including toroidal plasma heating are discussed from several points of view. The relation between the heating rate of plasma particles and the thermalization (randomization) frequency is theoretically investigated and the role of plasma turbulence in the fast thermalization is shown. The experimental results on fluctuation and heating of electrons and ions in turbulently heated plasmas are presented. The influence of turbulence, which is responsible for the particle heating, on the diffusion across the confinement magnetic field is considered for the application in the toroidal plasmas. It is pointed out that the turbulent fields in the fast turbulent heating give only a minor effect to the loss of particles across the magnetic field. It can be said that the enhanced fluctuation in turbulent plasma gives its field energy to the plasma particles while it can play the role of the fast thermalization of the ordered motion of particles that is produced in the plasma by some acceleration process. (Kato, T.)

  20. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section

  1. Asymptotic expansion and statistical description of turbulent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, W.K. III.

    1986-01-01

    A new approach to studying turbulent systems is presented in which an asymptotic expansion of the general dynamical equations is performed prior to the application of statistical methods for describing the evolution of the system. This approach has been applied to two specific systems: anomalous drift wave turbulence in plasmas and homogeneous, isotropic turbulence in fluids. For the plasma case, the time and length scales of the turbulent state result in the asymptotic expansion of the Vlasov/Poisson equations taking the form of nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. Questions regarding this theory and modern Hamiltonian perturbation methods are discussed and resolved. A new alternative Hamiltonian method is described. The Eulerian Direct Interaction Approximation (EDIA) is slightly reformulated and applied to the equations of nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. Using a similarity transformation technique, expressions for the thermal diffusivity are derived from the EDIA equations for various geometries, including a tokamak. In particular, the unique result for generalized geometry may be of use in evaluating fusion reactor designs and theories of anomalous thermal transport in tokamaks. Finally, a new and useful property of the EDIA is pointed out. For the fluid case, an asymptotic expansion is applied to the Navier-Stokes equation and the results lead to the speculation that such an approach may resolve the problem of predicting the Kolmogorov inertial range energy spectrum for homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. 45 refs., 3 figs

  2. Thermal load determination in the mixing TEE impacted by a turbulent flow generated by two fluids at large gap of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braillard, O.

    2005-01-01

    A 304L mixing tee mock-up is instrumented to assess the fluctuating temperature in the mixing area generated by two fluids (water) at large gap of temperature meet. The turbulent mixing layer impacts the structure wall and creates stresses, which lead to the damages. The case studied in this paper corresponds to the 'swinging streak' within a flow rate ratio of 25 %. The instrumentation is specifically planned to measure the fluctuating temperature in the fluid close to the internal skin and inside the wall too. This experiment is performed using a new sensor 'fluxmeter' which is non intrusive and typically designed to catch the fluctuation without any signal attenuation, within a frequency range 0-25Hz. The facility called 'Fatherino' supplies an available delta T of 70 degree C in water at 4 m/s mixture velocity in a mixing tee mock-up 50 mm in diameter. The flow features generate a large turbulent flow in the mixing layer and favour the heat flux transfer to the wall. By applying an inverse heat conduction method applied to the output data given by the fluxmeter, both the heat flux is deduced and the temperature (mean and fluctuating values) at the internal surface can be accurately determined. In addition, a calculation using the Trio U code (thermal hydraulic code) within the large eddy simulation module is computed to assess the fluid temperature distribution in the mixing area close to the internal surface. The output data in mean and standard deviation are compared with the Fatherino measurements. The comparison consists in analysing the main parameters as the mean and standard deviation in the fluid along the main axis and in a circumferential view. The mixing layer geometry and the frequency of the fluctuation are also analysed. These experiments added to the calculation allow us improving the state of the knowledge in the mixing tees and the thermal load to be used in the industrial mixing tees in operating for the long lifetime assessment or for the

  3. An experimental study of turbulent two-phase flow in hydraulic jumps and application of a triple decomposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Felder, Stefan; Chanson, Hubert

    2014-07-01

    Intense turbulence develops in the two-phase flow region of hydraulic jump, with a broad range of turbulent length and time scales. Detailed air-water flow measurements using intrusive phase-detection probes enabled turbulence characterisation of the bubbly flow, although the phenomenon is not a truly random process because of the existence of low-frequency, pseudo-periodic fluctuating motion in the jump roller. This paper presents new measurements of turbulent properties in hydraulic jumps, including turbulence intensity, longitudinal and transverse integral length and time scales. The results characterised very high turbulent levels and reflected a combination of both fast and slow turbulent components. The respective contributions of the fast and slow motions were quantified using a triple decomposition technique. The decomposition of air-water detection signal revealed "true" turbulent characteristics linked with the fast, microscopic velocity turbulence of hydraulic jumps. The high-frequency turbulence intensities were between 0.5 and 1.5 close to the jump toe, and maximum integral turbulent length scales were found next to the bottom. Both decreased in the flow direction with longitudinal turbulence dissipation. The results highlighted the considerable influence of hydrodynamic instabilities of the flow on the turbulence characterisation. The successful application of triple decomposition technique provided the means for the true turbulence properties of hydraulic jumps.

  4. Towards a collisionless fluid closure in plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dif Pradalier, G

    2005-07-01

    In this work 2 generic possible descriptions of a plasma have been compared namely the kinetic and the fluid approaches. The latter focuses on the successive moments (n, u, p, q,...) of the distribution function, whereas the former describes the time-evolution in phase space of this distribution function, both being based on the Vlasov equation. The fluid description is attractive for the Vlasov equation is tractable with great difficulties. Nevertheless it rests on a major difficulty: as the set of fluid equations constitute an infinite hierarchy, a closure equation must be chosen. The first chapter details physical characteristics of a fundamental kinetic interaction mechanism between waves and particles. In chapter 2 we propose a fluid closure that allows analytic comparison with a linear fully kinetic result, near an homogeneous, electrostatic, Maxwellian equilibrium. This approach consists in adjusting chosen parameters in order to minimize the discrepancies between fluid and kinetic linear response functions. In chapter 3 we present a general frame for a fluid closure in a magnetized plasma. This is attempted in a linear, simplified model with low dimensionality.

  5. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially evolving mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cristancho, Juan

    2012-12-01

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analyzed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. Velocity and passive scalar statistics are computed and compared to the results of studies addressing other shear flows, such as turbulent jets and wakes. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other types of free shear flow available in the literature. In addition, a detailed analysis of the passive scalar field (with Sc 1) in the vicinity of the interface is presented. The scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number, but it is a new result for Schmidt number of order one. Finally, the dissipation for the kinetic energy and the scalar are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterized by a strong peak very close to the interface.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of heavy particle dispersion in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvetti, M.V. [DICI, University of Pisa, I-56122 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-03-10

    Capabilities and accuracy issues in Lagrangian tracking of heavy particles in velocity fields obtained from large-eddy simulations (LES) of wall-bounded turbulent flows are reviewed. In particular, it is shown that, if no subgrid scale (SGS) model is added to the particle motion equations, particle preferential concentration and near-wall accumulation are significantly underestimated. Results obtained with SGS modeling for the particle motion equations based on approximate deconvolution are briefly recalled. Then, the error purely due to filtering in particle tracking in LES flow fields is singled out and analyzed. The statistical properties of filtering errors are characterized in turbulent channel flow both from an Eulerian and a Lagrangian viewpoint. Implications for stochastic SGS modeling in particle motion equations are briefly outlined.